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the

Cellar Door Wine a n d p o ss i b i l i t i e s b y Ba n v i l le & J o n e s W i n e Co.

STRANGE & UNUSUAL GRAPES PETIT VERDOT

Macabeo

PINOT BLANC

Alvarinho

Pinello Pedro Ximénez

Garganega

Corvina

NERO D’AVOLA

Falanghina Issue 22 October 2015 - January 2016

MARSANNE

Muscat

ZIBIBBO

SANGIOVESE

DORNFELDER


Honest food created from the diversity of the lands and waters of our great country.

Inn at the Forks –– 75 Forks Market Road 204.944.2445 twitter.com/smithwinnipeg smithrestaura nt.ca


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contents Features

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24 The Unusual Suspects: Exploring Unique Varieties Andrea Eby and Sylvia Jansen introduce you to the strange and unusual wines and varieties that will become your new favourites.

32 The Extraordinary: An Interview with Jancis Robinson Sylvia Jansen interviews one of the most influential and prolific wine voices of our time: Jancis Robinson.

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41 Roots: A Grape Pilgrimage Using three founder grapes as her guide, Andrea Eby takes you to three amazing destinations that mark the birthplaces of some of our favourite contemporary grape varieties.

52 Autumn Comfort Todd Antonation, Sylvia Jansen and Lisa Muirhead share their favourite comfort foods and wine pairings to warm your belly.

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60 Georgia on my Mind Exploring wine culture in the heart of the Caucasus.

Cover by Ryan Germain

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contents Columns 10 A Message from Tina Jones

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14 Ask a Sommelier 18 Banville & Jones and Company 22 Behind the Label Lingenfelder

30 Gluggy Holiday Cheer

35 Gary’s Corner Diversity

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38 Chef Profile Jesse Friesen, 295 York

48 Trending

ink DrMe

Didn’t Get the Memo

50 Banville & Jones Wine & Food Events 64 Banville & Jones Wine Institute 66

66 Sidebar It’s Magic

68 Culinary Partners 69 Shopping List 70 Top Picks


Venture

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FILLMORE RILEY LLP LEGAL ADVISORS AND TRADEMARK AGENTS

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the

Cellar Door Editorial Director Lisa Muirhead lisa@poisepublications.com

Connecting successful single men and women …because meeting is key. We introduce you to pre-qualified single professional men or women through our highly personalized service: • Getting to know you through an interview • Customized biography • Current photographs • Personalized search of our executive network for your best connections Our goal is to offer you opportunities to meet like-minded men or women who share your values and interests. We are the ultimate headhunters for your “personal” life.

Now that I have experienced the first meeting and what is involved, I can’t say enough of how impressed I am with your ‘air traffic controlling’ of the entire process. It was so thorough and professional. I was very impressed!

Editorial Board Tina Jones, Andrea Eby, Sylvia Jansen, Gary Hewitt, Mike Muirhead Graphic Design Ryan Germain | ryan.germain@gmail.com Advertising Sales Director Vanessa Shapiro vanessa@poisepublications.com Contributors Todd Antonation, Jan de Vlaming, Andrea Eby, Anna Everett, Gary Hewitt, Rhonda Hancock, Sylvia Jansen, Julia Jones, Tina Jones, Megan Kozminski, Ian McCausland, Steve Lagimodiere, Saralyn Mehta, Mike Muirhead, Rick Watkins Published for Banville & Jones Wine Co. by Poise Publications Inc. www.poisepublications.com

The meeting went great. We have set up another meeting to go for dinner on Friday. Great woman; perfect!!

For advertising information, please contact vanessa@poisepublications.com

In 1999, Tina Jones had the the vision of opening Banville & Jones Wine Co., a fine wine boutique in Winnipeg, Manitoba that specializes in promoting wine education and lifestyle. It is located in a three-storey Tuscan-inspired facility that houses fine wine and accessories, an educational facility, and a private function room. Banville & Jones Wine Co. 1616 St Mary’s Rd. Winnipeg, MB R2M 3W7 ph. 204-948-9463 www.banvilleandjones.com

info@selectiveprofessionalsnetwork.com | 204.488.9393 selectiveprofessionalsnetwork.com Printed in Canada by Transcontinental


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Jon Holeman & associates Private WealtH management of rBc Dominion securities Telephone: 204-982-2622 Website: www.rbcds.com/jon.holeman

RBC Dominion Securities Inc.* and Royal Bank of Canada are separate corporate entities which are affiliated. *Member-Canadian Investor Protection Fund. RBC Dominion Securities Inc. is a member company of RBC Wealth Management, a business segment of Royal Bank of Canada. ŽRegistered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada. Used under licence. Š 2015. RBC Dominion Securities Inc. All rights reserved. 15_90783_NT6_002


Photo by Joel Ross

a message from tina jones TINA’S FAVES ROSES DE JEANNE LA BOLORÉE CHAMPAGNE: Who knew that Pinot Blanc is even approved as a variety for Champagne? Well, it is! And Cedric Bouchard of Roses de Jeanne makes this amazing single-vineyard Pinot Blanc Champagne that is nothing short of divine.

TEDESCHI AMARONE: A beautiful, rich Amarone, perfect for evenings when the weather is getting cold! This is an amazing blend of Corvina, Corvinone, Rondinella, Rossignola, Oseleta, Negrara, and Dindarella.

GREEK WINES: Visiting Greece and tasting their wines are experiences of the rare and unusual. A chilled glass of Assyrtiko, a modern white with loads of personality, is the perfect companion to any Greek lunch on a patio in the Mediterranean!

I was expecting one thing and found another. When our editorial board first met to talk about “strange and unusual” grape varieties and wines, a few of our Sommeliers set down a dozen or so bottles that represented “strange and unusual” grape varieties or wines. I was expecting wines that exist on the margins of the wine world. Instead I saw wines that are important drivers of new, exciting trends. I came to the realization that the “Significant Seven” are not the only varieties that propel our interest in wine. Some of the wines we were tasting and talking about were very familiar, but their grape varieties are unusual. The widely loved Prosecco, for example, uses the unusual variety Glera. Everybody knows Valpolicella, but the varieties in it (including Corvina, Corvinone, Rondinella, Molinara) are almost completely unknown outside that region. Other wines were quite unusual in themselves: Mencia and Graciano from Spain; Groppello and Aglianico from Italy; Petit Courbu and Picpoul from France. So many of these are refreshing and new to us, yet are attractive, modern, and delicious! The next big revelation was our interview. We have always believed that The Cellar Door, like Banville & Jones itself, should be the very best. So we agreed that the person for the interview should be the person who is known the world over for her incredible contribution to wine—Jancis Robinson. It is a testament to our magazine that the most sought-after wine expert in the industry, who travels internationally, and who must have one of the most punishing schedules in the world, said yes to the interview with Sylvia Jansen. It is on page 30. Join us on a surprising journey to a fascinating corner of the wine world. There’s lots of great reading. Gary Hewitt looks at the value of genetic diversity in his column, and Andrea Eby and Sylvia Jansen help unravel those strange names and unusual varieties with connections to wines we know and love. Cheers!

Tina Jones

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30 years of helping your family grow, preserve and manage prosperity.

CONFIDENCE

NATIONAL BANK FINANCIAL IS AN INDIRECT WHOLLY-OWNED SUBSIDIARY OF NATIONAL BANK OF CANADA WHICH IS A PUBLIC COMPANY LISTED ON THE TORONTO STOCK EXCHANGE (NA:TSX). NATIONAL BANK FINANCIAL IS A MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN INVESTOR PROTECTION FUND.


Planning For Your Health and Wealth A healthy lifestyle is about balance. The same tenet applies to your financial wellbeing as well. True wealth is achieved when you find equilibrium between your investment income and your lifestyle choices.

Join us for an evening presentation on life and financial balance. November 12, 2015 at the Niakwa Golf and Country Club Please contact us for details about our spring 2016 event.

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ask a sommelier I am hosting an informal wine tasting, and I am wondering if there is a logic to what order I should serve the wines in? We will be tasting two each of red, white, rosé, as well as one bubbly and one dessert wine. —Greg Bach Dear Greg, The first steps to planning a wine tasting are deciding which wines to taste and in what order they should be tasted. Choosing a theme is helpful (wines from a specific country or specific region, Northern hemisphere vs. Southern hemisphere, Old World vs. New World, etc.), so your wine choices can be narrowed down a little easier. Generally speaking, the wine tasting order should be as follows: sparkling, white, rosé, red, dessert. You want to taste the lightest and most delicate wines first, moving through to the darkest and richest wines last—and always taste in order from left to right, like reading a book. Since you are serving two each of whites, rosés, and reds, you also want to put those in order. For example, if you have an unoaked Chardonnay and an oaked Chardonnay, you want to taste the unoaked Chardonnay prior to tasting the oaked Chardonnay; a lighter Provence rosé should be tasted before a heavier grape variety rosé such as Malbec or Garnacha; economical lighter New World Pinot Noir should be tasted before an elegant Old World (Burgundian) Pinot Noir, and so on. Another tip for hosting a wine tasting: keep the room and yourselves smelling as neutral as possible. Don’t taste wine in a kitchen where you may have recently cooked a delicious fragrant meal, and encourage your guests to arrive fragrance free. Outside smells and perfumes detract from the true essence of each wine. They can affect your opinion of the wines and what you actually smell in the glass. Try to be in a fresh, neutral environment to let those wine characteristics shine through. The wines will thank you and your tasting will be a hit. —Jill Kwiatkoski

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Other than Gewürztraminer, what white wine would you recommend in this flavour spectrum? —Craig Holigroski Dear Craig, Gewürztraminer produces aromatic wines redolent of lychee, rose, and Nivea hand cream that range from light to full-bodied and oily. The best have an in-your-face exotic richness. Full-body versions display warm alcohol and low acidity, thereby giving an impression of sweetness even in the absence of residual sugar. No other variety shares Gewürztraminer’s unique set of characteristics, although less ripe versions can be reminiscent of Muscat or Riesling.

Perhaps the best alternative is Viognier, also an aromatic variety with a similar spectrum of intensity and weight and a tendency to low acidity—but with aromas and flavours more of flowers and peach. Also, like Gewürztraminer, Viognier is best fresh and fruity and rarely benefits from aging. Lastly, look for Gewürztraminer by other names, notably Traminer (or names including Traminer), as it is often called in northeast Italy, Germany, Austria, and even in its most famous home of Alsace. —Gary Hewitt Why is my empty bottle of Cava so heavy? —Ehren Seeland Dear Ehren, As issues of sustainability become ever more front and centre, winemakers and importers have become more focused on implementing environmentally friendly practices in their businesses.

