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OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021

The Pocono Mountains' Magazine

Complimentary

Pocono Living M A G A Z I N E

Annual Photography Issue


Pocono Magazines, LLC PUBLISHING

Pocono Living Magazine© & Pocono Family Magazine© 1929 North 5th Street Stroudsburg, PA 18360 570-424-1000 pmags@ptd.net www.poconomagazines.com PUBLISHER/EDITOR Larry R. Sebring larry@poconomagazines.com ASSISTANT EDITOR Suzanne McCool ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVES larry@poconomagazines.com MAGAZINE & WEB DESIGN Smart Blonde Creative Food & Wine Editor Jamie Marra PHOTOGRAPHY & ART John Anzivino Barbara Lewis Gayle C. Brooke Marie Liu Ray Caswell Harry Loud Pat Coyle Regina Matarazzo Randall FitzGerald Janet Mishkin Ashley Hall John L. Moore Maurice Harmon Michael Murphy Susan Hartman Justine Nearhood Marlana Holsten Roseanna Santaniello Ann H. LeFevre Tom Stone CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Kimberly Blaker Jamie Marra Roseanne Bottone Suzanne McCool Kathy Dubin-Uhler Janet Mishkin Brian Hardiman John L. Moore Amanda Kuhn Allison Mowatt Amy Leiser Jim Werkheiser Marie Liu William M. Williams Marty Wilson ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Kristen Sebring Linda Spalluto

PROUD MEMBERS OF

Pocono Living Magazine and Pocono Family Magazine, two regional publications filled with articles, features and photography exploring and capturing the real Pocono Mountains living experience.

Our publications can be found at many locations

throughout the Pocono Mountains region, and are available by subscription.

The information published in this magazine is believed to be accurate, but in some instances, may represent opinion or judgment. The publication’s providers do not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information and shall not be held liable for any loss or damage, directly or indirectly, by or from the information. © 2021 Pocono Magazines. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be copied, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the expressed written permission of the publisher.


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“Great minds discuss ideas. Average minds discuss events. Small minds discuss people.” —Eleanor Roosevelt

> P hoto by Regina Matarazzo

4 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021


What’s Inside October/November 2021 FE ATURES 7

 Relative Remembers: One Man’s A Pilgrimage to the Scene of the Davis Cabins Tragedy

14

2  021 Photography Contest Winners and Contributors

54

 elebrating Our Centennial C Happy 100th Birthday, Monroe County Historical Association!

58 Friends of the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area 62

G  ouldsboro State Park

68

P  icture Perfect Pup: 5 Easy Dog Photography Tips

COVER By Ashley Hall

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 5


6 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021


A RELATIVE REMEMBERS

ONE MAN’S PILGRIMAGE TO THE SCENE OF THE DAVIS CABINS TRAGEDY By Tom Parrish with edits by John Moore

This feature is a sequel to “The Flood of “55” story which ran in our August/September issue of Pocono Living Magazine. A story of 37 children who perished in a place called “The Davis Cabins” along the Brodhead’s Creek in Stroudsburg, Pa. Tom Parrish, a 68-year-old retired bus operator from Savannah, Ga., visited Pinebrook Park north of Stroudsburg last summer. He went there to pay his respects to family members who were among the nearly 40 killed when the 1955 flood destroyed the Davis Cabins that once occupied the site. Here is his report:

S

ome recall it was a Boy Scout camp that got washed away in the Flood of ‘55 in Stroudsburg. It wasn’t. It was Davis Cabins, or Davis Camp as the press preferred.

Leon Davis was a retired Baptist minister who rented out cabins and a few Quonset huts to church groups on land along Brodhead Creek. Davis and his wife lived on the premises in what was known as the Clubhouse, or Big House. The groups were attending the nearby Pinebrook Bible Conference and Retreat Center, then known just as Percy’s. Percy Crawford was a world-renowned evangelist in the era of radio. His guests at Pinebrook included the Reverend Billy Graham, gospel singer George Beverly Shea and others. Percy’s attracted all the most popular Christian speakers and musical acts of the time. A small bridge straddled the Brodhead Creek and connected the Davis Cabins with Pinebrook. The Brodhead was one of the premier trout streams in the country; it separates Stroudsburg and East Stroudsburg. Just a “crick” only 30 feet across on a normal day, it swelled to 300 yards wide at the peak of the 1955 flood. Continued on page 16

← N o collection of images of the flood of 1955 in the Stroudsburgs would be

complete without a photo showing the separated trusses of the “interboro bridge” on opposite shores of Brodhead Creek. There were many such photos and this one appeared in the Harrisburg Evening News. OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 7


↑ T he second most-direct crossing of Brodhead Creek between Stroudsburg and East Stroudsburg is via Stokes Mill. (Mill Creek Road today.) The bridge here, too, was washed out in 1955 but it was the first “interboro” route restored after the flood.

