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Cellar Door Wine a n d p o ss i b i l i t i e s b y Ba n v i l le & J o n e s W i n e Co.

Issue 35 February 2020 – May 2020

Natural Wine Revolution


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From South Africa with Love

Authenticity in each bottle! A chance meeting between an Aussie (Mick Craven) and a South African (Jeanine) turned into Craven Wines. “In 2011 we chose to locate in Stellenbosch, South Africa, a place for which we both have an affinity and which has such an amazing array of sites and terroir. It is perfect for the site-specific, honest wines we want to make. We work as minimally, albeit attentively, with the grapes as we do with the resulting wine in the cellar. We pay serious attention to the wine, but we do not manipulate the wine. Our wines are all 100% single vineyard, single variety wines. We let the grapes do the talking…”

C R AVEN

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C R AV E N

Syrah $27.99

Pinot Gris $24.99

Cinsault $25.99

Chenin Blanc $25.99

Profoundly changing the Manitoba landscape from a pin-hole view of South African wine to a dazzling panorama.

Featured wines available at Banville & Jones.


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contents Features 24 Unfiltered and Fine Andrea Eby introduces the roots, styles, and politics of natural wines.

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38 Raw Wine Revolution: An Interview with Isabelle Legeron Andrea Eby and Gary Hewitt talk to Master Sommelier Isabelle Legeron about natural and low-intervention wines and the revolutionary RAW WINE Fair.

42 The Tastemakers Mike Muirhead traces the evolution of wine’s tastemakers: from the elite palates of the 70s and 80s to today’s much more democratic niche wine communities.

48 The Pasta Bar Settle into winter with our wine experts’ favourite pasta recipes and wine pairings.

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contents Columns 12 A Message from Tina Jones 14 Ask a Sommelier 16 Banville & Jones and Company

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19 Gluggy Get Real

20 Behind the Label Staffelter Hof

30 Profile Chef Melissa Makarenko, Peasant Cookery

32 Gary’s Corner Wine Zeitgeist

34 Trending PiWis: In a League of Their Own

46 Banville & Jones Wine & Food Events 58

56 Wine and Drinks College Manitoba 58 Sidebar Fabulous or Flawed?

60 Culinary Partners 61 Shopping List 62 Top Picks

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Cellar Door Publisher and Editor Lisa Muirhead lisa@poisepublications.com

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Editorial Board Tina Jones, Andrea Eby, Sylvia Jansen, Gary Hewitt, Mike Muirhead Graphic Design Ryan Germain ryan.germain@gmail.com Advertising Sales Vanessa Shapiro vanessa@poisepublications.com David Navratil david@poisepublications.com Contributors Alex Allardyce, Todd Antonation, Andrea Eby, Gary Hewitt, Sylvia Jansen, Tina Jones, Megan Kozminski/Media Spur Inc., Jill Kwiatkoski, Steve Lagimodiere, Rebecca Lechman, Ian McCausland, Sara McDonald, Christa Mottola, Mike Muirhead, Tom Penner, Doug Stephen Published for Banville & Jones Wine Co. by Poise Publications Inc. www.poisepublications.com

Winnipeg Jets Ticket Giveaway Contest Every purchase in February is entered to WIN a pair of premium seats (first row behind the opposing bench) at the Tuesday, March 17 Winnipeg Jets game against the Florida Panthers Three locations in Winnipeg: 2-929 Corydon Ave. | 204-505-1455 5-1604 St Mary’s Rd. | 204-615-3885 1-1530 Regent Ave W. | 204-504-4200

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In 1999, Tina Jones had the vision of opening Banville & Jones Wine Co., a fine wine boutique in Winnipeg, Manitoba that specializes in promoting wine education and lifestyle. It is located in a three-storey Tuscan-inspired facility that houses fine wine and accessories, an educational facility, and a private function room. Banville & Jones Wine Co. 1616 St Mary’s Rd. Winnipeg, MB R2M 3W7 204-948-9463 www.banvilleandjones.com © 2020 Poise Publications Inc.

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a message from tina jones TINA’S FAVES The experience of walking into a restaurant in Cape Town and discovering that the extensive wine list had only “natural” wines. I was completely out of my comfort zone but with some help from the Sommelier had an amazing experience! Visiting wineries around the globe and seeing the growing appreciation for low-intervention techniques, with large and small wineries paying closer attention to sustainability and organic farming, with gentler, less intrusive winemaking practices. The wine world is better for it!

A common question has circulated around the store—and around this issue—about natural wines: “How do you define ‘natural’ wines?” The short answer is that there is no consensus. The long answer is: this issue! We are devoting this issue to the study of a wine development that is proving to be not a trend, but an evolution. For example, a few short years ago, wine lovers looked suspiciously at cloudy wines as potentially faulted. Now we know why some winemakers choose not to fine or filter that character from their wines, and we know why it matters. A few years ago, we learned about organic grape growing practices and wine production. Now we are learning how low-intervention approaches to wine growing and winemaking are not only creating interesting and vibrant wine styles, they are contributing to a more environmentally sustainable approach to grape growing. Having lifted the lid on these ideas, there is really no going back. I invite you to open this issue of The Cellar Door with your natural curiosity alive. You will be as interested as I was to read the interview with dynamic Isabelle Legeron, MW, founder of the RAW WINE fairs and champion of the sustainable practices that produce natural and low-intervention wines. Elsewhere in the issue, Andrea Eby explains the origins, styles, and politics that surround natural wines. Mike Muirhead looks at the wine influencers trending in the wine trade; Gary Hewitt gives us a snapshot of the last 80 years in winemaking; and Sylvia Jansen offers us a glimpse into our own noses and palates. We are also excited that the iconic Doug Stephen of WOW! Hospitality joined us to develop a menu of the best pasta and wine pairings to get us through the winter. Enjoy!

Tina Jones

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CONGRATULATIONS

CHARLIE SPIRING 2019 IIAC HALL OF FAME Congratulations on being inducted into the IIAC Hall of Fame. This is an extraordinary accomplishment, and we’re incredibly proud of you! — Mike and Tina Jones

Congratulations Charlie on your well deserved recognition. In the 35 years we have been together your unending, refreshing enthusiasm and optimism in the markets, golf, and life has always been refreshing. — Oliver and Gennie Plett

Charlie Spiring, Founder & Chairman Wellington-Altus Private Wealth

Charlie Spiring has worked in finance, investing, and wealth management for 39 years. He was the founder of Wellington West Holdings Inc., which National Bank of Canada purchased in 2011 for $333 million. From 2011 to 2015, Charlie was Vice-Chair on the Executive Committee of National Bank Financial. He also served as Chair of the Board for the Investment Industry Association of Canada (IIAC). In April of 2017, Charlie founded Wellington-Altus Private Wealth, one of the fastest growing wealth advisory companies in the country with approximately $8 billion of assets under management and 200 employees to date. Charlie is responsible for all strategic direction and oversight of Wellington-Altus Private Wealth. In addition to his induction into the IIAC Hall of Fame, Charlie was inducted into the Wealth Professional Hall of Fame and named by Wealth Professional Magazine as one of the Top 50 Advisor’s in all of Canada. In May 2019 Charlie received a Lifetime Achievement Award from Wealth Professional Magazine.

Congratulations Charlie!! This award could not be more well deserved. You have been an amazing partner since 2002. — Mike Pyle and the Team at Exchange Income Corporation

20 plus years and counting, close friendship and trusted professional relationship. I couldn’t ask for anything more. Thank you and congratulations! — David Filmon QC, Partner MLT Aikins

Charlie, you are not only my mentor and business partner, but a great friend. No one deserves this honour more than you. Congratulations! — Shaun Hauser, President, WellingtonAltus Private Wealth

We are all proud to be part of your team. We have no doubt, under your leadership, you will again shoot us out of the park. — The Spiring Wealth Management Team


ask a sommelier Do all wines contain sulphites? —Helen Clark YES! Yes, they do! Sulphites can occur both naturally and as part of the preservation process. All wines produce natural sulphites during the fermentation process (up to around 40 parts per million [ppm]). Good wineries will also use sulphur judiciously as a way to preserve the wine for travel to market. It is used both as an antioxidant (to prevent the oxidization of wine) and to make sure there is no extracurricular bacteria development (which results in re-fermentation and “off” smells).

notable low levels. However, countless moderate-alcohol (up to 13%), dry (up to 6 g/L sugar) wines are equivalent to most of Secco’s brands. For example, try the Rivera 2017 Marese Bombino Bianco (Castel del Monte, Italy, $17.99) or try the Poggio Anima 2017 Asmodeus Nero d’Avola (Sicilia, Italy, $16.99).

—Mike Muirhead What do you think of keto wines such as Secco?

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I had a cocktail the other night made with “pink port.” What is that exactly?

Anticipating the coming craze of #roséallday, iconic port winemaker David Guimaraens created the first “pink port” in 2008. Bending the port-making tradition of extensive maceration to extract all that dark, inky goodness from the grape skins, Guimaraens decided on a short, 12hour colour extraction—just enough time to bleed in some colour—followed by a long, cool fermentation to keep things fresh and fruity.

“Low-carb” wines have typical alcohol levels (about 12%). For diets, this can be a deal-breaker. Alcohol has a high caloric value, interferes with carbohydrate metabolism, and prevents metabolism of fat reserves through the liver—the key to an effective keto diet. To maintain ketosis, there is little room for alcohol. A less severe, lowcarb diet can accommodate moderate consumption, but portion control is essential.

—M. Kaye Many of our customers ask us about “keto-friendly” wines for their lowcarb or keto diets. The company Secco positions their wines as “paleo and keto friendly” to save you the trouble of calculating carb, sugar and calorie levels—details that can be hard to find for other wines. Their Palo61 brand has

—Gary Hewitt

—Serena Seeland

While you can find wines with “no sulphite added,” all wines still contain sulphites naturally. The best way to consider the sulphur content of wines is to compare the average ppm in a bottle of wine (between 20 and 210 ppm) to dried fruit, which can contain up to 3,500 ppm of added sulphur. Clean, small-batch wineries are the least likely to add excessive sulphur to their wines. For example, I recommend the Spanish Artuke 2017 Pies Negros Tempranillo from Rioja ($25.99).

– 14 g/L sugar). Our wine experts at Banville & Jones can help you sort out which are the best low-carb wines for your lifestyle—ask us!