Customers are also showing more interest in making ethical choices when it comes to selecting their wines. You have asked a very relevant question, as a heavier bottle has a significantly higher environmental impact than its lighter-weight counterpart. Some producers cling to the old stereotype that a heavy bottle equates to a higherquality wine; however, even this antiquated view is evolving, particularly as importers such as the LCBO have begun fining producers for overweight bottles. Despite this new awareness, many notice that sparkling wine bottles haven’t followed the trend to sleeker, svelte bottles—and with good reason. Before the advent of thicker, stronger, coal-fired glass in the 17th century, the tremendous pressure caused by the production of carbon dioxide within bottles of sparkling wine was enough to cause explosions, and many a cellar worker lost an eye to flying shards of glass. Wines such as Champagne, Cava, Cremant, and Franciacorta are special because they undergo a second fermentation in the bottle. This fermentation is responsible for the beautiful bubbly texture and biscuit flavour that these wines are famous for, but it also creates up to 6 atmospheres of pressure within the bottle, equivalent to a standard double decker bus tire (about 90 pounds per square inch). This increased pressure puts a great deal of stress on the glass that is tasked with containing it and, as a result, thicker, stronger glass bottles are used to contain it. Someday soon, consumer pressure may force the industry to get creative and develop a more sustainable packaging alternative, but until that day, sparkling wine bottles will, for reasons of safety, continue to punch above their weight class. —Andrea Eby

IF YOU HAVE A QUESTION FOR OUR SOMMELIERS, EMAIL US AT WINE@BANVILLEANDJONES.COM, OR FIND US ON FACEBOOK AND ON TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM AT @BANVILLEJONES


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Lingenfelder: growers of premium, handcrafted single vineyard wines and home of the Vineyard Creatures series


Five Long-Term Health Benefits of Orthodontics for You and Your Child A beautiful smile is great, but there are so many other benefits to modern orthodontics! At Village Orthodontics, we are proud of the team and technology we have assembled to make orthodontics convenient, comfortable and fun. Modern orthodontics goes well beyond creating an amazing smile, and has many long-term health benefits.

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banville & jones and company

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Banville & Jones and The Cellar Door Advertiser Appreciation Event: 1. Theresa Epp, Gisele Sage, Wayne Sage, Jeremy Epp; 2. David Schmeichel, Jason Brandes, Roger Belton; 3. Jeanne Elliot, Ksenia Anikin, Melissa Mulder, Nell Elliot; 4. Mike Goreski, Jen Goreski, Lisa Muirhead; 5. Sylvia Jansen, Jihan Aquino, John van Houte; 6. Cliff Dyck, Tina Jones, Matt Banville, Kevin Neiles, Tracy Koga, Jon Holeman.

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Friends of Banville & Jones Wine Co. 7. Tyler Harlton of TH Wines in Summerland, BC; 8. Rick Watkins, Gary Hewitt, Jill Kwiatkoski, Sylvia Jansen, Alberto Escalona of Pago Calzadilla, Spain, Katie Keats, Rebecca Lechman; 9. Rick Watkins, Gary Hewitt, Sylvia Jansen, Fabio Angius of Pala Wines, Sardegna, Italy, Lia Banville, Andrea Eby, Mike Muirhead; 10. Thomas Webb of Thelema Mountain Vineyards, South Africa at a winetasting by Blend Imports; 11. Phillip Rumpf of Weingut Kruger Rumpf, Nahe, Germany, export representative Peter Schleicher, Sylvia Jansen, Gary Hewitt; 12. Riccardo Tedeschi of Tedeschi Winery, Valpolicella, Italy and Todd Antonation.

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A Toned Tummy...

on YOUR LUNCH BREAK By Courtney Tait

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or more than a decade, people have been enhancing their appearance through services offered at the Ziesmann Cosmetic Clinic. Opened in 2004, the clinic specializes in both surgical and nonsurgical procedures designed to help its clients look and feel the way they want. For many, feeling great includes toning areas of the body that remain soft or saggy regardless of healthy eating habits and exercise. The Ziesmann Clinic has recently introduced two new procedures to its services — VelaShape™ and UltraShape® — enabling clients to have their thighs, tummy or underarms

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rupture, stimulates collagen and reduces cellulite, giving the skin a smoother, firmer appearance.

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UltraShape® destroys fat cells by emitting sound waves of ultrasonic energy. While VelaShape™ tightens the skin, UltraShape® is aimed at reducing circumference, by removing fat in a noninvasive way. UltraShape® can be used on the abdomen, thighs and buttocks.


For maximum results, the two procedures may be used on the same area of the body. “The response time of these procedures is faster than with any other technology on the market,” says Colosimo. “Clients are very happy with the results.”

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features plush chairs, greenery, artwork, magazines and exceptional service from its team of RNs, aestheticians and laser technicians. “We help people feel as relaxed as possible,” says Dr. Ziesmann. While VelaShape™ and UltraShape® are not suitable for those seeking dramatic weight loss, they are very effective for people looking to tighten excess skin following weight loss or pregnancy. “For people who want contouring done, but don’t want an invasive surgery, VelaShape™ and UltraShape® are excellent options,” says Dr. Ziesmann. “There is no risk and no downtime.”

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behind the label: Lingenfelder By Gary Hewitt, D WSET, CWE, FWS, Sommelier

The Lingenfelder estate lies in and around the sleepy little town of Grosskarlbach in the northern reaches of the Pfalz wine-growing region of Germany. Thirteen generations of Lingenfelders have worked the local vineyards, and Karl Rainer Lingenfelder—owner, viticulturist, winemaker, husband, and father—is the current “caretaker” of the estate. Rainer is a thoughtful Renaissance man whose interests, beyond all things wine, span architecture, literature, natural science, photography, and computer technology. Ask Rainer a question, and prepare yourself for a considered, balanced answer. As for the wines, conscientious, sustainable viticulture, and ambient yeast fermentations create terrifically honest wines that reflect grape variety and growing season.

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Lingenfelder makes several vineyard-designated Rieslings; a dry white Sylvaner; reds from Spätburgunder (Pinot Noir) and Dornfelder (a German cross); and a stunning sparkling wine called Satyr from Riesling. Also look for Lingenfelder’s Vineyard Creatures series of top-value varietal wines including Fish Riesling, Bee Morio Muscat, and Hare Gewürztraminer, all with English-friendly labels. Lingenfelder wines fit the “strange and unusual” theme of this issue because the labels, as do German labels in general, baffle the uninitiated. German terminology, grape synonyms, novel varieties, and the seemingly arcane detail of the wine names intimidate and create fear! Achtung— they are easy to decipher! In fact, German wine labels are the most informative in the world.


Let’s look at the distinctive German terms on two Lingenfelder labels.

1. GRAPE VARIETY: Not always Riesling! You know other German grape varieties. Perhaps you know Grauburgunder as Italian Pinot Grigio or as the more international Pinot Gris. Grauburgunder translates literally as “grey (grau) from Burgundy.” The full, rich Lingenfelder style is closer to that of Alsace than of northern Italy. On the other hand, Scheurebe is a German variety originally bred from Riesling in the early 1900s by Georg Scheu. Intense pink grapefruit aromas waft from Lingenfelder’s highly acclaimed wines.

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2. HARVEST TERMS The top five levels of German wines differ by the ripeness of the grapes at harvest. Least ripe is Kabinett, followed by Spätlese, a typical international ripeness level for fully ripe grapes. This term does not indicate the sweetness level of the wine.

3. VINEYARD NAME Both village and vineyard are listed. The Scheurebe comes from the Musikantenbukel vineyards in Freinsheim and the Grauburgunder from the Osterberg vineyard in Grosskarlbach.

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4. STYLE TERMS Trocken means dry; halbtrocken means half-dry (off dry); and if no term is indicated, a wine is probably medium-sweet. Insider’s tip: check the alcohol content. A lower percentage, as low as 7.5 per cent, almost always indicates a significant level of unfermented (residual) sugar and a sweeter wine. 

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THE UNUSUAL SUSPECTS: exploring unique varieties By Andrea Eby, CSW, Sommelier and Sylvia Jansen, D WSET, CSW, Sommelier Aglianico. Dornfelder. Godello. Graciano. Groppello. Petit Courbu. Mencia. Petit Manseng. Pinello. Scheurebe. Teroldego. No one is completely sure how it happened. We know that wine and vines moved across the Mediterranean with traders, conquerors, and migrants. Roman legions marched through Europe and brought vine cuttings to grow and support their wine culture. Experts say that the chaos following the decline of the Roman Empire included cross-pollination between abandoned Roman vines and native vines. This intermixing gave a wide genetic diversity for a family of European vines (Vitis vinifera). Distinct vine varieties eventually developed in different regions throughout the continent, but great diversity was present. Then things changed. The invasion of the vine pest phylloxera in the late 1800s threatened the entire European vineyard. The solution (grafting European vine stock to North American rootstock) did not suit all vine varieties. Many varieties were lost or put to near-extinction. Further, when wine laws were established in the 19th and 20th centuries, the approved varieties were inevitably those that were native

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to each region. Some were favoured primary varieties and some were secondary; others were ignored. A few achieved international fame: Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, Riesling, Pinot Grigio/Gris; Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Pinot Noir, and Syrah/Shiraz. But behind these are close to 1,400 other varieties grown in pockets of the wine world. These represent treasures of genetic diversity, and offer wine lovers fresh options and regional gems. Many of these also represent incredible value, because winemakers know that they will produce excellent wines—and winemakers strive to ensure that the wines will deliver above their price category. These grape varieties may be unknown cousins to the famous varieties, but they produce wines that belong to familiar families of style. As a way to explore the lesser known, we have assembled a few lateral comparisons between famous grape varieties (or wines) and some unfamiliar, strange, and unusual varieties. You will see the same grape variety listed in a few places. Because a hotter climate can give a richer, fuller style than a cooler climate, styles of the same variety can be very different from region to region.


THE WHITES LIGHT & CRISP Clean and typically dry with refreshing levels of acidity. These wines are generally lightly scented and unadorned by oak. Look for notes of citrus, orchard fruit and minerals. If you like: Pinot

Grigio

WE RECOMMEND Pinot Blanc Garganega (Soave) Macabeo Picpoul (Picpoul de Pinet) Alvarinho (Vinho Verde) Pedro Ximénez Pinello

Finca Muñoz Artero Macabeo/Verdejo La Mancha, Spain $10.99

Tedeschi Soave, Italy $17.99

Félines Jourdan Picpoul de Pinet, France $14.99

Casal Garcia Vinho Verde Minho, Portugal $14.99

Fontanafredda Gavi di Gavi, Italy $19.99

Rabl Spiegel Grüner Veltliner Kamptal, Austria $19.99

Pala i Fiori Vermentino Sardinia, Italy $24.99

Pascual Peñalosa Verdejo Rueda, Spain $16.99

MEDIUM BODIED Aroma, flavour and body are all taken up a notch in this category. Wines have more intense fruit and feel more substantial in the mouth. If you like: Sauvignon

Blanc

WE RECOMMEND Cortese (Gavi) Grüner Veltliner Vermentino Arneis Verdejo Unoaked Semillon Catarratto Grillo Falanghina Friulano Furmint

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Italy, P u gl i a.

