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Established: OCTOBER 1989 – CELEBRATING 25 YEARS OF PUBLISHING HISTORY!

ponsonbynews.co.nz

FEBRUARY 2015

PONSONBY POOL HALL CELEBRATES 25 YEARS - P19 It’s never too early to start planning for retirement - P86


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92 P76; Last November, Bayfield School pupils from Rooms 8 and 9 went to sunny Herne Bay beach to clean up the disgusting rubbish. P92; Happy birthday to Grey Lynn Library. The team celebrated the library’s 90th birthday on Saturday 13 December.

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR FROM THE EDITOR DAVID HARTNELL: ONE MINUTE INTERVIEW SHALE CHAMBERS: WAITEMATA LOCAL BOARD NIKKI KAYE: MP FOR AUCKLAND CENTRAL JOHN ELLIOTT: SOAP BOX U3A PONSONBY MIKE LEE, COUNCILLOR FOR WAITEMATA & GULF JACINDA ARDERN: LABOUR LIST MP AUCKLAND LANDMARK BUILDINGS

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PONSONBY NEWS READERS ARE EVERYWHERE EAT, DRINK AND BE MERRY THE VEG FRIENDLY CHALLENGE LAURAINE JACOBS: THE SEASONED PALATE FASHION + STYLE ANGELA LASSIG: LETTERS FROM MAUDIE HELENE RAVLICH: NATURAL BEAUTY LIVING, THINKING + BEING JOHN APPLETON ON HEALTH SHEENA SHUVANI: STARDUST ASTROLOGY

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FUTURE GENERATION SIDELINE WITH GEORGE BERRY PONSONBY PEOPLE & THEIR PETS LOOK WHO IS IN THE ZOO PLANNING RETIREMENT HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS HEIDI PADAIN: ENTERTAINMENT IN YOUR GARDEN STREET NAMES JAY PLATT: WE CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT ARTS + CULTURE COVER PHOTOGRAPHY: Clare Gemima

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LETTERS + EMAILS

Views in Ponsonby News reflect the author’s, and not those of Alchemy Media. www.twitter.com/Ponsonby_News

Dogs in Grey Lynn Park In response to Vivienne Moore’s letter (November 2014 issue) regarding being abused and told to “f*** off” out of Grey Lynn Park with her Staffie/pitbull cross dog, I would like to respond.

council has surged ahead with its plans, ignoring the wishes of locals, ratepayers or indeed voters. Now the council has once again committed an unforgivable act with no consultation with the local residents or regular users of the park. They have built a toilet block in the middle of the children’s playground.

Three months ago, our dog (the ‘labradoodle’ referred to in the letter) - while on a lead, was viciously attacked by a pitbull cross dog. While the pitbull was also on a lead, it still managed to tear a sizeable rip in our dog’s back which resulted in surgery and ongoing treatment at a cost of $750. This pitbull was registered and neutered and was being walked by a solidly built adult male, who was still unable to prevent the attack.

This beautiful public spot has been ruined and I’m mystified as to why. After all, Western Park already has public toilets. If they’re not up to scratch then why not upgrade them? why spoil the park with such an eyesore? The arrogance of this present council beggars belief. I can’t help but wonder how building consent was given for this project to go ahead. I also can’t help but wonder why no-one else appears outraged by this. GABY LYNCH, Ponsonby

Several bystanders to the Grey Lynn incident agreed that the pitbull referred to in the letter was extremely strong and that the owner was struggling to keep it restrained and avoid being ‘dragged’ by the dog. The pitbull was also on an extendable lead around young children. The dog was not muzzled which as a dangerous breed it is required be by law in public spaces. The interaction, as I understand it, was that the owner ‘should not have her dog around young children on an extendable lead and she should b***** off out of the park if she can’t control her dog’. I suggest that seeing first hand the damage a pitbull can do may have caused a stronger response from my husband than necessary in the situation. I am sure that every pitbull owner defends their dog against what they consider unfair negative press. Sadly the statistics for attacks and deaths in this country from these breeds speak for themselves. ANN GRAHAM, Grey Lynn Western Park new toilet block It would be interesting to hear what Ponsonby News readers think of the new toilet block, placed right in the middle at the bottom of Western Park! The toilet block is a disgrace and has destroyed the lovely views and the surrounding area for families, next to the playground. The old toilet block was fine and tucked away discretely into a hillside and could have been refurbished instead of building this eyesore! RICHARD TURNER, Ponsonby

New Western Park toilets These may be nice to have and perhaps their location is better. In recent months Western Park has become controversial with plans to remove lighting from the walkways, which caused such a furore that the Waitemata Local Board stepped in and announced that they would hold a consultation on Western Park and nothing would happen until the results of this consultation were known. It surprising to see that a new toilet block was being constructed before the consultation had commenced. It also questions the intent of this consultation. Has the result already been predetermined? However, since the block is now a fait accompli, why are new toilets required? The existing site is not in a huge state of disrepair. It is not far from the main playing field and does not impact on park land. Sited in the lee of a hill there is land available in future years for an extension of amenities without impacting on useable park land. The toilet block does impact on usable park land and is also well situated for folk who use the middle park and play grounds too. What we need at both toilets in Western Park is a more regular cleaning and maintenance regime. This need will not disappear with the new toilets. We do have an old heritage block falling into disrepair at the top park. Wouldn’t it make more sense to have the toilet reopened for women and young children who are currently not catered for? Council money is in very short supply and we have seen in real terms cuts to many public activities, including Movies and Music in Parks and the Heritage Festival and greater subsidies will be required with the Auckland Festival now an annual event. Both the 254 Ponsonby Road park development and the Ponsonby Masterplan are in need of council funds. The new toilets are an indulgence. These funds should have been spent in repairing the lighting and improving the walkway from Hopetoun Street. If there is real intention for a consultation, these things would have become the consensus and the toilets may not have seen the light of day. GERRY HILL, Ponsonby The Western Springs pohutakawa trees Again the Auckland Council has failed in its statutory duty to represent the public and protect our natural heritage. A secret meeting was held last month by Auckland Transport to tell the public (who were not invited) that they had the right to fell six 80-year-old pohutakawa trees on Great North Road, opposite MOTAT, in order to widen the road for increased car use projected in 2026.

Changes to Western Park I have lived in Ponsonby and its surrounds for 30 years now. During that time I have seen some changes to the area both good and bad. One of the things that has not changed so much is our lovely municipal park, the oldest in Auckland. The fitness trail is run-down and could do with an upgrade but the public spaces are utilised more often and the park itself is somewhat safer at night. Towards the end of last year the council in its supreme arrogance deemed the park safe enough that it no longer needed lighting at night. Despite the public outcry, the

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Meanwhile the chainsaw gangs gag to be let loose as they were in Western Springs Stadium and in behind the zoo, and the local community board wrings its hands powerless to stop this CCO (Council Un-controlled Organisation)! Contrary to Auckland becoming the world’s most liveable city, the built and natural environment struggles to survive while greedy developers enjoy corporate welfare at the public’s expense. A widespread Auckland rates revolt is one way to get our councillors to listen to us. LISA PRAGER, Westmere Heritage Protection Association

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FROM THE EDITOR

LIKE US! www.facebook.com/ponsonbynews ALTHOUGH IT’S NOW FEBRUARY THIS IS OUR first issue of 2015 and is an opportunity for us to wish all our readers and wonderful advertisers a fabulous New Year. The team is all feeling rejuvenated after our break and ready to get stuck in to work. This month, with summer still with us, we are looking forward to the Auckland Pride Festival - especially the parade itself, which starts at the later time of 7.30pm on Saturday 21 February.

This issue I am delighted to have Elias Hanlon of the Ponsonby Pool Hall on our front cover. Elias has been running the business for 25 years and we wish him well. Most movie buffs will be aware of Video Ezy closing and selling off all their DVDs. The business has been a mainstay of movie viewing for many moons and its closure marks the end of an era - roll on digital platforms.

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photography: Michael McClintock

There was sad news over the break with the passing of several friends and locals; Anna Hoffmann, Warwick Broadhead and Audrey Jones. Anna always travelled with a copy of Ponsonby News and loved being featured in our PN Readers are Everywhere section. Warwick was a dear friend and always full of inspiration and wild ideas. Audrey was a long-term Herne Bay resident of 40 years and will be greatly missed by all who knew her. Jay Platt, Jessie Kollen, Martin Leach, Jo Barrett and Gwynne Davenport photographed at Shanghai Lil’s

New Zealand population statistics show that the first of the baby boomers turned 65 in 2011 and that this group will lead continued growth in the older age groups in the future.

working, and others aim to cycle between work and traditional leisure-based retirement. This month we are looking at how to plan for those years ahead.

There are concerns that this group will add pressure to healthcare, social services and government pensions, but what is clear is that the baby boomers will change the face of retirement. Many are choosing, or are obliged, to continue

Next issue is our Viva Italia issue - where we discover all that is Italian in our community. Happy Valentine’s Day! PN (MARTIN LEACH) F

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DAVID HARTNELL’S: ONE MINUTE INTERVIEW If you’ve ever been to Auckland Zoo or watched the Zoo TV series you’ll know of Christine Tintinger, if not, she’s the wonderful lady who works lovingly with the orang-utans. What was your childhood like? Did you want to work with animals? At a young age I was always reading the Gerald Durrell books and got inspired to work with exotic animals through him. How long have you worked at Auckland Zoo? Thirty-three years. Do you have a favourite monkey? Because I have been at the zoo for a few years I have more than one favourite. Hand raising Iwani, the Siamang gibbon was a once in a lifetime experience, Indra the orang-utan (who I knew for 25 years) was personality plus, and Janie the chimp was a friend of mine for 33 years until her death last year at 60! Would you prefer to work with animals or people? I think we may know your answer... You were right - animals. Who do you think is the most annoying celebrity today? Any of the Kardashians. Which TV series would you never miss? The C Word. Your dream holiday internationally? Anywhere in England. Prefer Tweeting or Facebook? Don’t do either and I’m ok with that, just seems to bother other people. The greatest love of your life? My daughter, Claire. How would you like to be remembered? Kind and considerate of others. The best thing about your age? I can do whatever I like whenever I like.

Your comfort food? Custard squares. What motivates you? Always look on the bright side of life - thank you Mr Eric Idle. What happens when we die? Although your working body stops, your essence is still around. Favourite movie? The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill. A true story of warmth, humour and a surprise at the end. Give your teenaged self some advice? Don’t be influenced by what other people say, be confident in your own skin. Who would play you in the movie of your life? It would be a low budget movie, so some unknown. How do you chill out? A good book on the couch in the sun on the back porch - heaven. Favourite book? Lord of the Rings. I’ve read it about seven times. Which item of clothing can’t you live without? Jeans. Favourite time of the day? Home time. What do you love about your life right now? I’m still in a job I love and have lots of good friends who still live in the neighbourhood. Your dream home? A villa that has a wrap-around balcony and an orchard. What are you insecure about? How the world is going to hell in a handcart.

Whose greatest hits would you take to a desert island? Eagles.

Something very few people know about you? I am a Karitane nurse.

Best dressed woman on earth? Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge.

Your idea of perfect happiness? My life.

Something that you really disapprove of? Bad manners, especially in children. Young primates learn from their parents.

Greatest fear? Getting old - oops, too late!

What song makes you happy? Any Beatles song. Oldies but goodies! Your biggest disappointments? Not having more time with my ex-husband who died last year of pancreatic cancer. If you won a million dollars what is the first thing you would do? Pay the rates in one lump sum.

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Favourite hero of fiction and why? Don’t do fiction much. Change one thing about yourself what would it be? To sing with gay abandon without caring what other people think. Your life motto? Treat people (and animals) with respect and kindness.

Any acting aspirations? Had a small taste of being in front of the cameras when filming The Zoo series for 13 years. What cliché do you most abhor? The grass is greener on the other side of the fence - no it’s not. Greatest weakness/indulgence? Coke - the drink, not the drug. Handshake or a hug kind of person? Hug. Favourite season? Seasons - spring AND autumn. Your dream dinner party guest? Michael Palin. Sounds like a down to earth sort of guy. Conversation would be flowing, talking of Pythons and his world travels. Describe your first pet? Unfortunately not a monkey, so it will have to be a ginger tom. How do you take your coffee? Tea person. Do you travel light or heavy? Well organised, so heavy. What is the best holiday you’ve ever had? Trip to England, went with friend up to the Lake District, all that history, great. What is your opinion on today’s man? Don’t really think about them. If you could change one law or policy in New Zealand, what would it be? Make New Zealand palm oil free. (DAVID HARTNELL) F PN PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


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SHALE CHAMBERS: WAITEMATA LOCAL BOARD REPORT Auckland’s golden weather summer has been amazing. Whilst the summer holidays may be over for most, Auckland’s outdoors continues to offer much, especially to the inner city communities. The next month remains the most jam packed for Council-supported activity: sporting, cultural and entertainment. Following on from Auckland’s recent fantastic 175th Auckland Anniversary Weekend, and the NRL Auckland Nines, Auckland is about to host the premiere global event; ICC Cricket World Cup 4 February - 29 March. If sport is not your thing, Music in Parks is back better than ever this summer, bringing Aucklanders free music and good times (for the 22nd year) right through to 15 March. There’s something for all music lovers. The ever popular Movies in Parks series is also back. This council-local board funded and run series of movies are played on large screens in local parks throughout the region. This year Waitemata brings you ‘The Book Thief’ at Grey Lynn Park Friday 6 March, a family friendly movie based on the much loved Australian novel. This will be popular so get your spot early. Movie start time expected to be about 6.30pm. Auckland Pride Festival is returning 6 February - 1 March, with Ponsonby Road once again set to host the Auckland Pride Parade, Saturday 21 February at the later time of 7.30pm. Now in its third year, we can expect colour, sequins, toned bodies, and Zeus in this parade of dancers, floats, marchers and music celebrating diversity and life. On 26 February - 1 March Albert Park will be transformed for the 16th year into a festival of Chinese

culture, art and cuisine for Auckland favourite, the Auckland Lantern Festival. Waitemata Local Board this year is a sponsor of Auckland Fringe Festival, 11 February - 1 March at various venues. Expect bold-and-ballsy drama, wildly frenetic dance and genre-busting street performance. Fringe will satisfy all types and tastes with kids’ shows, family days, free events, theatre, comedy, burlesque, dance, music, visual arts and more. We all love a good party, and the 100th birthday celebrations for city centre Myers Park Sunday, 15 February 12pm - 4pm is going to be just that. This local board free event has a huge range of activities planned for the whole family. Myers Park holds a special place in Auckland’s history; gifted to the children of Auckland by former mayor Arthur Myers and opened January 1915, the park has just undergone an impressive local board-initiated facelift, but retains its original character even a century later. A collection of historical images is being added to almost daily on the Facebook page (myersparkgroup) telling the story of the park better than I can simply with words. Bands, stalls and a food market as well as children’s entertainment including a Punch and Judy Show. Fringe Festival performers are involved, so expect something a little different. Auckland is indeed a great place to live in summer. It’s Council’s 10-year budget time. It seems we are forever writing plans and asking for your input. As it is a 10-year budget at least you won’t be asked the same questions again for a few years! Auckland is growing quickly, there is a lot for us to discuss as a city and decide on, which is why your input on regional and local priorities is important. The three main regional topics of discussion are: transport, housing and

rates. It is impossible to summarise the complexities of these topics here but I encourage you to get online www.shapeauckland.co.nz or read the booklet that will arrive in your letterbox any day now. As the local board we are proposing budgetary priorities for the next year that include: • Redeveloping Pioneer Women’s and Ellen Melville Hall as a city centre community hub • Funding a performance and temporary art installation series • Supporting local events such as Art in the Dark, Grey Lynn Park Festival, Festival Italiano and Parnell Festival of Roses • Completing the Weona Westmere Coastal Walkway • Initiating a Newmarket Laneways improvement project. If you want to make an official submission to the 10-Year Budget this year you need to register first and then attend a Have Your Say event. The Waitemata Have Your Say event will be held at the Town Hall, Wednesday 4 March. Alternatively if you just want to be heard, there are a number of community feedback events planned throughout February and March. These will be run in partnership with local community groups and attended by local board members. These will be advertised locally, we are still finalising the details, but you can follow us on PN Facebook.com/Waitemata. (SHALE CHAMBERS) F Contact me: shale.chambers@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

HEROIC GARDEN FESTIVAL - A FESTIVAL WITH A DIFFERENCE The Heroic Garden Festival gives attendees exclusive access to some of Auckland’s most striking private gardens, all with a point of difference. The 2015 event will feature 26 gardens - the biggest selection of new gardens opened for the first time to the public. Gardens will be open across Auckland City, including four gardens in the Ponsonby and surrounding area, food producing and designer gardens in the central city suburbs and a collection of North Shore’s best private gardens. All gardens are unique, however it is Stephen Neville and Paul Grace’s Sentinel Road ‘handkerchief-sized’ garden that is providing inspiration on what can be achieved in a small space with good design by utilising every inch to create privacy and beauty. This garden includes a swimming pool enhanced by potted plants and bamboo screening, a secluded deck, and a small curved lawn surrounded by a beautiful collection of lush subtropicals of different heights, textures and colours. The festival was originally set up with three main themes in mind, philosophies that remain unchanged today: to provide Auckland with a garden festival, to support a charity through a strong fundraising event and the unique opportuntity for gardening enthusiasts to spend time with the gardeners themselves in their environment. “We have limited the festival to 26 gardens, ensuring enough variety and contrast between big country gardens and small central city gardens including everything in between. Our aim is to provide gardening enthusiasts with inspiration of the possible and appreciation of the unobtainable,” says Geoffrey Marshall, Heroic Garden Festival organiser. The festival appeals to a wide range of gardening enthusiasts, from those who appreciate the technical skill to others who simply enjoy the beauty that is unique to each garden.

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Stephen Neville and Paul Grace’s Sentinel Road ‘handkerchief-sized’ garden “We often see the same people returning each year, many of whom will just sit and soak up the atmosphere of the garden. Others are new, often lured by an innovative garden design. Gardens have to evolve as gardens grow, it’s a process not a product, and that’s what makes the festival so exciting. You never quite know what you are going to see each year,” says Geoffrey. Funds raised go to support Mercy Hospice Auckland and Hospice North Shore. The Heroic Garden Festival will be held over the weekend of 14-15 February. Tickets are $50 each and valid both days. For more information and to purchase tickets visit www.heroicgardens.org.nz. PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


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NIKKI KAYE: AUCKLAND CENTRAL MP

Priorities for 2015 Happy New Year, I hope you all had a good summer break. We are gearing up for what promises to be a big year both locally and nationally. It will be an exciting year for major events in Auckland with the Cricket World Cup starting this month and the FIFA U-17 World Cup beginning mid-year, bringing to Auckland many tourists from around New Zealand and the world. I have started the New Year in a new electorate office, moving further down the hill to a smaller office, and am now based at 48C College Hill. Downsizing is enabling me to explore the possibility of opening another part time office on Waiheke Island to be more accessible to the more than 8000 residents who live on the island. Auckland Central is diverse, from the CBD to the Western Bays to the islands and I am constantly looking at ways to be accessible to as many residents as possible. We begin 2015 in good shape with lots more to do. Despite the challenges to reaching surplus, the economy is in its fifth year of expansion and economic growth is expected to average around 3% over the next four years, better than most of Europe, United States, United Kingdom, Japan, and Canada. Our positive performance and outlook in an unpredictable world led one international bank economist to call New Zealand “the rock star economy”. However, our goal isn’t to be a rock star. It’s to be rock solid. We want stable, sustainable growth over the long term to support New Zealanders and their families. At a ministerial level I have started back early as this will be a big year across all my portfolios. I’ll be focusing on building and upgrading more Auckland schools and delivering our digital literacy strategy so more young people continue to receive first class education. I will also be progressing with ACC reform to help more of our most vulnerable whilst ensuring the right incentives are in place to have safer communities and workplaces. In Civil Defence I’ll be prioritising great public alerting including cell broadcasting which would help save lives in a major event like a tsunami. In March I will visit Sendai, Japan where ministers from across the world will be discussing ways to improve disaster and emergency management. On the youth side, the Prime Minister’s

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Youth Programme kicked off in Auckland this week. This is a great way to recognise young people from disadvantaged communities who’ve taken big steps to make positive changes in their lives. I will also be progressing youth financial literacy and youth entrepreneurship projects early this year to ensure more young people have better skills to participate in modern society. This year I am focused on progressing the 23 local initiatives that I committed to delivering at the election. In April I will welcome the Bluegreens to their annual conference on Great Barrier Island and hope that we will be able to confirm several local projects to be delivered for the island such as progressing marine protection for the Hauraki Gulf. It is great to have other Ministers, including Maggie Barry and environmental stakeholders, attending this conference on our beautiful island. Our environment remains one of our greatest assets. Cleaning up the CBD, reducing air pollution and litter around the city will make it all the more welcoming for locals and visitors alike. We also need to tackle the issue of public drunkenness and I will be working alongside council and government colleagues to deliver solutions to what is a big social challenge. I’ll be working to progress the local school redevelopments including Freemans Bay School and Waiheke High school. Meanwhile, I’ll be lobbying central and local government to get funding for sustainable tourism on Waiheke. Local business and residents will really benefit from encouraging tourism companies to get tourists to the island from the new convention centre in central Auckland. Bringing more people onto the island will go hand in hand with developing better and more sustainable transport and improving cycle-ways and walkways so everyone can enjoy all Waiheke has to offer. I look forward to working hard on delivering key environmental, education and economic projects for PN the people of Auckland throughout the new year. (NIKKI KAYE) F Hon Nikki Kaye is the MP for Auckland Central. www.nikkikaye.co.nz

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JOHN ELLIOTT: SOAP BOX

Are Auckland ratepayers getting a fair deal - why aren’t costs being held? House price inflation in Auckland is a national joke. It’s fine for those who want to sell up and move out of Auckland, but for those of us who want to stay in Auckland to live, love, work, or a combination of all three, it is a nightmare. A few lucky Aucklanders at the top keep getting hefty pay increases, but most have hardly kept up with inflation these last few years. According to CTU President Helen Kelly, 43% of Kiwis didn’t get a pay rise last year. Small business owners are particularly stretched. And surely, just because my house is valued at 20, 30, or 40% more than it was three years ago, that doesn’t mean footpath maintenance, rubbish collection and water supply should increase at the same rate? Len Brown promised during the local body election campaign to contain rate increases to 2.5%. He’s now upped that to 3.5% - that’s a 40% increase on his proposed 2.5%. Trying to work out why this is, is like grasping at air. We know the inner city rail link is a controversial $2 billion-plus dollars item alone, but it is not factored into rate projections. Fuel taxes, motorway tolls, etc, are on the table for that debate. Funding those billions over the next 20 years or so will cripple many fixed income home owners. Combine that with dissatisfaction over population intensification, and many Aucklanders who are not tied to Auckland for jobs may well just up and leave. Then the rating base will be reduced and council income reduced. We need to examine the efficiency of council operations. What do the hundreds of council officers earning more than $100,000 a year actually do? What about those on $200,000? We know when we phone up they are always in a meeting. What evaluation of those meeting hours takes place? Are there too many consultants earning huge fees? In September 2014 the New Zealand Herald reported that 1780 council staff were earning more than $100,000. A year earlier the number was 1500. The figures for $200,000 plus were 113 in 2013, and 141 in 2014. And then there were the extra 12 officers on $300,000-plus, up from 23 in 2013, to 35 in 2014. Councillor Cameron Brewer has bemoaned the increase in staff numbers and costs, when the SuperCity was supposed to cut costs and staff. Brewer also described as ‘madness’ the planned $53.4 million to refurbish the council’s headquarters in Albert Street, which was bought for $104 million. A New Zealand Herald survey last year showed 42.5% of Aucklanders surveyed called for the council to reduce staff and salaries to meet its budget.

All we hear from council meeting reports is ‘we’re looking at how we can cut costs.’ It seems that looking always centres on reduction of services - less mowing of parks and reserves, reduced library hours and services, curtailing music in parks - never ‘we’re looking at how many staff and at what salaries are really essential for us to perform our core services.’ I’d like figures on how much has been spent in the last two years on large, outside commissioned reports, many of which will never see the light of day, or will be ignored if councillors don’t like what they say. Likewise, how many consultants have earned how much ratepayer money? Several specific issues right now are of major concern. The IT system for the new SuperCity has blown out in cost by $100 million. Outrageous! Ratepayers deserve a detailed report on how that happened. And now, Sky City wants a top up for their new ‘free’ convention centre to the tune of maybe $130 million. What a damn cheek! I predict this bill will be picked up by the government and the Auckland Council - probably split 50-50. So however the money is secured, I’ll bet Sky City gets its way. Auckland ratepayers will pay the lot - half through rates and half through taxes. What an absolute disgrace! I hope there is protest marching in the streets by angry ratepayers. And we just heard yesterday that the council spent nearly half a million last year settling staff grievances. I wonder what budget is set aside for that next year, or is it just hidden in ‘HR costs’? Most Aucklanders have had static incomes over the last few years, so this price gouging by Council is deeply offensive. Just why can’t Council balance the books? Does anyone now believe that those who trumpeted the savings the SuperCity would bring to ratepayers knew what the hell they were talking about? It just hasn’t happened, and ratepayers are now paying the price - in millions of dollars. It is no wonder voters abstain in their thousands - they just don’t believe politicians will stick to their promises and now have ample proof that their cynicism was well placed. (JOHN ELLIOTT) F PN

GREY LYNN SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS WALK Grey Lynn Business Association is set to kick off the first of their events planned for 2015 with a walking tour aimed at showcasing successful and like-minded Grey Lynn businesses who embrace sustainable business practices in our community. Our suburb is home to a growing network of green businesses who have successfully built and continue to build sustainable initiatives into their businesses. Grey Lynn Business Association is hoping that the walking tour will inspire you to work together on future sustainable initiatives. The tour will feature several award winning ‘green’ businesses with addresses from business owners including Mike Murphy from Kokako Organic Coffee Roasters, Isabel Pasch from Bread and Butter, Jacob Faull from Nature Baby, Simon Coley of All Good Organics. Each will share how they have incorporated green and design led strategies and encourage others to consider this model. If you would like to attend there is limited capacity for the walk so please RSVP as soon as possible info@glba.co.nz F PN

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The tour will feature several award winning ‘green’ businesses including Kokako Organic Coffee Roasters PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


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PONSONBY U3A: DECEMBER 2014

LOCAL NEWS SCHOOL HOLIDAY PROGRAMME MONTH AT THE GREY LYNN COMMUNITY CENTRE January was school holiday programme month at the Grey Lynn Community Centre with the sounds of happy 5 to 12-year-olds filling the air as they enjoyed the popular holiday programmes. With the aim of providing cool, fun activities and adventures for young participants, the holiday programme is deservedly popular and many children return every school holidays to join in the fun. However, now that school has restarted, it is business as usual at the community centre - which means activities and groups for adults and children are in full swing, the Sunday Farmers Market is pulling in the crowds, and the laughter of small children is heard four mornings a week from James Doyle’s burgeoning Grey Lynn Kids’ playgroup. “We host a huge range of activities for people of every age and interest,” says community centre manager Cath Bathe-Taylor. “There’s not much that doesn’t happen here. We have recently been thinking that we would like to be able to offer more for the older members of our community and we hope to have some exciting announcements in the next few months. “With so much on at the centre, we suggest that people check our website or call into the office to see the latest programme of classes and events,” says Cath. An exciting new addition for 2015 is the Fashion Stylist workshops run by Angelica Americo. Originally from Brazil, Angelica worked for many years in fashion in Europe and her workshops offer wardrobe planning and body shape analysis - as she puts it, “style and entertainment in one place.” The Grey Lynn Community Choir has said farewell to its leader, Philip Griffin, and welcomed in his place Helen Phare. Choir night has changed to Thursday. Also on Thursday evenings are the popular ukulele lessons in the Oval Room. The community centre exists for its local community and one of its main roles is venue hire. With a range of venues from the main hall down to small meeting rooms the centre gets much use by community groups and is a handy venue for corporate meetings and workshops. The Grey Lynn/Ponsonby Citizens Advice Bureau, with a daily JP service, is situated at the community centre.

ON A SUNNY DECEMBER AFTERNOON A LARGE GROUP OF PONSONBY U3A MEMBERS AND Herne Bay Petanque Club Thursday Players attended the unveiling of a memorial seat at the petanque club to honour Lucy and Alex Lanning, founding members of both groups. Lucy Lanning was responsible for the formation of Ponsonby U3A in 1994, but soon after suffered a stroke. She died in 2001. Following Lucy’s stroke, Alex Lanning continued to play an active role in U3A, including positions of secretary, newsletter editor, president and many other roles, such as fire warden and representative at the U3A Network. Alex passed away last year. In the latter months of his life Alex gave two talks to U3A members about his younger days as an engineer on the construction of the Benmore Power project. The Thursday petanque players group was started by Lucy and Alex. Over the years it grew into one of the biggest petanque groups in Auckland, with many U3A members taking part. Alex was regarded as “Mr Fixit” at the petanque club - nothing was too difficult for him. He was a familiar figure riding his battery powered bicycle to the petanque club and other locations. Alex also gave many years of service to the Grey Lynn/Ponsonby Citizens Advice Bureau. Ponsonby U3A rounded off a busy year with a well-attended Christmas party. Members are now looking forward to a stimulating programme in 2015, with a stellar line-up of speakers and varied activities in the 13 special interest groups. The special interest groups are the lifeblood of the U3A movement and are dependent on the interests of members. Ponsonby U3A offers Antiques and Collectables, Armchair Travellers, Art History, Classical Studies, Current Affairs, Dining Out, Gallery Visits, Green Fingers, Music Appreciation, New Zealand History, Petanque, Ramblers and Scrabble. Special interest group meetings are held in members’ homes or other venues, while the monthly U3A meeting is held at the Leys Institute in St Marys Road on the second Friday morning of the month. Monthly meetings feature a guest speaker as well as a 10 minute speaker from within U3A. Visitors and guests are welcome at all meetings. Speaker for the February meeting is writer Theresa Sjoquist. She is the author of Yvonne Rust: Maverick Spirit, a biography of renowned potter Yvonne Rust QSM. She is also a ghost writer, editor, professional speaker, freelance writer and photographer. The 10 minute speaker will be Lois Denbury: ‘Who am I? What is my family history?’ PN (PHILIPPA TAIT) F NEXT MEETING: ENQUIRIES:

9.45am, Friday 13 February at Leys Institute, St Marys Road. Annie Webster, President, Ponsonby U3A. T: 09 376 2902.

Grey Lynn and Westmere’s popular Plunket nurse, Marilyn Hemmings, has her Plunket rooms in the community centre. Marilyn is much loved by local mothers and their young families. Two new members have joined the governance committee and promise to add valuable skills to the dedicated group of people who oversee the community centre. Beth Sullivan comes with a background in financial policy planning and budgeting at the Grey Lynn Westmere Plunket Nurse Marilyn Auckland Council. With an engineering Hemmings with new community centre degree and five years in investment governance committee member Beth banking in the United Kingdom before Sullivan and her one-year-old son Ben returning to New Zealand 10 years ago, she promises to bring many innovative points of view to her role on the committee. Beth has two young children and her youngest, Ben, attends the community centre playgroup. The other new committee member lawyer Hayley Tangaroa has a young daughter Te Ataroa Ruby who also attends the playgroup.” Hayley’s focus will be to bring more finance to the centre’s operations and Beth comes with all her knowledge of council workings,” says Cath. “Peter Klein continues to chair the committee, as he has for the past 10 years. The committee’s aim is to grow the PN community centre to maximise its value for the community.” (PHILIPPA TAIT) F GREY LYNN COMMUNITY CENTRE, 510 Richmond Road, T: 09 378 498; www.greylynn.org.nz

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President of Ponsonby U3A Annie Webster with Norman Stanhope, president of the Herne Bay Petanque Club seated on the Lucy and Alex Lanning memorial bench at the Herne Bay Petanque Club

Ponsonby U3A and Herne Bay Petanque Club members at the unveiling of the memorial bench for Lucy and Alex Lanning at the Herne Bay Petanque Club PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


LOCAL NEWS PONSONBY POOL HALL CELEBRATES 25 YEARS

Elias Hanlon has owned the business for 25 years and recently spoke to Ponsonby News. A little bird tells us you were born in Ponsonby... Pretty much. Family estate issues meant my arrival at 15 Vermont Street was a bit delayed. It belonged to my grandmother and remained in the family until 1979 when its position became somewhat strategic and my parents sold - the property is now joined to the nun’s convent. Tell us a little history of the Ponsonby Pool Hall. We shifted to Ponsonby Road when the walls of the Hydra building at the top of College Hill came tumbling down. Local folklore has it going back to the early 1900s. In times gone by - before TV - in the rugby, racing, Gluepot and 6 o’clock swill days, every suburb had one or two billiard halls. ‘Dens of iniquity’, ‘signs of a misspent youth’ are all labels that have been attached to pool halls over time - but first and foremost they were social meeting hubs where people (mostly male) came to interrelate, relax and play the infamous cutthroat game of alleys. In 1990, College Hill was one of the last pool halls left and to be fair was all over - bar the shouting. As they say, timing is everything, and an array of changes occurred. Pool tables instead of snooker, the introduction of music, alcohol and standards meant that a whole new generation and demographic discovered a pretty cool environment to take some time out. And here we are today.” How many pool tables does the hall offer? Another sign of ever changing times; pool took over from snooker/billiards then pool morphed into two types. Just like cricket: Snooker = test matches, Pool (8-ball) = one dayers and super-pool, 9-ball = 20/20s. We now have nine super-pool tables, six pool and one snooker. The snooker table has its own separate lounge room along with the newly introduced dartboard. Have any famous names played pool in Ponsonby? No doubt more than we will ever know or recognise! The night U2 came to town will stay in the memory of all those who were there. Setting up the aforementioned snooker table as part of Rolling Stones’ rider for their 1995 and 2006 Western Springs concerts was a huge buzz for an ageing rock and roller. I could ramble on but really as far as the Ponsonby Pool Hall is concerned everyone who has supported and kept it going are the famous ones - customers, previous owners and the people behind the counter who have given to me more than I deserve but as much as such a wonderful business deserves. Thank you all and a big ups to my brother Patrick and the Magele brothers. Do companies use your facilities for team building? This is a facet of the business that continues to grow. Pool, as well as being a competitive sport, is also a fun pastime that can be played by all with a minimum of effort. Companies can book in for a casual hit around or if they wish we can organise and run a tournament for eight to 80 people. The snooker lounge can also double as a dining area so we can cater for most requirements - easy, enjoyable and economical. What do you love most about Ponsonby? Quite simply that Ponsonby is - it has been the setting, the sound track and the constant in my life from the playground to the schoolyard and then, in my case, to the road! Anyone who has read the enlightening book about greater Ponsonby ‘Urban Village’ will get a sense of the deeply ingrained character and culture of the place. For me, it is something that I will never lose or have taken away and that is the security and comfort of belonging and the feeling of identity. That makes me a very lucky, very grateful and very proud boy from Ponsonby. F PN PONSONBY POOL HALL, 106 Ponsonby Road; T: 360 2356 www.ponsonbypoolhall.co.nz The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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photography: Clare Gemima

Nestled comfortably underneath the ever-popular foodcourt, Ponsonby Pool Hall has made its home at 106 Ponsonby Road for the last 23 years.


MIKE LEE: COUNCILLOR FOR WAITEMATA & GULF

Solidarity with Charlie Hebdo and the people of France I planned to write something entirely non-political this month - about the latest conservation news on the Hauraki Gulf islands - but now feel compelled to offer a few words on the Charlie Hebdo massacre. While the tragedy is in many ways rather unique to the particular political and social circumstances in France, it certainly raises questions for everyone living in a modern, multi-cultural society - including ours. On that note, comments by Derek Fox of the Maori Party supporting the self-proclaimed ‘Jihadist’ killers were frankly rather sickening, but not entirely surprising. What I found even more disappointing were the reactions of some liberals, thankfully a minority, whose response was along the lines of “I’m not trying to justify mass-murder... [well that’s nice to know], but...” and who then went on to criticise the dead journalists - in effect rationalising their murder. While this ‘but’ argument was somewhat more delicately put than Derek Fox’s fascistlike outburst, if such thinking is indicative of more than a few here in New Zealand then surely we have challenges ahead maintaining our hard-won secular, democratic political culture. A culture based on post-enlightenment rationalism - a cultural legacy, as a matter of fact, we very much owe France. I personally don’t go in for purposely offending anyone but I salute the Charlie Hebdo cartoonists and journalists as brave men and women taking on a brutal ‘Jihadist’ tyranny with their pens, despite the dangerous consequences. As the French say they had ‘cran’. In other words ‘guts’. It is pertinent to point out that this outrage did not come out of nowhere; and must be viewed in the context of the current political state of the Middle East and North Africa.

