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JUNE/JULY 2021

The Pocono Mountains' Magazine

Complimentary

Pocono Living M A G A Z I N E

The Waterfalls of The Poconos Pennsylvanians who fought at The Alamo Our Founding Fathers


Pocono Magazines, LLC PUBLISHING

Pocono Living Magazine© & Pocono Family Magazine© 1929 North 5th Street Stroudsburg, PA 18360 570-424-1000 pmags@ptd.net www.poconomagazines.com PUBLISHER/EDITOR Larry R. Sebring larry@poconomagazines.com ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVES larry@poconomagazines.com MAGAZINE & WEB DESIGN Smart Blonde Creative Food & Wine Editor Jamie Marra PHOTOGRAPHY & ART John Anzivino Gayle C. Brooke Ray Caswell Pat Coyle Randall FitzGerald Ashley Hall Maurice Harmon Susan Hartman Marlana Holsten Ann H. LeFevre

Barbara Lewis Marie Liu Harry Loud Regina Matarazzo Janet Mishkin John L. Moore Michael Murphy Justine Nearhood Roseanna Santaniello Tom Stone

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Kimberly Blaker Roseanne Bottone Kathy Dubin-Uhler Brian Hardiman Amanda Kuhn Amy Leiser Marie Liu

Jamie Marra Suzanne McCool Janet Mishkin John L. Moore Allison Mowatt Jim Werkheiser William M. Williams

Marty Wilson ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Kristen Sebring Linda Spalluto

PROUD MEMBERS OF

Pocono Living Magazine and Pocono Family Magazine, two regional publications filled with articles, features and photography exploring and capturing the real Pocono Mountains living experience.

Our publications can be found at many locations

throughout the Pocono Mountains region, and are available by subscription.

The information published in this magazine is believed to be accurate, but in some instances, may represent opinion or judgment. The publication’s providers do not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information and shall not be held liable for any loss or damage, directly or indirectly, by or from the information.© 2016 Pocono Magazines. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be copied, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the expressed written permission of the publisher.


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“Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak. Courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen.” ― Winston Churchill

> P hoto by Marlana Holsten

4 | Pocono Living Magazine© June/July 2021


What’s Inside June/July 2021 FEATURES 7

P  ocono Living Magazine’s 2021 Photo Contest

8

P  ennsylvanians at The Alamo

16

Who Are Our Founding Fathers?

18 Pocono Environmental Education Center: Where Learning Comes Naturally 20

W  aterfalls of the Poconos

40

P  ark Prepares for Summer Visitors

44

5 Fun Ways to Keep Your Cat Entertained At Home

46

Bringing Life Back Into Your Yard and Garden

50

Budget-Friendly Travel Tips

COVER Raymondskill Falls By Marie Liu

June/July 2021 Pocono Living Magazine© | 5


Suzanne is a native of the Poconos and a former schoolteacher and former Monroe County Commissioner. She has recently published her own book, and lives with her husband Terry in Stroudsburg. Today, Suzanne enjoys writing, traveling and visiting her grandchildren.

John L. Moore John L. Moore continues to pursue his lifelong interests in Pennsylvania’s colonial history and archaeology. The Northumberland writer has published 11 non-fiction books about Pennsylvania’s 16th and 17th century. John’s latest book, 1780: Year of Revenge, is currently available in book stores or from the online bookstore Sunbury Press Inc. This book is the 3rd volume in his Revolutionary Pennsylvania Series and tells the story of Indian raids all across the Pennsylvania Frontier - including the Poconos and Minisinks - in the year following General Sullivan’s 1779 invasion of the Iroquios homeland. Over the years John has participated in archaeological excavations of Native American sites along the Delaware and Susquehanna Rivers. A professional storyteller, he recently took part in the Heritage Festival at Frances Slocum State Park near Wilkes-Barre. He told the true story of Frances Slocum, a 5-year-old girl who lived as a Native American after being kidnapped by Indians during the American Revolution. The park was named for her.

Photo courtesy of Pixabay

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Suzanne McCool


ENTER YO UR BEST SH OTS

Your photos could be seen by more than 26,000 readers when you enter them in Pocono Living Magazine’s Annual Photo Contest. The contest is open to amateur photographers only. (Those who do not earn a majority, over half, of their income as photographers). You may enter no more than 15 images, so choose your best shots. Categories are “Scenics”, “Wildlife”, “Florals”, and “Historical Structures”. Only photographs that are representative of the Pocono Mountains should be submitted. Individual photos should be attached to an email message and sent to: pmags@ptd.net. Photos submitted must be high resolution, (300 dpi), jpg or tiff files or they cannot be used. You must include your full name in the title with each photo submitted as you would like it to appear in the magazines. We will contact you for your mailing address to receive your prize if your photo is chosen as a winner in the contest. Winning photos, along with the names, and hometowns if available, of each winner will appear in the October/November 2021 issue of Pocono Living Magazine and the Pocono Magazines.com website. Some lucky participants may have their photo featured as a cover on Pocono Living Magazine!

PRIZES AWARDED: 1st Place: $100.00 in Gift Certificates to Local Restaurants & Shoppes 2nd Place: $75.00 in Gift Certificates to Local Restaurants & Shoppes 3rd Place: $50.00 in Gift Certificates to Local Restaurants & Shoppes Honorable Mentions: One year subscription to Pocono Living & Pocono Family Magazines. In the event of a tie, prize money will be split among the winners.

RULES OF THE CONTEST: 1. Contest open to amateur photographers only. 2. Contest opens April 1, 2021 and closes August 1, 2021. 3. Enter electronic files by email to: pmags@ptd.net. One photo at a time. 4. Submitted photos must be as an attachment to an email message, (not within the body of the email), and be high resolution (300 dpi), jpeg or tiff files. 5. Please include your contact information (phone number, mailing address & email address) with the submission. 6. Each contestant may submit no more than 15 photographs. Choose any combination of categories. 7. Photos submitted may be judged for inclusion in this year’s contest, and in all future year’s contests, so you have several chances to be a winner. 8. Entered photos must have been taken recently, from January 2012 to present and be of a scene or subject found in the Pocono Mountains only. 9. Categories are: Scenics (landscapes, rivers, lakes, waterfalls, etc.), Wildlife, Florals, and Historical Structures. 10. Judging will take place in August and September 2021 and winners will appear in the October/November issue of Pocono Living Magazine. 11. Winners will receive gift certificates within 90 days after being published. 12. Contestants will retain all rights to their photography, but agree that Pocono Magazines, LLC and Pocono Mts. Publications, LLC may use their photos from time to time in the magazines that they publish and on the Pocono Magazines.com website provided proper credit is given to each photographer. Questions? Email the editor at: pmags@ptd.net

Photo courtesy of Pixabay

Pocono Living Magazine 2021 PHOTO CONTEST


> 1 903 painting shows David Crockett swinging his rifle to strike Mexican soldiers inside The Alamo. The artist was by Robert Jenkins Onderdonk.

PENNSYLVANIANS AT THE ALAMO By John L. Moore

M

ore than 185 years have passed since Gen. Antonio López de Santa Anna led a Mexican army across the Rio Grande in early 1836 to end the revolution under way in Texas.

At San Antonio, his troops besieged The Alamo, which fell on March 6, its garrison overwhelmed after a siege that lasted 13 days. Victorious, the general ordered his troops to kill all the surviving defenders. The massacre gave rise to the battle cry, “Remember The Alamo!” Nearly forgotten today are the 15 Pennsylvanians who died defending the old mission – men like George C. Kimble who in

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1836 operated a hat factory in the east Texas town of Gonzales; John Purdy Reynolds, a Mifflin County physician who studied medicine in Philadelphia; and Reynolds’ friend, William McDowell, who had accompanied the doctor on a journey to Texas in 1835. Along the way McDowell and Reynolds fell in with a party of travelers from Tennessee, led by a former congressman, David Crockett. All died as Santa Anna’s soldiers surged over the mission’s walls and rushed the garrison.