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FULL BODIED, RICH & ROUND These whites offer concentration, weight, complexity and often a riper, more tropical fruit profile. Oak ageing sometimes adds layers of flavour to these bolder wines. If you like: Chardonnay

WE RECOMMEND Marsanne Roussanne Grenache Blanc (and blends of the previous three grapes) Oak-aged examples of Semillon, Chenin Blanc, Viura/Macabeo (Rioja)

La Forge Marsanne Reserve Pays d’Oc, France $16.99

Bokisch Garnacha Blanca Lodi, United States $28.99

Alheit Cartology Western Cape, South Africa $43.99

Zuccardi Serie A Torrontés Salta, Argentina $18.99

Lingenfelder Scheurebe Kabinett Halbtrocken Pfalz, Germany $26.99

dA Muscat Pays d’Oc, France $14.99

AROMATIC These wines have intense aromatics, generally with fragrant fruit and floral notes. The intensity comes from the fruit, so these wines are seldom aged in oak. If you like: Riesling

WE RECOMMEND Albariño Torrontés Muscat Fiano Chenin Blanc (Vouvray) Zibibbo Scheurebe

www.banvilleandjones.com 27


THE REDS LIGHT, FRESH & FRUITY Think refreshing, vibrant, juicy with light tannins. These wines rely on lively fruit flavours. Oak rarely has a starring role—the fruity and quaffable nature of these wines steals the show. Serve with a slight chill. If you like: Pinot

Noir

WE RECOMMEND Sangiovese (basic Chianti) Corvina (Bardolino) Dolcetto Barbera Lambrusco Marzemino

Donna Laura Ali Sangiovese Tuscany, Italy $15.99

Mauro Molino Barbera d'Alba, Italy $18.99

Callegaro Francesca Spumante Dolce Marzemino Veneto, Italy $21.99

Lingenfelder Dornfelder Pfalz, Germany $22.99

Menhir Quota 29 Primitivo Salento, Italy $16.99

Donnafugata Sherazade Nero d’Avola Sicily, Italy $21.99

MEDIUM BODIED, SMOOTH & FRUIT FORWARD Step up the intensity ladder to wines with moderate tannin with smooth texture and generous, ripe fruit flavours. Oak is often present, but the best examples display a deft balance of ripe fruit and subtle hints of vanilla and spice. If you like: Merlot

WE RECOMMEND Dornfelder Zweigelt Nero d’Avola Primitivo Groppello Grenache-based wines from Cannonau (Sardinia) to St-Chinian (south of France)

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FULL BODIED & RICH At the apex of the intensity pyramid, these are powerful, complex and more tannic reds. The majority of these wines spent time in oak barrels picking up notable flavours of vanilla, toast, and spice and softening the sometimesmassive tannin structure. Some are released after years of ageing and may take decades to reveal their full potential. If you like: Cabernet Sauvignon

WE RECOMMEND Mourvèdre (aka Mataro, Monastrell) Nerello Mascalese (Etna) Aglianico Sangiovese-Cabernet Sauvignon (Carmignano) Touriga Nacional (Douro) Malbec (Cahors) Corvina (Amarone della Valpolicella) Petit Verdot Tannat (Madiran) Cariñena/Grenache (Priorat)

Bacalhôa Vinhos Só Touriga Nacional Sétubal, Portugal $26.99

Remo Farina Amarone della Valpolicella Classico, Italy $48.99

Pirramimma Petit Verdot McLaren Vale, Australia $34.99

Continue exploring these new and exciting varieties with additional recommendations on the Poise Publications blog: www.poisepublications.com/blog

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gluggy By Mike Muirhead, CMS, Sommelier

Holiday Cheer With the holiday season upon us, we turn our attention to your holiday planning needs. We get a lot of inquiries about how much wine to buy, how many kinds of wine to offer, the split between red and white, chilling requirements and everything else involved with great entertaining. In the spirit of the season, here is your quick tip guide, and some of our holiday season favourites. Numbers: Is there ever really too much wine this time of year? How much you need depends on the length of your function and what other beverages will be served (and, of course, your friends’ appetites for “holiday cheer”). For gatherings where you would like to provide a few glasses, half a bottle per person is just over two glasses per person, and a safe amount if you are serving other beverages as well. If your party is heading later into the evening, and you have a brigade of cabs (taxis, not big reds) on the ready, we suggest moving up to about 3/4 to 1 bottle per person, which is about 5 standard drinks. The biggest secret to making sure you have enough wine for a function: knowing that the unopened bottles can be returned (at no charge)— or kept on hand for a great host gift for the next event! Variety: We have seen a trend towards offering many options at gatherings, but I’m much more inclined to keep things simple. I always suggest the most popular current wines. Wines that tend to be crowd pleasers include: Pinot Grigio, Sauvignon Blanc, and blends for white; and Malbec, Cabernet Sauvignon and blends for red. The larger the selection you have, the more often you will be cornered to answer the question, “Do you have any of this one left…?” and spend your time searching for remaining bottles rather than entertaining your guests. If you are still inclined to lean towards variety, remember that a few considerate guests will bring a bottle to contribute—which will take care of that for you. As for bubbly, if you want to have a dedicated toast, plan on one bottle for every six people. If you just want to have some on hand, one bottle for every 10 people will do. Red and White Split: Manitobans are a fickle bunch whose tastes change throughout the seasons. In the summer, we like about a 50/50 split for white/rosé and red. In the fall and winter, however, our diets and lifestyles drift toward the

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warming sensation of red wines. I would plan on a 60/40 split for red and white. Rosé sales fall off a cliff when the snow falls, but it is always nice to have a couple on hand. Chilling Requirements: They are not exactly what you think! White wines are easy. If they are in the fridge all day, lay them on a bed of ice to keep them at optimal temperature. I often find that it is the reds that face the wrath of under-cooling. In the winter, we tend to keep our houses at a comfortable 19–21°C. Add 30 of your closest friends, and the house can rise to a full 8–10°C warmer than “cellar temperature.” I suggest putting your red wine in a fridge (if you have any room beside the leftover yams) 30 minutes before guest arrival, and then putting them on that bed of ice once they have been opened. If you ever run out of space or ice, don’t forget that you have the world’s largest cooler just outside your door (with built-in ice!). 

MIKE’S HOLIDAY FAVOURITES ARE GUARANTEED TO PLEASE ANY CROWD McManis 2013 Cabernet California, United States $21.99 Melipal 2014 Ikella Malbec Mendoza, Argentina $13.99 Botter 2014 Oggi Pinot Grigio delle Venezia, Italy $11.99 BC Wines 2014 Sauvignon Blanc Worcester, South Africa $13.99 Botter nv Bollicine Frizzante Prosecco, Italy $14.99 As always, we are here to help you plan for your holiday events! We deliver 7 days a week in December, and have glass rentals, ice buckets, and coolers ready to help you make your event the envy of the entertaining elite!



THE EXTRAORDINARY:

an interview with Jancis Robinson Interview by Sylvia Jansen, D WSET, CSW, Sommelier Photo courtesy of Jancis Robinson

Jancis Robinson is legendary. Described by Decanter magazine as “the most respected wine critic and journalist in the world,” Jancis Robinson is editor of all four editions of The Oxford Companion to Wine, co-author with Hugh Johnson of The World Atlas of Wine and co-author of Wine Grapes: A Complete Guide to 1,368 Vine Varieties, Including their Origins and Flavours. Each of these books is recognized as a standard reference worldwide. She writes daily for JancisRobinson.com, weekly for the Financial Times, and bimonthly for a column that is syndicated around the world. An award-winning TV presenter, she travels internationally to conduct wine events and act as a wine judge. In 1984, she was the first person outside of the wine trade to pass the rigorous Master of Wine exams, and in 2003, she was awarded an OBE by Her Majesty the Queen, on whose cellar she now advises. She loves and lives for wine in all its glorious diversity, generally favouring balance and subtlety over sheer mass. Sylvia Jansen caught up with her for this interview.

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Sylvia Jansen (SJ) As an instructor in Wine & Spirit Education Trust (WSET®) and Sommelier courses, I am keenly aware of the power of your books and writing to inspire and encourage others in the study of wine. In your introduction to the 7th edition of The World Atlas of Wine, you said that “the magical liquid that is fermented grape juice” is your “other great love,” after your family. Why do you love wine and the study of wine? Jancis Robinson (JR) I love wine because it appeals hugely to the senses (it’s just so delicious—and so varied) but also to the intellect. It involves so many disciplines: all sorts of science, history, geography, psychology and more. SJ How different is the new fourth edition of The Oxford Companion to Wine from previous editions?


JR I know just how many people have passed wine exams with at least one well-thumbed copy [of The Oxford Companion to Wine] by their side. Which means that we have to try extremely hard to get everything right. This new fourth edition is the most radically different edition to date. More than 60 per cent of the entries have been seriously updated, and new topics include CellarTracker, counterfeit wine, Hong Kong, ingredient labelling, microbial terroir, natural wine, optical sorting, orange wine, oxygen transmission rate, premature oxidation, provenance, red blotch, skinfermented wines, and smoke taint. SJ Wine Grapes is an immense undertaking that spanned many years. Why did you take on this challenge? JR José Vouillamoz approached me and said he had done the research for a book about the 12 most planted wine grapes and asked would I co-author it with him. (He was probably inspired by my 1986 book Vines, Grapes & Wines.) I said I thought it should be rather more ambitious than that and should include details of all the grapes producing wine commercially. He took a deep breath and accepted the challenge, and my brilliant assistant, Julia Harding MW, stepped up to the plate to research what is grown where. SJ Some years ago in a web-based interview, you selected an Assyrtiko from Greece for tasting; for the North American consumer, the aromatic Assyrtiko even today is from the “unusual” camp. What draws you, as a wine lover, to wines such as these? JR Their self-evident quality! Assyrtiko is fascinating because it manages to be extremely refreshing, and ageworthy, in a very hot climate—and is grown in extraordinary conditions in very low basket-like bushes on the volcanic soils of the Greek island of Santorini. It is part of the Greek heritage and has shown itself to be adaptable to a wide range of conditions. SJ Some unusual (or lesser known) varieties also contribute to unusual wine styles: Fino Sherry is

one example. In some markets, this wine style is experiencing a new, energetic following. Can you comment? JR Sherry has to be the single most under-valued wine in the world; although, as you say, this is slowly changing. Not before time. You can also find some great port bargains too. SJ Reflecting on some of the wine varieties that are currently in the shadows of famous international varieties, which do you think have the potential to be brought into the limelight? JR Assyrtiko is now grown in South Australia, and Aglianico has travelled extensively, simply because the quality of their wine is so obvious—and they are both very good at coping with high temperatures. Château Retout in the Medoc grows Petit Manseng, Mondeuse and Savagnin Blanc because their wine is so good. SJ You mention in your Preface to Wine Grapes that “the study of wine grapes tells us much about social history and the movement of people and conquerors.” How does wine track history in this way? JR For example, you find Portuguese varieties in Australia and South Africa because ships used to make stops in Portugal en route there. You find Spanish varieties in Sardinia because the island was ruled from Aragon at one time. And the story of the origins of Zinfandel (look up Tribidrag) is fascinating! SJ Thousands of grape varieties from around the world are being made into wine. Why should wine lovers explore wines made from lesser-known varieties? JR Because we must encourage biodiversity and because they can present so many interesting flavours and styles. To follow Jancis Robinson’s wine writing, visit her website at www.jancisrobinson.com. 

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Photo by Ian McCausland

gary’s corner By Gary Hewitt, D WSET, CWE, FWS, Sommelier

DIVERSITY Long ago, seven grapevines travelled to new lands carried by explorers, migrants and priests. The vines adapted to new climates, soils, and weather and were nurtured, harvested, and raised in the image of famous wines from oncenamed Gaul and Germania. Joyous drinkers knew the wines by their red names, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Pinot Noir, and Syrah, and their white names, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, and Riesling. Their popularity grew to dwarf that of others. In the part-Gaul nation called Canada, the people learned their names, acclaimed their flavours, and put them in their shopping carts. And, all was good. But dissatisfaction grew. “There must be more!” And behold, there is more. Scores of grapevines still at home in the Old World, rooted in their soils, regions, and cultures. Champions of these vines, their voices beaten nearly mute by the surge of the Significant Seven, whisper: “These vines are pretty good too.” And they are. So say wise old people. The dominance of the Significant Seven international varieties rebounded on the Old World where wine producers, envious of New World success, invited foreign vines into their vineyards. A great example is Tuscany’s coastal area of Bolgheri, the birthplace in the 1970s of Super Tuscan wines imbued with the heavy dark fruit of the Bordeaux varieties Cabernet Sauvignon and

Merlot. These landed immigrants found homes in good neighbourhoods previously dominated by Sangiovese and other local vines. On a world scale, this trend to an international style obscures the importance of origin in the character of wines. But today, in many such regions, the pendulum has swung back. In a world awash with wines made of Chardonnay and Cabernet that could come from anywhere, many producers realize that, to be recognized, they need a point of difference, something to set them apart. One solution is literally in their backyards: indigenous grapevines totally adapted to local growing conditions. Such vines, if carefully tended, yield wines of unique character, wines that come from somewhere. Flirtation with foreign vines has rekindled affection for the locals: Tuscan producers have renewed their love of pure Sangiovese; Franken producers in Germany of cerebral Silvaner; and Austrian producers of spicy Grüner Veltliner. On home turf, each of these varieties is widely planted and used to produce regionally specific signature wines. However, the revival of indigenous varieties is sometimes for mercenary reasons, as it is impossible to compete with regions that produce international-style wines more cheaply. The staggering diversity of regionally adapted grapevines is a botanical treasure whose preservation may be justifiable on hedonistic value alone—think of our readiness, as we tire of the ubiquitous Macintosh, to

embrace heritage apple varieties— but its prolonged value may lie in its deep gene pool of traits—traits that will help vines adapt to the pressures of climate change and disease. Even now, new temperature, rainfall, and storm patterns are challenging regional viticulture so that wine regions must adapt or perish. Couple this with the heightened disease susceptibility of genetically homogeneous crops that are more likely to succumb en masse to new infestations, and the importance of diversity for survival is undeniable. Wine regions that resisted the allure of the Significant Seven are increasingly appreciated around the world. All major European wine-producing countries shelter hidden gems awaiting our discovery. Significantly, some of the lower profile countries such as Portugal, Greece, and those of Eastern Europe are the richest sources of unfamiliar vines. Their revelation will not come in a flood, more likely a trickle. Our job is to be open to the unfamiliar, to give praise where warranted, and to drink diversity. And all will be good. 