The whole region is now a running sore as the result of hard-line Israeli expansionist policies on the one hand, and on the other years of meddling by the United States and NATO, particularly in the violent overthrow of secular regimes in Iraq, Libya and Syria. This has created absolute chaos and given free rein to the extremists. From time to time I recall the lead-up to the fateful United States-British invasion of Iraq in early 2003, and marching up Queen Street with my wife and hundreds of other Aucklanders chanting, “No blood for oil”. Little good did that do but at least the Clark government kept us out of it. That no doubt took some courage, especially standing up to the United States and its foolish ‘coalition of the willing’. Speaking of courage, I have to say how much I admired the position taken by commentator Paul Thomas in his thought-provoking article in the New Zealand Herald on the Charlie Hebdo massacre. Thomas poured scorn on the ‘instant experts on satire’ and what Salman Rushdie called the ‘But Brigade’, those rather self-righteous liberal souls who in this case couldn’t wait to criticise the dead journalists, even before they had been laid to rest; their fashionable political correctness, I noted, laced with a dash of old-fashioned Francophobia. I agree with Thomas, there should be no ‘buts’ over murderous attacks on the freedom of expression. Like millions of others around the world I express my deep sympathy PN and solidarity with the families of the victims and the people of France. (MIKE LEE) F Councillor for Waitemata and Gulf www.mikelee.co.nz

ONE-OF-A-KIND,WARWICK BROADHEAD DIES Colourful, eccentric and incomparable gay performer Warwick Broadhead has died. Close friend Richard Howard says Warwick died peacefully in a chair at his home on Waiheke Island last month. He was found by a friend who regularly called in to see him. “Warwick had just celebrated his 70th birthday and the opening of his episodic show,” Howard says.

photography: Martin Leach

“He had had numerous visitors recently and was enjoying his achievements and a small revival in his health. A bright light of many colours has gone from our world to the next.” Broadhead was known for extravagant and numerous theatrical works, where lines between cast and audience were often blurred. “He was always offbeat, outside the square and moving away from the mainstream, which made him truly original,” says GayNZ.com reviewer Jay Bennie. “He was flamboyant in the most wonderful sense of the word. He was warm and embracing, with a great sense of theatricality and fun both in his work and his everyday life.” Broadhead was also a designer for the 2000 Hero Parade, with a massive and unforgettable penis float. In 2002 he managed to recover from four heart attacks and a triple bypass. Other moments of infamy were his marriage to his Grey Lynn villa, which he divorced in a private friends-only ceremony when he moved to Waiheke. He'd more recently been performing from his home on Waiheke Island, and had been amidst an epic 30-month fable entitled Monkey. Broadhead's life was captured by filmmaker Florian Habicht in the film 'Rubbings From a Live Man', which blurs the lines between documentary and performance art, and features many of the artist's alter-egos. In it, the performer recalls his years growing up gay in Auckland, describing his upbringing as a lot of cover up and pretense. "Then I went into the world of theatre," he said, "which is cover-up and pretense."

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Warwick Broadhead, pictured in 2006, resting at the Ponsonby News offices, while discussing his ‘RESTING SHOW’ event. Doug Sanders, who has written of being an HIV-positive gay man for GayNZ.com is also paying tribute to Broadhead. "At what was the lowest time, when I was struggling with truly horrible side-effects of a drug combination, Warwick visited me with a pot of strawberry jam and we sat on the couch for an afternoon talking about life. Somehow from that moment I picked up, medically and emotionally, it was a spiritual thing... and I'm not really a spiritual person. Warwick could do that to you. He was amazing." Friend Jeni Little, who sang in a choir he directed from 2006 to 2009, adds “All I can say is that he lived his life like he was going to live forever.” F PN Reprinted by kind permission of GayNZ.com PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


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RACHAEL TE AOTONGA: LEYS INSTITUTE LIBRARY NEWS Hello 2015! What an impressive summer we have had so far, and I’m not just talking about the weather. The staff here at Leys are feeling very proud of all the school students who participated in Auckland Libraries’ free ‘Dare to Explore’ reading programme this summer. Over 100 children joined up at the Leys, making a commitment to keep reading over the holidays. We also saw some fabulous imaginations at work with completed challenges. Well done! In all this excitement, we haven’t forgotten about our teens. Send them along to our new retro board-gaming club to develop their skills in strategy, negotiation and ruthless cunning. Sessions will be held weekly, starting Monday 9 February, 3.30pm - 5.30pm. We are celebrating the New Year at the Leys Institute Library in more ways than one, beginning with some fun activities to welcome the Chinese Year of the Ram. Our friends Amy and Victor will be at the library on Wednesday 11 February between 3.30pm - 4.30pm. Drop by if you would like to take home a special bookmark adorned with your name in handwritten Chinese characters. They will also explain what each character means. Please join us in sampling yummy Chinese dumplings and green tea while getting creative by making a ‘happiness lantern’ on Wednesday 18 February between 3.30pm - 4.30pm. Story-time for pre-schoolers will resume with the new school term. We would be delighted if you wanted to stay afterwards to make a Chinese good luck drum on Friday 19 and Saturday 20 February at 10.30am. Another important event on the Auckland calendar this month is the annual PRIDE Festival. What better place to come for your gay literature fix than here at the Ponsonby Library? We are pleased to be hosting two events to honour the festival: ‘All the Worlds of the Rainbow: Poetry Meet’ on Monday 9 February, 6.00pm - 7.30pm. Come and enjoy poetry and light refreshments in our courtyard, a peaceful haven for sharing poetic treasures. This will be a spontaneous evening of engagement where no one knows quite when the next gem of wonderment will appear. Receive a welcoming glass of wine on arrival. Adult themes. ‘Writing off Valentine’s Day’ on Saturday 14 February in the Reading Room. This creative writing seminar is for all levels of aspiration and accomplishment. With input from authors from a range of genres, we invite you to bring your creativity, ideas, paper, pen/laptop, to write discuss and tell your stories. It’s going to be a busy month at Leys Institute Library; PN we hope we see you there! (RACHAEL TE AOTONGA) F LEYS INSTITUTE, 20 St Marys Road, T: 09 374 1315, www.aucklandlibraries.govt.nz

AUCKLAND PRIDE FESTIVAL 2015 Q&A Name: Ta’i Paitai. Ponsonby resident. Ponsonby News reader since 1989. What is your role within Auckland Pride Festival 2015? Festival director, peacemaker, man of many miracles, arts-activist. How did you get involved with the Pride Festival? I first became involved with the festival through taking part in the parade and attending shows. What can people expect from this year’s Pride Festival? This year’s Pride Festival has more events and definitely caters to tastes that will appeal to many. Victor Rodger’s new work in development, ‘Girl on a Corner’, pays homage, A Different Conversation is a huge step, and all of the visual arts offerings are thought provoking. Not forgetting our furry friends, check out WOOF! (lower Western Park). Programmes available throughout. What’s your favourite Pride Festival memory from years past? Being a part of the Pacific float in last year’s parade. We owned it. If you could have a Pride Festival event with any celebrity in the world (dead or alive)... who would you choose to add to the programme? It will be something that involves Richie McCaw (and me). What would be your theme song for the Pride Festival? Queen - ‘We are the Champions’. Where in Ponsonby is the best place to get amongst the Pride Festival? Studio One, 1 Ponsonby Road and The Women’s Bookshop. At the end of the Festival - how will you be celebrating a job well done? Turning off my phone, and checking out the goodies at the Auckland Arts Festival, Macbeth, Fela, Hikoi, The Mooncake and the Kumara, I AM, iTMOi and White Night. When you’re not the Pride Festival director, what are you doing? Do you know something I don’t? What is your top tip for all anyone attending the Pride Festival? Top tip - take a friend. Introduce someone who has never been to a Pride festival event. Enjoy. Head to www.aucklandpridefestival.org.nz for booking info and the full list of all Auckland Pride Festival 2015 events.

SH1 VICTORIA PARK VIADUCT UPGRADE - PROGRESS UPDATE The Auckland Motorway Alliance is making steady progress installing 1.5km of new steel barrier and 50 LED lights on the Victoria Park Viaduct. They are on track to finish the upgrade by Wednesday 18 March 2015. Work started on Monday 5 January and so far, more than half of the lights and approximately 600 metres of barrier have been installed. Crews are working on both viaducts at once to complete the work as soon as possible. The NZ Transport Agency thanks you for your patience and co-operation while they complete this work. You can view progress photos online at www.nzta.govt.nz/projects/victoria-park-viaduct/gallery.html. Ta’i Paitai (Father Time) with Phylesha Brown-Acton.

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JACINDA ARDERN: LABOUR LIST MP AUCKLAND

The year of the non-resolution New Year’s resolutions seem to have fallen out of favour with a lot of people. I remember deciding that maybe they were a bit pointless about 10 years ago. I was standing next to a friend as the countdown started. She suddenly turned to me with a look of horror and said, “Wait, I haven’t come up with my resolution yet. Quick, pick one for me!” I declared that she couldn’t eat potato chips for a year, just as the clock struck midnight. She was horrified. But while I’m not much of a fan of arbitrary resolutions, there’s nothing wrong with a little self-improvement. Not so much the self-help book kind, but the kind that just says “I’m going to try and be a better human being.” On that front, I’m sure I’m not the only one who is continually singling out traits I want to shake. This year, I’ve chosen one of the things I hate being applied to me, or the job I do, but seem pretty quick to use it myself - the generalisation. I have no doubt that generalisations exist as a kind of short hand. We meet so many people in our working lives, have so many characters to navigate and issues to sort, a quick set of assumptions probably never did any harm, right? And yet one of my bugbears is when we let these get in the way of looking at an issue properly. To be honest, it’s one of the reasons I am so keen to have two of the jobs I have in politics right now - Spokesperson for Small Business, and for Children. For years, probably even decades, there’s been an assumption that Labour isn’t especially good for business - we’re the party that focuses on people, education, health, but just not the economy. While the first part is true, it’s a shame that somehow this has become mutually exclusive from wanting to promote and support businesses who are doing their best to provide what the Labour Party was founded on - work. Any party that wants to build a decent education system, universal health care, and a welfare state to care for people in times of need, has to have a strong economy. We proved for instance that you can have interest-free student loans and subsidised health care while running budget surpluses every year. You can introduce tax credits like Working for Families, and decrease the company tax rate, while still having the strongest continuous economic growth since the Second World War. So perhaps then part of the problem is that we’re a bit too quick to give in to generalisations and, if we keep doing that, we’ll never be able to successfully implement the solutions we need. Just look at child poverty. Far too many people would rather make an assumption that child poverty only exists because people have made bad choices in life. If we let that go unchallenged, we’ll not only let children suffer a poor start in life, we’ll never fix the real source of the issue. So there it is, 2015, the year to challenge the generalisation. I might need to start by PN reversing my assumptions about New Year’s resolutions. Maybe. (JACINDA ARDERN) F JACINDA ARDERN, Labour List MP based in Auckland Central. www.jacinda.co.nz

THE SWEET SMELL OF SUCCESS Anyone can do anything if they try hard enough. Michael Russell left school at a very young age without any qualifications and no formal training. His first role was as a customer services representative for a small New Zealand business, where he quickly moved up the ranks to the sales department, and then into business development. From there he moved on to a company then called Fisher and Paykel Business Centre, now named Connect. With some changes afoot in the company he and a colleague decided in good old Kiwi fashion to have a go at developing their own enterprise. At the tender age of 22, along with a third budding entrepreneur, the three founded Origin, initially working out of a garage in West Auckland. Their venture was the first of its kind in this country, providing fixed management IT to mid-market businesses. Effectively clients outsource their IT department to Origin so that if problems arise they need to do is call Michael’s company of experts to fix it for them. Instead of offering a reactive IT service, meaning that when problems arise an expert is called in on a once-off basis, Origin’s monthly fixed fee means clients can call on them whenever they need. This means that it is in Origin’s best interests to ensure their clients don’t need to ring the helpdesk, and Michael has put a lot of investment into systems and processes that keep his clients’ IT running at optimal levels. Origin also provides advisory and consulting services around IT and technology, aimed at providing business decision makers with all the IT business knowledge they need to stay ahead of their competition. Bayleys, Les Mills International, Jucy, JBWere and Better Drinks (Charlie’s) are among Origin’s 130 contracted clients. When end users in these companies are going about their daily tasks they need to be confident their IT is always online and available, and Origin is constantly on hand to help manage their internal computer systems and IT needs. Michael Russell is now the sole owner of Origin, having bought out his partners some time ago. He’s the head honcho and spends most of his time in a leadership role focusing on growing his staff. His early skills were around sales and people which he enjoyed, and still does. He’s proud of the fact that Origin has a fantastic culture that many want to come in and be part of. He says he’s learned a thing or two along the way and is still learning! The company enjoys steady growth and is now in its 14th year of business, employing 100 people. All the work Michael has put in over the years is really starting to pay off. When asked about the ever present danger hackers pose, Michael assures me he has all the necessary tools in place to prevent his clients from being exposed to those miscreants. Cloud computing is a comparatively new kid on the block that has become mainstream. Businesses are now facing the question of not ‘if’ but ‘when’ and ‘how’ they take parts, or all, of their company to the cloud. Origin has been providing cloud services since 2005, and has built up great knowledge around answering these questions. For the past eight years the company was based on the North Shore, but in November 2014 they made the move to College Hill to be more central to key clients, and as Michael lives in Grey Lynn this also worked well for him. It would be hard to find a more pleasing workspace than Level 3, 43 College Hill. Michael has applied his own aesthetic to the interior, which is quite stunning with flashes of Origin’s bright red and gold, against the Origin grey, and leafy vistas of tall trees bang slap against the exterior that filter light through the many windows. There’s even a pool table in the cafeteria and beanbags and a play station in a separate play room for light relief during downtime. Michael has lived in Grey Lynn for many years and has four children who attend Westmere School. He enjoys being part of the community and loves the vibrancy and character of the suburb. Now that he has moved his business from the depths of the North Shore life PN couldn’t be sweeter. (DEIRDRE TOHILL) F

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DEIRDRE TOHILL: LANDMARK BUILDINGS

Former Newton Police Station As with all early British colonies, there arrived the time when instigating law and order became paramount. When the Province of Auckland was established in 1853, the Auckland Provincial Police Force was set up at the same time and some years later amalgamated with the New Zealand Armed Constabulary. In 1892 the Auckland Police District was divided into six sub-districts: Auckland, Coromandel, Bay of Islands, Tauranga, Thames and Waikato, and in 1896, third-class Sergeant William Walker was put in charge of a small station in a building somewhere on the Great North Road. Already there were reports of severely overcrowded stations and only one policeman per 850 people in the entire borough, in spite of it being the colony’s “largest, most turbulent and most populous district”. To cope with the burgeoning city, Auckland’s mayor, McCosh Clark proposed an amalgamation of Newton, Arch Hill, Mt Eden, parts of Eden Terrace and Newmarket. Newton was renamed Grey Lynn which comprised of 960 acres with a population of over 7000. This first decade of the new century became a formative period for the Ponsonby area. In 1906 the new Newton Police Station was constructed near the junction of Ponsonby and Karangahape roads. It was designed by John Campbell, a draughtsman who arrived in Dunedin from Glasgow in 1882 and was appointed to a temporary position in the Public Buildings Department. When it merged with the Public Works Department, Campbell’s title became ‘architect’ and he remained in charge of government buildings in New Zealand till he retired in 1922. He standardised an Edwardian baroque style for municipal buildings throughout the country and those remaining are so ostentatious they command attention. The Leys Institute and the former Ponsonby Post Office are examples of his work. The Newton Station was designed as one of the ‘boundary’ stations of the enlarged Auckland city. It was two storeyed with six cells and barracks to accommodate 19 policemen. At the time the nearest stations were probably one at Mt Eden, the location of which is unknown, and the Ponsonby station and residence that was built on Jervois Road in the 1880s. This was demolished at the end of 1970 to make way for a car park. There were plenty of lawless incidents keeping the Newton police busy, but one in particular stands out, so much so that it received huge coverage in the Auckland Star. A young lad, Arthur Shannon, alerted the Newton Police to a suicide victim at Arch Hill. Constable Clark proceeded to the scene of the tragedy, but “it subsequently transpired that as usual in these affairs, love might be considered as the cause of the crime”. The article goes on to describe in detail how Edward Fuller approached a young girl, Emily Keeling who was on her way to Bible Class and after importuning her unsuccessfully, shot her before fleeing to Stanley Street where he took his own life. In 1969, the Newton Police Station became available for lease and on 1 January a special parade marked the closing of the station. On 31 January the Ministry of Works officially handed the station back to the Auckland Council who had been gifted it by the government. Over the next several years the building was leased to a mixture of manufacturing/clothing and security companies. In 1976, planning consent was given for the building to be used as a cultural centre on the grounds that its proposed use was deemed ‘in the public interest’. It was leased to the Outreach Trust whose programme aimed to “stimulate wide participation in all the visual, practical and performing arts”. Now renamed Studio One Toi Tu this Ponsonby Road landmark has been revamped in order to PN allow the building be used more widely by the community. (DEIRDRE TOHILL) F

REST IN PEACE - AUDREY JONES Audrey Jones, an iconic resident of Herne Bay for nearly 40 years, passed away peacefully in her sleep on Boxing Day 2014. She arrived in Auckland in 1959 from Palmerston North and settled in Hamilton Road, Herne Bay in the 1970s. She was a true local, frequenting and supporting the retailers along Jervois and Ponsonby Roads. Always impeccably dressed in up-to-the-minute fashion, sometimes wild, sometimes wacky, with red, purple and pink her favourite colours. She was a big supporter of local shops and cafes and you might have seen her making her way to Three Lamps or down to New World with a smile and a “how do you do”. She loved to take the bus down to Smith & Caughey’s and to wander about shopping, it was one of her favourite pastimes and at Christmas she would give all the best chocolates to shopkeepers she supported or the ones who took the time to chat with her. On Sunday you would find her in a pew at St. Stephen’s Church and on Friday nights supporting local restaurants out for dinner with friends and neighbours. Ath one stage she was hit by a car on Jervois Road and had shoulder and leg reconstruction. Cancer took one of her breasts, and she had many trips to hospital to recover from falling. She didn’t hang around at home wallowing though, no way, Audrey was fiercely independent, strong-willed, determined to live life to the fullest and never gave up trying to get out and about. She challenged those who got in her way, banging on cars if they got too close as she crossed the road and she didn’t suffer fools lightly, just plain telling it like it was. If you didn’t like it, you could lump it or “get a life” was a favourite phrase. She loved change and forward thinking, supporting causes that would better the community and donating to charities that made a difference, but always with humility, never boasting about it. Some she valued were, Forest & Bird, Mercy Hospice, Salvation Army and Kids Can. Audrey spent her last year at Elizabeth Knox home and hospital. She did so dislike her decline, but had her wits about her until the end, funny and cheery through her pain. Besides her friends, family and neighbours, what she missed most was shopping and eating out in her beloved Herne Bay. She was up to the minute all her life and in her passing Ponsonby has lost one of the last of the old guard. She wouldn’t be too worried about that though, she would embrace PN the new guard and tell them to “get on with it.” F

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LOCAL NEWS JONATHAN SMITH RECOGNISED FOR HIS FRAMEWORK’S WITHDRAWAL SERVICES TO PEOPLE WITH HIV/AIDS FROM KELMARNA GARDENS Jonathan Smith is to be made a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit in recognition of services to people with HIV/AIDS.

FRAMEWORK SERVICES HAVE BEEN USING THE SPECIAL ENVIRONMENT AT KELMARNA Gardens for their mental health clients for more than 10 years, allowing clients with special needs to learn gardening, mix with staff, each other, and the general public. This arrangement will end in mid-February.

Jonathan Smith, together with partner Kevin, have long been known as Buffy & Bimbo and some years ago the pair hosted our Ponsonby’s Top 10 Entrepreneur Awards. Jonathan is to be awarded with an MNZM.

Dr Colin Hayes, Framework Services CEO, told Ponsonby News that changing government rules and regulations have made it difficult to continue. It used to be possible to sell vegetables to the public and compensate mental health clients by giving them a few dollars. Now with changed government requirements, that is not allowed, and OSH rules, contract rules, etc, preclude a commonsense approach.

He told Ponsonby News: “Thankfully in the last 10 years we have gained ground on medications, which has relabelled this illness from a death sentence to a chronic manageable illness however as we know, this is not the case globally. “New Zealand’s infection rate is still rising, a sign that there is still ongoing complacency. This is a continual challenge for the gay community and HIV/AIDS organisations. “One of our biggest enemies that cannot be fought with drugs is discrimination. We might have laws in place to protect people living with HIV, however discrimination still affects many of us trying to live a normal life. “I would like to acknowledge the fantastic work conducted by the New Zealand AIDS Foundation, Positive Women and Body Positive. Without their consistent commitment I am sure the level of discrimination and the infection rate would be far greater. “I hope that since my diagnosis 21 years ago, my work educating and supporting people in our wider community has managed to prevent at least one new infection and enriched the lives and esteem of fellow people living with this virus. “I’d especially like to thank my beautiful family, close friends, the Queen of the Whole Universe community of which there are over 500 members and the Circle of Friends founding trustees, who have all worked with me in my mission to raise funds, compassion, quality of care and awareness for people living with HIV. Without their support this would never have been possible. “And finally, one more person to thank is my husband Kevin. Since we first met 20 years ago, he has motivated and supported me and taught me unconditional love.” F PN

The number of Framework clients working in the gardens has dropped off markedly in recent times. And so the Kelmarna Community Garden Trust which leases the gardens from the Auckland Council is seeking expressions of interest to continue work at the gardens. Ponsonby News spoke to trust chairperson Mary Paul, who clearly expressed her disappointment at the withdrawal of Framework, but told us that the trust is confident an organisation will step forward and fill the gap. A public meeting to discuss the future will have been held by the time this article goes to press. Framework Services has given the Kelmarna Gardens Trust a sum of money with no strings attached to see them through the next six months. Kelmarna Trust has decided to keep the popular garden manager, Adrian Roche, on in the meantime. Mary Paul was diplomatic when questioned about Framework’s sudden withdrawal, particularly the three months notice given over the difficult Christmas period, but reading between the lines Ponsonby News believes Framework was probably under pressure to adhere to the National Government’s new neo-liberal rules about getting people into employment at all costs - albeit mostly part time. The Kelmarna Trust is anxious to keep at least a part of the gardens for mental health therapeutic use, but the land leased by the trust from the Auckland Council is a large plot, and only about half has been utilised for growing organic vegetables. More could be done. It is entirely possible that a portion could be gardened by locals who sold produce so that the remainder of the space could be used by mental health clients. Dr Hayes told Ponsonby News that Framework could possibly provide carers for individual gardeners to assist the Kelmarna Trust to function more effectively. The Kelmarna Garden Trust welcomes suggestions and offers of help from individuals or organisations. They are taking part in the Heroic Gardens Tour on 14 February, and they invite all Ponsonby News readers to visit on that day, or call in at any time the garden is open to have a look around.

photography: Martin Leach

The gardens are a lovely peaceful oasis right in the middle of the tarseal jungle, and we PN hope good use can continue to be made of this community facility. (JOHN ELLIOTT) F

Buffy & Bimbo as PN ambassdors pictured with Carole Beu back in December ‘08 The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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JOHN ELLIOTT: LOCAL NEWS

Auckland - aspiring to be the world’s most liveable city What does liveable mean anyway? In the August 2014 issue of Ponsonby News I wrote about ‘amenity values’ in relation to population intensification. This month I want to explore the meaning of ‘liveability’. Len Brown and his team have developed a mantra about making Auckland ‘the world’s most liveable city.’

It is a seaside suburb, where formerly residents used to keep their boats at the bottom of the garden.

When I discussed ‘amenity values’ I talked about historical and cultural heritage, neighbourhood character, trees, safety, views, noise levels. These are some of the things that allow us to enjoy where we live, love and thrive.

The loss of amenity values and decreased liveability would result from further intensification. It would also inevitably mean removal or demolition of lovely old Victorian villas, especially on Sarsfield Street and Jervois Road.

So how do these amenity values stack up against liveability criteria? They are similar creatures in many ways, but not the whole story.

No conceivable intensification in Herne Bay would help to make Auckland ‘the world’s most liveable city’, no matter how much rhetoric is pumped out of city hall. Auckland should be developed ‘bottom up’, not ‘top down’, with bureaucrats listening to what, we the ratepayers, want, not being told what is good for us. The days of doctors telling us to “swallow this, it’ll be good for you,” without knowing what it is are over.

The international livaebility rankings depend on the interests and goals of the ranking agency. Four of the most commonly used measures are: access to affordable housing, cost of living, quality of education, and cultural amenities. An Economist reader is likely to be most concerned about cost of living and access to high paying jobs, rather than cultural amenities, so its list will favour those cities with an abundance of economic opportunities, whereas a list by ArtSpace America stresses art and culture because cultural amenities are weighted much more heavily. So, an exhaustive, accurate list and subsequent rankings is highly subjective, and Auckland’s councillors and bureaucrats would do well to listen to existing Aucklanders, asking us what ‘liveable’ means to us and our families, and what the powers that be can do to enhance that liveability. As Partners for Liveable Communities says, “Find out how the city is meeting the needs of the individuals actually living there.” This is not to say that international experience should be ignored. It is just that Aucklanders’ most liveable qualities may differ considerably from many overseas cities. There is also the suggestion in overseas research that smaller, less dense cities do best in the liveability stakes. (Jordan Fraade; The Liveability Trap, 2013) Yes, less dense, Mr Brown. Now let’s have a look at Herne Bay waterside. The Herne Bay Residents Association has made detailed submissions to the proposed Auckland Plan. This affluent innercity suburb has been systematically intensified in the last 40 years. In-fill blocks of flats dot the whole area, from Curran Street to Marine Parade. This development has taken place on land cut off from generous sized sections with lovely Victorian villas. Some of these villas, which originally might have had an acre or more of land, are now jammed in among aging flats, although newer, more expensive townhouses, as they have been renamed, are now being built. And yet, Auckland Council is still calling for further population intensity in Herne Bay. One possibility which scares the hell out of residents is a potential row of four or six storey apartments right along Sarsfield Street, blocking the whole suburb off from the sea, losing what residents call their precious ‘blue space’. Infrastructure problems would be horrific if this sort of intensification were allowed. There are few reserve spaces in Herne Bay waterside, and the proximity to the harbour has always been a prized asset.

There are inner city places where population intensity is desirable, and few of us want to see vast tracts of rural land covered in a new tarseal jungle. But it must not be at the cost of destroying many of the values we love about living in Auckland to serve some ideological fantasy. The best example I have found on the liveability question comes from the Phillips Electrical Group. They have identified three important and interlinked ingredients of a liveable city - resilience, inclusiveness and authenticity. They prefer the word resilience to the word sustainable. Resilience includes low carbon footprint, a relationship with the rural surrounds for food supply, and economic stability. It is about a city being able to ‘invent’ or ‘reinvent’ itself, to accommodate old and new values, to balance continuity with change, heritage and innovation. Inclusiveness is about creating social integration and cohesion, creating a city open to the widest range of civil society, irrespective of gender, age, ethnicity, cultural heritage, beliefs, religion and economic status. Phillips says this inclusiveness enhances community feelings, a sense of ownership towards the city, and the sense of belonging - what Maori would call tu-rangawaewae. Authenticity - an authentic city can create a sense of pride and belonging - ‘this is my city’, and it can make a city ‘lovable’ as well as ‘liveable’. To do this a city must match the expectations of its citizens. I have recommended to the Herne Bay Residents’ Association that they build up an inventory of the amenity values which residents want to keep and improve, with a wish list for greater ‘liveability’ in this attractive seaside, inner city suburb. I cannot stress enough the importance of the will of the people. We are hearing too much chatter about developers and bureaucrats running our city - even from elected PN councillors. This must stop. (JOHN ELLIOTT) F

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PONSONBY NEWS READERS ARE EVERYWHERE

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1-2. Marilyn McElwee sharing the August 2009 issue of Ponsonby News with SAN FRANCISCO. The second shot shows Marilyn with Darryl Dorrington when they took the PN to a caravanserai in Cappadocia, TURKEY. 3. Ron Craig from Ponsonby law firm Chambers Craig Jarvis, pictured after a long negotiation (three separate sendings out for teas for him and his wife Mary) with the seller from Silk Road Carpets and Kilims in the bazaar at Esfahan, IRAN. After the deal was done Ron regaled the vendor, by then an old friend, with the delights of Ponsonby shown in the Ponsonby News. 4. Mike and Bridget Caulton live in Freemans Bay and tell us, “We are both avid readers of your magazine and trust this photo is acceptable. We chose the Pantheon because it’s the only major attraction in ROME, that was built 2000 years ago and is still intact in largely its original state - it’s even older than the Colosseum.”

4 The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

Dear readers please keep sending us your holiday snaps reading your favourite magazine, we love getting them! Photos need to be in high resolution (300dpi), so please email them to info@ponsonbynews.co.nz without reducing the size. DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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ROSS THORBY: SEA FEVER

A ship too far... They used to say that cruising was for old people and their parents; but that perception has changed and cruising is very different today with the advancement in ships and the facilities offered by the ports that welcome today’s world cruiser. Today you can book any number of nights, from two or three up to a full cruise, which can last up to 180 days and most ships now provide a standard of decor that makes bringing your own furniture redundant. Of course world cruises tend to be more formal than general cruising and offer more varied entertainment and educational diversions. The menus on board often relate to the different regions of the world that the ship travels through and also afford the passengers more time to make the ship their home. A large number of the annual world voyages call into Auckland, affording easy access for boarding to those of us without the inclination to fly to the original embarkation points. It’s amazing how easy it is, one minute you are lying in a hammock taking short nips from a long drink surrounded by seafarer’s biographies and travel brochures lulling you into the sense of drama and adventure. Then before you know it, you are handing over credit card details to the nice friendly travel agent on the other end of the phone and 120 days of world cruising adventure on the Queen Victoria is booked for 2016. Mystical, distant and exotic ports, some of which the original vessels Victoria and Laconia visited, now minus the naked natives, and traversing portions of the world that are a bit more out of the way of recent Cunard circumnavigation itineraries, will be something to really look forward to. Although four months is either going to save me a lot of money in the future by putting me off cruising for good, or cost me a lot more by setting a new benchmark for my future cruising. Hmmm... the cold light of day, 120 days on a ship... that’s 17 weeks, 2,880 hours, 172,800 minutes, ooops, I’m wondering if I’ve bitten off more than I can chew. It does seem like a lot but at least I’ve got a year to get my head around it. PN (ROSS THORBY) F

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TRAVEL BREAKS: THE NEW THERAPY!

SRI LANKA

By Kate Gohar, World Journeys There’s so much more to Sri Lanka than cricket and tea! Few islands in the world offer the diversity that exists in Sri Lanka; from ancient cities to rich religious festivals, colonial memories to rolling tea plantations and some of the best beaches in the Indian Ocean.

The rock temple of Dambulla, built in the 1st century BCE, is also a World Heritage Site. The most impressive of Sri Lanka’s cave temples, the ceiling of this complex features the largest area of paintings found in the world, and a colossal figure of Buddha carved out of rock spanning 14 metres.

Colombo, like many capital cities in developing countries, is fast changing its face. Skyscrapers arise from where old buildings once stood. Yet in some parts the old world charm is retained, with colonial buildings, traditional bazaars and Buddhist or Hindu temples.

Natural beauty and a surprising array of wildlife can be found in Sri Lanka’s National Parks. In the wetlands of Minneriya National Park are wild elephants, plenty of amphibians and reptiles, and prolific birdlife. Horton Plains, on a high windswept and misty saddle, shelters the unique sambhur, leopard and endemic bear monkey. Take in one of the finest views in Sri Lanka at World’s End, a jaw-dropping 4000 foot high escarpment.

Nearby Pinnawala Elephant Orphanage was founded with tourism in mind, but has evolved into a highly respected conservation centre operating a scientific captive -breeding programme, the nearby river allowing the herd freedom of movement. The success story of Pinnawala has drawn the attention of scientists from all over the world, and is an equally fascinating experience for visitors.

Spice and tea plantations are also a highlight. The spice gardens of Matale allow a glimpse of how the spices are grown and processed, and also offer cooking demonstrations. Sri Lankan cuisine is renowned worldwide, dominated by fiery curries, sweet caramelised onion relishes, sour lime pickles, bitter melon, coconut, and fresh seafood on the coast.

The city of Kandy was the last royal capital, and many of its traditions, arts and crafts are still lovingly kept alive. A great way to explore Kandy is on a tuk tuk tour, taking in the lake, the bazaar, and various arts and crafts centres.

Take the train to Nanu Oya to visit tea plantations growing some of the best tea in the world. Enjoy tea tastings and pluck your own tea on the estate to take home with you as a memento of this extraordinary land.

Arguably the most iconic Sri Lankan sight is Sigiriya, a 5th century rock fortress, now a World Heritage Site. Built in 477-495 AD, the ‘Lion Rock’ is a citadel of unique beauty rising 200 metres from the jungle. Once the innermost stronghold of a 70 hectare fortified town, you can still view the moat, rampart, and extensive gardens around its base.

Packed with UNESCO World Heritage Sites, legendary temples, beautiful people, glorious beaches and some delightful national parks, Sri Lanka is a truly spectacular and intoxicating destination. F PN

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY THE VEG FRIENDLY CHALLENGE Finalist: Dizengoff It’s the great Ponsonby News Veg Friendly Challenge, in which Ponsonby-area cafes and restaurants line up to be judged on their vegetarian friendliness. What does that mean? Simply this: it’s a new day in food-land, what with an increasing number of restaurants offering a complete vegetarian menu, and a more ‘green’ perspective to eating generally. It’s possible to be nutritious and delicious, and we’re going to name the cafes and restaurants that cater well to vegetarians and vegans, whether or not they’ve also got meat on their menus. Each month, we’ll review one of our favourite ‘veg friendly’ eateries, and at the end of it all we’ll name an overall winner, and our coveted Veg Friendly Challenge Top 10. Try as I might to never, ever use the word ‘iconic’, the finalist in this month’s Veg Friendly Challenge can’t be described any other way. While hundreds of other cafes on the main Ponsonby strip have come and gone, and others have lapsed into ordinariness, Dizengoff has really never had an off day, and has continued to serve its Kosher-oriented food with style and simplicity, despite having changed hands a few times since it opened way back in the mid-90s. Its current owners Mark and Troy have steered the ship ably for a number of years now, seemingly keeping in mind the old truism that ‘if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it!’ The consistency of everything about Dizengoff is one of the real attractions to the New York-style diner, and a boon to vegetarians is the generous portions of the menu devoted to meat-free fare. Another great thing for plant-eaters with sensitive olfactory organs is the lack of pig products: being Jewish-inspired, the menu features no bacon, and it’s a pleasure to sit in a cafe without that very pungent smell wafting around. Both the breakfast and lunch menu is thoughtfully available all day (well, until the kitchen closes at 3pm, anyway), which gave us even more choosing power. Ponsonby News editor Martin Leach went for a half and half scrambled eggs with Dizengoff’s famous creamy mushrooms ($15.50), which never, ever fails to disappoint. I don’t know quite how they get mushrooms tasting so good, but Troy (a vegetarian himself) guarantees they’re free of any suspicious ingredients. Described as ‘sautéed mushrooms in a creamy balsamic sauce’ and served with sourdough bread and a generous dollop of fresh pesto, they’re both a taste and texture sensation. I went for the onion tart ($13.50) with caramelised onion and parmesan. It comes with either chargrilled veg or rocket parmesan salad, and I chose the latter which turned out to be a generous bowl of greens. The tart didn’t look like much, but as we know, looks are often deceiving. Once again, the combination of taste and texture was perfectly pleasing, and the chefs have obviously finessed this recipe until all wrinkles are completely ironed out. Metaphorically speaking, of course.