The story of The Alamo began long before 1836. During the years leading up to the war, Mexican officials realized that Texas was a huge, mostly empty place inhabited mainly by Native Americans. Most governing authorities in Texas were Mexicans. To encourage settlement in Texas, they offered land to newcomers. Cummings, the Lewistown surveyor, was lured to Texas by the prospect of obtaining free or cheap land. His father and Gen. Sam Houston, commander of the Texas army, had served together in the War of 1812. As Cummings left Pennsylvania in December 1835, his father gave him a letter of introduction to Houston and a shipment of rifles for the Texan rebels. In a Jan. 20 letter to his father, Cummings reported that he had arrived in the East Texas town of Gonzales. He said that he wanted “to connect myself with a company of rangers on the frontiers to keep off the Indians, but it is most probable I will go on to San Antonio de Bexar and there remain until I can suitably connect myself with the army or until an occasion may require my services.”

“The story of The Alamo began long before 1836. During the years leading up to the war, Mexican officials realized that Texas was a huge, mostly empty place inhabited mainly by Native Americans.”

Alamo) in late January or early February 1836. He left San Antonio sometime after February 14 to survey lands titled to him on Cibolo Creek.”

San Antonio is about 75 miles west of Gonzales.

A stream in East Texas, Cibolo Creek is a tributary of the San Antonio River, which flows through San Antonio.

The details of Cummings’ experiences in Texas are sketchy, but the Texas State Historical Association provides key facts about him on its website, “Handbook of Texas.” Born in 1808, Cummings graduated from Jefferson College, Canonsburg, in western Pennsylvania, in 1835. “He traveled to Texas by sea from New Orleans and arrived in mid-December of 1835. He walked to San Felipe (about 50 miles west of present-day Houston) with the intention of joining a ranger unit for action against Indians. Once there he sold his best rifle for $30, met Sam Houston, and presented him with a letter of introduction from his father. “Houston advised him to obtain a horse and proceed to Goliad, where he would later meet him. Cummings traveled to Gonzales and then San Antonio, where he joined the garrison (at The

> G eneral Santa Anna

In a second letter to his father, this one written at San Antonio on Feb. 14, Cummings said that not only did he want to acquire land for himself, but he also saw the distribution of land as a business opportunity. “I will most likely be engaged in surveying of public lands,” Cummings said. One of the factors that had sparked the Texas Revolution was the issue of illegal immigration. Unlike today, when most illegals in Texas are Latinos headed north, the immigrants sparking controversy in the 1820s and 1830s were Americans who were moving south and west into Texas from the United States. To begin with, many of these English-speaking immigrants – white Americans – came into the country without the necessary governmental approvals. They didn’t speak the language (Spanish) or obey the law of the land. Nor did they June/July 2021 Pocono Living Magazine© | 9


By John L. Moore

A

s his troops rushed The Alamo in 1836, little did Gen. Antonio López de Santa Anna know that 33 years later, he would travel to Staten Island, New York. There he met an inventor, Thomas Adams, who bought a large quantity of chicle from him. Chicle is made from the sticky sap of a Central American tree, the sapodilla. Adams used it in unsuccessful attempts to develop a substitute for rubber, according to the 1996 edition of "The Encyclopedia of New York City." The article also quoted a 1944 speech that Horatio Adams, Thomas’ grandson, made at a function of the American Chicle Co. Then in his 90s, Horatio told the gum makers that one night his grandfather was in the corner drug store when a child came in and bought some chewing gum for a penny. Chewing gum sold by retailers in those days often consisted of sweetened and flavored paraffin. The girl’s purchase prompted Adams to think of all the chicle he was ready to throw away. “When he asked the man if he would be willing to try an entirely different kind of gum, the druggist agreed,” Horatio said. “When Mr. Thomas Adams arrived home that night, he spoke to his son, Tom Jr., my father, about his idea. Junior was very much impressed, and suggested that they make up a few boxes of chicle chewing gum and give it a name and a label.” The rest, as they say, was history. As a boy in the early 1950s, I liked to take short cuts as I walked to school. I lived in Somerville, N.J., about 25 miles west of Staten Island. One of my favorite routes crossed the property of a very old man we all said was a millionaire. He and his ancient wife lived in a Victorian mansion built of dark stone. There was a cobblestone drive that led from the street to the mansion’s porch. I vividly recall seeing the old man get into an ancient automobile as an elderly chauffeur held the rear door open. When not in use, the car was kept in the carriage house behind the mansion. A retaining wall separated a large garden from the driveway to the carriage house.

10 | Pocono Living Magazine© June/July 2021

I remember pushing myself up and over the retaining wall, then running as fast as I could toward the mansion’s porch. Several other boys ran with me. Our goal was to touch the porch, then race off even though we all knew that the property owner, a frail old man, was probably waiting to chase us away.

“When Mr. Thomas Adams arrived home that night, he spoke to his son, Tom Jr., my father, about his idea. Junior was very much impressed, and suggested that they make up a few boxes of chicle chewing gum and give it a name and a label.” Sometimes the old man stood just inside the porch door, watching for us at the window. Other times he walked onto the porch as we started our run. When that happened, few of us had nerve enough to approach the porch. We’d abruptly change course, and head for the street. Either way, we’d cross the street, and then we’d turn to face him, forming a kind of chorus line. In sing-song voices we’d chant at the top of our lungs: “Chiclets! Chiclets! Yeah. Yeah. Chiclets!” Then we’d race off to school. As a child, I never understood what the chant meant. Little did I know that the father and grandfather of this ancient man had invented chewing gum and once had business dealings with the infamous Santa Anna. Half a century passed before I learned that when Horatio Adams died at 102 in 1956, his obituary ran in newspapers and magazines across the country. Even Time magazine and the New York Times reported his passing. An excerpt from “Skunks, Nuts, and Other Stories”


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> D avid Crockett share the religious beliefs of the majority of Texans, who were Roman Catholics. Even worse, many of these illegals brought contraband. Some even advocated the use of violence to overthrow the government. Author Michael Wallis describes the scope of the problem: “By 1823 at least 3,000 U.S. citizens had entered Texas illegally, along with 700 legitimate settlers.” Eventually, the number of immigrants from the U.S. – both legal and illegal – came to vastly outnumber the Spanish-speaking people of Texas. In the 1500s, Spain had conquered the Indian peoples that inhabited Mexico, and the Spanish government in Mexico began to colonize Texas in the late 1600s. Texas was a Spanish territory until Mexico rebelled against Spain and won its independence in 1818. As the revolution ended, Texas became part of Mexico. Its formal name was Coahuila y Tejas, according to Wallis, a Crockett biographer.

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As Wallis reported in his 2011 book, “David Crockett, the Lion of the West,” “the animosity had increased between the government of Mexico and the American settlers, called Texians … The white colonists were becoming increasingly tired of living under Mexican rule, and they headed for war with hopes of forming their own separate republic.” June/July 2021 Pocono Living Magazine© | 11


> 1 833 map shows the Mexican State of Coahuila and Texas. In 1835, Texas seceded from Mexico. > D etail of 1833 map of Coahuila and Texas shows San Antonio de Bexar (identified only as Bexar) along a road that crosses the Rio Grande (shown on the map as Rio del Norte) a short distance from Laredo. Far east of Bexar is San Felipe in the Austin Colony.