While shopping, be aware that many inexpensive wines have added sugar “to smooth the palate”; that warmclimate wines may be higher in alcohol and possibly sugar; and that some wine styles are intentionally sweet. Also, avoid many popular “dry” wines that are not actually dry (e.g., Apothic Red – 17 g/L sugar; Ménage à Trois Red

No oak here (can it be a port without time in casks?! I guess it can be!), but like other ports, they are “fortified” with grape spirit mid-fermentation, leaving residual sugars to add balancing sweetness. Since then, Croft Pink (500mL for $17.99) has had many imitators, introducing many drinkers—particularly a younger generation that’s hip to pink— to the joys of port. Served cool, or topped with tonic and a twist over ice, pink ports such as my favourite, Quevedo Rosé Port (750mL for $23.99), are red berry and blue fruit-laden delights. —Rob Stansel IF YOU HAVE A QUESTION FOR OUR SOMMELIERS, TEXT US BETWEEN 9 AM AND 9 PM AT 204.400.0499 OR FIND US ON INSTAGRAM AND TWITTER @BANVILLEJONES.


Spring 2020


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Friends of Banville & Jones Wine Co. 1. Norbert Hansch, Sheri Pelletier, Daniel and Kate Mills, Real Pelletier; 2. Todd Antonation and Albert Kirby; 3. Melissa Malden and Charlie Spiring; 4. Rachael Porter, Jeff Porter, Kim Gembey, Barry Gembey; 5. Devon Ostir and Ramona Thompson; 6. Laura Hansch, Laurie Moore Pflug, Donna McGarry; 7. Tina and Mike Jones with Thomas Stuart, ThermĂŤa.

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Friends of Banville & Jones Wine Co. 8. Isaac Nemez, Murdoch Leeies, Harris Lacovides, Myckaila Nemez, Telmo Rodríguez; 9. Irene and George Graham, Leo Boiteau, Steven Campbell, President, Lifford Wines & Spirits; 10. Christopher Sprague, Jim Armstrong, Michael Dacquisto, Mike Muirhead in Tuscany; 11. Doug and Keri Stephen, Julia Jones, Emily Fridrik, Tina Jones, Father Fogarty, Olivia Hewett; 12. Tina Jones and winemaker Telmo Rodríguez; 13. Alan and Erica McLaughlin with Tina Jones; 14. Doug Jackson, Tina Jones, Jacquie Jackson, Father Alan Fogarty in Tuscany; 15. Mikaël Boyer, Fleur Haut Gaussens, France.

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GLUGGY

Get Real By Sylvia Jansen, DipWSET, CSW, Sommelier If you ask our buyers about buying at wine shows and through their travels, they will tell you it is easy. Well, easy to find wine (there is a lot of it in the world)—but that is where easy stops. It is difficult to find modestly priced wines that are truly authentic: good wines that speak honestly of their place of origin, and of the people who made it, without carrying a big price tag. Authenticity is something that makes a Tuscan Sangiovese so different from a Spanish Tempranillo, or a red blend from the southern Rhône in France. Our buyers also face the challenge of pricing. To arrive on the Manitoba market under $20, a wine must be produced with ridiculously tight budgets for the grower and the winemaker; it has to be shipped, usually in heavy, breakable glass, using fuel and money; it has to go through imports and taxes; and getting into our province means it is subject to the high levies. Considering all of these factors, it might seem like a fantasy to get something authentic on a budget. Can it be done? Or do we need to resign ourselves to drinking whatever is a reasonable price, even if the Spanish tastes the same as the Italian, which is the same as the French or Chilean? The answer is yes—and no. Yes, we can get authentic wines on a budget. And no, we do not need to resign ourselves to something less.

Poggio Anima One gem is the Poggio Anima line of Italian wines. Their goal is to use great fruit from vineyards of growers they know and offer up wines that convey their origin honestly. These are not bulk wines or leftover juice from someone else’s winery, but rather the expression of place, fruit, and culture. The packaging is a bit of modern play on an ancient theme: white wines are named after religious archangels and reds are named after fallen angels. Each wine is made from a single grape variety and even from single vineyards, making them models of authenticity— and each for the very affordable price of $16.99. From left to right: Poggio Anima Lilith Primitivo, Poggio Anima Samael Montepulciano, Poggio Anima Gabriel Pecorino, Poggio Anima Asmodeus Nero d’Avola, Poggio Anima Belial Sangiovese

So, what makes a wine “authentic”? One factor is climate. Cool climates in general produce lighter-bodied wines with higher acidity, and hot climates produce wines that can be big and soft, with ripe fruit. We should expect that wines from cool climates like Niagara or France’s Loire Valley will taste different from wines from hot climates like central Spain or the Central Valley of California. Another factor is the fruit. The grape variety, or varieties, are a huge part of a wine’s character. Certain grape varieties have distinctive signatures that are modified by the place they grow. Sangiovese, for example, produces distinctive wines of lively acidity, with a dusty, cherry core, and a nice tannic structure. The variety needs a warm place, like Tuscany, to ripen well. If the wine reflects that fruit character, it will be

a great pizza wine, because the acidity is lively enough to cut through the fat, even if it might be a bit tart on its own. A third factor is the people who make it, or, more generally, the culture that the wine reflects. If the winemaker is aiming for a wine that speaks of his or her culture, it will be a different wine than one targeted to a particular audience. If our buyers select only wines that are made for what producers perceive North Americans want, we will have a lot of wines with a similar character. That character will not be particularly authentic to the people, the varieties, or the culture of the wine’s origin. Luckily our buyers are looking for authentic—and on budget. It is a tall order, but they get it done. 

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BEHIND THE LABEL

CLASSIC

Staffelter Hof By Alex Allardyce Staffelter Hof is one of the oldest wineries in the world, traditional-turned-modern in the best possible way. It isn’t modern in the sense of a factory-style winery pumping out gallons of sterile, manipulated wine. It is cool, hip, and relevant: they are making wine labelled with offbeat artwork, quirky names, and most noteworthy, the wines are made naturally.

Current winemaker Jan Klein continued to make these classic German-style Rieslings until 2010 when he started reconsidering the future of the winery—and the planet. So began the winery’s journey to organic certification and the move to minimal-intervention winemaking. Interestingly, Jan has never abandoned the production of the winery’s classic Rieslings, instead choosing to make both classic and natural wines and marketing them under different labels. “I’m still very passionate about my classic wines because Mosel is unique,” he tells Drinks Today. “But natural is where I can just go crazy and try things that would otherwise be seen as wrong.” Staffelter Hof has become a trailblazer: they are one of the few wineries in the Middle Mosel to achieve organic certification. Why is that? Simply put, organic farming and natural winemaking are not easy in Germany. The cooler climate and proximity to rivers and other waterways create a breeding ground for mould, mildew, and disease, so fungicides, herbicides, and pesticides have been used widely. In a damp, cool climate like the Middle Mosel, achieving organic certification while still producing healthy grapes, is an accomplishment—and not a battle that many producers are willing to take on. Staffelter Hof took the challenge in stride, however, going as far as producing wines that are not only farmed organically

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NATURAL

However, the wines weren’t always made this way. Located in the village of Krov in Mosel, Germany, and dating back to 862, to the original wine-producing abbey of the same name, Staffelter Hof has travelled a long road to this modernization. In 1805, the land was purchased from the government by Peter Schneiders and was passed down through seven generations, each building their reputation as high-quality, traditional Riesling producers.

but also made with minimal intervention and minimal sulphur levels. This, again, is not an easy task in Germany. Conventional off-dry and sweet  wines (no matter where they come from) often contain elevated sulfite levels to prevent wines  from refermenting in the bottle. As such, elevated sulphur levels have been a  necessary part of the German tradition  of making wines with residual sugar. Staffelter Hof stands by this tradition and continues to make their line of classic-style German wines with this in mind. However, tradition does not stop Jan from exploring natural winemaking, which produces unfiltered wines with minimal additives (including sulphur). The result of this commitment to both tradition and innovation is an interesting range of wines. They have cloudy, textured, unfiltered, and unsulphured blends alongside their crystal clear, clean, bright, searing Rieslings. The wines span dry and sweet, sparkling and rosé, white and small amounts of red. In the hands of winemaker Jan Klein, Staffelter Hof is a winery to watch. It is a historic winery that dares to be full of contrasts: contrasts between old and new; history and innovation; filtered and unfiltered. 


SHOWDOWN! CLASSIC

NATURAL

Staffelter Hof 2018 Paradies Riesling Mosel, Germany ($19.99)

Staffelter Hof 2018 Little Bastard Mosel, Germany ($27.99)

100% Riesling

60% Riesling, 25% Sauvignon Blanc, 12% MĂźller-Thurgau, 3% Muscat

Winemaking: Juice is pressed immediately off the skins and fermented in stainless steel without undergoing malolactic fermentation. The wine is fined and filtered with a small amount of sulphur added.

Winemaking: Juice sits on the skins for a few hours (except the Muscat, which sits for a few days). Each variety is fermented separately, undergoing malolactic fermentation before being blended and aged in old foudres for two and a half months. Unfiltered, unfined, no sulphur added.

Tasting note: Crystal clear with flavours of green apple, citrus and white flowers; bright acidity and finishing off-dry.

Tasting note: Cloudy, soft, textured, and wild with tangy flavours of peaches, bruised apple and orange rind.

How does Staffelter Hof’s natural wine compare to its conventional wines? Take home a bottle of each and tag us on Instagram to tell us which was your favourite! Are you #TeamClassic or #TeamNatural?

Experience the Style Difference

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UNFILTERED AND FINE By Andrea Eby, DipWSET, Sommelier, IWS, CSW Photo by Ian McCausland We live a filtered life. From our online personas, to our water, to our wine, we are a culture obsessed with removing impurities and imperfections. A quick search of mobile apps alone reveals hundreds of tools designed to blur away our imperfections, giving us bigger eyes and smaller noses. A civilization far in the future discovering

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a cache of such photos would think we lived in a time of godlike good looks. But what if we removed the filters from our lives and began to reassert our authenticity? This quest for authenticity has inspired a new generation of winemakers to return to the roots of winemaking and begin to redefine what real wine is.


The Roots Many of the original “natural” winemakers are traditional winemakers that inherited vineyards from their parents. The story of their conversion into cultural revolutionary is often similar. Many left their rural roots for prestigious professions in European cities. Returning home in search of a more authentic life (or obliged to due to familial obligations), many found the idyllic landscapes of their youth eerily lifeless: their parents’ generation had whole-heartedly embraced the advances of the agro-chemical industry in the 1960s–1980s, stripping the land of much of its regional personality. And why not? Before the advent of fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides, viticulture was backbreaking work, with most farmers making just enough to get by. Horses were replaced with tractors and farms became monocultures. The increases in yields and decreases in work that these chemicals created were seen as the answer to all their problems. Fast forward 20–40 years, and the costs of these advancements were all too obvious. Gone were the diverse ecosystems that once thrived, replaced by row

upon row of vines, separated by strips of barren soil. The vineyards were devoid of insects, birds and wildlife, and the soils were woefully lacking in life as well. All of these factors led to increased disease pressure, which led to more spraying, which led to weaker vines, which led to more disease pressure. A never ending cycle. This lifelessness had even extended to the microorganisms in the soil and on the grapes. The native yeasts that had once thrived in these vineyards were gone and many farmers had to turn to commercial yeasts to start their fermentations. As native yeasts (translators of terroir) were replaced with industrially produced versions, wines began to taste the same. Gone were the nuances of one plot versus another. Depending on the yeast you chose to use, all your wines could taste like mass-produced “Two Buck Chuck.” The new generation of winemakers realized that this system was not sustainable. They reacted by forsaking the tenets of industrial agriculture and turned back to nature. They planted trees, reintroduced horses to the vineyards, allowed weeds to grow and ecosystems to re-establish themselves. These decisions came at a cost. Yields decreased and wine styles changed.