↑ F looding of Bushkill and Little Bushkill Creeks caused the collapse of the Rt. 209 bridge, looking south from Pike into Monroe County. (MSTHC archives)

8 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021


→ The Delaware Water Gap

train station has been surrounded by flood waters before and since 1955, but the deepest inundation occurred in August of that year. (from Lackawanna Flood Story)

↑ T hree bridges along Rt. 611 between Bartonsville and Swiftwater were among those destroyed in Pocono Township as a result of flooding from Pocono and Swiftwater Creeks.

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 9


↑ F lash flooding along creeks and streams was the cause of most sudden deaths. Not long after, the sheer

volume of water in the Delaware River attained unprecedented depth such that some bungalows floated away and were able to squeeze beneath the Delaware Water Gap toll bridge. (DWGNRA archives)

→ M any bridges were

washed out by Pocono Creek, interrupting traffic for example on West Main St. (Rt. 209), Stroudsburg.

10 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021


“When all hell burst loose upriver, the Brodhead Creek rose 25 feet in 15 minutes. A wall of water 30 feet high came roaring downstream, and, like a bulldozer, it swept away the Davis Cabins.”

↑ D istance from the raging Paradise Creek was

crucial. In the Henryville area along Rt. 191 (then Rt. 90), the destructive swath was not wide but devastating near the town’s two intersections. Debris backed up and protected the bridge at Brown’s Hill Road but caused a large section of its southern approach to wash away (top). The bottom photo shows the receded creek, upper left, and its narrow path of havoc which engulfed “The Lighthouse” but did not effect the Henryville House, lower right.

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→ A mong bridges washed out by Brodhead Creek

were two that were side by side in the Minisink Hills area. Upstream was a railroad bridge and next to it was a road bridge. The railroad bridge was rebuilt in less than a month and a few years later a bridge for Rt. I-80 was constructed in this area. (from Lackawanna Flood Story)

↑ F lood waters arranged automobiles in many odd positions: tilted against buildings, trees, and each other;

washed into gullies; driven off bridges that had collapsed; floated miles from where they last were; even into a swimming pool.

12 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021


↑ E ffected by flooding in 1955 was Coates Board

& Carton Co., known today as WestRock and generically as “the paper mill”, in the Minisink Hills area. In addition to surrounding the main building, the swollen Brodhead Creek washed out paralleling railroad and road bridges, formerly located in the upper-center of this photo.

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↑ In some cases the decks of bridges remained but the approaches to them were washed out. Two such examples were north of Analomink — for DL&W Railroad, left, and for Cherry Lane Road, upper right. (from Lackawanna Flood Story)

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↑ Between Analomink and Henryville are two large culverts for Paradise Creek to underpass the railroad. In one culvert a bridge for Rt. 90 (now Rt. 191) was built above the creek. In 1955, flood waters overtopped the bridge leaving it intact but washing out the south-side approach. (Pocono Record photo) OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 13


↑ D amage to DL&W Railroad was $7-million. But after only 29 days, trains were able to travel the entire route. The

RR’s most time-consuming repair project was Devil’s Hole Curve where an 80’-tall, 300’-long embankment created a huge dam when a creek-level culvert became clogged with debris. The surging creek finally breached the “dam” and quickly washed away much of it, contributing to a fatal “wall of water” which traveled for miles downstream. (from Lackawanna Flood Story)

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↑ A familiar sight along Rt. 191 between Analomink and Henryville are culverts underpassing the railroad. North

of the culverts, the paralleling Paradise Creek severely damaged a long straightaway of what was then Rt. 90. (BWA archives)

A long dirt farm road ran along the creek to the bridge. It is how the Davis campers would go to and from the Conference Center. At night they would dodge the swooping bats to go see a show or attend a meeting.

tributaries that had been dammed for fishing. Downstream from five of those man-made earthen dams lay the Davis Cabins. As the pressures mounted, each stream overflowed into the next, carrying away everything in its path and gaining strength.