GRAHM CRU Randall Grahm (Cellar Door #13) has conceived the Popelouchum project to create thousands of entirely new vine varieties in a virginal tract of Central Coast vineyard. The idea is to create diversity through directed field pollination and repeated progeny selection over many, many generations of biodynamic cultivation. Will the population adapt as a group to the unique terroir in an expression of a New World Popelouchum Grand Cru? Will “particularly interesting” new varieties arise to be propagated in the greater wine world? Stay tuned for, say, 10 to 40 years. See updates on Grahm’s project at www.facebook. com/Popelouchum.


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chef profile Jesse Friesen, 295 York Photos by Ian McCausland

When he started in the kitchen at a young 14 years old, Jesse Friesen knew this was where he wanted to be. He attended Red River College’s Culinary Institute and worked his way up the ranks to run one of the city’s best contemporary steakhouse kitchens: 295 York. When Jesse became executive chef at 295 York, he applied his vision: “We passionately prepare the fundamentals of steakhouse classics but with a modern twist. Using local products and only the best and freshest ingredients available, we pour our hearts out to our guests through food and service.” The secret ingredient in your fridge: Passion. It may not be the main ingredient in everyone’s kitchen, but it is in mine. Being a chef, you must be able to fuel your passion by making every day count. Passing that passion on to other chefs is always a great feeling. The next new food trend: Tasting-style dinners are becoming more and more popular. People are becoming more adventurous, so offering a tasting menu where a guest can really explore the chef’s style and passion is a special thing. Signature dish: We are known for our features. On my menu, you will find a weekly game feature and a seafood feature. I like to bring in exotic products as well as local favourites that other restaurants are not offering, making our kitchen unique. For example, we run a feature of grilled Alaskan lingcod served with goat cheese grits, wilted arugula, truffle butter, breadcrumbs and lemon sauce. Favourite wine: Naked on Roller Skates by Some Young Punks. I had the opportunity to try this at a chef’s table I was preparing. This mouthwatering Shiraz Mataro blend goes very well with beef and game meats. Favourite cookbook: The Flavor Principle: a great resource book that goes in depth into the human senses that create taste. This book has many great stories and recipes.

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Guilty pleasure: I love cheese. A little too much. Cheese & crackers, mac n’ cheese, grilled cheese, anything cheese. I have experimented with making my own at the restaurant. First meal that made a real impression on you: My first staff meal at my first restaurant job when I was 14: veal scallopine with wild mushroom sauce. It blew my mind. From then on, I developed an expensive taste for the best ingredients. Favourite food travel destination: Bahamas. There is nothing better in this world then being able to eat fresh conch, snow crab, grouper, rock lobster, and white snapper on a daily basis. I learned how to prepare live conch in their shells the last time I was in the islands. It takes some practice but is well worth it. 

Grilled Alaskan Lingcod


“Eat healthily, sleep well, breathe deeply, move harmoniously.” —Jean-Pierre Barral

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HOME SLEEP STUDIES

HOSPITAL SLEEP STUDIES

If your doctor suspects you suffer from Obstructive Sleep Apnea, he or she may recommend a Home Sleep Study (level 3).

The provincial health care program covers testing performed at the Sleep Disorders Centre at the Misericordia Health Centre. Wait times for appointments vary.

Following the Home Sleep Study, you will meet with one of our Sleep Specialists to discuss your results and treatment options. We provide advice about private insurance coverage and the provincial health care program, which provides CPAP machines and related supplies.

In the comfort of your home, a device monitors your snoring, abdominal and chest effort, heart rate, oxygen levels and body position while you sleep.

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Once your family doctor has forwarded the referral form and all supporting documentation to Medigas, we will contact you with an appointment. Referral forms are available at Medigas locations and online at www.medi-gas.com.

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699 Broadway Hours: Monday-Thursday 8:00 am to 8:00 pm Friday, Saturday & Sunday 8:00 am to 5:00 pm | Phone: 204.786.2727 Visit our new Satellite Clinic at 5-871 Waverley St Hours: 8:00 am to 4:30 pm (Monday, Wednesday and Friday) Phone: 204.786.2727

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Old Town Rovinj Harbor, Croatia on the Adriatic Sea

ROOTS: a grape pilgrimage By Andrea Eby, CSW, Sommelier People love a good pilgrimage. Jerusalem, Mecca, Graceland, wherever it may be, humans love to walk where the prophets walked or the rock star rolled. We want to take it all in, be where it all began. Ampelographers are no different. These grape geneticists have pulled out every scientific tool in the proverbial toolbox to help determine just where the first wine grapes originated. Through a combination of biomolecular archaeology and DNA testing, experts have narrowed the origins of

domesticated grapevines down to the area of Anatolia and nearby Transcaucasia (more familiar to many of us as present day Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan). Scientists suggest that as few as 13 “founder grapes” are likely responsible for the almost 1,400 commercially produced wine grapes that we are familiar with today. Incredibly, these “founder varieties” still exist and true disciples of the vine can make their own pilgrimages, to touch and taste the grapes that started it all. For your next wine-centric vacation, may we suggest a pilgrimage to the cradles of these founder grapes?

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Savagnin One of France’s oldest and most prolific varieties, Savagnin shares a close relationship with Pinot (another famous founder) and is responsible for hundreds of modern-day varieties. Very few of the most serious wine geeks have tried a Savagnin, and even fewer have visited its homeland in the stunningly beautiful Jura region of France. Across the Saône River from Burgundy, Jura has remained largely off most travellers’ radars, to the delight of those lucky enough to visit. The most famous wine of the region is Vin Jaune, an unusual Savagnin that develops a layer of yeast in partially filled barrels for a minimum of six years before it is bottled in its unique clavellin-shaped bottle. This nutty, savoury elixir is highly addictive, especially when paired with the region’s sensational Comté cheese. Jura wines are not limited to those from Savagnin and include juicy reds and rosés from other regional varieties such as Poulsard and Trousseau.

Vineyards in the French Commune of Arbois in Jura

Jura's internationally renowned Comté cheese

Visiting Jura is a peek into the unspoilt French countryside of yesteryear. Breathtaking limestone cliffs protect hidden valleys dotted with castles and endless trails perfect for a cycling or hiking adventure. Or rent a car in Geneva or Lyon and sample your way through the gastronomic treasures of market villages such as Arbois and Poligny. Fans of winter travel could easily tack a few days in the Jura onto their next world-class alpine adventure and attend the La Percée du Vin Jaune (Opening of the Yellow Wine) festival, held each February. Artisanal producers provide samples of their charming wines served with local delicacies. Take part in the auction held at the close of the festival and you might just score some highly coveted bottles at bargain prices. Until recently, the wines of the Jura represented an opportunity for oenophiles to collect older vintages of rare wines at extremely reasonable prices, but the Jura star is rising, and the wines are fast becoming essential on trendy wine lists everywhere!

FROM THE JURA REGION, WE RECOMMEND: Looking across the European Alps in the Canton of Jura

Rolet Père et Fils 2008 Trousseau Arbois, France $31.99 Rolet Père et Fils 2007 Vin Jaune Jura, France $69.99 (620ml)


Split, on the Adriatic Sea, the ancestral home of Tribidrag

Tribidrag With a long and chequered past, this variety may be more familiar than you think. Known as Zinfandel in North America and Primitivo in Italy, Tribidrag is the oldest recorded name for this Croatian founder grape. In the heyday of the California grape rush, Zinfandel was widely planted because it thrived in the hot, dry Mediterranean-like climate. The grape has emerged as a variety capable of producing highquality red wines, especially when yields are restricted and grapes are sourced from highly coveted old-vines that dot historic vineyards. The mystery of Zinfandel’s origins motivated scientists at California’s UC Davis to find where this enigmatic grape came from.

Thought to have made its way to the Americas with Italian immigrants, the search began in Italy’s south and quickly moved on to Croatia. Grape geneticists scoured the Dalmatian coastline and eventually traced the origins to a handful of vines perched on a craggy slope overlooking the Adriatic Sea. Known by the name Crljenak Kaštelanski, the nearly extinct variety is genetically identical to Tribidrag, the ancient Croatian name for Zinfandel. Croatian wines are coming of age, and while the best wines are not cheap, they are unique and offer a glimpse into the rich heritage of this resilient


culture. Anyone with a love of good food, good wine, and spectacular scenery simply cannot pass up an opportunity to visit Croatia. Anthony Bourdain’s No Reservations Croatian episode may just be the most hedonistic 60 minutes of television ever shot; if watching that doesn't convince you it’s worth the trip, then nothing will!

The beaches of Baska, an ancient settlement on the island of Krk, Croatia

Flying into Zagreb may be the quickest way to reach Croatia, but if time permits, a multitude of cruise ships now ply the seas between Italy, Greece, Turkey, and Croatia and represent the most luxurious method of reaching the Dalmatian coastline. Regardless of how you get there, save a couple days to explore the vineyards surrounding the beautiful seaside city of Split, ancestral home of Tribidrag. Wine tourism is becoming more commonplace and excellent tours can be arranged to acquaint you with all the delights that Croatian wine has to offer.

A TRIBIDRAG BY ANY OTHER NAME... Oggi 2013 Doppio Passo Primitivo Salento, Italy $14.99 Bokisch 2012 Tizona Zinfandel Lodi, United States $54.99 The coastal fishing village of Petrcane, surrounded by olive groves and vineyards

Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains There are old grapes varieties, and then there are ancient grape varieties. Believed to be the oldest grapes on vine, ampelographers have traced the lineage of the Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains back to the Anathelicon Moschaton grape used by ancient Greeks and Apianae vines planted by Romans. The grapes probably moved into France by way of the Greek trading port at Marseilles and came along with the Romans when they conquered Gaul. This grape was the first documented wine variety in Germany (12th century) and in Alsace (16th century). As a testament to their longevity and reach, there are currently 306 synonyms for Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains in the world, including Moscatel de Grano Menudo (Spain), Moscato d’Asti and Moscato Bianco (Italy), and Muskateller (Germany). Perched on a spectacular cliff, Oia is known for its neoclassical mansions, blue-domed churches, and narrow cobbled paths

44 http://banvilleandjones.cornervine.com


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Perched high on the cliffs of Santorini, looking across the breathtaking Aegean Sea (Photo by Julia Jones)

These days, Greek Muscats come from Sámos, in the East Aegean—where 97 percent of their vineyards grow Muscat to produce sweet dessert wines—as well as Pátras and occasionally Cephalonia. Though Greek food has travelled the world, Greek wines are hard to get outside of the country. Every island in the Greek archipelago grows unique grape varieties, and many are undiscovered outside their shores. The Greek wine industry is currently experiencing a quality revolution, where traditional techniques are being honed with contemporary knowledge.

