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POINTS

September 2009

EAST

The Boating Magazine for Coastal New England

Cruising for science Hard lessons learned while doing good

Motorboat makeover A new Muscobe emerges


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Points East September 2009

editor@pointseast.com


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Points East September 2009

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POINTS

EAST

The Boating Magazine for Coastal New England Volume 12 Number 6 September 2009 F E AT U R E S

26

Strider’s surf ’n turf science show

It’s been that kind of summer.

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They say land is a greater threat to sailors than the sea. We challenged both in the name of science and still somehow came up aces. By Roger Long

34

Critical cruising gear.

18

Sailing for science.

26

Penelope gets a new wheel.

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Muscobe makeover The author wanted a long-term home away from home, so he had his lobsterboat cruiser redesigned and rebuilt from the inside out. By Joel Gleason LAST WORD

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Penelope gets a 40th birthday gift What I really wanted was a 19th-century castiron wheel like what you’d find on a schooner or a Friendship sloop in the golden age of working sail. By W.R. Cheney

Points East September 2009

editor@pointseast.com


COLUMNS

14

David Roper

Watching the nest The cycle of life goes on at anchor, at home. Dodge Morgan

The downside to technology

POINTS

Volume 12, Number 6 Publisher Joseph Burke

Marvelous solutions create more problems. Guest columnist: Rodney Myrvaagnes

Clavichord aboard We cruise with one in our J/36 Gjoa D E PA R T M E N T S

Letters..........................................7 Banshee piece touches MS survivor; Please wear live preservers.

Mystery Harbor...........................12 It’s right in R.I.’s City by the Sea. New Mystery Harbor is on page 42.

News..........................................20 First boat of the year to Brier Island; New Sail Newport dinghy park. The Racing Pages ........................44 NYYC Swan 42 Nationals; Marion to Bermuda Race; GMORA results.

Media ........................................52 “Sandbox Camp Tales” by Saco’s Randy Randall. Fishing reports ...........................54 Offshore forecast is good in north; In south, mahi-mahi, marlin and wahoo.

EAST

The Boating Magazine for Coastal New England

Editor Nim Marsh Marketing director Bernard Wideman Ad representatives Lynn Emerson Whitney Gerry Thompson, David Stewart Ad design Holly St. Onge Art Director Custom Communications/John Gold

Yardwork ...................................60 A space-age sportfisher from Goetz; Maine Yacht Center gets a big Travelift. Compass adjuster........................61 Ah, dealing with the rich and famous.

Dispatches ..................................66 Weather + economy = slow summer

Yardwork ...................................88 John Williams launches Stanley 38; Brooklin Boat Yard sets 90-footer free. Fetching along ............................72 A foggy day at Otter Island delights.

Advertisers .................................86

Contributors Dodge Morgan, David Roper, Carol Standish, David Buckman, Randy Randall, Ken Packie Points East, a magazine by and for boaters on the coast of New England, is owned by Points East Publishing, Inc, with offices in Portsmouth, N.H. The magazine is published nine times annually. It is available free for the taking. More than 25,000 copies of each issue are distributed through more than 650 outlets from Greenwich, Conn., to Eastport, Maine. The magazine is available at marinas, yacht clubs, chandleries, boatyards, bookstores and maritime museums. If you have difficulty locating a distribution site, call the office for the name of the distributor closest to you. The magazine is also available by subscription, $26 for nine issues by first-class mail. Single issues and back issues (when available) cost $5, which includes first-class postage. All materials in the magazine are copyrighted and use of these materials is prohibited except with written permission. The magazine welcomes advice, critiques, letters to the editor, ideas for stories, and photos of boating activities in New England coastal waters. A stamped, self-addressed envelope should accompany any materials that are expected to be returned.

.COM

ONLINE

Maritime images Points East Parley member ChuckA has posted some of his favorite maritime images. Check them out at the Points East Parley.

On the cover: A Saturday evening on the Harraseeket River in Maine brings out the creative side of teaching kids to love boating. Photo by Ken Packie www.pointseast.com

Mailing Address P.O. Box 1077 Portsmouth, N.H. 03802-1077 Address 40 Pleasant St., Suite 210 Portsmouth, N.H. 03801 Telephone 603-766-EAST (3278) Toll free 888-778-5790 Fax 603-766-3280 Email editor@pointseast.com On the web at www.pointseast.com

Points East September 2009

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EDITOR’S PAGE/Nim Mar sh

How we prefer to communicate safety at sea e do not preach or pontificate here at Points East. We don’t address boating, safety and life by the numbers. We leave that to the purveyors of maritime “how-to” dogma in the mainstream boating press. Our M.O. is to share our experiences, admit our mistakes or judgment lapses, dust off our 20/20 hindsight, and learn harsh lessons from each other’s experiences. Why do we approach recreational boating this way? For four reasons: (1) We’re already being suffocated by rules. For a sport that is supposed to be synonymous with freedom, simplicity, personal honesty and relaxation, boating has more hidebound, knee-jerk traditions and false pride, and more state, federal and international regulations, than any other pastime that comes to mind; (2) we are all human, and to be so categorized means that we are flawed and are given to faulty judgment; (3) rules become dogma, dogma becomes habit, and habit makes all situations dangerously the same; and (4), as an old sea dog told me when he sensed my anxiety as we surfed through big seas off the Sesuit, Mass., breakwaters one midwinter day in the 1950s, with burlap bags filled with frozen coot and eider, “Nimmy boy, we don’t go to sea to be safe.” Well, times have clearly changed in the half-century since old Mal (who, incidentally, had a bit part in the 1937 out ’o Gloucester movie “Captain’s Courageous” and was a shipwright for the old Herreshoff Manufacturing Company) snarled these words past his ever-present pipe to the tad who that day was wondering why he had gone to sea with the cantankerous shellback. Back then, boating was the province of coastal dwellers and fortunate suburbanites with summer

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homes. The disciplines of the sea were passed on from generation to generation in an “on-the job-training” format, and youngsters grew up with a “one hand for the ship, one for myself” mentality. Today, for a number of reasons, boating safety is a major concern, and numerous clubs, periodicals and associations have done an exemplary job educating recreational mariners about vessel management and the ways of the sea. However, all the rules, regulations, checklists and international-distress-orange items known to man are not going to keep us out of trouble if we leave our common sense and situational awareness at home. While we don’t go to sea to be safe, there is no reason why we can’t head off toward the next headland safely, and we believe our anecdotal way of imparting safety at-sea lessons is honest and effective and has a place in the New Millennium boating world. With this in mind, we commend naval architect Roger Long for telling us the harrowing story of his cruise nearly the length of the Maine coast doing scientific research for the University of New Hampshire (see Strider’s Surf ’n Turf Science Show” on page 26). When someone of Roger’s stature and experience lays himself bare before a significant readership, he renders himself vulnerable to criticism. But when such a seaman puts false pride aside and tell his story with constructive openness and honesty, the common reaction is to respond in kind, to admit that we, too, have made such errors in judgment (and worse), that we, too, have to be more thoughtful, more seamanlike, on and off our boats. In this era of nonstop opinion, dogma and communication, isn’t our way of learning just a little closer to that of a half-century ago?

Make Points East your magazine (and maybe you’ll win a cool hat!) We’re conducting a survey on our website, www.pointseast.com. We’d like to know what you, our readers, would like to see more of, what you’d like to see less of, how we can do things better. And if you leave us your name and contact information, we’ll enter you in our monthly drawing for a highly coveted Points East cap (check out website to see just how cool this accessory is). We’ll draw a winner each month from everyone who enters, so you could end up with nine chances of winning (but not nine hats, since you can only win once, OK?).

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Points East September 2009

Our September winner is Van Allen Rice of New York. He’ll be getting a Points East cap that not only makes an incredible fashion statement, but tells your fellow cruisers you have excellent taste in reading material.

editor@pointseast.com


Letters I walk in the shoes of Joey Potter As an enthusiastic reader of many years, I was recently struck by the article written by Dr. Ben Potter (“Boundless Banshee,” July 2009) – not just because of the longtime sailing of the boat on the Great Lakes or in Maine, but specifically because of Dr. Potter’s mention of his first wife on page 37 of the story. You chose to highlight the following passage in large type on page 39, and it struck my heart deeply: “My first wife, Joey Potter, who had long-term multiple sclerosis, also got a big bang out of short sails while lying on cushions on the cockpit floor. This required the boys to roll her wheelchair down the ramp to the float and manually lift her over the safety and down to the cockpit,” and further into the story, “It was exciting to see her big smiles as the boat heeled and she shouted for more wind . . . .” My mind was busy with many thoughts upon reading these words. Joey’s MS was long-term, so, sadly, the disease may have taken its toll and taken her life. Patients are told upon diagnosis that this is not supposed to happen, but it takes young people more than we hear or know. I personally have been faced with that fact losing young friends myself. Then my more positive thoughts: Joey absolutely loved and was thrilled by the experience of sailing. Not only can I walk in the shoes of Joey Potter, having been diagnosed myself with MS 17 years ago, but I can understand her emotions totally and completely. I tried a day of disabled sailing in the late ’90s, but found it too difficult and exhausting, tacking all along Boston Harbor. I was very fortunate, however, when, with new medication I got a second chance at sailing in 2004, and I have never stopped since. I put the wheelchair and motorized scooter in storage (but, of course, keep them forever in case of a relapse), and took all the energy I could muster with

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medication, put on the sailing gloves, and have come quite far, with the grace of God. I took as many classes as I could, and love the fact that sailing is a lot about “sitting,” thus it’s the best sport I’ve ever been accustomed to since my disease took hold. Sailing allows you to enjoy beautiful days and the wind – as much as it is a challenge to balance – and I cannot think of a better way to get nature’s air-conditioning, which helps with the disease’s torment of heat fatigue. I love sailing so much, and have found such enjoyment with it, that I have many times wanted to share the “big bang” of it with my dear MS friends, who mostly would have to get to the boat in the same manner as Joey’s sons so carefully did with her. I have regretted that I have found yacht clubs with no handicap facilities, as they were built long ago when Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) laws did not exist, or have special rules because of the private nature of them. I have had to become a complete advocate for myself, and I truly hate, for no better word, when my friends with limitations are excluded by physical barriers to great things like feeling the beautiful breeze that only comes with being near or on the water. I will close by saying, that photos of me with my biggest, and never rehearsed, smiles are from the cockpit and helm of a sailboat. I pray that never has to change, and I pray more that Joey Potter is sailing still with her big smile, even if in heaven. Robin M. Winthrop, Mass.

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I’ve got my own mystery harbors Every time I pick up (and read almost the entire issue) a copy of Points East at our marina Hawthorne Cove in Salem, Mass., I look at the Mystery Harbor and think, “I have three mystery water colors at home: Wouldn’t it be great to have the readers of Points East identify them.” I know that this is a bit of a stretch, but I have attached them. They are original water colors, are unsigned, and were done in about 1923. I know that “Sutton Island” is a small, private is-

last year about the Nonsuch Rendezvous, I had not paid much addition to Points East, but now I look for it. Barbara J Melanson Worcester, Mass. Thanks Barbara. We, too, think our art director and website designer John Gold is unparalleled.

land south of Mount Desert and north of Cranberry. I have not been able to locate “Framingham Center” (Nov. 7, 1923). And does the third one, “Down on the Cape” – I do not know which Cape – resemble capes in Maine or is it too generic to identify? So I’d love to know the direction of view for Sutton Island, and I would love to know where Framingham Center is. Maddy Webster s/y Arion Salem, Mass. maddywebster@hotmail.com

An error bursting with correction Loved Dodge Morgan’s August column (“Perhaps We All Should Keep Our Pasts a Secret”). But in the shaded “What’s Your Story?” box below it on page 14, you seem to be playing with the grammarians (such as this writer) in your readership. So do you know which its/it’s is correct? I’m sure you do! Love your mag. Picked it up on the Orient ferry. Tom Brischler s/v Fool’s Paradise Miller Place, N.Y.

Sorting out the Heisler boatyards

A Mystery Harbor submission Here is a photo of a harbor in Maine taken during the month of June 2009. My wife Denise thinks we were in Camden; I would have sworn we were in Stonington. It was hard to tell. Thom Perkins s/v Stella Jackson, N.H. 8

Points East September 2009

In the note from Andrew Grainger (“The Heislers of Chester, N.S.,” Letters, July 2009) and response from David Buckman, Mr. Grainger is correct: the boatyard Clarence R. Heisler & Son Limited is on Gifford Island in Mahone Bay. The usual mainland jumpingoff point is the community wharf in Indian Point. Last year Cecil Heisler sold the yard to Mike Kelly of Mahone Bay, and Cecil continues to work there. Our family’s 26-foot sloop Mist – built by the late David Stevens of Second Peninsula, Lunenburg County in 1947 – winters there and is maintained by that yard. The yard that Mr. Buckman refers to is the Heisler Boatyard at the foot of Tremont Street on the Back editor@pointseast.com


www.pointseast.com

Points East September 2009

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Harbour in the Village of Chester. In 1994, it was operated by the late Ben Heisler, son of its founder, the late Reuben Heisler. The yard is now operated by Ben’s son, Wayne “Butch” Heisler. Reuben was the designer of the famous Chester “C” class sloops (37 feet, four inches LOA), which were built in that yard by him and Ben, and thereafter by Ben and Butch. I believe that the Heisler family originally settled on Big Tancook Island in Mahone Bay, and that descendants, including Clarence and Reuben, who were cousins, spread out from there. Sen. Wilfred P. Moore, Chester, N.S.

Maine, program needs a boat The Center for Ecological Living and Learning (CELL, www.cellonline.org) is interested in receiving a donated sailboat for our educational programs (we are a 501c(3) public charitable organization located in Hope, Maine). We provide education programs for college students and leaders interested in learning how we can live sustainably while supporting sensible and creative ways to develop our economy and protect our environment. We are developing an alternative OutwardBound-type program as part of our semester program orientation in which students will spend time on the ocean off the coast of Maine learning about the ecological issues facing our oceans (and other habitats) and developing community and team-building skills. Our curriculum focuses on proactive solutions to local and global problems. We build bridges of understanding and cooperation between social, economic, political, and sustainability issues. CELL promotes imagination and ingenuity, and we cultivate in our students and leaders an understanding that “anything is possible” – qualities of thinking and proactive action rooted in our country’s rich maritime history. We are looking for a sailboat in decent shape in the 32- to 40-foot range that we can partially power off wind and solar technology and use for our education-

al programs. A donated sailboat to our nonprofit would, of course, provide a tax advantage for the owner donating the boat. Dave Oakes, Ed.D., Director Center for Ecological Living and Learning (CELL) Hope, Maine email: davoakes@midcoast.com

Accolades for the family issue I want you to know that your July issue is absolutely wonderful! Great articles, the reader’s letters about Mystery Harbor were fun to read, and Nim Marsh’s editorial (“The Mother and Father of All Family Cruises”) is a treasure. The quality of your editorial never ceases to impress my wife and me. It’s better than some nationally distributed publications. Keep up the great work. Paul R. White s/v Barn Door

Dodge’s blather keeps her reading Enclosed is a check for the revised ad for my 26-foot Kaiser sailboat. Even if I sell her, I will still be reading Points East as I also have an 18-foot catboat and may enjoy sending in a comment or two about old Dodge’s blather. Thanks for all you do. All (most?) of us read Points East cover to cover. Dorie Meltreder Brooksville, Maine

Please wear your life preservers Fourth of July, and at long last we’ve finally got a sunny dry day. Good grief, we were beginning to think the rain would never stop. We feel so sorry for the various vacation-based businesses that have all taken it on the chin due to the rotten weather so far. But that’s not really why I’m writing. This morning I was out riding the bike early and swung by the local town wharf. I watched a couple of guys struggling to load their gear into a typical eight- or nine-foot dinghy. The two men tumbled aboard, and one start-

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What’s your story? Points East is written by its readers, for its readers. Got a tale? Tell it! editor@pointseast.com editor@pointseast.com


ed the tiny outboard and pointed the little boat out across the harbor. There was a strong offshore breeze and a pretty decent chop on the water, and neither of these guys wore a life jacket. As you know by now, I’m fierce about wearing a life jacket when you’re on the water. I was even more dismayed when I returned to our own marina and watched another couple in an inflatable head off to their mooring, neither one wearing a lifejacket. I don’t know, it’s as if people think dinghies won’t capsize, or they figure because it’s just a short trip from the dock to the mooring that life jackets aren’t necessary. Whatever the reason, I suspect there are many boaters along the Maine coast on this holiday, putzing around in tiny dinghies, and none of them wearing a life jacket. Once in a while I do see folks rowing ashore, and they’re wearing life jackets. Even their dog has its life vest on. Good for them. But they’re the exception. I

once asked a customer who was climbing into his dinghy where his life jackets were, and he told me they were out on the boat on the mooring. Go figure. I want to remind people that dinghies are boats too and that the danger of falling overboard or capsizing is always there. The prudent sailor will wear a life jacket whenever he’s on the water and so will his guests. Randy Randall Marston’s Marina Saco, Maine

Neat North Cove mooring program For the past 12 years, I’ve been sailing Lady J, an 1984 Ericson 28 out of Noank, Conn., on the Mystic River. But over last winter, the Army Corps of Engineers has finally dredged in North Cove at the mouth of the Connecticut River in the town of Old Saybrook, and I have moved there. Before the dredg-

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ing, the cove had not been viable for drafts over four feet. I also joined the North Cove Yacht Club (http://www.northcoveyc.com). I, as a mooring holder, am required to affix a yellow ribbon to my mooring and a tag with my return date whenever I’ve away for more than a night or two. Visiting boaters should look for a yellow ribbon. Also, each mooring is marked with its weight, so you can pick one appropriate to your size boat and conditions. Mooring is free (for, I forget, 48 or 72 hours). You can pull up to the courtesy dock for up to 20 minutes, and there is a dinghy landing. One warning, however:

MYSTERY

After sunset, before dinghying in, put on some insect repellent. The bugs are vicious right at the landing. Visitors can also use the NCYC facilities for a daily fee, which includes limited launch hours and showers. The cove is within easy walking distance of shops (including a hardware store). A little more walking distance takes you to a Walmart and a full supermarket. There is also an Amtrak station within walking distance if you are picking up or dropping off crew. Jim Reddington s/v Lady J Old Saybrook, Conn.

HARBOR/an d

th e win ner is...

Mystery Harbor is in R.I.’s City by the Sea You have probably gotten many correct responses as this is a busy harbor. This is Brenton Cove in Newport, R.I. I work for a marina in town and recognize a few of the boats as my storage customers. Andy Newport, R.I.

Spent weekends in our catboat there The Mystery Harbor in the August issue is in the southwest part of Newport Harbor known as Brenton Cove, just east of Sail Newport, the public sailing facility at Fort Adams. With my parents we spent many weekends at Brenton Cove in the late 1940s on our family catboat and later on an Alden Malabar Jr. yawl. We now still spend weekends in Brenton Cove. Nelson Hawkins, Sr. Barrington R.I.

That’s Bonniecrest and Beacon Rock I believe the part of Newport Harbor called Brenton Cove is pictured on page 74 in your August 2009 issue. A portion of the Bonniecrest mansion is visible, plus a little bit of Beacon Rock in the lower righthand corner. This cove is a safe anchorage in stormy weather. If I should win, I shall give the Points East cap to one of my four sailing grandsons. Lorrie MacGowan Newport, R.I.

No-name cove is in Newport Harbor The photo is of Newport Harbor between Harbour Court and Sail Newport. I do not know the exact name of the cove, however. Michael Hall Via email 12 Points East September 2009

Went to Brenton to get out of the wind The Mystery Harbor in August is Brenton Cove in Newport, R.I. In my younger days, a friend had a Dragon Class sloop in Newport, and we sailed all around the bay, but mostly in Newport Harbor. Those boats were all overhang with about 12 inches of freeboard, so it was a classic beauty sliding around Newport Harbor. We would slip up into Brenton Cove to get under the cliffs and out of the breeze once in a while. Always fun! Jim Munro Padanaram, Mass.

I recognized the Herreshoff Murmur The photo is Newport Harbor. Specifically, the camera person is looking southeast with Beacon Rock in the foreground, looking at Bonniecrest. I recognize the small Herreshoff, Murmur, and the red sailboat, Jest. Newport is one of my favorite hangouts by boat. I also run the New York Yacht Club launch, Navette, one day a week. Denis Auclair Somerset, Mass. editor@pointseast.com


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Perspectives Watching the nest The wing of sail divides wind and then wind joins it together again. Nothing is used, so nothing is wasted. The Tao of Sailing old those words and bear with me. Think about cycles – life cycles. I know I was, as I sat under Elsa’s furled mainsail and looked up at the osprey nest above us, crafted into the pines and cedars of magical Quahog Bay. We were all alone, my daughter and me, anchored under this great nest of small branches and twigs. It had been a good trip east from Marblehead over the past few days, and now the weather had deteriorated. But Alli and I were happy here, in one of our favorite spots. There were no other cruising boats and no distractions. It was just us and the osprey nest. And so began a kind of vigil, or I guess a co-vigil, involving both us and the osprey parents. Day and night, we listened to their peep, peep, peep, and watched the mother or father leave the nest to scan for predators and search the abundant waters around us for prey to feed their young one. “They never both leave the nest at once, Dad. Did you notice that? One always stays back and stands guard, always looking around.” “That’s their role, sweetie. That’s why they exist: to get that chick of theirs big enough to someday fly away and then have a chick of its own.” She thought for awhile. “Why?” “Why what?” “Why go through all that just so you can then be a grown-up and then sit there your whole life yourself and watch for predators all over again? Seems like a pain. What’s the point.” Hmmm. It all got me to thinking about our family and the last couple of weeks. Our son Nick had had a tough surgery and, though he’s 24, my wife watched over him like a hawk (or osprey) over a chick. Her constant vigilance was remarkable. Or maybe not. She would make sure he survived, even if that meant almost 24/7 vigilance, because that was her role. Mother osprey in action.

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Though it was more than a week after he had come home after surgery, I still felt guilty leaving on the boat and so delayed our departure another day. My wife insisted we go. After all, my business was closed for vacation, Alli had taken time off from work, and the weather was right. So we cast off. Life’s biggest nightmare is the loss of a child. To me, the nightmare of that nightmare would be having it happen at sea, under my command, so to speak. So I equipped Alli with a whistle around her neck, a brand new submersible handheld clipped to her belt and set on Channel 16, and a harness. I wasn’t taking any chances. Still, I suspect the longest time in three days she was alone on deck out of my sight was three minutes. Father osprey in action. Life moved on. Nick recovered and went back to work. And Alli had to return to work, so she said good-bye to the osprey family. We motored Elsa into the always welcoming Great Island Boat Yard at the head of the bay for crew change. Alli’s friend Brad drove up for her, and my wife, Mary Kay, arrived by car that evening. Out we went again to the spot under the osprey nest, and Mary Kay took over Alli’s observation of the ospreys. The weather stayed nasty, so we stayed put. Mary Kay, like Alli before her, was content to just be there, anchored under the cedars and pines, and watch the ospreys. Sadly, when the weather finally did clear, it was time for her to go back by car while I awaited still more new crew in a couple of days. Though the boat would seem empty at first, I knew I would have company in the trees above me, and I looked forward to some solo time for thinking and writing. “I know you love to also be alone, but why don’t you drive home with me for a couple of days, see how Nick is feeling, and then come back with your crew?” Mary Kay asked. It was not a pressurized question, just a thoughtful suggestion. I was torn. And then the cell phone rang. It was Alli. She was scared. “Dad, I’m broken down in a tow zone in Boston. The brakes went out on the car. I called AAA, but they need to talk to you.”

David Roper

14 Points East September 2009

editor@pointseast.com


Then the cell phone range again. It was Nick. “Hey, Dad, are you coming home with Mom?” “Ah, no, pal. Staying out another week.” Long pause. “Oh.” “That OK?” I asked. “Yeah, sure. I guess. I do have two tickets to tomorrow night’s Red Sox game and the Jim Rice Hall of Fame ceremony, so I thought.…” There was no longer any hesitation in my mind after those two phone calls. “We’ll be home tomorrow morning,” I said. I felt at peace with the decision to leave. I poured glasses of wine for my wife and myself, and settled into my favorite corner of the cockpit. It was then that the sound came. It was the primal sound I’ve heard only twice before in my life, both times from people experiencing the horrific. But this was not from humans. It was from two ospreys. Somehow, vigilance had been relaxed for just one moment, and the eagle had struck. I looked above to see the pieces of nest and the chick in the big bird’s talons, as the frantic osprey parents screamed and then circled the now-empty nest for the next 15 minutes.

The cycle of life will go on here. There will be more baby ospreys, more osprey parents, more eagles, and more fish spawning around us to feed the cycle. It was time to go. I raise Elsa’s well worn mainsail in the gently lifting southwest breeze, and watch silently as the wing of sail divides wind and then

joins it together again. Dave Roper sails Elsa, a Bruce King-designed Independence 31, out of Marblehead, Mass. “She had her 30th birthday this year,” reports Dave, “and is still, despite her age, quite lovely and never lets me down.”

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The downsides of technology ave you noticed how mankind keeps inventing marvelous solutions to problems some of us have, sometimes only to create new problems worse than those we sought to solve? A D10 Cat can clear-cut a forest in one day that it would take a tribe of ax-toting Indians a lifetime to drop. A GPS-fed chart recorder can entertain the sailor totally away from seeing the wave action he is in. A 600-foot oil tanker can fuel a power plant for months and leak devastation to hundreds of miles of shoreline. A carbon-fiber spar can reduce weight aloft, which creates a motion in wave chop that will jerk the jam off a cracker. A fund based on financial derivatives can tactically enrich investors and help create the bubble that brings down the world economy. Electric winches can trim sheets like magic and with an ease that rips the clew right out of a headsail. A computer chip that can store all the information in the Library of Congress can remember nothing anyone actually wants to know. An outfit of sailing gloves, $400 sneakers, shorts with leather fanny grips, and sunglasses can create a highly photogenic image to enhance the wearer’s ego and insulate him from any real feel of his environment. A cell phone and Wi-Fi can put us in instant contact with the world and then, when missing, can turn a person into a paranoid. A boat constructed of epoxy greatly reduces maintenance time required and lasts almost forever as junk somewhere. A nuclear weapon that ends a horrible war can place the world on the lip of extinction. An onboard sound system can deliver sweet jazz at anchor and obliterate the call of a loon. This dark side of progress shadows us everywhere, and the less we understand it, the more obvious it becomes. Ignorance is my special skill, so naturally I have a solution. And here it is:

H

Imbue yourself with the attitude and the mindset of a luddite and seek the friendship of a classical, wood-built sailboat. I mean a boat like my old Eagle, now 82 and my friend for 41 years. She is an easily managed 30 feet long on deck and five feet deep. Instead of turnbuckles to tense the rigging, she has deadeyes and lanyards and rigging that is right when the lee shrouds flop. Her four-sided sails capture a sail area that is low and forgiving to heavy winds, and the gaffs help when lowering sails. She may be a mini-double-hernia rig, but her running rigging is block-andtackle powered. She uses a half-hour to get sails up and under way, resulting in a satisfaction that such an event has become earned. Her only electrical gear is a depth-sounder, a bilge pump, two light bulbs, and an engine starter. Her engine is relatively young at 20 years, a three-cylinder diesel banger, her one curtsy to technological advance. She keeps food cold in an insulated box and cooks it on alcohol flame. She leaks enough to keep her bilges sweet, but not so much as to require sleeping with a hand flopped onto the cabin soul. She has eight halyards and six sheets, delivering enough trimming options to consume all one’s time while sailing, yet assuring she will never be totally trimmed right, a perfectionist’s nightmare but a devil-may-care slob’s delight. When a sail is over and the kedge is set, the stops are bowed up, and her sailors have popped a beer, she becomes the cove show-off gal, a role she well earns. All of life should be as simple and as demanding as an old schooner. And all of us should be dumb enough to know it. Dodge Morgan and Eagle hang out at Snow Island, Maine, a couple of miles northwest of Cundy’s Harbor as the eagle flies.