Do you run a cafe or restaurant in the Ponsonby/Grey Lynn area that does vegetarian really well? If so, let me know on the email below. We’ll be sure to check out your eatery. And don’t be shy, okay? Gary Steel is an Auckland-based journalist who runs online vegetarian resource www.doctorfeelgood.co.nz. He can be contacted via beautmusic@gmail.com

FOOD COURTS IN DUBAI, NEO-BISTROS IN PARIS L’AUTHENTIQUE FOUNDER GUILLAUME DESMURS RETURNED TO NEW ZEALAND FOR a brief visit late last month to catch up with his Auckland-based partners and develop new lines for their brand of sausages, patés and terrines. Ponsonby News asked Guillaume, who has been living in Dubai and London, about international food trends. PN: How did you find the food business in the United Arab Emirates? GD: There are only mass production companies operating who leave no room for small players. The UAE is the kingdom of the food court with fast food brands. The only decent products are imported. I missed the fruit and veggies from the land of the long white cloud! PN: Had much changed in Parisian food when you last visited? GD: There is now the neo-bistro: elegant dishes, great products, organic wines, cool layouts, affordable prices. Refreshing! El Bulli’s bulls**t is a long way behind us and that’s good! Get back to real products coming from a farm and not a lab.

Other vegetarian options include hummus, beetroot salad, labneh cheese salad, feta pie and a bunch of egg-oriented breakfast dishes.

PN: Are you coming across more vegetarian products on your travels? GD: At home with my young family in London we have a meat/fish free day every week. When god-like chef Alain Ducasse dedicates a restaurant in Paris to vegetarian cuisine, you can only surmise that vegetarianism is growing.

If there’s a downside, it’s that while vegetarians are well catered for, the menu isn’t really a proposition for those of a vegan persuasion. This is one of the interesting discoveries of our Veg Challenge thus far: that vegetarian cuisine is now so mainstream it has been integrated into many menus, but vegan cuisine tends to exist out there on its own in dedicated environments such as the Little Bird Unbakery.

PN: What are the big trends in London food? GD: The mainstream trend, like here, is towards craft beers and organic wines. Otherwise, London is very much about brands with multiple outlets. I remember London in the ‘80s, there was nothing edible! Now, even the pubs have made huge efforts.

Personally, I found everything about Dizengoff to be pretty much top-notch. The counter service was friendly and helpful, the quality of the food justly celebrated, and the environment delightfully utilitarian. I hadn’t been to Dizengoff for some years, mainly because it’s so popular that I got tired of battling to find a table. Now that its excellence has been reconfirmed, I’m willing to join the fray! This time we chose 10am on a Monday morning and it was busy enough, but spare tables were in abundance. One other thing: we had demolished everything on our plates before we remembered our plan to photograph the meals. While I’m sure that the stimulating conversation had a part to play in our forgetfulness, I’m sure also that the food was just too enticing not to scoff up PN as soon as it hit our table. Open 7 days, 6.30am-5pm. (GARY STEEL) F DIZENGOFF, 256 Ponsonby Road, T: 09-360-0108.

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PN: Tell us how New Zealand foodies differ from their international equivalents. GD: My fellow Kiwis are the most discerning consumers I’ve seen so far. Products must be good (of course), super healthy, ethically perfect... and cheap! If you make it here, you can please anyone. PN: What’s next for l’Authentique? GD: We would like to use the combination of our experience to create our first line of ready-to-eat meat products: a family food solution, with the same criteria as our fresh products - free range meats, no preservatives, no cheating. F PN L’AUTHENTIQUE, www.lauthentique.co.nz PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


GARY STEEL: VEG FRIENDLY

It’s good news week The news has been all good for vegetarians over the past few months. While world affairs seem to be going to hell in a hat, and crackpot diets have been laughed out of town (hey Paleo, good luck hunting down that sabre-tooth tiger!) there has been an unprecedented run of stories in the mainstream press endorsing the health benefits of plant-based eating. This is good, because it means that the results of rigorous scientific research are actually getting some positive press, and science pretty much confirms that a varied diet of fresh, plant-based food is the best way to ensure a long, healthy life, with fewer degenerative diseases, less cancer and a much lower incidence of heart health problems. And the good news has been reinforced by the on-trend subject of veganism, with recent immigrant James Cameron (director of the movie Avatar) announcing his intention to convert his large New Zealand farm from agriculture to horticulture, and the front-page publicity accorded the Little Bird Unbakery and its raw food ‘cookbook’, The Unbakery Book. Out there in tabloid land, the United Kingdom’s Daily Mail recently ran the headline “vegetarian diet proved to fight disease”, in which it contended that scientists in Scotland had identified that the high amount of salicylic acid found in vegetables was an explanation for vegetarians having a much lower incidence of quite a few different diseases, including cancer, heart disease and hardening of the arteries. It’s interesting that salicylic acid is the main component of aspirin, which is generally prescribed to those at risk of heart attacks. Interesting that is, to ponder whether those aspirins could be avoided altogether if heart patients just converted to a vegetarian diet. Researchers found that vegetarians had up to 12 times the level of salicylic acid in their blood than meat eaters, which rather proves a point known by those in the know for many years: that populations around the world with diets low in meat and high in vegetables are healthier and more long-living. In fact, John Robbins’ book Healthy At 100 was an in-depth study of cultures that mainly rejected meat and, as a consequence, lived longer. An earlier Daily Mail story reported on a major study that found women who frequently eat red meat run the risk of increasing their chance of developing breast cancer by a worrying 20% - and three rashers of bacon is all it takes. Meanwhile, some mass media publications play the celebrity angle to sell a green diet, noting that the likes of Jennifer Lopez, Beyonce, Stella McCartney and many others have

jumped on the plant-based bandwagon. Well, whatever rocks your boat, I guess, but I’d rather base my eating decisions on solid research than the promotional activities of pop culture stars. In the more prosaic world of government organisations, in America, the National Institutes of Health notes that: “A growing body of scientific evidence indicates that wholesome vegetarian diets offer distinct advantages compared to diets containing meat and other foods of animal origin. The benefits arise from lower intakes of saturated fat, cholesterol and animal protein as well as higher intakes of complex carbohydrates, dietary fibre, magnesium, folic acid, vitamin C and E, carotenoids and other phytochemicals.” It goes on to discuss the misapprehension that vegetarian diets are not ‘complete’ and tend to lack iron - now known to be erroneous bunkum successfully promoted by the meat industry. In fact, as long as vegetarians eat a varied diet, they can easily get everything they need, including plenty of protein and iron. Meanwhile, a guest blog for Scientific American points out that the assumption that early “man” was inherently carnivorous is just plain wrong. Rob Dunn explains that our human gut is essentially the same as our monkey ancestors and like them, its main job is to dissolve/process plant material. There’s an abundance of material out there, and there’s very little of any consequence to hit back at the evidence that we’re healthier when eating and digesting plant-based foods. But you know there’s really been a sea change when the meat industry itself starts getting worried. Back in 2012, the United States Department of Agriculture incensed the meat industry with its tacit support of Meatless Monday. Now, Beef magazine has expressed its anxiety over expected new dietary guidelines for Americans, which take PN into account the environmental impact of food. Hold the front page! (GARY STEEL) F Gary Steel is an Auckland-based journalist who runs online vegetarian resource www.doctorfeelgood.co.nz. He can be contacted via beautmusic@gmail.com

PRINCIPALS ENDORSE FRUIT IN SCHOOLS As parents embark on a new year of school lunches, research has found that children who eat fresh fruit and vegetables at school are better behaved, more alert and healthier. The findings come from an independent evaluation of Fruit In Schools, which recently surveyed principals about the programme’s impact on nutrition and healthy eating. The survey found 46% of principals saw fewer behaviour problems in the classroom, while 74% said concentration in class had increased as a result of the programme.

All the principals agreed Fruit In Schools contributed to students’ positive attitudes, awareness and knowledge of healthy eating.

Principals explained the fruit provided “brain food” that helped children to concentrate and stay on task. 72% of principals agreed or strongly agreed that if the programme stopped, academic outcomes would suffer.

Obesity in childhood is associated with a wide range of serious health complications and an increased risk of premature onset of illnesses, including diabetes and heart disease. The New Zealand Medical Association recommends nutrition to be included as part of the mandatory curriculum in schools. “By introducing fruit and vegetables to children, we can encourage them to follow healthy, active lifestyles that will benefit them for the rest of their lives,” says 5+ A Day nutritionist, Bronwen Anderson.

Fruit In Schools started 10 years ago and provides around 20 million servings of fresh fruit and vegetables to 480 low-decile primary and intermediate schools every day during the academic year. The programme is funded by the Ministry of Health and managed by United Fresh New Zealand Incorporated and the 5+ A Day Charitable Trust, which commissioned the research. In the survey, 66% of principals reported an improvement in students’ general health, with 35% saying students had fewer sick days. The healthy eating messages of the programme are extending beyond the school gate, with principals reporting it was also having a positive impact on the children’s home environment and parental behaviours. The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

Anderson says parents can pack even more fresh fruit and vegetables into kids’ lunchboxes by taking part in the annual 5+ A Day Challenge, which invites Kiwis to add extra servings of fresh fruit and vegetables to their day for the month of February. F PN 5+ A Day www.5aday.co.nz. DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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JULIE BONNER: NEWS FROM FROG POND FARM I imagine that anyone who reads my blog may have guessed by now that I’m a bit of a nutty gardener who adores her chooks, loves composting, worms, growing soil and smelly homemade fertiliser brews. I don’t wear heels anymore, but live in my gumboots. I’m super passionate about photography and can now admit that until only recently I was a complete bore and shot in auto setting! That was then... At last our garden is doing famously as you would expect given that summer has finally arrived. The zucchini plants are pumping out long green shafts on a regular basis, we are digging up and eating purple heart spuds daily, the cucumber is doing a brilliant job of climbing over everything in its way (I’m still scratching my head in amazement - I planted it in the middle of a bed!). The painted lady runner beans have hauled themselves up and over their trellis and are looking fab with red and white flowers, chillies and eggplants are bushing out, the salad garden is full of lettuces that have gone to seed (I planted way too many) and there is beetroot waiting in line to be munched on. Did I mention the gorgeous colour and cheer from all the zinnia, cosmos, cleome, geraniums, marigold, nasturtium and calendula growing very happily amongst my veg? I even have loads of carrots on the way. I’m happy. Well I am, with the exception of the those furry night time raiders who delight in breaking branches, munching on unripe fruit and generally making themselves very unwelcome... think possums. Then there are the rats who love my strawberries and those wild turkeys who are waiting patiently to strip our fruit trees. That’s country living for you, never a dull moment! There is much happening at Frog Pond Farm... Sally has gone clucky and is storming around the place ambushing the sheep and performing circus acts on their backs. The chicks who are now mini hens have been discarded by their mum Gladys and are now having to ‘tough’ it up in the chook world. Our garden is on steroids which may have something to do with all the homemade fertilisers that I chuck liberally about. And that ‘to do’ list is growing... • Throw a rock at the rat that keeps stealing my strawberries - nice to know the netting is not working • Get cracking and net the those fruit trees • Weed, feed and water the garden, pots and flower beds, an endless task • Get hubby onto the possum problem • Preserve more lemons • Lift Sally off the nest morning and night and give her a cuddle • Grab more comfrey leaves for fertiliser tea (not the teapot kind) • Stop gloating at the size of our three very large red onions • Prop up Scoresby dwarf tom as it tumbles over its neighbours • Keep trimming back the New Zealand spinach, it is choking stuff • Get ready for the invasion of green shield beetles I have spotted and squashed a few nymphs • Wear gardening gloves, my hands look atrocious • Get a worm farm • Thin out my carrots big time, there is a lot of jostling going on in that garden • Mulch, mulch and more mulch - best thing there is to protect that soil. As I’m a twit and over plant, I noticed with horror while ferreting about in the allium garden a few weeks back, that our red onions were starting to rot in situ (remember the wet foul start to summer) and so were some of the neighbouring Egyptian walking onions. Some quick action was required other than to grab a hanky... so I hauled out those red alliums and thinned those walking onions so they could breath and enjoy the air and sunshine. Happy gardening! (JULIE BONNER) If you are interested in more madness from our place, or perhaps some gardening tips, PN then check out my blog. www.frogpondfarm.co.nz (JULIE BONNER) F

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY

GRILLED VEGETABLE AND RICOTTA PIZZA Choose in-season veggies to make this delicious pizza that’s done and dusted in 30 minutes. Serves four, time to make 30 minutes 4 cups thinly sliced vegetables of your choice eg. eggplant, tomatoes, kumara, pumpkin 1 medium-sized red capsicum, thinly sliced 3 medium-sized courgettes, thinly sliced lengthways 2 large wholemeal pita breads 2 tablespoons tomato paste 160g reduced-fat ricotta cheese 2 tablespoons basil pesto ½ cup grated mozzarella cheese 2 cups rocket 1. Preheat oven to 200°C. Heat two large baking trays in oven for 10 minutes. 2. Place a greased barbecue plate or chargrill over a medium-high heat. Grill vegetables for 3-4 minutes or until tender. Meanwhile, place pita breads on baking tray and spread with tomato paste. Layer grilled vegetables evenly over prepared bases. Top with ricotta dollops and drops of pesto then sprinkle with mozzarella. 3. Bake pizza for 12-15 minutes or until bases are crisp and cheese is golden. Cut in wedges. Top with rocket then serve. Bonus tip: This recipe freezes well. Recipe: Liz Macri Photography: Mark O’Meara Recipe reprinted from Healthy Food Guide magazine with permission from Healthy Life Media Ltd. Find more delicious, simple dishes making the most of summer veggies and fruit in the February 2015 issue of Healthy Food Guide ($5.90), on sale in supermarkets and bookstores or subscribe at www.healthyfood.co.nz F PN The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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PHIL PARKER: WHOSE WINE IS IT ANYWAY?

Waiheke’s new wineries Over the holidays we managed to catch up with two brand spanking new winery operations on Waiheke Island.

Frenchman’s Hill Estate and Expatrius Wines, 1 Margaret Reeve Lane. T: 09 372 3387; www.frenchmanshillestate.co.nz. Open summer: 11.00am - 4.00pm Thursday to Sunday; winter: 11.00am - 3.00pm Thursday to Sunday (phone ahead). Batch Winery, 129 Carsons Road, T: 09 372 3223; www.batchwinery.com. Open summer: 7 days 11.00pm - 7.00pm; winter: Saturday & Sunday 12.30am - 4.30pm. The highest elevated vineyard on the island, Batch has spectacular views out over the gulf and islands. Local architect David Scott has designed a suitably stylish Kiwi shed -like winery building that also incorporates state of the art gravity flow technology and winemaking equipment. They have three labels: Fizz (sparkling prosecco method 100% chardonnay, riesling and rosé); Batch Winery Estate, and the top tier Thomas & Sons reserve label. All wines are grown, vinted and bottled onsite, including pinot gris, flora, cabernet franc, cabernet sauvignon and syrah. Notable wines - flora $60, syrah $44, and the Prosecco style sparklers $34 - $42. Food - Café Lunch 11.30am - 3.00pm High Tea 3.00pm - 7.00pm Simple menu with fresh and tasty options accompanied by local olive oils and freshly baked artisan Italian style breads. High tea consists of a tall platter of savoury and sweet goodies, accompanied by a glass of Fizz! Vineyard Dog - Ranger The viticulturist’s dog, his favourite pastimes are meeting and greeting visitors and running madly through the vineyard.

Couple, Luc and Anna Desbonnets bring a touch of Gallic flair to Waiheke with their new vineyard, cafe, cellar door/gift shop and boutique accommodation. Anna takes care of the retail and wine tasting, while Luc looks after the vines and makes wines under the Frenchmans Hill Estate and Expatrius labels. The property consists of five hectares of north facing, steeply sloping vineyard just below the tasting room, plus olive groves and wetlands. Frenchman’s Hill also has two other vineyard blocks on Waiheke. Olive oil and figs prodded on the property are also for sale. The gift shop features art works and funky homeware and décor items. Tastings can be had at a small bar, or in the spacious covered courtyard with views across to Anzac Bay. Notable wines The Rocks Rosé $35, Blood Creek (Meritage Bordeaux style) $98. Food - cafe Simple bistro fare at reasonable prices. Accommodation - guest house The secluded guest house provides a luxury getaway accommodation with an apartment for one to four guests. Continental breakfast and complimentary wine tasting is included in tariff ($345 to $445 depending on numbers and season). (PHIL PARKER) F PN

Read Phil’s blog at nzwineblogger.blogspot.co.nz www.insidertouring.co.nz Phil Parker is a wine writer and operates Fine Wine & Food Tours in Auckland.

ANY PAGE IN PONSONBY NEWS IS A GOOD PLACE TO BE SEEN

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WHAT’S HOT AT SABATO VALENTINE’S VALRHONA... With Valentine’s Day just around the corner this divine chocolate mousse featured in our Sabato recipe card set is just the thing to delight your loved one. Full of rich chocolate flavours that only Valrhona chocolate can offer, but made without the addition of cream (the mascarpone topping is optional), this is a delightfully low-fat and low-sugar version of classic French chocolate mousse - sure to be love at first bite! Valrhona Chocolate Mousse with Cherry Centre 150g Valrhona dark chocolate fèves 2 free range egg yolks 5 free range egg whites Pinch of Iblea sea salt 3 Tbsp caster sugar 6 Tbsp Darlington’s morello cherry jam 2 Tbsp Valrhona grué de cacao (cocoa nibs) Vanilla Mascarpone 1 tsp vanilla paste ½ cup mascarpone Place chocolate fèves in a heatproof bowl set over a saucepan of barely simmering water to melt. Stir until smooth and then leave to cool slightly. Stir in egg yolks (the mixture may appear to clump together but this is fine). In a clean bowl, whisk egg whites with salt until soft peaks form, then add sugar and beat until stiff and glossy. Fold one-third of the egg whites into the chocolate, to lighten mixture (this will loosen any clumping of the chocolate and egg yolks). Fold in remaining egg whites until well combined. Place a tablespoonful of cherry jam into the bases of 6 serving glasses. Spoon the chocolate mousse on top, dividing mixture evenly. Chill for at least 1 hour before serving. Combine mascarpone and vanilla paste. Place a spoonful on top of chocolate mousse and sprinkle with grué de cacao. Serves 6. F PN Special Valentine’s Offer: As a Ponsonby News reader you can enjoy a special price on our Spring/Summer and Autumn/Winter recipe card sets - usually $19.50 each, simply mention you are a Ponsonby News reader and pay only $10 for each set. Offer valid until 15 February 2015. SABATO Limited, 57 Normanby Road, T: 09 630 8751, www.sabato.co.nz

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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NEWS FROM GREY LYNN FARMER’S MARKET

MARILYN AND BILL BROWNELL, TIKAPA MOANA ORGANIC ORCHARD AND ECO SPA RETREAT What’s your favourite thing about having an orchard? It is a dream lifestyle that keeps us physically active, very well nourished with a great variety of fresh natural foods, breathing fresh air, and appreciating a huge sense of space and greenery and appropriate natural soil management regimes at our place between the Hunua Ranges and the Firth of Thames. If you could sum up your food philosophy in one sentence... We strive to nourish ourselves and our friends, our guests and our farmers market customers mainly with fruits and vegetables that are naturally grown in organic soils free of chemicals of any kind, and to carry this message to the wider world. Where did you grow up? Bill: by the St Lawrence River between the United States and Canada, with huge family vege gardens in the rich alluvial soils and fresh fish from the river. Marilyn: in New Plymouth in a family of sustainable subsistence urban gardeners and outdoor lovers. What’s the biggest business challenge you’ve had to face? How to survive financially on a small organic property in a world that most effectively rewards large-scale, energy inefficient, chemically enhanced production.

from many different backgrounds, connects us with a great diversity of market people, brings us lots of customer reinforcement for what we do... all up providing the best of both worlds in our lives.

What’s your favourite way to relax after work? Go for a swim in the sea, a run in the park with the dog, cycling along our tranquil coastline, and sitting in the spa pool contemplating the mountains.

Bill and Marilyn will be away from the market on 1, 8 and 15 February but happily will be returning on 22 February. F PN

What’s your favourite thing about coming to the Grey Lynn Farmers Market? It connects us regularly with the multi-faceted life of the city, brings us many new friends

www.glfm.co.nz Follow us on twitter: www.twitter.com/GLFM Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/GreyLynnFarmersMarket

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LITTLE BREAD & BUTTER - ISABEL PASCH AND BETH ROBINSON

THE BLUE BREEZE INN - CHE BARRINGTON

Isabel Pasch and Beth Robinson are two women who share a common passion for baking.

Che Barrington, head chef at The Blue Breeze Inn, has to use a translator to talk to his dumpling team.

I find them out back of Little Bread & Butter discussing the proving time of the croissants. The hot weather is wreaking havoc in the bakery. They launch into an explanation of the fermentation process of their trademark organic sourdoughs versus that of commercially made bread.

Fortunately, Che’s translator, Suki, is also one of his chefs. “Tell them just to make a few, so she can see what I mean.”

“Of course it’s about ingredients [all certified organic], but mostly it’s about time. Our bread is made the same slow way it’s been made for centuries; before additives and ‘improvers’ were introduced to speed up the process” Isabel explains. Sourdough takes up to 20 hours to ferment as opposed to the 20 minutes of modern fast-rising yeasts, and during that time microorganisms in the sourdough break down complex carbohydrates, particularly gluten. She hands me a crusty chunk of the popular Swiss Loaf. “The result, a much more digestible bread that is aromatic, healthy and tastes really good!” My gluten-intolerant self can happily confirm all of the above. It all sounds very scientific to me so I am not surprised when Isabel says she has a degree in microbiology. When she and her Kiwi husband decided to move back to New Zealand from Germany, Isabel knew she would miss European bread terribly, so she decided to bring it with her. “I did a drastic career change and trained for a year in a couple of organic bakeries before we came over.” In 2010 they opened Paris-Berlin in Ellerslie, which soon garnered quite a following for its organic, rustic loaves and delicious pastries. Then came Little Bread & Butter at Ponsonby Central, and eventually Bread & Butter Bakery in Grey Lynn. Beth came on board when Little Bread & Butter opened, bringing to the cafe her own love of baking and taking ownership of the pastries. “I love responding to the seasons, making delicious treats that utilise the seasonal fruits, like feijoa jam in the Danishes and crumbles.” She also makes all the preserves, the jams and marmalades that sit on the big communal table for those like myself who prefer to toast their own delicious slice of bread, just so. Pass the butter please! (FIONA GARLICK)

photography: Stacey Simpkin

www.breadandbutterbakery.co.nz T: 09 376 4007

Beth Robinson and Isabel Pasch The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

I’ve asked Che which dish at The Blue Breeze Inn requires the most skill, and he’s taken me out back past flaming woks and steaming baskets to proudly introduce “the granddaddies of Auckland’s dumpling scene” - Raymond and Kwan. With the relaxed dexterity that comes from making dumplings all his life, Kwan drops a pinch of pearly white dough onto his board and in a circular motion, deftly rubs it with the flat Che Barrington edge of a cleaver. Seconds later, the dough has become a delicate, translucent circle, which Raymond then pinches 13 times (for good luck) around a delicious smelling parcel of savoury meats. Then the whole, beautifully choreographed process starts again. Along with English and Mandarin, there are four regional Chinese dialects at work in Che’s kitchen, creating an exciting blend of culinary knowledge - you can taste it in Che’s food. Look no further than the wok-fried tuatua, pork belly, black rice vinegar and sesame oil - a dish Che invented right here in Auckland. “Nowhere else in the world is doing this, because nowhere else can get their hands on our tuatua,” laughs Che. He prepares it for me - and it’s masterful. The tang of black rice vinegar and Chinese spices deliciously fuses together the savoury flavours of slowly-roasted pork and the sweet, succulent tuatua, still in their shells. “Good?” Kwan asks, watching me eat. “Hell yeah,” I mumble, no translation needed. Thanks Che. (FIONA GARLICK) www.thebluebreezeinn.co.nz T: 09 360 0303

Steamed scallop and pork dumplings DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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LIZ WHEADON: WINE, GLORIOUS WINE

Valentine’s Day and Champagne February - for those with a sense of occasion it means Waitangi Day and the forging of a nation, but for those romantically inclined it means St. Valentine’s Day. Who was this mysterious saint and what is the history behind the celebration? According to one legend, Claudius II in the 3rd century outlawed young men from marrying (his source of potential soldiers) but Valentine, a priest, defied Claudius and continued to marry young lovers. Claudius had him executed; Valentine was declared a martyr and sainted by the Pope. Sending red roses on Valentine’s Day as a declaration of undying devotion is a very sweet thought. But considering the pecuniary cynical world we live in, the reaction might well be “How much do you love me? Let me count the roses.” Maybe it’s best to send Champagne, that way you can share in the pleasure and maybe even pop the question. At Glengarry you’ll find a host of choices of Champagne; my top three wines would have to be Delamotte Non Vintage, Pol Roger Brut Non Vintage, Drappier Carte D’Or Non Vintage and if money was of no matter then Salon for sure. In a world where the majority of companies place profit ahead of quality it is refreshing to discover that integrity has not totally disappeared. Champagne Delamotte (established in 1760) together with its extraordinary sister company Salon (they only make a very very rare Blanc de Blanc) are one of the few still dedicated to the pursuit of perfection. Their Non Vintage is surely one of the best kept secrets of Champagne, a remarkably consistent bubbly. The chardonnay content is principally from 100% Grand Cru vineyards, the pinots (noir and meunier) from selected vineyards. It is a perfect expression of vivacity with a persistent stream of bubbles; doughy, berry fruit, mineral aromas, and wonderfully fresh flavours. Like its much celebrated competitor Moët, Delamotte has a light touch and an impressive depth of flavour.

FRUIT PICKING CHARITY NEEDS CO-ORDINATORS IN CENTRAL SUBURBS Community Fruit Harvesting, a charity that picks unwanted fruit to provide food for hungry families, is looking for neighbourhood co-ordinators in central Auckland to manage fruit picking. The role involves managing requests to pick fruit from local gardens or orchards, organising volunteer pickers and arranging for the fresh fruit to be delivered to charities or preserved. “Our current Auckland co-ordinator has broken her foot so she’ll be out of action for a number of months,” says Di Celliers, Community Fruit Harvesting National Co-ordinator. “Plums are ripening now and we need to make sure we can pick them and share them with people who need them.” Co-ordinators can select the size of area they feel comfortable managing, from a few streets to several suburbs, depending on the time they have available. They need access to a phone and/or computer to field requests from fruit tree owners and arrange teams of volunteers to pick the fruit. Co-ordinators also require their own transport, as they will usually attend fruit picking to manage volunteers on site and help to deliver the fruit to charity. “We’re looking for co-ordinators that are reliable, responsible and passionate about helping others,” says Di. Community Fruit Harvesting also wants to remind people who have fruit and vegetables going to waste to get in touch. Plums, peaches and berries are currently ripening and many gardens also have a glut of courgettes and tomatoes. In the next few months, feijoas, apples and pears will be ready for picking. People interested in becoming a local area Community Fruit Harvesting co-ordinator, volunteering or offering their fruit can email Di Celliers at pickfruit@xtra.co.nz or visit www.pickfruit.co.nz to register their interest. F PN

Pol Roger is one of the great names of Champagne. We don’t know quite how they achieve the consistency they do, given their breadth of style and class that surpasses anyone’s expectations. The ‘Réserve’ is an exquisite wine with a rich fruity fragrant bouquet and a delicate creamy mousse. It combines great fruit depth flavours within an elegant structure. Nicely weighted it finishes on a fine citrus note. Drappier Carte D’Or is blended exclusively from first pressings, this is an elegantly structured champagne. It is a fruit driven bubbly with classic tell-tale biscuity notes on the nose. The palate has a light deliciously fresh lively character; great as an aperitif and superb value. Under Michel Drappier’s stewardship of late, the wines of the house of Drappier have become drier and drier and the amount of sulphur used in production, the lowest in the region - Michel’s extremely sensitive. Happy Valentine’s Day. PN (LIZ WHEADON) F www.glengarry.co.nz

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY FRIDAY LUNCH 12NOON - 2PM 3-Courses including Crayfish & Champagne $75

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LAURAINE JACOBS: THE SEASONED PALATE

Lauraine Jacobs eats at the uber-cool Odettes Eatery A little background first. The old City Works Depot site stood waiting for years while developers mucked about, trying to get the site covered in monstrous new buildings and failing that, a residential enclave that may have extended those disgraceful housing blocks cluttering the top of Hobson Street. Thankfully good sense prevailed and the large airy sheds on the land have been renovated, broken up into very interesting spaces and house all sorts of creative uses. It is now a fun precinct to visit, day or night, and the best news is that there’s reasonable parking available round the clock. Al Brown has his office and development kitchen there for his ever expanding empire (tucked behind his Ugly Bagel shop), the media giant Bauer has vast offices below, other spaces are taken by ad agencies and creative, you can get your hair blow dried over a cup of tea, or pick up flowers for a date, and then there is food, good coffee, cakes and drink. Lots of it. The newest arrival is the best yet. Odettes Eatery sits in the centre, oozing comfort and offering a thoughtful menu that changes a little throughout the day to suit the appetite. It is the brainchild of Clare and Joost van den Berg who ran two wonderful chic eateries on the North Shore, Zus & Co and Zomer, before selling up to concentrate on their city venture. They planned the interior themselves, with minimal guidance from site architect Nate Cheshire, and the result is stunning in every detail. The large, almost square room is light and airy, and decorated in a gorgeous palette of restful blues and greens, with an outstanding feature wall of teal green tiles surrounding the open bar and kitchen behind, juxtaposing a sleek timber wall opposite. Banquettes and attractively placed corner tables are furnished with the most comfortable seating around - with lots of cushions that seem to cry out ‘sit here and relax.’ And two other features, the large artwork by Slim Aarons and some drop dead gorgeous globes of glass lighting that hang over the room, are just perfect. And while the warmer weather lingers on, diners can eat out in the stunning adjacent outdoor plaza. You may never want to leave. Fittingly, the menu is in total sync with this exhibition of good taste and high fashion. Chef, Josh Cucharick’s food meets all the demands of the modern diner and there is something for everyone, as long as they are prepared to be a little adventurous. His flavours tend to Middle Eastern tastes and are very tasty with the spices and the lovely sour notes that region is known for. The van den Bergs wanted a city style menu to suit anyone, anytime, so they open for breakfast and lunch seven days and for dinner Tuesday to Saturday.

Lunch and dinner menus are similar; divided into sections, ‘bites’, ‘for sharing’, mains, and desserts. It is hard to understand why the bites and sharing items are separated, since if you have a knife and fork it’s pretty easy to share anything (dishes that are hard to share are broths and soupy dishes, as the thought of dipping spoons in constantly is a little worrying). But that’s a very minor quibble. Standouts enjoyed alone have been the soft shell crab slider and a delicious Vanuatu prawn steam bun. The beef cheek fritters are very moreish, and spinach empanadas with kidney beans, quark and dill were delicious. I usually love fresh kingfish served sashimi style but at one recent shared lunch we all agreed that we’d have loved something more than the dry and crunchy coconut shreds and crisp popped rice that adorned it. Even a little lemon juice we requested didn’t help that lovely kingfish to shine! Our seared Atlantic scallops, large and plump with shreds of confit pork hock and a salsa verde was a much more successful dish and we all voted the saffron tortellini with yogurt curd, spiced cashew and green chilli a major triumph. There’s one dish not to miss; the ‘wild’ mushrooms which come bathed in whipped Persian feta, accompanied by little donuts made with mushroom flour and baby basil. I loved this highly original dish and I am not alone. Lunching with a gourmand friend, he took one bite and waved the waiter over to order a second helping. Yes! There’s a full bar and a great little wine list, with lots of wines by the glass that suit the food perfectly. Odettes also offers some lovely house made sodas - great if it’s hot or you need to return to work after lunch and can’t go the distance with wine or cocktails to accompany your meal. There are plenty of very helpful service staff on the floor and nobody seems to have to wait for their food to arrive. If you are after a casual meal, don’t miss this. No bookings unless you are a party of six or more. And don’t try to split the bill according to what you ate. I love their policy of “one bill per table or split it evenly.” We are all grown-ups, aren’t we? Odettes Eatery, Shed 5, City Works Depot, 90 Wellesley Street, City, T: 09 309 0304; www.odettes.co.nz (LAURAINE JACOBS MNZM) F PN www.laurainejacobs.co.nz

photography: Anna Kidman

The breakfast/brunch menu is way different from the expected ‘eggs with everything’ that dominate most other cafes and restaurants around town. And all the fashionable dieters will love current offerings like a dish of ancient grains bircher with almond milk, marinated berries and toasted almonds, an egg white omelette with tomatoes and a fresh and zesty smashed avocado, chilli and coriander on toasted rye. Fancy something

heartier. Then there’s a brioche burger with pork sausage or the lovely Tahitian vanilla crepes with lemon yogurt, blueberry compote and mandarin sugar. All complemented by delicious juices and smoothies that reek of freshness and good health.

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY HEALTHY, ORGANIC FOOD FROM EVEN THE SMALLEST PLOT Who has the time to garden these days? There are so many other demands on our time that the hard backyard slog of earlier generations simply isn’t an option for most of us. The pace of life, and indeed the world, has changed since the times when a full section was the norm, but spare a second thought for that barren strip of dirt next to the garage. Whilst times have certainly changed since the gardens of our childhood, plant selection and gardening methods have not stood idle. Even if you have no soil, it is now perfectly acceptable to grow figs, apricots, limes, nectarines and pears, to name a few, in pots. The rules for a potted veggie garden are the same, regardless of your chosen crop: a large enough pot, regular watering and fertiliser to replace the energy expended while producing fruit. Just remember, any plant in a pot is completely dependent upon the person to feed and water it. Think of them like pets but swap the droppings for raspberries. This means you also have total control of the fertilisers and chemicals used to keep your plant healthy. Usually, no sprays and no chemicals equal double the taste and certainly more satisfying than buying from even the trendiest retailer. I, personally, am growing three fruits in one pot. A double grafted nectarine/peach happily co-habits with a ground covering of perfect strawberries - always try to think outside the pot. Another method of soil-less gardening cultivating popularity recently is vertical gardening or green walls. Gardening fashions are often driven by necessity and, whilst this particular trend is still taking root, I see no reason not to give it a little twist. Can you imagine inviting your dinner guests to pick their own from your new fashion statement? Strawberries, blue berries and melons, tomatoes, cucumbers and all of the leafy salad greens can be grown this way. If, however, you do have some soil space to play with, here are a few options. A plot of soil 1m x 1m can in summer yield enough salad greens a day for a single person. Throw in a tomato, a cucumber and maybe a melon and you’re sorted. Why not have a tomato growing competition with the kids? Gardening is meant to be fun and you can slip in some healthy eating and life skills without them noticing. The key with growing your own food and certainly with organics is your soil. What you put in is what you get out. There is no substitute for organic matter and now thankfully it comes pre packed. I still remember the often heated exchanges between my mother and my grandparents about them sending her out with a bucket and shovel to collect horse manure from the streets. Thankfully there are now many products to rejuvenate tired ground and let your garden flourish. Super Natural from Aquaticus is a fantastic, water-on feed that works with your soil biology to get more nutrients to the roots. Healthier roots. Healthier plant. Heftier crop. Being a liquid, it also does away with the need for digging. On deciding where you want to grow something, the next step is plant selection. Many people get this bit a little backwards. ‘I want to grow an avocado here’. Plants, like pets, have unique requirements. It is better to look at which plants suit the area’s natural conditions. Have a peek over the fence or go for a walk in your street. If no-one is growing an avocado, there is probably a good reason. Let’s settle for that thin strip against the garage. If it’s blessed with full sun all day, you can start thinking figs, berries, currants or pomegranates. If it’s shady, then spinach, butternut squash and cucumbers.