12 | Pocono Living Magazine© June/July 2021


> 1 909 photo provides a stereoscopic view of The Alamo. According to Wallis: “Many of these Anglos were illegal immigrants and did not abide by Mexican law. All citizens were required to join the Catholic Church, accept the language and laws of the governing country, and, by the late 1820s, observe the ban on the enslavement of human beings.” Many whites moved to Texas to grow cotton. They had brought black slaves with them to work in the cotton fields. By 1835, nearly a tenth of the 30,000 people living in the state were black slaves owned by whites from the U.S., Wallis said. The conflict between newcomers and governing officials eventually turned violent and became known as the Texas Revolution, which began in October 1835. As the war began, Texan revolutionaries fortified an old mission called The Alamo in late 1835 and early 1836. It occupied a strategic spot along a key road leading from Mexico to settlements in the Texas interior. If and when Mexican soldiers arrived to suppress the revolution, its garrison had orders to send out riders to spread the alarm. Despite its strategic value, the mission was poorly defended. When Col. Jim Bowie, famous as a knife-fighter, led 30 volunteers to The Alamo in January 1836, he found a garrison of only 78 men.

Lt. Col. William B. Travis arrived on February 3 with an additional 29 men. Coming in from Tennessee, “David Crockett rode in with 12 men on the 8th,” according to the Texas State Historical Association. “The garrison had some 150 men.”

“The conflict between newcomers and governing officials eventually turned violent and became known as the Texas Revolution, which began in October 1835.” Numbering in the thousands, Santa Anna’s soldiers arrived at The Alamo on Feb. 23, surrounded it, and began firing their cannon at it the next day. On the night of Feb. 24, Col. William Travis sent a rider with an urgent message to Gonzales: “Come to our aid with all dispatch …” The men in Gonzales were already organizing a company of rangers when the messenger, Capt. Albert Martin, arrived. June/July 2021 Pocono Living Magazine© | 13


Martin passed Travis’ note along to another rider, but first he scribbled on the back of the note: “We were very short of ammunition when I left. Hurry on all the men you can get in haste.” The second courier then rode off to San Felipe, about 90 miles farther east. On Feb. 27, the rangers, led by Lt. George C. Kimble, left Gonzales and headed for The Alamo. “Loaded with rifles, blankets and food, 25 men rode out of town,” reported author Stephen L. Moore in a 2007 book, “Savage Frontier: Rangers, Riflemen, and Indian Wars in Texas.” On Feb. 28, they reached a ford on the Cibolo River, not far from San Antonio, also known as Bexar. “They stopped long enough to look for extra recruits,” Moore wrote. “They found some, including David Cummings, who had previously been in The Alamo garrison.”

> J im Bowie > S am Houston

On Feb. 29, “the men rested … and prepared to make an evening dash into Bexar,” Moore said. “The rangers crossed the river at sunset and moved west toward The Alamo.” The 32 men of the Gonzales Mounted Ranger Company “cautiously skirted Mexican soldiers during the bitterly cold night until arriving within sight of The Alamo. They rushed into the old fortress at 3 a.m.,” Moore wrote. It was Monday, March 1. Once inside, the men would have no way of knowing that on Tuesday, March 2, a convention of Texans meeting 170 miles away at Washington-on-the-Brazos, northwest of Houston, declared independence from Mexico and established the Republic of Texas. The rangers had only a handful of days left to live. On Sunday, March 6, Mexican soldiers stormed the mission and killed all 189 defenders. The dead included Bowie, Crockett and Travis, as well as Cummings, the Lewistown surveyor; Reynolds, the physician; and Kimble, the Gonzales hat maker. When the fighting ended, the bodies of the defenders were burned. On April 21, the Texans attacked Santa Anna’s army along the San Jacinto River near Galveston. Shouting “Remember The Alamo!” they defeated the Mexicans and captured Santa Anna. He signed a treaty that ended the war and granted Texas its independence. According to the Texas historical association, the battle lasted only 18 minutes.

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“WOW, Look At All That Candy!!”

> William B. Travis

Pennsylvanians at The Alamo John J. Ballentine

William Johnson

James Murry Brown

George C. Kimble

John Cain

William McDowell

Robert Crossman

John Purdy Reynolds

David P. Cummings

John M. Thurston

Almaron Dickinson

Hiram James Williamson

James Hannum

John Wilson

Samuel Holloway Source: Website of Alamo Trust Inc.

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WHO ARE OUR FOUNDING FATHERS? By Commissioner Suzanne F. McCool

S

o often we hear about or refer to our “Founding Fathers”. Which Americans deserve that title?

Would it be the colonists who opposed the rule of the King of England and were willing to fight for their freedom against enormous odds? Would it be the framers of the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, or our U. S. Constitution? This July let’s ponder these questions. The U. S. Constitution brought together, in a very remarkable document, ideas from many people and several existing documents, including the Articles of Confederation and our Declaration of Independence. Those who made significant intellectual contributions to the Constitution are who we are referring to when we say “Founding Fathers”. Many of the Founding Fathers were at the Constitutional Convention, where the Constitution was hammered out and ratified. George Washington presided over the convention. 16 | Pocono Living Magazine© June/July 2021

James Madison, also present, is credited as the main author. He wrote the document which became the model for the Constitution. Other Founding Fathers who were not there made significant contributions in other ways. For instance, Thomas Jefferson, who wrote the Declaration of Independence, was serving as Ambassador to France at the time of the Constitutional Convention. He was kept abreast of the proceedings by James Madison. John Adams, an Ambassador to Great Britain, Thomas Paine, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, and Patrick Henry all wrote significant treatises on Government and supported ratification of the Constitution. Patrick Henry liked the Articles of Confederation better, but once the Bill of Rights was added to the Constitution he fought hard for its ratification. The term “framers” is sometimes used to specify those who helped “craft” the Constitution. “Founding Fathers” often refers to people who contributed to the development of independence and nationhood. I believe it gets confusing because many


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> T he Signing of the Declaration of Independence, by John Trumbull, 1928

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Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons framers were considered “Founding Fathers”, but not all Founding Fathers were framers. Today I believe we consider “Founding Fathers” to be anyone who had a significant impact on our U. S. Constitution either directly or indirectly at this crucial time in American History.

“Those who made significant intellectual contributions to the Constitution are who we are referring to when we say “Founding Fathers.” This July 4th let’s be thankful that America had such highly intelligent, moral, and level-headed individuals, who beginning with the Declaration of Independence which led to a Revolution to win our Freedom from Tyranny, and wrote a Constitution which has resulted in our Democracy today, has become a standard for freedom of peoples all around the world. June/July 2021 Pocono Living Magazine© | 17


POCONO ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION CENTER: WHERE LEARNING COMES NATURALLY By Amanda Kuhn

This is the third of a series of features that will appear in Pocono Living about the agencies, organizations and associations that function to preserve and protect our lands and waters and promote the wise and safe use of our natural resources.

T

he future of the planet is in the hands of our youth. Would you trust your children with that responsibility? Most parents would agree that just making a bed or bringing dirty dishes to the sink can be a challenge. But just like these life skills, it’s important for parents to teach their children the value of responsibility both inside and outside of the home. Through education, we have the ability to teach our youth how to overcome the seemingly insurmountable environmental challenges we face. Tackling climate change, protecting our land and water, providing food and water sustainability, and building healthy cities requires a greater understanding of conservation to include a revaluation of nature. While putting dirty clothes in the hamper may be difficult to master, taking personal responsibility for changing the world just might inspire change. It’s only natural to protect what you love, which is why the Pocono Environmental Education Center (PEEC) believes the key to protecting our wildlife, watershed and planet is to help our youth fall in love with nature. Advancing environmental education, sustainable living and an appreciation for nature through hands-on experience in a national park is Pocono Environmental Education Center’s mission. This non-profit organization partners with the National Park Service in the

18 | Pocono Living Magazine© June/July 2021

Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area to provide students with programming that is exciting and engaging, while simultaneously giving tactile context to what they learn in the classroom. Each year, PEEC serves approximately 24,000 annual visitors - educating, inspiring and profoundly impacting their understanding and appreciation of our environment. Located along the Delaware River within the 77,000 acre Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, Pocono Environmental Education Center’s 38 acre campus has everything you need for a crash course in biodiversity; shady hemlock gorges, the Delaware River, diverse lowland and upland forests and fields, ponds, streams, waterfalls, unique flora and fauna, and rock outcrops containing 400 million year old fossils surround you. PEEC gives you the space and tools you need to experience and study these natural systems. With six hiking trails, two ponds for canoeing and fishing, team building courses, an education building, teaching yurts and more, you’re guaranteed to leave with a greater understanding of conservation and appreciation for nature.