In Santorini traditional koulara method, vines are woven into continuous circles to form a basket for protection from the strong winds and harsh summer sun.

While in Greece exploring ancient grape varieties, be sure to visit the island of Santorini. To get to Santorini, fly into a European hub such as Frankfurt or Rome and take a direct flight to the island. Once there, the main attractions are the towns of Oia and Thera, but not to be missed are the famous black volcanic sand beaches of Perissa. Travelling the island offers stunning views from sky-high towns, incredible sunsets, and eclectic cuisine. Most wineries in Santorini are located in the central and southern parts of the island, in the little villages that dot the island; the most famous winery, Santo Wines, is located in the village of Pyrgos. Greece is truly a wine traveller’s dream, where one can discover a range of grape varieties that are virtually unknown outside of its borders. 

Tasting Greece's diverse wine at Santos Wines (Photo by Julia Jones)

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MUSCATS FROM AROUND THE WORLD WE RECOMMEND: Zinck 2012 Terroir Muscat Alsace, France $26.99 Callegaro Francesca nv Fior d’Arancio Sparkling Moscato Colli Euganei, Italy $21.99


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ink DrMe

trending By Mike Muirhead, CMS, Sommelier

Didn’t Get the Memo I want to tell you about two grapes. They both produce world-class wines that demand some of the heftiest price tags in the industry. Their elegance and diversity in styles have made them stars in an expanding wine world, and you might not have tried one in so long, they are practically new to you. It is time to restart the conversation about Merlot and Chardonnay. In an issue devoted to odd grape varieties around the globe, I am going to talk about some of the most forgotten, underestimated, and sometimes even demonized grape varieties in the world.

Chardonnay was, for well over a decade, the most sought-after white grape variety for consumers in both Canada and the United States. It was so popular that Lindemans created Bin 65 Chardonnay solely for the Canadian market and had amazing success. Much like Merlot, it finds its spiritual home in France and, specifically, in Burgundy where the famed vineyards in Chablis and the Côte de Beaune make Chardonnay sing in so many different styles— from steely bright mineral examples from Chablis to rich, opulent oaktreated styles from the tiny plots just north of the village of Montrachet.

Merlot has its spiritual home on the right bank of Bordeaux, France. It creates one of the most expensive wines in the world. Pomerol’s Chateau Petrus is 100 per cent Merlot and commands prices of well over four figures per bottle. Vying with Cabernet as the top planted grape variety in the world, Merlot grows well in many different climates. It has been able to thrive in warm climates like Chile, Australia, and Italy, and also in locations with shorter, cooler growing seasons such as Canada, New Zealand, and the Pacific Northwest. Merlot is a quality wine that can be produced at many price points. The fruit is rich (think dark red berries, plum, and mocha), the tannins are supple (great with food or for sipping on its own), and the mouth feel is near perfect— full, round, and palate filling.

Chardonnay has also transferred well to diverse climates. For years, the big, buttery, full style of California Chardonnays landed on every wine list. But Chardonnay is so multifaceted: a plethora of different styles come out of climates as diverse as Spain, Niagara, South Africa, and Argentina. When people tell me they don’t like Chardonnay, I respond: “You just haven’t tried a Chardonnay

you like yet.” This winemaker’s grape can present as an unoaked, fresh green apple summer gulper or a rich oak-filled buttery style—and everything in between. Chardonnay has many personalities and pairs with a range of cooking styles. If you haven’t tried Chardonnay lately, you must give it another try. Over the past decade, movies have portrayed Merlot as the “antiwine” and poor Chardonnay had to endure the ABC years (“anything but Chardonnay”) without even a chance to redeem itself from its overindulgent, oaky past. But it is time for you to give these giants of the wine world another chance. They may not be “unusual” grapes, but if it has been a while since these standards graced your table, then you will be pleasantly surprised by what they have to offer. This issue may serve as a call-to-arms to try some new grape varieties—but these two didn’t get the memo. 

REVISITING THE CLASSICS CHARDONNAY

MERLOT

Bon Courage 2014 Unwooded Chardonnay Robertson, South Africa $16.99 White flower blossom, granny smith apple, and citrus peel on the nose. Bright and steely with a clean refreshing finish.

Benziger 2012 Merlot Sonoma County, United States $31.99 Rich round red berry fruit with chalky mocha tannins and a full, succulent mouth feel.

Buena Vista 2013 Chardonnay Carneros, United States $37.99 Balanced and elegant with perfect toasty buttery apple and a clean, mouthwatering finish. Bernard Defaix 2012 Côte de Lechet Chablis 1er Cru, France $41.99 A textbook nose of flint and exotic fruits, citrus and melon and a long, lingering finish.

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Chateau Ste. Michelle 2012 Merlot Columbia Valley, United States $21.99 Tomato leaf, black cherries, and Provencial herbs on the nose. Medium bodied with sandy tannins. Château Bon Pasteur 2009 Pomerol, France $164.99 Complex nose offers fig, dark roasted coffee, hot chocolate, and rich dark plum. The palate is rich and full of ripe, round tannins and black cherries on the finish. Drink now through 2025.


Celebrate the holiday season with the WSO!

Migration Magic. Discover Sunset Goose Flights at FortWhyte Alive– Wednesday to Sunday, September 23 -- October 25 Witness an ancient migration ritual at FortWhyte Alive. In a breathtaking display, thousands of geese will begin landing on our lakes as the sun dips below the horizon.

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Learn about the migration at an interpretive presentation, complete with a bonfire and BBQ. Or, take in the spectacular sunset lakeside at the Buffalo Stone Café. Enjoy a delicious three-course Goose Flight Feast, skillfully prepared by the chefs of Diversity Foods. By reservation only; please call (204) 989-8355 x 215.

fortwhyte.org/ sunsetgooseflights 1961 McCREARY RD WINNIPEG, MB PH: (204) 989-8355 INFO@FORTWHYTE.ORG

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Migration Season sponsor: Cambrian Credit Union


BANVILLE & JONES

Wine & Food Evenings

wine & food

Banville & Jones’s talented Sommeliers work with Winnipeg’s most talented chefs to create the ultimate pairing experience.

events schedule OCTOBER 2015 TO JANUARY 2016

Cost: $85.99 per person Saturday, October 10: Pasta Night with Amici Thursday, October 29: An evening with Dario Friday, November 20: Savour the Season: Comfort Food Friday, January 8: Amici Friday, January 15: Spice up the New Year Saturday, January 23: Pizzeria Gusto Thursday, January 28: All Seasons

Luxury Tasting REGULAR HOURS: Monday to Friday 10 am to 8 pm Saturday 10 am to 6 pm Sundays and holidays 11 am to 6 pm HOLIDAY HOURS (STARTING NOV. 28): Monday to Saturday 10 am to 9 pm Sundays 11 am to 6 pm Christmas Eve 10 am to 4 pm Christmas Day Closed Boxing Day 12 pm to 5 pm New Year’s Eve 10 am to 5 pm New Year’s Day Closed

Our Sommeliers explore some of Banville & Jones’s exclusive treasures. Cost: $99.00 per person Friday, October 16: Hidden Cellar Gems Friday, January 29: New Year, New World

Click on the Events and Education tab at banvilleandjones.com for updated information on Food and Wine Events. To reserve a space or book a private wine tasting event, call 948-WINE (9463) • Tickets for events are non-refundable, but are exchangeable 14 days prior to the event. • Events begin at 7 pm and take place in the 2nd floor Tuscany Room unless otherwise noted. • Prices do not include taxes.

TEXT A SOMMELIER Have a wine question? Your answer is just a text away! Impress your friends with your personal Banville & Jones Sommelier, at your fingertips. For the first time in Winnipeg, Banville & Jones is offering its Text a Sommelier program. Text us your wine questions: • • • •

Wines we have in stock Wines we carry Recommendations from a restaurant wine list Is it time to open that special bottle?

How does it work? Text wine-related questions to 204.400.0499 and one of our 7 Sommeliers will text you back with an answer.


No Time? No Problem! We’ve got you covered!

Banville & Jones Christmas Baskets and Gifts Get it delivered!* Sweet Treats $60.00 Savoury Sensation $60.00 Wine & Cheese $90.00 Festive Favourites $130.00 Holiday Reds $150.00 Decadent Delights $250.00 2-Bottle Gift Box: Sister Act $45.00 Solo red/white (one bottle) $20.00

Buy a $100 gift card and receive 1 Eisch Bordeaux glass FREE. Buy $500 in gift cards and receive 6 FREE! Value: up to $180. (Offer valid between November 24 and December 24, 2015)

*Free next day delivery within the Perimeter is available on orders over $250. Email us 24/7 at wine@banvilleandjones.com for any of your wine needs. Detailed descriptions of the baskets can be found on our website. 1616 St Mary’s Rd, Winnipeg 204-948-WINE (9463) banvilleandjones.com


Autumn Comfort By Todd Antonation, Sylvia Jansen and Lisa Muirhead Photos by Ian McCausland For this food and wine feature, we pulled Lisa Muirhead from her post as editor of The Cellar Door to join Banville & Jones wine experts Todd Antonation and Sylvia Jansen in bringing you some of our favourite comfort foods and wine paring ideas. We have assembled a unique selection of dishes: Todd’s Beef Tenderloin Stuffed Mushrooms is a

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decadent first course; Sylvia’s Savoury Potato Layer Cake is a substantial holiday meal side dish or a vegetarian’s dream main course; and Lisa’s Sweet Potato Gnocchi is a great dinner party staple that showcases fresh, simple ingredients.


TODD'S BEEF TENDERLOIN STUFFED MUSHROOM CAPS WITH A RED WINE BALSAMIC REDUCTION Serves 4 5 oz 1 tbsp 20 ½ cup ½ cup ¾ cup ¾ cup 1 tbsp

beef tenderloin olive oil large white mushroom caps blue cheese Panko crumbs beef broth red wine balsamic vinegar Kosher salt Fresh ground pepper 4 traditional escargot dishes

PAIR WITH: Domino Dostares 2011 Estay Prieto Picudo Castilla Y Leon, Spain $19.99 Fontanafredda 2011 Eremo Rosso Langhe, Italy $23.99 Buena Vista 2013 Pinot Noir Sonoma County, United States $28.99

Preheat oven to 375°F. Bring tenderloin up to room temperature and season with salt and pepper. Heat oil in a medium-sized pan on medium-high heat. Sear tenderloin 2 minutes on each side or until cooked to rare. Remove tenderloin from pan and cover with foil. In the same pan on high heat, deglaze with red wine, beef stock and balsamic vinegar. Reduce liquid to roughly half. Reduce heat to simmer and place mushrooms in the pan for 5 minutes. Pour the reduction into escargot dishes and place mushrooms in each hole. Put dishes on a baking sheet to catch drips and bake for 5 minutes. Slice tenderloin into thin strips and place into each mushroom cap. Crumble blue cheese onto each piece and finish with Panko crumbs. Turn oven up to high broil and place the mushrooms on the middle rack in the oven. Remove when crust turns golden brown, about 4 minutes.