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16 Points East September 2009

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Points East September 2009

17


GUEST PERSPECTIVE/Rodney Myr va agnes

Clavichord aboard y wife Barbara and I have been cruising the New England coast for about thirty years now, and whenever we have been alone on a bareboat charter or in our own boat, we have never had canned music on board. This was not an original idea. In 1976, we took a windjammer cruise, on Shenandoah, a square-topsail schooner that sailed out of Vineyard Haven, Mass. The skipper/owner was Capt. James Douglas then. Capt. Douglas had rules: No radios, no amplifiers. Acoustic instruments welcome: recorders, banjos, guitars, fiddles, etc. Another rule we appreciated was: “Smoking only at the lee rail.â€? Barbara brought a little clavichord that was easy to carry. The Shenandoah crew’s instruments included one fiddle, one clarinet, one guitar, and a concertina. In the saloon was a Victorian reed organ, like many surviving today in Maine country churches. Since 1989, we have cruised on our own boat Gjøa, a J/36. The little clavichord came with us on some of these trips, but on two-week cruises, there wasn’t

M

Photo by Rodney Myrvaagnes

Barbara plays the current version of the boat virginal, which we call "Spinetto Bar," while at anchor in Bunker Cove in the Roque Island archipelago. The early American sperm whales are Barbara’s. The lid motto is from Moby Dick, from the moment when Capt. Ahab really loses it: "Curse thee, thou quadrant. Nevermore will I guide my earthly ways by thee."

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much time to use it. We had to get from New York City to Maine, sail the coast for a few days, and return to New York to get back to the jobs that paid for the boat. In 2001 I retired, and Barbara followed suit in 2005. As long as our health allowed, we wanted to spend the whole summer aboard. When we are at home, Barbara plays one or another harpsichord nearly every day. That meant that a live-aboard instrument was needed. With the addition of a Murphy bed in the living room, the bedroom of our small New York apartment became a woodworking area as well as an office, with a computer desk and bookshelves. I did make a simple virginal by our first full summer, and it did work. Two more notes were needed, so home it came for a rebuild. The space for the keyboard in the old box wasn’t big enough, so it now has a new box and a drastically altered keyboard. Ruggedness and portability were more important than elegance, and the virginal had to be stowed on a forward pipe berth. That’s right, with no V-berth, the J/36 is a little weird inside. When we are at anchor, moored, or at a slip, we place the virginal out on the dining table and remove the mainsail bags that cover it. Barbara plays it as you see, sitting on cushions piled up on the settee. Carrying a wooden, stringed instrument on a boat is not troublefree. We do carry tools and brass wire for string replacement. It is humidity sensitive. We are trying to collect enough gull feathers to replace the plectra with quill, in place of the Delrin ones now in use. At home Barbara plays my Opus1 from 1972. I would not take this one on the boat, even if the boat had room for it. We call the www.pointseast.com

current version of the boat virginal “Spinetto Bar.” The earlyAmerican sperm whales are Barbara’s. The lid motto is from Moby Dick, the moment when Capt. Ahab really loses it: “Curse thee, thou quadrant. Nevermore will I guide my earthly ways by thee.” Rodney and Barbara taught themselves to sail on 505s in Marblehead in the 1960s. Learning

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was quick as the water was cold for capsizing (although the race committee would have been happy if the sail number had been painted on the centerboard). When they got too old to be in demand as racing crew, they bought a J/36. Now retired (Barbara from engineering and Rodney from musical-instrument building and editing), they spend June through September cruising the Maine coast.

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Points East September 2009

19


News The first boat to arrive at Brier Island in 2009 By Caroline Norwood For Points East We were wondering in Westport, Nova Scotia, if a yacht would ever visit our beautiful island this summer. The weather has been moist, to put it mildly. And foggy. And windy. But happily, on July 7, a sloop appeared in the Bay of Fundy, heading toward Brier Island. The yacht motored down the passage from Northern Point, but alas, these sailors went to a mooring and there they stayed. Officially, this mystery boat, flying an American flag, was the first yacht to stop at Brier Island. Happily, the next day, the 35-foot Cape George cutter Galatea arrived on the flood tide from Yarmouth, N.S., and tied up at the floating dock here. On board were Christopher and Molly Barnes with their sons, Porter, 6, and Jack, 5. Christopher said they started their cruise in Sedgwick, Maine, on June 8. “We worked our way east as far as Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia. We plan to go to Saint John, New Brunswick, and sail up the St. John River,” he added.

20 Points East September 2009

Photo by Caroline Norwood

On July 8, the 35-foot Cape George cutter Galatea arrived at Westport, N.S., on the flood tide and tied up at the floating dock. She was the first cruising boat to arrive at Brier Island this year.

He said the family wanted to explore the village of Westport on Brier Island but, most importantly, Molly needed to run for at least four hours. The family lives in Leadville, Colo., and Molly was planning to run in the Leadville 100 (mile) race in August. While Molly was running, Christopher, Porter and Jack found the General Store and the Lighthouse Café, where the boys enjoyed ice cream. Christopher said this is their fifth summer of cruis-

editor@pointseast.com


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ing. He said their children like cruising. Porter said he likes to sit on the boom and watch for whales. Jack said he has fun searching for crabs when they stop at islands along the way. Christopher said Porter had a special adventure while they were in Yarmouth. He went up the mast in the bosun’s chair to help his father replace a light bulb. Porter has also learned to steer by a compass on this trip. Christopher and Molly founded High Mountain Institute in Leadville in 1995. Their school offers a wilderness education with traditional academics. Christopher said they planned to be back in Sedgwick by the end of July. Caroline Norwood has been secretary of the Westport Harbour Authority since it was formed, and a member of the Harbour Authority Advisory Council for four years. She was a commercial fisherman for seven years, working on an inshore longline boat, and has worked on a whale-watch boat every summer as a crew/naturalist. She has been a photo-journalist for 30 years. www.pointseast.com

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Points East September 2009

21


Briefly Fairfield, Conn., man presumed lost The search for Raymond Callan, 57, of Fairfield, Conn., whose vessel was found two miles south of Charles Island near Milford, Conn., on July 18, was suspended pending further developments on July 20. Callan was reported missing after his boat was found under power without anyone onboard and doing circles by the crew of the vessel Carpe Diem, who contacted the Coast Guard. First-response agencies conducted 22 searches spanning a total of 2,400 square miles, roughly the size of the state of Delaware. Ten-mile-per-hour winds and two-foot seas were reported at the time of the incident. FMI: www.coastguardnews.com.

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22 Points East September 2009

Sail Newport’s Fort Adams Sailing Center has more space for more sailing with the addition of the expanded dinghy park in late July. Funding for the facility expansion was raised last year as Sail Newport celebrated its 25th anniversary as a community sailing center. In honor of the donor, the area will be called the Edgar T. Cato Foundation Ramp and Dinghy Park. Edgar Cato has competed in Newport and throughout the world for many years onboard several yachts named Hissar. FMI: Call 401-846-1983.

CG air VMS tested with commercials The Coast Guard conducted a two-week test and evaluation of a new aircraft-mounted search radar July 21-30, 2009, using commercial fisherman with the Vessel Monitoring System. Commercial fishing boats equipped with VMS in the radar testing areas were expected to experience VMS polling signals as often as every 10 minutes, for testing purposes only. Aircraft participating in the testing and evaluation are the HC130 Hercules and HC-144 Ocean Sentry, which support search and rescue, law enforcement, maritime domain awareness, living marine resources, International Ice Patrol, and marine environmental protection. The test will collect VMS positions and compare them to airborne radar observations. FMI: www.noaa.gov.

A new lobster-dinner wine is unveiled Big Claw, a new wine specifically designed to pair with lobster, was introduced at DiMillo’s Floating Restaurant in Portland, Maine, July 13 by the Lobster Institute at the University of Maine and Mariner Beverages of Portland. A portion of the proceeds from sales of Big Claw will be donated to the Lobster Institute to further their research and outreach with the lobster industry. Big Claw is a blend of chardonnay, sauvignon blanc, colombard, and chenin blanc. FMI: Call Tim Wisseman at 207-699-2939.

A clubhouse for new Nantucket club Great Harbor Yacht Club, the first yacht club built on Nantucket in 100 years, opened the doors to its waterfront clubhouse today in July. Located on Nantucket Harbor, the completion of the clubhouse marks the final development phase for GHYC. FMI: www.ghyc.com.

editor@pointseast.com


CALENDAR/Points Ea st planner SEPTEMBER 4-6 30th Annual Classic Yacht Regatta, hosted by the Museum of Yachting, Newport, R.I. FMI: www.moy.org Safe Boating Class The Portsmouth (N.H.) Power Squadron will run its Safe Boating Class at the Portsmouth High School, starting at 7 pm. To register call 207-748-3122.

8

17-20

The 39th Annual Newport International Boat Show, Newport Yachting Center, Newport, R.I. Both sail and power. Friday, Saturday: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sunday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. FMI: www.newportboatshow.com

OCTOBER 8-12 40th Annual United States Sailboat Show 1 Dock St., Annapolis, Md. FMI: www.usboat.com

Newport Boat Show participants fill the docks at last year’s show. This year’s event is scheduled for Sept. 17-20.

22

Sea Scout Ship 110 Sunset Dinner Cruise, windjammer Mystic Whaler, Captain’s Cove Seaport, 1 Bostwick Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. Boarding at 4:30 p.m.; departure 5 p.m. FMI: www.ship110-ct.org, ship110@sbcglobal.net

28

Maine Coastal Waters Conference 2009, Point Lookout Resort & Conference Center, Northport, Maine. Talks about issues of concern to those who manage, study and love the Maine coast. FMI: www.coastalwaters2009.com

NOVEMBER 1 10th Annual NARC Rally Departs Newport, R.I. on Nov. 1 or best weather window thereafter, bound for Bermuda and Caribbean. FMI: Call 1800-4-PASSAG, www.sailopo.com.

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Points East September 2009

23


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PORT CLYDE, ME editor@pointseast.com


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Points East September 2009

25


Features

Strider’s surf ’n turf Science Show Above: After running 12 miles out to run a line of stations along the 50-fathom curve, we slid into the Mudhole at Great Wass Island, and piled into the dinghy for a walk ashore on the trails. Left: But at Duck Harbor a couple of days later, our penchant for landbound R&R nearly resulted in disaster.

Photos courtesy Roger Long

They say land is a greater threat to sailors than the sea. We challenged both in the name of science and somehow still came up aces. By Roger Long For Points East y cell phone rang in the midst of the final flurry of preparations for Strider’s oceanographic cruise to monitor CO2 emissions in Northeast waters (see my June 2009 Perspective), which could affect global warming. A dispatcher from Fundy Traffic, the radio and radar system that controls vessel movements in the Canadian portion of our planned study area, said that we would be denied entry into Canadian waters. I was not naive enough to believe that I could just show up at the border in a 32-foot recreational sailboat loaded with water-sample bottles, strange-look-

M

26 Points East September 2009

ing instruments lashed in the cockpit, racks of chemicals on a small lab bench over the quarter-berth, and not expect some problems. I had a three-page letter from the proper U.S. agency, declaring that my volunteer, unpaid water sampling was not in violation of my recreational documentation, and I had filed a float plan with Fundy Traffic, and mentioned the oceanographic work since our route would involve frequent stops. But I was pretty sure I would not be getting into Canada without a piece of paper with a Canadian letterhead and signature. I spent six weeks trying to get that piece of paper, which, I later found out, is only obtained by asking the U.S. State Department to request it from their Canadian counterparts, who editor@pointseast.com


then send the authorization to the gatekeeper agency. Long story short, we would not be performing our tests in Canadian waters. I was not particularly upset. We had made the commitment to go where the need was greatest, but the change in plans was a good excuse to give my son Mike a tour of the coast of Maine. And the investigators at the University of New Hampshire Coastal Carbon Unit, who supported our venture, assured me that detailed work on this side of the border would be equally valuable. We were suddenly back in cruising mode, making it up as we went along. The new plan then was to get all the way Downeast as quickly as possible by the scenic route and begin our science work on the return. We carried 30 sample bottles and a small CTD, an instrument that measures conductivity (saltiness), temperature, and depth in the top of the water column

I was not naive enough to believe that I could just show up at the border in a 32-foot recreational sailboat loaded with watersample bottles, strangelooking instruments lashed in the cockpit, racks of chemicals on a small lab bench over the quarterberth, and not expect some problems.

wherever we sample. The surface water will be put into a bottle with a few drops of preservative and we’ll be off to the next sampling station. We departed Portland at 2030 on May 21, under clear but calm skies. I sent Mike and my old buddy Eric to their bunks soon after sunset and told them I would call when I got tired. After a winter of nearly full-time work on the boat, it felt so good to be out on the water again that I just never got tired. There was no moon, the sky was perfectly clear, the stars were startling in their clarity, and there was plenty of work for the crew ahead. I just kept motoring along, finally bringing her to anchor off Spectacle Island in Ebenecook Harbor at 0248 the

next morning. We were under way at 0800, following a plan to power whenever the speed dropped below four knots. It was about half and half through Monhegan Harbor,

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Photo courtesy Roger Long

We anchored in Roque Island’s Bunker Cove and walked the beach in perfect, crisp May weather. Our cruising guide claimed this to be the most beautiful anchorage on the Atlantic coast. It may be right.

around the cliffs, and up Penobscot Bay to Pulpit Harbor. The sail portions included a warp-speed broad reach from Monhegan to Metinic and a grand last leg up to Pulpit Harbor, where we shared the sunset over the Camden Hills with just one other boat. We sailed the next day to Merchant’s Row, and then were under power for the cliff tour of Mount Desert, followed by a fast sail to Schoodic. The wind dropped abruptly as we rounded into the point, and we went outside Petit Manan in view of the large swells. After passing through Pigeon Hill Bay, we had a lovely sail in the dying, gray light to Cape Split, where we spent the night. The next day, it was clear and sunny and almost perfectly calm in the Grand Manan Channel as we ran under power up the Bold Coast, for me, the last unseen portion of Maine’s outer coastline. Only Lubec and Cobscook Bay remain for me to “discover.” We powered right up to the border against the impressive current, and then it was time to go to work, running a zigzag pattern of sample stations down the channel with the current sweeping us along. Our

stops and starts and strange route interested a USCG vessl, and we had a pleasant “zero-defect” examination, the boarding officer saying he was impressed with the boat. The crew seemed remarkably uncurious about the CTD instrument and all the bottles, chemicals, and cases we carried. The long day ended with Strider anchored in Bucks Harbor. Following a leisurely 0930 start the next morning, we spent the day as a power research vessel, running 12 miles out to run a line of stations along the 50-fathom curve before heading in to Great Wass Island. We slid into the Mud Hole near low tide and piled into the dinghy for a walk ashore on the Nature Conservancy trails. This is the part of cruising that Mike likes best. We were pretty certain that the trail must loop around to come back to the portion we had seen when we went ashore but we became less sure as we went farther along. I was kicking myself for not bringing the back up GPS. By the time we finally decided to turn around, it was getting cool. Back aboard Strider, a fine dinner of fat mussels from the spring low tide line set us up for an excellent night’s sleep.

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28 Points East September 2009

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The following day was The weather radio broadfor enjoying Roque Island cast the next morning was in crisp and perfect weathall about rain, so we ran er. We walked the beach down to Great Harbor and anchored in Bunker Marina and tied up to a Cove, which our cruising dock with shore power and guide claims to be the spent a day restocking, most beautiful anchorage taking showers, doing on the Atlantic coast. The laundry, and reconnecting holding ground is certainwith the world via Wi-Fi. ly good because we reEarly the following mornmained fast in impressive ing, we were off on another winds blowing straight long sampling loop out to from the direction with sea that took us close to the least protection. There Mount Desert Rock under was a brand-new moon Photo courtesy Roger Long cold, gray skies. We anand the clearest sky I can While at anchor in Rockland Harbor, we had a front-row chored that night in Head ever remember seeing. Harbor on the outside end seat at the most impressive New England thunderstorm After breakfast the next we’d ever seen as it passed to the north. of Isle Au Haut, where I day, we ran another sample slept as soundly as I can line far out to sea. How many Maine cruisers have ever remember on the boat. Good thing: A bit of anhad the Petit Manan lighthouse eight miles off their cient wisdom is that the land is a greater hazard to starboard beam on the last week of May? The final leg the sailor than the sea, and we were about to prove into Mount Desert was with two reefs in the main and that true. no jib. The wind vane steered and Strider made six We slept late and then ran around to Duck Harbor knots hard on the wind, and felt as solid and power- in fog that was congealing into mist and rain drops. ful as a train. We ran up Somes Sound and picked up There were big swells being torn into awkward lumps a mooring. by the tide amid the unmarked ledges of this forbid-

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ding corner of the coast. developed the second Lobster pots were apday – that I told myself pearing suddenly just a he deserved this climb. wave ahead, some pulled So we started up into just under the surface by the wet after him, and the current. I was halfit began to rain. blind from fogging glassWe passed such steep es, and a snagged pot pitches that we could easily have put us couldn’t imagine strugashore. I was pretty gling back down the damn glad to say, “Let’er now wet and slippery go!” in Duck Harbor. rocks. Continuing on Before going ashore over and down the this time for a walk, I backside of the summit grabbed the GPS. Rain to the road seemed the threatened, but I only Photo courtesy Roger Long safest plan. We passed planned a short walk. the top and started My son Mike at I ran under power up the Bold Coast on a clear, We studied the map at sunny and calm day in the Grand Manan Channel. For me, this is down. Except, it wasn’t the trailhead, and I chid- the last unseen portion of Maine’s outer coastline. down. It was up some ed myself for not thinkmore, and then up and ing to bring the otherwise useless cell phone with down pitches and cliffs worse than we had ascended. which I could have taken a picture of it. We started There were places I would have used a rope instead of down the road. my old sneakers. We soon came to a trail marker pointing up to the The skies opened up with cold and driving rain. The top of the mountain. Mike was the only one who want- roots, puddles, and mud were almost as bad as the ed to leave the road and plunge into the wet bushes. rocks, and the mist mixed with rain penetrated the He had been such a trooper – uncomplainingly doing branches overhead. We came to the road, which ran a the sampling far out on ugly seas with the cold he’d couple of hundred yards and then stopped, with the

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blue trail blazes leading off into the woods. Our hearts sank. The GPS wouldn’t maintain a fix in my pocket, and walking around holding it at arms length wasn’t fea-

sible. I got it out and it showed that we were on a trail heading away from the boat. There was no alternative but to retrace all we’d done. We continued on exhausted; the GPS told us we were only about a third

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I was thinking, Too fast and I could have a heart attack that could kill more than just myself; too slow and we could all die a horrible death. We would never make it to town in our current condition with night coming on. of the way into our hike. Much later, I realized that I was entering that dangerous state where I no longer had the energy to keep moving fast enough to stay warm. The others were dressed less well than me. A twisted ankle or any other delay would send us quickly into hypothermic shock, far from help. The GPS still showed us heading 180 degrees away from the boat. Just when things looked bleakest and most dangerous, I remembered I hadn’t pulled the dinghy all the way up. Until this day, I’d always pulled the dinghy above the high-tide mark and tied it off, even for the shortest trips ashore. Inexplicably, I hadn’t done so this time. Everything we could possibly need for warmth, shelter, or summoning help was on the boat, and the tide was coming in. I’d confidently headed up the beach, GPS in hand, so we weren’t going to get lost, I’d apparently thought, thus we didn’t need to pull the dinghy all the way up. I can really move through the woods for an old guy, and I lit out to check on the dinghy, trying to think of every step as a separate event and adventure, knowing that just one bad one could literally kill us all. I reached the road and set out an arrow of branches to be sure there was no confusion. But I knew we were in trouble as soon as I could see the shore. The tide was full. I ran to the beach and there was no beach and no

dinghy. Strider sat mockingly out of reach in the middle of the harbor. I went out on a small headland to survey the empty cove, and I saw the dinghy on the far side bumping gently against a little nubbin of rock in the last indentation before the open sea. I ran the mile around the road and down the trail and finally through the thick woods. I was thinking, Too fast and I could have a heart attack that could kill more than just myself; too slow and we could all die a horrible death. We would never make it to town in our current condition with night coming on. I sprinted. I plunged through thick branches to the small cove, and it was empty. I slumped. Then, I thought, maybe this was a similar cove. I went over the point and there was the dinghy drifting away from the rock into deep water. I flew down the steep rocks, got one foot on the last rock with water up to my knees, and hooked one finger over the dinghy’s rail. The dinghy was half-full of rainwater. I hauled the poor thing up on the rocks and dumped her out. Mike and Eric were just coming out of the trees when I rowed into the open. I suspect they were relieved to see me, but we were all too tired and cold to discuss it. A few minutes later, we were on the boat. As I was rowing us out to the boat I said, “You know, if I had done something that stupid on the water, I would sell the boat.” I was serious. These remote is-

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32 Points East September 2009

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YE14t AR h

lands can be just as dangerous as the sea, and you must never abandon that navigational mindset just because there is land under your shoes. Heavy rain started just as we left the next morning looking for a place to dry out and regroup. We headed to Rockland via the Fox Island Thorofare, a long way with damp clothes under the foul-weather gear and in the hard, cold, driving rain. It began to clear just as we reached the Rockland breakwater, and it was sunny by the time we tied up at Landings Marina. Within an hour, the boat was mostly dried out, laundry was in the machines, and we were eating lunch ashore and buying food. We went out to anchor late that afternoon just before the most impressive New England thunderstorm I’d ever seen in passed to the north. We ran up to Camden under power the next morning in thick fog and picked up a mooring to consider our options. The fog was too thick to justify a tour of the harbor, so we headed across the bay, and I finally got to use the radar. It cleared up when we reached Mark Island, so we finished up our sampling work with three stations down the bay and started sailing toward Tenants Harbor. Sail gave way to power near Two Bush Light due to threatening skies to the west, and we were secure on a mooring just as the rain began, although no wind or lightning materialized. Eric treated us to a fine meal at the East Wind Inn that evening, and the day ended with the sun breaking out of a hole in the sky to produce a rainbow against a sky that seemed too dark to hold such incredible light. It was cold, clear and blowing very hard with the front’s passage the next morning. We were beyond sailing for fun in such conditions, so we bucked to windward under power up around Mosquito Island. It was hard and uncomfortable work, even with Strider’s reliable diesel. Once into

Port Clyde, we followed the inland routes up through Friendship and then well up the Medomak River to anchor for a leisurely lunch and rest. We then sailed down the river tending sails constantly as gusts burst over the tree line from random directions, occasionally resorting to power where the wind couldn’t penetrate the narrow parts. The wind died off Round Pond and we struck the sails. When we came around the headland, we were confronted with an intimidating expanse of white tops on every wave and winds that we might have been able to make four knots against in such seas. We turned and fled for Round Pond to pick up a Padebco mooring and go ashore, where it was a calm, warm summer day. That night, the boat was shook with moaning rigging, but when I woke up at 0230, it was dead calm. The weather report the night before had mentioned more wind and rain. I lay there thinking it was time to be home, but couldn’t quite get out of my warm bunk – until I heard a lobsterboat start. That did it. I got up, wolfed down some cookies, and Strider was under way at 0320 to motor clear back to Portland and end this 550-mile saga, 420 of which were covered under power. This was no pleasure cruise, but we’d had a job to do and we did it. The CTD data was downloaded within a day, and the UNH researcher said he was already finding surprises and interesting patterns. Surprisingly little basic study has been done Downeast, so there’s still plenty for us to do. We’re ready to go back. The only real impediment will be finding crew crazy enough to go with me. Roger Long is a naval architect specializing in oceanographic research vessels (www.rogerlongboats.com). The harbormaster of Cape Elizabeth, he sails Strider out of Portland Harbor. Watch for him in a “Nova” episode to air on PBS sometime next winter.

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uscobe akover

Muscobe of Marblehead heads to sea looking for all the world like a Downeast lobsterboat, which she is, until you go below and see her new accommodations (inset).

I wanted a long-term home away from home, so I had my lobsterboat cruiser redesigned and rebuilt from the inside out. By Joel Gleason For Points East y 2005, my children were grown, and I began thinking about a boat I could spend more time aboard. Muscobe, my 33-foot modified lobsterboat, was fine for cruising for a week or two, but she definitely was not suited for long-term living, and I was leaning toward being somewhere warm in the winters.