PoconoFourWheelDrive.com As one of the largest and longest running residential environmental education centers in the northeastern United States, PEEC welcomes families, groups, schools, clubs, and individuals of any and all ages. If you are a long time resident of the Poconos, you’ve most likely taken a field trip to PEEC at some point during your eduction. PEEC offers school programs, scout programs, family programs, homeschool programs, outreach programs, and more. They also have a variety of public programs and summer camp opportunities. More information about the programs can found on PEEC’s website. Programs are offered year-round and can be customized to fit your needs.

“Pocono Environmental Education Center’s 38 acre campus has everything you need for a crash course in biodiversity.”

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With a Price That’s Fair Through education we can all better understand the unique challenges that we face as residents of this planet. Pocono Environmental Education Center invites you to fall back in love with nature. Each month you can find unique programs like Birds & Brews, Edible & Medicinal Plant Walk or the Frog Frolic. For more information join PEEC on Facebook or visit their website at peec.org.

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*This is the third in a series of features that will appear in Pocono Living Magazine about the agencies, organizations and associations that function to preserve and protect our lands and waterways while encouraging the efficient use of our natural resources.

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June/July 2021 Pocono Living Magazine© | 19


> F ulmer Falls

Courtesy of Derek Ramsey

20 | Pocono Living Magazine© June/July 2021


THE WATERFALLS OF THE POCONOS By Amanda Kuhn

L

iving in the Pocono Mountains, we’re fortunate to be surrounded by such natural beauty. Rare plants, abundant wildlife, roaring creeks, lush forests - it can all be found in our own backyard. And while we may lose sight of just how amazing the views are, there are still many local wonders that have the ability to captivate even the natives. Whether you’re witnessing a waterfall cascade from 180 feet or being lulled by the gentle flow of a shallow slide, waterfalls are both impressive and mesmerizing. One of the most notable features of our landscape, waterfalls serve as the perfect reminder of just how extraordinary the Poconos can be. From Milford to Jim Thorpe and everywhere in between, breathtaking waterfalls can be found all around us. Grab your hiking shoes and get ready to explore, just don’t forget your camera! Here is a local guide to some of our favorite waterfalls.

SAFETY FIRST!

Before you hit the trails be sure you’re prepared for steep, often slick surfaces. Waterfalls are commonly accompanied by moss and algae covered rocks and cliffs. Here are some tips to help you prepare. 1. Consider your fitness and experience level. 2. Wear appropriate footwear. 3. Take a map or make sure you’re familiar with the route. 4. Hike with a partner whenever you can and/or let someone know where you are going. 5. Dress in layers and be prepared to get wet. Waterfall spray is the best! 6. Water! Water! Water! And maybe a snack too! 7. Never walk near the edge of any waterfall. 8. Never hike in high water or moving water that is above the knee. 9. Stay on the trails whenever possible and obey all warning signs. 10. Use your best judgment.

June/July 2021 Pocono Living Magazine© | 21


BUSHKILL FALLS K

nown as the “Niagara of Pennsylvania,” Bushkill Falls is one of our beautiful state’s most scenic attractions. With multiple falls and a number of other amazing views, there’s a natural treasure around every corner. Using their unique system of trails, stairs and bridges, you’re able to explore many of Bushkill Falls’ 300 acres at your preferred skill level. There are four trails that maneuver throughout the falls, each varying in length and difficulty. For avid hikers, take the red trail to experience eight falls from multiple angles — ­ you won’t be disappointed! Bushkill Falls is privately owned and operated. Tickets must be purchased at the entrance building where you will also find a Wildlife Exhibit featuring the area’s indigenous wildlife. Learn about the local wildlife and why these animals are an integral part of the ecosystem. You can also learn about the history of Bushkill Falls and local Native Americans.

BUSHKILL FALLS (MAIN FALLS)

BRIDAL VEIL FALLS

Type: Cascade Rating: 5 Height: 100 feet

Type: Falls over cascade Rating: 3 Height: 25 feet

PENNEL FALLS

LOWER BRIDESMAID FALLS

Type: Slide Rating: 1 Height: 8 feet

Type: Cascade Rating: 3 Height: 20 feet

UPPER BRIDESMAID FALLS

LOWER GORGE FALLS

Type: Cascade Rating: 3 Height: 20 feet

Type: Cascade Rating: 4 Height: 45 feet

Grab a pair of sturdy hiking shoes, dress in layers and get ready for the quintessential Pocono experience, Just be prepared, you might get a little wet!

DIRECTIONS TO BUSHKILL FALLS ARE AS FOLLOWS: From the interchange of I-80 and US 209, take US 209 north 3.9 miles to Marshalls Creek, where Business Route 209 and US 209 merge. Turn right, and continue on US 209 north for 7.7 miles to the blinker light at Bushkill Road. Turn left, and head up the hill for 1.8 miles to the Bushkill Falls entrance. Turn left, and proceed to the parking lot.

> B ushkill Falls

Courtesy of visitbushkillfalls.com

22 | Pocono Living Magazine© June/July 2021

For more information visit their website, visitbushkillfalls.com. Hours of operation and admission rates change seasonally so check the website for current rates and times before planning your trip.


> B ushkill Falls

Courtesy of visitbushkillfalls.com

June/July 2021 Pocono Living Magazine© | 23


Type: Cascade Rating: 5 Height: 180 feet Directions to Raymondskill Falls are as follows: From the traffic light at PA 739 and US 209 at Dingmans Ferry, take US 209 north 4.9 miles to Raymondskill Road. Turn left and proceed uphill for .7 miles to a marked parking area. For more information visit the National Park Service website at nps.gov/dewa/planyourvisit/ raymondskill-creek-trail Please note that the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area becomes extremely busy on the weekends, particularly at the points of interest. Kathleen Sandt, Public Affairs Specialist for the DWGNRA, suggests early morning or weekday visits.

> R aymondskill Falls Courtesy of PMVB

24 | Pocono Living Magazine© June/July 2021


RAYMONDSKILL FALLS T

he tallest waterfall in Pennsylvania, Raymondskill Falls is only a few feet shorter than Niagara Falls. With three cascades that flow into the Raymondskill Creek, hikers can take in views from one of two platforms. See views of the upper pool and first drop from the upper viewing area. Then, grab your camera and snap some pictures of the falls from the lower viewing platform. Located in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, the trails are maintained by the Nation Park Service however the trail to Raymondskill Falls is uneven and tricky to navigate. After viewing the falls from the lower platform, don’t go just yet, there’s more to see! Travel back to the top of the waterfall and where the trail splits, go straight, following the path along Raymondskill Creek. In the half mile between Raymondskill Falls and Raymondskill Road you’ll find even more cascades and four larger falls. The terrain is very rocky and often steep and slippery so wear appropriate shoes to enjoy this quick hike safely.