PANCAKE DAY JUST GOT BIGGER! It’s a day of enjoyment steeped in history and this year Nutella is making it easier (and more delicious) to join in the pancake tradition. Between 16-22 February, Nutella will be celebrating ‘Pancake Week’ in collaboration with Ponsonby Central eatery Crepes A Go Go, offering a limited edition Nutella menu to mark the occasion. Whether you like a traditional Nutella and strawberry option, or something a bit more gourmet such as Nutella, grilled almond and banana on a buckwheat base - Crepes A Go Go has something to suit your tastes. Celebrated Internationally, Pancake Day is determined by the Easter calendar and falls PN on the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday. www.ponsonbycentral.co.nz F

Another option for fruit in small spaces, especially on a wall, is trained fruit trees. Espaliers, cordons and step-overs are a fantastic way to grow apples, pears and citrus. Yes, the initial training can be a little technical, but pre-trained plants are only your nearest nursery away. The heat radiated from a wall or solid fence helps ripen fruit on both sides of the plant. There is something immensely satisfying about picking fruit from a tree that you have planted, trained and maintained yourself. Even if you do decide to buy a pre-trained tree, it is unlikely to be in full production in its first year. There is a very sensible train of thought that recommends the removal of fruit in year one. This is to allow the plant to establish and grow new roots. There are now as many plants for small gardens as large but these are a few ideas and trends for small gardens. If any of them have inspired you and you wish to know more simply drop into your nearest garden centre. With the right crop selection and a little imagination those few metres of bare earth could be worth their weight in golden PN delicious. Grow well. (JOE ROBBINS) F

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FASHION + STYLE RETAIL SUPERSTAR Mary-Ellen Prendergast, Shen How did you come to be a retail salesperson? I’m the founder and designer of the brand. We opened the store at the end of September last year - it’s our first and flagship store. I like to work in the store to meet the customers and to see the person who’s buying the product, and to see what is selling and how. What brought you to Surrey Crescent? I used to live on Old Mill Road and I love Grey Lynn. There are really cool brands in the vicinity that I like and it’s nice to sit alongside them. What do you love about your store? I love our location and the clean, urban boutique atmosphere. What makes a standout retail salesperson? Honesty and style. Someone you can trust. Tell us about a memorable sale you’ve made this year… A fabulous woman who lives down the road in Richmond Road came in. She didn’t know anything about the brand but she bought six garments - one of those wonderful women who just get the brand. If you could wave your wand and have anyone in the world walk into your store right now, who would it be? Cate Blanchett, I would love to fit her in a Shen suit. If you could wave your wand and have anyone in greater Ponsonby walk into your store right now, who would it be? We love Jennifer Ward-Leland. Like Cate Blanchett she is sophisticated, elegant and talented. Where do you shop/enjoy shopping? I enjoy shopping when I go overseas, as that’s when I have time. I love LA and Tokyo. Name someone you think is a great greater Ponsonby retail salesperson… I like the girls at Sass and Bide, they are really honest. I just got some sunglasses from there. F PN SHEN, 41 Surrey Crescent T: 021 808 283, www.shenclothing.com

NEW ZEALAND FASHION MUSEUM CALLS FOR GARMENTS The New Zealand Fashion Museum needs help locating garments and objects for their 2015/16 summer exhibition, At the Beach. The exhibition, which will open at the New Zealand Maritime Museum in October 2015, will examine 100-plus years of the history of New Zealand beach culture told through fashion. By calling for garments from private collections and closets the Fashion Museum anticipate discovering a wealth of personal ‘at the beach’ memories which will showcase New Zealander’s love affair with the coast. Other themes to be explored in the exhibition include how and why swimwear and beachwear changed and shrank including: growing trends in physical activity, and what was and is more recently popular; costume by-laws versus the push to rebel and follow international fashion trends; changing attitudes towards tanning and health; beach beauty contests; technological developments in materials which facilitated lighter and tighter garments; and the sexualisation of swimwear and fashion generally and with it expectations of bodily perfection. The exhibition will also offer an opportunity to tell some of the history of the New Zealand fashion industry and its ride of the industry wave. In addition to well known local brands such as Canterbury, Bendon and Expozay, the exhibition is expected to uncover international brands made under licence in New Zealand and also a myriad of smaller local labels, many of which will have disappeared. Exhibition co-curator Dianne Ludwig says, “Some initial conversations have already led to some interesting discoveries, including a 1960s Colin Cole bathing costume, a 1950s beach towel and a collection of 1980s Men’s Beach shirts.” The Fashion Museum is interested in men’s and women’s summer beach fashion from the early 1900s to 2000 including swimwear, sundresses, lounging suits, coveralls, Hawaiian shirts and board shorts, and beach fashion accessories galore: jandals, plimsolls, sandals, hats, sunglasses, parasols, and bathing caps to name a few. They are also interested in photos or advertising images which fit within the beach theme. F PN NEW ZEALAND FASHION MUSEUM - At the Beach co-curator Dianne Ludwig T: 029 3005783 Dianne@dianneludwig.com.

Image of Pamela Clark by Ron Clark. Sir George Grey Special Collections, Auckland Libraries, 1207-1192

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FASHION + STYLE

NEW FACES AND NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR 2015 It's a brand new year and we caught up with the director of Bintang Models, Patric Seng, to talk about the agency's exciting plans for 2015. "Last year our models have done well," says Patric with a twinkle of pride. During 2014 Bintang models have graced the front cover of Eye Magazine and New Zealand Best Dining Magazine as well as the catwalks of New Zealand Fashion Week, Whitecliffe College fashion show, a catwalk presentation at The Galleria for the Beauty Book launch. "As well as various talent placements working in TV commercials and other productions one of our models also appeared in an international event in the French Riviera - the Wella Trend Vision in Monaco. Victoria modelled the hair style that scooped up the bronze award," explains Patric. “And this year we are looking for new faces," Patric says. "People with an interest in fashion modelling - we are looking for females who are at least 174cm tall and males who are at least 182cm tall." Successful models will get the chance to work in Asia on a three-month contract basis and Patric is about to make the trip over to ensure the best working environment for the models. "It's a very new and exciting opportunity for our agency, Bintang Models," says Patric. Contact Patric Seng via email and follow the agency on Instagram and Facebook @ BintangModels. (PN) BINTANG MODELS, E: info@bintangmodels.com, M: 021 1300 182, www.bintangmodels.com Pictured: Ali@BintangModels - this year the agency is looking for new faces

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FASHION + STYLE THE GEMSTONE FOR FEBRUARY Donna Mills, owner of Jewels and Gems introduces us to the qualities of Boji stones, or pop rocks (pyrite balls).

PRETTY WENDY HOUSE DESIGNED BY DAME TRELISE COOPER, THE PRETTY WENDY HOUSE HAS BEEN SPECIALLY created to help raise money to find a cure for breast cancer and at the same time, raise awareness about this life-threatening condition. The Pretty Wendy House makes a wonderful gift for the special girl in your life, at the same time raising important funds that will help protect our next generation of women against breast cancer. Available to purchase from Harcourts, the Pretty Wendy House has an RRP of $139 and all proceeds will be donated to Breast Cancer Cure. But as with any real estate, you had best act fast as the houses are part of a limited edition line. F PN www.breastcancercure.org.nz

Most of the information comes from the scientifically conducted trials of German stone specialist Michael Gienger. At Jewels & Gems we have chosen the Boji for Valentine’s Day because these little stones are couples. There is a male and a female one and together they make energy flow. Male and female are the two primary creative forces from which everything in the universe has been engendered and they are both in all of us. Whether you have a Valentine or not, or whatever gender you are, these stones help us to achieve that balance within ourselves and get the energy flowing. Just like us, each individual Boji has an electro magnetic energy with a negative and positive side, like a little battery. We could also talk about it in terms of left brain right brain, the analytical coming into harmony with the intuitive side of our brain. The list of things this could help with is as long as your imagination. At the Jewels & Gems shop we have given them to couples wanting to conceive, people writing books, any situation where energy needs help to flow and create. The ‘male’ stones are rough and studded with ridges and the ‘female’ are smooth and outnumber the males. Sorry fellas. Boji’s are as old as the world itself, they grow among fossils and petrified bones and emerge from the muddy ground during the rainy season, on stone stalks, surrounded by little mounds of earth like nests. The land where they are found is the base of a natural earth pyramid, several stories high. It is almost directly at the epicenter of North America, in Kansas! Oh Dorothy, take us to the Emerald City! Sadly, they are becoming extinct and there is no other known source of them on the Earth. Gienger says they intensify emotions and moods, help recognise inhibiting patterns and are good for preventative health care; painlessly dissipate mild blockages and make us conscious of more severe ones; promote cleansing and excretion. All of these things are about energy flow. Little black balls of wriggly life. Your very own Toto! F PN JEWELS AND GEMS, 54 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 378 4389 www.jewelsandgems.co.nz

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A DARKER EDEN: FASHION FROM DUNEDIN Aucklanders will have an opportunity to explore the dark side of Dunedin fashion as 25 designers prepare to exhibit at Silo Six Gallery from 13 February to 1 March. Presented by the Otago Polytechnic School of Design and the New Zealand Fashion Museum, and hosted by Waterfront Auckland, the exhibition - A Darker Eden: Fashion from DUNEDIN - examines and celebrates the creative context unique to Dunedin. The 13-day exhibition will include established and emerging Dunedin fashion designers including NOM*d, Mild Red, Tanya Carlson, Company of Strangers and twentysevennames. With entry by koha, over 50 garments will be presented, including a gallery specifically curated for Dunedin’s iconic iD Fashion Week and highlights from Otago Polytechnic’s Fashion graduates. F PN

photography: Laura Bennett

photography: Dylan McCutcheon-Peat

A DARKER EDEN: FASHION FROM DUNEDIN www.nzfashionmuseum.org.nz

Designer - Duncan Chambers - Watson, model - Abram Hunter at AliMcD agency

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Designer - Kelsi Bennett, models - Alana and Gussie

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FASHION + STYLE ALEX PERRY: HIGH END FASHION AND REALITY TV COLLIDE Alex Perry is one of Australia’s best-known contemporary fashion designers and presenter of Australia’s Next Top Model. Perry travelled to New Zealand late last year to showcase his latest range of designer eyewear for Specsavers. Ponsonby News chatted with the charismatic and personable designer, who shared a glimpse into the unusual space where the worlds of high fashion, reality TV and eyewear design collide. How did you come to be involved in designing eyewear? Specsavers asked me! I’ve worn glasses since I was five. The first glasses I ever had were a bit Buddy Holly, but when I was six it wasn’t cool, they were just ugly glasses. I have an obsession with sunglasses and I thought it would be fantastic if we could provide really great fashion eyewear at a price people could actually access. Making them look great was obviously high on my priority list. How do you bring your design process down to such a small canvas? The design process is always similar - it’s about the fabrics you use, the colours, style, shape - but at first I wasn’t aware of what was possible; my first season with Specsavers was a learning one as you can literally do anything. I identify certain shapes that I like, or the feel of something - like for this range there was this beautiful zebra acetate that I’d seen when I was away. I love the idea of having it on the inside of the glasses so when you take them off the hidden detail is revealed, like a beautiful lining in a jacket. I use iconic references loosely. I’ll look at things and I’ll say “these are a little bit Marilyn Monroe-esque” but I think that when you start taking a reference too literally it starts looking costume-y. You can have a nod to something, but don’t want it too obvious. How do you merge the worlds of high end fashion design and reality TV? What I tried to do was to bridge the gap. With [Australia’s Next] Top Model, it’s the transformative component that I love and that’s like fashion, it’s about transforming people too. You don’t walk around in couture every day, but when you do you want to feel special and great, and on Top Model we take a regular girl and then three months later she’s walking [Louis] Vuitton. I love that, and you can do it with integrity. I’m about to start doing Asia’s Next Top Model as well which goes to 120 million homes. They may not know who Alex Perry is now, but they will know him in six months time. So you utilise those opportunities with integrity to do great stuff. How does the ‘Alex Perry woman’ wear her eyewear? She loves them and she’s confident with them and she wears them with everything. The Alex Perry girl buys things on the way that they look, not on the perception of them. We saw some Karen Walker glasses the other day and I bought them despite the fact that they were from another brand, I just liked the way they look. I think that’s how girls should buy things. The Alex Perry man is new... I’ve done things that I love to wear - the aviators that I want to wear, the reading glasses that I want to wear, the colours that I want to wear. Who’s the ultimate Alex Perry woman? My wife is my ultimate - she’s the one I always refer to on things. Otherwise, it’s a toss -up between Megan Gale, Sarah Murdoch, Miranda Kerr and Jennifer Hawkins. They are really regular normal nice girls - I know that sounds a bit trite but they are - who are able to transform themselves into these Glamazons. I’m really fortunate that I know them in their jeans and tee shirts and we just hang out. Is there a New Zealand Alex Perry woman? One of my best friends was Charlotte Dawson and for me she was like the quintessential New Zealand woman - funny and long-legged. I think that Australians and New Zealanders are like cousins, we’re the same really. And the Maori women in New Zealand are gorgeous. F PN

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FASHION + STYLE ART CURATES FASHION: COCURATA Watch out for hot new label Cocurata, launching at Workshop and Black Box at the beginning of March. The brainchild of George Gorrow, co-founder of Ksubi, and George Benias, a New York-based curator, the brand is: “a multi-disciplinary art platform and fashion label designed to commercially showcase and exhibit artists - and their artwork - beyond the parameters and restrictions of a traditional gallery model.” Founders Gorrow and Benias aim to create pieces that would be equally at home in a gallery as they would be in a fashion boutique. Cocurata was created in reaction to the myriad brands ‘collaborating’ on collections with contemporary artists in a tokenistic fashion. Gorrow and Benias envisage a direct

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exchange between artist and artisan that results in artwork and collections that stand alone in a gallery and boutique alike: “art curating fashion. Not the other way around.” Cocurata's inaugural collection, Extraction, includes high end street pieces for men and women with artists including Paul Insect - Banksy’s long term assistant. F PN BLACK BOX, 35b Surrey Crescent, Grey Lynn, T: 09 378 0073 www.blackboxboutique.co.nz WORKSHOP, 74 Mackelvie Street, Ponsonby, T: 09 361 3727 www.workshop.co.nz

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FASHION + STYLE: JULIE ROULSTON

Ponsonby Valentines Are you going to buy a gift this Valentine’s Day (Saturday 14 February)? In our book, it doesn’t have to be expensive (see Trelise Cooper’s very affordable ring and the witty Butter London nail polishes below) but it does have to be thoughtful. Buy stylishly and well, for your Valentine to own for a long time.

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1. Stolen Girlfriends Club ‘Band of Hearts’ ring $149 2. Trelise Cooper ‘Petit Fleurs’ ring $40 3. Bird & Knoll scarf - the Joli Carousel in Paris $325 4. Butter London ‘Saucy Jack’ nail polish (‘Come to Bed Red’ also available!) $29.95 5. Stolen Girlfriends ‘Heart Bones’ pendant $204 6. Karen Walker Jewellery Mood pendant $2479 7. Karen Walker Jewellery ‘Rock Garden’ ring $1449 8. Lonely Lingerie ‘Lulu’ strap bra and brief, $109 and $69 9. Standard Issue ‘Cashmere Ribbon’ cardi $528 10. Chaos & Harmony ‘Enlighten’ heel $349 11. Meadowlark ‘Double Swallow’ necklace $485 12. Lonely Lounge strap romper $285, Lonely Lounge long robe $340 13. Meadowlark ‘Heart Cocktail’ ring $419

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WHERE TO BUY Bird & Knoll @ Simon James Design Butter London @ Tessuti, Macy Home Chaos & Harmony @ Blak Chaos Karen Walker www.karenwalker.com Lonely Lingerie/Lonely Lounge www.lonelylabel.com Meadowlark @ Superette Standard Issue @ State of Grace Stolen Girlfriends Club www.stolengirlfriendsclub.com Trelise Cooper www.trelisecooperonline.com

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ANGELA LASSIG: LETTERS FROM MAUDIE The monthly jottings of a free-spirited Ponsonby dressmaker of the 1920s, as imagined by Angela Lassig. VERMONT STREET, PONSONBY 15 FEBRUARY 1925

Dearest Aunt Thora, Dearest Aunt Bertha,

Thank you very much for the bank draft, which I was so very delighted to receive last week. What sweet and generous Great Aunts I have! Its arrival has coincided with the death of my old coal range that I will now be able to replace with a modern gas stove. What a joy that will be! No more threatening flue fires or wayward downdrafts filling the house with smoke! Mother has just had one installed and although she doesn’t do much cooking these days she has found it to be so much faster and so much more convenient, especially for boiling the kettle. Which reminds me that I’m going to have to find another way of making my tea until the new stove is installed. I might have to buy a Thermos flask and beg the neighbours to let me fill it at their house each morning. If I ration myself it might just last until the afternoon. An even better idea though would be to ask my George if he would lend me his little Primus camping stove. His parents gave him a charming red and white striped canvas beach tent and the Primus stove for Christmas as we are spending most Saturdays of this glorious summer going for day trips on the harbour. This Saturday we are taking the steamer to Kawau Island. Last week we took the ferry to the volcanic Rangitoto Island, which you would find most fascinating Aunt Thora, with your passion for geology. I have enclosed a small map of the Waitemata Harbour, which I have marked in red with the course and dates of this summer’s travels. When not jaunting around the harbour and spending hours searching for the perfect picnic site, my leisure time is spent mostly in the garden which at long last is looking very pretty. After the front garden was partially destroyed with the building of my little workroom, I spent a whole week in late December - with George assisting with the heavy labour - trying to get it looking respectable. Because it was so late in the season, after putting back the roses (that I had lifted earlier), I simply scattered a variety of flower seeds that have all come up nicely! I like the effect so much that I might do the same next summer! You will be pleased to know Aunt Bertha that I have established a fernery! Every time a see a new variety of fern on our outings, I bring back an example for the garden. I’ve laid it out down the side of the house, behind the workroom, using our native ponga logs for the borders. Thanks to the neighbour’s huge overhanging pohutakawa, I have a most pleasant little cool nook to which I can retreat during the day when the heat becomes too unbearable in the workroom. It’s quite impossible to sit there after dusk though as at that time it becomes a popular meeting place for Ponsonby’s mosquito population!

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I enclose some photographic prints of the garden taken by Mother on her new Kodak Brownie camera that Father gave her for Christmas. No doubt she has already sent you a package of prints? She has the camera with her wherever she goes and the novelty shows no sign of wearing off anytime soon! Her very first photographs were of Tiger and Pusskins who, to my amusement, appear headless in every single print! I’m pleased to say that Mother has greatly improved her technique since then. I must say that the Kodak has been most useful for taking a record of my costumes when I’ve completed them. I am thinking about creating an album of photographs of finished garments to show prospective customers when they come in to discuss a gown. Much better to show a finished example than a sketch or a fashion plate in a magazine, don’t you think? George tells me he has seen little sets of special stains that one can use to colour the photographs. If they’re not too expensive I might buy one. With the weather being so relentlessly fine and hot, I have been overrun with orders from my regulars seeking simple, cool afternoon frocks suitable for garden parties and picnics. After experiencing a rather cold spring and cool early summer, most of my regulars were quite restrained with their orders, anticipating a quieter social season. I think this late burst of sunny weather has taken everyone by surprise. While I welcome the extra business, as do my milliner friends who love the additional orders for matching hats, I anticipate that I will have to give up some of my weekends in order to complete the orders. Before I close I must tell you about an enchanting garden party that I went to last week with George and his parents. It was at a large villa belonging to one of George’s father’s friends and had the most magnificent garden that bordered with Point Erin Park. The trees were strung with lanterns and they had a little band that played dance tunes in a pagoda. I wore a raspberry red straight sleeveless silk dress with little gathers at the hips held in place with matching stylized roses. George looked dapper in a cream linen suit and we had a lovely evening. I only mention this to you as I thought I heard a little whisper while I was passing George’s mother on the way to get us a glass of lemon squash - something about George, something about me, and possibly the word ‘engagement’! I shall keep you informed of any further whisperings, or better still, announcements! illustration: Michael McClintock

I do hope that this letter finds you both in splendid health and keeping toasty warm... I believe that you are having a very, very cold winter! Although we are experiencing a most wonderful summer, I think I would be just as happy curled up on the window-seat in the library of your darling house, wrapped up in a shawl and looking out at the myriad of fishing boats coming and going. Aunt Cissy has such vivid memories of Penzance that I feel as if they are my own! Perhaps one day I will be able to make my way over to see you both.

With warmest wishes, Your ever-loving niece,

Maudie xx

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HELENE RAVLICH: NATURAL BEAUTY

A new year means great skin I love discovering a new beauty haven close to home, and My Beauty Room is quite literally a hop, skip and a jump from my front door. It’s also helmed by one heck of a great beauty therapist in the form of petite blonde powerhouse, Nicky Watkins. Nicky opened up shop at the front of her home under the name Bali Spa nine years ago, closing when her second daughter Isla was born just over five years ago. Now, with Isla at school, the talented therapist has thrown herself back into the business of beauty, re-opening as My Beauty Room last year. “I had about 200 clients that I sold on when I decided to go part time,” she explains, “then last year I realised that I had just got really bored and wanted to get back in the skincare business. I started up again and word of mouth has meant that I’m getting busier, which is great.” The skincare brands she works with are Environ - which she has worked with for over 15 years - and Osmosis, which is my personal skincare brand of choice. “I had noticed a lot of girlfriends’ skin change so much after they started using Osmosis,” she says, “and it was so good just to learn about a new range and get passionate about something again. When I look for a skincare range I don’t want anything superficial, I want something that is going to penetrate and actually make a real difference with quantifiable results, and Osmosis and Environ both do that.” As well as a killer line in facials (believe me, an hour with her made a huge difference to my skin) she also specialises in Brazilian waxing. “I lived in Italy for six years and learnt the art of Brazilian waxing while I was there,” says Watkins, “and they are pretty much my specialty now, alongside facials.” She also takes care of eyebrows and lash tinting, but not manicures and pedicures due to the proliferation of nail bars in the area that are pretty much impossible to compete with. When asked for her most popular treatment she immediately names Osmosis’ vitamin A infusion, which has been called a “revolutionary facial treatment” by both professional therapists and the press. Vitamin A is the best anti-aging ingredient currently known for the skin, and the United States brand has become renowned for harnessing the properties of the most active, least irritating form: retinaldehyde. The Osmosis Facial Infusion has 2% Retinaldehyde present (the highest amount available anywhere in the world) and is the only non-acid peel that will infuse the dermis with fibroblast stimulators, immune boosters, antioxidants, pigment lighteners, and calming anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial ingredients. It rejuvenates the skin by increasing collagen production, fighting free radical damage, scavenging scar tissue and helping reduce hyperpigmentation, whilst your natural cellular turnover is also gradually increased - amazing. Skin thickens and becomes stronger and healthier - as opposed to thinning - with age, and the intense collagen and elastin stimulation that it delivers into your skin continues for a full 30 days. Book in for one with Nicky now - it comes highly recommended.

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At the other end of the Ponsonby ‘hood is About Face, a beauty mecca at 18 Jervois Road. About Face has always had the mantra “great looking skin for a lifetime, without extreme measures”, and the brand has long been associated with serious solutions for skin with over 29 years of experience in this industry. The Ponsonby location is one of seven Nicky Watkins of My Beauty Room Auckland-wide skin clinics owned by brother and sister team Paul and Marianna Glucina. Their clinics have won numerous best service and quality awards, yet still have the boutique approach you usually only find in smaller family-owned business. I love that, and always find the experience of popping into a small outfit much more user-friendly than big clinics where you feel more akin to a number (or a generously-sized bill). As well as the likes of two state-of-the-art skin rejuvenation lasers, they offer the Power of Three facial, which I was lucky enough to try just prior to Christmas. I went in with skin well in need of some TLC and came out with that often-mentioned ‘glow’, but one that lasted well into the next week. So what does this little wonder entail? Called the “ultimate quick fix in a hurry”, Power of Three combines the anti-aging benefits of microdermabrasion or a peel (to clear away dead skin cells, revealing fresh skin), Omnilux Light Therapy (to stimulate collagen) and a Vitamin Infusion with Sonophoresis to plump up your wrinkles with a deep infusion of vitamins A and C. By combining these three powerful treatments they deliver faster, more intense results than if you did them separately. It costs $259 and in all honesty, a facial probably doesn’t get much more high-tech than this, unless the likes of lasers get involved. Red light (found in Omnilux machines) has long been used in medicine, but its effectiveness as a skin rejuvenator wasn’t discovered until British researchers started trialling it as a way of killing melanoma cells. While it didn’t cure the cancer, it did stimulate cell and tissue regeneration, which is what you want if you’re in the market for plumper looking skin. Red light is widely recognised for its ability to stimulate collagen production, minimise fine lines and help skin to heal itself, and when combined with exfoliation beforehand and sonophoresis, your skin can PN do nothing but look simply amazing post-treatment. Love that. (HELENE RAVLICH) F MY BEAUTY ROOM, 3 Leighton Street, T: 09 376 1789 or M: 021 420 00. ABOUT FACE, 18 Jervois Road, T: 09 378 4140, www.aboutface.co.nz

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HELENE RAVLICH: NATURAL BEAUTY

Beauty: make friends with a faux glow I’m a confessed connoisseur of the faux glow and have tried pretty much every formulation out there - with varying degrees of success. It is still the safest tan out there for tanning at any time of year, and with New Zealand skin cancer rates constantly on the rise it’s time to pick a formula that works for you rather than baking under what are some pretty damn dangerous rays.

tone, prevent the visible signs of aging and protect the skin all while delivering a gradual golden glow. It’s also scented with what they call “delicious summer fruits”, so there are no tell tale signs of tanning, just a fresh, yummy scent.

At the moment my absolute favourite spray tan is St Tropez’s Rapid Tan formula as applied by the wonderful Bianka from Mollie’s Spa in Auckland, and I’m always on the lookout for anything new that the global tanning brand has on offer. The latest I’ve heard about is their Self Tan Sensitive range, which is specially formulated to be gentle on skin without compromising performance. The genius yet gentle range has been designed with the more sensitive skins in mind, using natural-based ingredients that won’t irritate the skin. As someone who ticks the ‘sensitive’ box more often than not this is a major revelation - and well worth the wait.

One product I make sure to pack when I travel is Kate Somerville’s Somerville360° Tanning Towelettes. The creator and director of her own renowned skincare clinic on Melrose in Los Angeles, Kate Somerville has devoted her life to creating flawless faces. Every product in her range began life in her clinic, including the Towelettes, which contain a paraben-free self-tanning formula to give you a quick and even application with no streaking. Incredibly easy to use and perfect for travel as they come individually sealed - no need to stress about bottles or tubes busting out en route - each Towelette is concentrated with a self-tanning formula to give you a quick and even application. The brand is available at Mecca Cosmetica, who also stock Somerville’s self tanning pads formulated especially for the face.

Hypoallergenic and dermatologically tested, it also has no added colours - meaning there’s no residue on towels, sheets or clothing. It also includes several options like the Self Tan Sensitive Bronzing Face - specially created for the delicate skin on the face and infused with a “gentle iridescence”, Grape and Blackcurrant Seed Oil, Pomegranate and melon extract and the Self Tan Sensitive Bronzing Mousse, which is a lightweight nourishing mousse that easily absorbs into the skin to match the user’s skin tone. It’s a great range to recommend to first-time tanners who want a fool-proof and subtle -looking colour, and can be used up to three times a week for a really golden glow.

Last up, I’d like to give a shout out to a product I’ve recently discovered by Xen Tan. Elle UK said of Xen Tan’s Transform Luxe: “it is one of the easiest gradual tanners to apply - it won’t streak and it smells remarkably good too,” which is no faint praise. Were they right? You bet, and I have fallen totally head over heels for the product. The luxurious lotion goes on clear and develops into a wonderfully natural-looking tan after just a couple of applications - and boy, they last and last. As well as a gradual tanner it’s an ideal ‘tan extender’ that can be used in between tanning with any of Xen-Tan’s other professional products, which I haven’t tried as yet but am gagging to now.

If you’re as rubbish at applying self-tanners as I was when I first made a foray into the faux, then it’s high time you made a gradual tan your friend - the best of the bunch are pretty much foolproof, and great for your skin to boot. One of my favourite gradual tanners is by Australian beauty brand ModelCo, who signed up model-of -the-moment Rosie Huntington-Whitely as their spokesbody and make cracking good formulas. They are a brand known for high performance, no-nonsense, innovative products, and ModelCo’s Gradual Tan is an everyday triple action self-tanning moisturiser for all skin types that acts as a self-tanner, tan extender and moisturiser all in one, allowing you to build or prolong a natural-looking, streak free tan gradually and easily. It helps to improve and even out skin

It is a great transitional product from winter to spring too, as it’s packed with nourishing moisturisers for skin that’s deeply dehydrated after being bundled up in woollens for a few months. It’s suitable for all skin types for those who prefer to build their tan gradually, and the fact that it’s refreshingly paraben free means that it is ideal for face and body use. Bonus! And as with so many of their products it comes with a wonderful scent of fresh vanilla - not the ‘wet dog’ smell that so many faux glow products come part and parcel with. To use just apply in a circular motion, blending evenly onto your skin. Wash your hands after application with soap and water and wait three hours before showering PN or swimming... Et voila! Great, glowy skin. (HELENE RAVLICH) F

SMOKEFREE AOTEAROA 2025 - WILL YOU BE SMOKEFREE IN 10 YEARS TIME? The goal of a Smokefree Aotearoa 2025, whereby less than five per cent of the population smokes, is just 10 years away. In the last 10 years, Quitline has supported almost half a million New Zealanders to quit smoking and the organisation plans to help even more over the next decade. Quitline estimates that a pack-a-day smoker who quits smoking today will have saved $67,890 by 2025 and this does not even account for tax increases. By 2025 the same person will also have dramatically reduced his or her risk of developing life-threatening cancer of the mouth, throat, oesophagus or lung. Quitline CEO Paula Snowden explains: “Every hour, day, week, month and year that you go without smoking, your health will improve. When you quit, your body starts to repair itself straightaway. Within eight hours your heartbeat slows down to normal, and your blood pressure goes down. The carbon monoxide is out of your system within a day and your lungs work better.

“Quitting is a fantastic thing to do at any age - you’ll live longer and your quality of life will improve. We know children of smokers are seven times more likely to become smokers themselves so you’ll also be setting a great example for your kids and grandchildren.” Quitline phone lines (0800 778 778) are open from 8.00am - 9.30pm on New Year’s Day and Advisers (most of whom are former smokers) are ready to talk to anyone who wants to chat about quitting. Quitline also says that the Government needs to do more to support people to quit. “We know that tax increases work to prompt quitting and we need to keep introducing them in a way that hits the tobacco industry in their back pocket. Plain packaging has proven to work in Australia and we should introduce that in New Zealand, sooner rather than later. Finally, we need to hold the industry accountable and implement measures to control supply such as a register for tobacco retailers. F PN

“Within five years your risk of cancers of the mouth, throat and oesophagus is half that of a person who continues to smoke and within 10 years your risk of lung cancer is less than half that of a person who continues to smoke.

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HELENE RAVLICH: NATURAL BEAUTY

The Enrich approach to clean, natural beautiful living Last year when I was desperately in need of a massage (honestly, who isn’t?) I discovered the work of the wonderful Olivia Van Lierop. An absolute gem of a therapist who works conveniently out of Jervois Road haven Enrich Massage Therapy, Olivia had just arrived back in New Zealand when we met after nine years working internationally as a sports masseuse working with top athletes in Australia and on yachts in Europe. At one point she held the position of private masseuse, beautician and yoga instructor on one of the most prestigious luxury yachts in the world, and her experience - and caring approach - speaks for itself. Looking for further challenges she travelled to many beautiful parts of the world, completing her yoga teacher training in Bali and then returning to New Zealand, where she has combined her talents to establish Enrich. She incorporates both a therapeutic and pampering aspect into almost every massage that she does, even sending some clients away with yoga poses to practice to keep their bodies in check. Moving only a couple of months after she established her practice to a larger space in the spacious villa at 37 Jervois Road, she also now offers private yoga sessions to clients who are keen to see real change in their lives. She is keen to establish a community of sorts around her wellness modus operandi, which she says is founded on a “connection with nature through ancient forms of living and healing through yoga and massage... I’m not talking about going backwards, I’m talking about creating a fusion between modern knowledge and ancient wisdom.” She stresses that this leads on to yoga, which at Enrich is another way to connect to nature. “Through movement and asanas we start to connect to that inner child that is happy,” says the vivacious brunette, “bringing us back to simple happiness, connection with ourselves, our bodies and with people and nature around us. At Enrich I am teaching private yoga classes for those wanting to learn more about yoga, to get back into yoga and to make the leap to bigger classes... every client is so different.” She says it is also for people wanting to create a personal practice so they can practise safely at home, an idea that I think is an absolute winner given how busy the average person is and the answer that yoga can be to their problem. “Just a 10 minute practice at home that you can repeat every day can make a huge difference to your life,” says Olivia, who has some clients that come to her for yoga twice a week whilst others check in once every couple of months to change their sequence. She tells me that she would like to begin teaching large classes again and wants to make this more accessible to people by creating affordable yoga classes. “This is in the pipeline but I don’t have the space for it at the moment,” she says, “but while the weather is being so kind to us I have been exploring the idea of holding classes in Victoria Park. It’s definitely a case of watch this space!” She says that yoga in the open air is a direct way of connecting back to nature and keeping fit and healthy, and she also planning to work on some retreats at a beautiful venue in Raglan. “I’m thinking of offering everything from nature hikes to trail runs and surfing,” she says with a smile, “just an opportunity to get out in the fresh air and re-charge.”

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But back to massage, which is truly focused on “creating a connectedness that we are losing a little in the city. Positive touch - a hug, a pat on the back or holding hands - is one of the simplest forms of feeling healthy. It causes the release of chemicals in the body that ease pain and create a feeling of happiness”. By increasing blood flow to the muscles, massage also supplies oxygen, nutrients and white blood cells to clean up waste products, whilst breaking down adhesions or scar tissue caused by injuries to the muscle and realigning muscle fibres to create a stronger, more flexible muscle. Relaxation is also essential to the massage experience, making it much more than an added bonus. “The altered levels of stress chemicals so common in modern city life have been linked to slow healing, loss of libido, loss of memory, depression, despair and a decline in physical performance,” says Olivia, whilst the disturbed sleep often caused by heightened stress levels also contributes to slow healing and sensitivity of tissues. “It is not only the relaxation aspects but the nurturing aspect that massage provides - feeling supported and appreciated is proven to shift people into the state where healing, nourishment of tissues and replenishment of overall health can occur.” F PN Hallelujah to that I say - and here’s to regular massage in 2015. (HELENE RAVLICH) ENRICH PONSONBY, 37 Jervois Road. M: 021 822 184 www.enrichmassageponsonby.co.nz

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING FREE FRUIT TREES FOR AUCKLAND REGISTER NOW! The Mt Eden Village People community group are providing 1000 free fruit trees for Auckland in 2015. The Fruit Trees for Auckland project is focused on helping children gain a greater understanding of the importance of eating fresh, unsprayed fruit and locally sourced produce. Schools, early childhood centres and community gardens are encouraged to register on the Fruit Trees for Auckland website by 15 June 2015: www.fruittrees.org.nz/signup Individuals who would like to plant a fruit tree on the grass verge in front of their house are also encouraged to register for a free fruit tree on the website. “We had around 300 schools and early childhood centres planting fruit trees with us in 2013. We are delighted that we have received funding from the New Zealand Lottery Board so we can continue our work and support the vision of free fruit for Aucklanders,� says Judith Holtebrinck, Fruit Trees for Auckland coordinator. The Fruit Trees for Auckland project started in 2006 as part of the worldwide Transition Town movement and since then the group has run this as an annual event. Due to a lack of funding Fruit Trees for Auckland was unable to run the project in 2014. Donations towards this project are welcome. F PN For further information: www.fruittrees.org.nz or contact Judith Holtebrinck: T: 022 020 3126, E: Judith@mountedenvillagepeople.co.nz

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING WORLD’S HOTTEST WORKOUT LAUNCHES IN PONSONBY XTEND BARRE®, THE REVOLUTIONARY FITNESS METHOD THAT USES A TRADITIONAL ballet barre to provide a full body workout, has launched their first free-standing exclusively branded Xtend Barre® studio in Ponsonby. The demand for an Xtend Barre® studio has grown ever since classes were introduced at Viv Gallagher’s Newmarket Studio3 in 2013 leading Viv to open this Xtend barre studio. Viv has an extensive dance, pilates and fitness background. “It’s such a powerful workout that sculpts, strengthens and motivates our clients, the transformation in our regular clients is so rewarding,” says Viv. Xtend Barre fuses elements of dance, ballet and pilates to create an adrenaline-fuelled workout that strengthens, lengthens and chisels the body. Each class features an elegant yet energetic combination of movements that enhances flexibility, improves balance and challenges the core. Barre is just the beginning of the programmes on offer.