B

34 Points East September 2009

Muscobe was built for me in 1987 by Young Brothers & Company, Inc. of Corea, Maine. In 2005, I talked with Vid Young about building a 38-footer with more space and more accoutrements, but nothing came of that. And then one day the option of getting a new, bigger Young Brothers boat disappeared when Colby, Vid and Vin announced they were closing up shop and “retiring� to go back to lobster fishing. I explored possibilities with other builders, but I simply editor@pointseast.com


couldn’t find the quality of boat I wanted at the price Young Brothers would have built it for me. Then, in the spring of 2008, Vid announced he was getting married in July. This was an event I didn’t want to miss, so I arranged to fly up for the wedding, which occurred on a picture-perfect Maine summer day. During the reception, which was held poolside behind Vid’s home, I expressed my disappointment at not being able now to ever have my new Young Brothers 38. At this, Vid introduced me to his nephew, Mike Light, who had worked for him for some time, knew the business inside and out, and was now operating his own business in Corea, Light’s Fiberglass. “Mike can build you a boat as good as any we did, or he can make Muscobe over into a ‘new’ boat for you.” And a new dream was born. I asked my friend, Dieter Empacher, a naval architect in Marblehead, to make some drawings of a new interior, and the project began to take shape. I’d originally had double V-berths installed in the foc’sle to accommodate my three children. Aft, on the starboard side, was a double berth that converted to a dinette. In 21 years, we’d never used that dinette, and the berth, well, it just wasn’t quite right. Muscobe’s head, which had seemed roomy enough during construction in

the Young Brothers shed, proved way too cramped while under way and needed to be enlarged. Finally, I’d requested that the boat be built with a “bright” interior. Young Brothers boats of that era were constructed of plywood, covered and bonded together with fiberglass cloth, then gelcoated. Abiding by my request, they did not fiberglass the interior, but instead stained and varnished it. The mahogany carlings and trim were attractive enough, but the rest of the interior (which I had envisioned would be mahogany) was varnished plywood, which I had been meaning to paint over white since the first day I saw it. Dieter went all over Muscobe’s interior, taking measurements and jotting notes. Then we had a long discussion about what I did and did not want, before he made up the drawings. These I forwarded to Mike, and then he and I had long phone conversations. Over time, we agreed on an end result that would satisfy me, one that was practical to build. Mike then drew up a formal estimate, and the project became a reality. Everything would come out of the cabin interior, right down to the bare hull. A large, queen-sized berth would replace the forward V-berths. The head would be moved aft against the main bulkhead, on the same side to accommodate the existing plumbing and thru-hull fittings. A new galley would be installed on the port side, with a holding tank underneath. To starboard would be a hanging locker, and where the old

Photos by Joel Gleason

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Photos by Joel Gleason

The miracle on Muscobe: Left: Her new interior is roughed out, glassed, and ready for gelcoat. Right: Voila! Looking forward, with settee set up in twin single-berth format.

dinette had been would be a settee, the back of which could swing up to make a second single bunk/berth. As previously stated, most of our meals were eaten on the engine box in the wheelhouse, so the dinette was to be eliminated. New wiring and light fixtures would be installed, along with numerous new cabinets and storage areas, all with louvered teak doors. The old pump-action toilet would be replaced by an electric head. And, equally important, those ugly brown-stained plywood surfaces would be sanded, treated, and covered white, leaving the original bright mahogany carlings and trim where possible. As it later turned out, the forward bulkhead on the new, larger head came directly at the middle of the after porthole, which just wouldn’t do. So to provide daylight and fresh air in the head, Mike removed it, filled the gap, resurfaced the entire outside port cabin side, and then reinstalled the port farther aft. New cushions with Tempur-Pedic foam would have to be custom made to the new dimensions. I selected a dark-green covering with blue piping to match Muscobe’s dark green topsides.

Finally, the time came to deliver the boat to Mike. My good friend and cruising buddy, Al Cristofori, agreed to go along to provide the entertainment and to spell me at the wheel. Rather than make a straight delivery, we would make a mini-cruise out of it. And so, on Monday, Sept. 15, 2008, after a hearty breakfast at The Driftwood, we dropped Muscobe’s mooring pendants into the water for the last time that year and headed east. Once around the lee of Cape Ann, the seas became brutally rough and hit us with a vengeance. We spent a very uncomfortable day, at reduced speed, plowing through huge seas until, mercifully, we slipped past Seguin Island and into Boothbay Harbor. The next two days were uneventful. We enjoyed beautiful crisp, clear weather, going to Camden the next day. Day three was more of the same, until we ran into some unseasonal fog in Blue Hill Bay, which stuck with us all the way into Northeast Harbor. Finally, late Thursday morning, Muscobe slipped into her birthplace, picturesque Corea Harbor. We got a few friendly waves from the lobstermen’s co-op, as they recognized another

The mahogany carlings and trim were attractive enough, but the rest of the interior (which I had envisioned would be mahogany) was varnished plywood, which I had been meaning to paint over white since the first day I saw it.

36 Points East September 2009

editor@pointseast.com


Photos by Joel Gleason

Left: This is how the galley looked in mid-restoration. At right: The galley looks like this today, and you can see the queensize berth forward in the foc’sle.

Young Brothers boat “coming back home again.” A short time after our arrival, Vid came in from his day’s fishing, covered in gurry and sporting his big smile. Later, we went up to the shop to fetch Mike, who had never actually seen Muscobe, so he could check things out, take measurements, and discuss the final aspects of our project. Later, Vid and Brenda, Colby and his wife, Nana, Al and I drove over to the Fisherman’s Inn in Winter Harbor for dinner. We caught up on the local and fishing news and, of course, discussed the alterations that would be occurring in Muscobe. As with almost any boat project, it would be a work in progress: Things would be changed and additions made as it went along. I mentioned that I’d had some cavitation at high speed ever since installing the Yanmar and changing to a bigger, five-bladed propeller. “That’s the wrong wheel,” Vid said casually to me. “You need a four-blade. That will stop your cavitation. And I’ll bet you’ll get another two or three knots out of her.” When one of the Young brothers makes a suggestion

like that, you listen. So, after returning home, I had Mike bring in his propeller man who, with the aid of his computer, designed a new prop for the boat. As a result, even before work on Muscobe began, we were already over budget. More changes would come. Mike and I kept in touch by phone over the ensuing weeks. He emailed photos of the construction and complained, “That damned boat is built like a battleship. I wore myself out and practically burned up my Sawsall tearing out that @#$%& interior.” Muscobe has six cleats mounted along her side decks for tying her up and for spring lines. “I’ve tripped over those damned cleats a hundred times,” Mike told me during one of our telephone conversations. “Why don’t we put in some of those cleats that fold down flush into the deck?” “Go ahead,” I told him. Then he told me how much they cost. Gradually, over the winter, it all began to come together. As the work progressed in the cabin area, the engine maintenance was completed, water tank

“I’ve tripped over those damned cleats a hundred times,” Mike told me during one of our telephone conversations. “Why don’t we put in some of those cleats that fold down flush into the deck?” “Go ahead,” I told him. Then he told me how much they cost.

www.pointseast.com

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37


Photos by Joel Gleason

She’s still a Beal Island lobsterboat. Remove one side of the wheelhouse, install a davit and hauler, and she’s ready to head for the traps.

emptied and flushed out, the bottom painted, chips and dings in the topsides and spray rails were Awlgripped, and the brightwork was sanded and refinished. A two-way electric pump was installed to remove used crankcase oil and replace it with new. A

new water pump, with filter, was installed in the galley. An EPIRB was added. New gold-leaf lettering on the transom replaced the old white name and hail. Each phone call generated new questions, which often turned into new mini-projects or additions. Through the entire process, I could sense the pride Mike felt about his work, and the tender-loving care he was giving my boat. Eventually, I could stand it no longer, and I booked a flight to Bar Harbor, where I rented a car and drove to Corea to see the results. The new cushions had not yet arrived, but most of the work was completed. Gone was the dreary brownstained plywood interior. Instead, dazzling white surfaces made it all seem larger and cheerier. The laminated mahogany carlings in the overhead were still there, along with some of the original brightwork. Beautiful louvered teak doors gave the interior a look of luxury, in addition to providing much more storage than before. New interior lights, with twoway switches had been strategically placed. A new galley, with soft gray countertop, finished Muscobe’s transformation into a true yacht. Yet, from the outside, she retained her traditional Downeast looks and heritage. She’s still a Beal Island lobsterboat. Take out one side of the wheelhouse, throw a davit and hauler into her, and she’s ready to

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Points East September 2009

39


go fishing. A few weeks later, the cushions arrived, covered in green canvas with blue piping, to match her jadegreen-mist topsides. All that was left to be done now was to settle up with Mike and bring Muscobe home to Marblehead. I’d like to comment here on Michael Light. In light of today’s daily news stories about the graft, greed, sloppy work habits, and corruption, all of which has brought our economy to its knees, it is refreshing to know that honesty, integrity, and a solid work ethic are alive and well in America – most notably in Corea, Maine. At a time when millions of people are unemployed and businesses (including many boat builders) are closing down, Light’s Fiberglass is as busy as ever. Knowing they will be guaranteed an honest day’s work at a fair price, both commercial fishermen and pleasure boaters continue to seek Mike out. From the very beginning, I could sense during our initial meeting and subsequent phone conversations that Mike would take very good care of my boat and be deeply concerned about accomplishing everything I wanted to my complete satisfaction. He knew from the beginning that I was fussy when it came to my boat, and he treated her as if she were his own. In a recent conversation, he told me, “I’ve been putting your things back aboard your boat. I found

some pillow cases that were pretty dusty, so I took them home and washed them for you.” People have come to his shop to see the type of work he does, and he lets them go aboard Muscobe – but only as far as the cockpit. “You can look down below there,” he tells them, “but you can’t go in.” As April turned into May and the weather improved, boats began going by my office window to be launched at the yard just across the street, and I became increasingly anxious. Normally at that time of year, I can run down to the boatyard to give Muscobe a hug, putter around inside, and begin the numerous tasks of spring fitting-out. Now all I could do was to sit, wait, and admire the pictures Mike had sent me. By Mother’s Day, I was already packed and ready to go. I’d booked flights to Bar Harbor for myself, Al, and my son Randy, who would be accompanying me on the journey home. Finally the day arrived. Al, Randy and I arrived in Corea, and I finally got to see the finished product. Vid came in from his day of fishing as we stowed our gear aboard. We had a celebratory “corner” with Mike, and finally we idled out through the fishing fleet, past the co-op, and turned Muscobe’s bow into a heavy chop, heading southwest back toward Marblehead and the next adventure. A resident of Marblehead, Mass., Joel Gleason is a frequent contributor to Points East.

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Mystery Harbor

If you can correctly identify this harbor, and you’re the first to do so, you will win a fine Points East designer yachting cap. To qualify, you have to tell us something about the harbor, such as how you recognized it and some reasons you like to hang out there. Send your answers to editor@pointseast.com or mail them to Editor, Points East Magazine, PO Box 1077, Portsmouth, NH 03802-1077.

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43


THERACIN

Photo by Dan Nerney/New York Yacht Club

Every ounce of rail meat is used to power Phil Lotz’s Arethusa to windward. “We had two goals: Have fun and try to get in front of Bandit and push them back a little,” said Lotz.

Arethusa: Consistency counts Phil Lotz’s Arethusa won the NYYC Swan 42 Nationals off Newport, R.I. on July 19, on the final day in the final two races. He passed Andy Fisher’s Bandit, which had dominated this regatta since the first race. Arethusa scored 50 points to Bandit‘s 57. In 3rd place was Amelia, skippered by Alex Jackson. Malcolm Gefter’s Celeritas was 4th, and Interlodge, sailed by Austin and Gwen Fragomen, was 5th. Twenty boats sailed in the NYYC Swan 42 Nationals, July 16-19, at the club’s Harbour Court clubhouse. But for Lotz, consistency carried the day. He notched a 2nd in the final race, saving his best for last, and four 4ths. His worst placing was 7th. “We had two goals: Have fun and try to get in front of Bandit and push them back a little,” said Lotz. “We NYYC, continued on Page 46 44 Points East September 2009

Photo by Dan Nerney/New York Yacht Club

Andy Fisher’s Bandit had dominated the Swan 42 Nationals since the first race, but Arethusa passed her in the standings in the last two races.

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NGPAGES Cetacea collects some M-B silverware His Excellency the Governor of Bermuda Sir Richard Gozney and Royal Hamilton Amateur Dinghy Club Commodore David Skinner presented three-deep trophies for each of the four classes, 19 fleet, special or regional prizes, and four seamanship and sportsmanship Awards of Merit garnered during the 2009 Marion to Bermuda Cruising Yacht Race in June. Among the big winners was Chris Culver, skipper of Cetacea out of Newport, R.I., winner of Class A, the Iboattrack Marion to Bermuda Team Trophy, the “Sail” Magazine Bermuda Ocean Cruising Yacht Trophy and the RHADC Past Commodores Trophy for the best performance by an electronically navigated yacht. Said Chris, “Winning is a bonus: Arriving was the challenge.” The biggest winner of the 2009 race had to be Martin Jacobson’s Crescendo, out of Newport, R.I., which took home the Kaplan Memorial Min Ron III Trophy for 1st place in class B; The Blue Water Sailing Club Board of Governor’s Trophy for first yacht to finish; the Beverly Polaris Trophy for best performance by a celestially navigated yacht; the

Photo by Ken Packie

On a glorious day in Hamilton, Bermuda, Chris Culver (in red shorts and blue blazer, in line with the flagpole) and the crew of the Hinckley Sou’Wester 59 Cetacea display their haul during the awards ceremony.

Navigator’s Trophy to Jeremy Whitty, navigator of the first celestially navigated yacht; and the Gosling’s Rum Founder’s for the monohull yacht with the best overall corrected time. Awards of Merit went to Craig Slater, skipper of Phantom (Newport, R.I.) ; Philip Clorite, skipper of Lucky Dog (Niantic, Conn.); David Risch, skipper of

Corsair (Marion, Mass.); and George Denny, skipper of Restive (Saunderstown, R.I.). These four crews suspended racing and diverted in response to an emergency flare they sighted. They took time from the race searching for its source, a singlehanded sailor later rescued by a cruise ship. For complete results, visit: www.marionbermuda.com.

Marblehead’s Altreuter takes Sonar title in NOOD Regatta Marblehead’s Sam Altreuter and his team on Resonance won the Sonar class and the overall title at the Sperry Top-Sider Marblehead NOOD on July 26, which qualifies him for the Caribbean NOOD championship. Altreuter will join eight other overall NOOD winners in the British Virgin Islands in November in Sunsail charter boats. Altreuter won the first race on Saturday, then posted a fourth and another 1st to provide what appeared to be a comfortable margin going into Sunday’s. A 6th in the first race reduced the size of his lead as perenwww.pointseast.com

nial class champion Bill Lynn took second. Lynn took the second race, but in the last go-round, Altreuter’s 4th gave him the series by a single point. Lynn took 2nd in that race. Eleven other fleets crowned champions, including Martha Martini of Beverly, Mass., who defended her Town Class title with 1st places in all of her races. Marblehead was the seventh stop in the Sperry TopSider NOOD regatta series, and has been part of the NOOD regattas since 1998. For more information: www.sailingworld.com/nood_regatta. Points East September 2009

45


St. Georges Maritime Day delights racers After almost two months of persistent deluges, cloud, and fog, a warm sun and balmy breezes greeted this year’s Seventh Annual St. George Maritime Day, in Tenants Harbor, on Saturday, July 25. Just after 1100, to the prompting of the horn of the committee boat, Saltwort, nine kayaks and rowing boats paddled to the red nun off Northern Island and returned, a distance of about two miles. The Norse Myth Award went to Steve Lindsay and Zeb Casperson, rowing in their ancient double, Olaus Magnum; the Best Crew Award went to Skip Bracy, who paddled with his dog; the Finest Hat Award was given to Kate Bourne; and the Persistency Award was presented to Wendy Ford, who has rowed her small dinghy in all seven Maritime Day rallies. That afternoon, at 1400, despite an enticing eightto 10-knot southwest breeze and bright sun, only two

small sloops showed up to race. But the race committee, rudely awakened from a noon siesta on the foredeck, sent them off on six windward-leeward contests, assigning arbitrary handicaps for each race based on the strength of the wind. The winners of this matchrace series were Steve Lindsay and Zeb Casperson, sailing in Jenny G, a 16-foot O’Day Daysailer, with eight points. Westy Ford and his sister Lindsay, sailing Dovekie, a 14-foot 420 sloop, came a close 2nd with 10 points. Dovekie actually won four of the six races, but the Committee’s inexplicable handicaps reversed two of them. Awards followed at 1700 at the Tenants Harbor Town Dock. The sponsors this year were Blue Water Fine Arts, Lyman Morse Boat Building, MonheganThomaston Boat Line, and the St. George Community Sailing Foundation. FMI: www.stgeorgesail.org.

NYYC, continued from Page 44 thought it was possible. Given the volatility of the boats it’s possible for people to drop back. We’ve been sailing very consistently, and we thought with three races that would work in our favor.� On the strength of his performance here and in the NYYC’s 155th Annual Regatta, Lotz will also repre-

sent the club in the NYYC Invitational Cup to be sailed Sept. 15-19. This event will feature world-class, Corinthian sailing among 19 yacht-club teams from 14 nations aboard these one-design NYYC Swan 42s, made available for charter by the class. Complete results of the Swan 42 Nationals are on the web at www.nyyc.org.

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GMORA racing results between July 18-Aug.2 The Boothbay Harbor Yacht Club Regatta was held July 18 and 19 in various conditions from light wind and fog to 18 knots of wind and waves. Saturday produced the fog and light winds. The race committee was challenged with the task of running races and not being able to keep track of the competitors. The competition was close in each division. Division One was decided by a throw out race, giving Scott Smithwick’s Frers 41-foot Kaos a one-point edge over Merle Hallett’s N/M 39 Scaramouche. In Division Two, the J/105s Ghost and Keemah were tied going into the last race. When they met back at the windward mark Ghost led by a few boat lengths and held off a very fast Keemah downwind to the finish. Division Three had a close battle by J/24s Pit Party and Rainier, with Pit Party coming out on top. Rainier didn’t go home empty-handed as they won the Hank Spencer Award for sailing with more than 33 percent of their crew under the age of 18. Cruising Division was dominated by Zealot, an Alerion Express 38 skippered by John Merrill. The Boothbay Harbor One Design Division braved the fog on Saturday sailing short drop-mark courses without many navigational aids. Pozy tied with

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Coriolis for first but won the tie breaker by winning the second race. PHRF State of Maine Championships & One Design Regatta hosted by Portland Yacht Club in Falmouth, Maine had 30 boats in four divisions. Great consistent winds on Saturday and Sunday produced six races in Division One, five races in Divisions two and three and one long race each day for the Cruising Division. Tom Hall, skippering the Elliot 770 Seven, finished with a strong six points, winning four out of the five races in Division Two to win the Overall PHRF State of Maine Championship. The Seguin Island Trophy Race was held over the weekend of July 25-26. Twenty-four boats raced in J/24 one-design, two PHRF racing divisions, PHRF cruising, a touring division, and a multihull division. The fleet enjoyed clear skies and wind on Saturday with most divisions sailing two races close to the Southport shore of the Sheepscot River. Sunday produced fog and light winds, which allowed only one race in all divisions except the J/24 division which was able to get two races.

Points East September 2009

47


The Pete Wells trophy for best overall performance went to Strega, a J/24 sailed by the Cunningham family from Round Pond. They impressively scored three wins and two 2nds. The Sash Spencer Memorial Award for best performance in Division One went to Kaos, a Frers 41 raced by Scott Smithwick. The Hank Spencer award for the best performance by a boat with 30 percent or more of their crew be-

low the age of 18 went to which won the Greyhawk, Cruising Division. The Camden to Castine Race took place Aug. 1 and 2. Participants enjoyed a nice spinnaker ride down the bay on Saturday in strong winds finishing the 20-mile course in three and a half to four hours. On Sunday, participants finished in a similar time as Saturday. Each division saw very tight competition with all the

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top boats finishing within a point or two of each other. The boats that did well on Saturday were mixed up with other boats finishing well on Sunday. The top boats in Division One were Big Dog Party a Farr 39, Revolution IX, a Dobroth 43, Snowbird, a C&C 115 and Scaramouche an N/M 39. Top boats in Division Two were Sidewinder, a J/105, Fiesta, a C&C 40, and Beausoleil, a Beneteau 456. For complete results in all events, visit www.gmora.org.

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Which is best: one-design or handicap racing? have often been asked what I like more, one-design racing or handicap racing. I was thinking of this question recently after racing a one-design type boat in a handicap race against a group of uniquely different boats. Most people who know me know that I can be opinionated and don’t hesitate to pick a side. However, after years of racing the answer to which I like more becomes harder and harder to discern. As an attempt to answer this age-old question, here is my pro-and-con list for what it’s worth. One-design racing is when boats of one type of design agree on a set of rules that restrict changes to the design, equipment and often how the boat can be sailed. I have been sailing in one-design boats since I was a kid. My father owned a Lightning, one of the world’s largest one-design fleets, and a J/24, one of the world’s most competitive one-design fleets. I grew up sailing these boats and since age 15 or so I have been competitively racing J/24s at various levels of competition. In addition to these types of boats, I have also raced extensively in dinghies such as 420s, FJs, 470s, Lasers, Sunfish and I-14 one-design. In my younger years

I

based on my experience and lack of knowledge of other types of racing, I would have said that nothing compared to one-design racing. The theory of one-design racing is that each boat will have approximately the same speed and, therefore, any difference in speed or finish position can be attributed to the skipper and crew abilities and execution. However, in my experience many one-design fleets have boats that are not exactly the same speed. Whether it is better equipment, age of the boat, optimization of the boat (within the rules) by the owner or other factors at play; these onedesigns are often hard to control and can often feel unfair if the rules aren’t followed strictly. These differences can lead to the top boats and crews winning many of the races and regattas with little change until they get tired of winning it all. Now there is the other side of the coin, “coin” being the optimal word. With strict rules on equipment and design, often the cost of sailing a one-design boat can be somewhat controlled. Rules such as sail purchase limitations on cloth and frequency of purchase can reduce

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upfront and ongoing costs. Also, rules that don’t allow major structural or speed-enhancing changes, such as appendage and hull fairing, can keep the overall costs low for owners. This is appealing to me as I often am working on the budget aspect of sailing without very deep pockets. One-design fleets can be found in every major sailing town and often even in every sailing port. If two or more of the same boat are racing each other, they can be racing one-design. However, the town, city or port you live near might not have a boat that suits your needs. For example, the town of Falmouth, Maine, has two one-design fleets: J/24s and Etchells. Both boats have their own pros and cons, however: Either of the boats might not fit your need for a boat with standing headroom, or a boat with an enclosed head or a boat that is just downright exhilarating and wet that you can launch from a ramp. If you find yourself in this last group — and can’t find the right one-design boat in your area and you just have to be different — then that is fine, you’re not alone. Many boats race each week in handicap races. These races attempt to create a handicap value to the relation of the speed of each boat. Over a certain amount of time or distance each boat’s handicap is computed in relation to their finish time to create a final corrected time. In theory, if each boat sailed perfectly and if all the

ratings were perfect in relation to each boat and its speed, then the corrected times would be equal. However, we all know that we don’t sail “perfect,” and often the handicapping doesn’t take into account the course type or various wind and wave conditions that might affect some boats different than others. “Every dog has its day” can explain handicap racing at times, as every boat has its optimal conditions, and when those conditions are met, that boat will have a better chance of winning then when the conditions are not favorable to that boat. This often allows more boats a chance of winning over a series of races and keeps things interesting. Also, since there are not as many rules restricting sails, equipment, and modifications, boats can be optimized to race either in certain conditions, area, fleet or handicap system. This freedom often provides and creates learning opportunities that are often missed in one-designs and seriously keep the racing interesting, if not controversial. So which type of racing wins out in the end? The answer is simple, any type of racing where the wind is blowing, the sun is shining and your boat makes it across the start and finish line without major incident. I will take what I can learn from each, every time I go out, as this is a lifelong sport and the answers to simple questions can often take a lifetime to create. Carter White owns Regatta Promotions (www.regattapromotions.com).

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Points East September 2009

51


MEDIA/Resources for cr u isers

Everyday experiences of an observant man Reviewed by Carol Standish For Points East

Sandbox Camp Tales from a Maine Storyteller: One man’s view from his camp in Maine. By Randy Randall, Just Write Books, www.jstwrite.com, 240 pp., $24.95

Randy Randall grew up in the environs of the grand old resort, Old Orchard Beach. He also has a rustic camp on Spectacle Pond, way in the woods near Cherryfield. Today, he lives in Saco and runs Marston’s Marina on the Saco River. These three locations provide most of the settings in this collection of Randall’s charming “down-home” stories and recollections. The subjects of his stories are the everyday experiences of an observant and friendly man. The reader will recognize the characters and the situations: If not down to the last detail, they are certainly familiar. Randall’s family was in the tourist trade from the turn of the last century. His gramp fixed the tourists’ cars, and Randy delivered Western Union telegrams. “You have to imagine what a veritable warren of hotels, cottages and rooms Old Orchard Beach was in the 1950s and ’60s…Finding your way in and out of the alleys, along the beach, and up to the rooming houses was an adventure,” he writes in his story “Summer Complaint.” The title doesn’t refer to any specific person. Randall simply observes, “As much as we anticipated the arrival of the tourists, we also longed for their departure; but we held our tongues. We all knew too well that these people from away had money to spend and could help us make it through the year. Right after Labor Day, the silence and lack of ac-

tivity in town was eerie.” Both hosts and guests can sympathize with this story. My favorite Old Orchard story, “A Milkman’s Christmas,” is about Randall riding in his father’s milk-delivery truck on Christmas morning. “Dawn would just be on the horizon when we would grind to a stop at the end of a driveway to make our first delivery…Imagine, Christmas morning, when almost all the kids in Maine were up early tearing into their presents, and bleary-eyed parents were working on their first cup of coffee, and the milkman’s son stepped into a private home right into the midst of their family.” What a great scene Randall paints of a time when people were unguarded and trusting and warm-hearted. He and his dad usually cleaned up with little presents of their own from the customers, who fully appreciated them, and best of all, they were home in time for Christmas dinner. Tales from the camp on Spectacle Pond are full of action. As Randall’s kids, and the kids of family friends, romp through the woods, fish till they drop, or pick blueberries by the pound, stuff happens. Trucks get stuck in the mud; people get stranded on the ice; a neighboring camp goes up in smoke from a lightning strike; the Randall camp gets invaded by squatters. In all of these stories, Randall’s warmth and wonderment provide a big fluffy cushion of genuine inclusion, as if the reader were tramping down the path along with the gang. Randall’s writing style is relaxed and conversational – totally guileless and shot through with enthusiasm for the task at hand and for life in general. He could be in the chair across from you telling the story. By the time you’ve finished the book, you feel as if you have become a member of Randall’s extended family and that he’s more than happy to have you.