> R aymondskill Falls Courtesy of PMVB

June/July 2021 Pocono Living Magazine© | 25


DINGMANS FALLS

Type: Cascade over slide Rating: 5 Height: 130 feet

DINGMANS FALLS & SILVERTHREAD FALLS

SILVERTHREAD FALLS

Type: Slide Rating: 3 Height: 80 feet

Directions to Dingmans and Silverthread Falls are as follows: From the blinker at the intersection of Bushkill Road and US 209, follow US 209 north into the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area for 11.6 miles to Johnny Bee Road. Turn left, and proceed for 1.1 miles to the falls parking area, taking the right fork about .5 miles up Johnny Bee Road. For more information visit the National Park Service website at nps.gov/dewa/planyourvisit/dingmans-creek-trail

T

he second tallest waterfall in Pennsylvania, Dingmans Falls is another impressive site located in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. Once you hit the trail, you’ll quickly encounter Silverthread Falls, a narrow 80 foot shoot with a cascading flow that varies with the rainfall. Winding through a beautiful hemlock ravine, follow the trail through rhododendron and tall hemlock trees. The trail ends at the base of Dingmans Falls. Take in the sights from the platform or trek the final tenth of a mile via staircase for a birds-eye view from the upper falls. Please be aware that there are limited services available in this area. The DWGNRA asks that you visit responsibly. Most park trails are open, but some restrooms are closed and all park regulations apply. Be sure to visit the park’s webpage for more details and updates.

Please note that the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area becomes extremely busy on the weekends, particularly at the points of interest. Kathleen Sandt, Public Affairs Specialist for the DWGNRA, suggests early morning or weekday visits.

Courtesy of PMVB

> S ilver Thread Falls Courtesy of PMVB

26 | Pocono Living Magazine© June/July 2021


> D ingmans Falls Courtesy of PMVB

June/July 2021 Pocono Living Magazine© | 27


> H ornbeck’s Creek Falls Courtesy of PMVB

HORNBECK’S CREEK FALLS J

ust a few miles south of Dingmans Falls, Hornbeck’s Creek Falls is also one of the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area’s hidden gems. Also known as Indian Ladders, Hornbeck’s Creek Falls includes a few falls as well as other water features. Beginning off of Route 209, the recently restored trail is perfect for families, with interesting bridges and water crossings that kids will enjoy.

28 | Pocono Living Magazine© June/July 2021

> H ornbeck’s Creek Falls Courtesy of PMVB


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Type: Slide Height: 20 feet Direction to Hornbeck’s Creek Falls are as follows: From the parking area located off of Route 209 near Chestnut Hill Road, there is an obvious trail head that follow the creek upstream. Another entrance can be found off of Emery Road near the Pocono Environmental Education Center. For more information visit the National Park Service website at nps.gov/dewa/ planyourvisit/dingmans-creek-trail Please note that the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area becomes extremely busy on the weekends, particularly at the points of interest. Kathleen Sandt, Public Affairs Specialist for the DWGNRA, suggests early morning or weekday visits. June/July 2021 Pocono Living Magazine© | 29


CURRENTLY CLOSED. CHECK WEBSITE FOR UPDATES.

FACTORY FALLS, FULMER FALLS & DEER LEAP FALLS A

lso located in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, Factory Falls, Fulmer Falls & Deer Leap Falls are just a short distance away from Dingmans Falls. Each different and unique in many ways, these three falls are worth the hike. Following the single path along the creek, the first waterfall you’ll find is Factory Falls, aptly named for it’s proximity to a 19th century woolen mill. Best viewed from the far side of the creek, Factory Falls is the shortest of the trio. Next up is Fulmer Falls which is the largest of the Child’s Park falls. The semicircular basin of rock that the falls flow into before continuing downstream makes this fall particularly unique. A bridge spanning the top of Deer Leap Falls gives you an interesting vantage point to observe this last falls. While the shallow pool these falls flow into are appealing, no swimming is allowed. Due to storm damage, the George W. Childs Park is temporarily closed. Stay up to date on conditions by visiting the Nation Park Service’s website at nps.gov/dewa/planyourvisit/conditions.

> Factory Falls

Courtesy of Derek Ramsey 30 | Pocono Living Magazine© June/July 2021

FACTORY FALLS

Type: Falls over cascade Rating: 2 Height: 17 feet

FULMER FALLS

Type: Falls over chute Height: 55 feet

DEER LEAP FALLS

Type: Falls over falls Height: 30 feet Directions to these three waterfalls are as follows: From the blinker at the intersection of Bushkill Road and US 209, follow US 209 north into the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area for 11.8 miles to the traffic light at PA 739. Turn left, and proceed 1.2 miles to Lake Road. Turn left, and drive 1.6 miles to the George W. Childs Picnic Area. For more information visit nps.gov/dewa/planyourvisit/conditions. Please note that the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area becomes extremely busy on the weekends, particularly at the points of interest. Kathleen Sandt, Public Affairs Specialist for the DWGNRA, suggests early morning or weekday visits.


> Deer Leap Falls Courtesy of JMP

> F ulmer Falls

Courtesy of Derek Ramsey

June/July 2021 Pocono Living Magazine© | 31


BUTTERMILK FALLS & LUKE’S FALLS T

he Lehigh Gorge State Park is home to more than just miles of amazing trails and whitewater adventure. Several amazing waterfalls can be found throughout park, some that flow uniquely through the walls of the gorge. While the Delaware and Lehigh Rail Trail stretches more than 160 miles, Buttermilk Falls and Luke’s Falls are located about .3 miles

> B uttermilk Falls Courtesy of PMVB

32 | Pocono Living Magazine© June/July 2021

north of the Rockport Access Area. Buttermilk Falls is a tall cascade that flows through a series of drops down the side of the gorge landing in a pool that is commonly waded in by visitors. Heading back in the opposite direction you’ll find Luke’s Falls which is harder to see depending on the time of year. Thick foliage hides the falls but also adds to it’s beauty.


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Directions to Buttermilk Falls and Luke’s Falls is as follows: To reach the Rockport Access Area of the Lehigh Gorge State Park follow US 209 south from Jim Thorpe to PA 93 north. After 6 miles, turn right onto Brenckman Drive to the town of Weatherly. Continue through Weatherly then turn right onto Lehigh Gorge Drive. Then, make a right only Rockport Road. If you’re coming from I-80, take exit 273 and follow PA 940 west for one mile then turn left onto Lehigh Gorge Drive, then right onto Rockport Road.

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> L uke’s Falls

Courtesy of PMVB

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CURRENTLY CLOSED. CHECK WEBSITE FOR UPDATES.

GLEN ONOKO F

or the last two years, the popular Glen Onoko Trail has been closed in an effort to keep hikers and first responders safe. Overuse and trail deterioration has led to dangerous conditions that have resulted in injuries and sometimes death. Steep and rocky, this trail was designated for expert hikers. Although the trail is less than one mile, the rocks are often slippery, especially near the tops of the falls. While there were multiple cascades along the way, the first falls that you reach is Chameleon Falls followed by Onoko Falls. Despite warning signs and rope barriers, some brazen visitors would climb out to the top of the falls, often with disastrous results.

CHAMELEON FALLS

Type: Cascade Rating: 3 Height: 25 feet

ONOKO FALLS

Type: Cascade Rating: 4 Height: 64 feet

HIDDEN SWEET

Type: Falls Rating: 4 Height: 15 feet

Directions to Glen Onoko are as follows: From the PA Turnpike interchange at Lehighton, take US 209 south for 2 miles towards Lehighton and Jim Thorpe. After crossing over the Lehigh River, turn right and continue on US 209 south for 4.3 miles, passing through the historic district of Jim Thorpe, to the traffic light at US 209 and PA 903. Turn right onto PA 903, and cross over the Lehigh River again. Once across, PA 903 makes a sharp left, and .2 miles after stop at the stop sign and continue straight down a steep hill. Turn left into the park and follow the park for 1.8 miles to the parking area. For more information visit the DCNR website at dcnr.pa.gov.

34 | Pocono Living Magazine© June/July 2021


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> Glen Onoko Falls Courtesy of Bill Wright

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Type: Cascade Rating: 2 Height: 12 feet Directions to Hawk Falls are as follows: From I-80 and PA 534 in White Haven, take PA 534 east for 9.6 miles toward Tannery and Hickory Run State Park. Fore more information visit the DCNR website at dcnr.pa.gov.