A popular quartet was playing at Percy’s on the evening of Thursday, August 18th. That was incentive enough for Sara and Linda LeCropane and their friend Marion Baker to disobey orders and cross the bridge to Percy’s that night. Later that evening they would hear crying and screaming from the cabins. In the morning when they looked down upon the camp, it was gone.

Communications at the time were limited to landline phones and maybe AM radio. Information was at a premium and arrived late if at all. Ignorance was not bliss in this case. Thursday was quiet. After all, the creek was across the road and down a steep embankment. The Davises went to town for provisions; nobody seemed too concerned at this point. Their return was blocked by

A week earlier, Hurricane Connie had been a gully washer that dropped a ton of rain on the drought-stricken Poconos. Diane came on Connie’s heels, but nobody paid it much mind. The storm didn’t have much wind. What it did have was water. Tons and tons of water, all running downhill, and into creeks and

It was at this time that Henry and Lilly Hartling, great aunt and uncle of the LeCropane girls, forbade the kids from going over the bridge. As the creek rose and came onto the Davis property, people started heading toward the Big House, which had a foundation. The first floor started taking on water, so they

16 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021

road closures and downed bridges, as creeks and rivers rose.


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“Diane came on Connie’s heels, but nobody paid it much mind. The storm didn’t have much wind. What it did have was water. Tons and tons of water, all running downhill, and into creeks and tributaries that had been dammed for fishing.”

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The climbed to the attic, which was cramped, dark and crowded. With candles lit, they prayed and sang songs. There was no panic, only faith. When all hell burst loose upriver, the Brodhead Creek rose 25 feet in 15 minutes. A wall of water 30 feet high came roaring downstream, and, like a bulldozer, it swept away the Davis Cabins. The Clubhouse, as they called their safe haven, was overwhelmed. The rain battered the roof under which they huddled and sounded like a machine gun over their heads. They felt the house jump as it left its foundation. Nails were popping, adding to the noise and confusion, then the floor split open. They were cast into the water among all the shattered remains of the house and everything else that had washed downstream. A raging 45 m.p.h. current, one that toppled nearby railroad cars, took them and everything else downstream.

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“I didn’t know these people, yet I felt them. As I sat there, I remembered the family stories and recalled the memories I’d been told ever since I was a toddler.”

↑ Tom Parrish, sitting on the memorial bench in Pinebrook Park

↑ C hris Marek, Park Ranger 18 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021

↑ M emorial plaque in memory of the victims


A few survivors clung in trees all night long before being rescued the next day. One managed to hang on to a wire but couldn’t manage to hold two children as well. In all, 37 perished from Camp Davis, mostly women and children. Their bodies were later found in trees, roadways, or not at all. Years later, a farmer discovered one while plowing. Survivors included six in addition to the three young women who had walked to Pinebrook to listen to the quartet. My family regularly visited Davis Cabins to attend the Pinebrook retreats. In a photo taken prior to that August, my mother is actually seen hanging clothes on a line in front of a cabin. My mother and sister were supposed to be there during the week prior to the flood, but for some reason didn’t go. But a number of other relatives were there. We lost Aunt Gladys, my mother’s sister. She was the mother of Bruce and Beverly Thompson, who died. My second cousins, Roy and David Johnson also perished. Today a weathered bench with a plaque sits in Pinebrook Park where members of my family died. I visited the park in late July while vacationing and met one Chris Marek, a friendly park ranger, who showed me the field where the Davis Cabins and the Clubhouse were in 1955. I sat and surveyed the field in front of me where the semi-circle of cabins once stood. I looked high into the tree over my head and imagined the height of the water at its peak during the flood. I didn’t know these people, yet I felt them. As I sat there, I remembered the family stories and recalled the memories I’d been told ever since I was a toddler. I’m not sure closure is the right word, but when I rose to leave, I felt better. Sixty six years later those memories and stories led me to this place, this time, and this bench.