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*Skin-contact wines (also called “orange” wines) are fermented in contact with grape skins for days, weeks or months, adding colour and complexity.

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Realizing early on that conventional journalists and critics would neither understand this new generation of winemakers’ intentions nor endorse their wines, they began to develop a parallel marketplace that would sustain their way of winemaking. And it worked. In cities such as Paris, there were fewer than five retail establishments selling natural wines in 2004; today, there are nearly 500. The natural wine movement has become a cultural movement that not only embodies environmental, aesthetic, social and political ideals, but also ethical wine.

The Style “Real” wines is a rather ambiguous term, but so too is “natural” wine. There is no official definition of what gets your wine into this exclusive club, and most of the makers of such wines want to keep it that way. By defining the term, you remove much of the poetic realism that attracts people to this way of winemaking and living. Despite the lack of hard and fast rules, there are some unwritten laws that nearly all the qualifying wines adhere to. Some of the non-negotiables include: organic or biodynamic farming, no additions or subtractions in the cellar, no chemical additions in the vineyard or the winery, no commercial yeasts, nor fining or sterile filtration. Producers tend to hold slightly more wideranging opinions regarding the use of sulphur dioxide, with some eschewing its use completely and others using small amounts (usually far below the legal limits) in order to help their wines survive the challenging environments they encounter during shipping and storage. Describing wines made with benevolent neglect is often difficult. There is no one descriptor that defines the style. The wines are as varied as their winemakers and the winemaking choices that are made, or not made, along

the way. Disciples of the style would say that this new way of making wines is actually as old as winemaking itself and that the majority of the wines seem to have a vitality and life-force that conventional wines simply do not possess. They are seldom heavy, rich or high in alcohol, often valuing drinkability over power. Some are light and juicy, often referred to as “glou glou” or “quaffable.” Some are funkier, with interesting flavours of cider, savouriness and sometimes a salty, mineral finish. Most are unfiltered and unfined and therefore will often appear cloudier than commercially produced wines. The winemakers would argue that fining and filtering remove essential textural and flavour components from the wine and therefore they choose to avoid these steps. The flavours may not be for everyone, but they do give you a glimpse of what wine tastes like free of the chemical additions that characterize many of today’s industrial wines. Many people find themselves drawn to the world of natural wines as much by the ideology that the movement embodies as the wines themselves. Some find the flavours challenging initially, some fall head over heels in love with the first sip. Many that are initially challenged by the unfamiliar flavour profiles find themselves sufficiently intrigued that they soon find themselves trying wine after wine, enjoying the journey of exploration and emerging as the most devoted proponents in the end. Some people swear these wines have brought an end to the hangovers and allergic reactions they have endured in the past. Lovers of the style speak of the satisfaction they feel in supporting small family farms and contributing to an alternative economy. The reasons for trying a taste of natural wine are many. And who knows, you may find that, like a good photo, the best wines are unfiltered and fine. Look for the “Green Cork” symbol on the Banville & Jones shelves to locate our selection natural wines.

The Politics Natural wine seems like an anti-establishment reaction to this fake and filtered world so many of us seem determined to inhabit. While there is no strict definition of “natural wine,” those who are leading the charge share certain characteristics. Its winemakers generally endorse a political attitude that leans a little to the left. They view the consumerism of this century as one of the leading causes of the ecological crisis and see low-intervention farming and winemaking as one solution. However, according to Cultural Insurrection author Jonathan Nossiter, many of these winemakers are “natural without any desire or sometimes even consciousness of the ‘naturalness.’”

And though many see the natural wine movement as pitted against “big wine,” Nossiter characterizes this cultural insurrection as “generating an aesthetic and social movement that isn’t oriented in a battle against the industrial standard but outside of it.” Instead of running a business driven by the bottom line, most of these winemakers are content to simply make enough to pay their staff and live comfortably, without luxuries or extravagancies. Having many friends and acquaintances that would count themselves among this group, I can say that the majority want to be “real” people, with “real” friends, having “real” experiences and making “real” wines.


RED

(Italy, $31.99)

CLEANEST

Monteraponi Chianti Classico

Tenuta l’Armonia Brio Pop (Italy, $24.99)

The Juice Asylum Il Terzo Grado

Akilia San Lorenzo

(Italy, $28.99)

(Spain, $19.99)

Kelley Fox Ahurani Pinot Noir

The Rennersistas Waiting for Tom

(United States, $44.99)

(Austria, $24.99)

Barbacan Rosso di Valtellina

Etnella Tracotanza

(Italy, $36.99)

(Italy, $35.99)

Les Vignerons d’Estezargues Cuvée des Galets

Jonc Blanc Les Sens du Fruit

(France, $16.99)

(France, $25.99)

Luyt Pipeno Pais

(Italy, $21.99)

(Chile, $24.99)

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FUNKIEST

Iuli Umberta Barbera


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PROFILE

Chef Melissa Makarenko Peasant Cookery Photos by Ian McCausland

Like many of us Manitobans, Chef Melissa Makarenko grew up making perogies and holopchi with her Mom and grandmother. Her path to the kitchen was not a direct one, however. Melissa was in school pursuing marine biology, when the drudgery of university studies caught up with her. Melissa met a passionate chef at a local job fair who inspired her to explore culinary school. After working for the Fairmont hotels in Winnipeg, New Brunswick and Montreal, Melissa came home to roost with an 8-year tenure at Resto Gare in St Boniface. It was a place to learn and develop her own personal philosophy as a chef, and prepared her for her current home as Executive Chef at The Peasant Cookery. How would you describe your cooking philosophy? I describe it as “upscale comfort.” I want the flavours and the product to shine. The simplest ingredients can be the tastiest—but also the most complicated to make. I like to be honest and be true to every flavour. You arrived at Peasant Cookery in the summer of 2019. What is your vision for the restaurant? I feel so at home here. The restaurant concept is very much who I am. We are maintaining the housemade philosophy of the restaurant—we are still the only place in the city that makes everything on the charcuterie platter from scratch. I have developed a flex menu that changes daily, so when someone comes in, there will always be something new—whether it is a brand new dish or a dish that evolves. I have a plan to bring more daring dishes to the menu. I want people to come here for different and exciting dishes, but we are easing into it. You can’t just put a pig’s face on a plate and expect people to love it. The most daring dish I have offered so far is breaded sweetbreads. It is a traditional ingredient, but served in a contemporary way. Peasant Pot de Feu: Hylife pork with seasonal vegetables

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What’s the secret ingredient in your fridge? Fresh produce: I got some quince in the fall and made jelly and jam. Quince is very tart, so I have been chatting with the lead bartenders about roasting them and making a fusion drink for the winter. What is most interesting current food trend? I have been paying attention to the fermentation trends, and I appreciate that, like wine, food is moving back toward honest expression. What is your favourite wine? Les Compains d’Abord 2017 Le Premier Soir Gamay (France, $24.99). We are also featuring many local craft beer and spirits on the bar side.

Crispy sweetbreads with blue cheese mayo and mild harissa sauce

What is your favourite kitchen gadget? My smoker gun is my newest tool. I make the beef carpaccio with a dome over it to release the maplewood smoke just before you eat it. When you smell the smoke, you experience a different flavour than if you are simply smoking the meat. What is your favourite cookbook? I use Joel Robuchon’s The Complete Robuchon, and there is one I always turn to called My Paris Kitchen by David Lebovitz. What is your favourite food travel destination? I love the South of France. The way they treat spices and seafood, and the time they take to build a sauce really inspire me. I would like to go to Morocco next. What is your guilty pleasure? Maple syrup; I use it in everything. They call me the Maple Chef.  Smoked Beef Carpaccio

We get it. Many things in life are better when paired with a glass of wine. Pairing it with reading your insurance policy…not so much. Like wine however, insurance is good to have. Look for an insurance broker displaying this symbol. Insurance brokers are the most knowledgeable resource at your disposal to ensure you’re properly protected.


Photo by Ian McCausland

GARY’S CORNER

Wine Zeitgeist By Gary Hewitt, DipWSET, CWE, FWS, Sommelier In the late 1940s, North America was recovering from the effects of Prohibition, the Depression, and the latest global war. Soldiers came home with a nascent appreciation of all things French. People extended their horizons and began to travel. They discovered that our domestic sweet and potent “sherry” and “port” bore little resemblance to the wines of Europe. Even sophisticated New York restaurants listed wines only by their origin (the producer name did not matter, except for Champagne!), and Champagne and German wines dominated lists. Early change came in the form of less sweet and less potent wines with European-sounding names such as E. & J. Gallo’s Chablis Blanc and Hearty Burgundy—wines that in no way resembled their namesakes! At home, “Canadian wineries,” as noted by Robert A. Bell on his Wines of Canada website, “passed off their generally mediocre wines with European-sounding labels.” Undoubtedly, readers of a certain age will recognize Hochtaler, Alpenweiss, Toscana and Tollerkranz. Bell further notes that “misleading consumers actually worked.” The 1950s and 1960s saw the impact of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, refrigeration and stainless steel—and with them, the emergence of global trade. With best intentions, grape growers following the “Green Revolution” denuded earthen rows between vines, fed vines with purified forms of nitrogen and phosphorus, and protected vines with strong doses of pesticides. The aim was a uniform harvest of uniform grapes. In the winery, temperature control and limited exposure to oxygen enhanced freshness, particularly in white wines, in a way that we now take for granted. Unprecedented distribution to foreign markets was led by top European brands: you may fondly remember Black Tower, Mateus Rosé and straw-wrapped bottles of Chianti…or you may still be drinking these today. The 1970s was the era of technical winemakers who transformed grapes defined by measurements of sugars and acids into squeaky-clean wines likewise defined by numbers. Schools such as the University of California