> H awk Falls

Courtesy of PMVB

HAWK FALLS & STAMETZ DAM O

ver 40 miles of hiking trails, streams full of wild brook trout, three natural park areas, and an 18-acre field of rocks known as Boulder Field - Hickory Run State Park is primed for exploration. Regardless of the season, Hickory Run State Park’s diverse habitats and unique geological formations draw visitors year-round. After you have traversed the Boulder Field, make your way to Hawk Run to discover another of this park’s unique attractions. Hiking to the falls is fairly easy as you pass through tall forest and beautiful rhododendron. It is about .5 miles to reach Hawk

36 | Pocono Living Magazine© June/July 2021

Falls and you will hear the rushing water well before you see it. The rock outcropping near the top of the falls will give you a great vantage point but you can return to the trail and continue on to view the falls from the bottom. Another awesome water feature to checkout while visiting Hickory Run State Park is the Stametz Dam Falls which is located on the Shades of Death trail. The spillway is a great place for photos and a chance to sit a listen to the sounds of water rushing along the rocks.


From our local farms to your families table! Stroudsburg Old Time Farmers Market is dedicated to offering an extensive variety of farm fresh goods, as well as other locally grown and created items.

(570) 460.1452 or (570) 236.8456 Saturdays • May - October • 8am - Noon www.stroudsburgoldtimefarmersmarket.com 925 Ann Street • Stroudsburg PA, 18360

> H awk Falls

Courtesy of PMVB

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• 60 acre lake with 300 campsites • Paved roads • Electric, water and cable TV hook-ups; 100 campsites have sewer hook-ups • 8 heated bathouses, store, laundry and propane • Boating, boat rentals and fishing (no fishing license required)

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> S tametz Dam

Courtesy of PMVB

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June/July 2021 Pocono Living Magazine© | 37


SHOHOLA FALLS E

asy to find yet not very well known, Shohola Falls is easily one of the most impressive falls in the area. While many of the local waterfalls do not have a large amount of water flow, this waterfall does. With the ability to view this waterfall from multiple angles, you’ll be tempted to venture to the ledges to grab a great pic but be sure to use caution.

Type: Slide Rating: 3 Height: 70 feet Directions to Shohola Falls are as follows: From the interchange of I-84 and US 6 west of Milford, take US 6 west 8.5 miles. Follow US 6 over Shohola Creek and after crossing the creek, park in the state game land’s parking area on your left. For more information visit the Pocono Mountain Visitor’s Bureau website at poconomountains.com.

> S hohola Falls 38 | Pocono Living Magazine© June/July 2021

Courtesy of PMVB


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> S hohola Falls

Courtesy of PMVB

Visit us at the Farmer’s Market!

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HERE ARE A FEW OTHER WATERFALLS TO CHECK OUT: • Sawkill Falls • Savantine Falls • Tumbling Waters • Tanners Falls

• Wild Creek Falls • Resica Falls • Nay Aug Falls • Adams Falls

www.farmers-basket.com

June/July 2021 Pocono Living Magazine© | 39


> D elaware Water Gap

Courtesy of Marlana Holsten

PARK PREPARES FOR SUMMER VISITORS By Kathleen Sandt, Public Affairs Specialist, DWGNRA

BUSHKILL, PA: Employees at Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area have been busy gearing up and getting facilities ready for a busy summer season. The 70,000-acre national park unit in PA and NJ and was the 10th most-visited national park unit in the country in 2020 with 4.1 million visits recorded. “This summer, our visitors will see our staff stationed at busy sites throughout the park where we can best serve the public’s needs. We’re going to put our focus where our visitors are and where we can be of most assistance.” said Superintendent Sula Jacobs of the park’s summer plans. “We’ve been planning ahead and getting the park ready to welcome our visitors,” she added. “But for the best trips, we recommend that visitors plan ahead too.”

GET INFORMATION ONLINE OR BY PHONE:

• Call the information desk at (570) 426-2452. • Follow us on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/ DelWaterGapNPS. • Visit the park website at www.nps.gov/dewa.

The health and safety of our visitors and our employees is our

40 | Pocono Living Magazine© June/July 2021

top priority. Prior to visiting the park, visit the Current Conditions section of our website for up-to-date information on important public health and safety measures that are in effect related to stopping the spread of Covid-19. Some services remain limited or unavailable.

ACCESSIBILITY:

For information on accessible facilities in the park visit the park’s website or call (570) 426-2434. Audio files of wayside exhibits located throughout the park can be downloaded from the website before visiting: Wayside Audio - Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area (U.S. National Park Service) (nps.gov).

COOL OFF IN, OR ON, THE RIVER:

All beaches and boat/canoe launches are open for the season. A $10/car fee is charged 7 days a week; annual passes are available for $45. The hand-launch access at Cadoo Recreation Site in NJ is open Monday morning through Friday evening and is closed on weekends; there is no charge to use the access. • Lifeguards will be on duty at Milford Beach from 10 am to 6 pm, Thursday through Monday, beginning June 20 and ending August 28.


• Inflatable pool toys are not permitted within designated swimming areas and lifejackets are recommended when lifeguards are not on duty. • Visit the park website for a list of businesses in the area that rent canoes, kayaks, tubes, and rafts and provide transportation; or B.Y.O.B- bring your own boat. Always wear a properly fitted and fastened US Coast Guardapproved lifejacket when on or near the water. Lifejackets must be worn by children 12 and under while aboard any vessel.

GO FOR A RIDE…OR A DRIVE:

• The McDade Trail in PA is a great place to ride your bike (and it’s the only trail in the park where bikes are permitted). Visit our website for information on bicycle rentals in the area. • Take a scenic drive and enjoy the views. • The upper section of Blue Mountain Lakes Road and Skyline Drive will be open to vehicles on weekdays beginning May 10. They will remain closed to vehicles on weekends, from Friday at dusk until noon on Monday. These roads will be closed to all users later in the summer for road work including re-grading, resurfacing, and drainage improvements. Updates will be posted on our website and on our Facebook page as construction schedules are finalized. •F  reeman Tract Road off River Road in Middle Smithfield Township will be closed weekends, closing on Friday evenings and re-opening on Monday mornings, beginning May 10.

PLANNED CONSTRUCTION/ROAD WORK:

Additional information is available on the park’s website and project updates will be posted to the park’s Facebook page. Scheduled road repair and construction projects include: • Mountain Road in NJ will remain closed to vehicles due to construction on a historic culvert. The road is open to pedestrians wishing to visit Buttermilk Falls. • Old Mine Road near Watergate in NJ will be open, but motorists may experience single-lane closures with traffic control due to ongoing construction in the area through July. • The dirt section of National Park Drive in the Slateford Farm area is closed to vehicles due to construction. • Route 209 near Adams Creek will be closed evenings from 9 pm to 5 am from June through July due to construction work on the bridge over the creek. A detour to and from the Milford area will be in place via Route 739 and Milford Road.

VISIT ONE OF OUR PARTNER-OPERATED SITES:

The park works in partnership with several not-for-profit and volunteer organizations who offer a variety of programs and services for the pubic. Thanks to these Park Partners, visitors can visit and tour historic homes and villages, learn about nature, practice outdoor adventure skills, or learn a fine craft. Check their websites for hours and program offerings: • Mohican Outdoor Center • Pocono Environmental Education Center • Peters Valley School of Craft • Foster-Armstrong House and Nelden-Roberts Stonehouse • Walpack Center and Van Campen Inn • Montague Grange

PITCH A TENT:

• Alosa River Campsites are available to river users by reservation. There are 6 individual campsites at this location. Go to recreation.gov or call (877) 444-6777 to reserve your riverside campsite before you visit. There is no vehicle access to these campsites. • Dingmans Campground offers tent and RV sites. For more information or to make a reservation visit their website at Dingmans Campground or call (570) 828-1551. • River camping is available to those on extended river trips in accordance with park regulations. Designated river campsites can be found on the park website. • Backpacking on the Appalachian Trail is permitted in accordance with park regulations. • A complete list of campgrounds, river campsites, and regulations is available on the park’s website. Make reservations well in advance as campsites and campgrounds are in high demand during the summer months.