Winnipeggers Paul and Shirley Martens first visited South Africa in 1996. Thus began a love of the South African people, culture, and their imminently drinkable wines! They formed Blend Imports and return each year to explore South Africa’s boutique and family-focused wineries, bringing the most interesting and affordable wines back to Manitoba to share with you. Pour unto others as you would have them pour unto you.

blendimports.com

 Heron Ridge The Flight Shiraz ($21.99) This is a spicy and well-built Cabernet Sauvignon Shiraz blend. This fruit-driven blend has a touch of American oak, lending notes of vanilla. The well-balanced wine is lifted with fruit and charged with a little volatility. Enjoy its full-bodied and lingering finish.

 LAM Pinotage ($21.99) The colour is very light and slightly opaque, reminding one more of Pinot Noir than Pinotage. A combination of aromas greets the nose, forever changing—red fruit combined with tobacco-like notes. The palate is very delicate and the tannins extremely fine and elegant. At just 13% alcohol, the term drinkability is an understatement.

Secateurs Red Blend ($22.99) The aromas are perfumed, peppery, spicy, smoky, and exhibit ripe red fruit notes. As always, the palate texture of this style of wine is supple, smooth on the entry but with enough grip to end dry and refreshing. In the mouth, the texture and fineness of fruit tannin and drinkability of the wine are immediately evident.

 Sutherland Pinot Noir ($24.99)

 Cellar Foot Harslevelu ($67.99)

Aged in French oak barrels for 9 months, this wine shows pure fruit aromas, lovely perfumed forest floor characteristics and hints of smoky spice. Earthy flavours of wild strawberry and spice on the palate end in a long, refined finish. Pinot Noir is a great option for pairing with lightly flavoured dishes like risotto, salmon & mild beef dishes.

This unusual wine is lime green in colour with a golden tinge. Initial notes of spice and herbs appear on the nose, quite similar to Syrah. This softens after time and a subtle, elegant perfume comes through. The mineral notes on the mouth leave an extremely long, nutty finish. A beautiful Harslevelu with hints of Muscatlike aromas and flavours that appear from time to time.


SYLVIA'S SAVOURY POTATO LAYER CAKE Serves 4 For the tomato layers: 2 medium onions, chopped 3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 2 cans (796 ml) San Marzano tomatoes, drained well and chopped freshly ground black pepper pinch of spicy red pepper flakes Sauté onion in olive oil with red pepper flakes, add chopped tomatoes and cook over medium heat about 30 minutes. Cool slightly. Divide into 2 equal portions. For the potato/cheese layers: 8 large red potatoes, cleaned but not peeled, cooked, roughly mashed and cooled slightly 4 large eggs, beaten 1¼ cups Monterey Jack cheese, diced 1½ cups other soft and aged cheeses: anything from mozzarella to old white cheddar, diced 1 cup Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, coarsely grated ½ cup fresh Italian parsley, chopped ½ cup fresh oregano, chopped 2 tbsp fresh thyme leaves, chopped

Preheat oven to 350°F. Stir together mashed potatoes, eggs, cheeses, fresh herbs and divide into 3 equal portions. Butter the springform pan and add a ring of parchment paper to inside wall of pan to make a parchment riser about twice the height of the original pan. Cover bottom with 1/3 of potato mix. Add half the tomato layer, then another potato/cheese layer, then tomato, then potato/cheese. Brush the top with olive oil and fold extra parchment around the edges over the top of the cake. Bake the cake for about an hour, then cover with foil and bake another 20 minutes. Remove foil, cool cake, and let it sit for at least 20 minutes to set. Transfer cake in the pan to a serving platter, remove springform and peel away parchment. Drizzle with a bit more olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt to serve.

To assemble, you will need a pinch of coarse sea salt, butter, parchment paper, aluminum foil, and a 12” springform pan.

PAIR WITH:

La Forge 2013 Marsanne Reserve Pays d'Oc, France $16.99 San Salvatore 2013 Falanghina Campania, Italy $24.99 Tolaini 2009 Al Passo Tuscany, Italy $34.99

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LISA'S SWEET POTATO GNOCCHI WITH PEAS, CAPICOLA AND GOAT FETA Serves 10-12 2

one-pound red-skinned sweet potatoes, rinsed, patted dry, pierced all over with fork 1 12-ounce container fresh ricotta cheese, drained in a sieve or cheese cloth for 1 hour 1 cup finely grated Parmesan cheese 2 t + 2 T salt 2¾ cups all-purpose flour 100 g capicola, spicy or mild 1 cup grape tomatoes, sliced 1 cup peas, fresh or frozen 1 cup goat feta, diced ½ cup fresh basil, chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 3 tbsp olive oil

PAIR WITH: Santa Venere 2012 Gaglioppo Ciró Classico, Italy $19.99 Zinck 2013 Portrait Pinot Gris Alsace, France $22.99 Cave Spring 2013 Gamay Niagara Peninsula, Canada $23.99

Microwave sweet potatoes on high until tender, about 10 minutes per potato. Once the potatoes are fork-soft, slice in half, cool, and then scrape sweet potato flesh into medium bowl. Pass through a potato ricer to get out big lumps, or mash and then give a quick pulse in the food processor. Transfer 3 cups to a large bowl. Add ricotta cheese; blend well. Add Parmesan cheese, 2 teaspoons salt and mash to blend. If you didn’t use a potato ricer, mix with your hands to find and remove any hard lumps. Mix in flour, about 1/2 cup at a time, until soft dough forms. Divide dough into four portions. Roll between palms and a well-floured counter, forming into ropes about 1 inch in diameter, sprinkling with flour as needed if sticky. Cut each rope into 20 pieces. Transfer to baking sheet. Bring large pot of water to boil. Working in batches, place gnocchi in boiling water and gently stir so that they don’t stick together. Boil gnocchi until tender, 5 to 6 minutes. Transfer gnocchi to clean rimmed baking sheet sprayed with cooking oil. Cool completely until the surface of the gnocchi is firm instead of mushy. (Can be made 4 hours ahead. Let stand at room temperature.) While gnocchi is cooling, dice tomato, mince garlic, chop basil, and cook peas. Chop capicola up and pan fry until crisp, about 8 minutes on high. Once the gnocchi is firm, sauté on medium high in olive oil until they are heated through, about 6 minutes each side. When you have about 3 minutes left, throw in garlic, sauté for one minute, then throw in feta, peas, capicola, and tomatoes. Simmer for two minutes. Garnish with fresh, chopped basil and serve.



Post a picture enjoying Tolaini wines anywhere in the world, and receive 10% off any Tolaini product at Banville & Jones Wine Co. Instagram: @BanvilleJones

We love hosting Banville & Jones friends and family at the Tolaini Estates in Tuscany. Many of our customers and staff have already travelled to visit the vineyards that give birth to the Tolaini family wines. Consider this your invitation to join us for a glass of Tolaini wine—either at our table in Tuscany or at one of our many restaurant partners in the city! www.banvilleandjones.com | www.tolaini.it


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12/16/2014 10:53:50 AM


Georgia on my Mind By Lisa Muirhead

Autumn colours and snowy peaks in the Caucasus Mountain province of Svaneti

Legend has it that when God was handing out land to all the people of Earth, he designated a time and place for all to meet. The Georgians were having a feast and ran late. After giving out all of the land, God was walking back and heard talking and great laughter. When he stopped to see what the commotion was, the Georgians saw him, poured him a glass of wine and said, “Lord, I am sorry we are late, but sit, join our feast.” God sat with the Georgians and enjoyed their hospitality so much that he decided to give them a small piece of paradise that he had reserved for himself. This origin story tells you three important things about Georgians: first, punctuality isn’t a priority; second, they consider their country paradise on Earth; third: they take hospitality very, very seriously. Visit Georgia and you will find that the latter two rules make this country difficult to leave, and impossible to forget.

An Unexpected Journey I was asked by Winnipegger (and honorary Georgian) Max Johnson to travel with him and a group of writers on a trip to Georgia. Immediately, I said yes! Then googled: “where is Georgia?” My sommelier friends were terribly excited that I would be trying the fabled amber Georgian wines. I downloaded a Georgian language app, did some rudimentary research, and stepped off the plane largely unprepared for everything I was about to experience.

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In Tbilisi, the traditional architecture of Georgia's past in Old Town (top) is juxtaposed with contemporary structures like the Bridge of Peace, concert hall and exhibition centre (below). (Photos by Lisa Muirhead)


A small country at just under 70,000 square kilometres, the Republic of Georgia has spent centuries protecting its little slice of paradise from those who have wanted to control its important geographical position—adversaries that have included the Roman Empire, Pathis, Persians, Arabs, the Byzantine Empire, Turks, and Soviet Russia. Though small, Georgia is astoundingly diverse. The western region borders the Black Sea, where you will find resort towns flanked by semi-tropical rainforests and the Caucasus Mountains to the north. Inland, the west is characterized by bountiful orchards and rich agriculture. In the north, the Caucasus Mountains are a popular destination for Europeans looking for fresh powder for their alpine activities. As you move east, the climate becomes more arid, and you enter the heart of Georgia: wine country.

We started with a crash course, tasting through 14 wines at Vino Underground, whose staff has encyclopedic knowledge of the country’s wines. Tasting through 14 wines showcased the unique Georgian style, displayed the diversity of grape varieties being produced, and helped familiarize our palates to wines produced in the traditional Georgian method.

TRADITIONAL GEORGIAN METHOD Georgia’s traditional qvevri winemaking method is so unique and ancient that UNESCO has placed it on its Intangible Cultural Heritage list. Not just reserved for the many commercial vineyards that preserve the tradition, every household in Georgia has a qvevri buried in the ground, for daily meals and to welcome guests into their home. For a description of the traditional Georgian method by winemaker Iago Bitarishvili, visit the Poise Publications blog at www.poisepublications.com/blog.

Ghvino To say that ghvino (wine) is important to Georgian culture would be a gross understatement. Wine and winemaking are tendrils that weave through Georgian culture, underscored by its long history—the oldest grapestones found in Georgia date back 8,000 years—and unique winemaking process, which has remained virtually unchanged in 6,000 years. Today, 535 of the 1,400 grape varieties cultivated in the world originated in Georgia. The wine industry, like all of Georgia’s cultural traditions, has been through a lot. Invading forces systematically destroyed ancient vines in an effort to uproot the culture itself. In an effort to protect its viticultural legacy, traditional Georgian soldiers were known to go into battle with a grapevine cutting tucked in their breastplate so that if they fell, a Georgian vine would spring up in their place, preserving their wine traditions. What would-be occupiers failed to consider is that their vineyards are at the very heart of Georgian culture. The Georgian people are much like the hardy vines they have nurtured, lost, and regained over the centuries: they are stubborn and they thrive in the most adverse conditions. Since the last occupying force, the Russians, left in 1991, Georgians have managed to recover 450 grape varieties that were almost lost due to the wages of war, though only about 38 of those are commercially grown. Our introduction to Georgian ghvino was the capital city of Tbilisi, a 1,500-year-old city that manages to capture the pride of their ancient culture while still maintaining the vibrancy of a contemporary, growing city.

Monks at the Alaverdi Monastery in the Kaheti region have been making wine since the 11th century.

As we tasted through “white” wines made from varieties like Chinuri, Rkatsiteli, Kisi, and Khikhvi, we first noticed the colour of the wines. Because the Georgian method requires the grapes to sit on the stems and skins much longer than Western wines, the colours ranged from a deep yellow amber to orange to a golden light brown. These wines had a weight and a drying quality that could almost be mistaken for the characteristics of a red wine—due to the tannins drawn from the extra time on their skins.