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Randy Randall: Maine’s Renaissance marina man I met Randy Randall at Marston’s Marina on the Saco River for the first time in mid-July. A fine mist was blurring everything, especially my eyeglasses. My note pad was soggy before I wrote down a word. Randy came loping down the slope of the marina parking lot with a big grin on his face, wearing a floppy hat that somehow made him look impervious to the weather. He was, and – in his company – so was I. He showed me around the marina, a fabulous facility started by his father-in-law in the early ’50s that’s undergone many sound and attractive improvements since. He and his wife, Jean, live in a comfortable house tucked into a bluff above the marina. “I’m the greeter,” he says. “Jean does the books.” But, of course, he’s too modest. Together with other family members, and a young dockmaster, they do all the work around the 120-slip facility, from qualifying as a state designated “Clean Marina” to hauling the floats in the fall. They treat the customers as family and, in fact, were planning a big cookout for everybody for the following Saturday. His grin is nearly constant. “I don’t see the dark side,” he says, and proceeds to tell a story about lending life jackets to some boaters – total strangers – who were from up country and had no clue about the regulations and the possibility of being ticketed by the marine patrol. The life jackets appeared on the dock at the end of the day. “See?” says Randy. The goodness in the world is totally self-evident to him. “I always wanted to write,” he says. “Thought I ought to make some use of my English degree from U Maine. I started to write after I retired.” Retirement was in no way evident as he puttered around the marina. He wrote a few stories and sent them off. Several have been published. “It’s a thrill to see them in print,” he says. So far, Randall has been published in “Down

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magazine, “The Maine Sportsman,” East” “Northwoods Sporting Journal,” “No Umbrella,” “Points East,” and “Wolf Moon Journal.” “Sandbox Camp Tales” is his first book and is a compilation of his favorite stories. “I had the best time with the book,” he grins. “But the first edit killed it. The editor wanted to take out all the colloquialisms. All told, three separate edits were made.” One of the best things about the book for Randall is the number of people he has met since it came out. “Members of our family I didn’t even know existed came to visit from New Hampshire. I gave a talk at the Damariscotta Grange, and was invited to speak to a writing class at Nokomis High School.” Now that the book is a reality, Randall is engrossed in the arduous process of “getting it out there.” We talked about how hard it is for budding writers to publicize their work, especially when no one has any extra money to sink into publicity. “I’ve tried using the Internet and sending introductory letters to businesses with websites. I have built mailing lists of sporting camps in Maine, all the Maine libraries, and all the independent bookstores in Maine and New Hampshire,” he said. When he said he didn’t see dark side, it wasn’t wishful thinking. It is a fact. I could have spent the day listening to Randall talk about his life and all the adventures he’s had, but he had to go deliver Meals on Wheels. I’ll be back, though. By the end of the interview, I wanted to move right in. “Anyone cruising the coast can swing into Marston’s Marina on the Saco River tidewater and buy the book and probably meet the author,” Randy said with a grin. “A great excuse to come up the river and rent a mooring for one or two nights.” Carol Standish

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Points East September 2009

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Fishin g repo r ts f rom aro und New England

North: The offshore prognosis is quite bright By Craig Bergeron For Points East I was busy at the store early Saturday morning, Aug. 1, selling chum and flats of bait to customers heading offshore in search of sharks. Conditions were ideal: The sun was bright orange and there was not a breath of wind. We’ve had a few reports of blue shark action on the back side of Jeffreys Ledge, and just beyond Tantas Ledge. Mike Keegan hooked and lost a mako shark the last week of July; I spooled his 50 Tiagra with fresh mono as he was fishing all weekend. I should have plenty of sharking news in the next report. The groundfishing has been red hot on Tantas with huge numbers of sea pollock and market size cod. Our good friend Dan Kelley has been doing well at haddock fishing Jeffreys with the 14- and 16-ounce Lav Jigs. The striped bass fishing has been decent in the

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Saco River; the tube and worm combo is still the most productive method when fishing from the boat. Friends Pete and Max fished Thursday afternoon and caught a couple dozen fish mostly in the slot, with the largest fish measuring over 36 inches – not bad river fishing at the end of July. Beach fishermen have been doing well early in the morning, or late in the evening. Bait of choice: live eels. The mackerel fishing is still strong. My father fished in front of Wood Island Friday morning and caught all he wanted in an hour. Mustad Flasher rigs with a heavy jig was the ticket. Dad said they were so thick you didn’t even need chum. I guess the bluefish have moved out of Saco Bay. Capt. Joe Tufts from Rock & Reel Charters said they had caught quite a few bluefish off Richmond Island, using Gag’s poppers and Yozuri Hydro Magnums to keep the rods bent. The bluefin tuna report is promising, with many anglers catching them trolling, on the hook, and flying kites. Eon Bexon was in the shop a few days ago getting his squid rig repaired after a giant he landed thrashed it. John Bergeron on Angler Management caught a beauty just over 80 inches long late in July while fishing at anchor. The weather and seas look promising in early August, this coming week, so I should have a good offshore report for you next month. Craig Bergeron has been a manager at Saco Bay Tackle in Saco, Maine for 16 years. He’s an avid saltwater fisherman who loves to teach people the art of serious offshore fishing techniques, from custom line splicing to rigging squid rigs for bluefin tuna.

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South: Yellowfin, mahi-mahi, marlin and wahoo By Elisa Jackman brings. For Points East Water temps are finally warming up, and the boniRhode Island had record-breaking rainfall the to and albacore should begin frequenting the waters month of July, but this did not hamper the inshore of the south shore. Green Hill, Point Judith Light and fishing conditions along the south shore. With a very up into Narragansett Bay are locations to try for large Rhode Island recreational legal limit on fluke, these fast-moving targets. DeadlyDicks, Swedish 21 inches, it was a challenge for most anglers. Many Pimples, and Fastrac Rebels are some favorite lures fish were released; however, the keepers were all very to try for these finicky fish. Offshore fishing this year has been challenging. big. Bryan Denblenyer aboard the TLC landed an 11.2- Small bluefin tuna have been sporadically caught south of Block Island from the Fairway pound summer flounder, which was Buoy to the Acid Barge out to the south large enough to win the Snug side of Cox’s Ledge. Trolling Hex Harbor Marina Doormat Derby Heads and Green Machines worked Fluke Tournament. Gisele best in the early season. If the fish setGolembeski landed the second tle in and eat some of the plentiful largest fluke of the tournament sand eels and whiting that have filled and won the women’s division with the Mud Hole and Acid Barge areas, a 10.2-pounder. As water temperathen chunking with butterfish should tures increase, deeper waters (65 to certainly do the trick. Check the web 75 feet) and Block Island waters (www.snugharbormarina.com) for upwill have best results. to-date tuna reports. Scup and sea bass fishing are Fishing from the canyons at providing great action and usually Hydrographers, Veatch, and the Fish frequent waters close to home. Tales, has produced many mahi-mahi, Center wall of the Point Judith some over 30 pounds. Small yellowfin Harbor of Refuge out to the Bell tuna and occasional bigeye tuna Buoy are great starting points. As Photo courtesy Snug Harbor Marina have also been reported. Waters are the season progresses, fishing Junior angler Mike Arbor hauled in warm enough for white and blue around Block Island improves, as this 6.3-pound fluke while fishing marlin and possibly even wahoo. Be will the areas of the East Grounds. from the Jackhammer. sure to check temperature charts for Anglers have had little trouble finding the striped bass this season. Point Judith the best temperature breaks. These locations are posLight, Green Hill, North Rip and south side of Block sibly the best fishing spots. Be sure to enjoy the awealong with the Southwest Ledge have had great line- some fishing September has to offer. Elisa Jackman, a Point Judith Pond native, has sides fishing. These locations are the spots to try through October. Eels in the early morning and at managed the tackle shop at Wakefield, R.I.’s Snug night yield the largest stripers. Don Smith fished Harbor Marina (www.snugharbormarina.com) for along Block Island’s south side and landed a 48- over 16 years and has spent her life fishing the waters pounder. Daily 40- to 50-pound fish have been of Block Island Sound. weighed in. Can’t wait to see what the fall fishing

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Points East September 2009

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Points East September 2009

57


September Tides New London, Conn.

Bridgeport, Conn. 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

03:45 AM 04:26 AM 05:04 AM 05:40 AM 12:06 AM 12:43 AM 01:20 AM 02:00 AM 02:44 AM 03:32 AM 04:28 AM 05:30 AM 12:33 AM 01:39 AM 02:40 AM 03:35 AM 04:26 AM 05:14 AM 06:00 AM 12:33 AM 01:20 AM 02:07 AM 02:56 AM 03:47 AM 04:41 AM 05:38 AM 12:30 AM 01:26 AM 02:18 AM 03:04 AM

0.8 0.6 0.4 0.3 7.2 7.1 7.1 6.9 6.7 6.5 6.3 6.2 0.7 0.6 0.3 0.0 -0.3 -0.4 -0.4 7.7 7.5 7.1 6.8 6.4 6.1 6.0 1.3 1.2 1.1 0.9

L L L L H H H H H H H H L L L L L L L H H H H H H H L L L L

09:51 AM 10:33 AM 11:12 AM 11:49 AM 06:16 AM 06:51 AM 07:27 AM 08:05 AM 08:48 AM 09:36 AM 10:32 AM 11:36 AM 06:36 AM 07:42 AM 08:43 AM 09:40 AM 10:32 AM 11:20 AM 12:07 PM 06:45 AM 07:29 AM 08:14 AM 09:01 AM 09:52 AM 10:47 AM 11:47 AM 06:37 AM 07:34 AM 08:27 AM 09:14 AM

6.5 6.8 7.0 7.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.7 0.9 1.0 1.1 6.2 6.5 6.9 7.4 7.8 8.2 8.4 -0.3 0.0 0.3 0.7 1.1 1.4 1.5 6.0 6.1 6.4 6.7

H H H H L L L L L L L L H H H H H H H L L L L L L L H H H H

03:58 PM 04:41 PM 05:22 PM 06:00 PM 12:24 PM 12:59 PM 01:34 PM 02:13 PM 02:56 PM 03:46 PM 04:44 PM 05:50 PM 12:44 PM 01:52 PM 02:56 PM 03:54 PM 04:49 PM 05:40 PM 06:29 PM 12:53 PM 01:38 PM 02:24 PM 03:12 PM 04:04 PM 05:00 PM 06:00 PM 12:47 PM 01:45 PM 02:38 PM 03:26 PM

1.0 0.8 0.6 0.5 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.4 7.2 7.2 1.0 0.7 0.4 0.0 -0.4 -0.6 -0.6 8.3 8.1 7.8 7.4 7.0 6.6 6.4 1.5 1.4 1.2 0.9

L L L L H H H H H H H H L L L L L L L H H H H H H H L L L L

10:08 PM 10:50 PM 11:28 PM

06:38 PM 07:17 PM 07:57 PM 08:40 PM 09:29 PM 10:25 PM 11:27 PM

06:59 PM 08:05 PM 09:07 PM 10:04 PM 10:56 PM 11:45 PM

07:17 PM 08:05 PM 08:53 PM 09:43 PM 10:36 PM 11:32 PM 07:00 PM 07:57 PM 08:48 PM 09:34 PM

6.9 7.0 7.1

0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.5 0.6 0.7

7.2 7.4 7.6 7.8 7.9 7.9

-0.5 -0.2 0.1 0.5 0.9 1.2 6.4 6.4 6.6 6.7

H H H L L L L L L L

H H H H H H L L L L L L

H H H H

12:03 AM 12:36 AM 01:09 AM 01:43 AM 02:15 AM 02:47 AM 03:18 AM 03:51 AM 04:26 AM 05:06 AM 12:53 AM 01:52 AM 02:56 AM 04:03 AM 05:09 AM 12:02 AM 12:42 AM 01:20 AM 01:58 AM 02:35 AM 03:12 AM 03:49 AM 04:27 AM 12:11 AM 01:02 AM 01:56 AM 02:55 AM 03:57 AM 04:56 AM 05:45 AM

0.7 0.5 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.2 3.2 3.1 3.2 3.4 3.7 0.1 -0.1 -0.3 -0.4 -0.3 -0.2 0.0 0.2 3.2 3.0 2.8 2.8 2.8 3.0 3.3

L L L L L L L L L L H H H H H L L L L L L L L H H H H H H H

06:22 AM 07:03 AM 07:39 AM 08:13 AM 08:47 AM 09:22 AM 10:00 AM 10:42 AM 11:28 AM 12:20 PM 05:55 AM 06:56 AM 08:14 AM 09:40 AM 10:53 AM 06:08 AM 07:01 AM 07:51 AM 08:38 AM 09:25 AM 10:12 AM 11:00 AM 11:49 AM 05:07 AM 05:53 AM 06:50 AM 08:11 AM 09:46 AM 10:48 AM 11:34 AM

3.2 3.4 3.7 3.8 3.9 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 3.9 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.3 0.1 4.2 4.6 4.8 5.0 4.9 4.7 4.4 4.0 0.5 0.7 1.0 1.1 1.0 0.9 0.7

H H H H H H H H H H L L L L L H H H H H H H H L L L L L L L

11:50 AM 12:35 PM 01:17 PM 01:58 PM 02:36 PM 03:13 PM 03:48 PM 04:25 PM 05:07 PM 05:57 PM 01:17 PM 02:19 PM 03:27 PM 04:36 PM 05:40 PM 11:54 AM 12:49 PM 01:40 PM 02:28 PM 03:13 PM 03:55 PM 04:36 PM 05:18 PM 12:41 PM 01:35 PM 02:33 PM 03:35 PM 04:35 PM 05:27 PM 06:10 PM

02:09 AM 02:47 AM 03:22 AM 03:57 AM 04:31 AM 05:05 AM 05:41 AM 12:05 AM 12:47 AM 01:33 AM 02:26 AM 03:31 AM 04:42 AM 12:05 AM 01:00 AM 01:52 AM 02:41 AM 03:28 AM 04:13 AM 04:57 AM 05:42 AM 12:05 AM 12:56 AM 01:50 AM 02:48 AM 03:52 AM 04:58 AM 05:58 AM 12:43 AM 01:26 AM

0.5 0.4 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 2.7 2.5 2.4 2.3 2.3 2.3 0.3 0.1 0.0 -0.1 -0.2 -0.1 0.0 0.1 2.7 2.5 2.4 2.3 2.2 2.3 2.4 0.6 0.6

L L L L L L L H H H H H H L L L L L L L L H H H H H H H L L

08:01 AM 08:41 AM 09:20 AM 09:58 AM 10:35 AM 11:11 AM 11:47 AM 06:20 AM 07:04 AM 07:55 AM 08:55 AM 10:00 AM 11:05 AM 05:48 AM 06:46 AM 07:38 AM 08:27 AM 09:15 AM 10:03 AM 10:51 AM 11:39 AM 06:29 AM 07:20 AM 08:17 AM 09:18 AM 10:19 AM 11:18 AM 12:13 PM 06:48 AM 07:31 AM

2.5 2.7 2.8 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.1 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.6 0.5 2.5 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.5 3.6 3.6 3.5 0.3 0.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.8 2.5 2.7

H H H H H H H L L L L L L H H H H H H H H L L L L L L L H H

02:19 PM 03:01 PM 03:40 PM 04:18 PM 04:57 PM 05:39 PM 06:24 PM 12:24 PM 01:06 PM 01:56 PM 02:57 PM 04:08 PM 05:19 PM 12:09 PM 01:10 PM 02:09 PM 03:04 PM 03:56 PM 04:46 PM 05:36 PM 06:26 PM 12:29 PM 01:21 PM 02:17 PM 03:18 PM 04:24 PM 05:28 PM 06:22 PM 01:03 PM 01:49 PM

0.6 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.3 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 0.4 0.2 0.0 -0.1 -0.2 -0.2 -0.1 0.0 3.4 3.2 3.0 2.8 2.7 2.7 2.7 0.7 0.6

L L L L L L L H H H H H H L L L L L L L L H H H H H H H L L

1.6 1.3 1.0 0.7 9.8 10.0 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.3 10.2 10.2 1.3 1.0 0.6 0.0 -0.5 -1.0 -1.2 11.4 11.2 10.9 10.4 9.9 9.5 9.1 2.3 2.2 2.0 1.6

L L L L H H H H H H H H L L L L L L L H H H H H H H L L L L

0.6 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.5 0.7 3.9 3.9 3.9 4.0 4.2 -0.1 -0.3 -0.4 -0.4 -0.2 0.0 0.2 0.5 3.7 3.4 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.3

L L L L L L L L L L H H H H H L L L L L L L L H H H H H H H

06:49 PM 07:25 PM 07:58 PM 08:32 PM 09:06 PM 09:44 PM 10:24 PM 11:09 PM 11:59 PM

07:06 PM 09:12 PM 10:30 PM 11:20 PM 06:36 PM 07:27 PM 08:14 PM 09:00 PM 09:47 PM 10:33 PM 11:21 PM

06:06 PM 07:10 PM 09:03 PM 10:08 PM 10:48 PM 11:22 PM 11:55 PM

3.5 3.7 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.7 3.6 3.5 3.3 0.8 0.8 0.6 0.3

4.4 4.5 4.5 4.4 4.2 3.9 3.5

0.8 1.1 1.1 1.0 0.9 0.7 0.4

H H H H H H H H H L L L L

H H H H H H H

L L L L L L L

Boat Detailing By Yacht North “We come to YOU!”

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

03:44 AM 04:26 AM 05:04 AM 05:41 AM 12:07 AM 12:45 AM 01:24 AM 02:03 AM 02:46 AM 03:33 AM 04:25 AM 05:23 AM 12:13 AM 01:17 AM 02:19 AM 03:18 AM 04:13 AM 05:04 AM 05:52 AM 12:32 AM 01:21 AM 02:09 AM 02:58 AM 03:48 AM 04:41 AM 05:38 AM 12:18 AM 01:17 AM 02:12 AM 03:01 AM

1.1 0.9 0.7 0.5 10.0 10.0 9.9 9.7 9.5 9.2 8.9 8.7 0.5 0.3 0.1 -0.3 -0.7 -0.9 -0.9 11.1 10.8 10.3 9.7 9.1 8.6 8.2 1.5 1.6 1.5 1.3

L L L L H H H H H H H H L L L L L L L H H H H H H H L L L L

09:57 AM 10:39 AM 11:18 AM 11:54 AM 06:17 AM 06:53 AM 07:30 AM 08:09 AM 08:51 AM 09:37 AM 10:28 AM 11:26 AM 06:26 AM 07:31 AM 08:34 AM 09:33 AM 10:28 AM 11:18 AM 12:06 PM 06:39 AM 07:24 AM 08:10 AM 08:56 AM 09:45 AM 10:36 AM 11:31 AM 06:37 AM 07:35 AM 08:28 AM 09:16 AM

8.5 8.8 9.2 9.5 0.4 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.7 0.9 1.1 1.3 8.7 8.9 9.3 9.9 10.5 11.0 11.3 -0.8 -0.4 0.1 0.7 1.3 1.8 2.1 8.1 8.1 8.4 8.7

07:14 PM 08:09 PM 09:08 PM 10:08 PM 11:07 PM

2.9 2.9 2.9 2.9 2.8 2.8

H H H H H H

3.2 3.3 3.3 3.3 3.2 3.0 2.9

H H H H H H H

0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.3

06:22 PM 07:17 PM 08:06 PM 08:53 PM 09:40 PM 10:28 PM 11:16 PM

L L L L L

07:19 PM 08:14 PM 09:12 PM 10:10 PM 11:05 PM 11:56 PM

0.2 0.4 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.7 2.7 2.8

H H

10:06 PM 10:49 PM 11:29 PM

9.6 9.8 10.0

H H H

06:43 PM 07:49 PM 08:53 PM 09:53 PM 10:49 PM 11:42 PM

10.3 10.5 10.8 11.1 11.3 11.3

H H H H H H

06:49 PM 07:47 PM 08:41 PM 09:30 PM

9.0 9.0 9.2 9.4

H H H H

07:08 PM 07:49 PM

L L L L L L

Weekly, Bi-Weekly or As Needed Service AFFORDABLE, CONVENIENT. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED!

“We’re on the job, so you can be on the water.”

H H H H L L L L L L L L H H H H H H H L L L L L L L H H H H

03:47 PM 04:32 PM 05:14 PM 05:54 PM 12:29 PM 01:04 PM 01:40 PM 02:18 PM 03:00 PM 03:47 PM 04:40 PM 05:39 PM 12:28 PM 01:33 PM 02:37 PM 03:37 PM 04:33 PM 05:27 PM 06:17 PM 12:52 PM 01:37 PM 02:23 PM 03:10 PM 03:59 PM 04:52 PM 05:50 PM 12:29 PM 01:28 PM 02:24 PM 03:14 PM

07:07 PM 07:55 PM 08:43 PM 09:33 PM 10:25 PM 11:20 PM

0.4 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4

-1.1 -0.9 -0.4 0.2 0.7 1.2

L L L L L L L

L L L L L L

“The Ultimate Wood Sealer” Stops rot and mold • Strengthens soft wood

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Yacht North Group 182 Christopher Rd, Suite 1, North Yarmouth, ME 04097-6733 207-221-5285 • info@yachtnorth.com • www.yachtnorth.com

06:34 PM 07:13 PM 07:54 PM 08:37 PM 09:24 PM 10:15 PM 11:12 PM

Clear Penetrating Epoxy Sealer

Compounding, Waxing, Wash and Chamois Metal Polishing, Interior Cleaning

58 Points East September 2009

08:20 PM 08:58 PM 09:35 PM 10:12 PM 10:49 PM 11:27 PM

Boston, Mass.

Newport, R.I. 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

RESTORATION & REFINISHING PRODUCTS

• We Ship Daily • Dealers Wanted

editor@pointseast.com


September Tides Portland, Maine 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

03:44 AM 1.0 04:26 AM 0.8 05:03 AM 0.6 05:36 AM 0.5 06:08 AM 0.4 12:32 AM 9.6 01:08 AM 9.5 01:45 AM 9.3 02:27 AM 9.1 03:13 AM 8.8 04:05 AM 8.6 05:04 AM 8.4 06:10 AM 8.3 01:03 AM 0.4 02:10 AM 0.1 03:11 AM -0.3 04:06 AM -0.6 04:57 AM -0.9 05:45 AM -0.9 12:24 AM 10.7 01:13 AM 10.4 02:01 AM 9.9 02:51 AM 9.3 03:42 AM 8.8 04:36 AM 8.3 05:34 AM 7.9 12:19 AM 1.4 01:19 AM 1.5 02:13 AM 1.4 03:01 AM 1.2

L L L L L H H H H H H H H L L L L L L H H H H H H H L L L L

09:54 AM 10:35 AM 11:12 AM 11:46 AM 12:18 PM 06:39 AM 07:12 AM 07:48 AM 08:28 AM 09:13 AM 10:04 AM 11:02 AM 12:07 PM 07:19 AM 08:26 AM 09:26 AM 10:21 AM 11:11 AM 11:58 AM 06:31 AM 07:16 AM 08:01 AM 08:48 AM 09:37 AM 10:30 AM 11:28 AM 06:35 AM 07:33 AM 08:26 AM 09:13 AM

8.2 8.5 8.8 9.0 9.3 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.2 8.5 8.9 9.5 10.1 10.5 10.8 -0.7 -0.4 0.1 0.7 1.2 1.7 2.0 7.7 7.8 8.0 8.3

H H H H H L L L L L L L L H H H H H H L L L L L L L H H H H

03:48 PM 04:30 PM 05:09 PM 05:45 PM 06:21 PM 12:50 PM 01:23 PM 02:00 PM 02:41 PM 03:27 PM 04:21 PM 05:21 PM 06:28 PM 01:17 PM 02:25 PM 03:28 PM 04:25 PM 05:19 PM 06:10 PM 12:44 PM 01:29 PM 02:15 PM 03:02 PM 03:51 PM 04:46 PM 05:45 PM 12:29 PM 01:29 PM 02:25 PM 03:14 PM

Bar Harbor, Maine 1.5 1.2 0.9 0.7 0.5 9.5 9.7 9.8 9.9 9.9 9.8 9.8 9.8 1.0 0.6 0.0 -0.5 -0.9 -1.1 10.9 10.7 10.4 10.0 9.5 9.0 8.7 2.1 2.1 1.8 1.5

L L L L L H H H H H H H H L L L L L L H H H H H H H L L L L

10:03 PM 10:44 PM 11:22 PM 11:57 PM

9.3 9.5 9.6 9.6

H H H H

07:38 PM 08:45 PM 09:46 PM 10:42 PM 11:34 PM

10.0 10.3 10.6 10.9 10.9

H H H H H

06:46 PM 07:45 PM 08:39 PM 09:26 PM

8.6 8.6 8.8 9.0

H H H H

06:57 PM 07:34 PM 08:16 PM 09:01 PM 09:52 PM 10:50 PM 11:55 PM

06:59 PM 07:47 PM 08:36 PM 09:27 PM 10:21 PM 11:18 PM

0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5

-1.1 -0.8 -0.4 0.2 0.7 1.1

L L L L L L L

L L L L L L

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

03:21 AM 04:04 AM 04:43 AM 05:18 AM 05:51 AM 12:12 AM 12:48 AM 01:25 AM 02:06 AM 02:52 AM 03:44 AM 04:43 AM 05:50 AM 12:46 AM 01:53 AM 02:54 AM 03:49 AM 04:40 AM 05:28 AM 12:04 AM 12:52 AM 01:40 AM 02:29 AM 03:20 AM 04:14 AM 05:11 AM 06:11 AM 12:57 AM 01:51 AM 02:40 AM

1.0 0.7 0.5 0.3 0.3 11.1 11.0 10.8 10.6 10.3 10.0 9.7 9.6 0.4 0.1 -0.4 -0.8 -1.1 -1.2 12.4 12.0 11.4 10.8 10.1 9.5 9.1 9.0 1.5 1.4 1.2

L L L L L H H H H H H H H L L L L L L H H H H H H H H L L L

Corrections for other ports Port Reference Maine/ New Hampshire Bar Harbor Stonington Rockland Bar Harbor Boothbay Harbor Portland Portland Kennebunkport Portsmouth Portland

Massachusetts Gloucester Plymouth Scituate Provincetown Marion Woods Hole

Rhode Island Westerly Point Judith East Greenwich Bristol

Connecticut Stamford New Haven Branford Saybrook Jetty Saybrook Point Mystic Westport

Time Corrections

Height Corrections

High +0 hr. 8 min., Low +0 hr. 6 min., High +0 hr. 9 min., Low +0 hr. 6 min., High -0 hr. 6 min., Low -0 hr. 8 min., High +0 hr. 7 min., Low +0 hr. 5 min., High +0 hr. 22 min., Low +0 hr. 17 min.,

High *0.91, Low *0.90 High *0.93, Low *1.03 High *0.97, Low *0.97 High *0.97, Low *1.00 High *0.86, Low *0.86

Boston Boston Boston Boston Newport Newport

High +0 hr. 0 min., Low -0 hr. 4 min., High +0 hr. 4 min., Low +0 hr. 18 min., High +0 hr. 3 min., Low -0 hr. 1 min., High +0 hr. 16 min., Low +0 hr. 18 min., High +0 hr. 10 min., Low +0 hr. 12 min., High +0 hr. 32 min., Low +2 hr. 21 min.,

High *0.93, Low *0.97 High *1.03, Low *1.00 High *0.95, Low *1.03 High *0.95, Low *0.95 High *1.13, Low *1.29 High *0.40, Low *0.40

New London Newport Newport Newport

High -0 hr. 21 min., Low +0 hr. 3 min., High -0 hr. 1 min., Low +0 hr. 32 min., High +0 hr. 13 min., Low +0 hr. 3 min., High +0 hr. 13 min., Low +0 hr. 0 min.,

High *1.02, Low *1.00 High *0.87, Low *0.54 High *1.14, Low *1.14 High *1.16, Low *1.14

Bridgeport Bridgeport Bridgeport New London New London Boston Newport

High +0 hr. 3 min., Low +0 hr. 8 min., High -0 hr. 4 min., Low -0 hr. 7 min., High -0 hr. 5 min., Low -0 hr. 13 min., High +1 hr. 11 min., Low +0 hr. 45 min., High +1 hr. 11 min., Low +0 hr. 53 min., High +0 hr. 1 min., Low +0 hr. 2 min., High +0 hr. 9 min., Low +0 hr. 33 min.,