ECO STORE - GREEN CLEAN BASICS KIT On sale this month $31.92 A handy assortment of healthier cleaning goodies with ecostore. All packed in a handy bucket made from recycled plastic, the ecostore Green Clean Basics Kit contains: • Dishwash Liquid Lemon 500ml • Dish scrubber • Bathroom and Shower Cleaner 500ml • Glass and Surface Cleaner 500ml • Toilet Cleaner 500ml • Laundry Powder Lemon 500g • Coconut Soap 80g • Lemongrass Soap 80g Ecostore, 1 Scotland Street, Freemans Bay, T: 09 360 8477 PN shop online www.ecostoredirect.co.nz F

Xtend Barre Stick: A stick apparatus adds resistance to Xtend Barre’s signature moves to chisel and sculpt the body. Xtend Barre Fusion: An intense and invigorating floor barre class based on pilates fundamentals. Xtend Babies On Board: this postnatal barre class designed to give new mums a dynamic workout with their babies in class with them. Xtend Suspend: incorporates new techniques and choreography with suspension training to challenge your body. Xtend Classes are geared to challenge bodies of any age, gender or fitness background. Exercises can be modified for beginners, prenatal clients or clients with injuries, but can PN also be amplified for advanced clients that are looking for an extreme challenge. F XTEND BARRE, Level 1/56 Surrey Crescent, www.xtendbarreworkout.com/studio/xtend-barre-ponsonby/

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CLARE CALDWELL: THE ART OF LIVING

Have you ever felt unseen for who you truly are? Did your parents (who maybe never knew who they were) ever try to cast you into some projected role and identity of who they thought you were? In her book, ‘Do You Sometimes Feel Invisible?’ Margaret Paul PhD says she grew up feeling invisible. Her parents “couldn’t see the magnificent beauty within them or within me. Instead they projected onto me a distorted view of themselves, believing I was just a smaller version of their own woundedness.”

aggressive, jealous, greedy and even evil within us all. Denying the totality of ourselves leaves us superficial. The way to the light is through this darkness into healing and transformation. It is this entirety of being that connects us to the Divine. (CLARE CALDWELL) F PN

If they couldn’t see themselves, how could they see her? By feeling invisible to themselves they in turn tried to make her feel invisible.

Clare (Claudie) Caldwell is a creative arts therapist who runs a small private practice from home. She is voluntary team leader of creative arts as therapy at Mercy Hospice Auckland, College Hill, where she has worked for the last 10 years. She is also a freelance artist.

Many people get trapped into thinking they are their looks or their achievements. In celebrity culture it’s particularly dangerous as people fall victim to believing the hype that surrounds them and move further and further away into disconnection from who they truly are.

Enquiries: T: 09 836 3618; M: 021 293 3171; clare.e.caldwell@gmail.com

Other areas of invisibility where people feel passed over, unseen or unheard are in the workplace and relationships with friends and partners as well as within families. It can also happen in retirement where people become isolated and lost, if their work has defined who they think they are. It can be a frightening, lonely and confusing place to be and the great tragedy is if people acquiesce to others’ viewpoints of who they are, they can become invisible to themselves. So how do we find out who we really are? Challenging stuff! According to Paul, there are five basic steps. Firstly, we must cease defining ourselves within the wounds inflicted from childhood. Most of us have these and they come from teachers, family, peer groups, professionals and the media. Secondly, “re-programme our vision of ourselves” and align with the truth of who we really are: our higher selves. Thirdly, as we begin to see ourselves through the eyes of our higher selves, we see the “beautiful, magnificent, individualised expression of the Divine, living in our earthly bodies.” Fourthly, we begin more and more to see ourselves not as the wounded self, but as the truth and beauty of our I am-ness, thus stop being invisible to ourselves. Finally, people tend to ‘reflect back to us, how we see ourselves,’ so the more we connect to our true soul selves, the more visible we’ll be to ourselves and others. I’d also add, as part of this journey to reach authenticity and wholeness in relationship with ourselves and others and deepen our spirituality, we must have the courage to integrate our shadow. Focusing solely on the light evades that which is shameful,

WOMEN'S OUTDOOR PURSUIT INTRODUCTORY COURSE If you enjoy the bush and would like to improve or refresh your skills in the outdoors, then join our Women’s Outdoor Pursuit introductory course running on Saturday 7 and Saturday 14 March 2015. Open to women of all ages. Experienced trampers or beginners are welcome. Visit www.wops.co.nz for information or ring Anne on T: 09 480 5424. F PN

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JUNEBUG WAX & LASH ADDS NEW CUTTING-EDGE TREATMENTS TO ITS SPECIALIST MENU VOLUME LASHES GIVE BEAUTIFUL FULLNESS, NO MATTER HOW SPARSE OR LUSH your natural lashes are. Applied in hand-formed fans to a single natural lash, these lashes are lightweight and safe when applied correctly - that means full, soft and sultry lashes are available to almost anyone!

until the desired shape, thickness and style is achieved. In a single appointment Junebug can create the dreamiest brows just for you.

Rectifeye Eyebrow Extensions are the most exciting treatment added to the menu, the treatment allows the restoration, or even creation, of a brand new brow if fullness or evenness has been lost due to health reasons (or 90s-style over plucking). Fine synthetic hairs are individually applied to either the eyebrow hair or directly to the skin

JUNEBUG WAX & LASH, L2 4 Ponsonby Road, M: 021 0845 1879, www.junebug.co.nz

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LIVIING, THINKING + BEING

DYLAN WILLIAMS AT SHOUT HAIR Shout Hair is thrilled to announce the arrival of Dylan Williams. With a background in barbering, Dylan has since embarked on a career in women’s hairdressing. Although skilled in all aspects of colour and styling, Dylan’s strength lies in his men’s hair work, which is well priced at $45.00. F PN Book now at: team@shouthair.co.nz. SHOUT HAIR, 386 Richmond Road, Grey Lynn, T: 09 376 6534

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JOHN APPLETON: ON HEALTH

Coenzyme Q10 - why don’t we just try it? IN MY ARTICLE PRIOR TO CHRISTMAS I WROTE ABOUT the issues associated with ignoring evidence of safe and potentially effective options for treating chronic illnesses. Over the holiday period I have read dozens of new studies where natural health products have been tested and one in particular is worthy of mention.

on the study say that, “despite these remarkable results several limitations of the trial should be considered”. They are calling for a more ‘robust’ study and larger trials with patients who are optimally medicated. They claim that during the Q-Symbio trial participants had “sub-optimal drug dosing”.

In 2003 a group of eminent scientists and doctors from several countries set out to produce evidence that a simple nutrient that is essential for all life on earth could be used to help patients suffering from heart failure. The nutrient they were testing was coenzyme Q10, or CoQ10, which as it happens is one of the most widely used dietary supplements around the world.

Over the past 15 years new treatments for heart failure have been scarce and the raft of drugs currently used are administered to block rather than enhance cellular processes. If we look at heart failure as an energy starved heart, i.e. the heart is not capable of performing its primary function as a circulatory pump because it is not able to produce the energy required, it makes a lot of sense to me that any intervention to improve the situation should be targeting the area of science which is known as bioenergetics. Coenzyme Q10 is the king of bioenergetics with a vital role to play in facilitating the production of adenosine triphosphate, or ATP, which is the fuel used by our cells to create energy. So why aren’t we doing this? Although it seems to be a no brainer; when a totally safe natural substance comes up against very profitable pharmaceuticals it will always be difficult.

The study, which ran for eight years, was known as the Q-Symbio trial, a randomised double blind trial involving 16 centres worldwide. I have met some of the investigators including Franklin Rosenfeldt, who is a cardio thoracic surgeon from Australia and Professor Gian Paolo Littarru, a renowned scientist from Ancona University in Italy. The trial investigators concluded that “long term CoQ10 treatment of patients with chronic heart failure is safe, improves symptoms and reduces major adverse cardiovascular events”. After two years a large and significant reduction in major adverse cardiovascular events was observed. Treatment with CoQ10 was also associated with significantly lower rates of hospitalisation, cardiovascular mortality (both from sudden death and from heart failure) and a relative risk reduction of 42% in all-cause mortality. One would think that this would be cause for great celebration; however reviewers at the cardiovascular division of King’s College London (funded by the British Heart Foundation) in a two page report

I suspect that regardless of how hard scientists try to demonstrate the effectiveness of nutritional interventions, the goal posts will keep moving and to me this is a very sad state of affairs. My conclusion after reading the King’s College review is that the focus seems to be on giving patients more and more drugs thus making it difficult for a nutritional intervention to get a foot in the door. Over the past 15 years I have seen remarkable results with CoQ10 and if there is any good news it is that currently it’s easy for anyone to purchase some. Almost

all pharmacies and natural health food stores have it. CoQ10 has been on my must have list for a long time - I couldn’t imagine a day without doing what I can to fuel the mitochondria in my heart cells. Apart from what CoQ10 might achieve in terms of heart failure, it also has a significant role to play in normalising blood pressure and regulating the rhythm of the heart. It’s hard to believe that a discovery that was made in 1957 is taking so long to gain acceptance as a must have for cardiovascular health. As with any dietary supplement (which is how CoQ10 is sold) dose can be important, and with CoQ10 from what I have observed the more ‘serious’ the condition the higher the dose. I take 100mg daily but doses of up to 2400mg have been used in studies. There is little to be gained from having more trials which take years and are very costly. There is plenty of evidence to recommend the use of supplemental CoQ10. Doctors could very easily run their own trials with patients and monitor the outcomes. We are not talking about a dangerous drug - CoQ10 is a molecule that is made in the body and safety has never been questioned. The feedback on the Q-Symbio trial seems to be more about the process than the product. When lives are on the line, patients are not able to wait for the results of further studies which once again may be overlooked. Why don’t we just try it - what is there to PN lose? (JOHN APPLETON) F APPLETON ASSOCIATES, T: 09 489 9362 john@johnappleton.co.nz www.johnappleton.co.nz

FEIJOA AND BLACKBERRY HELP REDUCE INFLAMMATION Feijoa and blackberry are two fruits with a strong anti-inflammatory effect that could help people with inflammatory diseases, according to recent research from the University of Auckland. The research into treatments for inflammatory bowel disease investigated the anti -inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of 12 fruits.

anti-oxidant action of the feijoa compounds was not a direct effect, but was mediated through inhibitory effects on the enzyme, kinase.

They tested mango, feijoa, elderberry, cranberry, blackcurrant, blackberry, red raspberry, strawberry, green grapes, plum, pear and black grapes.

“Our studies support other results that suggest these fruit extracts could help to regulate oxidative stress and inflammation in cells, both directly and indirectly,” says Ferguson.

“Most fruits are good for you and have some anti-oxidant effect, but feijoa and blackberry showed the strongest anti-inflammatory response in the experiments,” says University of Auckland Nutrition and Dietetics researcher, Professor Lynn Ferguson.

“Feijoa is already known to be very high in polyphenols such as flavonoids and these may be responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects. Research to identify the active compounds will be the subject of further studies,” she says.

The study identified fruit compounds with an anti-inflammatory effect through certain chemical pathways that could be tested further to develop them as complementary therapies for inflammatory bowel disease and other inflammatory disorders.

For the experiments reported in the study, the testing included the skin and pulp of all the fruits. “In feijoa, the skin has more bio-activity than the pulp,” says Professor Ferguson. “Some Asian cultures eat the skin, but in most western cultures many people find the taste too sour.”

“Inflammatory responses are important for coping with damage, but an over-active inflammatory response is also damaging and can create problems, says Professor Ferguson. “These responses can be debilitating for New Zealanders with an inflammatory disease, and these fruits can help to limit the inflammatory response.” Feijoa and blackberry showed the highest and strongest anti-inflammatory effects in the various test screens carried out for this research. The study also showed that the

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The research was a collaboration across New Zealand with people of different expertise getting together to share ideas and discuss the findings, she says. Nutrigenomics New Zealand provided the fruit fractions for testing, and the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment and the Kate Edger Educational Charitable Trust supported this work. F PN

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


PLANET AYURVEDA: ASK DOCTOR AJIT

Q: A:

I’m afraid I indulged over the Christmas break and have put on a bit of weight. Any advice to help me shed a few pounds? Name and address withheld

Whenever a discussion comes up about losing weight, most people only think about diet and exercise. However, according to Ayurveda, the science of awareness, what is equally important is to consider whether what you are eating is appropriate to your constitution and why it is not being metabolised properly by the body. Here are some general guidelines that, according to Ayurveda, will be of benefit to help you lose some weight: 1. Eat according to your constitution. According to Ayurveda, our bodies are made from the five primordial elements of space, air, water, earth and fire. Each of us is a unique combination of these elements, though one or two tend to dominate: Vata body types are dominant in air and space so tend to manifest the qualities of these elements. As a result they tend to have light frames, dry and rough skin, are susceptible to cold and have varied metabolism. Pitta body types are dominant with the fire and water elements so tend to be well built with sharp features, have warm, sometimes red skin, have good metabolism and are highly organised. Kapha bodies tend to have heavy frames, soft skin, thick body hair and slow digestion as they are a combination of the earth and water elements. To keep the body in balance, you should always select foods that do not aggravate the dominant elements in your body. For instance, if you have a Kapha body type and eat lots of heavy, cold, damp and sweet foods, your body can easily get out of balance and this includes your weight.

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2. Keep your digestive fire at optimum level. Another important point to consider is that no matter the quality or quantity of the food you are eat, if the stomach can’t metabolise it properly it will not only fail to nourish the tissues but this partially digested food can accumulate in the body causing health problems, like weigh gain, to occur. That is why Ayurveda recommends eating, warm, light cooked foods with selected herbs to enhance the stomach digestive capability. 3. Eat according to season. Each season too has its own qualities For example, the environment during summer feels hot, moist, oily and sharp. Now if you are eating foods with these qualities like fish and chips, potato crisps, alcohol, and sauces like chilli, tomato and soya during this season, these qualities can accumulate in the body, causing it to become imbalanced. Imbalances in the body, particularly in the digestive system, cause imbalances in tissue metabolism affecting both the quantity and quality of body tissue, including fat cells. Being aware of the dominant qualities in a particular season and eating with awareness to keep the body in balance is another way to prevent weight gain. 4. Avoid emotional eating. In Ayurveda, emotional eating can be a contributing factor in weight gain. Certain emotions such as loneliness, anxiety, fear, nervousness and relationship problems indicate we are not being nourished at an emotional level and we can turn to food to provide this comfort. This is the reason that Ayurveda strives to create balance in one’s mental state through such practices as meditation and emotional healing programmes. This is Ayurveda’s great strength as it recognises that there must be balance between body and mind to achieve perfect health. If you are able to incorporate some of these suggestions into your daily routines, along with some light exercise like walking or yoga, you will find your body will find its natural PN balance and this includes your weight. (DR AJIT) F PLANET AYURVEDA, 41 Gillies Avenue, T: 09 522 5390, www.planetayurveda.co.nz

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MICHELLE OWEN: POSTURE TO PERFORMANCE

What is a postural assessment? Good practitioners will always assess their clients before working with them. Why? Because if we’re not assessing - we’re guessing. With the new year ahead of us I am sure that you are thinking about what you will do to keep fit and healthy through 2015. If you are like most you have had some level of discomfort, pain or reccurring injury within your body over time. Why not make a physical health plan to correct your posture, muscle imbalance, and structure so that instead of just working out you are working smart towards specific long -term goals of having a great, solid, pain free body. Posture is one of the most unrevealed best kept secrets - poor posture leads to many dysfunctions within the body from back pain, knee, shoulder, hip, ankle, torn hamstrings, calfs, painful Achilles and more. This can cause general aches and pains through to debilitating pain. If people corrected their posture we would have fewer orthopedic problems and therefore surgeries. So many people are told they need surgery or have to have surgeries due to long-term postural issues. Good posture makes you look 10 years younger, creating optimal shape, curves, flatness and joint position in all the right places. It also gives you the look of confidence. In this assessment I use a postural grid to look at the distortions within the body that could be causing pain and discomfort. Then a series of muscle length/tension tests will identify which muscles are too weak and need strengthening; which ones are too tight and need stretching, which joints need mobilising, etc. Spinal curves and pelvic angles are measured to understand holding patterns in static posture. Movement patterns are also assessed in varying degrees depending on your needs.

You have pain and can’t play your sport. You’re a mum, dad or grand parent wanting to play with their kids, as they get older. You’re a busy corporate and want to train intelligently. You want to be functional, pain free and improve with age. What happens after the assessment? The training begins. Creating new neural pathways is key. Simple things like learning to hold body position in sitting and standing is essential. Then you learn highly specialised exercises that are unique to your imbalance. The correct exercises are determined from your assessment. A various mixture of myofascial stretching, spinal decompressions, spinal stability and functional movement patterns are taught and evolved over time to make you flexible, mobile, strong and connected - to do the things you love without pain and dysfunction. A postural assessment and correction deals with the underlying issues of structural imbalance and is a long-term approach to great well-being. (MICHELLE OWEN) F PN MICHELLE OWEN, Level 2, 10 New North Road, M: 021 770 153 www.michelleowen.co.nz www.fitness-n-function.co.nz

This detailed assessment provides the information necessary to move forward and develop a highly individual programme to correct your postural imbalance. This postural assessment takes two hours. We discuss your pain and discomfort and what you have previously done about it - most of my clients have tried a lot of other methods but have not had the long-term results that they desire. What you are currently doing exercise-wise, your sporting requirements, your goals, time and commitment levels, your overall health and abilities and anything else that is needed. Then a full measure up of the body to find imbalances. It is this high-calibre and unique postural assessment that gives the ability to look at the ‘whole’ picture. This is what sets it apart from many other modalities. These assessments are both proven and comprehensive - to identify the cause - not treat the effect - for you to achieve your true potential. Perfect posture is essential for everyone but even more for athletes - the more athletic that you are the more you need good alignment. How do I know if I need a postural assessment? You might feel like you have tried everything possible without relief. You have pain, discomfort, weakness, tight muscles, or feel twisted somehow. You have reccuring injuries. You’re aware of your slouched position. You want to be functional, strong and pain free for life and sport. You’ve been told you need surgery or have had surgery. You’re an athlete wanting to improve your sport performance.

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CARING PROFESSIONAL Ingrid Hauge - Qi Acupuncture Originally From Edinburgh, Scotland, Ingrid Hauge is a traditional Chinese medical acupuncturist, with a sports therapy background. Ingrid has been living in “beautiful Aotearoa” for 14 years, and Qi Acupuncture has been in central Auckland since 2006. This year the clinic has evolved into a group practice. “It’s very exciting for us,” says Ingrid. “I have always loved working with people so being here and a part of this amazing profession is a real pleasure.” How did you come to be a traditional Chinese medical acupuncturist? I was introduced to acupuncture via acupressure. The whole more Eastern philosophy of Qi and health care makes sense. Treating the whole person. Traditionally health was defined as being the harmonious relationship between Heaven, the Earth and Person. This relates to the balance between our body, our environment and our spirituality. An ancient medicine for our modern world! What do you love about your job? Seeing the results! What do you find challenging? We are all a unique combination of connections. The secret and challenge to a successful outcome is working out each individual and very specific treatment plan. How do you differ from other traditional Chinese medicine acupuncturists? How you respond to treatment will guide us forward. We want to be seeing a continual improvement with every session. Reassessment and being open to change is key. What do you do to stay at the top of your field? Ongoing education, as in any profession, is essential. Working alongside other complementary practitioners is also great. Be it physiotherapy, chiropractic, a massage therapist, osteopath, their GP... working together can make all the difference. I am also now looking forward to being a part of a supportive group practice. Can you share an anecdote about a case or cases? It is really common that people first discover acupuncture via an injury. It can then become clear how related often-thought-of-as-separate health issues are. For example, here in Auckland we live in a damp climate. Therefore optimal health can often struggle with ‘internal damp.’ This relates to congestion at some level. This may manifest in numerous, very commonly seen complaints .. sinus, headaches, fluid retention, difficulty loosing weight, sluggish metabolism, difficulty feeling motivated, not waking up feeling refreshed, low energy levels, sub fertility. By approaching these issues with the Eastern concept of draining our internal damp, the results can be amazing! What do you do to care for yourself? Our needs are constantly in a state of flux. Being able to slow down enough to listen is my not-so-secret method of self care. Maintaining a balance and enjoying how we spend our time. For me: off road running, painting, reading, nourishing food, company, laughs... the list is endless. What’s your advice to people seeking traditional Chinese medical acupuncture? Think long term health benefits! Traditional acupuncture treats the cause as well as the manifesting symptoms. Qi Acupuncture promotes the unimpeded circulation of Qi, and its balance, to achieve whole health again. F PN QI ACUPUNCTURE, G4, 29 Scanlan Street, Grey Lynn, T: 021 886 796 www.qia.co.nz The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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SHEENA SHUVANI STARDUST ASTROLOGY (January 20 - February 19) ♐ AQUARIUS Element of air. Symbol: The Water Bearer

Quality: Fixed = stability (true to yourself) Planetary ruler Uranus.

Character Deep thinker, day-dreamer, rainbow child wandering in a utopian wonderland future. Individual, often artistic, innovative, slightly eccentric (now and then flashes of genius). You are stubbornly true to your vision of an improved world. You are honourable, idealistic and principled. Humanitarian and ecologically inclined, you are ever adventurous and ever embracing change, yet stubborn and unbending in your convictions. You are truly a free spirited idealist. Anti-authoritarian, a rebel with a cause! Career Aquarius, you love to break new ground, venture into new territory. Careers that help or entertain or instruct humanity, nature or save the planet appeal. Your dazzling intelligence and flashes of brilliance inspire others. Work related travel always appeals. You are often found in marine biology, science, acting, show business, music, writing, avant garde movies, pilots and explorers, quite simply it is your instinct to plunge into the unknown. Love and sexuality With your effortless social skills you belong to everyone and no one. You are often emotionally detached and not ruled by sex, seldom expressing deep feelings, more attached to a concept than a person. You love to try new things, so surprise and sudden adventures appeal. Thus sex on the deck of a seagoing yacht, or impromptu elevator encounters, outdoor couplings, tantric sex and wild, impulsive mile-high lovemaking and exotic locations are your bag. The ho-hum and the hum-drum are not for you. Past directions Impatient and seemingly ungrateful at times, you have huge expectations of your partners and the world, acquiring new friends daily, paradoxically you sometimes choose space and solitude to gloomily mull over the state of the world and unlock the secrets of the universe. Helpful advice Learn to deepen intimacy and communication with your lover. You possess awesome concentration, acute intelligence and ability to analyse. Your desire is to share quality time with others and still retain your freedom loving ways. Sometimes you do not appreciate yourself enough.

TAU HOU OAOA! HAPPY NEW YEAR FROM AROHA HEALING! We hope you had a wonderful Chrismas and New Year celebration and now it is time for positive action. Aroha Healing’s product range has expanded and they now offer some unique products to support and remind you to bring peace and love into your day - everyday. The 2015 year feels ‘lighter’ than the preceding few years and January has been a time of contemplation and setting new goals both personally and professionally. A definite theme that we are noticing is that wellbeing and balance are at the top of the list for many, therefore Aroha Healing has and will, continue to streamline their therapeutic offerings and workshops, bellydance, yoga and yoga nidra classes to integrate perfectly with what you need for the year ahead. Valentine’s Day 14 February is all about aroha (love). This year a beautiful version of the Aroha candle with a love-red heart logo and beautiful rose quartz heart crystal has been created. Very unique and beautiful scented with rose, lavender, geranium and a touch of wild mint. At Aroha Healing they are super excited about the candles and especially love this one. They have added three natural precious, sacred stone candles to the range; Sunstone, Amethyst and Pounamu and at $49 these deliciously natural candles make the perfect gift for a loved one or yourself! The summer promotion is the perfect combination for allowing your intentions to flow in 2015. An Aroha Healing signature massage (Hawaiian and Maori massage combined with reiki and chakra balancing) plus an Aroha healing candle (medium) of your choosing that includes a candle meditation for manifesting desired visions for $144 usually $164. Wishing you a most prosperous and happy 2015! F PN AROHA HEALING, 3 Maidstone Street, T: 0800 646 326 www.arohahealing.co.nz www.arohahealingcandles.co.nz info@arohahealing.co.nz

Your lucky number According to Cheiro (the world’s most famous seer) the day of your birth is the luckiest of all numbers for you! Your deepest desires Sharing, improving, free travel. Favoured precious stones Sapphires, opals, black pearls, celestial crystal, amethyst. Favoured metals Quicksilver. Favoured colours Aquamarine, turquoise blue, lavender, sea greens, paua shell colours. PN (SHEENA SHUVANI). F

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PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


LIVING, THINKING + BEING TEEN YOGA CLASSES START THIS MONTH Fast paced and vigorous, fun and friendly; a new yoga class just for teens is starting at the Herne Bay Iyengar Yoga Centre. Yoga helps co-ordination, eases muscle tension, painful hips, back and shoulders, as well as increasing flexibility and strength. The hour-long class combines stretch and strength exercises, ending with a guided relaxation. The aim is to bring a sense of well-being and calm to every participant. Elite sports and dance teens, as well as those wishing to stretch and strengthen, or increase focus and relaxation, will find the class enhances their skills. Open for enrolments for young people aged 15 to 19 years, the class runs each Thursday from 4.45 to 5.45pm with fully trained teachers Modeena Brown and Melodie Batchelor. Modeena has reached a high level of dance training in New Zealand and has practised yoga with Melodie, the director of Herne Bay Iyengar Yoga Centre, since she was nine years old. Modeena brings passion, precision and pace to her teaching, to keep the mind alert and the body active and captivate the interest of her students. PN Start date: Thursday 19 February, cost $15. F

Yoga for Teens, HERNE BAY IYENGAR YOGA CENTRE, 230C Jervois Road, Herne Bay, T: 09 376 5477, E: melodiebatchelor@hotmail.com www.yogahernebay.co.nz

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FUTURE GENERATION DID YOU MISS OUT ON TAKING PART IN A VOYAGE THROUGH YOUR SCHOOL LAST YEAR? Or maybe voyage dates haven’t suited or you’re no longer at school? Don’t let that stop you! If you’re aged between 15-18 years (or you know someone that is), you can still get onboard by applying directly to the Spirit of Adventure Trust. Spaces are available now on summer voyages and throughout 2015. No matter where you are in New Zealand, everyone who meets the criteria is welcome to apply - Spirit of Adventure Trust even arrange your travel to and from the ship (conditions apply). Application forms can be found on the Spirit website or you can give the Spirit of Adventure Trust a call to discuss the voyage options. A 10-Day Youth Development Voyage onboard Spirit of New Zealand is one of the most defining experiences you can have as a young person. Payment of fees can sometimes be an issue for families, so Spirit has that covered too. A funding assistance programme offers grants and subsidies to families facing financial hardship. Who said classrooms need four walls? One ship, 40 Trainees. One incredible adventure. www.spiritofadventure.org.nz T: 0800 4 SAILING.

TESS TEE - FORMER PUPIL AT GREY LYNN SCHOOL IN THE 1930S Fiona Hill sent in this great shot telling us, "My friend Tess Tee was at the Helpers Morning Tea at Grey Lynn School 3 December 2014. Tess is 96 and a former pupil at Grey Lynn school in the 1930s. She spent time at the school talking to pupils before having a cuppa. Tess still lives in the Grey Lynn home she was born in." (FIONNA HILL) F PN

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MOTAT FIRE AND RESCUE DAY 2015 Fire engines, sirens, rescue displays, demonstrations and education programmes about disaster preparation are just some of the exciting things on offer at MOTAT’s Fire and Rescue Day on Sunday 8 February. “This is a great opportunity for children and parents to learn about how to stay safe in a disaster situation in a fun, interactive way,” says MOTAT CEO Michael Frawley. The New Zealand Fire Service has been a major supporter of this event for many years and their fire engines will once again feature alongside MOTAT’s vintage fire trucks. Firefighters will be on hand to highlight key fire safety messages such as the importance of working smoke alarms and the dangers of unattended cooking. Fire drills and ‘explosions’ in the popular Kitchen Fire unit are sure to instil an unforgettable fire safety message in the minds of visitors. Emergency response teams will be demonstrating the complex procedures and equipment used to remove trapped accident victims from the wreckage. These vehicle extrications are scheduled for 11am and 1pm. Other activities and displays include: • One of the world’s largest collection of old and new fire engines housed at MOTAT • Urban Search And Rescue teams, the Bronto Command Unit as well as the Auckland • Local Emergency Response Team (ALERT) • Auckland Surf Lifesaving and First Aid NZ CPR demonstrations • Hands-on activities in the Tactile Dome and Little Flick fire engine rides • Fire hose target practice and Police laser speed activities for children • Volunteers and their pets from Outreach Pet Therapy • Face painting

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Fire and Rescue Day starts at 10am and ends at 4pm. Normal MOTAT admission fees PN apply. www.motat.org.nz F PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


FUTURE GENERATION

JUNIOR FOOTBALL OPEN DAY AT WESTERN SPRINGS Winter football sports registrations are already in full swing, with teams being put together, pre-season training starting and coaches and managers signing up. Now here is a chance for your kids to dust off their football boots or give football a try. Head down to Western Springs Football Club on Meola Road on Saturday 21 February from 10am-3pm for the open day. There will be various stations with coaches helping kids to learn and practise core skills, and fun small games will be run throughout the day.

national partner to New Zealand Football Juniors, there will be a blow-up pitch to play on, and other football related activities for everyone to enjoy, as well as the possibility of seeing some very well-known faces. Gold coin donations will be collected with all proceeds going to the Ronald McDonald House.

Targeted at junior players aged 5-12 years, this will give any keen or aspiring young All White the chance to show off their skills and maybe learn some new ones. Entry is free and everyone is welcome. Supported by McDonald’s, who sponsor WSAFC and are the

Registrations for the 2015 season at WSAFC are open now and closing between 14 - 25 February depending on the grade. To register and for further information please go to PN the website www.wsafc.org.nz F

MOTAT HONOURED WITH INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR PUMPHOUSE RESTORATION The Institute of Mechanical Engineers has honoured MOTAT with an award for its work restoring The Pumphouse’s Beam Engine to its former glory. “The IMechE Engineering Heritage Award is our way of formally recognising the dedication and ingenuity shown by MOTAT to restore the double beam engine,” said President of IMechE, Mark Hunt. “It is wonderful to see modern engineering expertise being applied to such a historically significant piece of infrastructure.” William Herrington, an engineer trained in the United Kingdom, designed the double beam engine in 1874 as a way of solving Auckland’s water supply problems. The Pumphouse operated for almost 50 years until it was decommissioned. “This award highlights both the passion and world-class talent of our volunteers and staff,” said MOTAT CEO, Michael Frawley. “The Pumphouse is an iconic part of MOTAT and Auckland’s history.” The award coincides with the appointment of the new Pumphouse Operator, John Broadwell. John is a qualified fireman with Glenbrook Vintage Railway, a member of Railway Enthusiasts Society and Auckland Steam Engine Society. Once all the necessary operating certifications are complete, John will be operating the Pumphouse and Beam Engine on a regular basis to provide ongoing demonstration of this example of early engineering and steam technology. www.motat.org.nz F PN The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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MEET THE TEACHER Annette Middleton Martin - Bayfield Primary Currently teaching: Year 3; 26 students. How did you come to be a primary school teacher? I devoured books as a child and so it was either going to be librarian or teacher. When I was 21 the thought of high school students seemed daunting but I still to this day think I would have used my English degree more if I had taught secondary. I absolutely love inspiring young people to enjoy writing and reading as much as I did as a child. Where did you train? In Auckland. It is called the Auckland University of Education now but back then it was Training College. What brought you to Bayfield Primary? When we moved to Westmere in 2000 I needed a school for our boys and thought it would be good to work in the same school as my children. What are your favourite things about being a teacher? To share the excitement of children being truly engaged and loving their days learning is a privilege. To get to know so many interesting characters over the years and to help understand what inspires them and wonder how they will contribute in the future is endlessly interesting to me. Having close bonds with children and their families in my community makes my life more meaningful and fulfilling. It is so much fun and yet challenging hard work - the perfect job for me as I am passionate about progress of any type! What has been a highlight of your teaching career? Becoming leader of a team where I can inspire other teachers with my insights and learning about the teaching of children. This is a personal inquiry to improve mine and others’ practise that is forever evolving.

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What has been a low point of your teaching career? As you are no doubt aware Bayfield is going through some major building changes. Though not really impacting on the children’s education it has been stressful for the staff. How would your principal describe you? Passionate about teaching, creative, sometimes challenging, outspoken and I hope as a person of high integrity that is dedicated to the school and children’s learning. How would other teachers describe you? Mmmm, I love to mentor young teachers starting out in teaching and I think they would say I was a great teacher who inspires them and has a lot to share. I have very close relationships with my colleagues, another benefit of our career is the close collaboration and shared excitement we have in our endeavour to create an optimal learning environment for all our students. How would your students describe you? Fun, warm, interesting, dedicated to their wellbeing and passionate about their individual progress in learning and personal growth. If you could wave a magic wand in your classroom... To create magic, yes that’s it! Five tips for mums and dads of primary school kids: 1. Read high quality literature to your children even when they can read themselves. 2. Limit playing games on the computer! 3. Take them into the natural world - skiing, sailing, tramping, camping. We live in such an amazing country, our children need to learn to treasure it. 4. Give them as many experiences of other cultures and countries as you can - our children at Bayfield are very lucky! 5. Make their education important to you as it is the only time they are truly by themselves and on their own without you; that time builds their individual character.