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The red wines we tried, made from Tavkveri, Otshanuri Sapere, and Saperavi grapes, were similarly dense in both colour and weight. Our tasting would not be complete without a quaff of chacha, the potent alcohol distilled from the stems, skins and pips leftover after the grapes are fermented.

Be our Guest There is a saying in Georgia, that guests are gifts from God. As a country establishing its international identity, Georgians do everything from the heart out, inviting you to sit at their tables; honouring you with impossibly heartfelt, philosophical toasts; and proudly discussing their deep-seated patriotism. Our journey through Georgia’s rich cultural history was punctuated by indescribable feasts and ardent hospitality. The food is fresh, largely organic, surprisingly vegetarianfocused, and it doesn’t stop coming. At the receiving end of the endless family-style platters, we were once again reminded of how a region’s wine is inextricably linked to its food. As we indulged in khachapuri (cheese-stuffed bread), badrijan nigzit (eggplant with walnut puree), khinkali (doughy dumplings stuffed with meat and spices), and adjika (an Indian-inspired pickle) served with cucumber and tomato salad, I marvelled at how the sturdy amber wines paired so seamlessly with the multitude of flavours. Intriguing cultural performances complemented the hospitality throughout our travels. At Arpesha restaurant in Tbilisi, between courses, four men sitting casually in a corner table having dinner treated us to traditional polyphonic singing (also listed on UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage list), creating a truly indescribable acapella chorus. At 2,200 metres in the Caucasus in the

Georgian wines are made in traditional beeswax-lined earthenware vessels that are buried in the ground of each household.

12th-century village of Ushuguli, an impossibly tiny ancient woman took out a handmade stringed instrument and played a traditional folk song to welcome us to the local museum. At Pheasant’s Tears Wine Bar and Restaurant in Sighnaghi (about 120 km east of Tbilisi), our feast was complemented both by Pheasant’s Tears wine and Georgian folk dancers, accompanied by a local accordion player. The dancers summed up the spirit of Georgian hospitality, when one breathlessly told us at the end of an acrobatic performance that “We danced with everything because you enjoyed it so much.” If you yearn for travel that is authentic, cultural, warm and inviting, I hope that you soon find yourself among the Georgians. More than intriguing wine and delicious food, they are an unforgettable, resilient, and proud culture that God himself could not resist. 

While hospitality characterizes the experience of Georgia, there are many stunning cultural experiences that cannot be missed. For a photo gallery and list of cultural destinations, visit the Poise Publications blog (www.poisepublications.com/blog).

Two Departures!

June 15 & 30, 2016

$3,480

From US

per person

*Early Booking Bonus: Book and pay in full before November 1, 2015 and receive US$200 off per person

Georgia & the Caucasus Food, Culture, Wine Named one of National Geographic Traveler magazine’s ninth annual “50 Tours of a Lifetime”, this ten day tour explores Georgia's exquisite wine regions and is fully escorted by a Georgian food and wine expert.

Contact us today to reserve your spot on this exclusive program!

1-800-661-3830 georgia@gctravel.ca www.greatcanadiantravel.com

2015


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WINE APPRECIATION COURSES (NO EXAMS!)

CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS

Essentials of Wine

Canadian Association of Professional Sommeliers (CAPS/ACSP) Certified

Do you have two evenings to discover more about the magic of wine? You will walk away with a new understanding of price and quality in wine, a better understanding of your own palate, and a structured approach to tasting that makes sense! No previous knowledge or experience is needed. Classes run in the 2nd Floor Tuscan Room of Banville & Jones. Cost: $79.99 plus GST Dates: see banvilleandjones.com for details. Essentials 2 – Coming in 2016! To take your wine knowledge to the next level, Essentials 2 opens the door to deeper understanding of the world of wine. Essentials 2 is two evenings of tutored tastings that explore differences that come with climate, grape growing, and winemaking in the world’s classic wine regions and beyond. Essentials 2 will be of interest to wine lovers of all descriptions, as well as to those who have participated in Essentials of Wine. Classes are 7:00 to 9:00 pm, in the 2nd Floor Tuscan Room at Banville & Jones. See banvilleandjones.com for more details.

Professional Sommelier Program

What does it take to become a Sommelier? Passion. Study. Tasting. Dedication. To become a Sommelier, people who are deeply interested in the study of wine, spirits, and beverages apply themselves to a rigorous course of study, practical, and project work. To become a Sommelier is to immerse oneself in these subjects, to hold to a demanding schedule, and to maintain the passion that started it in the first place. The Professional Sommelier Program involves intensive classroom time, with full day classes on Mondays (not including holidays) from: January to June 2016 (term 1) and September 2016 to February 2017 (term 2) Successful graduates of the Professional Sommelier Program hold comprehensive knowledge of the world of wine, spirits, beer and beverages. Sections include: • Old World (Europe) and New World wine regions • Viticulture and winemaking • Wine tasting theory

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• Food and wine harmonies • Beer and sake • Spirits • Sommelier management, including a 60-hour Stage work placement.

In addition to full-day classes each week, the program includes in-depth tastings, case studies, term exams, practical projects and the Stage work. The program concludes with a two-day CAPS Sommelier certification exam that includes theory, service, and blind tasting. The Sommelier Diploma is internationally respected and recognized in all 44 affiliate countries of the Association de la Sommellerie International (ASI). For more information, contact Banville & Jones Wine Institute at bjwi@banvilleandjones.com, or visit the website at banvilleandjones.com Cost: $4,500 plus GST (payment options available—please inquire) Program begins January 4, 2016 WSET® Level 2 Award in Wines & Spirits (Wine Specialist) The internationally renowned Wine and Spirits Education Trust (WSET®) introductory course gives candidates excellent all-round product knowledge. The course focuses on key grape varieties and regions of the world, principle types of spirits, and wine service. WSET Level 2 is designed for anyone with an interest in wine and spirits and does not require previous wine knowledge. We recommend early registration.

Cost: $1,495 plus GST. Includes WSET exam fees and all materials Course offerings: Beginning January 6, 2016; evening classes, 6:30 pm to 9:00 pm (Wednesdays) WSET® Level 2 Award in Spirits This specialized qualification focuses on spirits and liqueurs, their production methods, tasting evaluation, major brands, and their place in the market. This course is valuable for those working as bartenders or sales representatives, for those planning to enter the Professional Sommelier Program, or for anyone with a fascination for spirits. Cost: $795 plus GST. Includes WSET exam fees, all materials, and a set of tasting glasses. Course offerings: October 6 to November 24, 2015: Evening classes, 6:30 pm to 9:00 pm (Tuesdays) French Wine Scholar (FWS): Spring, 2016 For more information on this specialization program, and others offered by BJWI, see our website at banvilleandjones.com.

Updates and new course offerings are posted regularly on our website.

Cost: $795 plus GST. Includes WSET exam fees, all materials, and a set of tasting glasses. Course offerings: January 5 to March 1, 2016: Evening classes, 6:30 pm to 9:00 pm (Tuesdays) WSET® Level 3 Award in Wines & Spirits (Wine Steward) WSET® Level 3 builds on Level 2 by providing more indepth product knowledge of principal wines and spirits of the world, and a thorough understanding of their commercial importance. Candidates also benefit from regional tastings where they will learn to identify product style and quality, and to evaluate wines professionally for quality and commercial value. The course is excellent for those in the food and beverage industry or for wine lovers who want to learn about wines and spirits in a structured and rigorous course.

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sidebar By Sylvia Jansen,

D WSET, CSW, Sommelier

It’s Magic Almost every wine lover can name a Moment. A Moment is a taste of something unusual, or special, or a great wine from a particularly good vintage, opened in the right time and space. The Moment is a combination of the nuances of aroma, balance, quality, and some other intangible that baffles and beguiles. The first wine Moment draws us into the world of loving wine, not just for its pleasure, but for its magic. Last year my colleagues and I were tasting wines with Rémi and Simon Rollin in the dim, chilly cellars of Rémi’s father in the French town of Pernand-Vergelesses. We had spent a week in Burgundy, and our notebooks were full of notes about some amazing, famous wines. Then Rémi opened a bottle of Domaine Rollin 1990 Premier Cru Île des Vergelesses. To say this wine was a Pinot Noir is to say that Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata is a song. The aroma lifted from our glasses, we tasted, and suddenly the conversation stopped. My face warmed and I was moved to tears, as was our friend Christopher Sprague. Gary Hewitt put his notebook down (needing to double back the next day to retrieve it). The wine defied description. But we all agreed it was magical. Like other special moments in life, wine magic is not something scripted, nor is it guaranteed by a particular purchase or gift. A few ingredients are always present, though. One is quality, which is often accompanied by higher price. Granted, the most expensive bottle does not necessarily conjure up magic. Great tickets to see a professional sports event or blockbuster concert can be big tickets, but do not

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guarantee a magical evening either. However, magic is never conjured by the cheapest wine available, I can guarantee that. The $10 bottle of hearty red or fresh white you drink with dinner on a Tuesday can be pleasurable and easy, but it is not magical. Another ingredient is the occasion, when there is opportunity to pay attention to the wine, and perhaps even talk about it. It is difficult to have a wine Moment when one’s attention is constantly diverted to something else. A third ingredient is the company. Wine is a personal experience, and personal preferences range wildly. So to produce magic, the wine needs to match the palates of the company it keeps. And almost all wine Moments happen in the company of others. The Rollin Premier Cru that moved us in Burgundy was not the most costly wine we had tasted that week, but it was by no means at the basic end of Burgundy. It was a great wine, from a treasure of a vineyard, made with care by someone who understands the soul of Burgundy. A great bottle, at a good moment, in good company, can move us to tears, or can transport us to another dimension where everything is beautiful. To set the stage for magic, go up from what you love: select a wine in the same style you regularly enjoy, get information about that wine, give yourself a treat, and spend twice what you normally spend. Or three times. Create a quiet evening, with lovely food for that special person, or special people, and then open the special bottle. The magic is waiting in your glass. So here’s to you, enchanted by the Moment. 


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COLD-PRESSED JUICES SMOOTHIES CLEANSES 100% RAW ORGANIC VEGAN AIRPORT: Between Gates 7 and 8 at the airport (open daily at 5 am) OSBORNE VILLAGE: 132 Osborne St (open weekdays at 7 am, weekends at 10 am) Also available at Maples Chiropractic, Wiebe Chiropractic Centre, Aevi Salon & Spa, Moksha Yoga, Shawarma Khan, Banville & Jones Wine Co, Nature Doctors, and Thermea Nordik Spa

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culinary partners 529 Wellington serves only Canadian Prime beef and fresh seafood, with impeccable service in an elegantly restored 1912 mansion on the banks of the Assiniboine River. Celebrating its 10th Anniversary, 529 has quickly become a world-renowned icon in the restaurant industry. An exquisite menu and extensive wine cellar make for truly memorable food and wine experiences at 529. 529 Wellington Crescent 204.487.8325

Located in the Canadian Museum for Human Rights, ERA Bistro is a modern and sophisticated space for lunch, dinner and private events. Executive Chef Barry Saunders and Executive Sous Chef Stephen Strecker have created a fresh, eco-modernist menu with an emphasis on locally sourced, Certified Fair Trade and sustainable products. ERA Bistro is open for lunch Tuesday–Sunday from 11 am to 5 pm, and dinner on Wednesdays from 5 pm to 8 pm. Closed Mondays.