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Davis, Roseworthy College in Australia, and Geisenheim in Germany turned out a generation of winemaking wizards who believed that technology paved the path to excellence (not just commercial success). Also, at this time, the now widespread practice of naming wines for their grape variety was promoted by American wine writer/ merchant Frank Schoonmaker. Imagine today not seeing “Chardonnay,” “Merlot,” or “Syrah” on wine labels! The 1980s and 1990s saw a shift back to the land. Comfortable with their expertise, but realizing that technology did not compensate for poor grapes, many winemakers once again became winegrowers (a term long used in Europe). “Great wine is made in the vineyard” became a mantra, massive focus on vineyard management created physiologically perfect grapes, and terroir entered our vocabulary. The 1980s saw the rise of wine critic Robert Parker via his independent newsletter The Wine Advocate and his 100-point scale. As the most influential wine critic in history, Parker’s penchant for super-ripe, full-bodied, highly oaked wines influenced more than a generation of wine drinkers…and winemakers! The 1990s and 2000s witnessed a burgeoning global wine industry growing in different directions, one leading to consolidation and standardization and another leading to small-to-medium scale, human-crafted wines. This largely defines the wine world that we live in today, but the past 10 years have magnified the divergence of the trends. Massive “drinks” businesses jockey for market share in campaigns promoting wines “designed” for the “consumer palate.” Meanwhile, movements for organic, biodynamic, and vegan wines (to name a few) gain ground. But the potentially revolutionary change is the emergence of “natural” wines, wines that challenge our fundamental idea of how a wine should taste. In a way, such wines bring us full circle back to the ancient methods, but this simplification ignores the enormous increase in our understanding of viticulture and oenology. Today’s winemakers make an informed choice to intervene or to leave winemaking to Nature. The impact of low-intervention winemaking is already profound. Today, wine rests on a fulcrum, balancing climate change and industrialization, the interests of large and small producers, and the philosophies of technology and nonintervention. Today, well-made wines span a broader style spectrum than ever before, and consumers have an enormous choice. How we embrace our options will define the coming decades. Now is an exciting time: the most exciting time of my wine life. 


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TRENDING

PiWis: In a League of Their Own By Andrea Eby, DipWSET, Sommelier, IWS, CSW Sustainability represents one of the most holistic ways of addressing global issues such as climate change. Viticulturists and winemakers have realized that, in order to create a sustainable future for the industry, they must be willing to explore less traditional approaches. One such cutting-edge approach comes in the form of PiWis: an affectionately nicknamed class of superhero fungus-fighting varieties (PiWi comes from the German word Pilzwiderstandsfähig, meaning literally “fungus resistant”). Originally developed in Germany, these vines represent one of viticulture’s most exciting advances in the move away from chemical dependency. The first hybrid grapes were developed by crossing wellknown European grape varieties with lesser-known American vines. These hybrids were developed by scientists in an attempt to combine the palate-pleasing parts of European grape varieties (Vitis vinifera) with the disease resistance inherent to American vines. Original attempts created hardier, disease-resistant plants, but the wine crafted from the grapes was often criticized for its “foxy” flavours (think: strong, earthy, musky). Some of these hybrids have endured, despite their less conventional flavours, because other character contributions outweigh their flaws. Maréchal Foch, a common cultivar in Canadian vineyards, is one such hybrid. A complex crossing of an American riparia–rupestris vine and an early-maturing Muscat variety, Maréchal Foch has survived thanks to its ability to survive our Canadian winters. More recent attempts at creating such varieties have incorporated native Asian grapevines into the genetic pool. The ancient Vitis amurensis has strong resistance to frost, mildew and rot without the peculiar flavours of North American grapes. After decades of crossings, the resulting varieties are so genetically similar to the common Vitis vinifera that their wines are virtually indistinguishable in the glass. In fact, the only thing they have in common with “foxy” hybrids of the past is their disease resistance. This genetic similarity, coupled with the ability to produce high-quality wines, has 34 http://banvilleandjones.cornervine.com

Patrick and Karoline Uccelli in the vineyards at Tenuta Dornach


meant that these PiWi varieties have been accepted into the European Union catalogue of approved vines. This move signals a dramatic departure from the previous anti-hybrid regulations. The wines created from these vines have also seen a huge jump in quality and, in blind tastings, often outperform the familiar varieties we know and love. Winemakers committed to practicing environmentally sustainable viticulture are increasingly turning to PiWi varieties to fit their philosophies. Traditional grape varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay typically require chemical sprays up to 15 times a season in order to protect the vines from fungi and mildews. In fact, the use of chemicals is substantially higher in viticulture than in any other European agricultural sector. The French National Institute for Agricultural Research estimates that wine grapes receive almost 25% of all pesticide applications in the EU, while only accounting for 3% of the agricultural land. Adding to the environmental impact is the fact that each time the vineyard is sprayed, tractors contribute to pollution and soil impaction. PiWi varieties, on the other hand, are chosen for their inherent natural resistance to these same viticultural hazards: spraying for fungus and mildew can be eliminated, or at the very least, significantly decreased.

Some new PiWi grape varieties: If you see some unfamiliar grape varieties popping up on bottles, it could be a PiWi: Cabernet Eidos, Cabernet Volos, Fleurtei, Goldmuskateller, Julius, Merlot Kanthus, Merlot Khorus, Mucaris, Sauvignon Kretos, Sauvignon Nepis, Sauvignon Rytos, Soreli, Souvignier Gris, Rathay, Regent, Roesler—with more varieties awaiting approval.

As consumer demand for organic, sustainable products continues to grow, winemakers around the world are increasingly turning to PiWi varieties. New World winemakers seem keenest to incorporate the vines into their climate change arsenal. European winemakers, weighed down by centuries of tradition and memories of “foxy” flavours lingering on the palates, have been slower to plant the vines. However, a new generation of wine drinkers, free of the dogmatic adherence to the mainstream grape varieties of their parents’ generation, has begun demanding more from the industry. Sustainability and drinkability are forefront in their minds. With support growing, PiWis stand poised to move out of the viticultural minors and into the big leagues. 

PiWis in Italy Patrick Uccelli took over his family’s historic Dornach estate in the beautiful Val dell’Adige area of Italy in 2008. Trained as a viticulturist and oenologist, Patrick and his wife Karoline, a biologist by trade, quickly set to work converting the vineyards, using a mix of organic and biodynamic practices to bring the estate back into balance. Patrick is a firm believer in the core values of Rudolph Steiner, the founder of the modern biodynamic philosophy, striving in his lifestyle and on his farm to foster the development of a selfsustaining ecosystem. “We started with PiWi because it’s a further possibility for us to shape a ‘clean’ agriculture,” explains Patrick. “Working without pesticides, it’s a great goal, and it’s offering us the opportunity to produce interesting white, red, and also orange wines.” In the quest for truly sustainable viticulture, Patrick has dedicated a portion of his vineyards to these resistant varieties. “The greatest challenge is to find the right balance between the right PiWi variety for the wine type and the terroir where we live. It takes a lot of time. The greatest reward is to get really great wines from totally untreated grapes in a healthy environment.”

Dornach 3 Vino Bianco: Solaris, Souvignier Gris and Cabernet Blanc are blended together to create an exotic white ($38.99); Dornach 4 Vino Rosso: Regent, Prior and Merlot lend their personalities to this complex red ($38.99).

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RAW WINE REVOLUTION:

an interview with Isabelle Legeron Interview by Andrea Eby, DipWSET, IWS, CMS, Sommelier, and Gary Hewitt, DipWSET, CWE, FWS, Sommelier Isabelle Legeron is the author of Natural Wine: An Introduction to Organic and Biodynamic Wines Made Naturally and the founder and driving force behind the “totally independent” RAW WINE fairs. Isabelle was raised in a traditional agricultural family, developed a love of the land, and later found herself drawn to the study of wine. Even advanced studies left her wanting more, and she enrolled in the Master of Wine (MW) program, where she discovered that her non-intervention and organic outlook challenged the program’s conventional teachings. But Isabelle remained resolute: she not only graduated but is now a champion of the natural wine movement. Isabelle brings deep knowledge and a focused, clear approach to her ongoing work. She happily shared her time in order to spread the word about natural wines

life, that microbiology, is preserved and translated during the vinification process.

Gary Hewitt (GH) Perhaps we could start our discussion with your definition of natural wine.

IL I think it’s divided. I would say that the majority of people would like to see a definition. You cannot tell anything from the wine label or from just looking at the bottle of wine. So, from my perspective, it is important to define it. I like things to be quite transparent; I want to open eyes, and I like to know what’s what.

Isabelle Legeron (IL) Natural wine is literally a 100% grape juice—nothing added, nothing taken away. It’s a wine that has been made from organically grown grapes with very little intervention in the cellar and nothing added during the vinification process. And really, for me, it’s the wine that preserves the living: the living in the soil, in the vineyard. That

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GH At the moment, there is no official definition of natural wine…? IL Yes, that’s really true. I think the closest thing you’re going to get may be some charters of quality that grower associations are putting together like the Association des Vins Naturels (France). At the moment, we’re relying on private organizations and their definition of what is a natural wine. Andrea Eby (AE) Do you feel that the community wants an official definition or does the culture of that community like a little ambiguity in the definition?

But, there are people who prefer it to be more nebulous. And for me, the two go together. When you start exploring natural


wine, and you start talking about the growers, you realize that the vast, vast majority of these growers are highly organized, highly meticulous, and highly precise. I think a lot of people assume that these growers are a bit all over the place, and it’s really not true. You have to be a lot more organized and, in a way, have much greater hygiene to make natural wine than when you make conventional wine. That’s why the wines are getting better and better. It’s because people are understanding what they are dealing with. Even though there is a certain amount of mystery, nature is much more complex and much more organized and balanced than we’ll ever be. I think that a level of knowledge and scientific understanding definitely is helping. GH How did your interest in natural wines evolve? IL It very much reflects my upbringing. I was brought up on a farm where everything we consumed we grew or made. We were very much subsistence farming: we had animals, we had grapes. I was brought up in the rhythm of the seasons, because we only ever ate what was in season. As a typical kid, I thought, “I have to go to University, and I want to get out of this farm.” And so I left the nest, and I got a job in London. But within a few years, I was really missing the farming and missing the culture. I went back to studying, but as I became more and more educated in wine, I realized actually a lot of what wine was, wasn’t what I was looking for. It didn’t really resonate with the type of person I am. I’m much more comfortable having a picnic in the back of a van in the vineyard than having fancy dinners in some top château. And so I was looking for more of the type of people that I wanted to spend time with. That led me to organic-biodynamic farming and then natural wine throughout my Master of Wine studies. When I finally finished with my studies, I decided that the only thing I want to do is work with natural wine. GH How did the idea of the RAW WINE fair develop? IL RAW WINE fair is a natural and low-intervention wine fair. We welcome people who farm organically, who ferment naturally and who use small amounts of sulphites and some people who use no sulphites at all. I wanted to be transparent because sometimes people mix all of everything together. RAW WINE is kind of a broader church, so to speak, where we bring together a community of people who farm organically and naturally and produce both natural and low-intervention wines. In the beginning, I wanted to organize an event in London so that people from the UK could meet those amazing growers from Italy and France. I really wanted to organize a fair that