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FUTURE GENERATION SWIMMING LESSONS FOR UNDER-FIVES SAVE LIVES Recently a client of Hilton Brown Swimming recounted a story that demonstrates the value of early swimming lessons. Kirsty Inglis was taught to swim by Hilton Brown, so when she and her husband started their family deciding to give their children swimming lessons with Hilton Brown Swimming was a "no brainer". The usefulness of the lessons became abundantly clear recently when the family were at Kirsty’s brother’s place trying out the new pool. “My husband dived in down the far end, about 20 metres away. I was chatting with some other mums when one of them said, 'Oh my god, Jackson’s in the water.' Jackson is three and a half and he’s an over-confident swimmer, at lessons we’re always encouraging him to stop and think before he jumps. This time he was really in over his head - the pool was deep and he went straight to the bottom. But after a moment he popped up to the surface for a breath, just like he’d been taught. He went down again, and then

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popped up for another breath. Then he made his way safely to the side of the pool. We didn’t panic, he didn’t panic. It was very reassuring to see.” Lessons can begin as early as three months at Hilton Brown Swimming. For a free trial, call your nearest centre and visit the website for a full PN list of locations. F HILTON BROWN SWIMMING, Newmarket, Albany and One Tree Hill, www.hiltonbrownswimming.co.nz

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FUTURE GENERATION CHILDREN’S BOOK REVIEW Singing Home the Whale by Mandy Hager, Random House NZ, $19.99 An extraordinary story of a boy who protects a baby whale that locals believe is threatening their livelihood. Will Jackson is hiding out, a city boy reluctantly staying with his uncle in small town New Zealand while he struggles to recover from a brutal attack and the aftermath of a humiliating YouTube clip gone viral. After he discovers a young abandoned orca whale his life is further thrown into chaos when he rallies to help protect it against hostile interests. The boy and the whale develop a special bond, linked by Will’s love of singing. With echoes of the classic book and film The Whale Rider, this powerful connection is utterly convincing on the page. It’s a strong, plot-driven and exciting story with lots of drama, tension and romance. This is a beautifully touching, rich and layered story by an award-winning writer for young adults. F PN DOROTHY BUTLER CHILDREN’S BOOKSHOP, 1 Jervois Road, T: 09 376 7283, www.childrensbookshop.co.nz

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PONSONBY NEWS DEADLINE

COPY DEADLINE: Friday, 20 February PUBLISHED: Friday, 6 March

+ FASHION / SHOES + CAREERS & EMPLOYMENT

PREMIUM POSITIONS AVAILABLE TO BOOK ADVERTISING: Jo Barrett on 021 324 510 or Jessie Kollen on 021 166 2002 t: 09 361 3356 or 09 378 8553 e: joannebarrett@xtra.co.nz e: jessiekollen@gmail.com w: www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

THE RUBBISH AT HERNE BAY BEACH IS GONE! One day in November last year, Bayfield School pupils from rooms 8 and 9 went to sunny Herne Bay beach to clean up the disgusting rubbish there. As pupil Gus Griffen says, "We had to climb up mountains to get to the rubbish! We carried colourful buckets to put the waste in. Some of it was actually not waste to us. Also we had to keep our hands clean by wearing gloves but they got dirtier by the minute... "Some people had to dig to find plastic. They were laughing, “we found pure gold, we found pure gold!” But alas, it wasn’t gold it was... a walkie talkie! We trudged to the end of the beach and then took some photos. We ran to the start of the beach, full of

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energy. We jogged up the stairs, walked up the hill, found our way through the streets with the parents leading the way and got back to school. When we got back to class we made graphs of how many pieces of rubbish we collected and then printed them out. “I’m tired,” I moaned, along with, “I hope we didn’t go to the beach just to make graphs. If there is a beach cleaner (other than us of course!) they will be very impressed with our work.” (GUS GRIFFEN) F PN PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


FUTURE GENERATION The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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SIDELINE WITH GEORGE BERRY

A touch team with a difference What started as a bit of an off-shoot from the Ponsonby Falcons gay rugby team has now morphed into something Dion Hoskings, captain of the LYC Chargers, never envisaged possible. In just over two years the LYC Chargers a LGBTI (Lesbian, Gay, Bi Sexual, Transgender and those who wish not to identify with any particular reference) mixed touch rugby team has been so inundated with people wanting to join the team they’re now looking at starting another one or risk having to continually turn people away. From its early days as a gay men’s team designed to help out with a few extra rugby skills, interest from women saw them enter the mixed grade competitions this last year, which Hoskings says has now become more than just a sports team too. "We pretty much represent all of Auckland, all of New Zealand in fact. We’re a bit of a melting pot; we are lawyers, doctors, students and music teachers, we have players aged from 17 right up to our oldest player being 52, but it’s also about what we do away from the field, we’ve started mentoring a few of the younger members of the team, etc, and helping them with everyday things like enrolling at university and also helping one of our team members find a job." "We have a strong Polynesian base so it’s all about family I guess, making sure everyone who’s part of our group or team is doing well and achieving what they want to and can do, making sure they’re looked after, I guess you could say we’re a community team," said Hoskings. "Our first focus is sport and I guess you could say our second is to support." The attraction of what's believed to be New Zealand's first LGBTI touch team has people travelling from as far away as Silverdale and Kumeu to play and be part of the team, which plays at Victoria Park in the summer league. This year they’re also in line for a podium finish, so other than just supporting others they’re obviously not too bad at playing touch rugby either. The LYC Chargers are sponsored by Love Your Condom and Ponsonby News and if you’d like more info on them or like to join the team check out their facebook.com/pages/LYC-Chargers-Touch-Rugby. (GEORGE BERRY) F PN

HONOURED WITH THE HONOUR It’s not every day you have a sporting hero move into the hood, but we can now lay claim to another. Recently awarded the New Zealand Order of Merit, Ivan Vicelich, has brought his Playmaker Sport, a clothing and sportswear store, to Grey Lynn. And yes, there are plenty of Auckland Football Club shirts there on sale and you’ll even be able to get it signed while you’re there. “Yeah it’s our second store so it’s been a pretty good year for me and my family,” Vicelich said when I quizzed him about the last 12 months. “I got this letter in the post completely out of the blue saying I’d been nominated for the award and would I accept it if it was awarded. It was very much unexpected and pretty humbling I must say,” said Vicelich. “You know, the Football World Cup was something else in 2010, but the memory and the feeling of Morocco is right up there too, to do it (finish third at the World Club championship) with the boys I’d played with for the last six years - you know we are a pretty tight group of guys - was just awesome. And it’s just great to see the sport and the club getting plenty of recognition.” When I asked the 38-year-old skipper of Auckland FC about his plans for the future he replied, “While I’m still enjoying it and I’m fit enough I’ll just keep going.” No doubt the second Playmaker Sports store will keep him busy too... perhaps as the empire expands, that might be what slows Ivan’s time on the pitch. Well done Ivan, an award well deserved. (GEORGE BERRY) F PN

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The LYC Chargers Team PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


SIDELINE WITH GEORGE BERRY

AUCKLAND FC HEROICS WITNESSED FIRST HAND As a sports journalist I’m simply spoilt when it comes to attending live matches and events. I’m often sat plonked in the best seats in the house at the best fixtures for free - with the only requirement that I later produce a fair account of what I witnessed. Although I must admit the week in week out sporting smorgasbord can render even the biggest sports fanatic a little blasé about another night in the press box doing your ‘job’. But on 15 December last year at the Rabat Sports Stadium in Morocco, I was awoken from my professional working coma to be reminded of just how lucky I am. That evening Auckland City were taking on African Champions ESS in the FIFA Club World Cup. They took them on and beat them. I was the only Kiwi perched in the press box and possibly the only New Zealander, outside of the team, in the stadium at all that night. It was something to savour. No one gave the plucky Kiwi qualifiers a chance, despite their opening round victory and despite their promising form. But from the outset they showed they could do more than the famous All Whites side of the 2011 Football World Cup. This team could move the ball and their opposition around, they could work it out from the back and they could create enough scoring chances to win. The team of amateurs from Auckland, with a mechanic up front and a model in goal took the game to ESS and took everyone, including their complacent opponents, by surprise. The Moroccan crowd, who had booed and jeered the New Zealanders just a couple of nights earlier for ousting their team were now rallying in behind their conquerors, as they sensed an upset brewing over their bitter African neighbours and rivals. The mood in the open air press box changed as well. The light hearted, almost patronising chuckles, and surprised eyebrow raises turned into genuine interest and intrigue. And it wasn’t long until Auckland City had a goal to validate their sheer dominance. The stadium erupted in pockets, of mostly Moroccans, and I allowed myself a fist pump under the desk and a grin from ear to ear. Even my Australian colleagues were on the bandwagon - that’s when you know it’s something special! Rather than just hold the lead the New Zealand champions continued to drive forward and push for a second goal. They ran rings around their highly rated opponents at times, with a triple exchange of headers over an ESS midfielder sending the crowd into raptures. When the full time whistle finally blew it was simply surreal. The players either fell to the ground or threw their arms aloft - while I had my hand shaken by nearly every member of the media, as though it was me and not John Irving who had scored the winning goal. The local fans embraced the Kiwis as their own and the players even did a mini lap of honour to thank them for cheering them on to the audacious victory. To be there, on the other side of the world, in such a remote place and to watch a team representing your PN country completely defy the odds was something truly special. (WILLY NICHOLLS) F

An experience like no other The Sydney to Hobart yacht race was everything I was told it would be. At times I loved it and in probably equal measures I hated it and wanted to get off the boat, but as we reached the finish line at Hobart’s Constitution Dock that overwhelming feeling of completion hit me and I was quickly contemplating agreeing to do it all over again. For the first 24 hours I was battered and severely bruised as I sat on the rail, and as the afternoon sun disappeared into darkness that first evening I found myself thinking some very strange thoughts, willing the warm waves to crash over me. Previously unbeknown to me and something I’d never contemplated, the water temperature was actually warmer than the chilly night time air temperature, so as I sat there trying to occupy my mind with thoughts of anything and everything other than where I was at that present time, in a very weird way I longed for those waves to crash upon our bow and spill down over me and the rest of the seated crew. Once the sun peeked up over the easterly horizon the next morning, firstly warming my enthusiasm before warming my body, I found myself quickly aware that we were very much alone. Just the eight of us on board a 40ft yacht miles from land and any other boats. Due to the rough overnight seas many of the fleet had chosen to hug the coastline yet our brave quest for the southerly heading currents, a move that would later prove to pay off for us, meant that we were now 60 nautical miles off shore and in complete isolation. It wasn’t until late in the afternoon on the second day that we actually caught a glimpse of another boat on the horizon. Throughout the next 40 hours before crossing the finish line in Hobart I experienced almost every possible emotion, from being scared and exhausted to excited and delighted. Physically it was one of the most demanding experiences I’ve taken part in over the last few years. At one stage as we waited for the wind to shift to the north we sat dormant for a couple of hours. We tried numerous sail configurations and yet we stood still and when we slipped across Bass Strait, (a stretch of water that had been described to me as one of the most notorious in the world) virtually untroubled, my mind went into a scramble. The image of what I’d built Bass Strait up to be in my mind was proving to be nothing of the sort, in fact I remember remarking to my fellow crewmembers that I felt embarrassed taking any photos. It was so flat and calm when we crossed I thought that no one would ever believe where the photo was actually taken. Then, when we reached the very southern tip of Tasman Island, the volcanic organ pipes rising straight up out of the Southern Ocean took my breath away, quickly followed by being equally out of breath due to the multitude of sail changes needed as we raced up the Derwent River. The final 30 odd miles proved that adrenaline can easily overcome any feeling of exhaustion as the lolly scramble of weather threw up an array of conditions. Firstly we were hit by hail stones the size of your thumbnail, then three minutes later greeted by scorching 27 degree sun and very little breeze, then wind gusting toward 50 knots straight on the nose. I was later told that many people following my journey on the race tracker were puzzled by the fact that at times it had us almost going backwards. Our ETA was changing by the minute as we slipped from one weather pattern to the next. The feeling of completion was something that will never leave me, it’s exactly why I agreed to do the race in the first place and while we were 60 boats back from claiming the Rolex watch for taking line honors, the experience is a time in my life I’ll find hard to forget. (GEORGE BERRY) F PN

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PONSONBY PEOPLE + THEIR PETS

Seamus and Daniel Marshall Je suis Seamus. Shameless. My namesake Irish setter was the first dog in history to significantly upset American politics. It’s something I aspire to, but not today because today I am eating flies. Like birds close up, easily attainable. Flying popcorn. It’s a dog eat fly world. I like food from Raw Essentials. I like to think of myself as a connoisseur. Have you ever wondered how handrails taste? I can tell you. I don’t live in mystery. And dirt. And cat food if I can get it but my cat sister’s food is now out of reach. Unattainable. The cats and I have what you might describe as an uneasy truce. They were here first, which I accept, and they have watched me get bigger and bigger over the last year and a bit. I test the boundaries and they bop me on the nose. It’s our relationship and it’s just how it is. My days are perfect, as a dog I am blessed. My pack is small but perfectly formed. I go to work with my dad, he is an architect with an office on Karangahape Road, the Road of Very Interesting Smells I like to call it. Transfixing sometimes. I am led by my nose. I have to stop and breathe it all in. We walk in Western Park every morning and in the evenings I go for a run with my mum in Grey Lynn park. She is American and grew up with Irish setters, so that is why they picked me. A beautiful coincidence as well, my sister by birth, Amber, also lives in Grey Lynn. Sometimes I see her at the park or at Barkely Manor and we play together as only Irish setters can. We dance like beautiful clowns. F PN

THE TRUE AND ONLY SLIGHTLY EXAGGERATED TALES OF CHESTER PONSONBY Episode Four Chester is enjoying the outside world in summer, roaming our streets, looking for stimulation and company. Enthusiastically trotted up the hill after two door-knocking Jehovah’s Witness women. Concerned sales assistant in Mag Nation, Ponsonby Road, stayed late for me to collect him. Was he deciding on a magazine subscription - SPCA’s ‘Animals’ Voice’ or ‘Wild Animals of the World’? I wonder. On Sunday the priest at Sacred Heart Catholic Church, Vermont Street, suggested to his congregation that he had a second celebrant that morning, according to the Brother from St Pauls College (who recognised Chester outside the house, from his earlier school visit). Followed a TV celeb’s son home to Schofield Street, from soccer practice in the Grey Lynn Park Street; in no hurry to leave. Back to Grey Lynn - Paul phoned from Selbourne Street, but cat had moved on. His large, white paws gleaming in the dark revealed him sitting on the pavement, contemplating the cross roads of Firth Street and Dryden Street. Phone call alert from Arnold Street, lying in the grass by the park at dusk: collected for his evening meal. Affectionate as always. Just missed the boy - an SPCA collector on Ponsonby Road was impressed that he was content to wait, with her dog, for 10 minutes until he moved on to SPQR. She commented on his good road crossing skills. Out for two nights, but returned, impressively under his own steam, minus collar. Had he found an Airbnb? Another new collar. Quick Brown Street run, then home from Norfork Street (again), impervious to his trail of muddy footprints, waiting patiently on the veranda. Definitely prefers humans’ front entrance to cat-door at the back.

WE LOVE VISITS FROM FREYA! We’ve never owned a cat as we’ve always had a dog, but our next door neighbours, Daniel Marshall and Ingrid Frisk have a beautiful cat named Freya. She never visited us when our Scottie, Jack, was with us, but since he passed away last July, Freya is a regular visitor. We love her visits and often have a few cuddles in our garden. (MARTIN LEACH) F PN

Ponsonby Market Day - did you think he would miss out on the excitement? Of course not - face painting at Pumpkin Patch, on the strip, where he had lots of cuddles. The manager asked for a photo with our celeb. Popped into True, Richmond Road - more advertising of Chester needed? I think not. Already has an international fan club. Is fame going to his head? Loves admiring himself in the mirrors at Fifth Ave Menswear, Ponsonby Road. Had to check out the new Santa on Ponsonby Central. Visited the Bedford restaurant: lunch with friends? Rescued after ducking and diving under cars and buses in Ponsonby Road... Seems to have a penchant for women’s clothing shops - today, Trelise Cooper in Richmond Road. Cross dressing? After all, this is Ponsonby. Returned to Cook the Books, Richmond Road, with very bedraggled attire. During a cooking class, was taken upstairs to ‘his’ bean-bag. Felicity said she’s thinking of asking Chester for his autograph (paw print?) on their copy of their Ponsonby News. After a Friday night on the town, Chester had a brush with the law. Not drunk and disorderly, but he had negotiated a motorway crossing and was taken from Cook Street to the Central Police Station. As it was 1.30am, I contemplated asking them to lock him in a cell for the night... But he knows I’ll come, so we’ll have another day in the garden together. As long as there is activity, he’s very contented, stretched out in the sun. He may not respond to the command ‘Fetch’ secateurs (slacker!), but he is very loving. PN (PAM TARULEVICZ) F

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PONSONBY PEOPLE + THEIR PETS ASK ALEX Each month Dr Alex Melrose answers readers’ pet related issues. Email yours to: alex@vetcare.net.nz I have been in to see you with Monkey because of a problem with his eye. I was referred to the animal eye centre specialist vet who said he has had a problem for a long time, which is true, he had cataracts for a long while but was coping really well and busy being his usual happy self. The specialist says his eye now needs to be removed.

Q:

WANT TO SEE YOUR BELOVED ON A 'DOGS OF PONSONBY' TEA TOWEL? Artist Beck Wheeler is looking for people who own dogs in Ponsonby to send her their dog photographs, which she will then illustrate and screenprint onto tea towels. A bit of background on the idea: "The original idea was to create a tourism tea towel that showed a more personal side of a communtiy. Like a bird spotting handbook, only for dogs not birds. I did a 'Dogs of Piha' tea towel before Christmas. It took off in Piha and I ended up with 120 dog photos from 100 people in the community. I illustrated each dog, added their name beneath each illustration. These were then hand screenprinted and sold at a two day market held locally. A lot of people ended up getting them framed as pieces of art, says Beck. "The project has been a real hit out in Piha and I want to take it beyond Piha and into a few other places around Auckland. I thought Ponsonby would be a great next stop for this project as there are so many dog lovers in Ponsonby as well as a strong community vibe.

What I would like is your opinion about what I should do? What happens if he doesn’t have this operation? Will it be a lot for him to cope with at his time of life? He seems quite happy to me but apparently it is quite painful for him? Claire, Grey Lynn.

A:

I’m sorry to hear the little guy is sore. What I’m guessing has happened is that his slowly deteriorating cataract has suddenly moved. As an eye’s lens hardens and becomes milky in appearance, vision is progressively lost, sometimes only to a small extent, as in the case of sunlight and ageing induced nuclear sclerosis.

Other illnesses can result in much more dense cataracts and complete blindness in the affected eye. When the changes to the eye’s lens are dramatic, the heavier, stiffer lens can tear from its support structures and drop forward into the front chamber of the eye. This can block the globe’s drainage channels and cause increasing internal pressure, pain and redness. I would also recommend the surgery, once the eye has deteriorated to this point, fixing it is not a practical option. If we don’t proceed the intra-ocular pressure will continue to rise and with it his pain levels. He is a little trooper and will be trying his hardest not to show symptoms. I believe the need to remove any source of significant pain outweighs some genuine age-related anaesthetic risks in his case. (DR ALEX MELROSE, BVSC, MRCVS) F PN VETCARE GREY LYNN & UNITEC, 408 Great North Road, T: 09 361 3500 www.vetcare.net.nz F PN

"The more dogs I get, the better the project would be. I would like to aim to get a complete list of dogs that live in Ponsonby, or as close to a complete list as possible." Contact Beck on M: 021 055 4902 or via www.beckwheeler.net

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LOOK... WHO IS IN THE ZOO!

Vet team extraordinaire AUCKLAND ZOO’S VETS AND VET NURSES ARE ON THE JOB 365 DAYS OF THE YEAR. In partnership with our keepers, they do an incredible job of taking care of the animals that have a home here at the zoo; over 1000! Their patients include everything from tiny frogs to giant wetas, tortoises, tigers, parrots, giraffe, orangutan and our elephant Burma. Depending on what’s required, this can be onsite at our state-of-the-art vet centre (New Zealand Centre for Conservation Medicine), or out in the zoo at animals’ enclosures. The team also provides vet assistance to endangered wildlife species that have been injured in the wild such as kakapo, takahe, kiwi, little penguins and sea turtles. Plus, they work out in the field around New Zealand - including down south on Whenua Hou (Codfish Island) where they do health checks on kakapo and sometimes also help raise chicks, as part of their services to the Kakapo Recovery Programme. We caught up with our senior vet manager, Dr James Chatterton (ex Chester Zoo in England), to find out more about what he does and why he loves it so much. What’s been a highlight for you in the past year? There have been many, but I’d have to say visiting Whenua Hou (Codfish Island) working with the Kakapo Recovery Programme was a dream come true. This is a project at the forefront of conservation. The island itself is an untouched ancient forest teeming with bird life. My time there was both exhilarating and exhausting. Caring for kakapo can involve walking up to seven hours a day! What do you love most about your job? I love the fantastic group of people I get to work with and the variety in my job. With such an amazing range of animals to work with, no two days are the same.

Getting to work with New Zealand’s rare kakapo on Whenua Hou (Codfish Island) was a dream come true for Auckland Zoo senior vet manager, Dr James Chatterton.

How is new technology helping to enhance the way you and your team work? Modern technology such as digital x-ray, endoscopy and ultrasound allow us to provide advanced levels of care for our animals. For example, with an ultrasound we can monitor the ovulation and egg production in some of our reptile species, and with an endoscopy diagnose respiratory infection in a rescued little penguin. Do you have you have pet(s) at home? Although I don’t have pets in New Zealand, I have had a few in my life - mostly waifs and strays handed in to me whilst working in general practice in the United Kingdom, including cockatiels, canaries and my tortoise Tommy. Some friends back in the United Kingdom are currently looking after Tommy for me. Vet Encounters: If visiting the zoo, be sure to get along to our Vet Encounter - 10.30am every Monday and Tuesday. Visit www.aucklandzoo.co.nz

Finn-tastic zoo gig

Tim, Neil & Liam Finn: Friday 27 February New Zealand’s famous and fabulous Finns perform a not-to-missed twilight concert at the Auckland Zoo band rotunda stage on Friday 27 February. Brothers Tim and Neil and Neil’s son Liam will be playing each other’s songs and are promising to comb through the catalogues of Split Enz, Crowded House, Finn Brothers and Liam’s solo work to bring you a night to remember! Gates open 5pm and concert starts at 7pm. Tickets are on sale via Ticketmaster www.ticketmaster.co.nz

Auckland Zoo Senior vet Dr An Pas (right) and vet nurse Amy Ross treat an injured little penguin, found recently by a member of the public at Milford beach.

Get a wriggle on!

Wriggle & Rhyme at the Zoo: 17 February - 24 March The Zoo is once again teaming up with Auckland Libraries to bring you the hugely popular Wriggle & Rhyme - on every Tuesday (10.30am-11am at the band rotunda) from 17 February through to 24 March. This fun half hour of music, dance and rhyme (and bubbles - the blowing kind!) is a fabulous way for mums, dads, caregivers and littlies (six months to four years) to get active. Once done, you and the family can check out your favourite animals and explore the rest of the Zoo. Normal zoo admission prices apply. Friends of the Zoo, free.

Tim, Liam and Neil Finn at Auckland Zoo.

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PONSONBY PEOPLE + THEIR PETS

WILL YOU BE AN SPCA HERO IN 2015? Did you make a New Year’s resolution to get fit? Do you want to help the animals of Auckland? If the answer to either (or both) of these questions is “Yes!” then you could be one of the heroes that SPCA Auckland are looking for. Team SPCA Auckland is looking for people wanting to challenge themselves in 2015 whilst raising much needed funds for the animals of Auckland. Would you be willing to participate in the Ports of Auckland ‘Round the Bays’ in March? How about the World Tri-Series or Orewa Beach half-marathon in April? Or maybe you’d rather ‘Jump to the Rescue’ in our second annual fundraising skydive? However you decide to challenge yourself, fundraise for Team SPCA Auckland - the animals will thank you for your efforts! How can you become an SPCA hero? It's easy to fundraise for SPCA Auckland, just visit www.spca.org.nz or contact the fundraising team on T: 09 256 2520, or fundraise@spca.org.nz to find out how. Plus if you raise more than $100, you’ll receive a free Team SPCA Auckland t-shirt to wear PN during the event. F

Dawn Folkard and Bella

L to R: Pixel, Ruby, Praline and Gaga

Dawn Folkard is the “owner/chief cook and bottle washer” at Pure Food Kitchen. Dawn’s one year old puppy Bella is a terrier cross. “I affectionately call her our 'street special' as she was rescued off the street in the far north... I'm guessing there are a couple of different breeds in there.” Bella and Dawn have lived together for almost a year. “It was the pleading eyes and the SPCA rescue sign in the window that got me!” tells Dawn. She didn’t change the puppy’s name - SPCA staff had been calling her Bella and she responded to it, so Dawn felt there was no reason to change. Bella’s favourite thing to do is play tug o’ war... sometimes she even lets Dawn win! The puppy is a real foodie much like her owner, and will devour most things including raw veges and fruit. Dawn also has a cat, Mia. “After a rather rocky start to the relationship I think they are now friends,” she says. And as Dawn works long hours, Bella goes to doggy daycare a couple of times a week where she reportedly has several friends: “She even got PN a Xmas card from her special friend there, Ama.” F PURE FOOD KITCHEN, 2A Hakanoa Street, Grey Lynn T: 09 378 7016 www.purefoodkitchen.co.nz

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PONSONBY PROFESSIONALS: METROLAW GOT A LEGAL QUESTION? ASK MICHAEL@METROLAW.CO.NZ

Email Michael with your question and include PONSONBY NEWS in the subject line. Michael Hemphill, a partner of the firm, will answer one topical question each month. I live in a relatively dense part of Grey Lynn and have recently had problems with my neighbours relating to trees on my property. Late last week, I received a letter from my neighbour claiming that trees on my property were dropping leaves onto their property and blocking their sunlight. They say that they require me to remove the trees immediately. The letter has not been written by a lawyer nor does it quote any legislation. Are they able to do this?

Q:

Trees are a constant cause of tension between neighbours and often lead to disputes. In regards to what your neighbours are entitled to do about trees that are on your property, they are able to cut back any branches that encroach onto their property. If the leaves that are landing on their property are coming from branches hanging onto their property, then they are within their rights to cut back the branches.

A:

The Resource Management Act protects various trees which may be endangered or indigenous, so if you feel that this applies to any of the trees located on your property, it would be best to warn your neighbours of their significance before they started chopping away at any overhanging branches. Check with your local council if you are not sure whether the trees are protected. You will not be responsible for any costs involved in your neighbours removing the branches or roots, unless the branches or roots are causing actual damage to their property and have become a legal nuisance. If there has been damage to their property they can apply to the District Court to claim back the cost of removing the offending branches and the cost of repairing the damage. You don’t need a court order to trim overhanging branches. It is possible that your neighbours could bring the matter to the District Court, where an order can be made requiring you to trim or remove any trees that are dangerous or blocking your neighbours’ view. This would be a costly and time consuming procedure for your neighbours to pursue this course of action. Your neighbours have come to you first before pursuing other legal avenues, this hopefully suggests a desire to preserve neighbourly relations. If your neighbours feel that your trees are dangerous or blocking their view and do take the matter to the District Court, the court will consider whether it’s fair and reasonable to remove or trim the trees. The court will look at whether removing or trimming the tree will prevent current or potential danger to the property and the people within; any undue obstruction of a view; undue interference with the use and enjoyment of your land and undue interference with drains due to fallen leaves. The court won’t make an order if it would cause you more hardship than your neighbour would be caused if the order wasn’t made. There is a strong proportionality and reasonableness requirement. If the court does make an order against you, they can also require other specific conditions, such as you being required to compensate your neighbours for damage done to their property and damage done in carrying out the work. The person applying for the order must, generally, bear the reasonable cost of carrying out the work. However, they consider the parties’ conduct when deciding who pays the costs. Generally after the order is made, your neighbours will have 20 days to carry out the order. It is also possible that that the order can require you to do ongoing work, such as keeping the trees trimmed. In short, unless the trees on your property constitute a genuine danger to your neighbours and their property or if the nuisance the trees cause is significant and genuine, it is unlikely that the District Court would give the order requiring the removal PN of the tree or trees. (MICHAEL HEMPHILL) F Disclaimer - This article is for general information purposes only. If you have a legal problem you should seek advice from a lawyer. Metro Law does not accept any liability other than to its clients and then only when advice is sought on specific matters.

METROLAW, Level 2, 36 Williamson Avenue, T: 09 929 0800, www.metrolaw.co.nz

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PLANNING RETIREMENT SO NEAR AND YET SO FAR - RETIREMENT STRUCTURING YOUR “IT’S NEVER TOO EARLY TO START planning for retirement” are the lines on the cover of Ponsonby News this month and the articles in this feature explore that planning. Retirement still seems far away for people my age (mid 30s) and the word ‘retirement’ conjures up images of older people giving up the toil of jobs and careers for gardening, reading and crosswords. These images are a stereotype of course, but the point is that what we do during retirement depends entirely on what we want to be doing, and that thinking of retirement in terms of ‘old age’ is a mistake. The time to start thinking about retirement is probably as soon as any young person starts their first job! Yet I only recently began considering my ‘golden years’, and I am not unusual in this. People my age tend to give a small shiver when asked about retirement, as many are still paying off student loans, paying exorbitant rents (and the occasional mortgage) or have started families that are gradually taking up more of the available funds.

FINANCIAL PATH TO RETIREMENT If you own your own home you effectively have a retirement plan - repay the debt in time for retirement and you’re sorted... right? Of course there’s a bit more involved than this - just like you would consult an accountant for taxation issues and a lawyer for legal issues, you should consult a financial adviser in relation to financial issues. Within the category of financial advisers there are many sub-types. Ungaro & Co is a small team working to assist would-be, or current home owners in structuring debt in the most appropriate way - in many cases, the equity in your own home could be your primary source of funds in your retirement, so it’s key to be purposeful, when determining the loan structure. A big mistake we often see people make (if they take no advice) is mortgages fixed for longer than people’s ownership circumstances or too short for market conditions (result is either high break fees or re-fixing in unfavourable times). Another mistake often made is going for a loan structure that sounds great in theory but works poorly in reality.

Many people aim to rely on New Zealand Superannuation and savings for retirement, and an article by Craig Simpson on interest.co.nz outlined a basic scenario in which a 25-yearold manages to save $5000 a year towards a retirement savings goal of $2 million (with a projected 25 years in retirement). I was horrified, $5000 a year? The savings I amass per annum are always absorbed by insurance, taxes (I am a freelancer) ACC levies, rent increases, car repairs, replacing appliances and so on.

Ungaro & Co specialise in advising clients how to pay down debt using loan structures compatible with their financial personality - not a ‘one-size-fits-all’ programme. Long term, their goal is to meet regularly with their clients to review and update their loan structures until it is no longer required - that is, you’re debt free!

With this frightening revelation in mind, I perused websites and similar articles; it appears that the best plan for retirement is to at least start making one while you are still young. What we do in our retirement depends on what we plan for, and that means imagining how much money we’ll need. Picture your retirement, and then start by visiting these PN websites: www.sorted.co.nz and www.govt.nz (JESSIE KOLLEN) F

UNGARO & CO, Perspective Building, Unit 301/28 College Hill, T: 09 360 2179 www.ungaro.co.nz

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If you are interested in having a chat, give the team a call or pop into their new office on College Hill. F PN

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PLANNING RETIREMENT

THE TOP 7 RETIREMENT PLANNING MISTAKES TO AVOID WE ALL RECOGNISE THE IMPORTANCE OF PLANNING, TO BUILD RESERVE FUNDS for retirement or simply to gain some financial independence. But too often we fall victim to one or more of the common mistakes that hinder our progress and influence the success of outcomes. Here are seven avoidable mistakes to watch out for. 1. Putting off planning, the longer you wait the harder it is. Begin planning early, recognise the approach you need to take, know you need to plan for 30 years in retirement and start the investment programme as early as practical. In this way you will not have to adopt too much risk later in life or need to adapt your lifestyle to match your dwindled investment base. 2. Relying on, and assuming the State Pension will remain ‘as is’. National Superannuation is not a liveable income and it may not be available to you when you reach age 65 (or at all). Discussions are already mooted that it may be meanstested (income and/or assets) and/or entitlement delayed to age 67 or beyond. 3. Being too big on lifestyle assets, especially the home. Having all your assets in your home and possessions makes it very difficult to release enough capital at retirement to live off; you can’t eat a house or sell a quarter of it!

Jocelyn Weatherall

Phil Ashton

Richard Knight

6. Believing the media. Believe them at your peril, the media earn their keep through advertising and thus seek to be sensationalist and entertain. Best you ignore the noise and stay true to a good strategy. 7. Believing the share brokers. No-one can regularly pick the winners, there is no evidence that this can persist over the long term you need to be investing. Don’t even try. Just back all the vital asset classes and keep your costs low. Remember, brokers get paid when you trade. Don’t mess with investment capital. Get advice. Remain disciplined. Make 2015 the year that you put your financial house in order and keep it that way by having a free coffee with any of our team of Authorised Financial Advisers at No. 52 College Hill, Freemans Bay. Rutherford Rede (Akld) Limited, www.rutherfordrede.co.nz Phone 09 361 3670

4. Avoid backing the wrong horses and stick with what is proven. Keep to proven investment options at least for your foundation investment needs. Don’t be lured into ventures that are unproven, and promise return. Risk and return are entirely related!

Jocelyn jweatherall@rutherfordrede.co.nz Phil pashton@rutherfordrede.co.nz or Richard rknight@rutherfordrede.co.nz

5. Getting caught with all investment money in too few assets. The only proven way to protect capital is through smart diversification. Have offshore investments also, remembering we live in a small economy that is on a fault-line and heavily reliant on primary industry.

Opinions are of a general nature and are not to be considered financial advice, specific advice is recommended to be sought before action is taken. Disclosure Statement(s) relating to our advisers are available on request and free of charge.

INVESTING - IT’S JUST COMMON SENSE IN ONE RESPECT, INVESTING IS LIKE POLITICS: EVERYONE HAS AN OPINION. GIVEN THE opportunity, many people will freely provide their opinions, with the inevitable effect that matters get confusing very quickly as conflicting opinions are received. At this stage we usually revert back to our familiar decision-making processes: collect the evidence, process the results, decide what is best for you and implement it. It’s really just a matter of common sense. The problem is that common sense can be surprisingly tricky. Let’s look at some simple formulations of common sense in proverbs: • Look before you leap. • It’s better safe than sorry. • Absence makes the heart grow fonder. • If at first you don’t succeed try again. There is nothing you could argue about in those proverbs - they encapsulate the essence of common sense. However, what about these: • He who hesitates is lost. • Nothing ventured, nothing gained. • Out of sight, out of mind. • Don’t beat your head against a wall. More basic common sense - but completely contradictory to the first proverbs. What makes decision-making more complex is that everyone is affected by natural behavioural biases. Subconsciously, they will steer your decisions - one way or another. Of course, if you were being steered in the right direction, there wouldn’t be an issue. Unfortunately for investors, these biases are usually bad for their portfolios. Common biases affecting investors include: Recency effect: thinking that what is happening now will continue in the future (this is very common among investors who chase last year’s ‘winners’). Framing: reacting differently to a situation depending on whether it is presented as a gain or a loss. Would you prefer to buy meat that is 90% fat free or 10% fat? Overconfidence: people overestimate their abilities. As an example, 82% of people think they are in the top 30% of good drivers(1). Confirmation bias: investors look for PN evidence that supports their decision and reject evidence that contradicts it. F (1) Tilson, W. (1999, September 20). ‘The perils of investor overconfidence’

BRACKENRIDGE FINANCIAL SOLUTIONS LTD, T: 09 360 7138 or T: 0800 088 116 www.brackenridge.biz This document contains information of a general nature only. It does not take into account your particular financial situation or goals.

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PLANNING RETIREMENT

NEARING RETIREMENT? With retirement looming for many ‘baby boomers’ these are some of the main issues you will need to keep in mind and discuss with your lawyer. • • • • •

Review Will Enduring powers of attorney Succession plan for business Downsize house Retirement village options

It is not possible cover all these points in this limited space. Many folk nearing retirement will be asset rich but may have limited cash flow. While there are ‘reverse’ mortgages to unleash capital these have the downside of eating away at the capital tied up in your house. Instead you could consider taking out a small ‘normal’ mortgage or increasing your mortgage to cover the cost of a holiday or some travel. Nearing retirement, you may wish to travel, but if you put it off any longer you may find that your health is not up to it. You may have hundreds of thousands or more than a million dollars tied up in your house. While it is wonderful to leave a valuable estate for your children, you could dip into it and enjoy some of the benefits of the increased value of your real estate. The ‘baby boomers’ were brought up with the urge to save, and not to owe debt. Borrowing at this late stage in life goes against the grain, but is worth a thought. The debt can be repaid when you downsize your house or go into a retirement village, and PN both of these are likely in the next decade or so after retirement. F CLARK & CO, Level 1/283 Ponsonby Road T: 09 360 2413 www.clarklawyers.co.nz This article is not meant to be legal advice. If my comments have raised concerns, then see your lawyer to discuss.