High *1.07, Low *1.08 High *0.91, Low *0.96 High *0.87, Low *0.96 High *1.36, Low *1.35 High *1.24, Low *1.25 High *1.01, Low *0.97 High *0.85, Low *0.85

09:30 AM 10:12 AM 10:50 AM 11:25 AM 11:57 AM 06:23 AM 06:56 AM 07:31 AM 08:10 AM 08:54 AM 09:46 AM 10:46 AM 11:53 AM 06:59 AM 08:05 AM 09:05 AM 10:00 AM 10:50 AM 11:38 AM 06:14 AM 06:59 AM 07:45 AM 08:32 AM 09:22 AM 10:16 AM 11:14 AM 12:15 PM 07:09 AM 08:03 AM 08:50 AM

9.6 9.9 10.3 10.6 10.8 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.7 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.4 9.8 10.3 11.0 11.7 12.2 12.5 -1.0 -0.6 0.0 0.7 1.3 1.8 2.2 2.3 9.0 9.3 9.7

H H H H H L L L L L L L L H H H H H H L L L L L L L L H H H

03:32 PM 04:15 PM 04:55 PM 05:31 PM 06:06 PM 12:30 PM 01:04 PM 01:40 PM 02:21 PM 03:08 PM 04:02 PM 05:04 PM 06:12 PM 01:04 PM 02:12 PM 03:14 PM 04:11 PM 05:03 PM 05:53 PM 12:24 PM 01:09 PM 01:55 PM 02:43 PM 03:33 PM 04:28 PM 05:26 PM 06:27 PM 01:14 PM 02:09 PM 02:57 PM

1.5 1.2 0.9 0.6 0.4 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.3 11.2 11.1 11.1 1.2 0.7 0.0 -0.6 -1.1 -1.3 12.6 12.4 12.0 11.4 10.8 10.3 10.0 9.8 2.2 1.9 1.5

L L L L L H H H H H H H H L L L L L L H H H H H H H H L L L

09:42 PM 10:24 PM 11:02 PM 11:38 PM

10.7 10.9 11.0 11.1

H H H H

07:21 PM 08:27 PM 09:27 PM 10:23 PM 11:14 PM

11.4 11.8 12.2 12.5 12.6

H H H H H

07:25 PM 08:18 PM 09:06 PM

9.9 10.1 10.4

H H H

2.3 1.7 1.2 0.7 0.3 19.1 19.3 19.3 19.2 19.0 18.7 18.5 18.5 1.8 1.0 -0.1 -1.1 -1.8 -2.2 21.3 20.9 20.3 19.4 18.4 17.6 17.0 16.7 3.5 3.0 2.3

L L L L L H H H H H H H H L L L L L L H H H H H H H H L L L

09:43 PM 10:27 PM 11:07 PM 11:45 PM

18.0 18.4 18.7 18.9

H H H H

07:29 PM 08:33 PM 09:32 PM 10:27 PM 11:18 PM

18.9 19.5 20.2 20.8 21.1

H H H H H

07:24 PM 08:18 PM 09:08 PM

16.8 17.1 17.7

H H H

06:41 PM 07:18 PM 07:58 PM 08:43 PM 09:34 PM 10:32 PM 11:37 PM

06:42 PM 07:30 PM 08:18 PM 09:09 PM 10:02 PM 10:59 PM 11:58 PM

0.3 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6

-1.2 -0.9 -0.5 0.1 0.7 1.2 1.4

L L L L L L L

L L L L L L L

Eastport, Maine 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

03:20 AM 04:06 AM 04:48 AM 05:26 AM 06:04 AM 12:22 AM 12:59 AM 01:37 AM 02:18 AM 03:04 AM 03:55 AM 04:52 AM 05:56 AM 12:58 AM 02:02 AM 03:04 AM 04:00 AM 04:52 AM 05:41 AM 12:07 AM 12:54 AM 01:41 AM 02:28 AM 03:17 AM 04:09 AM 05:04 AM 06:03 AM 12:52 AM 01:48 AM 02:40 AM

1.7 1.2 0.7 0.3 0.1 19.0 18.9 18.7 18.4 18.0 17.5 17.0 16.9 0.9 0.3 -0.4 -1.2 -1.8 -2.0 21.0 20.5 19.7 18.8 17.7 16.8 16.1 15.7 2.7 2.5 2.0

L L L L L H H H H H H H H L L L L L L H H H H H H H H L L L

09:26 AM 10:10 AM 10:51 AM 11:28 AM 12:05 PM 06:40 AM 07:17 AM 07:56 AM 08:37 AM 09:22 AM 10:14 AM 11:12 AM 12:16 PM 07:02 AM 08:07 AM 09:08 AM 10:03 AM 10:54 AM 11:42 AM 06:28 AM 07:14 AM 07:59 AM 08:45 AM 09:33 AM 10:24 AM 11:18 AM 12:16 PM 07:02 AM 07:58 AM 08:48 AM

16.6 17.2 17.8 18.4 18.8 0.1 0.2 0.4 0.8 1.2 1.7 2.1 2.1 17.1 17.8 18.8 19.9 20.7 21.2 -1.8 -1.2 -0.4 0.6 1.7 2.6 3.3 3.6 15.7 16.1 16.8

H H H H H L L L L L L L L H H H H H H L L L L L L L L H H H

03:37 PM 04:22 PM 05:04 PM 05:43 PM 06:21 PM 12:40 PM 01:17 PM 01:55 PM 02:37 PM 03:24 PM 04:17 PM 05:17 PM 06:23 PM 01:22 PM 02:27 PM 03:28 PM 04:24 PM 05:17 PM 06:06 PM 12:28 PM 01:14 PM 02:00 PM 02:47 PM 03:36 PM 04:29 PM 05:26 PM 06:25 PM 01:14 PM 02:10 PM 03:01 PM

07:00 PM 07:39 PM 08:20 PM 09:05 PM 09:55 PM 10:51 PM 11:52 PM

06:53 PM 07:40 PM 08:27 PM 09:15 PM 10:04 PM 10:57 PM 11:54 PM

0.1 0.0 0.1 0.3 0.6 0.9 1.0

-2.1 -1.6 -0.8 0.1 1.1 1.9 2.5

L L L L L L L

L L L L L L L

Charter Maine! Bareboat • Crewed • Power • Sail Trawlers • DownEast Cruisers

“We’re on the job, so you can be on the water.”

Yacht North Charters 182 Christopher Rd, Suite 1, North Yarmouth, ME 04097-6733 207-221-5285 • info@yachtnorth.com • www.yachtnorth.com

www.pointseast.com

interport arine.ccom Full-Service marina in the center of Winterport Village, Maine 207-223-8885

ING XPLOR IVER E N E H R SW OT VISIT UNIC PENOBSC E C THE S Points East September 2009

59


YARDWORK/people and pro j ects

Goetz unveils fast, lightweight 65-foot sportfisher Goetz Custom Technologies in Bristol, R.I., will soon start building a lightweight carbon-fiber sportfishing boat called the G65. It will be up to 30 percent lighter than comparably sized fiberglass boats, thus will be faster, more maneuverable, and more fuel-efficient than boats of more conventional construction. The G65 will cruise comfortably at 36 knots with a top end speed close to 50 knots. The G65 will use cutting-edge pre-preg carbon-fiber materials in both hull and superstructure, which lowers the center of gravity and provides excellent stability. Goetz is using the same technology employed in Grand Prix racing boats like Popeye and ocean-racers like PUMA’s il mostro, which placed second in the Volvo Around the World Race. The G65 is 65 feet LOA and 56-feet, eight inches on

the waterline. The beam is 18 feet, eight inches, the draft is four feet, 10 inches, and the displacement is 75,000 lbs. The G65 is powered by three (yes, three!) Volvo IPS third-generation rotating pod-drives developing 3600 horsepower. In other Goetz news, it has signed an order for its first G58 semi-custom sailboat, designed by German Frers Naval Architects. The buyer is from the United States and plans on entering it in select regattas worldwide. Initial design work is in progress, with launch next spring. Use of aerospace-grade carbon fiber coupled with an aircraft-grade interior should result in fine performances. For more details, visit www.goetzboats.com.

Every Now And Then

All The Stars Align

The New Eastern 248 Explorer

Size +Finish +Performance +Price +Perfection +

P.O. Box 1040,11 Industrial Way, Milton, NH 03851 (603) 652-9213

For the dealer nearest you visit

www.easternboats.com 60 Points East September 2009

Briefly Gemini Marine Canvas and Marine Products of Rockland, Maine, has hired Peter Lindquist as sales manager and production assistant. Lindquist has spent the past six years at Bohndell Sails and Rigging in Rockport, Maine, and as a digital photographic consultant at the Penobscot Marine Museum. He also served as marketing consultant to the schooner Nathaniel Bowditch, which sails out of Rockland. Lindquist is a native of Cape Elizabeth. FMI: www.geminicanvas.com. Maine Yacht Center, in Portland, Maine, is installing an 80-ton marine Travelift as part of an extensive expansion project. MYC recently completed dredging the fairway channel west of the marina, and the new channel, eight feet deep at mean low water, creates an approach to the new Travelift piers. Maine Yacht Center will be the only full-service marine facility between Midcoast Maine and Boston capable of hauling and storing boats of any size up to 80 plus feet. FMI: www.maineyacht.com.

editor@pointseast.com


Confessions

Part 5: The rich, famous and straight and narrow By Bob Witherill For Points East A little-known figure in the world of boats is the marine-compass adjuster. Bob Witherill of Belfast, Maine, has been one for more than a quarter-century, and his “Confessions of a Compass Adjuster” will reveal the highlights of a colorful life devoted to keeping mariners in the middle of the channel. Yes, I know Bob Dole personally – not the one you’re thinking of, but a college professor of the same name. Since I was once a college professor myself, I can’t make fun of them, but we do get a little absent-minded now and then. This Bob Dole loved boats, and he had quite a few of them. He would usually call me in the spring and have me come and adjust the compass on his latest boat. Bob is a real nice guy, but like most academics, he had quite a few questions. Normally, I wouldn’t mind too much, but when you are trying to concentrate on the job at hand it can be a little distracting. However, his money was good, so I let him fire away. Questions like, Do you think I should have bought a different brand of compass? Isn’t this compass still one degree off? Well, one year his compass was 20 degrees off. It was a brand-new compass, and I fussed with it for quite a while, but I could not correct it. It was a Ritchie, and they are almost always perfect. I finally decided that this compass was faulty in manufacture. The compass card was out of alignment with the lubber line by 20 degrees. I called Ritchie, and they said they would send him a new one. A couple of weeks later, Bob called me and said the new compass had arrived. We set a date to install and adjust it. We met in Rockland, Maine, on a cloudy day. He had driven from Waterville; I, from Northport. About the time we arrived, the heavens opened up. It continued to rain very hard, but Bob was anxious to have his compass swung. “OK, Bob, I said, “If you’re game, I am.” I have a plastic cover for the gyro so I can use it in the rain. We had to go out into the harbor for about 20 minutes to get to an area where we could swing the compass. When we got to the area, I said, “OK, let’s mount the compass,” and Bob said, “Oh gee, I left it in the car.” Needless to say, I recalled a few choice words I might have said, but kept them to myself. It took another 20 minutes to get back to the dock, pick up the compass, and return to the adjusting area. So it was an hour and twenty minutes travel plus an hour to adjust the compass, all in the pouring rain. I should have charged him double, but, of course I didn’t. I’m www.pointseast.com

of a compass adjuster

just too nice a guy. Yeah, right! You may have heard of the Bemis Bag Company, now known simply as The Bemis Company, established in 1858. While they made their name manufacturing bags for large-capacity bulk products, like 100 pounds of sugar or cement, today they are known as “the largest flexible-packaging company in the Americas.” One of the principals of this company was Alan Bemis, who had a summer estate at Brooklin, Maine, that looked more like a castle from the water. He had his own amphibious plane for a while and could land on the water and drive it up a concrete ramp into a hangar. Pretty neat. Alan could tell a yarn, and actually preceded Maine comic Tim Sample with Downeast humor. Alan also had a beautiful 35-foot red yawl named Cirrus. Cirrus would probably cost several-hundred thousand today, but Alan told me he paid $5,000 for it brand-new about 1950. Anyway, Alan called me one day and asked me to come and swing the compass on Cirrus. I had never met Alan before, so it was an education. The compass was recessed into the cockpit floor but could be raised up out of the recess to a height of about 30 inches. Well, we swung the compass, and it was perfect. I didn’t have to touch it. “Now,” says Alan, “Since you didn’t have to do anything, you aren’t going to charge me are you?” I thought Alan was pulling my leg, but I wasn’t sure. I said, “Alan, before I came fifty-five miles over here from Northport, you didn’t know if you could trust this compass or not. You could be out in the fog, and figure it might be off a little one way or the other, and try to compensate by steering the opposite way. Next thing you know, you are on a ledge. Now you know you really can rely on your compass.” Here was a multimillionaire, who could buy anything he wanted, quibbling over a compass fee. He kept a straight face, but I still think he was having fun with me. I’ll never know because I presented him with a bill and he paid it. He died a number of years ago, but Cirrus is still sailing, a fact for which her compass can take no little credit. In the next installment of “Confessions,” I travel to Florida to correct the compass on a 40-foot fiberglass trawler-type named Golden Rings owned by legendary surveyor Guilford “Giffy” Full. Points East September 2009

61


Maine’s Largest Sailmaker

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Toll Free 888-788-SAIL

207-223-8885

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Find Points East at more than 650 locations in New England MAINE

Arundel:The Landing School. Augusta: Mr. Paperback. Baileyville: Stony Creek Bangor: Borders, Book Marc’s, Harbormaster, Young’s Canvas. Bar Harbor: Acadia Information Center, Bar Harbor Yacht Club, Lake and Sea Boatworks. Bass Harbor: Morris Yachts. Bath: Kennebec Tavern & Marina, Maine Maritime Museum. Belfast: Belfast Boatyard, Belfast Chamber of Commerce visitors’ center, Coastwise Realty, Fertile Mind Books, Harbormaster’s office. Biddeford: Biddeford Pool Y.C., Buffleheads, Rumery’s Boatyard. Blue Hill:, Blue Hill Farm Country Inn, Blue Hill Food Co-op, Blue Hill Peninsula Chamber of Commerce, Compass Point Realty, Downeast Properties, EBS, Kollegewidgwok Y.C., North Light Books, Rackliffe Pottery, Slaven Realty. Boothbay: Boothbay Mechanics, Boothbay Resort. Boothbay Harbor: Boothbay Harbor Inn, Boothbay Harbor Shipyard, Brown’s Motel, Cap’n Fish’s Inn, Carousel Marina, Gold/Smith Gallery, Grover’s Hardware, Municipal Office, Poole Bros. Hardware, Rocktide Inn, Sherman’s Bookstore, Signal Point Marina, Tugboat Inn. Bremen: Broad Cove Marine. Brewer: B&D Marine, Port Harbor Marine. Bristol: Hanley’s Market. Brooklin: Atlantic Boat Co., Brooklin General Store, Brooklin Boat Yard, Brooklin Inn, Center Harbor Sails, Eric Dow Boatbuilder, Eggemoggin Oceanfront Lodge, WoodenBoat School. Brooksville: Bucks Harbor Market, Bucks Harbor Marine, Bucks Harbor Y.C., Seal Cove Boatyard. Brunswick: Bamforth Automotive, Coastal Marine, H&H Propeller, New Meadows Marina, Paul’s Marina. Bucksport: Bookstacks, EBS Hardware. Calais: EBS Hardware. Camden: Camden Chamber of Commerce, Camden Y.C., French & Brawn, Harbormaster, Owl & Turtle, PJ Willeys, Port Harbor Marine, Waterfront Restaurant, Wayfarer Marine. Cape Porpoise: The Wayfarer. Castine: Castine Realty, Castine Y.C., Four Flags Gift Shop, Maine Maritime Academy, Saltmeadow Properties, The Compass Rose Bookstore and Café. Chebeague Island: Chebeague Island Boat Yard. Cherryfield: EBS Hardware. Columbia: Crossroads Ace Hardware. Cundyʼs Harbor: Holbrook’s General Store, Watson’s General Store. Damariscotta: Maine Coast Book Shop, Poole Bros. Hardware, Schooner Landing Restaurant. Deer Isle: Harbor Farm, Pilgrim’s Inn. East Boothbay: East Boothbay General Store, Lobsterman’s Wharf Restaurant, Ocean Point Marina, Paul E. Luke Inc., Spar Shed Marina. Eastport: East Motel, Eastport Chowder House, Marine Technology Center, Moose Island Marine, WaCo Diner. Eliot: Great Cove Boat Club, Independent Boat Haulers, Patten’s Yacht Yard. Ellsworth: Branch Pond Marine, EBS Hardware, Pirie Marine, Riverside Café. Falmouth: Hallett Canvas & Sails, Portland Yacht Club, Sea Grill at Handy Boat, The Boathouse, Town Landing Market. Farmingdale: Foggy Bottom Marine. Farmington: Irving’s Restaurant, Mr. Paperback, Reny’s. Freeport: Gritty McDuff’s, True Value Hardware. Georgetown: Robinhood Marine. Gouldsboro: Anderson Marine & Hardware. Hampden: Hamlin’s Marina, Watefront Marine. Hancock Pt.: Crocker House Country Inn. Harpswell: Dolphin Restaurant, Finestkind Boatyard, Great Island Boat Yard. Harrington: Tri-Town Marine. Holden: McKay’s RV. Islesboro: Dark Harbor Boat Yard, Tarratine Club of Dark Harbor. Islesford: Little Cranberry Y.C. Jonesport: Jonesport Shipyard. Kennebunk: Kennebunk Beach Improvement Assoc., Landing Store, Seaside Motor Inn. Kennebunkport: Arundel Yacht Club, Bradbury’s Market, Chick’s Marina, Kennebunkport Marina, Maine Yacht Sales. Kittery: Badger’s Island Marina, Cap’n Simeon’s Galley, Frisbee’s Store, Jackson’s Hardware and Marine, Kittery Point Yacht Yard, Port Harbor Marine. Lewiston: Mr. Paperback. Machias: EBS Hardware, H.F. Pinkham & Son. Milbridge: H.F. Pinkham & Son. Monhegan Is: Carina House, Island Inn. North Haven: Calderwood Hall, Eric Hopkins Gallery, JO Brown & Sons, North Haven Giftshop. Northeast Harbor: F.T. Brown Co., Full Belli Deli, Kimball Shop, Mt. Desert CofC,, McGraths, Northeast Harbor Fleet, Pine Tree Market. Northport: Northport Marine Service, Northport Yacht Club. Owls Head: Owls Head Transportation Museum. Peakʼs Island: Hannigan’s Island Market. Penobscot: Northern Bay Market. Port Clyde: Port Clyde General Store.

64 Points East September 2009

Portland: Becky’s Restaurant, Casco Bay Ferry Terminal, Chase Leavitt, Custom Float Services, DiMillo’s Marina, Fortune, Inc., Gilbert’s Chowder House, Gowen Marine, Gritty McDuff’s, Hamilton Marine, Maine Yacht Center, Portland Yacht Services, Ports of Call, Sawyer & Whitten, Vessel Services Inc., West Marine. Raymond: Jordan Bay Marina, Panther Run Marina. Rockland: Atlantic Challenge, Back Cove Yachts, E.L.Spear, Eric Hopkins Gallery, Gemini Marine Canvas, Hamilton Marine, Harbormaster, Journey’s End Marina, Knight Marine Service, Landings Restaurant, Maine Lighthouse Museum, North End Shipyard Schooners, Ocean Pursuits, Pope Sails, Reading Corner, Rockland Ferry, Sawyer & Whitten. Rockport: Bohndell Sails, Cottage Connection, Harbormaster, Market Basket, Rockport Boat Club, Rockport Corner Shop, Rockport Marine. Round Pond: Cabadetis Boat Club, King Row Market. Saco: Marston’s Riverside Anchorage, Saco Bay Tackle, Saco Yacht Club. Scarborough: Seal Harbor Y.C. Seal Harbor: Seal Harbor Yacht Club Searsport: Hamilton Marine. South Bristol: Bittersweet Landing Boatyard, Coveside Marine, Gamage Shipyard, Harborside Café, Osier’s Wharf. South Freeport: Brewer’s South Freeport Marine, Casco Bay Yacht Exchange, DiMillo’s South Freeport, Harraseeket Y.C., Strouts Point Wharf Co., Waterman Marine. South Harpswell: Dolphin Marina, Finestkind Boatyard, Ship to Shore Store South Portland: Aspasia Marina, Centerboard Yacht Club, Joe’s Boathouse Restaurant, Port Harbor Marine, Reo Marine, Salt Water Grill, South Port Marine, Sunset Marina. Southwest Harbor: Acadia Sails, Great Harbor Marina, Hamilton Marine, Hinckley Yacht Charters, MDI Community Sailing Center, Pettegrow’s, Sawyer’s Market, Southwest Harbor-Tremont CofC, West Marine, Wilbur Yachts. Spruce Head: Spruce Head Marine. Stockton Springs: Russell’s Marine. Stonington: Billings Diesel & Marine, Fisherman’s Friend, Inn on the Harbor, Lily’s Café, Shepard’s Select Properties. Sullivan: Flanders Bay Boats. Sunset: Deer Isle Y.C. Surry: Wesmac. Swanʼs Island: Carrying Place Market Tenants Harbor: Cod End Store and Marina, East Wind Inn, Halls Market. Thomaston: Harbor View Tavern, Jeff’s Marine, Lyman-Morse Boatbuilding. Turner: Youly’s Restaurant. Vinalhaven: Jaret & Cohn Island Group, Vinal’s Newsstand, Vinalhaven Store. Waldoboro: Stetson & Pinkham. Wells: Lighthouse Depot, Webhannet River Boat Yard. West Boothbay Harbor: Blake’s Boatyard. West Southport: Boothbay Region Boatyard, Southport General Store. Windham: Richardson’s Boat Yard. Winter Harbor: Winter Harbor 5 & 10. Winterport: Winterport Marine. Wiscasset: Ames Hardware, Wiscasset Yacht Club. Woolwich: Scandia Yacht Sales, Shelter Institute. Yarmouth: Bayview Rigging & Sails, East Coast Yacht Sales, Landing Boat Supply, Maine Sailing Partners, Royal River Boatyard, Royal River Grillehouse, Yankee Marina & Boatyard, Yarmouth Boatyard. York: Agamenticus Yacht Club, Woods to Goods, York Harbor Marine Service.

NEW HAMPSHIRE Dover: Dover Marine. Dover Point: Little Bay Marina. Gilford: Fay’s Boat Yard, Winnipesaukee Yacht Club. Greenland: Sailmaking Support Systems. Hampton: Hampton River Boat Club. Milton: Ray’s Marina & RV Sales. New Castle: Kittery Point Yacht Club, Portsmouth Yacht Club, Wentworth-ByThe-Sea Marina. Newington: Great Bay Marine, Portsmouth: New England Marine and Industrial, West Marine. Seabrook: West Marine. Tuftonboro: Tuftonboro General Store.

MASSACHUSETTS Barnstable: Coast Guard Heritage Museum at the Trayser, Millway Marina. Beverly: Bartlett Boat Service, Beverly Point Marina, Jubilee Yacht Club. Boston: Boston Harbor Islands Moorings, Boston Yacht Haven, Columbia Yacht Club, The Marina at Rowes Wharf, Waterboat Marina. Bourne: Taylor’s Point Marina Braintree: West Marine. Buzzards Bay: Dick’s Marine, Onset Bay Marina. Cataumet: Kingman Marine, Parker’s Boat Yard. Charlestown: Constitution Marina, Shipyard Quarters Marina. Chatham: Ryders Cove Marina, Stage Harbor Marine. Chelsea: The Marina at Admiral’s Hill. Cohasset: Cohasset Y.C. Cotuit: Peck’s Boats. Cuttyhunk: Cuttyhunk Town Marina. Danvers: Danversport Yacht Club, Liberty Marina, West Marine. Dedham: West Marine.

editor@pointseast.com


Dighton: Shaw’s Boat Yard. Dorchester: Savin Hill Yacht Club. East Boston: Boston Harbor Shipyard & Marina, Orient Heights Yacht Club, Quarterdeck Marina. East Dennis: Dennis Yacht Club, North Side Marina. Edgartown: Boat Safe Martha’s Vineyard, Edgartown Moorings, Edgartown Yacht Club, Harborside Inn. Essex: Flying Dragon Antiques, Perkins Marine. Fairhaven: Fairhaven Shipyard, West Marine. Falmouth: East Marine, Falmouth Harbor Town Marina, Falmouth Marine, MacDougall’s Cape Cod Marine Service, West Marine. Gloucester: Beacon Marine Basin, Brown’s Yacht Yard, Cape Ann’s Marina Resort, Enos Marine, Three Lanterns Ship Supply. Green Harbor: Green Harbor Marina, Taylor Marine. Harwich Port: Allen Harbor Marine Service, Cranberry Liquors, Saquatucket Municipal Marina. Hingham: 3A Marine Sales, Eastern Yacht Sales, Hewitts Cove Marina, Hingham Shipyard Marinas, Hingham Yacht Club. Hyannis: Hyannis Marina, West Marine. Ipswich: Ipswich Bay Yacht Club. Manchester: Manchester Marine, Manchester Yacht Club. Marblehead: Boston Yacht Club, Corinthian Yacht Club, , Dolphin Y.C., Eastern Yacht Club, Lynn Marine Supply Co., Marblehead Yacht Club, The Forepeak, West Marine. Marion: Barden’s Boat Yard, Beverly Yacht Club, Burr Bros. Boats, Harding Sails, West Marine. Marston Mills: Prince’s Cove Marina. Mattapoisett: Mattapoisett Boatyard. Nantucket: Glyns Marine, Nantucket Boat Basin, Nantucket Moorings, Nantucket Y.C., Town Pier Marina. New Bedford: C.E. Beckman, Cutty Hunk Launch, IMP Fishing Gear, Lyndon’s, Neimic Marine, New Bedford Visitors Center, Pope’s Island Marina, Skip’s Marine, West Marine. Newburyport: American Boat Sales, American Yacht Club, Merri-Mar Yacht Basin, Newburyport Boat Basin, Newburyport Harbor Marina, Newburyport Yacht Club, North End Boat Club, The Boatworks, Windward Yacht Yard. North Falmouth: Brewer Fiddler’s Cove Marina. North Weymouth: Tern Harbor Marina. Oak Bluffs: Dockside Marketplace. Onset: Point Independence Yacht Club. Orleans: Nauset Marine. Osterville: Crosby Yacht Yard, Oyster Harbors Marine Service. Peabody: West Marine. Plymouth: Brewer’s Plymouth Marine, Plymouth Yacht Club, West Marine. Provincetown: Harbormaster. Quincy: Captain’s Cove Marina, Marina Bay, POSH, Squantum Yacht Club, Wollaston Yacht Club. Salem: , Fred J. Dion Yacht Yard, Hawthorne Cove Marina, H&H Propeller Shop, Palmer’s Cove Yacht Club, Pickering Wharf Marina, Salem Water Taxi, Winter Island Yacht Yard. Salisbury: Bridge Marina. Sandwich: Sandwich Marina, Sandwich Ship Supply. Scituate: A to Z Boatworks, Cole Parkway Municipal Marina, Front Street Book Shop, Scituate Harbor Marina, Scituate Harbor Y.C. Seekonk: E&B Marine, West Marine. Somerset: Auclair’s Market, J&J Marine Fabricators South Dartmouth: Cape Yachts, Davis & Tripp Boatyard, Doyle Sails, New Bedford Y.C., New Wave Yachts. Vineyard Haven: Owen Park Town Dock, Vineyard Haven Marina. Watertown: Watertown Yacht Club. Wareham: Zecco Marine. Wellfleet: Bay Sails Marine, Town of Wellfleet Marina, Wellfleet Marine Corp. West Barnstable: Northside Village Liquor Store. West Dennis: Bass River Marina. Westport: F.L.Tripp & Sons, Osprey Sea Kayak Adventures, Westport Marine, Westport Y.C. Weymouth: Monahan’s Marine. Winthrop: Cottage Park Y.C., Cove Convenience, Crystal Cove Marina, Pleasant Point Y.C., Winthrop Book Depot, Winthrop Lodge of Elks, Winthrop Y.C. Woburn: E&B Marine, West Marine. Woods Hole: Woods Hole Marina. Yarmouth: Arborvitae Woodworking.