I would be proud of if I was pouring or if I was tasting. And the growers really loved it. They said, “For us it is such an amazing event.” People turning up at the event were actually interested in the wine. I never really thought I’d be here today with an event which is actually quite international. The growers said to me that they really wanted us to do something on the continent, and we ended up in Berlin. And then a lot of growers and importers in the States, particularly in New York, said, “We’d love you to really organize this in New York.” And that’s how it started. We have had RAW WINE fairs in London, Berlin, Montreal, New York, Miami, and Los Angeles. GH I think RAW is a great name for the event. It has a real visceral feel to it. IL RAW WINE is a trademark. It’s not a category of wine. For me, “raw” is what they are, they’re a little brut (crude or unrefined), you know, as they say in French. I work really hard at making sure the charter quality is implemented and every single grower signs off on the analysis of all their sulphites and stuff inside the wine. So, when people taste the wine with the RAW WINE seal of approval, they know what it is. I’m quite precious about the name. GH You’re an advocate for ingredient lists on wines. Why? IL Well, to be honest, I’m shocked that it doesn’t happen. As a consumer, I’m really very careful about what I eat. And I don’t understand how people do not demand to know what’s in their wine. Somehow wine got this exemption that it doesn’t have to declare any of the ingredients. And as a result, people believe that all wine is natural. I really believe that we owe it to the people who drink the wine to give them all the information and then they can make up their minds. If the wine has had fish bladder, used for the refining process, this wine is not actually good at all for a vegetarian or vegan person—and that person really should know. For decades, we have sold this notion that wine is this very romantic product made with just tears and sunshine and vegetables. Not even 1% of the wine production is made like that. AE As an advocate for low-intervention and natural wines in Winnipeg, I’m confronted with the criticism of natural wine, in particular, faults or flaws or characteristics outside of what we would consider normal for wine. How do you address this kind of criticism? IL It’s always a tough one. Wine drinkers are so used to having extremely squeaky clean, shiny flavours. Whenever they have something that is more alive and different, they just can’t get their heads around it. I think how we’ve been brainwashed,

www.banvilleandjones.com 39


for 40 years, into thinking a Sauvignon Blanc has these tendencies, a Merlot should taste like this, a Chardonnay should taste like this. And this has been depicted by very modern winemaking practices, focused on grape variety. I think it is very useful to question yourself and think: “Why do I think that a Sauvignon should be tasting like this?” I try to have a conversation around being open to different flavours and then trying to realize that we taste inside this very small box, which is a shame. AE What do you think the natural wine scene will look like in 10 years? IL I think it will definitely grow, but I wouldn’t say it’s going to explode. I think we need to remember it’s still going to be a niche. I see a lot of applications for the RAW WINE fair from more and more young growers who have 3, 4, 5 hectares. And it’s their first, second, third vintage. There’s a lot more of that because it’s becoming a proposition where you can make good wines and sell them—and you can make a living out of it. I think you and I are very specific people who believe that it’s worth spending more on an ethical choice of what we consume. But the vast majority of people don’t actually really care about that.

AE What are your concerns about some of the big players moving into the natural wine sector? IL Well, that’s a big concern absolutely. I see people who try to get into the fair just because they make one wine or two wines that might possibly fit the criteria, and I know they have no place in the fair. When you taste it, you can’t taste any of the terroir or any of the viticulture. But, it’s awfully important to remember why we do what we do. For me, the bigger picture is about the environment. If a very big company gets inspired by what’s going on—even if they do it for marketing purposes—they are converting a lot of land to organic farming. If big wineries end up using less water and produce less pollution, if they stop using fertilizers, weed killers, and synthetic stuff for farming, that is a really good thing. Maybe they are not called natural wine, but I’m not going to quibble over 10 or 20 parts per million of sulphite being added or not added because I think that butchers the point. We also want to do this because there is a need to change the way people farm. I believe we can change the environment. 

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THE TASTEMAKERS By Mike Muirhead, ISG, CMS, Sommelier Who are the modern taste influencers? It might come as a surprise to know that for you, it’s you. When we look at the current movement toward organic, low-intervention, and natural wines, we can see a reflection of what is on a lot of people’s minds: a rising concern for the damage that chemical intervention has

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done to the environment. However, it is, in fact, also an indicator of our current cultural moment and a larger market trend. How we came to this point has been an interesting path. We have gone from following large companies and even bigger personalities for guidance in the wine world to finding smaller, niche wine stories and trusting our own voices (and palates).


Royalty Makers At a time when large, commercial wine companies and conglomerates led the market, the international wine market found an advocate: Robert Parker Jr. was the first “modern influencer.” In the 1970s, Parker was frustrated by the lack of impartial wine critics: you see, at the time, most “critics” were also attached to wine sales companies. In 1978, he decided to start his own subscription-based newsletter called The Wine Advocate, launching his 100-point scale for rating wine. Wine Spectator, Wine Enthusiast, MW Jancis Robinson, and Decanter eventually followed suit— and for the next three decades, wine agents would sell us the Next Big Thing based on these points rankings. Customers would only purchase wines rated over 90, and every winery clamoured to show their wines to “get some points.” Points were a way for casual wine lovers to determine what was good, based on professional tastemakers—whether or not they agreed with their taste.

Cheese • mon • ger (noun) a person who sells cheese, butter, and other dairy products • Cut to order cheese counter • Exclusive provisions and pantry items • Cheese, Charcuterie, and Grazing boards • Guided tastings and classes • Cheese of the Month Club subscriptions • Cheese wheel cakes for weddings, birthdays, and anniversaries


The impact on the market was a general homogenization of wines and wine styles that catered to these mainstream palates. This included the very popular “big” wines that reigned: Napa Valley Cabernet, micro-oxygenated Bordeaux and big California Pinot Noirs (that didn’t taste at all like Pinot Noir and, in fact, likely had Syrah blended into it). If you wanted to show your “good taste,” these were the wines you brought to the dinner party.

From Points to Likes In the mid-2000s, the emergence of YouTube reviews and vloggers like Gary Vaynerchuk (Wine Library TV) sought to bring wine back to the people with honest, fun reviews and open, unpretentious interactions with followers. These influencers held their own well into the 2010s, directing tastes and deciding on the Next Big Thing. The rise of Instagram and crowd-sourced reviews in the last five years has resulted again in a shift—one that has both mirrored and influenced how we make and choose wines. This new era has ushered in an opportunity for winemakers and small producers to interact directly

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with different wine communities. One of the strongest connections has been within the natural wine movement. The wine lover’s focus has turned to the stories of wine, the value of appreciating the craft behind small-batch products, and a focus on sustainability and stewardship of the land. Because these seemingly more intimate conversations are taking place on the grand scale of the Internet, niche wineries (such as natural winemakers) that don’t have any financial clout on the mass market have exposure. Interesting stories draw followers and, happily, that builds demand for more diverse styles of wine on our shelves.

Communities of Wine One of the great equalizers in the wine industry is the proliferation of apps that allow everyone to be instant wine-raters. Crowd-sourced reviews create conversations around wine and allow us to follow people who share our taste, which explains why they are now the main influence on how people choose wine. Customers that used to come in with a wine recommendation from a friend now have thousands of recommendations from a broader community available at their fingertips: friends, winemakers, wine critics,


their favourite Sommeliers. The role of a Sommelier has shifted from the person who recommends a wine to the person who can help you sort through the massive amount of digital information available to find the wine that suits your palate (or your level of adventure). This new era of smaller wine communities has given wine lovers access to like-minded people, but also a direct line to winemakers who share their philosophies about being custodians of the land, about smallerbatch winemaking, and about wine culture. With that knowledge, wine lovers are able to make decisions regarding wine that not only align with their palates but also their ethics. Through this democratization of wine communities, the wine lovers in our community are discovering what we at Banville & Jones have always known: they

are the most important “tastemakers.” The people who love the subtle intricacies and light body of a Burgundian Pinot Noir are not the same people who love rich, voluptuous Napa Cabs. What one person might consider a wine fault, another might consider an exciting new approach. What one might consider a perfectly clean wine might be very boring for others. In addition to your personal preferences, your palate is always evolving with experience, age, and knowledge—as are the people influencing you. There is a wine for everyone. A bottle of wine can be special to you for different reasons, whether you value a certain wine style, a wine philosophy, or even a good story. The best thing about this moment in wine is that, with access to broader wine communities, wine lovers are starting to trust themselves and ask for the wines they love, not the wines they have been told to love. 

Find Your Community CornerVine: If you want to see what wines your local wine experts and friends are drinking, download the Banville & Jones CornerVine app. It keeps track of the wines you have purchased, your own reviews, and reviews by the people in your community. You can also search for wines we carry within the app and order delivery to your home.

Instagram: Start with wines you like and follow the winemakers! You will get info on their wines but also find out what they are drinking and are excited about. Follow wine writers and Sommeliers you trust to see what they are drinking—then follow those winemakers. Just follow the Internet rabbit hole!

Raisin: The Natural Wine App: This app is all about natural wines! You can create a profile and interact with other users, scan a label to find out if that wine is natural, find locations where natural wine is available, and read about natural wine news and events.

Delectable App: Learn about wines by taking a photo of the label, keep track of the wines you have tried, find friends from your contact list, follow your favourite influencers and see their reviews, see what wines are trending on the app, rate wines, and post your own reviews.

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WINE & FOOD

EVENTS SCHEDULE FEBRUARY 2020 THROUGH MAY 2020

Wine & Food Evening

Top Shelf Tasting

Essentials of Wine

Join us for our wine and food pairing series! Our talented Wine Experts work with Winnipeg’s finest chefs to create the ultimate pairing experience. Cost: $89.99 per person

Taste the luxury when our Sommeliers open the doors to our specialties cabinets to explore some of Banville & Jones’s exclusive treasures. This event is held on the main floor and is wheelchair accessible. Cost: $99.00

Essentials of Wine is a two-evening class (7–9 p.m.) that will help you understand price and quality, develop your tasting skills that appeal to your unique palate. Cost: $79.99

Thursday, February 6: The Mitchell Block Thursday, April 16: Beaujena’s Thursday, May 28: Chef Ben Kramer

Cooking Demo Learn from the best! Banville & Jones Sommeliers team up with Winnipeg’s premier chefs for an instructional evening of recipes and wine pairings. Cost: $89.99 Thursday, February 20: Pizza with the Pros featuring Diana’s Cucina

Friday March 20: Tolaini Estates – explore library and current vintages from this iconic Tuscan Winery

Wine Workshop Wine workshops are one-evening classes that dig deeply into specific topics of interest, with an educational and engaging approach. Cost: $79.99 Thursday, March 12: Benevolent Neglect

Saturday, February 22 & 29 Thursday, April 30 & May 7

For updated information on wine and food events, and to register online, click on the Events & Education tab at banvilleandjones.com. To inquire about private events, call 204.948.9463. • Tickets for events are non-refundable, but are exchangeable 14 days prior to the event. • Events begin at 7 pm and take place in the 2nd floor Tuscany Room unless otherwise noted. • Prices do not include taxes.