PICK A PLACE TO PICNIC:

All picnic areas are open except for those at George W. Childs Park which remains closed for construction. Check the park website for group size limits and restrictions. • Grills are not provided anywhere in the park, but visitors may bring their own grill to one of the following designated picnic areas: • In PA: Milford Beach, Smithfield Beach, Toms Creek Picnic Area, Bushkill General Store Picnic Area, Hialeah Picnic Area (open weekdays only) • In NJ: Turtle Beach and Namanock Recreation Site in NJ • Most areas are “carry in/carry out” so please take all food scraps, trash, and other waste with you when you leave so that wild animals are not attracted to these areas. June/July 2021 Pocono Living Magazine© | 41


To protect park resources, including wildlife, and to reduce trash, picnicking and food preparation and consumption are prohibited at the following areas: • Raymondskill Creek, Trails, and parking areas, from the park boundary to the confluence of the Delaware River, including Hackers Falls and Trail; • Point of Gap overlook parking area and riverbank along Route 611; • Sawkill Creek from park boundary to the confluence with the Delaware River (including the Mott Street Bridge and pool below the bridge); • Riverview Trailhead parking area for the McDade Recreational Trail on River Road; and • Karamac Trail and riverbank.

WATCH WATER…FALL:

Because of the unique geography and geology of the area, the park boasts several stunning waterfalls that are free to visit. From water rushing over a steep cliff to rambling streams with gentle cascades, there is a waterfall for everyone. Waterfalls are among the most popular, and busiest destinations in the park, especially on summer weekends when visitation swells. For the best experience, visit on a weekday, early in the morning, or at twilight. To protect park visitors and resources, including wildlife, picnicking is not allowed at any of the waterfall areas and visitors are expected to take everything they brought in back home with them when they leave. “Some of the most beautiful places in the recreation area are our many waterfalls and the streams that feed them. They are also

> H idden Lake

Courtesy of Marlana Holsten

42 | Pocono Living Magazine© June/July 2021

among the most fragile environments in the park and are easily damaged by trash, human waste, overuse, and misuse,” said Kara Deutsch, Chief of Resource Management and Science at the park. “We ask all visitors to follow the rules and regulations when visiting so that these special areas can remain as they are for future generations of visitors to also enjoy.” Swimming is prohibited within 50 feet upstream from the top of all waterfalls. • Dingmans Falls: Dingmans Falls Visitor Center will remain closed this year however the trail is open daily, and the access roads will be open on weekdays, from noon on Mondays to dusk on Fridays, beginning on May 10. On Saturdays and Sundays, the roads will be closed to vehicles and only open to pedestrians. • Buttermilk Falls: Mountain Road in NJ will remain closed to vehicles due to construction but is open to pedestrians wishing to access Buttermilk Falls. • George W. Childs Park remains closed for construction.

GO TAKE A HIKE!

From steep, rugged climbs to the top of the Delaware Water Gap to lazy strolls along the river on the McDade Trail, there is a trail in the park to suit every visitor. All trails are open except the following which will remain closed until further notice due to public hazard or ongoing construction work: • The George W. Childs Park trails and the Conashaugh Equestrian Trail remain closed for construction. • The Adams Creek drainage area and the White Pines trailhead for the McDade Trail are closed from May 1 to September 30 to maintain public safety; protect environmental and scenic values; protect natural and cultural resources; and avoid public use conflicts.


WHERE CAN I PARK?

Parking areas are located throughout the recreation area and directions to them can be found on the park’s website under the listing for each location. On weekends, parking areas at many destinations fill by 9 am. “When a parking area is full, the site you wish to visit is also full,” Chief Ranger Eric Lisnik would like to remind visitors. “Some sites have narrow trails or viewing areas or are in fragile ecosystems and can only fit a limited number of people at one time before the area is damaged or it gets too crowded to enjoy. If the parking area is full when you arrive, choose a different destination or a different time to visit that area.” Park rangers recommend having several backup plans in case the area you want to visit is already full when you arrive.

TAKE THE SHUTTLE:

Use the Pocono Pony’s Hiker Shuttle to get back and forth between the Park and Ride lot in the town of Delaware Water Gap, PA and the Kittatinny Point/Mt. Tammany and Lake Lenape/Mt. Minsi area trails at the south end of the park. The shuttle runs every 30 minutes on summer weekends. Masks are required to be worn aboard the shuttle. Schedules are available at: www. gomcta.com/trip. The River Runner shuttle for boats and bikes will not be operating in 2021.

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TIPS FOR TRAVELERS:

• Plan ahead! Visit the park website or call ahead to find out what you can and can’t do, where you can go, what you need to bring, and what you should leave at home. • Travel on Tuesday… or Wednesday, or Thursday to beat the crowds. Weekends are the busiest times in the park. • Have a Plan B… and C in case the places you wish to visit are already full when you arrive. If the parking area is full, the site is also full. Many popular destinations reach capacity by 9 am on summer weekends. • Recreate Responsibly. Help take care of the park by following all rules and regulations, taking all trash and waste home with you when you leave, and by practicing Leave No Trace © principles: Plan Ahead and Prepare, Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces, Dispose of Waste Properly, Leave What You Find, Minimize Campfire Impacts, Respect Wildlife, Be Considerate of Other Visitors. To learn more about what you can do visit Leave No Trace Seven Principles (U.S. National Park Service) (nps.gov). June/July 2021 Pocono Living Magazine© | 43


Courtesy of BPT

T

hanks to the pandemic, many people have gone from working in an office to working from home, giving cat owners a chance to spend more time with their furry friends. With all this extra time, you have the opportunity to strengthen the bond you share with your cat while helping them get active and stay healthy. Fortunately, there are several enrichment activities you can set up indoors to give them some much needed mental stimulation and prevent destructive behaviors.

1. Plan a treasure hunt

One of the easiest ways to make a quick activity for your cat is to create a treasure hunt. All you have to do is hide small amounts of dry cat food in various spots around your house. Throughout the day, your cat can "hunt" for their food, which will keep them active in a fun and engaging way.

44 | Pocono Living Magazine© June/July 2021

2. Play a game

Cats need mental stimulation just as much as humans - playing a game is a simple way to provide a stimulating, enriching experience. Friskies Cat Fishing 2, a free app available for iOS or Android, is a game designed specifically for cats. The app plays special sounds and displays schools of fish, encouraging your cat to pounce like she would in the wild. The more fish your cat catches, the higher the score. You can even keep track of her score and share it on social media.

3. Make a puzzle feeder

The active pursuit of food is instinctive for cats. A puzzle feeder is a great way to appeal to your cat's desire for physical and mental stimulation. All you need is a plastic water or soda bottle and a utility knife. Use the knife to cut a few small holes in the sides of the clean, sanitized bottle. Make sure the holes are big enough for pieces of kibble to pass through. Place some dry kibble into the bottle, screw on the cap and let your cat get to work.

Photo courtesy of Pixabay

5 FUN WAYS TO KEEP YOUR CAT ENTERTAINED AT HOME


4. Create your own cat toy

Cat toys don't have to be expensive or complicated. Get crafty to keep your cat busy with a DIY wand toy. Start with a wooden dowel (about three feet in length and half-inch diameter), a barrel swivel and some fishing line. Then, gather materials to customize your wand - like colored pom poms, colored felt, feathers and jingle bells.

“You have the opportunity to strengthen the bond you share with your cat while helping them get active and stay healthy.”

