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OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

The Pocono Mountains' Magazine

Complimentary

Pocono Living M A G A Z I N E

ANNUAL PHOTOGRAPHY WINNER’S ISSUE


Pocono Magazines, LLC PUBLISHING

Pocono Living Magazine© & Pocono Family Magazine© 1929 North 5th Street Stroudsburg, PA 18360 570-424-1000 pmags@ptd.net www.poconomagazines.com PUBLISHER/EDITOR Larry R. Sebring larry@poconomagazines.com ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVES Linda St. John, 570-856-8155 MAGAZINE & WEB DESIGN Smart Blonde Creative Food & Wine Editor Jamie Bowman PHOTOGRAPHY & ART Ricky Batista James Chesnick Julie Enterline John Galarza M. Harmon Marlana Holsten Barbara Hornstra Vinzon Lee Ann LeFevre Barbara Lewis Harry Loud Maritza McFaline

William McKee Veronica Murray Lisa Newberry Andrei Protsouk Lynn Pryor David Sandt Matt Siptroth Tom Stone Dave Trainer Nancy Tully Linda Weaver Linda Zak

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Roseanne Bottone Jamie Bowman Kimberly Blaker Kathy Dubin-Uhler Marty Wilson Amy Leiser Suzanne McCool Amanda Kuhn John L. Moore William M. Williams Jim Werkheiser Janet Mishkin Allison Mowatt ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Kristen Sebring Linda Spalluto

Pocono Living Magazine and Pocono Family Magazine,

PROUD MEMBERS OF

two regional publications filled with articles, features and photography exploring and capturing the real Pocono Mountains living experience.

Our publications can be found at many locations

throughout the Pocono Mountains region, and are available by subscription.

The information published in this magazine is believed to be accurate, but in some instances, may represent opinion or judgment. The publication’s providers do not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information and shall not be held liable for any loss or damage, directly or indirectly, by or from the information. © 2019 Pocono Magazines. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be copied, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the expressed written permission of the publisher.


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“For my part, I know nothing with any certainty, but the sight of the stars makes me dream.” – Vincent Van Gogh

(said before he painted “Starry Night”)

> P hoto by Ricky Batista

4 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


What’s Inside October/November 2019

FEATURES 8

F  RONTIER FORT SERIES The Story of Fort Penn

14

State Parks of the Pocono Mountains

18

2  019 Photography Contest Winners and Contributors

50

Quiet Valley Farm – The Middle Years

70

H  ikes and Outdoor Adventures with Pocono Living: Big Pocono State Park and the Cattell Cabin

COVER By: Richard Genova

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 5


John L. Moore continues to pursue his lifelong interests in Pennsylvania’s colonial history and archaeology. The Northumberland writer has published 11 non-fiction books about Pennsylvania’s 16th and 17th century. John’s latest book, 1780: Year of Revenge, is currently available in book stores or from the online bookstore Sunbury Press Inc. This book is the 3rd volume in his Revolutionary Pennsylvania Series and tells the story of Indian raids all across the Pennsylvania Frontier - including the Poconos and Minisinks - in the year following General Sullivan’s 1779 invasion of the Iroquois homeland. Over the years John has participated in archaeological excavations of Native American sites along the Delaware and Susquehanna Rivers. A professional storyteller, he recently took part in the Heritage Festival at Frances Slocum State Park near Wilkes-Barre. He told the true story of Frances Slocum, a 5-yearold girl who lived as a Native American after being kidnapped by Indians during the American Revolution. The park was named for her.

Allison Mowatt Allison Mowatt is a freelance writer and currently a Pike County resident. As an Information Specialist for the Pocono Mountains Visitors Bureau's Lake Wallenpaupack Visitors Center, Allison is able to combine her passion for exploring the area, sharing it with visitors and writing about it. When she's not working, Allison enjoys hiking, dining out at restaurants, listening to live music, trying out new recipes at home, and reading.

Janet Mishkin Janet Mishkin is curator and grant writer for Quiet Valley Living Historical Farm and former adjunct Professor of History at East Stroudsburg University. As the former Executive Director of the Monroe County Historical Association, Janet developed her love of local history and has been researching Monroe County topics for more than 30 years. Photo courtesy of Pixabay

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

John L. Moore


— FRONTIER SORT SERIES —

FORT PENN By John L. Moore Photos courtesy of John L. Moore

A

n officer in the Pennsylvania militia, Jacob Stroud created Fort Penn in present-day Stroudsburg by fortifying his homestead near McMichael Creek.

“It was evidently built as a possible means of protection against the Indians, and was expected to be used for that purpose more than to resist an attack from the British troops,” H. M. M. Richards wrote in the 1916 edition of the report of the Pennsylvania Commission to Locate the Frontier Forts. A map of Stroudsburg that accompanied Richards’ report placed the fort between Main Street and Quaker Alley and to the west of North Fifth Street. Paved parking lots that serve commercial establishments cover much of the site today. Fort Penn stood along an Indian trail that ran from Shawnee on Delaware to present-day Wilkes-Barre. Early settlers and soldiers widened the trail so that wagons could use it.