STORE HOURS: Monday to Friday: 10 am to 8 pm Saturday: 10 am to 6 pm Sundays and holidays: 11 am to 6 pm


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The Pasta Bar With Todd Antonation, Rebecca Lechman, Mike Muirhead, and Doug Stephen Photos by Ian McCausland Pasta’s vast array of styles—from ragu to oven-baked; from simple to intricate; from light to filling—are the perfect comfort food for our long winter nights. With a variety of flavours, textures, and levels of complexity to inspire wine choices, the Banville & Jones team once again rose to the challenge. Todd led with a spicy take on traditional mac and cheese with some locally made sriracha macaroni; Rebecca 48 http://banvilleandjones.cornervine.com

added local Italian sausage to her tried-and-true crockpot lasagne soup for weekday meal planning; and Mike served up a braised pork shoulder ragu on pappardelle noodles. Local veteran restaurateur Doug Stephen introduced us to the deceptively simple pasta that is rumoured to be the most ancient pasta recipe in Italy: cacio e pepe (simply: cheese and pepper).


SMOKEY SRIRACHA MACARONI AND CHEESE Serves 8 2x

½ cup ¼ cup 3 cups 1 cup 1 tbsp 1 tsp 2 3x

1 cup 6

350 g bags of The Mitchell Block Sriracha macaroni* unsalted butter flour milk whipping cream Smak Dab Beer Chipotle Mustard each of salt, pepper and chipotle powder generous squirts Sriracha sauce 170 g blocks Bothwell Maple Smoked Extra Old Cheddar, grated Panko crumbs pieces smoked bacon, cooked and sliced

* Available at Banville & Jones and The Mitchell Block.

Cook pasta for 3-½ minutes in salted water; drain and run under cold water to stop the cooking process. Preheat the oven to broil. Melt the butter in a saucepot over medium heat. Add flour and cook, stirring vigorously with a wooden spoon to form a roux. Slowly add milk, then cream, whisking constantly to avoid lumps. Reduce for 3 minutes. Stir in mustard, salt, pepper, chipotle powder and sriracha. Gradually add grated cheese, while stirring constantly until melted. Place macaroni in an oven-proof container (casserole dish or cast-iron skillet). Stir in the cheese sauce to desired consistency. (If the sauce is a little runny, it will absorb into the pasta.) Stir in bacon and top with Panko crumbs. Broil on the top rack until toasty brown. Remove from the oven and let it sit for 10 minutes.

PAIR WITH:

Staffelter Hof 2018 Kiss Kiss Maddie’s Lips Mosel, Germany $31.99 El Enemigo 2016 Chardonnay Mendoza, Argentina $35.99 Ventisei 2017 Rosso Tuscany, Italy $19.99

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ZUPPA DI LASAGNE Serves 8 1 lb

Marcello’s store-made spicy Italian sausage, casing removed 1 large yellow onion, diced 3½ cups mushroom broth 1 can diced tomatoes with Italian spices (796 ml) 1 cup Deluca’s Tomato Basil Pasta Sauce 2 tsp dried basil 2 cloves garlic, minced 9 lasagna noodles Shredded mozzarella and grated Parmesan for topping Ovenproof bowls or French onion soup crocks Crockpot

Remove sausage from casing and crumble into a frying pan with the chopped onion. Sauté until the meat is cooked through and onions are translucent. Drain fat then add to crockpot with mushroom broth, diced tomatoes, pasta sauce, basil, and garlic. Set on low for 7–9 hours. Thirty minutes before serving: break lasagna noodles into bite-sized pieces and submerge fully in the tomato sauce. (Note: Make sure the heat is still on and the crock has not switched to “warm”). Cook approximately 40 minutes until the noodles are al dente. To serve: Preheat the broiler and fill your oven-safe bowls with soup. Top with mozzarella and grated Parmesan. Broil until desired golden bubbliness.

PAIR WITH:

Terrra Costantino 2016 Bianca de Aetna Siciliy, Italy $34.99 Donatella Cinelli Colombini 2016 Rosso di Montalcino Tuscany, Italy $34.99 Les Vignerons d’Estezargues 2018 Cuvée des Galets Côtes du Rhône, France $16.99

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TACCOZZETTE CON STRACOTTO (PASTA WITH BRAISED PORK RAGU) Serves 8 2 tbsp 1 kg 2 2 6 1 tsp 1 tsp 1 tsp 2 1 1 cup 1 2 tbsp ½ 1 cup 1 cup

olive oil boneless pork shoulder large onions, finely chopped carrots, grated cloves garlic, minced dried thyme dried oregano dried basil bay leaves pinch dried chilli flakes red wine 28-oz can whole Italian tomatoes tomato paste 28-oz can crushed tomatoes water Salt & pepper, to season Pappardelle pasta fresh basil, roughly torn, to serve

Trim fat from the pork shoulder and dry the pork with paper towel. Season the whole pork with salt and pepper. In a large Dutch oven, heat oil over medium heat for 5 minutes. Sear the pork on all sides until a golden brown crust forms (approximately 3 minutes a side), then remove from the pan and set aside. Add onions and carrots to the pan juices and cook on medium 4–5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add garlic, thyme, basil, oregano, chilli flakes (optional), a pinch of salt, and bay leaves, and cook, stirring occasionally, for another 1-2 minutes. Stir in red wine and reduce for 4–5 minutes. Add the whole tomatoes (and their juice), tomato paste, crushed tomatoes, and water. Stir to combine. Return the pork to the pan. The liquid should cover at least one third of the meat, but more is great. You will be turning the meat throughout the process to ensure all parts of the pork come in contact with the sauce. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a simmer. Replace the lid, but leave a slight opening to allow the sauce to reduce as it cooks. Cook the pork for about 4 hours, turning as necessary to make sure all of the sides get time in the sauce and that it maintains a simmer. When the meat is fall-apart tender and is easily torn apart with a fork, move from the pan into a bowl. Using two forks, shred into bite-size pieces. Using a wooden spoon, smash apart any whole tomatoes in the sauce that haven’t already broken down. At this point, if the sauce reduced too much, you can add the other half of the crushed tomatoes and water until it is the desired consistency and taste. Discard the bay leaves. Return shredded pork to the pan, stir, and simmer for at least 30 minutes to combine the flavours. 52 http://banvilleandjones.cornervine.com

Cook pasta in salted water to preferred tenderness, per the directions on the package. Drain and immediately add pasta into the pork ragu along with the fresh basil. Cook for another minute to allow the pasta to absorb the ragu flavour and the basil to wilt slightly.

PAIR WITH:

Meritxell Palleja 2016 Nita Priorat Catalonia, Spain $32.99 Tolaini 2014 Gran Selezione Chianti Classico Tuscany, Italy $53.99


CACIO E PEPE Serves 6 500 g 1 tbsp 2½ cups 2l

Kosher salt tonnarelli pasta freshly cracked black pepper finely grated aged pecorino (to garnish) water (1 cup pasta water, reserved)

Bring 2L salted water to a boil. Add pasta and cook, stirring occasionally, until about 2 minutes before tender. Before you drain the pasta, remove 1 cup of pasta water and reserve. Do not rinse the pasta. Combine the pepper and half of the grated pecorino cheese in a bowl. Add 1/2 cup reserved pasta water to the bowl and whisk until the cheese sauce is smooth. Add the cooked pasta. Use a pair of tongs to mix and toss the pasta in the sauce. The sauce should take on a silky texture and coat the pasta completely. Add the second half of the cheese; toss and coat with the tongs. If the sauce seems dry, add 1–2 tbsp more pasta water. Garnish with grated cheese and serve immediately.

PAIR WITH:

Stefano Amerighi 2016 Syrah Tuscany, Italy $34.99 Thörle 2018 Kabinett Riesling Rheinhessen, Germany $22.99

Notes: Because this dish is so simple, the details are important: • Grate fresh cheeses, as pregrated cheeses will not melt as evenly and may clump instead of becoming silky. • The starch level in the pasta water is crucial to the silkiness of the sauce, so use just enough water for cooking the pasta. • Salt the pasta water generously before boiling, and you won’t have to add salt at the end.


We’ll come to you! Free delivery for the month of February! Whether you want one bottle of wine or several cases, for the month of February, wine deliveries ordered directly from Banville & Jones are FREE!*

Delivery to home address or business (18+ required to accept delivery) Order before noon for same day delivery 12–5pm (Monday through Saturday) Three ways to order your wine: Online*: www.banvilleandjones.com Phone: 204.948.WINE (9463) Text: 204.400.0499

*Some restrictions apply. Free delivery does not apply to orders made through Skip the Dishes—only orders made through Banville & Jones directly.


“The last time we were in Winnipeg, we went to The Common for lunch and we were blown away by its stunning, historic location,” says Tara Luxmore. “When we got the call from The Forks, we jumped at the opportunity.” Tara describes this new role as a mission to create the best beer menu in the country — one that continues to reflect the great Manitoba-made beer while also bringing in breweries that have never been on tap in Winnipeg before. “We want to give beer drinkers a chance to taste the wide breadth of beer styles,” says Tara. “We’re also excited to spread the word about The Common as an amazing beer venue, attracting the best breweries from around the world.” Meanwhile, Royale brings 20 years of experience curating awardwinning wine lists for some of the best restaurants in Western Canada. “I focus on purity of expression,” says Royale. “Every wine should be a clear and precise representation of where it comes from.” The Common has been one of Winnipeg’s busiest meeting places since its inception. For the last two years, Véronique Rivest has curated the list of craft beers and fine wines. With Rivest’s initial obligations fulfilled, wine curation duties will now be taken on by sommelier Brad Royale, while the beer lists will now be curated by cicerones Crystal and Tara Luxmore, otherwise known as the Beer Sisters.

Royale cites the excitement of being in a new city as a key motivator in taking on the role. “I love new projects, new people and new wines,” says Royale. “I’m so excited to dive into the market!” Royale and the Beer Sisters’ first curated lists will start pouring at The Common in Spring, with guided tasting events at The Forks planned throughout the year.