We would like to thank Kim Williams for his assistance in finding the photographs for this feature. Kim is a lifelong resident of Monroe County, an amateur photographer and president of a local historical group. “The Flood” and the County’s railroad history are of particular interest to him. Kim’s two daughters — a doctor & a teacher — are sources of pride. OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 19


POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE

2021 PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST


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FIRST PLACE

Poconos Forevergreen Eagles by Ray Roper • CANON EOS R OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 21


SECOND PLACE TIE

By Jan Olsommer • NIKON COOLPIX P1000

22 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021


SECOND PLACE TIE

Pileated Woodpecker by Laurinda Faye Guarriello • CANON EOS 7D OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 23


THIRD PLACE TIE

By Barbara Lewis • NIKON COOLPIX P900

THIRD PLACE TIE

Vantage Point (Green Heron) by Melissa Burt • NIKON D5500 24 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021


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Preparing the Nest by Regina Matarazzo • CANON EOS REBEL T6

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Spiderweb by Brittany LoGuirato • CANON EOS REBEL SL3 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 25


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By Carrie Harrington • CANON POWERSHOT SX60 26 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021


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By Stephanie Masgula • NIKON D3200 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 27


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FIRST PLACE

Serene Ripple by Melissa Burt • NIKON D5500 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 29


SECOND PLACE TIE

By Maurie Harmon • OLYMPUS E-M5MARKII

30 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021


SECOND PLACE TIE

Poconos Brady’s Lake by Ray Roper • CANON EOS 6D

SECOND PLACE TIE

MoonGlow by Sherwood Samet OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 31


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Tannersville Cranberry Bog Boardwalk by Laurinda Fay Guariello • CANON EOS 30D OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 37


Delaware Water Gap by Jodie Hagerty • APPLE IPHONE 11 PRO MAX 38 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021


Lackawaxen River in Hawley, Pennsylvania by Julie Rizkalla • APPLE IPHONE 11 PRO

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 39


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40 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021


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Poconos Lavender Farm Sunflower by Ray Roper • CANON EOS R OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 41


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Winterberry with Orange Shutter by Joan Wallis • NIKON D90 42 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021


SECOND PLACE TIE

Single Cotton Grass by Laurinda Fay Guarriello • CANON EOS 7D

SECOND PLACE TIE

By Maurie Harmond • NIKON D3000 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 43


THIRD PLACE TIE

Flower in Woodland Trail by John Anzivino • OLYMPUS E-M5MARKIII

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By Pat Valentine • OLYMPUS PEN-F 44 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021


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By Rachel Cyphers • CANON EOS REBEL T6 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 45


HISTORICAL STRUCTURES

46 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021


FIRST PLACE TIE

Bait Box at Grey Towers by Ashley Hall • NIKON D7100 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 47


48 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021


FIRST PLACE TIE

Poconos Smith Hill Barn in Winter by Ray Roper • CANON EOS 6D OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 49


SECOND PLACE TIE

Millbrook Church by Laurinda Fay Guarriello • CANON EOS 7D

SECOND PLACE TIE

By Kim Detrick • APPLE IPHONE XR 50 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021


THIRD PLACE TIE

Cresco Train Station by Ray Caswell • OLYMPUS E-M1MARKIII

THIRD PLACE TIE

Scene at Quiet Valley Farm by John Anzivino • OLYMPUS E-M5MARKII OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 51


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Hickory Run Chapel by Brittany LoGuirato • APPLE IPHONE 12

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CELEBRATING OUR CENTENNIAL 1921-2021

HAPPY 100TH BIRTHDAY, MONROE COUNTY HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION! By Amy Leiser, Director Photos courtesy of the Monroe County Historical Association

Stroud Mansion

54 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021


W

hen members of the Stroudsburg Civic Club purchased the Stroud Mansion for $20,430.50 in 1920, they intended to provide community space for various local organizations. Rooms in the historic Georgian structure served as headquarters and meeting place for numerous groups, including the Civic Club, the Woman’s Club, the Junior Woman’s Club, the Monroe County Public Library, the Red Cross, the Girl Scouts, the Jacob Stroud Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the Monroe County Historical Society. The Monroe County Historical Society was formed on April 8, 1921. A group of 40 “deeply interested and enthusiastic” citizens met at the Monroe County Courthouse. The meeting was presided by Robert B. Keller, who offered an “aspiring address” to the citizens. Three speakers provided remarks to support forming a historical society. Professor Joseph Hart, president of the Northampton County Historical Society and former professor at Lafayette; Mrs. Stocker, president of the Woman's Club of Bethlehem; and C.B. Eilenberger, treasurer of the Stroudsburg