Fort Penn stood along an Indian trail that ran from Shawnee on Delaware to present-day Wilkes-Barre. Early settlers and soldiers widened the trail so that wagons could use it. The post “does not seem at any time, except for a few days occasionally, to have been occupied by troops of the Continental army, but served as a place of rendezvous for the militia of the neighborhood when called into active service, for which purpose Colonel Stroud made it his headquarters,” Richards said.

> M ap is from: Page 491 REPORT OF THE COMMISSION TO LOCATE THE SITE of the FRONTIER FORTS OF PENNSYLVANIA. VOLUME ONE 1916

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Stroud was born in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, in 1735, and about 10 years later moved with his family to what eventually became Monroe County. He fought in the French and Indian War on the side of the British during the late 1750s. When the American Revolution began, Stroud joined the militia and fought against the British. By December 1776, he had attained the rank of colonel. Today’s Monroe County was part of Northampton County during the American Revolutionary War, and Stroud commanded the Sixth Battalion of the Northampton County Militia. For much of the war, Stroud’s superior officer was Colonel John Wetzel, who was based in Easton.

When the American Revolution began, Stroud joined the militia and fought against the British. By December 1776, he had attained the rank of colonel. To fortify his house, Stroud probably erected a stockade wall fashioned of upright logs about 15 feet long. Most stockades of this type were square or rectangular. The bottom of the logs were secured in a trench about three feet deep so that the top of the wall was about 12 feet above the ground. The Northampton County Militia had garrisoned troops at Fort Penn by the time of the Battle of Wyoming, which took place on July 3, 1778 about 50 miles northwest of Stroudsburg. An army of nearly 500 Indians and 100 Loyalists had invaded the Wyoming Valley, then routed a

defending force of 400 men and boys. The warriors killed and scalped 227 of the defenders, and then looted and burned the Wyoming settlements.

> T his historical marker stands along Stroudburg’s Main Street. It is a short distance from the site of Fort Penn, which protected settlers during the American Revolution. OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 9


FORT PENN EXCERPT FROM 1780: YEAR OF REVENGE PENNSYLVANIA OFFERS A REWARD FOR SCALPS OF INDIANS

T

wo men from Monroe County’s historic past – Colonel Daniel Brodhead and Colonel Jacob Stroud – played significant roles during the American Revolutionary War. As commander of Fort Pitt at present-day Pittsburgh, Brodhead spent several years defending Pennsylvania’s western frontier against attacks by Native Americans aligned with the British. Stroud led militia forces at what became Stroudsburg, then a settlement that was part of upper Northampton County. Joseph Reed, a Philadelphia lawyer who was president of Pennsylvania’s Supreme Executive Council in 1780, had responsibilities that made him the state’s de facto governor. He was frequently addressed as Governor Reed, as shown by this excerpt from 1780: Year of Revenge: Governor Reed, in letters written during April and May 1780, informed militia and military leaders across the state that Pennsylvania would pay a reward for prisoners—Tories as well as enemy Indians— but that a bounty on scalps would be offered only on those taken from the heads of Indians. In an April 11 letter, for instance, Reed directed Colonel Jacob Stroud at Fort Penn (present-day Stroudsburg) “to encourage the young men to hire out in small parties to endeavor to strike the enemy near home.” The state had

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authorized payment of “$1,500 dollars for every Indian or Tory prisoner taken in arms against us, and $1,000 dollars for every Indian scalp,” he explained. On April 29, Reed notified Colonel Brodhead at Fort Pitt that “after many consultations and much deliberation, we have concluded to offer a reward for scalps and hope it will serve as an inducement to the young fellows . . . and others to turn out against the Indians.” In early May, Reed advised Colonel Samuel Rea of the Northampton County Militia of the new practice. Offering rewards for scalps and prisoners was intended to “encourage the young men of the county, and even of (neighboring) New Jersey, to turn out in small parties, endeavor to fall in with them on their marches, and even follow them to their towns,” the governor said. In Westmoreland County, Colonel Alexander Lochrey raised the issue of scalp bounties when he wrote to Reed on June 1 and requested the state to provide the county with an additional “500 or 600 weight of powder . . . and the same quantity of lead.” The colonel explained that since his county was continually on a war footing, its defenders consumed immense amounts of gun powder. “Every man on the frontiers (is) obliged to carry their

arms, even at the plow,” Lochrey said. He added, “I hope the reward offered will answer a good end, as a number of people seem determined to exert themselves that way, for which reason the ammunition now applied for will be the more wanted.” Only Colonel Brodhead expressed any reservations about the new policy. He noted that not all Indians were hostiles. On the contrary, Delaware warriors “act with our scouts, and seem very desirous of discovering the enemy’s parties,” the colonel said. As for paying bounties for scalps, Brodhead told Reed in a May 18 letter, “I wish it may have the desired effect, but I apprehend that it will be construed into a license to take off the scalps of some of our friendly Delawares, and produce a general Indian war.” From “1780: Year of Revenge” by John L. Moore, published by Sunbury Press Inc. in June 2019.