PLANNING FOR YOUR FUTURE STARTS TODAY The idea of retirement is simple. Having worked hard your whole life, it’s the time where you are supposed to be able to sit back and enjoy the fruits of your labour. In reality, it is never that simple and most people, instead of looking forward to this stage, are nervous about the financial implications that it brings. Time and time again, we are seeing the most common response to continue to ignore the pending retirement by burying one’s head in the sand, even if it leads to denial or a form of financial anxiety. Simply, to have a lifestyle you enjoy in retirement you need to make some decisions today. In order to make the right decisions you need a strategy and an action plan and most importantly; execution. For most people, retirement is not about investing in financial products, because in reality few people have surplus money to invest. In fact a high proportion of people are going to be going into retirement with a mortgage and with no savings so buying shares or financial products is not an option on any level. So instead of investing, the first step to retirement is to make sure you are mortgage free before you hit retirement. If you are not mortgage free then you need a plan to sort this. Time is of the essence, more so than ever before. The sooner you start, the sooner you take control back. Remember, before you start you must diagnose your financial situation. You need to understand what your retirement will look like and what it will cost. For most, there is going to be a shortfall between what you are likely to have and what you will need. A bridge must then be built between the two. For many this is a very sensitive process that takes some bravery to confront. You need to be free of emotion. It can be challenging but you simply need to be getting ahead because falling backwards in not an option. Whilst everyone’s goals are different and their situations are unique, universally, planning for your future is not supposed to cause anxiousness and retirement should not be ignored. (HANNAH MCQUEEN - Director) F PN ENABLEME, Financial Personal Trainers, T: 0800 897 898 www.enableme.co.nz

Hannah McQueen - Director - enableMe - Financial Personal Trainers

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS

ENHANCE YOUR WARDROBES WITH INNOVATIVE INTERIORS Wardrobes and home storage have evolved to become stylish elements of the home, and form an integral part of a well-planned and functioning living environment. Innovative Interiors can transform your inner-city bungalow that was built without wardrobes by installing a ‘stand alone’ wardrobe that doesn’t even require a builder! Fit out your contemporary home with beautiful walk-in wardrobe systems that make getting ready in the morning a breeze. Space efficiency is what they do best and it doesn’t stop at the bedroom. If you need extra storage, chances are they can build it for you - desks and home offices, bookcases, toy storage and laundries. Fit out your garage or creative space with their new Formula Garage range, available installed, or flat packed for the DIY home owner. Innovative Interiors design, manufacture and install, and can work with your contractor or manage the whole process for you including supplying a builder. They specialise in easy care melamine units with 200 colours to choose from, in modular or custom designs. Sliding Doors are not only for wardrobes, they make great room dividers for the home or office too. Innovative Interiors manufacture their own stunningly quiet Whisper Sliding Doors that glide with the lightest touch, framed in aluminium. A range of panel options are available including mirrors, melamine, acrylic, and paint finishes. Bring your plans or measurements to one of their showrooms and their designers can start brainstorming on the spot, or phone for an on-site appointment. Showrooms are PN open Monday to Friday 8.30am to 4.00pm and Saturday 9.30am to 12.30pm. F INNOVATIVE INTERIORS, 24s Allright Place, Mt Wellington and 49a Arrenway Drive, Albany, T: 0800 80 30 50 www.innovativeinteriors.co.nz

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IT’S SO EASY WITH AN EDIBLE ISLAND ON THE APARTMENT BALCONY FRESH EVERYDAY, GROWING AND READY FROM PLANTER TO KITCHEN... BRILLIANT! Made here in New Zealand from recyclable non toxic polyethylene, the planters are perfect for creating a vegetable, flower or plant garden in very small spaces. Wheels are available to be fitted for easy manoeuvrability. F PN

www.edibleislands.com.au

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS SEA SHEPHERD ANNOUNCES PLANS TO TAKE OVER CHASE FROM NEW ZEALAND NAVY Captain Sid Chakravarty of the Sea Shepherd ship, Sam Simon, has announced plans to intercept three illegal fishing vessels that fended off the New Zealand Navy last month. The announcement comes after reports that the New Zealand Navy has now abandoned its operation to intercept the poachers in the Southern Ocean, and has returned to port.

Captain of the Bob Barker, Peter Hammarstedt, has criticised the Australian government for leaving the New Zealand government stranded. He said, “Last year, the Australian government failed to deliver on their promise to send a customs vessel to the Antarctic to monitor the whaling fleet. This year, the Australian government budgeted for two, 40-day Southern Ocean patrols. Still, New Zealand was left to single-handedly tackle the poachers - one vessel up against three. With the New Zealand Navy ship en route back to Wellington, and the Australian government nowhere to be seen, Sea Shepherd is now the only sheriff in town.”

Captain Chakravarty said, “With three criminal boats on the loose and the Navy on its way back, the Sam Simon is now the only vessel with the intentions and the capability to locate the poachers once again. We have an intimate knowledge of these seas, we have an ice-strengthened vessel and we have the will to directly intervene and physically shut down their criminal operations.” The HMNZS Wellington intercepted the three poaching vessels, engaged in illegal fishing activity in the Southern Ocean. Reports from the New Zealand government stated that the vessels were intercepted west of the Ross Sea, however their exact position was not released. The three vessels, the Songhua, Kunlun and Yongding, are confirmed to be registered in Equatorial Guinea and are known to have links to the infamous Spanish crime syndicate, Vidal Armadores. All three vessels have now been listed with Interpol Purple Notices. Despite the fact that a request by the New Zealand government to board the vessels was granted by Equatorial Guinea, two of the ships’ captains refused to allow New Zealand Navy to board. The poachers then engaged in evasive manoeuvring, and subsequently fled.

DON’T MISS THE MARCH

Since 26 December, the Sam Simon has been involved in mammoth operations to extract illegal gillnets, left by the poaching vessel Thunder, from the Southern Ocean. More than 60 kilometres of illegal gillnet have been retrieved so far, with over 1,000 toothfish and numerous non-target marine species found dead in the nets. “For the past three weeks, my crew and I have been retrieving illegal gillnets left by the poaching vessel, Thunder, from the Antarctic waters. We have a responsibility to see the retrieval operations through to the end. Once this is complete, we will set our sights on these three new targets,” said Captain Chakravarty. PN The Bob Barker continues its record-breaking pursuit of the Interpol-listed Thunder. F

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MARCH SPECIAL FEATURES + VIVA ITALIA + FASHION / SHOES + CAREERS & EMPLOYMENT

TO BOOK ADVERTISING: Jo Barrett on 021 324 510 or Jessie Kollen on 021 166 2002 t: 09 361 3356 or 09 378 8553 e: joannebarrett@xtra.co.nz e: jessiekollen@gmail.com w: www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

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MY FAVOURITE ROOM

Veronica Crockford-Pound Veronica Crockford-Pound works for Stephen Marr and Sans Ceuticals in Ponsonby, doing PR and working in their creative team. She lives in Eden Terrace with her longtime friend and collaborator Claire Duncan and Geva Downey. Veronica told Ponsonby News, “I grew up in Picton Street, Ponsonby. Best place to grow up! Now I work in Ponsonby so I’ve never really left.”

She says, “My favourite room is this one, our lounge, kitchen, dining room... (but it’s not very roomy!) It used to be a funeral parlour but now it’s the place we all have a drink at the end of the day. It’s the heart of the flat. Within the room, my favourite things are the (currently dying) plants, the old fireplace and its kauri walls. F PN

HAPPY 90TH BIRTHDAY GREY LYNN LIBRARY It’s only fitting Grey Lynn library celebrated its 90th birthday last month - 13 December. “The library was officially opened on a Saturday afternoon so the hard working ‘industrial public’ of the suburb could attend on their half day off,” says community library manager Alola Robertson. The heritage listed building at 474 Great North Road, has seen its neighbourhood change over the years, but what hasn’t changed is the community’s passion for its library.

The Grey Lynn Library team; Zainab, Helen, Lucia, Jo, Claire, Alela, Sergio and Alison.

“The Grey Lynn Library is much loved and remains an important part of its community,” says Waitemata Local Board Chair Shale Chambers. “It is wonderful to see such a significant milestone celebrated.”

photography: Martin Leach

The 1924 building, designed by notable Auckland architect William Gummer, has played host to generations of families including his own. Nine decades after Gummer designed the building, his granddaughter Claire Gummer has joined the staff, while his grandniece, Anne Gummer, is a member along with her children Olive and Francis. “One of the first things we did when we moved to Grey Lynn was to walk down as a family to join our local library,” says Anne. There were readings by several local authors from Stephanie Johnson and Anne Kennedy; board games; art activities; live music from the Central City Songbirds choir PN and the Down Home Girls and a celebration cake. F

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The Central City Songbirds choir provide entertainment for Grey Lynn Library’s 90th Birthday. PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


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ASK AN ARCHITECT: DANIEL MARSHALL Each month architect Daniel Marshall answers readers’ property related questions.

Q: A:

What is conceptual design? We have asked for a price from an architect to draw up our house and they have a fee for that. We know exactly what we want so why should we pay for that?

Conceptual design is the assimilation of an aspirational brief, with the complexities of context and the restrictions of regulatory frameworks and budget. An architect spends five years at university honing their skills to rationalise massive complexities into a functional and beautiful form. The value of this should not be underestimated, one of my favourite quotes about architecture is that it should be a process of editing rather than addition. Less actually is More.

a design continues. One of the best compliments one of my clients has given me was; “you gave us everything we never knew we always wanted.” These clients came from a civil engineering background and had given me the exact dimensions of every space in the house that they wanted, and yet the final arrangement was nothing like they had conceived. And they loved it! This is what you are paying for. And to be honest, this is where the financial value of your project can be most enhanced if you choose to use one of Auckland’s many talented residential architects.

We have made a diagram that we feel clearly illustrates this process. Made with rings from the bottom of wine glasses. Because, well, wine helps.

An early concept drawing for a house in Waiheke from my sketch book.

Diagram indicating Daniel Marshall Architects’ approach to concept design. Often we find that when clients say they know exactly what they want, the reality is that they have clearly thought about their brief - which is fantastic, because having a very clear brief before a project starts is incredibly important. But this is not a design, because the sculptural arrangement of the functional requirements is where the magic happens. It is when you walk into a space and you go “wow! this space feels amazing” and you can’t identify why. That wonder was born in the initial space making and is enhanced as

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Different architects will deliver a concept in different ways, but it is the idea that is important. Our office will provide sketch plans and a physical model at 1:100 scale. Some offices will create sketches and others might provide computer renderings. They are all media of the conceptual process and all valuable if they help get the idea across. The concept is the moment of creation, it is the DNA that will grow through the design process and the financial value of a good architectural concept can not be measured. (DANIEL MARSHALL) F PN DANIEL MARSHALL ARCHITECTS, 472 Karangahape Road, T: 09 354 3587 www.marshall-architect.co.nz

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THE BOYS’ BOOK CLUB WHAT WE’RE READING Here are some books us blokes on the Ponsonby News team have recently enjoyed. We love reading in the bath or in bed. A real stress buster!

MARTIN LEACH As Luck Would Have It by Sir Derek Jacobi (Harper Collins) The chairman of my company in London called me back in the day asking if I’d like to have dinner with Sir Derek Jacobi. What an interesting evening we spent in his company. We met three or four times subsequently and the last time I caught up with him was when we were both on the same Air India flight to New York. He had some immigration issues at JFK and almost wasn’t allowed in to the States - he was to appear in a play on Broadway, but was travelling on a tourist visa. What an amazing career he has had. Star of stage, screen and television, and one of only two people to be awarded two Knighthoods, Sir Derek Jacobi is one of Britain’s most distinguished actors. “If you want to be an actor, don’t. If you need to be an actor, do.”

Theatre. Often admired for his willingness to grapple with even the most dislikeable of characters, Derek Jacobi has worked continuously throughout his career, starring in roles ranging from the lead in I, Claudius to Hitler in Inside the Third Reich and Francis Bacon in the controversial Love Is The Devil. But it is his numerous Shakespearean roles that have gained him worldwide recognition. This book is, however, much more than a career record. Funny, warm and honest, Jacobi brings us his insider’s view on the world of acting. From a simple childhood in the East End to the height of fame on stage and screen, Derek recalls his journey in full: from the beginnings of his childhood dreams to the legendary productions, the renowned stars and the intimate off-stage moments.

JAY PLATT Redemption Song: The Definitive Biography of Joe Strummer by Chris Salewicz (HARPER)

The world of theatre could not have been further from Derek’s childhood: an only child, born in Leytonstone, east London. With his father a department store manager and his mother a secretary, his was very much a working class background. But nonetheless Derek always knew he was going to be an actor, and he remembers clearly the first time he was in costume - draping himself in his mother’s glorious wedding veil as he paraded up and down the Essex Road with his friends.

I spent decades living around Kensington and Notting Hill in London and often spied The Clash’s Joe Strummer around our neighbourhood. Chris Salewicz, a journalist, was a close friend of Strummer from 1977 until Joe’s death in Christmas 2002 shook the world.

A few short years later, at the age of seven, Derek made his acting debut, playing both lead roles in a local library production of The Prince and the Swineherd. By the age of 18, Derek was playing Hamlet (his most famed role) at the Edinburgh festival. He won a scholarship to Cambridge, where he studied and acted alongside other future acting greats including Ian McKellen. His talent was quickly recognised and in 1963 he was invited to become one of the first members of Laurence Olivier’s National

With full approval and cooperation of relatives, companions and fellow musicians, he writes the definitive account of British rock ‘n’ roll’s most fascinating of idols. The Clash was the most influential band of its generation, producing intelligent punk anthems such as ‘London Calling’, ‘White Riot’ and ‘Tommy Gun’. Both Strummer and The Clash transcended music stardom to become heroes to their fans and peers - this is an honest tribute to them, and the best and last word on the subject.

DESIGN AND COPY THAT GETS RESULTS Creative ideas, persuasive copy and clean, uncluttered design, all pitched in the right tone and style to suit your business. Copywriter Sue Reidy and designer Adrienne Land, two long-time friends and colleagues with complementary skills, work as a freelance creative team. Both women have decades of experience behind them in design and communications. They work closely with clients to get their businesses noticed generating strong ideas, eye-catching design and polished copywriting. They work from their home offices, Sue in Ponsonby and Adrienne in Grey Lynn. This gives them the flexibility and the ability to keep their overheads low and their rates competitive. They meet regularly to brainstorm ideas together. “There are many advantages to working with an independent designer/writer team,” says Sue. “Clients receive a very personal level of service. You’ll be talking to the people who work on your project and have a personal stake in achieving great results.”

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Sue and Adrienne offer a comprehensive range of professional design and copywriting services. Design and copywriting for: brochures, fliers, logos, advertisements, websites, newsletters, packaging, point-of-sale, signage, catalogues, books. Copywriting, rewriting and editing for: speeches, web content, newsletters, staff profiles, case studies, corporate histories, business profiles, business letters, blogs. If you’re looking for creative input to promote your business, please contact Sue or Adrienne to have a chat about your requirements. F PN SUE REIDY, Copywriter/project manager, M: 021 637 887 suereidy@gmail.com ADRIENNE LAND, Designer/art director, M: 021 310 019 adrienne@abd.co.nz

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BIRKENHEAD VILLA BATHROOM This classic Birkenhead bathroom uses marble replica tile to stunning effect, designer Greg Chichester has created a modern and spacious bathroom without compromising the unique features of the villa. The tile replicates the natural look of Calacatta marble, with superb attention to detail, variation and subtlety in the design. Greg chose the tile for its bold style, yet due to the quality of the replication, there is a high variation in the faces of the tile, which keeps the look fresh and interesting. Using the same tile on the wall and floors gives the room an open feel, maximising the space. Tiles are a great option to consider as a marble replica. Highly water resistant and hard wearing, they will look as good as the day you put them in for decades with no maintenance required. Designed by Greg Chichester www.chichesterdesign.co.nz TILE SPACE, 3/114 St Georges Bay Road T: 09 270 8796, www.tiles.co.nz

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REAL ESTATE UPDATE: KAREN SPIRES

A new year, a new home and a new beginning Happy New Year! We couldn’t have asked for a better start to 2015 than to see in the year with a couple of weeks of gorgeous sunshine. While many of us head away over the Christmas and New Year break to enjoy some of our incredible beaches and seaside holiday spots, those who remained in Ponsonby by no means missed out on the fun. In fact, there is something strangely satisfying about not having to wait for a table at your favourite cafe or do laps of Ponsonby Road to find a car park.

how much people value living here in our wonderful city. We have a strong economy at present and plenty of jobs available to skilled and qualified people. Auckland is continually featured as one of the best places in the world to raise a family and the proximity of beaches, native bush and world class facilities makes for a lifestyle that is second to none.

I love Ponsonby at any time of the year, but summer is when it truly comes into its own. One of our favourite things to do as a family is to fill up a picnic basket with some delicious goodies from Nosh and find a spot under the trees at Victoria Park for lunch. We take a ball and sometimes a cricket set and go home feeling blissfully sun drenched and relaxed.

If buying or selling property is one of your New Year resolutions give us a call to discuss PN how we can help you to achieve your goals. (KAREN SPIRES) F Karen Spires is a Bayleys Real Estate ‘Top Achiever’ - placing her sales data among the top 5% of salespeople within the company.

While the real estate business never truly stops, there comes a time when we have to ditch the jandals and head back to the office. We have hit the ground running at Bayleys following up on strong interest in property throughout Ponsonby and the inner-western suburbs. We are seeing unprecedented numbers at our open homes with families, couples and investors making the most of the warm weather to get out house hunting. When families return from their holidays and the kids go back to school we typically see a settling period in the market as those thinking of making a move begin to put thought into action. We are constantly reading headlines alluding to the poor affordability of housing in Auckland and while there is no denying prices have risen, it is a direct reflection of

ARRIVING THIS MONTH AT DAWSON’S FURNITURE NEW FROM ITALY’S 2015 CALLIGARIS COLLECTION IS THE DELIGHTFUL SAMI DINING chair. Elegantly characterised by its quilted fabric and contrasting cross-stitch, available in a variety of fabric and leg finishes, this chair is extremely versatile in its presentation.

DAWSON’S FURNITURE, 1/1 Holder Place, North Shore, T: 09 476 1121 www.dawsonsfurniture.co.nz

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MILLY NOLAN: DESIGNER GIFTS

A day at the beach 2015 is off to an exceptional start, with back-to-back sunny days encouraging frequent trips to the beach. Cover all bases when packing the car or day bag by including some of our all time favourite beach essentials.

Kubb Brothers Kubb Set, from $230 Petanque never fails to amuse, however our new favourite pastime is Swedish lawn game Kubb. Described as a combination of bowls and horseshoes, it’s highly competitive and fun for all ages. The Beach People Roundie Towel, $140 Possibly Australasia’s most wanted warm weather accessory right now, The Beach People’s Roundie Towel accommodates not one, but two people, perfect for when a certain someone conveniently forgets to bring their own. Kakkoi WOW Bluetooth Speaker, $100 Easily play tunes anywhere with WOW, a speaker that wirelessly streams music from any Bluetooth enabled device. Its durable silicone housing is suprisingly sand friendly, too. Coast Picnic Bag, $400 If you are serious about your day trip snacks, house them in Coast’s purpose built picnic bag. It sports numerous handy pockets for bottle openers, cutlery and knives, is fully insulated and makes for convenient storage when you opt to bring a few chilled bottles of rosé to share with mates.

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Govino Plastic Wine Glass Set, $25 These elegant plastic wine glasses are a godsend for the beach loving bon vivant. Made from BPA-free poly-mer, the vessels reflect a wine’s colour and aromatics much like crystal. House Doctor Matt Thermos, $80 The ultimate transeasonal essential, the Matt Thermos is fashioned from stainless steel, keeping drinks hot in winter and cold in summer. Comes in three pastel hues. Family Croquet Set, $350 Planning a full day at the beach? Cart along this croquet set and set up on a patch of beach front lawn. Hours of lazy summer entertainment will follow. Ottoloom Bondi Towel, $54 Lighten the load and swap heavy terry towels for cotton ones at the beach. They are highly absorbant, look great and also function admirably as a sarong or cover up. (MILLY NOLAN) F PN All products available from www.mildredandco.com

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BIRD OF THE MONTH The white heron - kotuku The story of the white heron, or kotuku, and the idea that it can be seen only once every 10 years was one of my favourites when I was a child. It stuck in my mind and it took me many years to recognise it for the fable it was. The white heron is one of the most enchanting birds to visit New Zealand and they are rarely sighted. Some believe that a sighting is a good omen and kotuku are considered tapu by Maori. The only heronry in New Zealand is in Okarito in South Westland and it is presumed that a favourable wind carried some individual birds over to us from Australia. It is rare for one breeding site to be in use for so many years - in this case it could have been centuries. The Waitangiroto colony has many distinguishing features that make it a perfect long term breeding site for the heron: natural protection from predators due to being surrounded by swamps, forest and rivers (which also contribute to the difficulty of sighting the kotuku). The Waitangiroto Nature Reserve was established in 1976 and for decades there has been limited access to the herons during breeding season - all tourists view the birds from a ‘hide’ across the river. European settlers first discovered the colony in 1865 and spent the next 70 years destroying the nests and taking the feathers. By 1940 there were only four nests remaining and measures were taken to ensure the colony’s survival. Maori certainly knew of the colony, set in the dense bush alongside the river. They would capture individuals but always ensured the total population remained stable and viable. The captured individuals would be kept alive and every few months a prized feather would be plucked - these plumes were reserved for high-ranking chiefs and their feathers were tapu. It was believed that if a man dreamt of a skull of one of his ancestors decorated with kotuku feathers it meant his wife would have a boy (as opposed to dreaming of black huia feathers which would signify a girl). The kotuku is also known as the bird that accompanies the recently departed into the spirit world, and takes them to their final resting place in Hawaiki. The white heron may be rare in New Zealand but it is common in parts of Asia and Australia. They are tall, with a slender neck and thin legs - the neck is held kinked when in flight. They are found solely in Okarito, although during winter they have been known to disperse around northern estuaries, some city gardens or across to the Chatham Islands. The saying “te kotuku rerenga tahi,” the white heron of a single flight, refers to distinguished guests who seldom visit - sadly I am not expecting a white heron to visit my PN back garden anytime soon. (FINN MCLENNAN-ELLIOTT) F

EUROPEAN INFLUENCES FROM FORMA Gibson Sofa and Pad Sofa Proudly designed and handmade in New Zealand, Forma integrates European influences with New Zealand lifestyle allowing you to customise their furniture to create your own special environment. F PN

FORMA CONTEMPORARY FURNITURE, 51 - 53 the Strand, Parnell T: 09 368 7694 www.forma.co.nz

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HEIDI PADAIN: ENTERTAINMENT IN YOUR GARDEN Over the years, my partner Martin and I have developed a keen interest in birds, and we have become exceptionally good at recognising a wide variety of bird calls and their meanings. This has certainly proven invaluable of late. One fine morning we decided to have our coffee on the deck. As soon as we were seated we heard the familiar high pitched call of a fledgling song thrush. What concerned us both was the close proximity of this call. One of the things that is tricky about locating a fledgling bird of any kind, is that the sound is often seemingly everywhere, all at once.

I can hear a variety of bird species persistently calling out in unison. On one such occasion my investigation led me no further than my front door, which, I should inform you, is roughly 25 feet up in the trees, so when I came across this bold predator I was both shocked, and rather amused.

We both set about locating the little bird, and walked around the edges of our deck peering into the nearby trees. We could find nothing, but the call was persistent. Suddenly, I felt a tickle against my bare ankle. I looked down, and there was the cutest little baby thrush. It must have been there, on the deck staring up at us the entire time we were searching.

In the cabbage tree, directly facing our front door, I found a mischievous feline wearing nothing but a pained expression, no collar, no bells. This cat’s rotund rear was wedged firmly in the fork of the tree. Questions formed in my mind, how long has it been here? Is it hurt? Why is it glaring at me like that? How the hell do I get it out of there?

We resumed drinking our coffee, and allowed the little fur ball to roam around at will. “Are we running a bird crèche now? I hope the parents aren’t just dropping them off here.” Martin’s question was answered by the timely appearance of an adult thrush carrying a beakful of wriggling nourishment. “No, honey,” I said, “on this occasion we’re just providing the dining table.” To be fair we do appear to provide a bit of a crèche arrangement here, but with parents mostly in attendance. In the weeks that followed, a wide variety of birds came along and introduced their young to us, and some fledglings simply introduced themselves.

The tipping point - I added my laughter to the chit! chit! chit! alarm calls of the birds. This gave rise to what I can only assume to be further humiliation, and indignation. Thankfully this rather deranged looking cat mustered up enough feistiness to be able to haul his entire furriness from out of the fork of the tree; completely unaided, then, quickly, very quickly, clawing its way back down, shot out of sight like a fluffy rocket. For all you cat lovers out there, repeat after me. Collars and bells, collars and bells, collars and bells... (HEIDI PADAIN) F PN To see more of Heidi’s photographic work go to www.flickr.com and type Heidi Padain into the search box.

Strange as it may seem to some of you when reading this, I actually respond, and investigate quite quickly when I hear birds sounding their alarm call, especially when

For all you cat lovers out there, repeat after us “Collars and bells, collars and bells, collars and bells...”

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OFF THE WALL Textiles and interiors expert Rebecca Bowering considers how we’re no longer taking a strictly balanced approach to interiors. I have a penchant for watching the Sky Living Channel. Recently I heard one of their designers make a comment that caused me to pause and think: his prognosis was that the placement of objects in the home had changed. The “old way” was symmetrical: cushions two by two, candlesticks or other objects neatly at either end of the mantel pieces and paintings and pictures side by side. The moment I heard it, I thought to myself that he’d made a huge generalisation. He went on to say that “nowadays” we prefer to place things in little clusters of three, five or more, but usually in odd numbered configurations. So I truly started to think. And he is quite right. Unless you have a formal setting, it’s more usual to have things arranged asymmetrically. A few cushions of differing sizes on the sofa, or a rainbow of coloured cushions the same size and shape, or even just one, casually tossed off-centre. Our precious collectables too are now in little groups, usually off-centre to a painting or mirror, and of differing heights, sizes and colours. Paintings now are often hung at eye height (or just above) and in groups - a column of three next to a single, or even haphazardly across the wall, but keeping a level to the top line. Where I disagree with him, however, is that “nowadays” there is a place for everything. I believe symmetry works well on either side of a fireplace, where built-in units or shelves are concerned, or if you are incorporating a couple of French chairs, or even stools to either perch on by the fire, or to put your feet on for comfort. A fabulous bed lends itself to symmetry: gorgeous bedside tables, cushions placed decadently in front of the stack of delicious feather pillows. However, to counteract the rigidity, consider a variety of paintings or mirrors above the bed, or a single cushion that truly makes a statement placed artfully in the middle.

THE PHANTOM IMPLOSIVE SOUND CENTRE Phantom is the future of hi-fi in your home. On its own it will replace your stereo systems, speakers, docking stations and homecinema. It can be a thousand times superior in terms of sound quality, thanks to several extraordinary inventions in them, including ‘Heart Bass Implosion’, all exclusive to and created by Devialet’s world leading audio engineers. Phantom brings you a different sound, in fact arguably for the first time truly the best sound in the world. Phantom actually produces a unique sound with a physical impact, with never reached before power, clarity and sharpness which brings an intense emotional experience. And once you bring it home, Phantom evolves, automatically upgrades itself without requiring your intervention, and reacts to your presence... Is it alive? Rediscover the music on your smartphones, tablets and computers, 100% wirelessly connected, by Wi-Fi. Phantom can play on its own, or with other Phantoms, in one room, or throughout the entire house. Whether alone, or with friends, you will experience true happiness. Make no mistake - Phantom is a truly revolutionary sound system, with full stereo sound from a single Phantom, or enhanced stereo by using two Phantoms together for larger areas or up to eight Phantoms to create an immersive surround sound, it will change how you listen to music. And with no cables, no other appliances cluttering your space, and its own unique stand system - it’s pure style. Phantom will be here in May 2015. For more details go to www.theaudioconsultant.co.nz THE AUDIO CONSULTANT, 23 Williamson Avenue T: 09 376 6176

Often a pair of chairs, whatever their style, looks great in a room. Chairs offer a lighter effect than another sofa, and they give you an opportunity to put another layer into your decor. Use a fabric on both chairs that can be a feature, but that can also coordinate back to the other furniture in the room. Trade Me sometimes has some great deals on pairs of chairs, and having these restored and reupholstered is well worth the effort. Whichever way you see things now, it’s the room itself that will probably give you the answer about whether symmetry, asymmetry or a combination of the two is best. Oh, and your designer too, of course! Atelier Textiles owner and managing director Rebecca Bowering explores the latest textile trends and new interior design ideas every month. For more information visit PN www.atelier.co.nz F

Let the size and shape of your room determine whether an asymmetrical layout or symmetrical approach to your interior design will work best.

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UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL Richard Adams, Atticus Limited A contemporary artist, Richard Adams first exhibited his works in 1982 at the Molesworth Gallery in Wellington. Since then the now Auckland based artist has achieved national and international recognition. He has exhibited in New Zealand, Dubai, Tokyo, Sydney, New York and London. In addition to painting, Richard is also an established musician, playing Jazz violin for Nairobi Trio. He has published a book of poems and co-directed and acted in a feature film ‘Artman’. Richard tells Ponsonby News... “I live in Brown Street in Ponsonby. My partner is Sarah and we have a son Jasper who is 11. Jasper is about to start at Ponsonby Intermediate. I also have a grown up daughter Tess and two grandchildren who live in Sydney. We have a dog Messi (Jasper named him after the soccer player). I bike and scooter most days and usually make my way to the beach in Herne Bay for a swim. I’m spending this holiday at home painting (although we did have a great trip to the States for Christmas). Your best friend would say of you... I am a creature of habit. Your mother would say of you... I was a determined dreamer. What are your virtues? Good wine. And your vices? Far too much of it - and apparently I talk too much. Who’s your ultimate rock icon? Has to be Mick Jagger. What’s your secret passion? Travel. I’ll go anywhere, any time. What’s your secret talent? Getting the window seat on an aeroplane. What is your perfect Sunday? A game of soccer with Jasper and dinner at home. What’s inspired you recently? The Grand Canyon - magnificent.

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What were you going to be when you grew up? I wanted to be a seagull at one point... My mother was a big influence on me as a child. She was a classically trained violinist and taught me to play but she also gave me a huge appreciation of all the arts. There was never an alternative for me. What’s your favourite Ponsonby cafe? Bambina. Favourite Ponsonby restaurant? Prego and Ponsonby Bistro. Favourite Ponsonby store? Cyco. Favourite fashion store? Fifth Avenue. Name your desert island distraction: Audio books and jazz - preferably Miles Davis. The house is on fire and your family is safe - what do you save? My mother’s violin. Also my computer as it has 50,000 photos. One thing you have learned about life is...? You have to believe in yourself and listen to your children! What is your standout sale? My standout sale of the last 12 months was a commission for an ex prime minister.” F PN RICHARD ADAMS, T: 021 677 887 www.richardadams.co.nz RICHARD ADAMS is exhibiting at OREX GALLERY, Arch Hill from 10 - 28 February www.orexgallery.co.nz

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FOUR WALLS ARCHITECTURE UNVEILED Spending most of 2014 hidden behind covered scaffolding at their Jervois Road office, Four Walls Architecture has now emerged as one of Ponsonby’s leading local practices. “It was good to see out our windows again!” says Amy Hendry, founder of the practice. The building underwent a long-awaited maintenance overhaul, and it is fitting that an architecture practice has moved in to such a local landmark. Amy and co-director Claire Paterson believe in creating architecture that is informed by the site, the client, their budget and brief. “That may sound prosaic, but we avoid applying a particular ‘style’ to our architecture,” says Amy. “Instead it’s about finding the crux of the project and marrying those core components through original, thoughtful and environmentally responsible design.” Four Walls Architecture focuses primarily on residential and small scale commercial design, in both renovations and new builds. “We approach every project with a clean slate: we consider how the client, their site, their budget and brief will affect planning, form, materials and finishes. Our clients can expect their project to be one of a kind.” The company also prides themselves on client relationships. “At all stages of their project our clients can expect excellent design, clear communication, thorough drawing and specifications and friendly, dedicated service,” says Claire. Amy and Claire have over 20 combined years of experience in award winning residential and commercial architecture across Auckland and New Zealand. New clients are welcome to stop by or call the office at any time. “There’s no obligation,” says Amy, “we’d love to talk about your project and how we can help.” F PN FOUR WALLS ARCHITECTURE, 122A Jervois Road, M: 027 452 3027 www.fourwallsarchitecture.co.nz The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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THE HISTORICAL BOROUGH OF PONSONBY AND GREY LYNN: STREET NAMES

Old Mill Road Old Mill Road derives its moniker from a water mill that was constructed by two Scotsmen who arrived in New Zealand in 1839. Many early settlers who arrived here found opportunities galore that would never have been available in the ‘old’ countries. Among the earliest pioneers was William Motion, who was born at Broughty Ferry, Forfarshire, Scotland in 1820. He was a carpenter and at the tender age of eighteen, he sailed to Australia with his friend, Joseph Low but a year later, in 1839 they both arrived at the Bay of Islands. Coincidentally William was present at the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi and his name appears on the list of witnesses. A year later the boys decamped to Auckland and the two enterprising lads, because that’s all they were, formed a partnership and built the city’s first flour mill at Mechanic’s Bay. This business was very successful for many years but they had been investigating various streams around the city that would be suitable to power a larger mill and so extend their activities. Maori valued Waiorea or Western Springs for its clean clear water and the eels that thrived in the stream. It was fed by rain falling on the slopes of the three volcanoes, Three Kings, Mount Albert, and Mount Eden. The water ran underground for several miles through lava flows and was well filtered by the time it emerged as the spring that was acquired after colonisation. The partners were now affluent enough to look at purchasing a large property where they could grow their own wheat and grind it as well as other growers’ crops. Their fields extended as far as Meola Road and they constructed a water mill that was situated at the seaward end of what is now the Auckland Zoo. Wheat from outlying districts was sailed in to Auckland and punted up to the mill at high tide. Over two decades the plant expanded into a massive operation employing as many as 13 cutters during the peak season in the mouth of the waterway now known as Motions creek. In the meantime, with the influx of new migrants Auckland was growing and in dire need of a reliable and plentiful supply of unpolluted water. In 1874 the government decided to approach the well-to-do William Motions and Joseph Low and persuade them to sell 120 acres of their land, including the springs, to the Provincial Council. A pump house was built next to the springs and supplied Auckland with its water till the early 1900s when large dams and reservoirs were constructed in the Waitakere Ranges. The old pump house is on display at MOTAT, which opened in 1964, and Western Springs Park now surrounds a natural spring fed lake that is a wildlife sanctuary for both birds and people. The lake is also a refuge for the native orea or eels that can be seen trailing the the swans and ducks, remaining an original part of Western Spring’s ecological heritage. The lake’s Maori Name is Te Wai Orea, which means ‘waters of the eel’. Supposedly, the sale was extremely beneficial to William and Joseph. The former retired from business at the age of 54 and lived at his residence, Western Springs Lodge until he died in 1894. Curiously the mansion, for that’s what it was, had a change of name to Hastings Hall for some unknown reason. At that time it looked over green fields and dirt tracks with no other houses in sight. Unlike later ‘makers of fortunes’ who often made unwise decisions and consequently suffered financial loss, William’s affluence remained secure. He married one of Joseph Low’s daughters who produced six children before she died in 1865. He married again in 1869 to a daughter of Mr John Cowie, a very prominent man of Londonderry, Ireland. There were two sons from that union who farmed a large property on the Otaua swamp near the road that bears their name. Records have hardly any information about Joseph Low, and William seems to have been the one that created a dynasty, but they certainly made a formidable team and deserve that a street commemorates their energy and enterprise. (DEIRDRE TOHILL) F PN

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AUCKLAND HOUSING MARKET HAS STRONG FINISH TO 2014 December’s residential property sales in Auckland were the strongest they have been in a December for the past decade, with sales numbers up significantly, prices reaching all-time highs, and the number of available listings reaching an all-time low. “It was our busiest December in the last 10 years with demand never being higher, or choice lower,” said Peter Thompson, Managing Director of Barfoot & Thompson. “Even though December was the shortest selling month of the year we sold 1050 properties, our fourth busiest month of the year." “Sales in December were 28.5% higher than in December 2013. The average sales price in December 2014 was $758,891, $1982 higher than November’s average price.” The median price increased to $720,000 in December, which was $28,500 or 4.1% higher than November’s, and it is the first time the median price has moved above $700,000. “At the same time the number of properties on our books at the end of December was 2500, our lowest number for any month end in the past 10 years. For us, this represents less than two months’ stock, and indicates that in the first quarter of this year, buyer choice will remain severely limited. “In part, December’s strong activity was a flow over from October and November, which were catch up months following a relatively low period of activity during September caused by the General Election. Although the year ended with record prices and sales activity, overall prices in 2014 rose slower than they did in 2013. “The average price increased by 10.3% in 2014, compared to 11.1% in 2013 while the median price increased by 11.1% compared to 12.7%. The past two years of strong price growth is reflected in the significant change in sales volumes in both the higher and lower price segments of the market. In 2014 29.5% of all homes sold for under $500,000. A year earlier, 38.6% of all sales were in this price category. “The same trend is found at the top end of the market, with sales of homes in the $1 million and above category in 2014 representing 17.2% of all sales. A year earlier PN it was 12.4%.” F

WHAT’S NEW AT TRENZSEATER ARCHIE DINING TABLE The Archie Dining table is one of Trenzseater’s latest New Zealand made designs. It features a sandblasted solid oak top with a tapered angled steel frame. Top and base are available in multiple colour options. F PN TRENZSEATER, 80 Parnell Road, T: 09 303 4151 www.trenzseater.com

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JAY PLATT: WE CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT...