RHODE ISLAND Barrington: Barrington Y.C., Brewer Cove Haven Marina, Lavin’s Marina, Stanley’s Boat Yard, Striper Marina. Block Island: Ballard’s Inn, Block Island Boat Basin, Block Island Marina, Champlin’s, Harbormaster, Old Harbor Dock, Payne’s New Harbor Dock. Bristol: Aidan’s Irish Pub, All Paint, Bristol Bagel Works, Bristol Marine, Bristol Yacht Club, Hall Spars & Rigging, Herreshoff Marine Museum, Jamestown Distributors, Quantum Thurston Sails, Superior Marine. Central Falls: Twin City Marine. Charlestown: Ocean House Marina. Cranston: Edgewood Yacht Club, Port Edgewood Marina, Rhode Island Yacht Club. East Greenwich: Anderson’s Ski & Dive Center, East Greenwich Yacht Club, Norton’s Shipyard & Marina, West Marine. East Providence: East Providence Yacht Club. Jamestown: Conanicut Marine Supply, Dutch Harbor Boatyard.. Narraganset: West Marine.

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Newport: Armchair Sailor, Brewer Street Boatworks, Casey’s Marina, Goat Island Marina, IYRS, Museum of Yachting, New York Yacht Club, Newport Harbor Hotel & Marina, Newport Nautical Supply, Newport Yacht Club, Old Port Marine Services, Sail Newport, Seamen’s Church Institute, The Newport Shipyard, West Marine, West Wind Marina. North Kingstown: Allen Harbor Marina, Johnson’s Boatyard, RI Mooring Services. Portsmouth: Brewer Sakonnet Marina, East Passage Yachting Center, Eastern Yacht Sales, Hinckley Yacht Services, Life Raft & Survival Equipment, Ship’s Store and Rigging, The Melville Grill. Riverside: Bullock’s Cove Marina. Tiverton: Don’s Marine, Ocean Options, Quality Yacht Services, Standish Boat Yard. Wakefield: Point Jude Boats, Point Judith Marina, Point Judith Yacht Club, Point View Marina, Ram Point Marina, Silver Spring Marine, Snug Harbor Marine, Stone Cove Marina. Warren: West Marine. Warwick: Appanoag Harbor Marina, Brewer Yacht Yard at Cowesett, Greenwich Bay Marina, Pettis Boat Yard, Ponaug Marina, Warwick Cove Marina. Wickford: Brewer Wickford Cove Marina, Johnson’s Boatyard, Marine Consignment of Wickford, Pleasant Street Wharf, Wickford Marina, Wickford Shipyard, Wickford Yacht Club. CONNECTICUT

Branford: Birbarie Marine, Branford River Marina, Branford Yacht Club, Brewer Bruce & Johnson’s Marina, Dutch Wharf Boat Yard, Indian Neck Yacht Club, Pine Orchard Yacht Club, West Marine. Byram: Byram Town Marina. Chester: Castle Marina, Chester Marina, Hays Haven Marina, Middlesex Yacht Club. Clinton: Cedar Island Marina, Connecticut Marine One, Harborside Marina, Old Harbor Marina, Port Clinton Marina, Riverside Basin Marina, West Marine. Cos Cob: Palmer Point Marina. Darien: E&B Marine, Noroton Yacht Club. Deep River: Brewer Deep River Marina. East Haddam: Andrews Marina East Norwalk: Rex Marine. Essex: Boatique, Brewer Dauntless Shipyard, Essex Corinthian Yacht Club, Essex Island Marina, Essex Yacht Club. Fairfield: J. Russell Jinishian Gallery, West Marine. Farmington: Pattaconk Yacht Club. Greenwich: Beacon Point Marine, Indian Harbor Yacht Club. Groton: Pine Island Marina, Shennecossett Yacht Club. Guilford: Brown’s Boat Yard, Guilford Boat Yard, Harbormaster. Lyme: Cove Landing Marine. Madison: East River Marine. Milford: Flagship Marina, Milford Boat Works, Milford Landing, Milford Yacht Club, Port Milford, Spencer’s Marina, West Marine. Mystic: Brewer Yacht Yard, Fort Rachel Marina, Gwenmor Marina, Mason Island Yacht Club, Mystic Point Marina, Mystic River Yacht Club, Mystic Seaport Museum Store, Mystic Shipyard, West Marine. New Haven: City Point Yacht Club, Fairclough Sails, Oyster Point Marina. New London: Crocker’s Boatyard, Ferry Slip Dockominium Assoc., Hellier Yacht Sales, Thames Shipyard and Ferry, Thames Yacht Club, Thamesport Marina, West Marine. Niantic: Boats Inc., Mago Pt. Marina, Port Niantic Marina, Three Belles Marina. Noank: Brower’s Cove Marina, Hood Sails, Noank Village Boatyard, Palmers Cove Marina, Ram Island Yacht Club, Spicer’s. Norwalk: Norwest Marine, Rex Marine, Total Marine, West Marine. Norwich: The Marina at American Wharf. Old Lyme: Old Lyme Marina. Old Saybrook: Brewer’s Ferry Point Marina, Harbor Hill Marina & Inn, Harbor One Marina, Island Cove Marina, Oak Leaf Marina, Ocean Performance, Ragged Rock Marina, Saybrook Point Marina, West Marine. Portland: Yankee Boat Yard & Marina. Riverside: Riverside Yacht Club. Rowayton: All Seasons Marina, Wilson Cove Marina. South Norwalk: Norwalk Yacht Club, Rex Marine Center, Surfside 3 Marina. Stamford: Brewer Yacht Haven Marina, Czescik Marina, Halloween Yacht Club, Hathaway Reiser Rigging, Landfall Navigation, Ponas Yacht Club, Prestige Yacht Sales, Stamford Landing Marina, Stamford Yacht Club, West Marine, Z Sails. Stonington: Dodson Boat Yard, Dog Watch Café, Madwanuck Yacht Club, Stonington Harbor Yacht Club. Stratford: Brewer Stratford Marina. Waterford: Defender Industries. Westbrook: Atlantic Outboard, Brewer Pilots Point Marina, Pier 76 Marina, Sound Boatworks. West Haven: West Cove Marina. Westport: Cedar Point Yacht Club.

NEW YORK Sag Harbor: Sag Harbor Yacht Club. West Islip: West Marine.

Points East September 2009

65


DISPATCHES/f ro m the ha rb or master s

Rain + cold + down economy = a slow summer duous effort, not just because of the dissension, but because of the actual work involved. “I never imagined how much time this job would take,” says Asch. “I am a public official, but I am also a volunteer” (as are all Connecticut harbormasters). “But, I love the harbor; I love boating and I know the regs. I ran marinas in the area for twenty-five years.” At the moment, the town has no public docks and no transient moorings, but three yacht clubs can accommodate the handful of transients that Greenwich currently sees. Incidentally, “It’s been a slow start to the season for the local boaters, mostly because of the rain,” he says. Assistant harbormaster John Hole takes a long look at the season. Things weren’t so good in June, mostly because of the rain, but activity has picked up in the last three weeks in Newport, R.I.’s usually hopping harbor. The summer music series has bolstered traffic, and he told me he’d had five boats come in the last hour. “Things start to fill up on Thursday. We’ve been getting a couple of phone calls an hour,” he says. “Outside of this phone call [mine], there’s nothing odd or out of the ordinary to report.

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By Carol Standish For Points East Jonathan Asch is Greenwich, Conn.’s first-ever active harbormaster! Seems hard to believe, but it’s true. The water is held in trust for public use. The State of Connecticut requires all users to apply for a permit. “Nobody’s ever bothered to do that before,” says Asch. Two years ago, he and the town’s first selectman, Peter Testei, and volunteer John Crane set about to set things right – that is to comply with federal regulations by requiring permits and assigning moorings. The proposal was voted down the first time, but since it was passed just about a year ago, a lot has been accomplished in a short amount of time. “We got rid of all the illegal moorings and reconfigured the mooring fields, installing 750 moorings in the town’s several harbors located along 28 miles of coastline between Port Chester and Stamford. Greenwich has joined the twenty-first century!” he says. The town charges $100 a season per mooring. “Who can complain about that,” Asch asks. As with any civic action, it has been a long and ar-

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It’s quiet but busy. I like it quiet.” Martha’s Vineyard is such a popular cruising destination I was sure that if anyone was having a “normal” season it would be that island. I talked to Will Schrade, seasonal assistant harbormaster and student at St. Lawrence University when he’s not on the Edgartown, Mass., docks. “We’re on-and-off busy,” he says. “Transient traffic is down. We have open moorings every night. About half the local boats are in the water. I tell people to come on ahead, even if they don’t have a reservation. We can find a place for them.” The office is fully staffed, in spite of the slow traffic. “We have one of the largest areas to patrol so we haven’t got a choice,” says Schrade. “And the pumpout boat is going all day.” So far, it’s been the sixth slowest season since records have been kept. Even the Fourth of July was quiet. “It was the first fourth ever where there were no accidents,” says Schrade with a note of incredulity in his voice. Dick Gordon reports that recreational traffic is about half what it ought to be in Portsmouth, N.H. “Moorings aren’t full. People aren’t putting their boats in, but when the Tall Ships come we’ll see a lot more activity. Right now, most of the action is from seals in the Piscataqua, and they’re the biggest seals I’ve ever seen up river – 800 to 900 pounds – and

they’re all the way into Great Bay. The river is full of bait.” Patrick Feeney is one of Cutler, Maine’s, three harbormasters. He is also a lobster fisherman and the father of two kids, 7 and 4. After fishing and running errands all day, he still had the energy and courtesy to return my call after supper. I asked him about the volume of recreational boating traffic he’s seen this summer, and his answer was pretty gloomy. “There’s not nearly as many sailboats. We used to have as many as 400 a season, sometimes 30 or 40 at a whack. No yacht-club groups at all so far, which is a shame. I don’t think we’ve seen 50 sailboats all summer. There were always some big, big ones that used to stay two or three nights – not one this year. Customs usually comes over to this side [of the Canadian/U.S border] to clear the boats before they start across. They haven’t come once this year.” Feeney hasn’t seen as many land tourists this year, either. Summer traffic seems to have been declining for the past two or three years. He figures that Cutler, next door to Lubec, the jump-off to Canada, is just too far to go in a bad economy with high gas prices. The rain hasn’t helped either. “People can’t make enough to tuck away some; they’re just going to put their heads down and try to get by. People aren’t traveling. They’re just waiting to see what happens.”

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AMENITIES

of

) (W iFi W (L) )• y (P dr ) ne un (B ho La it yp ) • Ba ) Pa s (S (I) el(D er Ice ies er ow G) ) D th Sh s ( (G ) O ) ) • ie as (C (O r (R oce l: G NG ds ) s r e C ar (P om G Fu (P) tbo op ) ro C) u Pr (E ne st y ( pa • O • cs Re dler ro (I) (F) oni L) P r R an ds ss ct Ch ar gla Ele h ( o r c nb be ) • un ties : I Fi (R La li p Faci e irs ) • g m pa (W gin as a t Re od Rig e•R pou -ph o • n /3 le W S) )ra Pum 220 Cab ( / • il •(C • Sa )ift ter 110 ne LOA •(L Wa er: pho ax s ay le M w th ilw er Po Te )a s: / B el p (R u gs nn ok rin ha Ho oo C M HF nt V sie an Tr

#

MARINA

CITY

TEL#

MASSACHUSETTS BUZZARDS BAY South Wharf Yacht Yard Burr Brothers Boats Inc. Kingman Yacht Center Brewer Fiddler's Cove Marina

So Dartmouth Marion Cataumet North Falmouth

508-990-1011 508-748-0541 508-563-7136 508-564-6327

9 68 71 9

110/220 0/12 135' 4/4 55' 110 20/20 120' ALL 0/3 55' P/C 110/220

CAPE COD Crosby Yacht Yard, Inc.

Osterville

508-428-6900

9

Hyannis Marina

Hyannis

BOSTON SOUTH Brewer Plymouth Marine Hingham Shipyard Marinas Captains Cove Marina Boston Waterboat Marina Constitution Marina

Plymouth Hingham Quincy Boston Boston

ALL ALL ALL ALL

G/D G/D/C G/D G/D

I ALL W I R/S W C/G/I C/I ALL W

10/3 110' C ALL W/P L/RL

ALL

G/D

C/I

R/S W

508-790-4000

9/72 0/30 200' C ALL W/P L/RL

ALL

ALL

ALL

ALL P/W

508-746-4500 781-749-6647 617-479-2440 617-523-1027 617 241-9640

9/72 9 69 9 69

0/25 100' P/C 110/220 20/30 120' 110 0/20 80' ALL 12/20 145' ALL 0/100 200' C 110

ALL

G/D G/D

ALL

C/I/B G/I I C/I I

ALL ALL R/S ALL ALL

NORTH SHORE Fred J. Dion Yacht Yard Salem Manchester Marine Manchester-By-The-Sea

978-744-0844 978-526-7911

9 72

6/8 100' 5/3 45'

L/C

I/W/F/P/S/R/E P/C

G/I

R/S

Enos Marine/Pier 7 Newburyport Marinas Merri-Mar Yacht Basin Inc.

978-281-1935 978-465-9110 978-465-3022

16 /7 1/1 60' P 71 50/50 150’ C 5/5 100'

L/C C L/C/RL L/C

ALL I/O/F/P/E

I C/I ALL I

R/S R/S W ALL R/S

603-781-4528 603.436.5299

68

Gloucester Newburyport Newburyport

W W/P W/P W/P

W/P L/C W/P L/C W/P W/P W/P

ALL W 110 110/220 110/220 110/220

L/C L/C/RL RL L/C

W/P W/P W/P W/P

G/D

I/O/F/P/S/R/E G/D

I/W/F/P/S/R/E

W W W W

NEW HAMPSHIRE Marina at Harbour Place Portsmouth Great Bay Marine Newington / Portsmouth

180' C ALL W 110 W/P L/C/RL ALL CALL65'

G/D/C

C/I/B ALL W


2009 MARINA LISTINGS DOCKAGE

SERVICES

AMENITIES

of

) (W iFi W (L) )• y (P dr ) ne un (B ho La it yp ) • Ba ) Pa s (S (I) el(D er Ice ies er ow G) ) D th Sh s ( (G ) O ) ) • rie as (C (O (R oce l: G NG rds P) s C a ( r e om G Fu (P) utbo rop E) e ( ro C) st y ( an • O • P cs Re ler op (I) (F) oni ) r d P s s tr (RL an rd las ec Ch oa rg El ch nb be ) • un es : I Fi (R La iliti p irs ) • g ac e pa (W gin am t F as Re od Rig e•R pou -ph o • n 3 le / W S) )ra Pum 220 Cab ( / • A il •(C • Sa )ift ter 110 ne LO •(L Wa er: pho ax s ay w le M rth e ilw Po : Te )a s / B el (R up gs nn ok rin ha Ho oo C M HF nt V sie an Tr

#

MARINA

CITY

TEL#

PORTLAND SOUTH Kittery Point Yacht Yard York Harbor Marine Service Webhannet River Boat Yard, Inc Kennebunkport Marina

Kittery York Harbor Wells Kennebunkport

207-439-9582 207-363-3602 207-646-9649 207-967-3411

Rumery's Boat Yard Spring Point Marina

Biddeford 207 282-0408 South Portland 207-767-3213

9

South Port Marine DiMillo's Old Port Marina

South Portland 207-799-8191 Portland 207-773-7632

9 0/12 150' P/C 110/220 W/P L/C/RL ALL 9 /71 CALL250' C 110 W/P

Portland Yacht Services Maine Yacht Center

Portland Portland

207-774-1067 207-842-9000

9 9

Handy Boat Service Inc. Yankee Marina & Boatyard Royal River Boatyard Strouts Point Wharf Co Brewer South Freeport Marine

Falmouth Yarmouth Yarmouth South Freeport South Freeport

207-781-5110 207-846-4326 207-846-9577 207 865 3899 207-865-3181

9 9

BOOTHBAY REGION Paul's Marina New Meadows Marina Dolphin Marina Kennebec Tavern Marina

Brunswick Brunswick Harpswell Bath

207-729-3067 207-443-6277 207-833-5343 207-442-9636

Robinhood Marine Center Boothbay Region Boatyard Carousel Marina Ocean Point Marina Coveside Restaurant & Marina

Georgetown 207-371-2525 Boothbay Harbor207-633-2970 Boothbay Harbor207-633-2922 E. Boothbay 207-633-0773 South Bristol 207-644-8282

9 9 9 9/18 9

Broad Cove Marina

Medomak

9/16 2/0 35'

MAINE

207-529-5186

71 6/2 85' 9/6 1/CALL 45' 16/9 42' 9 0/1 30'

9 9

9 9

110/220 110/220

110

0/2 50' 110 0/35 200' C 110

W/P W/P W/P W/P

W/P L/C W/P L/C

10/

500'+ 220' P 0/20 150' C 40/ 125' CALL CALL65' 2/4 70' 2/2 90' 3/8 130'

R R/L RL RL

C/RL

ALL I/O/F/P/S/R/E G/D I/W/F/P/S/R/E

ALL ALL

110/220

W/P L/RL W/P L/C/RL W/P C W/P

2/0 40' 0/4 24' 20/12 80' CALL 38'

110 110 110

W/P C W C/RL W/P L/RL W

15/10 65'

110

110/220 110/220 110/220

40/40 80' 27/15 180'

110 5/5 150' C 110/220 11/call 80’ 110

W/P W/P W/P W/P W/P W/P

ALL C/I

ALL W ALL P/W

I

ALL W

G/D ALL

C/G/I ALL W C/I R P/W

ALL ALL ALL

110

G/D/P G/D

I/W/F/P/S/R/E

W/P L W/P L/C

110/220

G/D

C/I/B R/S R C/I/B ALL P/W

I/O/W/F/P/R/E

I/O/F/P/E

C/I C/I I C/I

ALL W ALL R/S ALL W

C/I C/I I G/I

R R/S W R R P/W

ALL G/D/C ALL G/D

C/I C/I C/G/I C/I I

ALL ALL ALL ALL R/S

G/D

G/I

R/L P/W

G/D I/O/W/F/P/S/R/E G/D ALL G/D

ALL I/O/P

G/D G/D G

L/C ALL L/C ALL RL R/C/RL ALL RL I/O/F/P

I R/S C/I ALL P C/I/B R/L

W P/W W W


2009 MARINA LISTINGS DOCKAGE

SERVICES

AMENITIES

of

) (W iFi W (L) ) • ry d (P ) un ne ho • La it (B a yp ) Pa s (S I) B ) ( (C er e Ic NG ow ) )C Sh (G ) (P ) • es (O e (R eri an ds ) c p s o ar (P o om Gr ) Pr bo p ) ro C) ut ro (E P D ( st • O ) • ics el( Re ry e ) (I) (F n ies dl s s tro (RL )D an rd las ec oa rg El ch Ch as(G nb be ) • un es : I Fi (R La iliti :G c e el p irs ) • g a Fu pa (W gin am ut F has Re d ig •R p oo R ane mpo /3- le • W S) 0 ab u )r ( (C • P /22 • C il • Sa L)ift ater 110 one LOA •( r: h x W a e ay lep M rths w ilw e Po Te )a s: / B el (R up gs nn ok rin ha Ho oo C M HF nt V sie an Tr

#

MARINA MIDCOAST Port Clyde General Store Journey's End Marina Knight Marine Service Ocean Pursuits Camden Town Docks Wayfarer Marine Dark Harbor Boat Yard Belfast Public Landing Bucksport Marina Winterport Marine Hamlin's Marina Billings Diesel & Marine

CITY

TEL#

Port Clyde Rockland Rockland Rockland Camden Camden Dark Harbor Belfast

207-372-6543 207-594-4444 207-594-4068 207-596-7357 207-236-7969 207-236-4378 207-734-2246 207-338-1142

20/ 50' 9 CALL 9/18 0/14 225' 110 9 16/9 110' P/C 110 25/0 110 71 59/20 110' 110/220 9 20/0 65' 9/16 6/25 160' 110/220

Bucksport Winterport Hampden Stonington

207-469-5902 207-223-8885 207-941-8619 207-367-2328

16 0/6 90' 9/16 2/5 50' 6/CALL48' 9 16 10/15

MDI Hinckley Yacht Service-ME Dysart's Great Harbor Marina John Williams Boat Company Town of Northeast Harbor

So.W. Harbor So.W. Harbor Mount Desert No.E. Harbor

207-244-5572 207-244-0117 207-244-5600 207-276-5737

10 9 9 9

110/220 W/P L/C ALL 70/0 120' 0/90 180' ALL W/P 10/0 70' L/C/RL ALL 50/ CALL165' P/C 110/220 W/P RL

DOWNEAST Jonesport Shipyard Moose Island Marine Eastport Lobster & Fuel

Jonesport Eastport Eastport

207-497-2701 207-853-6058 207-853-4700

9 10

5/0 42' 2/0 CALL 48'

902- 742-7311 902-354-4028

0/12 75' 68/16 3/15 45'

110 110

W W

506-529-5170

14/16 18/0 220'

110

W/P RL

110 110 110 110/220

W W/P L/C W L C/RL

G/D ALL G/D I/W/F/P/S/R/E G/D ALL G/D W/P L/C/RL O/W/F/P/S/R/E G/D/C W R/L/C ALL G/D W/P RL G/D W/P RL I/O/F/P/R/E G W/P RL ALL G/D/P W RL ALL G/D W/P L/C ALL G/D

W W

C/RL L/C RL

D/P/C D

C/G/I R/L C/I R/S C/I ALL W G/I C/G/I C/I I G/I/B C/I C/I

R ALL ALL R/S ALL ALL R ALL

W P/W P W P

G/D

C/I ALL P C/G/I ALL P/W W R/S P/W

G/D

C ALL W C/I/B R/S P G/I ALL P/W

W/F/P/R/E O/I/W/F

CANADA

NOVA SCOTIA Parker-Eakins Wharf & Marina Yarmouth Brooklyn Marina Brooklyn NEW BRUNSWICK St Andrews Market Wharf St Andrews

RL

C/G/I ALL P/W I R/S P/W I

ALL


FETCHING

ALONG/David

Buckm an

David Buckman photo

The Leight has Southern Harbor on Otter Island in Muscongus Bay all to herself.

A foggy day at Otter Island I knew before coming fully awake that the woolly mists had filled in, for the light coming through the cabin window was as dull as dishwater, and foggy dewdrops plashed gently on the cabin top. The Leight was the sole occupant of the thumbprint of an anchorage at Otter Island in Muscongus Bay, and a pregnant stillness was in the air. Peering through the port, all I could see was that a clammy river of vapors had reduced the scene to a few shades of pale gray. “Thick-o,” I muttered, giving the mate a brief summary of my findings. Asking her thoughts on our plans to get under way, Leigh replied, “Hmm,” yawned and fell silent. I assumed she was mulling over the possibilities, but soon realized she’d fallen back to sleep, which spoke volumes, and before long I drifted off as well. What a luxury it was, yielding to the fog, snug in the little cabin, and untroubled by the prospect of worrying our way 40 sea-splintered miles eastward. Rising at length, I set the lantern alight, tuned in Rob McCall’s “Awanadjo Almanack” on WERU (89.9 FM, Sundays, 8:30 a.m.), crawled back under the covers and listened as the naturalist and philosopher chronicled the arrival of monarch butterflies, blackeyed Susans and the ripening of blueberries on Blue Hill Mountain. Unfailingly interesting, it’s the best five minutes on radio. It takes time to adjust to a day with nothing on the 72 Points East September 2009

agenda. Gazing into the murk, the world hardly existed a few yards beyond the sloop, and it was for us to color the occasion. Soon the heady aroma of sizzling bacon, eggs and home fries roused us from our listlessness. Cleaning up the cabin after breakfast, we undertook a few fiddling and long-put-off maintenance tasks, finding some pleasure in making a workmanlike job of them, absent the usual press of time. At the sound of a lobsterboat somewhere off in the mists, I looked out the hatch but could only see a lone guillemot hovering astern. We’ve noticed these little black birds, with their white wing crests, hanging close aboard many times, and imagined they enjoyed the sounds of Coltrane and Mozart on the radio. Fluffing up a pillow and retreating into the pages of a book and quiet conversation, there is no better environment for going deep in literature or cultivating common ground. Midday brought a brightening, and we went ashore for a walk among trees gilded with millions of tiny crystal gazing balls, the world deaf with fog. There was a lonely edge to it, and at length we returned to the comfy cabin, poured a glass of ruby wine, and were soon lost in the soft billows of a nap. There are few bad days on the coast, just hours that can be more profitably spent. David Buckman sails out of Round Pond, Maine. editor@pointseast.com


LAST

WORD/W. R. Ch en ey

Photo courtesy W.R. Cheney

Penelope gets a 40th birthday present After 40 years of faithful service, the wheel on Penelope, a 1967 Marshall 22 catboat, was showing signs of age. A certain relaxation had set into all its joints, and unlike its owner, who has become increasingly stiff with the passage of years, it was becoming ever more flexible. Our once stern and rigid helm was metamorphosing into something better described as a

floppy disc. This yielding, almost malleable, quality could be unnerving at times. Beating into a crowded harbor got to be even more thrilling than usual: a fresh breeze, you’re close-hauled passing just to leeward of a moored gold-plater – cocktail party in full swing in her cockpit – a gust heels you over, and weather helm

Keep your little boats afloat Let The Bilge Rat™ tend your boat while you're away

Patent pending

Ideal for: DOCKSIDE DINGHY OR INFLATABLE MOORED DAYSAILERS

Solar charged • Compact, portable, self-contained 12-volt electronic sensing switch • 500-gph pump

www.thebilgerat.com www.thebilgerat.com

Rugged fiberglass case • Sealed maintenance-free battery

Patten Marine Consulting, Inc. • thebilgerat@comcast.net • Kittery, Maine 03904 • (207) 206-2423 www.pointseast.com

Points East September 2009

73


comes on strong as you force the wheel over to stop her from rounding up and joining the festivities just to windward. What, you are compelled to wonder at such times, would happen if your creaky, floppy old wheel should choose just that moment to disintegrate in your hands? Thoughts such as those coupled with the realization that, now into her 41st year, Penelope was due for a belated 40th birthday present, led to the decision that a new wheel was in order. But then the problem was finding a wheel worthy of the occasion. A search of the usual marine suppliers and the Internet did not at first produce anything to my liking. What I really wanted was a 19th-century cast-iron job like what you’d find on a schooner, a Friendship sloop or a catboat in the golden age of working sail. Like antique chess sets, although there were millions of them, they are now very hard to find. I was about to give up and accept one of the serviceable but less-than-wonderful modern substitutes when I remembered the Lunenburg Foundry up in Nova Scotia. Some years back, when I had plans to put a make-and-break one-lunger into a gunning dory, I had seen their catalog, which at that time was still full of gear from an earlier age – make-andbreaks, manual windlasses, stoves, and, of course, wheels, wheels, wheels.