Chef partner Tristan Foucault has reinvented the menu on the corner of King and Bannatyne. Peasant Cookery goes back to the land with uniquely prepared Old World dishes and top-notch service. This is real food, freshly harvested, and the seasonal ingredients speak for themselves. Literally everything is made from scratch by Tristan and his team. 100-283 Bannatyne Avenue 204.989.7700

Fine fare, done right. SMITH is a new culinary experience built on craftsmanship and a dedication to the finer points located in the Inn at the Forks. Celebrate the truth of honest food created from the diversity of the lands and waters of our great country. 75 Forks Market Road 204.944.2445

Located in the heart of downtown Winnipeg, 295 York is a modern seafood and steakhouse. The lunch menu boasts unique, contemporary takes on classic steakhouse fare, and dinner focuses on prime cuts of beef and fresh seafood. Chef Jesse Friesen and his team work with the freshest ingredients and smoke all of their own meat in-house. Enjoy daily features and live music in the lounge. 295 York St 204.896.7275

Chef Louise Briskie-de Beer and partner Faiz de Beer love to share the fruits of their travels by bringing global cuisine with Manitoba flare to your palate. Cafe Savour’s atmosphere is as unique and delightful as the food, perfect for an intimate, formal dinner for two or a group of friends out to enjoy a casual evening of relaxing laughter. Open Thursday, Friday, and Saturday starting at 5:30 pm for dinner. 956 St Mary’s Road 204.254.4681

85 Israel Asper Way 204.289.2190

Across the Board Amici Restaurant Black Rabbit Bistro Lounge Bombolini Boulevard Pub and Bistro Café 22 Café Dario Chew D-Jay’s Restaurant De Luca's Cooking School and Restaurant Diana’s Cucina and Lounge Elements

Elkhorn Resort Earl’s Restaurant and Bar Enoteca Era Bistro at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights Food Evolution Hotel Fort Garry Hy’s Steakhouse Jane’s Restaurant and Red River College Joey Kenaston Joey Polo Park Joey’s Only Seafood

Le Cercle Molière Mano a Mano/Teo’s Market Burger Mere Hotel Olive Garden Italian Restaurant Pizzeria Gusto Sabai Thai Segovia South Beach Casino & Resort St. Charles Country Club Swiss Chalet The Merchant Kitchen

The Velvet Glove at the Fairmont TR McCoy’s Italian Restaurant The Victoria Inn Tony Roma’s Urban Prairie Cuisine Vera Cucina Wasabi Sabi Thermëa Spa


shopping list

Alheit 2013 Cartology Western Cape, South Africa $43.99......................................................................................................…27 Bacalhôa 2008 Só Touriga Nacional Sétubal, Portugal $26.99..................................................................................................29 BC Wines 2014 Sauvignon Blanc Worcester, South Africa $13.99..................................................................................................30 Benziger 2012 Merlot Sonoma County, United States $31.99..................................................................................................48 Bernard Defaix 2012 Côte de Lechet Chablis 1er Cru, France $41.99.....................................................................................48 Bokisch 2013 Garnacha Blanca Lodi, United States $28.99..................................................................................................27 Bokisch 2012 Tizona Zinfandel Lodi, United States $54.99..................................................................................................44 Bon Courage 2014 Unwooded Chardonnay Robertson, South Africa $16.99...........................................................................48 Botter 2014 Oggi Pinot Grigio Delle Venezia, Italy $11.99........................................................................................................30 Botter nv Bollicine Frizzante Prosecco, Italy $14.99...................................................................................................................30 Buena Vista 2013 Chardonnay Carneros, United States $37.99..................................................................................................48 Buena Vista 2013 Pinot Noir Sonoma County, United States $28.99..........................................................................................53 Cà Maiol nv Chiaretto Classico Garda, Italy $19.99.................................................................................................................70 Callegaro Francesca nv Fior d’Arancio Sparkling Moscato Colli Euganei, Italy $21.99............................................................46 Callegaro Francesca nv Spumante Dolce Marzemino Veneto, Italy $21.99................................................................................28 Casal Garcia nv Vinho Verde Minho, Portugal $14.99.............................................................................................................25 Cave Spring 2013 Gamay Niagara Peninsula, Canada $23.99.................................................................................................56 Château Bon Pasteur 2009 Pomerol, France $164.99................................................................................................................48 Chateau Ste. Michelle 2012 Merlot Columbia Valley, United States $21.99............................................................................48 dA 2013 Muscat Pays d’Oc, France $14.99..............................................................................................................................27 Daisy Day 2014 Cabernet Sauvignon Western Cape, South Africa $14.99................................................................................70 De Bos 2014 47 Varietal Rosé Walker Bay, South Africa $21.99..............................................................................................70 Donna Laura 2013 Ali Sangiovese Tuscany, Italy $15.99.........................................................................................................28 Donnafugata 2013 Sherazade Nero d’Avola Sicily, Italy $21.99................................................................................................28 Domino Dostares 2011 Estay Prieto Picudo Castilla y Leon, Spain $19.99............................................................................53 El Grillo Y La Luna 2012 12 Lunas Red Blend Somontano, Spain $22.99...............................................................................70 Falernia 2012 Pinot Noir Reserva Elqui Valley, Chile $24.99..................................................................................................70 Félines Jourdan 2013 Picpoul de Pinet, France $14.99............................................................................................................25 Finca Muñoz 2014 Artero Macabeo-Verdejo La Mancha, Spain $10.99.....................................................................................25 Fontanafredda 2011 Eremo Rosso Langhe, Italy $23.99...........................................................................................................53 Fontanafredda 2013 Gavi di Gavi, Italy $19.99.........................................................................................................................25 La Forge 2013 Marsanne Reserve Pays d’Oc, France $16.99...............................................................................................27, 55 Lingenfelder 2013 Bee Morio Muscat Pfalz, Germany $17.99..................................................................................................22 Lingenfelder 2009 Dornfelder Pfalz, Germany $22.99.........................................................................................................22, 28 Lingenfelder 2012 Fish Riesling Mosel, Germany $17.99..........................................................................................................22 Lingenfelder 2012 Hare Gewürztraminer Pfalz, Germany $17.99..............................................................................................22 Lingenfelder nv Satyr Brut Riesling Pfalz, Germany $48.99........................................................................................................22 Lingenfelder 2009 Scheurebe Kabinett Halbtrocken Pfalz, Germany $26.99.......................................................................22, 27 Lingenfelder 2011 Ganymed Spätburgunder Pfalz, Germany $48.99.........................................................................................22 Lingenfelder 2013 Ypsilon Sylvaner Spätlese Trocken Pfalz, Germany $35.99............................................................................22 Mauro Molino 2013 Barbera d’Alba, Italy $18.99.....................................................................................................................28 McManis 2013 Cabernet Sauvignon California, United States $21.99.......................................................................................30 Melipal 2014 Ikella Malbec Mendoza, Argentina $13.99............................................................................................................30 Menhir 2011 Quota 29 Primitivo Salento, Italy $16.99..............................................................................................................28 Pala 2013 i Fiori Vermentino Sardinia, Italy $24.99..................................................................................................................25 Pascual 2012 Peñalosa Verdejo Rueda, Spain $16.99.............................................................................................................25 Pirramimma 2012 Petit Verdot McLaren Vale, Australia $34.99.................................................................................................29 Oggi 2013 Doppio Passo Primitivo Salento, Italy $14.99........................................................................................................44 Rabl 2014 Spiegel Grüner Veltliner Kamptal, Austria $19.99..................................................................................................25 Remo Farina 2013 Amarone della Valpolicella Classico, Italy $48.99.....................................................................................29 Rolet Père et Fils 2008 Trousseau Arbois, France $31.99..................................................................................................42 Rolet Père et Fils 2007 Vin Jaune Jura, France $69.99 (620ml).................................................................................................42 Roses de Jeanne 2010 La Boloreé Blanc de Blancs Champagne, France $198.99......................................................................10 San Salvatore 2013 Falanghina Campania, Italy $24.99...........................................................................................................55 Santa Venere 2012 Gaglioppo Cirò Classico, Italy $19.99......................................................................................................56 Some Young Punks 2013 Naked on Roller Skates Shiraz/Mataro McLaren Vale, Australia $26.99...............................................38 Tedeschi 2011 Amarone della Valpolicella, Italy $58.99..............................................................................................................10 Tedeschi 2014 Soave, Italy $17.99............................................................................................................................................25 Tolaini 2009 Al Passo Tuscany, Italy $34.99................................................................................................................................55 Tres Palacios 2011 Family Vintage Merlot Maipo Valley, Chile $19.99......................................................................................70 Zinck 2013 Portrait Pinot Gris Alsace, France $22.99...........................................................................................................56 Zinck 2012 Terroir Muscat Alsace, France $26.99..................................................................................................................46 Zuccardi 2012 Serie A Torrontés Salta, Argentina $18.99........................................................................................................27

Due to the nature of the wine industry, any prices and vintages listed in this publication, as well as the availability of all products, are subject to change and cannot be guaranteed by Banville & Jones Wine Co.


top picks

TINA JONES

RICK WATKINS

RHONDA HANCOCK

De Bos 2014 47 Varietal Rosé Walker Bay, South Africa $21.99

Falernia 2012 Pinot Noir Reserva Valle De Elqui, Chile $24.99

El Grillo Y La Luna 2012 12 Lunas Red Blend Somontano, Spain $22.99

We may have moved to odd grape varieties, but I’m still on rosé! The DeBos 47 Varietal rosé is a blend of 47 different grape varieties. This Fair Trade wine is sourced from the De Bos family nursery, one of the best in South Africa. With fresh summer berries and a complex, rich palate, this is a great way to keep summer in mind all through the winter.

Pinot Noir: the heartbreak grape. It is so hard to find one under $50 that knocks your socks off. This one does. Pretty black cherry and raspberry on the nose, followed by a hint of forest after the rain. A touch of vanilla from oak barrels and a rush of gorgeous fruit on the palate. A perfect pairing with cedarplanked salmon on the BBQ.

A crazy blend of Cab Sauv, Tempranillo, Granache and Syrah. This Spanish red is big and beautiful. It’s full bodied with bold flavours and really nice balance. On top of all that, it has a beautiful label. It’s great all year long with BBQs, roasts, stews, and any comfort food—or all by itself!

ANNA EVERETT

ANDREA EBY

STEVE LAGIMODIERE

Daisy Day 2014 Cabernet Sauvignon Western Cape, South Africa $14.99

Cà Maiol nv Chiaretto Classico Garda, Italy $19.99

Tres Palacios 2001 Family Vintage Merlot Maipo Valley, Chile $19.99

A fitting top pick for our unusual grape varieties issue, this delicious Italian rosato is a blend of Groppello, Marzemino, Sangiovese, and Barbera, typical varieties in the vineyards surrounding beautiful Lake Garda. Loads of savoury red fruit and hints of almond and blossom make this dry and surprisingly full-bodied rosé a delight to drink. Super versatile, this wine is the ideal sipper to serve alongside your next holiday meal.

This merlot offers an immediate fresh blueberry nose with baked strawberry rhubarb to follow. In the mouth, it is fine tannins and ripe plum. Hints of chocolate sneak up and resonate like Chris Issak’s “Wicked Game” guitar tone. Merlot can often be overlooked, so this Chilean red is a great way to get reacquainted. A great pairing with burgers and friends or to share on a moonlit lake!

This great little red gives black fruits and plum with a little smoky edge on the nose. It is very easy drinking and doesn’t necessarily need food. On the palate, there are soft cherry and blackberry notes with a little peppery smokiness on the finish. The fun bottle may attract people to this wine at first, but it’s the juice on the inside that keeps you coming back for more.

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Monday - Saturday 9-9 Sunday 10-6 75 Forks Market Road, Winnipeg, MB, Canada To book an appointment, call 204.944.2444 or visit us at www.riverstonespa.ca

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