Trust Company, all spoke to the large group. William A. Gilbert was named head of the organization, with Dr. Mary Erdman serving as his first Vice President. Other officers elected that day were: Second Vice President, Dr. Elwood L. Kemp; Third Vice President, Eleanor Croasdale; Fourth Vice President, Harry Schoch; Fifth Vice President, John A. Seguine; Recording Secretary, Robert Brown, Jr.; Corresponding Secretary, Miss Mary Flagler; and Treasurer, Milton S. Kistler. An article in the Morning Press from July 14, 1920, stated that the Historical Society “will be given one room {in the Stroud Mansion} in which may be preserved records, and relics of the early days.” The Historical Society was given two rooms in the basement of the three-story Stroud Mansion to establish the museum and archives. When the Monroe County Public Library received the gift of the Keiper building and moved across Main Street, the Historical Society acquired the first-floor rooms the library had occupied. The organization was officially incorporated on September 5, 1928.

“We are the heirs of the ages, and we can’t do anything better than to teach our people what our men and women have done before us.” — C.B. Eilenberger, remarks made April 8, 1921 during the meeting to form the Monroe County Historical Society

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 55


< N otes from the first annual meeting program

< 1 920s photo of the brick road in front of the Stroud Mansion 56 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021


As community organizations that occupied space in the Stroud Mansion grew, they moved to other locations throughout the county. When the organizations moved out, the Historical Society expanded to those spaces. Space was desperately needed as the Historical Society’s collection’s increased. Citizens from all over Monroe County donated thousands of locally-significant artwork and artifacts to the museum. Contributions to the archives also grew. Residents added their family histories, census records, church histories, books, maps, journals, ledgers, and other primary sources to the Historical Society’s library.

“The Stroud Mansion offers a feeling of pride not only for Monroe County citizens but also for visitors.” On March 8, 1990, the Monroe County Historical Society merged with the Monroe County Museum Association forming the present-day Monroe County Historical Association.

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On May 16, 1994, the Woman’s Club of the Stroudsburgs transferred total ownership of the Stroud Mansion to Monroe County Historical Association. Today the historic 1795 Stroud Mansion continues to serve as the headquarters of the Monroe County Historical Association. This beautiful structure houses a local history museum with four floors of exhibit space and a genealogical research library. The building remains a jewel in the county and is an important landmark showcasing the heritage of the area. The Stroud Mansion offers a feeling of pride not only for Monroe County citizens but also for visitors.

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Amy Leiser is a local resident and historian who has been working with the Monroe County Historical Association for 19 years. In addition to the live tours, research assistance, and museum that the organization keeps available, Leiser offers her knowledge and assistance with family charting and genealogy. Visit www. monroehistorical.org

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FRIENDS OF THE DELAWARE WATER GAP NATIONAL RECREATION AREA DEDICATED TO PRESERVING THE NATURAL, HISTORICAL, RECREATIONAL, AND CULTURAL FEATURES OF THE DWGNRA. By Amanda Kuhn Photos courtesy of Friends of DWGNRA

This is Pocono Living Magazine’s fifth article in our conservation series.

T

he Delaware Water Gap stretches over 70,000 acres and includes 40 miles of beautiful riverside scenery primed for exploration. Home to an abundance of flora and fauna, this impressive ecosystem includes some of Pennsylvania’s most impressive views. Commonly referred to as the “Gateway to the Poconos,” the Delaware Water Gap not only shaped our region but also inspired it’s name. The word “Pocono” is a Native American word meaning “stream between two mountains.” From rushing waterfalls to breathtaking vistas, the Delaware Water Gap (DWG) has been our area’s most remarkable natural attraction for centuries. In 1965, the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area (DWGNRA) was formally founded in an effort to save the river and its ridges as a part of the government plan for the Tocks Island Dam project which later failed. Tasked with the responsibility of protecting this expansive park, the National