H

The 2008 version of their catalog, when I finally got to it on line, was not quite the same. Much of the great old stuff was gone, notably the wonderful Atlantic one-lungers, but they still made mention of their traditional wheels. I could get the pattern I wanted, and if it was no longer available in cast iron, well then, sniff, I would just have to make do with bronze. Custom made with Penelope’s name and hail port cast right in, they could promise delivery in six weeks. The price, I admit, did give me pause, but upon reflection, it seemed more reasonable. I had a quote from a local sailmaker for a six-foot bunk cushion that didn’t come in at much less, and in that light, a one-of-a-kind bronze wheel began to sound like a steal. How many things can you own which are unique, beautiful and, barring catastrophe, will last forever? The Lunenburg Foundry did deliver in exactly six weeks, and I can report that Penelope is very happy with her new wheel, as am I. She lets me bring it home to Vermont winters so I can look at it and dream of August sails. But come spring, she wants it back so we can share it for another summer. W. R. Cheney sails the 42-year-old, engineless catboat Penelope out of Burnt Coat Harbor, Swan’s Island, Maine.

H

Maine’s Most Friendly Anchorage in the heart of Casco Bay

H Seasonal Moorings & Membership H Includes Launch Service, Parking and Use of Docks

H Full-Service Boatyard H Falmouth Sea Grill Restaurant H Hallett Canvas & Sails H The Boathouse - Boating Hardware H Gulf of Maine Yacht Brokerage

207-781-5110

H

H

handy boat FalmouthHForeside H

H

Fax 207-781-7534

www.handyboat.com

H

PERSONAL SERVICE - QUALITY WORKMANSHIP

74 Points East September 2009

editor@pointseast.com


Reserve winter storage now

B R O K E R A G E

A Full Service Marina 216 Ocean Point Rd., E. Boothbay, ME 04544 Power 15' SunBird w/40hp Johnson

Sail $3,000

17' J.B. Sloop 7hp Yanmar '83

16' SportCraft w/Johnson & trailer $2,800

22' Catalina 1977

21' Regulator cc '02

28' Sabre '79 w/new diesel

$29,900

24' Proline Classic w/trailer '06 $39,900 24' Eastern 2003 w/trailer

$31,500

34' Luhrs 3400 ‘90

$49,500

38’ Sea Ray Aft Cabin '89

$70,000

42' Carver Aft Cabin ‘86

$70,000

43' Marine Trader Trawler '84

$69,900

29' Huges '70

$4,900 $3,000 $15,999 $5,000

32' Catalina '94

$55,500

34' Sabre Mark I '79

$35,000

34' Irwin Citation Sloop '80 40’Ta Shing Baba '84

$10,000 $153,000

Stanley 38 $285,000 Fishwife is the first Stanley 38, built in 1984 and owned by the same family since her launch. She is currently in excellent condition. POWER

SAIL

2001 1990 1958 1987 1948 1978 1954 1990

2002 Bridges Point 24 $59,000 1982 J-24 14,500 1990 Herreshoff Buzzards Bay Boat 17 14,000 1983 Cape Dory Typhoon 19 5,500 1983 International One Design inquire

Stanley 36 $385,000 Stanley 36 245,000 Bunker & Ellis 42 134,900 Somes Sound 26 100,000 Steel Tug 40 60,000 Sisu 22 21,500 Palmer Scott 23 16,800 Gott 19 9,500

Mercury engines and Mercury Inflatables in stock. Certified Mercury technicians. Storage, dockage, Ship’s Store, and a full service marina.

POINTS

EAST

11 Bristol Way, Harpswell, Maine 04079-3416

Brokerage Listings

20’ 25’ 26’ 30’ 32’ 32’ 33’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 38’

25’ Pursuit $22,800 Power Edgewater 2004 $34,000 Pursuit 1993 $22,800 Fogg Craft $40,000 Lindal Wallace 1965 $6,500 Holland 1988 $39,500 Steel hull tug $79,000 Egg Harbor $15,000 Crowley 1992 $79,000 Calvin Beal 1998 $95,000 Ellis 1998 $139,500 Earnest Libby 2002 $150,000

Broker: Al Strout Phone: 207-833-6885 Mobile: 207-890-2693 Email: sales@fkby.com Web: www.fkby.com

36’ Pacemaker $18,000 Sail 14’ Whitehall Skiff $11,995 17’ Dark Harbor $17,000 26’ Tanzer $4,500 29’ Hunter 1985 $7,500 32’ Bristol 1976 $35,000

Where boats change hands & new memories begin! Contact our office & put Points East toour workoffice for you! Contact

& putFebruary Pointsdistribution East Mid-winter/ augmented withfor 5,000 copies to work you! direct mailed to New England Boaters! 26’ Tanzer (sistership) $4,500

1-888-778-5790

EAST B ROKERAGE P OWER & S AIL

(207) 633-0773 www.oceanpointmarina.com WI-FI available dockside

POINTS

Y A C H T


EAST B ROKERAGE P OWER & S AIL

340 Robinhood Road 207/371-2525 or 800/255-5206 Georgetown, Maine 04548 fax: 207/371-2899 http://robinhoodmarinecenter.com/aaa/brokerage.html

40’ Eagle Trawler 1999 $279,000

32’ Sam Devlin Topknot Fast Cruiser $198,500

33’ Robinhood Poweryacht 3 from $199,500

28’ Cape Dory HT Completely Refurbished

FALL BOAT SHOW RMC In-water – Sail & Power Something for every budget October 2nd thru 4th ~ 10:00 to 4:00 Free Admission

27’ Cape Dory 1977 $18,500

34’ Pacific Seacraft 1994 $139,900

36’ Pearson P-36 Cutter 1982 $73,500

30’ Cape Dory Cutter 2 from $39,500

40’ Sabre 402 1996 $219,500

40’ Pacific Seacraft Voyagemaker 1995 $290,000

Edgewater 205CC LOA 20'6" • Beam 8'6" • Disp. 2,800 150 HP Yamaha

POINTS

In stock 14'-23' models. 150 HP Honda 4 stroke

Honda 4 Stroke

Bristol Harbor 21CC LOA 21'3 5/8" • Beam 8'5" Draft 14" • Weight (dry) 2,575 lbs.

Woolwich, Maine

Bristol Skiff 17

75 HP Yanmar Diesel

Pompano 21

LOA 17' 2" • Beam 6' 6" • Disp. 675 lbs LOA 21' 3" • LWL 20' 6" • Beam 7' 0" Max HP 40 HP • Passenger Weight 900 lbs. Draft 2' 0" • Weight 2,400 lbs.

(207) 443-9781

www.scandiayachts.com


Gray & Gray, Inc.

Tel: 207-363-7997 Fax: 207-363-7807 www.grayandgrayyachts.com

Three Exceptional Cruising Vessels 38' Hallberg Rassy C/C Sloop, 1981, $114,000

1999 Eastern 22' Classic Cuddy w/2006 Honda 200-hp $21,500

1989 BW 17-Montauk w/2001 90-hp Merc $11,900

1977 BW 13 Sport w/40hp Evinrude

1991 BW 17-Sport GLS w/Yamaha 90hp, trailer 1988 Carver/28 Riviera w/twin gas IBs

36' Stanley/Williams FB Cruiser, 1990, $219,000

$11,750 $7,995 $24,000

1993 Luhrs Tournament 350 w/twin Marine Power 350s

$32,499

2002 BW 255-Conquest w/twin Honda 200s

$52,500

Sales · Service · Storage · Repairs

40' Jonmeri Sloop, 1983, $109,000 Specializing in Downeast Vessels, Trawlers and Cruising Sailboats.

THE YACHT CONNECTION at SOUTH PORT MARINE 207-799-3600

2008 Scout 222 Abaco walk around. New boat with full warranties. Yamaha 225hp 4-Stroke. Full canvas, marine head. Aluminum trailer. $49,500

2008 Southport Boatworks 28 Express New boat, last of our ’08 stock. Twin Yamaha 250’s. Ray Hunt design. Best in class. $175,000

1987 40’ Silverton Aft Cabin $61,000 1988 36’ Marine Trader Sundeck $79,500 1986 36’ Mainship Aft Cabin $63,000 1997 30’ Pro-Line Walkaround $32,500 1998 27’ Maxum Suncruiser $25,500 1966 27’ Chris Craft Commander $8,500 2001 26’ Boston Whaler Outrage $57,500 1987 25’ General Marine $23,500 2005 22’ Rosborough Seaskiff $37,500 2004 22’ Castine Cruiser $25,000 1998 22’ Mako 223 Walkaround $16,000 2008 22’ Scout 222 Abaco $46,500

1998 21’ Maxum 2100 SC 2001 21’ Duffy Electric Boat 2008 20’ Scout 205 Sportfish 2008 17’ Scout 175 Sportfish 2003 17’ Scout 175 Dorado

$11,500 $22,000 $36,200 $20,300 $12,500

1986 31’ O’Day Sloop 1978 30’ Bristol 29.9 Sloop 1988 27’ Catalina Sloop 1985 27’Catalina Sloop 1974 22’ Tanzer Sloop

$18,500 $24,500 $18,000 $16,800 $4,500

www.theyachtconnection.com

$4,150

20 Harris Island Road York, Maine 03909 www.yorkharbormarine.com Toll Free: 866-380-3602

WESMAC 42' Twin 420hp Yanmar diesels w/less than 600 hours, Twin HJ322 Hamilton jets w/Aqua drives, Full electronics, two state rooms, complete head with enclosed shower.

Reasonably priced:

$460,000

207-667-4822 Email: sales@wesmac.com

W W W. W E S M A C . C O M

EAST B ROKERAGE P OWER & S AIL

1979 BW 15 Sport w/New Honda 50 4-S

POINTS

36 York Street York,Maine 03909 E-mail: graygray@gwi.net


Classifieds

To advertise: There are two ways to advertise on the classified pages. There are classified display ads, which are boxed ads on these pages; there are also line ads, which are simply lines of text. Line ads can be combined with photos, which will run above the text.

RESEARCH USED BOATS Check the price of any used boat that catches your eye. Go to the Points East website (www.pointseast.com) and click on the link to the NADA pricing guide. This is a free service for visitors to Points East.

SAIL

Rates: Classified display ads cost $30 per column inch. Line ads are $25 for 25 words (plus $5 for each additional 10 words). For a photo to run with a line ad, add $5.

Discounts: If you run the same classified line ad or classified display ad more than one month, deduct 20 percent for subsequent insertions.

Web advertising: Line ads from these pages will be run at no additional cost on the magazine’s web site: www.pointseast.com.

9ʼ8 Sailing Skiff, 2008 Redmond Tetra Spritsail Skiff. Ideal for evening sails and grand for kids. Exquisite hardwoods, Okoume glued lap hull; 6mm planking, 12mm bottom/trunk. natural crook breasthook/knees, cleats of tropical hardwoods, bronze or copper fastenings. Traditionally finished 6-oz poly/cotton drill sail, roped with 1/4” tarred hemp, leathered corners. Oars: 7’ spruce, leathered with bronze ring oarlocks. Rated at 250#. $3,900. Call Bob at 401862-1700 or email: roberttbooth@gmail.com

Payment: All classifieds must be paid in advance, either by check or credit card.

To place an ad: Mail ads, with payment, to Points East Magazine P.O. Box 1077, Portsmouth, NH, 03802-1077 or go to our website at www.pointseast.com Deadline for the October/November issue is September 1, 2009

Need more info? Call 1-888-778-5790.

Whitehall skiff Equipment for rowing and sailing. Includes Ez loader galvanized trailer included. $11,995 Call Al 207-890-2693 www.fkby.com sales@fkby.com

17ʼ Herreshoff Buzzards Bay Boat. Classic style. Built by the Wooden Boat School in Eastport, Maine. Marconi-rigged with a 3hp Yamaha outboard. $14,000. billw@jwboatco.com

19ʼ Cornish Shrimper, 1986 Classic British gaff rig pocket cruiser; tan bark sails; fiberglass hull; shoal draft with retractable centerboard; wood mast and spars (tabernacle rig); sleeps two; 5hp Nissan outboard; new E-Z Loader trailer. Boothbay, ME $22,000. 207-633-5341 www.classicsmallboats.com alan@classicsmallboats.com

20ʼ Alerion Express 20 Elegant day sailer and a civilized club racer? It’s possible with an Alerion Express 20, a tried and true Day Sailer. All the Alerion essentials are present—classic topside, modern underbody, gratifying speed and single-handed ease. Note the fingertip control as the boat charges along on a beam reach in a brisk southwest breeze on Narragansett Bay. The special features are open cockpit, complete simplicity and a

friendly price designed to introduce sailors to the Alerion Express Fleet. Priced rigged and ready to sail on it’s own custom trailer at $46,948. Contact Cape Yachts, 866-657-9929. www.Cape-Yachts.com

24ʼ Bridges Point, 2002 Judith, built by the John Williams Boat Co. Daysailor layout. $75,000. Call 207-255-7854 or email billw@jwboatco.com

27ʼ Cape Dory, 1981 Many upgrades. Call for specs. Boat is moored in Belfast, Maine. $22,000. 207-907-9492. Or email jcmacleod@tds.net 27ʼ Pacific Seacraft Orion 1982. Fully equipped & professionally maintained. Hand laid solid fiberglass hull. Bronze portlights. This is a well found yacht ready to go. $45,000. 207-2447854. billw@jwboatco.com.

27ʼ Soverel, 1987 Built by Tartan in 1987. Fast club racer/daysailer, excellent condition, large sail inventory, instruments, new hardware, 10hp

N ORTHEAST S AILBOAT R ESCUE

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Pearson Commander 26’ Daysailor Weekender, recent sails, almost new 4 stroke outboard.

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78 Points East September 2009

editor@pointseast.com


Yanmar. $18,500. 207-236-3149, or email either scott@rocknaks.com or artzm3@gmail.com 27' Island Packet, 1988 Cutter, full keel, 6' 2" headroom. Easy single handler. Selling Price: $43,500. info@jonesportshipyard.com www.jonesportshipyard.com

29ʼ Hughes, 1970 29’ Hughes for sale. Great boat for the money., $5000. Call Ocean Point Marina at 207-6330773 or email www.oceanpointmarina.com info@oceanpointmarina.com

30ʼ Sabre 30 MkIII, 1985 Sabre 30 MKlll Prototype, custom interior, 450 hrs. on Westerbeke, many new features. $56,000. Call or e-mail for details: 207-655-4962. gbclark@maine.rr.com 30ʼ Cape Dory, 1980 Cape Dory Intrepid Sloop Model 9M. Volvo diesel, teak interior, North Sails, Profurl furler, moored Cape Cod. $14,000. 508-428-3052. rsilk145@norwoodlight.com

30ʼ C&C, 1974 Very clean. Bottom barrier coated. New: diesel (195 hours), shaft & prop; Raymarine C80

Hunter 27

chartplotter, depth sounder; main. Harken furler, 5 sails & spinnaker gear. Numerous equipment – on complete listing. $19,750 (motivated seller – 2boat owner). 603-329-7064. pwmail@comcast.net pwmail@comcast.net

30ʼ Haven, 1977 Wonderful double-ender, full galley, head, sleeps four comfortably. $35,000. Atlantic Boat Company, 207-359-4658. www.atlanticboat.com brokerage@atlanticboat.com 30ʼ Dufour Arpege, 1970 Beautifully maintained, blue Awlgrip hull, recent sails and dodger. Teak cabin sole. 10hp Volvo diesel. $19,900. Robinhood Marine Center, 207371-2343. robinhoodmarinecenter.com 30ʼ Pearson 303, 1986 Yanmar, 10’11 beam, 4’4 draft, clean and turn key. Asking $33,000. Call John Morin at Wilbur Yachts Brokerage, 207691-1637.

32ʼ Columbia Sloop, 1976 Roomy, affordable, well-kept family cruiser that sails beautifully. Yanmar diesel, propane stove with oven, sails in good condition, large cockpit and sleeps 46. $20,000. 413-458-2798. rfisher@williams.edu 32ʼ Freedom, 1984 Very roomy and simple to sail. Enclosed aft stateroom, rare on boats of this size. 22hp Yanmar. $35,000. Robinhood Marine Center, 207-371-2343. robinhoodmarinecenter.com 34ʼ Irwin Citation Sloop, 1980 $10,000. Contact Ocean Point Marina at 207-633-0773. www.oceanpointmarina.com info@oceanpointmarina.com

34ʼ Tartan Sloop New Westerbeke 30B & exhaust system. $24,000 or best offer. Jonesport Shipyard, 207-4972701. www.jonesportshipyard.com info@jonesportshipyard.com

35ʼ Hunter Legend, 1987 Stockton Springs w/mooring, has a Raymarine E-120 navigation package, too many other upgrades to note here. Surveyed at $49K, must sell. Capt Ron, 207-949-3435 or email rnblnchrd@aol.com.

35ʼ Hinckley Pilot Sloop, 1970 Black hull, outstanding condition. $127,500. Gray & Gray, Inc. 207363-7997.

Boat Building & Repair Dave Miliner 30 years in the Marine Industry Professional Quality Work at an Affordable Price

32ʼ Jenneau 32, 1985 This is a clean and wonderfully spirited boat ready for a new owner. Canvas, electronics, and nice sails are all well maintained. She is a great starter yacht or good for downsizing. Tiller steering for the true sailor. Recent price drop to $25,000. Contact Cape-Yachts, 866-657-9929. www.Cape-Yachts.com

• Major Fiberglass repair • Gelcoat and Awlgrip resurfacing • Woodwork • New boat construction

34ʼ Tartan, 2006 This Tartan 3400 is equipped

Rte. 236, Eliot Business Park Eliot, ME 03903 (207) 439-4230 Fax: (207) 439-4229 email: dmiliner@msn.com CALL FOR A FREE ESTIMATE

CURTIS YACHT BROKERAGE, LLC mb Me er

www.curtisyachtbrokerage.com PO Box 313 Yarmouth, ME 04096 207.415.6973 Peter F. Curtis, CPYB, Representing Buyers or Sellers Featured Boat:

RUSSELL’S MARINE

1995 Albin 28 Tournament Express

Sailboats

NEW Diesel Engine in 2007 with less than 100 hours. One-owner boat in MINT condition. Garmin Color GPS Chartplotter, Furuno Radar, Fish Finder, Standard VHF. $79,500.

Sales & Service

You’ll find a wide variety of sailboats from small daysailers to coastal cruisers. Call us about our boat brokerage. 345 U.S. Rt. 1, Stockton Springs, ME 04981 • 207-567-4270 sailmaine@fairpoint.net • www.RussellsMarine.com

www.pointseast.com

with a 27hp Yanmar. She is extremely clean and very well cared for; a fresh water boat with an equipment list worthy of a closer look. Please call today for a showing. Asking $179,000. Contact DiMillo’s Yacht Sales, 207-773-7632 or email info@dimillos.com

So. Bristol, ME 40' 1990 Trojan/Bertram 12m Express 38' 1987 Bertram Convertible 36' 1969 Columbia 36 Sloop 35' 1979 Pearson 35 Yawl 34' 1983 Sabre 34 Mark I 27' 1980 Bristol 27.7

$65,000 Deal Pending $19,500 $29,500 Sold $24,500

Danvers, MA Boothbay, ME Yarmouth, ME Yarmouth, ME Yarmouth, ME Yarmouth, ME

Points East September 2009

79


boards. A must buy at only $69,900. Contact Cape Yachts, 866-657-9929. www.CapeYachts.com 35ʼ Island Packet 350, 2001 Yanmar diesel, roller main, jib & staysail. Solar panel, wind generator, radar, chartplotter, autopilot, davits, dinghy/OB. Much more. $174,500. 603-755-9192. spiritus350.googlepages.com cfpiper@juno.com

35ʼ Beneteau 35s7, 1994 This Beneteau First 35s7 is a true racer/cruiser and not your typically hard raced boat. She is very well maintained, clean, dry, nicely outfitted and inclusive of a wonderful sail inentory and a new set of varnished floor

36ʼ Sabre 362, 1996 The Sabre 362 is a sought after racer/cruiser in today’s market. Windfield has been yard maintained and professionally cared for and it shows. With her reliable Yanmar deisel and Sabre quality build you need look no further for a preowned cruiser/racer to suit your needs. $165,000. New Castle, NH. Call Kyle at 207-439-9582. kmckenna@kpyy.net

36ʼ Pearson Pilothouse 36.5 1980. Equipped and ready for cruising or live aboard. Full instruments, main with Dutchman, roller furl genoa, freezer, fridge, A/C heater, and much more. 36.5’L x 11.5’ beam x 4.5’ draft. RCR3PH@aol.com or 401-8643222. Price reduced to $59,500. RCR3PH@aol.com

37ʼ Hunter, 1998 Fully equipped including genset, heat/AC, radar, autopilot. 38hp

&

Transmission New England’s Largest Stocking Distributor Call for prices and delivery New & Rebuilt

1-800-343-0480

HANSEN MARINE ENGINEERING

Yanmar diesel. Superb condition. $109,500. Robinhood Marine Center, 207-371-2342. robinhoodmarinecenter.com 37ʼ Fisher Pilothouse Ketch 1978. Recent re-fit including dark green Awlgrip, new sails, cushions. Espar heating, radar, inverter included. $90,000. Located in Eastport, Maine. Call Robinhood Marine Center, 207371-2343. robinhoodmarinecenter.com

38ʼ Ericson 38, 1988 Phoenix is Pacific Seacraft built and one of the best maintained yachts of her kind on the market. Hailing from Maine and only recently sailed down to SW for sale, look at her specs and pictures. She truly is immaculate. If a turn key yacht for a reasonable price is what you are looking for then Phoenix is your boat. Priced aggressively at $79,600. Contact Cape Yachts, 866-6579929. www.Cape-Yachts.com

45ʼ Brewer CC Ketch, 1984 Original owners of this Brewer center cockpit ketch. Strong, solidly built fiberglass yacht, fully equipped for comfortable passagemaking. Living aboard, cruising the Caribbean the past 13 years. Presently in Antigua, VI. Surveyed May 2006. Asking $140,000. Photos & specs at svcelebration@hotmail.com.

Marblehead, MA 01945

Marine Moisture Meters For Fiberglass and Wood Non-destructive meters, simple to use, understand & evaluate moisture levels. GRP-33

J.R. Overseas Co. 502.228.8732 www.jroverseas.com

80 Points East September 2009

49ʼ Hinckley 49, 1978 Center cockpit. Perfect for around the world cruising, chartering, or live aboard. Excellent condition. Located in Boston. $229,000. Call 781-760-0285. pbkress@gmail.com

POWER

15ʼ Sunbird with 40hp Johnson. $3,000. Contact Ocean Point Marina at 207-633-0773. www.oceanpointmarina.com info@oceanpointmarina.com

17ʼ Boston Whaler Montauk 1989 with 2002 90hp Merc 2-s. Includes Bimini, console cover and mooring cover. Ritchie compass, Humminbird PMAX 2200 DF, Standard Horizon VHF w/antenna. $11,850. York Harbor Marine Service at 207-363-3602. sales@yorkharbormarine.com 17ʼ Boston Whaler Sport GLS 1991. An uncommon boat – a Montauk hull with comfortable molded fiberglass interior, vinyl seats. 1991 Yamaha 90hp outboard, Pacific trailer w/spare. VHF, Bimini, mooring cover. $7,700. York Harbor Marine Service at 207-363-3602. sales@yorkharbormarine.com

17ʼ Boston Whaler Montauk 1989 Well-equipped, meticulously maintained 1989 17-Montauk with 2002 90-hp Mercury 2stroke and a 2008 Venture trailer. Includes Humminbird PMAX 220, Standard Horizons Eclipse radio w/antenna, Ritchie compass, bimini top and console cover new in 2008, plus mooring cover, cushions, anchor, docklines, fenders, etc. York Harbor Marine Service at 207-363-3602. sales@yorkharbormarine.com 17ʼ Sunbird Corsair, 1994 With very nice trailer. Add an outboard and a little cosmetic work for a great little runabout. $1100. 207-223-8885. 17ʼ Eastporter, 1989 Many improvements by yard 2006. Must see to appreciate.

editor@pointseast.com


$3,900. 1988 40hp Evinrude add $600. Jonesport Shipyard, 207497-2701. jshipyard@mgemaine.com 17ʼ Scout Boats Dorado, 2002 Only 100 hours on great fuel-efficient family/fish boat, 100hp Yamaha four stroke, trailer. $14,500. 207-799-3600. www.theyachtconnection.com 19ʼ Eastern, 2003 Center console, 90hp Evinrude, power tilt, professionally maintained and stored indoors. Low operating hours. $20,000. Atlantic Boat Company, 207359-4658. www.atlanticboat.com brokerage@atlanticboat.com

21ʼ Duffy Electric Launch 2001. Fully electric, full weather enclosure. Quiet, stable, the perfect platform for picnics or cocktails on the bay. $22,000. 207799-3600. www.theyachtconnection.com 22ʼ Pro-Line, 2003 Center console with trailer,

200hp Mercury, very clean, low hours, t-top, cover, bow cushion and more. $25,500. www.maineyachtsales.com mikev@maineyachtsales.com

PYY 22, 2008 Center Console, 150hp Mercury, vhf, gps, fishfinder, compass. Designed by George A. Patten for seaworthiness and custom finished for the discriminating boater. Picnic style also available. $61, 855 (Spring Special) Call Kyle, 207-439-9582. www.kpyy.net kmckenna@kpyy.net 23ʼ Palmer Scott, 1954 Located in Mt. Desert, Maine. Fiberglass hull, gas engine. $16,800. Call 207-255-7854 or email billw@jwboatco.com

23' Mako Sport Fisherman 1996. Motor needs work. Selling Price: $6,000. info@jonesportshipyard.com www.jonesportshipyard.com 24ʼ Eastern, 2003 Eastern Center Console w/130hp 4-stroke Honda outboard. Comes with trailer. $31,500. Call Ocean Point Marina at 207-633-0773 www.oceanpointmarina.com info@oceanpointmarina.com

25ʼ Boston Whaler 255 Conquest 2002 Twin Honda 200hp engines, 350 hours. Hardtop w/weather curtain set. Anchor windlass, deluxe ladderback helm seats, v-berth filler. Porta-potti w/pumpout, macerator/overboard discharge. Stereo, VHF radio, Simrad integrated electronics, chartplotter/radar & echosounder. $57,500. York Harbor Marine Service at 207363-3602. sales@yorkharbormarine.com

25ʼ Luhrs 250 Sport Fish, 1993 Luhrs 250 Sport Fish with twin

gas Marine Power 350hp IBs, one brand new w/zero hours. Yard maintained, new plugs, hoses, wiring harness. Ready to go. $35,899. York Harbor Marine Service at 207-363-3602. sales@yorkharbormarine.com 25ʼ Sea Fox 257 CC, 2004 W/twin Mercury 150hp. Saltwater Series. Demo boat. Full warranty. This boat is loaded. $39,900. Carousel Marina, 207-633-2922.