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5. Go for a walk

It may seem unorthodox, but cats can be trained to walk on a leash. Many cats enjoy getting out to explore the neighborhood. Taking your cat for a walk lets them safely experience the great outdoors. It can also give them some necessary exercise. Planning activities for your cat keeps them entertained, helps them stay healthy and can strengthen the bond you share. Try these activities for quick and easy ways to enrich your cat's life at home.

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9080 Franklin Hill Road East Stroudsburg, Pa www.psgaragepa.com June/July 2021 Pocono Living Magazine© | 45


Spring season is a time of regeneration and renewal as you prepare to bring life back to your lawn and garden.

46 | Pocono Living Magazine© June/July 2021


BRINGING LIFE BACK INTO YOUR YARD AND GARDEN Courtesy of BPT

RETURN OF THE GREEN: GET YOUR GRASS AND GARDEN GROWING AGAIN

(BPT) - Spring season is a time of regeneration and renewal as you prepare to bring life back to your lawn and garden. Taking the proper steps after seasonal changes or severe weather conditions can prove to be the difference between creating a breathtaking landscape or an outdoor space with unsightly mishaps. By following a few simple steps, you can take pride in your backyard year after year.

INSPECT AND REPLACE YOUR TOOLS OF THE TRADE

The first step to creating an outdoor masterpiece begins with the proper equipment. You can't very well dig, rake or mow with broken or dull materials, so now is the time to inspect each of your tools. Check your lawnmower and other garden essentials for signs of damage or rust. Making sure that your garden tools are in good condition at the start of the season will help establish the right foundation for a successful planting and growing season. "The right tools can make all the difference in creating a lawn that leaves a lasting impression," says Alan Luxmore, host of A&E's hit television show Fix This Yard. "Arm yourself with tools that are not only durable, but easy to use. Complete

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June/July 2021 Pocono Living Magazine© | 47


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POCONO MAGAZINES ONLINE

Pocono Living Magazine

and Pocono Family Magazine watering systems such as LeakFree by Nelson, offer a turn-key watering experience from start to finish, allowing gardeners more time to revel in their landscaping successes."

BRING NEW LIFE INTO THE GARDEN

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48 | Pocono Living Magazine© June/July 2021

Once your soil is permeable, it should be prepped for the upcoming planting season by removing dead leaves and plants that may have been left over from the previous season. Use a rotary tiller to break up and aerate hard soil. Once the old material has been removed from the work area and your soil is ready, begin planting your new plants, flowers, vegetables and grass. You can also help your trees, bushes and even certain plants have a more robust look by trimming them back to encourage new bud growth.

ESTABLISH A REGULAR WATERING REGIMEN

One of the most important steps to maintaining a healthy lawn and garden is providing it with the proper nutrients. Using a hose for daily irrigation seems simple but without the proper watering set up, your efforts could be futile. A proper watering guide and the following tips from the watering experts at Nelson can increase efficiency and bring you one step closer to creating a yard with envious curb appeal.


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• Give your greens a thorough soaking once in a while to produce extended and robust roots. • The best time to water is in the morning, when the air is cool and moist. The warmth of the sun and the rising temperature gently dries the grass and the leaves on the plants. And since morning air is damp, you don't waste water through evaporation. • Follow a regular watering schedule to discourage bugs by providing them with an inhospitable environment. Insects, with the possible exception of the water bug, aren't terribly fond of water. • To be certain your lawn is hydrated adequately when it has failed to rain, the standard rule of thumb is to sprinkle one inch of water per week.

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• Use a complete guaranteed leak-free system such as LeakFree by Nelson in order to conserve water in drought conditions, save money and stay dry. For additional watering and gardening tips, and to learn more about LeakFree technology, visit www.facebook.com/ NelsonWateringAndGardening.

June/July 2021 Pocono Living Magazine© | 49


BUDGET-FRIENDLY TRAVEL TIPS Courtesy of Family Features

W

ith a winter that never seems to end, families are aching to enjoy some fun in the sun, turning their attention to a welldeserved getaway. According to a recent Bank of America survey, 46 percent of Americans plan on hitting the road and organizing familyfriendly vacations this year. But nearly half of these survey respondents, 48 percent, said the most difficult part of planning a trip is managing a budget.

FUN, AFFORDABLE VACATIONS

Travel Channel host Samantha Brown has trekked the globe and is an ace at keeping costs low while maximizing adventure. She shares a few budget saving tips for the millions of Americans looking to take a family vacation and ensure lasting memories. “When you start researching vacation destinations, it’s important to keep in mind that a good rewards card can help to offset 50 | Pocono Living Magazine© June/July 2021

travel costs,” Brown said. “I find that using credit cards like the BankAmericard Travel Rewards credit card gives you great flexibility in how to use your points to cover travel expenses ... more than just for flights. You can book your travel whenever, however you choose so there are no restrictions or blackouts.”

DESTINATION, DESTINATION, DESTINATION

The majority of survey respondents said they are headed towards easy to access, family-friendly destinations like beaches, theme parks and zoos. Sixty three percent of respondents said car trips are the preferred mode of travel because they are easier on the budget and also ensure that the vacation will be an adventure.

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Pocono Living Magazine Subscriptions Available “The majority of survey respondents said they are headed towards easy to access, family-friendly destinations like beaches, theme parks and zoos.” Having difficulty finding your copy of Pocono Living Magazine©? We know... they go fast! Visit any one of our advertisers to find your copy. Look for this decal on their storefront windows or door…

One Year (6 issues) Subscription also available. Mail the form along with your check or money order for $29.95 to:

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Families are increasingly looking for ways to stretch the dollar. Half of the survey respondents agreed that hotels and lodging generally eat up most of the budget. Search for ways to save in other places by being flexible with dates or traveling to locations that are off the beaten path. You can use rewards points you’ve accumulated towards lodging or airfare expenses. Some travel rewards credit cards let you use points to “pay yourself back” for any type of travel purchase through a statement credit. You can even use points to pay for theme park tickets and camp sites.

PAY WITH YOUR CARD

Most families (77 percent) pay for purchases during vacations with credit cards. This not only minimizes the amount of cash or travelers checks you should carry, but it allows you to offset costs. Since most places accept credit cards, think about using a rewards card for big ticket expenses like gas, theme park admission and hotels. If you use a rewards credit


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Search for ways to save in other places by being flexible with dates or traveling to locations that are off the beaten path. card for those purchases, it frees up cash for smaller expenses and also accumulates points that you can use on your next vacation. Look for a card like the BankAmericard Travel Rewards card where you can earn 1.5 points for every dollar spent on purchases, every time. Then these points can be used to get a statement credit to cover your flights, hotels, vacation packages, cruises, rental cars or baggage fees. For more information, visit www.bankofamerica. com/creditcard.

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Pocono Family Magazine

Barrett Paradise Friendly Library Cresco, PA 570-595-7171 www.barrettlibrary.org

Pocono Mountain Public Library Tobyhanna, PA 570-894-8860 www.poconomountpl.org

Clymer Library Pocono Pines, PA 570-646-0826 www.clymerlibrary.org

Western Pocono Community Library Brodheadsville, PA 570-992-7934 www.wpcl.lib.pa.us

Eastern Monroe Public Library Branches Hughes Library (main branch) Stroudsburg, PA 570-421-0800 www.monroepl.org Pocono Township Branch Tannersville, PA 570-629-5858 Smithfield Branch Marshalls Creek, PA 570-223-1881 Bookmobile 570-421-0880 x49

Available at Local Businesses & by Subscription Pocono Magazines, LLC 1929 North Fifth Street, Stroudsburg, PA 18360 570-424-1000 • pmags@ptd.net

Pocono Slate Belt Shooting Association A trapshooting club located in Bangor, Pennsylvania

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TRUSTED PARTNERS

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Pocono Living Magazine June/July 2021  

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