58 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021

Park Service relies on the help of all nature-lovers. In 1998, the Friends of the DWGNRA was incorporated with the same goal of preserving the natural, historical, recreational, and cultural features of the DWG. For over 20 years the role of the Friends of the DWGNRA has changed but the mission has always remained the same. Karen Tiesling-Keenan has been a member of the Friends of DWGNRA for 3 years, serving as the group’s President since January 2021. What makes this non-profit group unique, Tiesling-Keenan explains, is their partnership with the DWGNRA. As a national organization, the DWGNRA is not able to accept any type of monetary gift. The unique relationship between the DWGNRA and the Friends of the DWGNRA group allows the group to both simultaneously raise money and provide monetary support to the park.

The primary functions of the Friends of the DWGNRA are encouraging volunteerism, supporting the park and helping with


Photo courtesy of Pixabay

THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE

Commonly referred to as the “Gateway to the Poconos,” the Delaware Water Gap not only shaped our region but also inspired it’s name. The word “Pocono” is a Native American word meaning “stream between two mountains.”

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expenses. One of the group’s most important projects each year is hosting an Annual Volunteer Appreciation Dinner. Showing appreciation for the park’s valuable volunteers is just as important as their work. Without volunteers, the park would not be able to hold many of their ongoing programs or help maintain the miles of trails and attractions.

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 59


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Providing general information and educating visitors on the history of the DWGNRA is another prime focus of the Friends of the DWGNRA, one they hope to expand on in the future, Tiesling-Keenan explains. Recently the group held a very successful informative lecture on the resorts that once speckled the DWG. The group plans to increase their lecture series and offer a mentoring program for careers at the park. The Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area encompasses such a vast area requiring many surrounding organizations and groups working in concert to protect assigned areas. Trying to coordinate all efforts that touch the Delaware Water Gap area and cultivate partnerships is what Tiesling-Keenan is striving to accomplish. “Working together as a group to protect that river, that’s what has kept the river from development. Protecting the land, flora, fauna…everything.” Some of Tiesling-Keenan’s favorite parts of the park are Raymondskill Falls and the Cliff Trail spanning Raymondskill

60 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021


M

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inisin hotel

Fruit Pies, Burgers, Pot Pies, Sandwiches, Pastries, Gifts, Jams & Jellies

www.VillageFarmer.com

1/2 mile off of Rt. 80 exit 310 GPS Broad St. Delaware Water Gap 570-476-9440

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FRIENDLY REMINDER:

Help keep the DWGNRA clean, pick up your trash.

to Milford Knob. Also, a pro-tip, the New Jersey side of the DWGNRA is just as beautiful but often less crowded. Some of the great spots to check out on the New Jersey side are Millbrook Village, VanCampen Inn and the Military Road Trail. For the water-lovers, you can also find plenty of kayaking, canoeing, rafting, fishing and more.

www.farmers-basket.com

For more information on the Friends of the DWGNRA, volunteering, donating, and upcoming projects, visit their website at friendsofdewanps.org/. To stay up-to-date on what’s going on at the park, follow them on Facebook facebook.com/ FriendsOfDEWANPS.

THE FRIENDS OF THE DELAWARE WATER GAP NATIONAL RECREATION AREA

1978 River Road, Bushkill, PA 18324 570.202.0432 • friendsofdewanps.org/ facebook.com/FriendsOfDEWANPS

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 61


GOULDSBORO STATE PARK By Amanda Kuhn Photos courtesy of Gouldsboro State Park

W

hile Gouldsboro State Park may not be as well known as many of the state and national parks located in our area, its history and beauty are both cause for exploration. With roots stretching back to 1892, the area now known as Gouldsboro State Park has been an integral part of the local railroad system, ice industry, and military. Connected to Tobyhanna State Park, Gouldsboro State Park encompasses numerous trails spanning both parks, an abundance of wildlife and endless activities for the whole family to enjoy.