20 CRAFT BEERS | 20 FINE WINES

C U R AT E D B Y O U R W O R L D- C L A S S SOM M E LI E R AN D CICERONES IN TH E F O R KS MAR K ET C O M E S E E WHAT WE’R E PO U R I N G FIND US IN CENTRE COURT AT THE FORKS MARKET

Aoccdrnig to a rseearch taem at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be in the rghit pclae. It matters. Editing | Design | Translation

Perfect Your Documents | Empower your Team info@fireflywords.com | www.fireflywords.com | 204.557.1968

theforks.com


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WESTERN CANADA’S PREMIER WINE AND DRINKS EDUCATION FACILITY OFFERS WINE, BEER, AND SPIRITS COURSES FOR EVERYONE FROM THE HOBBYIST TO THE PROFESSIONAL.

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Profile: Rebecca Lechman, FWS, IWS, WSET 3, Sommelier (CMS) We are pleased to announce that our own Rebecca Lechman has completed the rigorous WSET Educator Training Programme and joins our WDCM team in teaching WSET courses. Rebecca came to Banville & Jones with a degree in biology as well as extensive experience in hospitality and event management. She has studied in the WSET programs, achieving Level 3 certification, and she has completed the Wine Scholar Guild programs in the French Wine Scholar and Italian Wine Scholar certifications. Rebecca has also qualified under the Court of Master Sommeliers as a Certified Sommelier. Dedicated to continued wine and drinks study, Rebecca is currently enrolled in the challenging CAPS Professional Sommelier Program at WDCM and is one of the candidates for our 2020 class of Professional Sommeliers. During this intensive schedule, and while managing full-time responsibilities with the team at Banville & Jones Wine Co., Rebecca travelled to Toronto to qualify as an Instructor for WSET Level 1 and 2. Rebecca’s wine studies have also led her to travel to wine regions in Italy as well as across Canada (Okanagan, Niagara and Nova Scotia).

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Her enthusiasm for the subject and her approachable manner combine with her deep understanding to make Rebecca a valuable addition to the WDCM team. She joins Gary Hewitt, Andrea Eby, and Sylvia Jansen on the teaching staff of WDCM. We have known for a long time that our staff and teachers at Banville & Jones and Wine & Drinks College Manitoba are industry leaders. Rebecca continues to enrich this reputation. Congratulations Rebecca!


WSET Level 1 Award in Wines WSET Level 1 has been offered by the WSET for many years, and WDCM has recently introduced the qualification as part of our own course offerings. Please visit our website for more information and to register. The Wine & Spirit Education Trust (WSET) is an international awarding body devoted to the development and delivery of qualifications and courses in wines, spirits, and sake. The mission of the WSET is to provide accessible, best-in-class education and qualifications to inspire and empower the world’s wine and spirit professionals and enthusiasts. WSET offers qualifications in more than 70 countries; WDCM is among its network of 700+ course providers.

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Would you like to know more about wine? WSET Level 1 Award in Wines is a full-day course that introduces students to the world of wine. During the hands-on workshop, we will explore how wine is made, wine styles, classic wines, grape varieties, and what contributes to taste and impressions of wine (and what makes some people have differing opinions about the same wines). We will also discuss how to describe wine accurately, wine storage and service, and food and wine pairings. It is a great introduction, suitable for anyone interested in wine and for servers who have not yet had formal wine education. A WSET certificate and lapel pin are presented to those who successfully complete the program.

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NO MORE PLASTIC! Banville & Jones has phased out single-use bags for environmentally friendly reusable options: • 3 bottle reusable fabric bag $1.25 • 6 bottle reusable fabric bag $1.99

SPECIAL OFFER: From now until March 31, exchange four reusable bags (3- or 6-bottle) for a $5 credit toward your next purchase.* *Unlisted wines only. Maximum of 12 bags exchanged per visit for up to a $15 credit. No cash value. Bags must be Banville & Jones branded.


SIDEBAR

Fabulous or Flawed? By Sylvia Jansen, DipWSET, CSW, Sommelier

In a 1990s French comedy film, a devious host decides to wreck a fine aged Bordeaux by adding vinegar to the wine. On tasting the corrupted bottle, he declares he just made the wine better. Sound crazy? Maybe not. This character’s palate clearly had a preference for volatility (also referred to as volatile acidity, or VA for short). How about you? Would a bit of vinegar in your wine make it intriguing and refreshing? Or just flawed and irritating? The movie was fiction, but those aromas and tastes are real. They exist in many wines and are among the great dividers of opinion with wine lovers. The major contributor of wine volatility is acetic acid (think vinegar) which along the way also results in the formation of the aroma compounds ethyl acetate and acetaldehyde (think nail polish or polish remover). These compounds grow in environments where there is alcohol, sugar and oxygen (think fermented wine especially). Each person has his or her own tolerance and preference levels for volatility in wine, and the same goes for winemakers (and wine reviewers, by the way). Some winemakers work hard to avoid any detectable VA, and some winemakers work purposely to achieve the lift that volatility brings to a wine. Some even want it to be prominent.

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In sparkling wines, for example, Champagne and other quality sparklers generally want to aim for beautiful fruit, toasty notes from ageing, and beautiful bubbles. No discernable VA is wanted on that voyage. But those who are making edgy, bubbly pet-nat (a gluggable, spritzy bubbly often with its own sediment in the bottle or can) is another story. The VA gives the pet-nat a lively, cider-like edge. A tiny concentration of VA in a table wine can lift and accentuate aromas without obviously showing vinegar, giving a little prickle in the nose, and can add to our appreciation of a wine’s complexity. Avoiding VA for many winemakers means using sulphur dioxide (SO2) as a disinfectant, or keeping temperatures low, or keeping barrels or vats topped up to avoid oxygen contact. (Our friend Adi Badenhorst in South Africa, for example, uses minimal SO2 but aims for beautiful fruit; his Secateurs Chenin Blanc is vibrant and delicious, with very low VA.) A higher level of volatility can be the result of even lower intervention both at harvest and in the winery. For these reasons, some natural or low-intervention wines can show high levels of VA. (Terracura nv Smiley Chenin Blanc, also from South Africa, is savoury and edgy with volatility.)

However, the purposely “natural” wines are not the only ones to show a lot of VA. Several traditional wine styles tend to show high levels of VA, including Tawny Ports, as well as some Barolo and red Burgundy wines that have spent a long time in barrel. Similarly, dried grape wines (like Amarone della Valpolicella), and sweet wines created from the famed noble rot (aka, Botrytis cinerea) such as Sauternes are often quite high in volatility, because at harvest these grapes already tend to have high levels of acetic acid bacteria present. You guessed it: not everybody likes them. But those who like them, love them. To be clear, there is some VA in all wine, and legal limits are imposed in most jurisdictions. But here’s the thing: the human threshold is considerably more sensitive than allowed maximums, and some humans are more sensitive to it than other humans. Or less tolerant. Or both. If you like that cider vinegar, prickly edge in your wine, you do not need to add vinegar to your Bordeaux: there are some mighty interesting wines out there with lively volatility. If you want to avoid it, be clear that to you, it’s not intriguing. You are just a bit sensitive. So here’s to you, sensitively. 


AT E VERY G LASS OF THIS T U SC A N R ED BL EN D IS SE RV E D F R ES H AT THE P ERFEC T T EM P ER A T UR E W IT H O U R TORR W IN E ON T A P SYST EM .

Pappagallo is sourced from grapes in the Tuscan hills and expertly blended at Tolaini Estates by Sommelier David StansďŹ eld. Available by the glass at Earls.

E A RL S MAIN | EARL S P O LO PA R K | E A R L S S T V I TA L Available at and exclusively supplied by


culinary partners

Banville & Jones Wine Co. partners with Manitoba’s finest restaurants to develop the perfect wine list. For more information about partnering with us, contact Todd Antonation, todd@banvilleandjones.com

529 Wellington serves only Canadian Prime beef and fresh seafood, with impeccable service in an elegantly restored 1912 mansion on the banks of the Assiniboine River. 529 has become a world-renowned icon in the restaurant industry. An exquisite menu and extensive wine cellar make for truly memorable food and wine experiences at 529. Just ask Brad Pitt or Jennifer Lopez!

From the land to the table: fresh, local, house-made. These are the words we live by. Peasant Cookery strives for flavours that can only come from the best ingredients, prepared with exacting standards. We take dishes from the past and make them taste like they are from our own backyard. A Wine Spectator Award of Excellence wine list, and the service to match. Join us at our table on the corner of King & Bannatyne.

529 Wellington Crescent 529wellington.ca

100-283 Bannatyne Avenue peasantcookery.ca

Regarded by many as one of the best restaurants in Winnipeg, Beaujena’s French Table provides a truly unique dining experience. Seven-course surprise dinners featuring Chef/Owner Randy Reynolds’ modern interpretations of French and Mediterranean Cuisine combined with his wife Beaujena’s warmth and hospitality make dining here special, regardless of the occasion. 302 Hamel Avenue beaujenas.com

Choose from 20 craft beer and 20 wines on tap to pair with your favourite Forks Market Food Hall eats. Our lists are curated by internationally acclaimed sommelier Veronique Rivest. The entire two floors of The Forks Market is licenced, along with over 250 seats outside overlooking the junction of the Red and Assiniboine Rivers. The Forks Market www.theforks.com/eat-and-drink/dine/thecommon

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Across the Board Aevi Spa Salon Boutique Amsterdam Tea Room Canadian Brewhouse Café 22 Café Dario Carbone Café Chino’s Bistro (Steinbach) Cibo Waterfront Café Cordova Tapas & Wine D-Jay’s Restaurant Deluca’s Cooking School and Restaurant De Luca’s Specialty Foods Diana’s Cucina and Lounge Earl’s Restaurant and Bar Enoteca ERA Bistro at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights Fifth Hair Lounge and Beauty Bar Forth Frankie’s Italian Kitchen & Bar Good Earth Coffee House Gusto North

Carne is an elegant and contemporary Italian Chophouse featuring Waygu beef from Canada, USA and Japan as well as highend single-source beef from select suppliers across the country. Or choose succulent seafood, fresh pastas and Italian classics such as Osso Bucco. Pair these entrées with an exemplary wine and cocktail list. Carne is just steps away from the MTS Centre and The Forks. Private rooms are available. Open for dinner Monday–Saturday. 295 York Avenue carneitalia.ca

Hotel Fort Garry Hy’s Steakhouse Inferno’s Bistro Joey Restaurants Joey’s Only Seafood Jonesy’s Restaurant Junction 59 Roadhouse King & Bannatyne Kristina’s on Corydon La Roca Le Cercle Molière Local Public Eatery Máquè Manitoba Club McGee’s Family Restaurant Mere Hotel Mon Ami Louis Monticchio Ristorante Italiano Olive Garden Passero and Corto Pauline PF Chang’s Pizzeria Gusto Prairie’s Edge Rae & Jerry’s Rae’s Bistro + Lounge