25ʼ General Marine Downeast 1987 Great small lobster boat, 351Cleveland/Windsor V8 inboard. Cuddy V-berth cabin w/ heat, in top condition. $23,000. 207-799-3600. www.theyachtconnection.com

26ʼ Silverton Flybridge, 1978 Runs nice, great cruiser/fishing

Stock-Up

PROVISIONS

Stay Prepared

Stop By

Sail Away

Pizza, Sandwiches, Hot & Cold Subs, Gas, Groceries, Cigarettes, Soda, Ice Cold Beer & Wine, Film, Bait, ME State Lottery Megabucks and Instant Tickets, Ice

Port Clyde General Store 43O 55.585' 69O 15.547'

Monday thru Saturday 6 to 7, Sunday 7 to 6

207-563-1388

Launch & Delivery Service Groceries, ice, beer, wine and liquor Fuel, Water, Ship’s Store & Restaurant on site

207-372-6543

At the Junction of Rtes 129 & 130 Bristol, Maine

VHF Ch 9

TO W N L A N D I N G M A R K E T

Deli

Wine

Provisions

207-633-6666 southportgeneralstore.com Island Store Gerry's favorite coffee stop...make it yours too!

Provisioning for a day sail or week-long cruise. 26 9 F O R E S I D E R D., FA LM O UTH, MA I N E

www.pointseast.com

207-781-212 8

The Island Store on Isle au Haut, ME 200 yards from the Town Landing welcomes you with a full selection of groceries, fresh meat, fish, produce, beer, wine, ice and lots more. Tel/fax 207.335.5211. Visa, MasterCard accepted. E-mail:islandstore@tds.net www.islandstore@tds.net.

Points East September 2009

81


boat w/lots of room. 10’ beam, sb Crusader fwc, v-drive, new stainless steel fuel tanks, manifolds, alternator, more. Full bridge enclosure, stand-up head, sink, stove, v-berth, dinette, big cockpit. Radar, Loran, VHF, compass. $8000 or best offer. More pictures available. dmarslini@yahoo.com

26ʼ Back Cove Pipe Hardtop 2008. Just traded for a Back Cove 33 and options like no other on the market. Her galley includes a 120V AC/12 VDC fridge, stainless steel sink, microwave oven and cooktop for meal preparation. A v-berth with drop-down, inlaid table, sleeps

two comfortably; and her fully enclosed head provides a spacious layout for maneuverability. Asking $149,900. Contact DiMillo’s Yacht Sales, 207-7737632 or email info@dimillos.com

27ʼ JC Boat, 1993 LOA 26’ 11, Beam 10’+. Twin Volvo TAMD 31 RL80C. GPS/radar/depth. 8gph @15kts. Valued at $57K, asking $49K, buy it before September 10th for $45K. 207-266-1750. Moored in Northeast Harbor. www.managementmarineservice.com info@managementmarineservice.com

27ʼ Eastern, 2006 In flag blue with white cushions. Evinrude Etec 250hp with great fuel economy, Fortune canvas, Garmin Electronics, and loaded with options, and less than 50 hours. Venture tandem axle trailer, with 4 wheel brakes. Reduced for fall sale. $64,900. 207-266-2018.

28ʼ Albin Tournament Expess 2003. This 2003 Albin is pow-

ered with the popular 315 Yanmar diesel with only 277 hours. She is fully equipped and also has the optional cockpit bench seating facing forward. The Albin 28 has the reputation of being tough and durable, and combined with her cleanliness, you won’t be disappointed. Please call today for a showing. Asking $109,000. Contact DiMillo’s Yacht Sales, 207-7737632 or email. info@dimillos.com

28ʼ Cape Dory Flybridge 28’ 30’ & 36’ Cape Dory FB, new Yanmar diesel in 28’ & 36’. Three very clean examples, From $75,000-$199,000. Gray & Gray, Inc. 207-363-7997 28ʼ Albin HT (2), 2002 Yanmar diesel, very clean from $99,500. Gray & Gray, Inc. 207363-7997.

m a r i n e education Women Under Sail

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editor@pointseast.com


30ʼ Albin Aft Cabin, 2004 This family cruiser is in Bristol condition and has been professionally maintained since purchased by her original owner. She has a great electronics package and a reliable Yanmar deisel. Perfect coastal cruiser with a full canvas enlosure that allows for plenty of room for entertaining or just enjoying your privacy. Owner is motivated, so bring reasonable offers. Located in New Castle, New Hampshire. $139,900. Call Kyle, 207-4399582. kpyy.net

30ʼ Pro-Line Walkaround, 1997 Fishing/family layout, fish box, bait well, transom door. Cabin w/ galley and head, sleeps 4. $39,500. 207-799-3600. www.theyachtconnection.com 32ʼ Grand Banks, 1974 Fiberglass hull. Ford Lehman, excellent condition, surveyor owned $63,900. Gray & Gray, Inc. 207-363-7997

tras, full electronics, inflatable dinghy and 3hp OB. New price: $64,900. In South Portland, Maine. Call Chuck, 207-7992310. wilsoncape@aol.com

Atlantic Boat Company, 207359-4658. www.atlanticboat.com brokerage@atlanticboat.com

32ʼ Holland Downeast, 1989 There is nothing out there like Sally G. She has undergone extensive restoration over the past 4 years. Since the work was completed, state of the art Simrad Electronics, 23’ Pulpit, and Custom Tuna Tower have all been added. The tower and pulpit were both done by Redman Marine. Sally G will do 30 knots and get you on the fish in a hurry with her 6 cylinder 315hp (1998) Cummins diesel(520hrs). This boat is for the serious fisherman who appreciates the quality Holland design and numerous upgrades. (This boat is a proven Fish-Raiser.) $159,000. Call Kyle at 207-439-9582 or email. www.kpyy.net kmckenna@kpyy.net

32ʼ Morris Flybridge, 1998 BHM hull and deck. Finished by Morris Yachts. Proven Downeast hull. Design and construction first class. Professionally maintained, stored indoors. $235,000.

33ʼ Wellcraft Coastal, 1999 LOA 33’, beam 12’5. Good condition. One owner, one mechanic. T/7.4 Horizon Mercury inboards. 580 hrs. – new risers and manifolds. Galley, head/shower, master berth, electronics included. $54,900. 877-899-0933. sroach2197@aol.com

33ʼ Carver Aft Cabin, 1992 Excellent family boat, very clean, twin 350 FWC gas Crusaders, 650 hours, excellent maintenance records. Loaded with ex-

ACCREDITED MARINE SURVEYOR

www.MarineSurveys.com Jay Michaud

Marblehead 781.639.0001

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CASEY YACHT ENTERPRISES

Capt. N. LeBlanc, Inc 106 Liberty Street Danvers, MA 01923

Since 1988

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33ʼ Pearson True North , 2004 True North 33 is one of the most popular 33’ downeast style boats on the brokerage market. With a helm deck that has easy access to the large open cockpit and opening transom door for boarding from a dinghy, swimming or just carrying recreational toys. This TN 33 is equipped with the upgraded 440 Yanmar diesel, Mastervolt generator, air conditioning, bow thruster and Espar heater. Asking $215,000. Contact DiMillo’s Yacht Sales, 207-773-7632 or email info@dimillos.com

DOR-MOR INC. 603-542-7696 www.Dor-Mor.com

PO Box 214 285 Main St. Jonesport, ME 04649 info@jonesportshipyard.com www.jonesportshipyard.com

Points East September 2009

83


33ʼ Robinhood Flybridge Poweryacht 2001 Yanmar 420hp diesel, 5kw genset, Raymarine radar, GPS, autopilot upgraded ‘06. Dark green hull. $275,000. Others available from $229,500$475,000. Robinhood Marine Center, 207-371-2343. robinhoodmarinecenter.com

34ʼ American PH Tug Trawler 2001. Cummins diesel, immaculate and lowest one on market. $229,500. Gray & Gray, Inc. 207363-7997.

34ʼ Albin Command Bridge 2002. Yanmar diesel 370hp, Northern Lights genset, 8 GPH at cruise. Full keel and skeg, Furuno 48 nm radar, Northstar chart plotter, Robertson autopilot, Ritchie compass, and Standard Horizon Spectrum VHF radio. Vetus bow thruster, Bennett trim tabs, and Lofrans windlass. $169,900. Call Dick at 603-742-3487, or email barrettdd@comcast.net

35ʼ Eastern, 2001 This 2001 Flybridge is well equipped and spacious, an extremely versatile boat. It could be a great weekender, a very accommodating live aboard or you could go long range with the very efficient single diesel set up. The equipment list includes full navigation electronics with autopilot, bow thruster, diesel fired heat, inverter, a functional galley, a Trinka sailing dinghy, upgraded latex mattress and even upgraded ultraleather upholstery. Asking $179,000. Contact DiMillo’s Yacht Sales, 207-773-7632 or email info@dimillos.com 36ʼ Grand Banks, 1979 Twin Lehman 120’s. Excellent condition. Fully equipped for cruising. $99,000. Call 781-4612692 or email. RGN98@aol.com

38ʼ H&H Osmond Beal, 2002 EcoFriendly custom Downeast

WEATHERFAX 2000 New USB Interface *

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liveaboard cruiser. Solar panels. Composting head. Fully insulated. Hurricane diesel heater. Yanmar 370, low hours. Spacious salon. Galley up. Island Queen. $225,000. 603770-8378. dotgale38.googlepages.com dotgaleforsale@comcast.net

38ʼ True North 38, 2003 Just traded. This True North 38 represents the best True North on the market today. Replacement cost is nearly double as this fine yacht includes: Generator, A/C, Espar heater, full electronics with color display, hard back enclosure, central vac and so much more. Priced to sell at $318,500. Contact Cape Yachts, 866-657-9929. www.Cape-Yachts.com

42ʼ Matthews Classic, 1956 Double Cabin Flying Bridge (DCFB) Cruiser. Beautifully restored cruiser, a sea-going summer home. Repowered with twin GM V6 220hp delivering 4.5gph @9knots. Complete new plumbing, electrical including Lewmar anchoring system, Garmin chartplotter/GPS and Ritchie binnacle. $65,000. More information and pictures available. Contact: herliebarnes@yahoo.com 42ʼ Duffy, 1997 Heavy-duty, commercial pilot

NAVCOM DIGITAL

800.444.2581 • 281.334.1174 E-mail: info@navcomdigital.com

and tow boat converted to pleasure. CAT 3406E 800hp. Meticulous maintenance. Firstrate construction and mechanical systems. $250,000. Atlantic Boat Company, 207-359-4658. www.atlanticboat.com brokerage@atlanticboat.com

42ʼ Bunker & Ellis,1958 Aleria is prime for restoration. $134,900. Call 207-255-7854, or email billw@jwboatco.com 43ʼ Marine Trader, 1984 Priced to sell at $69,999. FMI contact Ocean Point Marina at 207-633-0773. www.oceanpointmarina.com info@oceanpointmarina.com

46ʼ Duffy, 2007 Exceptionally able off-shore boat. Cummins 670hp QSM-11 diesel, 100 hours. Shorepower, inverter, generator, full electronics. Three staterooms, two heads, great liveaboard. $595,000. Atlantic Boat Company, 207-359-4658. www.atlanticboat.com brokerage@atlanticboat.com

47ʼ Novi Dragger, 1985 Fiberglass Atkinson Novi Dragger.43.8’ + 4’ extension. 15.5’ beam, 6’ draft. Good condition. $135,000. Jonesport Shipyard, 207-497-2701. jshipyard@mgemaine.com

50ʼ Sea Ray Sedan Bridge 2005. Shegavin shows as new and is in absolute Bristol condition. Powered by 730hp Manns she has plenty of power and reliability. Her well thought out interior is done in dark cherry and there were numerous option upgrades. The Mann engine upgrade was a $100K upgrade itself and should be an indication of the rest of this boats condition. No expense was spared to

Convenient Convenient heated heated work work space space Railway access up to 42 feet Piscataqua River Eliot, Maine

Space Limited. Call Today!

207-439-8872 84 Points East September 2009

Makers of 8’, 10’, 12’ & 14’ Yacht Tenders

43o 20.9’N - 70o 28.7’W Kennebunkport, Maine

207-967-4298 BAYOFMAINEBOATS.COM

editor@pointseast.com


make this vessel the best one of its kind. This boat is loaded and ready for her new owner. She was finished with digital guagesat the helm station and is the only one of her kind. Please view her full specs and call if interested in a showing. This should be the next one to sell. Dont miss out. $630,000. Call Kyle, 207-439-9582 or email www.kpyy.net kmckenna@kpyy.net

65ʼ Viking Sports Cruiser 2003. 3 staterooms plus crew, custom hardtop w/ a/c-heat on bridge. Low hours. Newest and best 65VSC anywhere. Best equipment, best condition, best price. Located in New Hampshire. Asking only $829,000. Call John Haucke, HMY Yacht Sales 561-371-386. haucke@hmy.com

OTHER

10ʼ Kittery Point Tender Sailing version. White w/ black bootstrap. Excellent condition. Shaw & Tenney oars. New $6,900. Asking $4,900 with trailer. 207-866-4867. steve@shawandtenney.com

10 1/2ʼ & 12ʼ Skiffs Maine style and quality. Epoxy bonded plywood/oak, S/S screws. Easy rowing and towing, steady underfoot. Primer paint. $1,100 and $1,400. Maxwell’s Boat Shop. Rockland, Maine. 207-594-5492.

18ʼ Echo Rowing The most advanced recreational rowing shell on the market today. This is a demo boat – one available. 207-799-3600. www.theyachtconnection.com

Commission a Tender Get a great boat while helping a great cause. Custom-built for you by the Compass Project. Come on in and meet your build team. 12’ Bevins Skiff $850 12’ Echo Bay Dory $1950 16’ Gloucester Light Dory $1,600 Call Clint at 207-774-0682 www.compassproject.org compassinfo@maine.rr.com

Console available for half day, full day and extended rental. Guilford Boat Yards, View Details www.guilfordboat.com, Guilford, Connecticut 203-453-5031

Delivery Captain Your power or sail boat delivered wherever you need it. Owners welcome on deliveries. Also available for instruction. Captain Tim. 603-770-8378. dotgale38.googlepages.com tphsails@comcast.net Moorings & Slips Small marina on beautiful Great Bay. 16’ to 30’ boats. Bay View Marina, 19 Boston Harbor Road, Dover Point, N.H. 603-749-1800.

Puffin dinghies Puffin fiberglass dinghies in stock. Jackson’s Hardware & Marine, Route 1 Bypass, Kittery, Maine. 207-439-1133.

Island Store The Island Store on Isle au Haut, Maine. 04645, 200 yards from the Town Landing welcomes you with a full selection of groceries, fresh meat, fish, produce, beer, wine, ice and lots more. Tel/fax 207 335 5211.Email:www.islandstore@tds.net. Visa,Mastercard accepted. islandstore@tds.net www.islandstore@tds.net

Hinckley Pilot 35 Info Needed Need help locating Hinckley Pilot 35’s to update history of the 125 built. Call Buzz 914-325-5195. Or visit website www.hinckleypilot35.ning.com tfunk50@gmail.com Boat Rental Triumph Boats 17’ & 19’ Center

CHARTER NorthPoint S/V Harvest Moon

Sailing from Boothbayharbor, Maine 7 days a week

Yacht Charter Co. Owner managed  Power & Sail  Boats for charter Larrain Slaymaker PO Box 252 Rockport, Maine 04856 (207) 557-1872 info@northpointyachtcharters.com

www.northpointyachtcharters.com

207-649-2628 capfrank@goddesscruise.com

www.goddesscruise.com Buy or Charter • Power or Sail

ONBOARD, NO DETAIL HAS BEEN LEFT UNEXPLORED.

www.mecat.com 888-832-2287

UNDER SAIL, NO PART OF THE COASTLINE WILL BE, EITHER.

HINCKLEY YACHT CHARTERS Southwest Harbor, Maine 1-800-HYC-SAIL • (207) 244-5008 charters@hinckleyyachts.com

www.pointseast.com

P-47 Power Catamaran now available for Charter

“We’re on the job, so you can be on the water.”

Charter Maine! Bareboat • Crewed • Power • Sail Trawlers • DownEast Cruisers

Yacht North Charters 182 Christopher Rd, Suite 1, North Yarmouth, ME 04097-6733 207-221-5285 • info@yachtnorth.com • www.yachtnorth.com

Points East September 2009

85


Perfect Thank You Gift A perfect thank you gift – A set of lovely fitted sheets for their boat. Check www.fleetsheeet.com for ideas or to arrange for a gift card.

Westerbeke 6 Cyl. Diesel Model 6-346, 120hp, 1050 hrs. with recently rebuilt 2:1 Paragon gear, engine harness, mounts and panel. Clean and well maintained. $3,800. Call Fred 781771-1053. fjdions@msn.com

New Canvas Option Introducing Center Harbor Marine Canvas – offering expanded canvas services to cover and protect you and your investment! Contact Aimee Claybaugh through Center Harbor Sails, Brooklin, Maine 207.359.2003 Charter Your Boat Established Midcoast Maine charter company expanding the fleet. If you’re interested in offsetting yard bills, give a call. 207-785-2465.

Boat Transport Best rates, fully insured. Nationwide trucking and/or ocean freight. Reliable service. Contact Rob Lee, Maritime. 800533-6312 or 508-758-9409. www.marinasandtransport.com Repower Special New Westerbeke 30B 3 Diesel in crate. 27hp, 3 cyl., 2.47:1 gear, flexible mts., 272 lb. List $9,979, asking $8,000. Perfect Atomic 4 replacement. Jonesport Shipyard, 207-4972701. jshipyard@mgemaine.com

Ocean Master, Motor 40 years in big boats and small ships, Boatwise instructor. Deliveries, training, management. 401-885-3189. capt_bill@cox.net Slips & Moorings in N.H. Limited dockside slips and protected moorings available in pristine Great Bay, New Hampshire. Leave trailering behind and chase the big stripers

more often. Reasonable rates. Great Bay Marine 603-436-5299 or email@greatbaymarine.com Rental Moorings Sail beautiful Penobscot Bay. Seasonal moorings in protected Rockland harbor with an expansive float and pier facility for dinghy tie-ups and provisioning. On-site parking. 207-594-1800. www.atlanticchallenge.com info@atlanticchallenge.com

Offshore Passage Opportunities No. 1 crew networking service. Sail for free on OPB’s. Call for free brochure and membership application. Call 1-800-4PASSAGe for info or visit our website. Sail a Swan Offshore in our Offshore Program. www.sailopo.com Free Rally – 10th Annual NARC Rally North American Rally to the Caribbean. Departure from Newport, R.I., Nov. 1, 2009 (or

best weather window thereafter) for Bermuda and Caribbean. Call 1-800-4-PASSAGe for info or www.sailopo.com

Marina For Sale For Sale: Wotton’s Wharf Marina in Boothbay Harbor, Maine. For more information call Bruce Tindal at 207-633-6711. www.wottonswharf.com Captain Wanted Wanted: Captain to operate 30 passenger lobster/coastal tour boat from Kennebunkport. Responsible for providing information to passengers and all daily boat operations. Paid per trip basis. Contact John Martin, 207-468-7262.

Tilting Frame Ship's Saw 36" Crescent Dayton motor, very nice shape. Cost $6,000 rebuilt. Selling Price: $3,000. info@jonesportshipyard.com www.jonesportshipyard.com

Advertiser index All Paint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 All-Taut Marine Transporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Associated Marine Surveyors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Atlantic Challenge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82 Atlantic Outboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Bamforth Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Bay of Maine Boats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 Bayview Rigging and Sails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Bilge Rat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 Black Point Inn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Boatwise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Bohndell Sails & Rigging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Boothbay Region Boatyard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39,54 Bowden Marine Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Brewer Yacht Yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87 Broad Cove Marine Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Buck’s Restaurant & Catering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Burr Brothers Boats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Capt. Jay Michaud, Marine Surveyor . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 Carousel Marina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Casey Yacht Enterprises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 Chase Leavitt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Conanicut Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Concordia Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Conn. DEP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Constitution Marina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Coveside . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Crocker’s Boatyard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Curtis Yacht Brokerage, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 Custom Float Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 CWC Boat Transport, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Dark Harbor Boat Yard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Dip Net Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Dockwise Yacht Transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Dolphin Marina & Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Dor-Mor Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 Doyle Center Harbor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Eastern Boats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 Eastport Chowderhouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Enos Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Eric Dow Boat Shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Finestkind Boatyard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Finestkind Brokerage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Fleet Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 Flowers Boatworks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Flying Point Boatworks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 Foliage Food & Wine Festival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Fortune, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Fred.J. Dion Yacht Yard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Gamage Shipyard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 Gemini Marine Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Gilbert’s Chowder House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Goddess of the Sea Cruises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85

86 Points East September 2009

Gowen Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18,31 Gray & Gray, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 Great Bay Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32,39 Great Cove Boat Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 Gritty McDuff’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Guilford Boat Yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Hallett Canvas & Sails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Hamilton Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Handy Boat Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39,74 Hanley’s Market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 Hansen Marine Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20,39,80 Hinckley Yacht Charters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Island Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 J/24 N.E. Regattas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 J-Way Enterprises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 J.R. Overseas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 J/24 New England Regattas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Johanson Boatworks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 John Williams Boat Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42,46 John Williams Yacht Brokerage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Jonesport Shipyard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 Journey’s End Marina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Kennebec Tavern & Marina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Kent Thurston Marine Surveyor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 Kingman Yacht Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Kittery Point Yacht Yard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 Knight Marine Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Main Sail Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Maine Cat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22,85 Maine Sailing Partners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Maine Yacht Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 MapTech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Marblehead Trading Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Marina Listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71 Marine Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Maritime Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Merri-Mar Yacht Basin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Miliner Marine Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 Mobile Marine Canvas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Moose Island Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Nebo Lodge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Newport Boat Show . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Niemiec Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 NorEast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Norm Leblanc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 North Sails Direct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Northeast Sailboat Rescue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78 NorthPoint Yacht Charter Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 Novabraid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 Ocean Offerings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 Ocean Point Marina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Ocean Pursuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Padebco Custom Yachts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52

Pierce Yacht Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Pope Sails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 Port Clyde General Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28,81 Port Harbor Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Portland Yacht Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39,48,49 Postcards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 PYC Race Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 Robinhood Marine Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27,76 Rocktide Inn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Royal River Boatyard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Rumery’s Boat Yard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Russell’s Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 Saco Bay Tackle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Samoset Boatworks, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Scandia Yacht Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 Seal Cove Boatyard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 SeaTech Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 Snug Harbor Marina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 South Port Marine Yacht Connection . . . . . . . . . . .54,77 South Shore Boatworks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Southport General Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 Springer’s Jewelers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Spruce Head Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Stanley Scooter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Star Distributing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 Stur Dee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 The Brooklin Inn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 The Edge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 The Osprey Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 The Reach Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Town Landing Market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 URL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62,63 Waterfront . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Wayfarer Maine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Webhannett River Boat Yard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 Wesmac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 West Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Whale’s Tale Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Wilbur Yachts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 Winter Island Yacht Yard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Winterport Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Women Under Sail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Wooden Boat School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82 Yacht North Charters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58,59,85 Yankee Boat Yard & Marina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Yankee Marina & Boatyard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 York Harbor Marine Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20,77

editor@pointseast.com


WINTER storage & service... ...choose Brewer this winter BREWER STORAGE Winter storage is more than simply hauling and storing your boat; it is, in fact, the beginning of next season. The performance of your boat depends upon winter maintenance. As Winter approaches, contact a Brewer Yacht Yard to make plans for service and storage at a location convenient to you. A Brewer yard will ensure that your boat is safely tucked away for the winter, and gets proper care and service during the down time. A Brewer yard will give you peace of mind that your boat will be ready for the next cruising season.

YACHT SERVICE Brewer boasts over 350 talented service staff, some with up to 45 years of experience. This crew is capable of handling all your yacht’s needs - from mechanical and electrical, to rigging, carpentry and painting. Brewer facilities are top-notch, with equipment upgrades being made regularly, ensuring your yacht receives the best care in the industry! Call a Brewer Yacht Yard today to arrange winter storage and service, or send an e-mail to info@byy.com. And don’t forget to ask how you can earn free transient dockage.

www.byy.com New York Greenport (631) 477-9594 Stirling Harbor (631) 477-0828 Glen Cove (516) 671-5563 Port Washington (516) 883-7800 Mamaroneck (914) 698-0295 Connecticut Stamford Stratford Branford Westbrook Old Saybrook Essex Deep River Mystic

(203) 359-4500 (203) 377-4477 (203) 488-8329 (860) 399-7906 (860) 388-3260 (860) 767-0001 (860) 526-5560 (860) 536-2293

Rhode Island Wickford Warwick Greenwich Bay Barrington Portsmouth

(401) 884-7014 (401) 884-0544 (401) 884-1810 (401) 246-1600 (401) 683-3551

Massachusetts N. Falmouth (508) 564-6327 Plymouth (508) 746-4500 Maine South Freeport (207) 865-3181

Photo by Patrice Conklin of Brewer Stirling Harbor Marina.


In house, factory trained technicians Two waterfront locations

One sweet deal! KITTERY POINT YACHT YARD

Repower your vessel with a 300hp or greater inboard engine at KPYY and your Outside Winter Hull Storage is on the HOUSE!

Offer valid for '09 / '10 Winter Storage Season- (October 15th-May 15th)

• Storage for 200 boats • New Indoor Heated Storage Building • All major mechanical

• Awlgrip • Fiberglass/Carpentry • Rigging

Reserve your space now! Call! Kittery yard 207.439.9582 • Eliot yard 207.439.3967 www.kpyy.net 88 Points East September 2009

editor@pointseast.com

Points East, September  

We cover the boating and cruising scene for the New England states of Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut

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