Connected to Tobyhanna State Park, Gouldsboro State Park encompasses numerous trails spanning both parks, an abundance of wildlife and endless activities for the whole family to enjoy. Located in Monroe and Wayne counties, Gouldsboro State Park includes 2,800 acres and the 250 acre Gouldsboro Lake. Named after the village of Gouldsboro, the area was acquired by Jay Gould, a native of New York in 1892. The fortune that Gould acquired at that time included ten percent ownership of all railroad tracks in the 62 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021


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country, including the Erie-Lackawanna which ran parallel to the park’s eastern boundary. Gould additionally co-owned a tannery in Thornhurst; raw hides from Australia and across the United States were shipped to Gouldsboro by railroad and taken to Thornhurst for tanning. During the early 1900s, the Tobyhanna and Gouldsboro Lakes were active sites for the bustling ice industry. Year round, ice was harvested and shipped via railroad boxcars hauling meats and produce. During the mid to late 1900s the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers used the area and in 1948, the War Assets Administration took control of the property. When the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania received title to most of the 26,000 acres, about two-thirds of it was made into state game 64 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021

lands, and the remaining one-third was used to create both Gouldsboro and Tobyhanna State Parks. Open year-round, there are a variety of seasonal activities to enjoy during every visit. For easier hiking, the Old Entrance Trail offers 1.8 miles and connects the Prospect Rock Trail and Old Route 611. Looking for a more challenging hike? The Prospect Rock Trail is 2.9 miles and includes several rocky sections. Along these trails you may find all different types of flora and fauna. During summer months visitors can not only check out the trails but do some camping, boating, swimming, fishing, picnicking, and more.


Rudy’s

Your Neighborhood Tavern Established in 1933 90 Washington Street, East Stroudsburg, PA 18301 570-424-1131

The fortune that Gould acquired at that time included ten percent ownership of all railroad tracks in the country, including the Erie-Lackawanna which ran parallel to the park’s eastern boundary. Gould additionally co-owned a tannery in Thornhurst; raw hides from Australia and across the United States were shipped to Gouldsboro by railroad and taken to Thornhurst for tanning.

Serving fine food & spirits in an elegant setting

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1920

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1940

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40

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66 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021

423

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State Park Hunting

mm

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(no fishing license required)

P.O. Box 850 • Marshalls Creek, PA 18301 570-223-0123 Reservations only: 800-345-1369 www.otterlake.com

TOB

1880

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State Park Natural Area CONTOURS ARE ON 20 FT. INTERVALS

190

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1860

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z nt Ga

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• 60 acre lake with 300 campsites • Paved roads • Electric, water and cable TV hook-ups; 100 campsites have sewer hook-ups • 8 heated bathouses, store, laundry and propane • Boating, boat rentals and fishing

0

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Park Office Blue Symbols Mean ADA Accessible Public Phone

CAMP RESORT

198

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744 Lake Minsi Dr., Bangor, PA 18013

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psbsa.com

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610.588.7888

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Open to the public. Practice on Tuesdays. 9am till 2pm 4pm to 8pm (after April 1st)

190

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A trapshooting club located in Bangor, Pennsylvania

20

435

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Pocono Slate Belt Shooting Association

To PA 307, 1 Mi. & Moscow, 5 Mi.

One of Gouldsboro and Tobyhanna State Park’s most notable qualities is the presence of rare wildlife and plant-life. Located on the Pocono Plateau, the rocky soil and nutrientpoor bogs provide a habitat for a diversity of animals and plants. According to the PA Department of Natural Resources, blackburnian warbler, red-breasted nuthatch, and northern waterthrush are common in this area. In the spring, spotted and Jefferson salamanders and wood frogs migrate to the bogs to breed. You can also find interesting plants like the carnivorous pitcher plant, cotton grass, and many sedges that inhabit the bogs.

To I-80, 6 Mi.


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1003 Main Street, Stroudsburg, PA 18360 570-421-9000 | www.wmhclarkfuneralhome.com 21 00

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(570) 421-0956 542 River Road, Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA

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In the heart of Shawnee on the Delaware!

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570-730-4944 ldiemer@ptd.net

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20

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Gary A. Raish, Supervisor

2060

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196

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Photo courtesy of Pixabay

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To Mt. Pocono, 4 Mi.

Rev. 12/14/18

There is much to explore at Gouldsboro State Park, both nature and history alike. The entrance to Gouldsboro State Park is located on Route 507, one-half mile south of Gouldsboro. For more information, visit the DCNR website.