Riverside Inn Rose Bar Royal MTC Sabai Thai Segovia SMITH Restaurant South Beach Casino & Resort St. Charles Country Club Swiss Chalet Tapp’s Neighbourhood Pub The Alt Hotel The Magic Room and Spa The Merchant Kitchen The Mitchell Block The Oxbow Natural Wine Bar and Restaurant The Roost The Victoria Inn The Wood Tavern Thermëa Spa Tony Roma’s Urban Prairie Cuisine Vera Cucina VG Restaurant at the Fairmont Wasabi Sabi


SHOPPING LIST ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰

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Badenhorst 2017 Secateurs Chenin Blanc Swartland, South Africa $23.99......................................................................... 60 Akilia 2016 Villa de San Lorenzo Mencia, Spain, $19.99........................................................................................................... 28 Andreas Tscheppe 2017 Blue Dragonfly Sauvignon Blanc Steiermark, Austria, $62.99............................................................... 26 Artuke 2017 Pies Negros Tempranillo Rioja, Spain $25.99........................................................................................................ 14 Ausonia di Simone Binelli 2017 Machaon Pecorino Abruzzo, Italy $26.99................................................................................. 26 Barbacan 2017 Rosso di Valtellina Lombardy, Italy, $36.99....................................................................................................... 28 Bella 2018 Mariani Clone 787 Pet Nat Okanagan Valley, Canada $46.99.................................................................................. 26 Cambridge Road 2018 Naturalist Marlborough, New Zealand $32.99...................................................................................... 26 Les Compains d’Abord 2017 Le Premier Soir Gamay Burgundy, France, $24.99.......................................................................... 1 Craven Wines 2019 Pinot Gris Western Cape, South Africa $24.99............................................................................................ 26 Croft nv Pink Port Douro, Portugal (500 ml) $17.99.................................................................................................................. 14 Davide Xodo 2018 Nina White Blend Veneto, Italy $32.99........................................................................................................ 26 Domaine de la Vinçonnière 2017 Muscadet Sèvre et Maine Loire Valley, France $14.99............................................................. 62 Donatella Cinelli Colombini 2016 Rosso di Montalcino Tuscany, Italy $34.99........................................................................... 51 El Enemigo 2016 Chardonnay Mendoza, Argentina $35.99....................................................................................................... 49 Erste + Neue 2017 Kalterersee Classico Superiore Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy, $19.99................................................................. 62 Etnella 2016 Tracotanza Sicily, Italy, $35.99............................................................................................................................... 28 Iuli 2017 Umberta Barbera Piedmont, Italy, $21.99.................................................................................................................... 28 J. Bouchon 2017 Salvaje Pais White Maule Valley, Chile, $32.99................................................................................................ 26 Jonc Blanc 2016 Les Sens du Fruit Bergerac, France, $25.99...................................................................................................... 28 Kelley Fox 2015 Ahurani Pinot Noir Oregon, United States, $44.99.......................................................................................... 28 Les Vignerons d’Estezargues 2018 Cuvée des Galets Côtes du Rhône, France, $16.99.......................................................... 28, 51 Les Vins de Vienne 2016 Crozes-Hermitage d’Argent Rhône, France $39.99.............................................................................. 62 Lock & Worth 2018 Chardonnay Okanagan Valley, Canada, $28.99......................................................................................... 26 Luyt 2017 Pipeno Pais Red Maule Valley, Chile (1L) $24.99...................................................................................................... 28 Matthew Rorick 2016 Queen of the Sierra California, USA $33.99............................................................................................ 26 Meritxell Palleja 2016 Nita Priorat Catalonia, Spain $32.99...................................................................................................... 52 Monteraponi 2017 Chianti Classico Tuscany, Italy, $31.99......................................................................................................... 28 Pinuaga 2018 Bianco Sauvignon Blanc La Mancha, Spain $14.99.............................................................................................. 62 Poggio Anima 2017 Asmodeus Nero d’Avola Sicilia, Italy, $16.99........................................................................................ 14, 19 Poggio Anima 2018 Belial Sangiovese Tuscany, Italy, $16.99................................................................................................ 19, 62 Poggio Anima 2018 Gabriel Pecorino Abruzzo, Italy, $16.99...................................................................................................... 19 Poggio Anima 2018 Samael Montepulciano Abruzzo, Italy, $16.99............................................................................................ 19 Poggio Anima 2018 Lilith Primitivo Puglia, Italy, $16.99........................................................................................................... 19 Quevedo nv Rosé Port Douro Valley, Portugal $23.99................................................................................................................ 14 Rabl 2017 Langenlois Grüner Veltliner Kamptal, Austria $19.99............................................................................................... 62 Rivera 2018 Marese Bombino Bianco Castel del Monte, Italy, $17.99........................................................................................ 14 Staffelter Hof 2016 862 Riesling Mosel, Germany $30.99.......................................................................................................... 20 Staffelter Hof 2018 It’s Mueller Time Riesling Mosel, Germany $25.99.................................................................................... 20 Staffelter Hof 2017 Knackarsch Liebl Mosel, Germany $19.99.................................................................................................. 20 Staffelter Hof 2018 Kiss Kiss Maddie’s Lips Mosel, Germany $31.99................................................................................... 20, 49 Staffelter Hof 2018 Little Bastard Riesling Mosel, Germany, $27.99................................................................................... 20, 26 Staffelter Hof 2018 Mosecco Müller Thurgau Mosel, Germany $19.99..................................................................................... 20 Staffelter Hof 2018 Portu Geezer Mosel, Germany $39.99......................................................................................................... 20 Staffelter Hof 2018 Paradies Riesling Mosel, Germany $19.99................................................................................................... 20 Staffelter Hof 2015 Kröv Steffensberg GeGe Riesling Mosel, Germany $39.99.......................................................................... 20 Stefano Amerighi 2016 Syrah Cortona, Italy $34.99................................................................................................................... 53 The Juice Asylum 2018 Il Terzo Grado Tuscany, Italy, $28.99.................................................................................................... 28 Tenuta l’Armonia 2017 Brio Pop Rosso Veneto, Italy, $24.99..................................................................................................... 28 Tenuta Dornach 2017 3 Vino Bianco Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy $38.99..................................................................................... 35 Tenuta Dornach 2017 4 Vino Rosso Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy $38.99...................................................................................... 35 Terra Costantino 2016 Bianca de Aetna Siciliy, Italy $34.99....................................................................................................... 51 Terracura nv Smiley Chenin Blanc Swartland, South Africa $23.99...................................................................................... 26, 58 The Rennersistas 2017 Waiting for Tom Neusiedlersee, Austria, $24.99..................................................................................... 28 Thörle 2018 Grauburgunder Rheinhessen, Germany $22.99...................................................................................................... 26 Thörle 2018 Kabinett Riesling Rheinhessen, Germany $22.99.................................................................................................... 53 Tolaini 2014 Gran Selezione Chianti Classico Tuscany, Italy $53.99........................................................................................... 52 Ventisei 2018 Rosso Tuscany, Italy $19.99.................................................................................................................................. 49

Due to the nature of the wine industry, any prices and vintages listed in this publication, as well as the availability of all products, are subject to change and cannot be guaranteed by Banville & Jones Wine Co. www.banvilleandjones.com 61


* C U STOMER P IC K *

top picks

CHRISTA MOTTOLA

REBECCA LECHMAN

JILL KWIATKOSKI

Les Vins de Vienne 2016 Crozes-Hermitage Amphore d’Argent Rhône, France $39.99

Domaine de la Vinçonnière 2017 Muscadet Sèvre et Maine Loire Valley, France $14.99

Pinuaga 2018 Bianco Sauvignon Blanc La Mancha, Spain $14.99

Syrah is centre stage in this delightful wine made from hand-picked grapes from quarter-century-old vines. The grippy tannins are balanced nicely with refreshing acidity. On the nose and palate, Syrah’s distinctive notes of black pepper are combined with blackberry and plum. Aromas of bacon/smoked meat, clove, and subtle hints of red rooibos tea add intrigue. This spicy, smoky number would go nicely with a juicy brisket, grilled lamb or a cozy evening by the fire.

Made from 100% Melon de Bourgogne, the Vinçonnière has zesty notes of citrus. Because it is made “sur lie,” yeast is left in the wine for an extended period allowing it to impart some of its flavour character, texture, and body. Produced in proximity to the sea, Muscadet Sèvre et Maine has a slight saline quality that makes it a classic pairing with shellfish. Next time you’re thinking mussels or oysters, pick up this pocketbookfriendly gem.

One of my favourite refreshing whites from one of my favourite producers! Organically farmed and abiding by their minimal intervention philosophy, Pinuaga brings us this little gem of a Sauvignon Blanc. Full of bright, fresh citrus notes, a hint of honeydew melon, Bosc pear, and yellow flowers, this unique Spanish Sauvignon Blanc is perfect just to sip and also pairs beautifully with appetizers, salads, chicken, fish, and your favourite paella recipe!

SARA MCDONALD

SYLVIA JANSEN

STEVE LAGIMODIERE

Rabl 2017 Langenlois Grüner Veltliner Kamptal, Austria $19.99

Erste + Neue 2017 Kalterersee Classico Superiore, Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy, $19.99

Poggio Anima 2017 Belial Sangiovese Tuscany, Italy $16.99

I know what you’re thinking— Grüner Vetliner? What is that? This grape is predominately grown in Austria and produces a fresh, zesty white wine with mouth-watering acidity. Classic tasting notes include lime, grapefruit, and white pepper. Sauvignon Blanc and Riesling lovers take note—this is right up your alley. Try the Rabl Langenlois with your favourite sushi takeout to see just how versatile this grape can be! 62 http://banvilleandjones.cornervine.com

Have you ever tasted a Schiava? This one is an elegant, light-bodied red from Italy’s far north. Aromatic with red fruit, almond, and floral notes, it glides over the palate with harmonious balance and smooth, low tannins. Serve cool, about 13°C, matched with an informal taco buffet or mixed topping pizzas. Erste + Neue: translated, that’s First and New.

As a fan of Heavy Metal, I was immediately drawn to this label (you can see it on page 19). This little demon is 100% Sangiovese sourced from a single vineyard near Siena. Winemaker Riccardo Campinoti pours just as much passion (or sorcery) into this wine as his Brunellos. Rockin’ ruby, sustained notes of cherries, grace notes of spice balanced with harmonic tannin. Pair with power chords and Marshall stacks.


204-989-5000 - Cell: 204-941-0573 chrispennycook@royallepage.ca

Val Miller

www.ChrisPennycook.ca


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The Cellar Door Issue 35: Natural Wine Revolution  

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