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1. Shooting Sparrow rose candle and unicorn head candle $59.50 each @ Bob and Friends www.bobandfriends.co.nz; 2. ‘Hay’ Hand Mirror $161 @ Simon James Concept Store www.store.simonjamesdesign.com; 3. Riess Stovetop Enamel Kettle $154.95 @ Milly’s www.millyskitchen.co.nz; 4. Ahoy Feathered ‘Cross’ $420 @ Republic Home www.republichome.com; 5. Vetyver Bergamot Body Cleanser $49, Body Hydrant $99 and soap bar $20 all by Ingrid Staines @ Tessuti www.tessuti.co.nz; 6. Jonathan Adler Key/Jewellery Box $199 @ Askew www.askew.co.nz; 7. ‘So Nude’ fragrance 30ml $139 @ Askew www.askew.co.nz

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1. ‘Love’ Yellow mug, Lilac jug and Green bowl $24.50 each @ Milly’s www.millyskitchen.co.nz; 2. Mor marshmallow soy candle $59.90 @ Chambers Linen & Gifts www.chambersnz.co.nz; 3. C.A.M Flamingo cushion $99 @ Askew www.askew.co.nz; 4. Minimalux Neon table light $288 @ Simon James Concept Store www.store.simonjamesdesign.com; 5. Byrne & Love Candle ‘Vanilla Bean’ $70 @ Republic Home www.republichome.com; 6. Morgan Haines Jug $186 @ Tessuti www.tessuti.co.nz; 7. Halosmith Rose Quartz Bracelet $159 and Rose Quartz Necklace $200 @ Republic Home www.republichome.com STYLING: Jay Platt PHOTOGRAPHY: Danilo Santana David, Fisher Santana.

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photography: Aaron Moffitt

FINN MCLENNAN-ELLIOTT

Silo Park – our neighbourhood arts and social centre The wonderful Silo Park in the Wynyard Quarter has a busy February schedule of music, arts, markets and films. It is a place to relax and spend a sunny summer afternoon - and it’s only just down the road! Sunday 8 February, Silo Markets will host an ‘Upcycled’ market to celebrate all things sustainable, repurposed, recycled and upcycled. Silo Park believes in the importance of sustainable practices and showcases innovation, creativity and impact-conscious products. Sunday will feature hiphop culture and community support collective, The Breaks NZ, who will host ‘Silo Social’ with a hiphopinspired dance workshop. Multiple programmes across dance, music and art will be offered to allow the community to discover positive creative outlets. The Breaks NZ believe that for people to express themselves creatively is the most honest and direct way to ‘break’ away from negative situations faced on a daily basis. The group takes time to recognise the individual qualities of each participant in their workshops and they aim to offer a service that will make a positive difference in people’s lives. Saturday 14 February is Valentine’s Day! It is a crucial day to have something planned for your loved one, either getting out of town, a nice dinner or perhaps a jaunt down to Silo Park. Valentine’s Day will see a unique

edition of the Silo Markets and will run into the evening when the market is transformed into a romantic dining experience. This will precede a special screening of Silo Cinema; the perfect afternoon and evening to get cosy with your loved one. Sunday 15 February, Silo Social welcomes back Dance Pasión, an Auckland based dance company that promotes and fosters Argentine Tango and Salsa within New Zealand. Their emphasis is on retaining authentic movements and feeling for each dance style while still allowing the dance forms to evolve. Saturday 21 February features the ‘Readers and Writers’ themed market which will bring together stalls selling old books and new, magazines, zines, stationery and accessories to celebrate unique products and showcase the creative output of the literary world. It will also feature a Zine Fest pop-up, and if you’ve never heard of a ‘zine’ I suggest you get online and take a look. These little, and often handmade, magazines are glorious.

Saturday 28 February rounds off an awesome February programme with an eclectic and inspiring lineup of DJs and musicians from around the world for Silo Sessions and Weird Together: World Together, thanks to L&P. Once a basement blog, Awesome Tapes From Africa (USA) brings the website’s awesomely curated collection of underrated African music to the live stage. Esteemed Melbourne DJ Lewis CanCut is here to get the people moving with his clean cut, ice-block blend of world beats, percussive house and tropical disco. Courtesy (Denmark) is one of the freshest names on the Copenhagen DJ set, and was present at the Red Bull Academy 2014, along with Auckland’s own Chelsea Jade, who will also be performing her crystalline textured twist on dream pop. Weird Together’s live incarnation will also be bringing the beats, as will Fat Freddy’s Drop heavyweight selectors Slave & Hohepa. This is music, culture and history from around the globe as Silo Park hasn’t seen before - you won’t want to miss it. (FINN MCLENNAN-ELLIOTT) F PN

Finn McLennan-Elliott has a Bachelor of Science Honours degree specialising in human geography at Auckland University. In his spare time, Finn plays clarinet and guitar in an orchestra and a folk music group. He is hosting ‘Folk at the Old Folks’ on the first Sunday of every month at the Auckland Old Folks Association Hall, an intimate afternoon concert of folk music.

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TO BOOK ADVERTISING: Jo Barrett on 021 324 510 or Jessie Kollen on 021 166 2002 t: 09 361 3356 or 09 378 8553 e: joannebarrett@xtra.co.nz e: jessiekollen@gmail.com w: www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

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FINN MCLENNAN-ELLIOTT

Grand Central Season - Albi & the Wolves Folk Club. Albi and the Wolves may be a new band, only having six months of gigs and song writing under its belt, but it has a strong following already - something the band is delighted by. They manage themselves, steering the ship from gig to gig, and have found themselves playing all across the North Island already. The band is heading off to play with The Eastern in New Plymouth, 7 February, one of many out of town gigs lined up for the year.

Recently I’ve been drawn to bands that feature banjo, double bass or violin and they must have an acoustic guitar. It’d also be nice if there was a mandolin in there somewhere and four part harmonies help too... It just so happens there is one band that fits this bill perfectly and they’re coming to Grand Central on Ponsonby Road in February. Albi and the Wolves - remember that name. I’ve been holding this close to my chest, waiting for the best time to let Ponsonby know. Kingsland loves them, as do numerous towns out of Auckland. February 21 and February 28 they will take Grand Central by storm. Without a doubt this is not to be missed and I’d go along both nights if I were you. Grand Central has got a reputation these days for pulling in good party bands on weekend nights and Albi and the Wolves are the best of the bunch. Some of you might be asking how the kind of music I described above could be considered ‘party’, but when you put a mixture of folk, country, rock and soul together and throw in the dynamic between frontman, Albi, and violinist Pascal, you are in for a wild night. I sat down with Albi and Matt Owens, who plays banjo, and it was pretty clear that audience interaction and chatty band persona is important to them. They all try to be involved and talk to the audience and, despite what the name may suggest, ‘The Wolves’ are not a backing band for Albi. Well known in musical circles, Albi and his bandmates are equally respected from numerous other artistic projects. Pascal plays with Miho Wada’s Jazz Orchestra and bassist Michael Young plays an active role in the Devonport

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“It’s safe to say we are a touring band, we’ve developed a love and passion for being on the road... The beauty of that is the people you come across and the places you get to see,” Matt says. The band wants to play the whole country and then leapfrog over to Australia and some festivals - from there taking the folk rock world one country at a time. Albi and the Wolves has a video in the works to accompany their first single that will probably be released in March or April. Albi has hopes that they will launch this in a theatre, and the plan is to follow on with another single to create the momentum until a full-length album is ready. The band has a diverse array of songs, each with influences from different styles and a full length album will satisfy those die-hard fans who love their range. We had a long conversation about the need for records and how to create interest in them and Albi and the Wolves are focused on getting people to see the physical copies, to create a connection with their fans and foster this relationship through stunning live performances - something that works, trust me! A final word from Albi, “I like gelato, I like cross fit, my jeans are over $150, and I have a cute animal the size of a teacup. I drink water that is five dollars a bottle and comes in glass not practical plastic ones.” Albi and the Wolves are an amazing band, full of covers you wouldn’t expect performed in a unique way, and a stage presence and banter to rival any international act - they are on the way up. Make the most of this season at Grand PN Central! (FINN MCLENNAN-ELLIOTT) F www.albiandthewolves.com or www.facebook.com/AlbiAndTheWolves

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ARTS + CULTURE SHOWING AT WHITESPACE

PLAYING AT THE LOFT, Q THEATRE

Kenneth Merrick - Loops & Lines Until 14 February

STRIPPED BARE By Jennifer De Leon 7pm, 12, 13, 14, 17, 18 February

Whitespace is delighted to present a new show of paintings by talented young artist; Kenneth Merrick. Kenneth Merrick is an Auckland based artist whose work currently orbits around drawing, painting and digital/analogue media. Merrick graduated with a Bachelor of Design and Visual Arts, Unitec in 2012 and completed a Bachelor of Music, University of Auckland in 2004. Over the past five years his works have featured in a variety of exhibition settings and spaces in New Zealand, and overseas.

Jennifer De Leon is a local resident and a dancer-choreographer working from her studio in Grey Lynn where she teaches dance to adult students. Her studio is also the place where she rehearses passionately and, in preparation for the new production, somewhat relentlessly. Jennifer is the proud owner of two total hip replacements as well as knee reconstruction, and is “very nearly closer to 100 than 20!” she laughs.

Through image making Merrick seeks to convey perspectives that form a basis for a type of visual thinking, underpinned by explorations into cultural experience, speculative spaces, and myth. The resulting work attempts to further hack and refract historical and contemporary paradigms, via unique and fractal view points filtered through Merrick's European, Tongan, and Maori heritage. F PN WHITESPACE, 12 Crummer Road, T: 09 361 6331 www.whitespace.co.nz

Jennifer warmly invites you to her solo dance performance, ‘Stripped Bare’, which she describes as; “Vulnerability, terror, extraordinary movement, stillness. Fierce technical and emotional intensity can take us on a journey as we explore and expose a kind of terror. Can, can’t she? Will she, won’t she? Should she?” ‘Stripped Bare’ is gaunt, stark and beautiful. Jennifer expresses a great vulnerability and the audience may wonder if they even dare to watch. Utterly exposed, so stripped - the audience may ask themselves, “Are we voyeurs?” Deeply immersed in this arcane journey, Jennifer understands that the audience knows PN that she is intentionally exposing the depths and testing this edge. F The Loft @ Q Theatre, 305 Queen Street T: 09 309 9771 www.qtheatre.co.nz, www.iticket.co.nz Adult - $25.00 Concession - $15.00 www.facebook.com/Stripped Bare - Auckland Fringe Festival 2015

Kenneth Merrick, Tri Star, ink on salvaged canvas, 2014, 1580 x 1240mm

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ARTS + CULTURE WHAU STUDIOS OFFERS NEW JEWELLERY COURSES Whau Studios is a friendly, relaxed and fun jewellery workshop just around the corner in Point Chevalier. The studio runs various jewellery making classes where enthusiasm, not experience, is all that's required. Found on Point Chevalier Road, Whau Studios are light, warm, airy and equipped with all the tools and machinery you need to make your own jewellery. Ilse-Marie Erl teaches a beginners jewellery-making class at Whau Studios

During the classes participants are taught the basic skills to make rings, earrings, neckpieces, bangles and brooches - that are as unique as you want them to be. Classes run both in the evening and during the day, ranging from three weeks to eight weeks in duration. Whau Studios was established in March last year and has been delivering popular classes since then - everybody loves the experience of learning and using their hands in a safe and encouraging atmosphere. Often people start with a three week class and become addicted to the thrill of being able to make their own jewellery. Then they can enrol for an eight week course and continue with their new found hobby. The tutors at Whau Studios say they love watching people getting hooked! At Whau Studios you will meet a group of well established jewellery makers and teachers who are represented in various galleries throughout New Zealand. New students are welcome to join and become part of a creative environment that is very much alive - and full of interesting happenings. Come and check out Whau Studios for yourself. F PN WHAU STUDIOS, 161 Pt Chevalier Road, M: 021 201 5151, www.whaustudios.co.nz

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ARTS + CULTURE DANIEL LARSEN-BARR - CREATIVE WRITING AND POETRY TUTOR DANIEL WAS ‘DROPPED INTO A LITERARY MAGIC POTION’ AS AN INFANT. HE NOW HAS a Bachelor’s degree in English and has been a regular performance poet around Auckland for a decade. His interests include remixing, sampling, appropriation and the inappropriate. Daniel also dabbles in visual art and music and he can be found teaching at Toi Ora on a Friday morning. The Alphabet of Nature - By Daniel Larsen-Barr you bring me water silent yet articulate then you shy away implicitly forbidden and the premise is unbroken unaddressed but implied expressionless understanding sneaks up on inferred taboo you make a retraction a clenched invoice tight-lipped about it ubiquitously accepted tacit communication a curtain drawn over in phrases not yet stated without acknowledgement intimate restraint purely carnal mute regret

SHOWING AT TOI ORA GALLERY HOI POLLOI 10 February - 4 March Opening 10 February, 5pm - 7pm The tutors’ exhibition kicks off the season at Toi Ora Gallery with a selection of works presenting innovative approaches to art making. Live performance blends with visual arts on the opening night. There is a range of diverse and upbeat exhibitions happening at Toi Ora throughout the year; coming up next is the Outsider Art show in association with Auckland Arts Festival - White Night on 14 March 6pm to midnight. To follow will be themes related to Mental Health Awareness Week, Matariki, Express Yourself Youth Project and more. F PN Toi Ora, 6 Putiki Street, T: 09 360 417 info@toiora.org.nz www.toiora.org.nz

LAUREN KITTS AT HOME IN GREY LYNN Local sculptor Lauren Kitts is not short on degrees. She gained a Bachelor of Social Sciences at the University of Hamilton in 1981, then four years later she studied at the University of California, and secured a Bachelor of Fine Arts, majoring in sculpture. Lauren comes from America but when her anthropologist parents moved to New Zealand she lived with them in the Waitakeres for 10 years, went to high school in Henderson and eventually ended up living between here and the States till she completed her arts degree before returning to New Zealand where she has stayed ever since. Another consideration was meeting a New Zealander whom she married, and subsequently gave birth to two Kiwi children. On returning to New Zealand after finishing her arts degree she embarked on a professional sculpting career. In 1988 she was Artist in Residence at Hawke’s Bay Polytechnic and demonstrated stone carving plus creating works for the institution. A similar stint followed at the Wairarapa Arts Centre, then between 1991 and 2002 she was commissioned to create sculptures for several schools mainly in Auckland, and to construct a large public effigy for the sculpture park in Uchihara Province, Japan. Other commissions include one for Henderson’s new Council Offices, Downtown Hokitika, the Fo Guang Shan Buddhist Temple at Flatbush, and a bronze award for the Waitakere Enterprise Board, to name just a few. Lauren has also been a tutor in Oamaru Stone at Auckland Girls Grammar and Diocesan Girls Grammar but nowadays confines her activity to taking commissions and exhibiting at sculpture symposia which she loves. She organised The Western Springs one below the zoo and adjacent to the park which remained in situ for five years. It was the first of its kind in New Zealand but now they have been springing up all over the country. Lauren now exhibits at wherever they happen to be set up throughout New Zealand. She’s moved on from working with soap and Remuera stone because they don’t weather well and tend to break easily. She has taken part in some wood symposia at the Lake House Arts Centre in Takapuna where 28 sculptors busied themselves wielding chainsaws! The proceeds went to Women’s Refuge. Her degree covered the whole spectrum of the arts but she found sculpture to be the most fascinating. She loves the physicality of it and has an affinity with stone because it’s very direct - “What I do with it is what you get”. She goes on to reflect that many sculptors use a variety of materials but she finds changing stone into an art work is like magic. Usually, if she doesn’t have a commission to work on she will go to a quarry and choose a block of granite or marble and then find the concept she has in mind often has to change in order to fit within the block’s dimensions. It’s very different from painting where you don’t have the strictures sculpting imposes. When asked if she has dry spells she admits to feeling muscle strain through lifting heavy pieces which gets exacerbated over a concentrated period of sculpting, but it wears off. Her workshop is out in West Auckland in an old apple shed which she shares with five other artists. It has a pleasing vista of green paddocks and grazing sheep which is conducive to her muse. Most importantly she welcomes visitors to view her works at her house in Grey Lynn where they have the opportunity to ask her questions about her oeuvre. She held a home exhibition on 31 January to 1 February where over 50 of her sculptures were on display including small mantelpiece objets and large landscape pieces. She also takes commissions and can be contacted on M: 021 267 1127 for an appointment. Check out her website, and go to the Gallery page to view images of her PN collection. www.laurenkitts.co.nz (DEIRDRE TOHILL) F

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ARTS + CULTURE PLAYING AT THE SURF CLUB, MURIWAI ‘Tunes in the Dunes’ The Auckland Symphony Orchestra - Saturday 7 March The sweet sound of strings, the gentle timbre of timpani and the trumpeting of woodwinds is about to meld with the brazen birdsong of gannet colonists at Auckland’s Muriwai beach. The Auckland Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Peter Thomas is joining with the Surf Club at Muriwai to present a fundraising event of ‘Tunes in the Dunes’ on Saturday, 7 March. Collaborating with the orchestra to present an evening of family friendly classics and contemporary music will be the popular singer/songwriter Jason Kerrison of Op Shop and New Zealand’s Got Talent fame as well as the internationally acclaimed Muriwai artist in residence Moana Maniapoto from Moana and the Tribe. Organisers hope that Tunes in the Dunes will become a popular annual family event along the lines of Concert in the Park and the longstanding Music at Mission Estate. Spokesperson Erin Griffin says funds raised from the ticketed event will go towards support of the orchestra and the completion of the award winning The Surf Club at Muriwai which has become a significant hub for myriad community groups who are flocking to use its world-class facilities. The Club is home base for Muriwai Volunteer Lifeguard Service which does an outstanding job keeping beachgoers safe on the beach and in the water. F PN Tickets are available from www.Eventfinder.co.nz

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ARTS + CULTURE NEW ZEALAND PLAY PREMIERES AT SHOWING AT OREXART GARNET STATION TINY THEATRE THE WILD BLUE YONDER 10 - 14 February, 8pm, $25/$20 A witty New Zealand play written 16 years ago, and never before seen, by Olwyn Stewart and David Lyndon Brown; Directed by Andrea Kelland with Duncan Allan, Maxine Fleming, Tom Sainsbury, Edwin Beats and Verity George. Grey Lynn 1999 - a torrid summer of love, betrayal, madness... and Dusty Springfield. In time for Pride comes a play with the central gay character, Martin, bitten by the Dusty bug. Grief about her death in 1999 is heightened by an antipodean heat wave, and the disintegration of his relationship with a complex closeted thug. Meanwhile his best friend, an older woman poet, mistakes a young man’s admiration for love.

RICHARD ADAMS - KEY LINES 10 - 28 February Opening: 10 February 5.30pm

Having spent the past 30 years dividing his time between a successful career as a painter and a jazz violinist, local artist Richard Adams wields a brush as fluently as a fiddle bow. The juxtaposition of these two disciplines is manifest in this latest body of work, Key Lines. Much like his music, improvisation and spontaneity play a leading role in the creation of his paintings, which are filled with light, fluid colour and radiant horizons that remain atmospheric and evocative rather than specific.

Dusty Springfield, the pop icon of the Swinging Sixties, with a voice of haunting sexual vulnerability, had a Pet Shop Boys-driven comeback in the 1990s.

In a catalogue essay for Adams’ 2013 exhibition, Hamish Coney writes: The best art, like the best music is an exploration that does not demand a destination at the outset. Wassily Kandinsky described it thus, “Colour is the key. They eye is the hammer. The soul is the piano with its many chords. The artist is the hand that, by touching this or that key, sets the soul vibrating.”

She was a gay icon who turned her personal pain into art, emphasising her femininity with panda eyes and peroxide bouffant, perfect for Drag Queens to emulate.

Key Lines features both large canvases and a selection of elegant works on paper. Please contact rex@orexart.co.nz for details. F PN

GARNET STATION TINY THEATRE, 85 Garnet Road, Bookings essential T: 09 360 3397, dinner before the show recommended (plenty of free street parking) www.garnetstation.com

OREXART, 15 Putiki Street, Arch Hill, T: 09 378 0588 rex@orexart.co.nz www.orexart.co.nz

Cast of The Wild Blue Yonder

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ARTS + CULTURE I WANNA BE NA NAH NA NAH NAH Imagine it’s Ponsonby 1983. Teenage girls with fake IDs and boys with too much time on their hands. I WANNA BE NA NAH NA NAH NAH takes you to another Ponsonby, before neighbourhood fences and fashionable bars, when the future of this working-class melting-pot was anything but certain. Theatre makers Stephen Bain, Tessa Mitchell and Dave Fane weave true stories and interviews into a real-time journey through present-time Ponsonby, from 12-22 February as part of Auckland Fringe. Audience meet at The Basement Theatre to catch a free bus to Ponsonby. Once there they are each given wireless headphones and lead through backyards, alleyways and along Ponsonby Road. Actors move between past and present as guides, performers, and conductors of unexpected meetings along the way - all set to a darkly pulsing 80s soundtrack. Jess remembers growing up in Ponsonby in the 80s when it was a working class suburb. She recalls the large Pacific Island families in her neighbourhood, the Maori neighbours hanging out on their front porches, and the big groups of students who lived cheaply in villas up the road. But most of all Jess remembers being a teenager looking for her place during mixed-up times of social change. She could be whoever she wanted to be if only she could work out who that was. For now she will go to as many parties as possible, ride in cars with boys, and fit into every scene she can. Like Ponsonby, Jess is a teenager in a state of change, looking for the fastest way up. Joe lived with his brothers and sisters in 80s Ponsonby too. His parents emigrated from Samoa, making a new life in New Zealand through good times and hard times. School, church, pub and neighbourhood backyards were all places that brought people together. There was a sense of belonging to Ponsonby whether you liked it or not. He remembers the famous Gluepot Tavern when the greatest bands in the country would play, from The Straightjacket Fits, to Blam Blam Blam to The Twelve Tribes. A natural charisma allowed Joe to move between social classes, meeting his heroes and heading for the big time. This is less a show about ‘the good old days’ and more a contemplation on what we went through to be where we are today. Ponsonby is a vehicle to view the rapid changes New Zealand has undergone in creating a new identity. Seats are limited so booking will be PN essential. Bus leaves Basement carpark at 7pm sharp. F

STUDIO ONE TOI TU STARTING THE YEAR WITH PRIDE Studio One Toi Tu is launching its 2015 exhibition schedule with a showcase of work by young people from Auckland’s Rainbow Community in celebration of the Auckland Pride Festival 2015. The annual Rainbow Youth Pride Art Exhibition features the work of young LGBTI (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex) artists. The exhibition has been curated by the collective artistRY, which is supported by RainbowYOUTH. Paul Stevens, fundraising coordinator for RainbowYOUTH, said the exhibition will give Aucklanders an insight into LGBT identities through a vibrant range of artworks reflecting the diversity of the Rainbow Community and “exploring challenging themes relating to queer and trans identities; and our history, politics, struggles and joys”. Now entering its third year, the Auckland Pride Festival is firmly established as New Zealand’s biggest and best social and cultural celebration for the Rainbow Community (Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Takatapui, Fa’afafine, Intersex, Queer) and their friends and families. The 2015 programme has been lengthened by one week to accommodate the increased number of events to be featured within the festival, which runs from Saturday 7 February until Sunday 1 March. The Rainbow Youth Pride Art Exhibition is one of around 70 individual events in the programme that includes local and international theatre and cabaret, visual art exhibitions, live music, film and new media, literature, debates and discussions, drag and burlesque, historical walks, youth events and workshops, sports and recreation, gardening, pets, pageants and parties. Studio One Toi Tu manager Echo Janman said Studio One Toi Tu is a creative hub for Aucklanders located in the heart of the festival and she is proud to be hosting the Rainbow Youth Pride Art Exhibition as she believes it will become a key annual event in the Pride Festival. She said the show inaugurates a year of diverse exhibitions, classes, workshops, cultural conversations and events at Studio One that are all aimed at reflecting and serving local audiences. Stevens said the exhibition is an opportunity for youth to engage creatively with issues relating to their identity and at the same time leverage a profile for their creative practices by having their work seen in an established community art space within PN a world-class festival programme. F

Bookings: www.iticket.co.nz or 0508 iTICKET (484-253).

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ARTS + CULTURE UPTOWN ART SCENE The neighbourhood heats up with two galleries making the move here! Tim Melville is opening his new gallery in Winchester Street, just off the bottom of Newton Road and around the corner from Art & Object. Fox Jensen will add to the fantastic concentration of galleries in Putiki Street, Arch Hill. Rumour has it that Fox Jensen will be re-fitting the residency studios of fellow Putiki Street gallery Two Rooms. Jacqueline Fraser; The Making of Purple Rain 2015, 2015 mixed media on plastic, 2400 x 4000mm

Two Rooms has run a highly successful residency programme over the years, including Sarah Lucas, Kevin Appel, and Isaac Julien. We are delighted that the imminent resident there, before Fox Jensen take up residence, is Turner Award nominee David Shrigley. Although best known for his cartoon-style works, Shrigley is planning to make a show of paintings for a Two Rooms exhibition at the end of his stay. The first exhibition of the year is Implicated and Immune, at Michael Lett until 28 February. This group show looks at the broad effects and implications of HIV/AIDS over the last 30 years, and is a partial reprise of the show Implicated and Immune: Artists’ Responses to AIDS held in 1992 at Fisher Gallery (now Te Tuhi). That landmark exhibition featured work by artists including Jack Body, Fiona Clark, L. Budd, Richard Killeen and Fiona Pardington, and the current exhibition will include Billy Apple, Simon Denny, Russ Flatt, Jacqueline Fraser, Giovanni Intra, Imogen Taylor and Douglas Wright. While the advances in treatment of HIV/AIDS have allowed our affected friends and family to live with the illness, it has also allowed a large degree of complacency in the community, which this exhibition hopes to combat. A very warm welcome to Fox Jensen and Tim Melville galleries - we look forward to your PN first shows of the year soon! (WILL PAYNT, STUDIO ART SUPPLIES) F

Imogen Taylor; Freddie, 2015, acrylic and rope on hessian 1800 x 900mm

DRAWING ON THE NEIGHBOURHOOD Some of the team from Zoomslide motion picture studio worked with internationally renowned Mumbai artist and illustrator Sameer Kulavoor and have created a striking new piece of street art on the exterior of the Zoomslide building on the corner of Great North Road and Elgin Street, Grey Lynn. Kulavoor’s observations of street life - in India and elsewhere - are at once playful and profound. His richly observed observations, both fluid and uncannily descriptive, have earned him a worldwide reputation, with numerous commissions from the likes of Rolling PN Stone magazine and fashion guru Paul Smith. F www.zoomslide.com

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OUT + ABOUT

Above L to R: Grey Lynn Park Festival 2014 - crowd on the hill; Grey Lynn Park Festival 2014 - crowd at the stalls

photography: Michael McClintock

Above L to R: Alice Fauvel and Pippa Coom of the Waitemata Local Board; David Rose of Trade Aid; Hana Newnham and Sam Clark of the Piha Life Saving Club

Above L to R: Jill Lawrence, Louise Caro, and MP for Mt Albert David Shearer; Liz Ah Kuoi and Graeme Atmore of the Richmond Rovers Rugby League Club; Robot Chibi sculpture

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OUT + ABOUT

Above L to R: Grey Lynn Park Festival 2014 - view; Enjoying the rides; Juice, Pikelets, Honey

Above L to R: Grey Lynn local Dim Pivac; Circability Trust activities; Annie Evans and Thomas Graydon-Guy of SAFE

photography: Michael McClintock

Above L to R: Gael Baldock; The Twisty Twinz; Perusing the wares at the festival stalls

Above L to R: The Hipstamatics laying down the funk; Dancing to the Hipstamatics; Sal Valentine and The Babyshakes

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OUT + ABOUT

Above L to R: Buckwheat; Cheeky Santa gives Ponsonby Central a show; Cheeky Santa in the treetops

Above L to R: Aneta Stroud, Tim McKeown, and Dardie Kelso, of The Concept; Artist Diane Greenwood with Andy Davies of Ponsonby Central

photography: Michael McClintock

Above L to R: Cheeky Santa’s creator, Tim McKeown of The Concept; Countdown to the unveiling; Gael Baldock and Queen Elsa

Above L to R: Christmas tree baubles; Sheena Shuvani playing the harp

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OUT + ABOUT

Above L to R: Tess Tickle, Buckwheat, and Victoria Secret; Tess Tickle

photography: Michael McClintock

Above L to R: Jubilation choir; Crowd gathers at Ponsonby Central

Above L to R: Katie and Zara Dobson, Claire, Neve, Isla O’Shannessy, Barry Barton, and Andy Davies; Kids enchanted by balloon artist; Santa and his little helper

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OUT + ABOUT

Above L to R: Chic Christmas; Christmas Punga sparkles; Local residents Dona White and Jacqui Dixon

Above L to R: Enchanted by snow in summer; Fairy lights, ships, and dolphins; Franklin Road at Contagion

Above L to R: Franklin Road classics; Franklin Road fairy lights; Gayleen MacKinnon of the Fairy Shop with her fairies and elf

photography: Michael McClintock

Above L to R: Karl Urban and Ross Thorby; Reindeers in the yard; Vernon Tava, Shale Chambers, Greg Moyle, Mike Lee and Pippa Coom of the Waitemata Local Board

Above L to R: Ross Thorby’s illuminated arch; The Voice Club Choir perform; Penguins playing on the rooftops

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Above L to R: Kids playing in the snow; Localist lights; Looking down Franklin Road; Reindeer bounding through the lights

Above L to R: Love and lights; Mitchell and Callum Foster feed the crowd; Penguin sliding through the air

photography: Michael McClintock

Above L to R: Santa gives a wave from Ross’ porch; Santa watches from his perch; Shale Chambers of the Waitemata Local Board addresses the crowd; Santa’s band of merry Santas; Reindeer graze through the night

Santa’s here! Tree of light; Ross Thorby and The Fairy Shop fairies; The Franklin Road Lights are open!

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HOROSCOPES: MISS PEARL NECLIS

What your stars hold for February ♒ Aquarius (the Water Carrier): 21 January - 19 February

Take your time this month and do things right instead of making deadlines that you can’t meet. Set guidelines that you are able to follow and will keep you on track.

Pisces (the Fish): 20 February - 20 March You’re all fired up and ready to work this year but finding what you want to do is proving difficult. Relax and think about what makes you happy, maybe you can find the right balance.

♈ Aries (the Ram): 21 March - 20 April

There is something important building in your life and it is going to make a big impact. However, you’re not very comfortable with change and are not sure what to expect.

♉ Taurus (the Bull): 21 April - 21 May

It might take you a while to get back into the swing of things this month as your mind could still be dreaming about the lovely holiday you just had. You should start thinking practically now though as your creative thinking could lead to new possibilities.

Gemini (the Twins): 22 May - 21 June Even the most intelligent of ideas can go wrong some time and the key is not to take it too personally. Just concentrate on what is possible and you’ll find you might reach your goals sooner.

Cancer (the Crab): 22 June - 22 July You seem to have a hard time being in social situations with people you don’t know, you still seem to be stuck in a place that isn’t doing your soul any good. You need to find the time for you and try to listen to yourself.

Leo (the Lion): 23 July - 21 August Your time off has hopefully refreshed you enough that working continuously for the next year isn’t as daunting as it sounds. Remember, you can take time off and going away will recharge your batteries.

♍ Virgo (the Virgin): 22 August - 23 September

Don’t try and implement all your ideas at once. If you try to change your approach to the way you work you might find that with some fine tuning you will produce some excellent results.

♎ Libra (the Scales): 24 September - 23 October

You feel like creativity is slipping you by but it’s not, you’re just getting to the point where you have taken on too many projects but not finishing any of them. If you’re feeling overwhelmed it’s easy to say no.

Scorpio (the Scorpion): 24 October - 22 November You sometimes feel like a change and the only way you can achieve this is by a good clean out both physically and emotionally. When that’s done you will have a great opportunity to look back and see how cluttered you were before.

♐ Sagittarius (the Archer): 23 November - 22 December

As the New Year begins you need to make sure that your life is going in the direction that you want. Choices that were made in haste in the past need not be repeated now or in the future.

♑ Capricorn (the Goat): 23 December - 20 January

You’re thinking of making an escape somewhere on your own but you need to give yourself some more time to settle into the groove. Make the most of these long summer nights and have a holiday at home.

PONSONBY NEWS OUTLETS FREEMANS BAY

NEWMARKET

Ecostore, 1 Scotland Street Glengarry, Corner Sale and Wellesley Streets Kellands Real Estate, 4 Drake Street New World, Victoria Park Sale St, 7 Sale Street

Planet Ayurveda, 41 Gillies Avenue Studio Italia, 96 Carlton Gore Road Taylor Boutique, 1 Teed Street

GREY LYNN Barfoot & Thompson, 533 Great North Road Barkley Manor, 400 - 402 Great North Road Grey Lynn Community Centre, 520 Richmond Road Grey Lynn Community Library, 474 Great North Road Raw Essentials, 401B Richmond Road Ripe, 172 Richmond Road Tapac, 100 Motions Road Vetcare, 408 Great North Road

HERNE BAY Herne Bay Post & Stationers, 240 Jervois Road Five Loaves & 2 Fish, 206 Jervois Road Icing on the Cake, 188 Jervois Road Momentum, 182 Jervois Road

KINGSLAND Atomic, 420c New North Road

MT EDEN Citta Outlet Store, Corner Enfield & Normanby Road Sabato, 57 Normanby Road

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NORTH SHORE Rug Direct, Wairau Park Dawson’s Furniture, Mairangi Bay Nose To Tail Dog Wash, Albany

Ponsonby News is published on the first Friday of each month excluding January. Copies go quickly so be quick to collect yours from any of the following outlets. The issue is also published on our website www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

PARNELL Jane ns, 2 Birdwood Crescent Parnell Community Centre, 545 Parnell Road

PONSONBY Barfoot & Thompson, 184 Ponsonby Road Fitness Trainer, 36 Jervois Road Harcourts, 89 Ponsonby Road Leys Institute, 20 St Mary’s Road The Longroom, 114 Ponsonby Road Mag Nation, 123 Ponsonby Road Ponsonby Community Centre, 20 Ponsonby Terrace Spa Ayurda, 213 Ponsonby Road Studio One, 1 Ponsonby Road Whitespace, 12 Crummer Road

WESTMERE Glengarry, 164 Garnet Road

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


THE PONSONBY PINK PAGES

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

PONSONBY NEWS+ February 2015

131


132 PONSONBY NEWS+ February 2015

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)

PONSONBY NEWS - FEBRUARY'15  

Ponsonby. Anyone not heard of us. We are Auckland's most talked about part of town

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