GOULDSBORO STATE PARK

SR 507 & State Park Rd. , Gouldsboro, PA 18424 570.894.8336 • www.dcnr.pa.gov/StateParks

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PICTURE PERFECT PUP: 5 EASY DOG PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS Courtesy of BPT

L

oyal, loving, quirky and kind — a dog brings so much joy to life. It comes as no surprise that pet parents take ample pictures of furry family members. Dogs are a favorite subject matter for amateur and professional photographers, and countless framed photographs and slews of social media images prove it. From capturing those split-second cute poses to setting up the ideal seasonal image, dog photography is a big trend. A recent survey found that most dog owners (65%) admit to taking more photos of their dog than their significant other. However, getting the ultimate shot can be trickier than it seems, even for seasoned pet photographers.

68 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021

No matter your experience with pet photography, there are some tips and tricks that can help you get the ideal pictures of your canine counterparts. The photography experts at Adobe share some methods for taking pet pictures that you'll cherish for years to come.

BALANCE LIGHTING

Good lighting is essential for any type of photography. If too much light is coming from behind, your dog will appear darker. If too much light is in front, it may wash out your pup. Keep in mind, fur absorbs light differently than skin, so experiment to see how changes in lighting impact the photograph. Natural light is typically best, not only for the resulting image, but also because many pets are sensitive to flash.


Creekside

PET CREMATORY USE A FAST SHUTTER SPEED

No matter your pup's personality, they'll probably be moving in some manner as you try to photograph. If you're using a tablet or smartphone, switch the settings for an action shot. If you're using a camera, opt for a faster shutter speed. This will help ensure that your pup's excitement doesn't turn into a disappointing photo when you review the image and it's a big blur.

Compassionate Care That Lasts Forever Located at Stroudsburg Cemetery on Dreher Avenue 570-420-9599www.CreeksidePet.net / 570-421-4501 www.CreeksidePet.net

KNOW THE DOG'S PERSONALITY

Some dogs adore affection and will melt for back scratches and belly rubs. Some pets go gaga for a game of fetch. Some just can't resist their favorite treat. Whatever the dog's preferred ways to feel loved, use them to your advantage during your photo session. This will help make them feel comfortable, encourage cooperation and keep their attention.

A recent survey found that most dog owners (65%) admit to taking more photos of their dog than their significant other. MAKE SOME QUICK EDITS

A few simple edits after you take a picture can elevate the image significantly. When on the go, Lightroom presets allow you to seamlessly edit your photos in one click from your mobile device. Lightroom offers thousands of presets to choose from, and even more can be found in Lightroom Discover.

TRUST THE PROCESS

You may have an idea of what you want to create, but in the end it's the pets who determine the context of the photo, which is part of the magic. Remember to mix candid and posed photography to get a nice variety and just keep clicking. You never know what might be captured and the beauty of digital photography is that there is no limit to how many photos you can take.

P&S GARAGE Servicing the Poconos since 1975

Scott Dreisbach owner

570-223-8874

9080 Franklin Hill Road East Stroudsburg, Pa www.psgaragepa.com OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 69


You May Also Enjoy

Pocono Family Magazine

Barrett Paradise Friendly Library Cresco, PA 570-595-7171 www.barrettlibrary.org

Pocono Mountain Public Library Tobyhanna, PA 570-894-8860 www.poconomountpl.org

Clymer Library Pocono Pines, PA 570-646-0826 www.clymerlibrary.org

Western Pocono Community Library Brodheadsville, PA 570-992-7934 www.wpcl.lib.pa.us

Eastern Monroe Public Library Branches Hughes Library (main branch) Stroudsburg, PA 570-421-0800 www.monroepl.org Pocono Township Branch Tannersville, PA 570-629-5858 Smithfield Branch Marshalls Creek, PA 570-223-1881 Bookmobile 570-421-0880 x49

Available at Local Businesses & by Subscription Pocono Magazines, LLC 1929 North Fifth Street, Stroudsburg, PA 18360 570-424-1000 • pmags@ptd.net

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Photo courtesy of Pixabay

M A G A Z I N E


OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 71


Make the time

When your family needed face masks, you made the time. When you had to reinvent your daily routine, you made the time. Isn’t it time you squeezed in your mammogram?

Make the time. Make an appointment. Visit LVHN.org/mammo or call 888-402-LVHN.

Profile for LARRY SEBRING

Pocono Living Magazine Oct/Nov 2021  

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