“WOW, Look At All That Candy!!”

> T he Fort Penn historical marker along Stroudburg’s Main Street. Survivors and their families fled from Wilkes-Barre. Many hurried along the old Indian trail, known as the Pechoquealin Path, heading toward Stroudsburg. The refugees passed through the Great Swamp, a thick and mountainous forest west of Pocono Pines that Charles Miner referred to as the Shades of Death in his 1845 “History of Wyoming.” The trail then led them through the present-day communities of Tannersville and Bartonsville before reaching Fort Penn in Stroudsburg.

There were hundreds of refugees. It took many of them 10 days to make their way through the forests and over the mountains to Fort Penn. Jabez Fish, one of the Wyoming defenders, survived the battle, but his wife didn’t know that. Fearing that he had been killed, “Mrs. Fish hastened with her children through the wilderness,” Miner said. “Overcome with fatigue and want, her infant died. … There was no way to dig a grave, and to leave it to be devoured by wolves seemed worse than death, so she took the dead babe in her arms and carried it 20 miles, when she came to a German settlement. Though poor, they gave her food, made a box for the child, attended her to the graveyard, and decently buried it.” There were hundreds of refugees. It took many of them 10 days to make their way through the forests and over the mountains to Fort Penn. From there, they headed for Connecticut, from which many had migrated years earlier. Decades later, one of their descendants still possessed a pass written by Colonel Stroud, urging the authorities in other

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> Left: Settlers fleeing fighting in the Wyoming Valley in July 1778 took this route, then an Indian trail, to reach Fort Penn in Stroudsburg. The photo was taken along Route 940 west of Pocono Pines. > Right: In July 1781, Colonel Jacob Stroud led militia troops from Fort Penn west along a dirt road wide enough for horse-drawn wagons. An Indian war party had attacked settlers in the mountains about 20 miles northwest of Stroudsburg, and Stroud went out to fight them. Part of the old road has become Route 611. This photo was taken east of Bartonsville. jurisdictions to “permit the bearers” – in this case, Sergeant William Searle and 12 women and children – “to pass unmolested to … the state of Connecticut.” The travelers “are especially recommended by me to all persons in authority, civil and military, and to all continental officers and commissaries, to issue provisions and other necessaries for their relief on the road. Given under my hand at Fort Penn. July 14, 1778. Jacob Stroud, Colonel.” Two weeks after the battle at Wyoming, an express rider arrived at Fort Penn with news that a settlement at Cochecton, New York, about 65 miles up the Delaware River, “was entirely cut off yesterday morning by a parcel of Tories and Indians, massacring all men, women and children,” Stroud said in a July 17 letter to Colonel Wetzel at Easton. The Minisinks settlements north of the fort depended on Stroud’s troops for protection. “If they [the Indians] should incline to come on to Minisinks and this place, we shall be unable to prevent it, as we are but about 60 men strong now assembled,” Stroud told Wetzel. Stroud asked Wetzel for “a line from you directing me what to do, whether to retreat with the inhabitants or stand with a handful of men to be destroyed.” He said he also needed to know “whether I can depend on relief, as we cannot hear anything of relief coming.” Should Wetzel “think it best for me to make as good a stand as I can,” then the county lieutenant should “in all haste send me more ammunition, and you may depend on my taking all the care I can,” Stroud said. The fort and its garrison managed to survive because in late September, Stroud, Nicholas Dupui and three other 12 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

men fired off a letter to George Bryan, vice president of the state’s Supreme Executive Council, noting that the enlistment periods had expired for the militia troops protecting Lower Smithfield Township.

In mid-October, Colonel Stroud sent an express rider with news that a force of 600 Indians and Tories “are burning and destroying all before them” in the upper Minisinks, in New York State. For 30 miles above Fort Penn, the Delaware Valley “is almost evacuated, the people moved over to New Jersey for safety,” the men said. “In this township there is only a guard left at Colonel Stroud[‘s], whose times is almost expired and will soon return home.” They warned that unless these troops “are replaced with others, we shall lay exposed to the ravages of the savages.” In mid-October, Colonel Stroud sent an express rider with news that a force of 600 Indians and Tories “are burning and destroying all before them” in the upper Minisinks, in New York State. “It is not to be doubted but they will be in this state soon, and the inhabitants above are all moving, and in the greatest distress and confusion,” Robert Levers, a Northampton County official, said in a letter to the governor’s council. “By a letter I have seen this morning from Captain Alexander Patterson at Colonel Stroud’s,


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stationed as quarter master, it is mentioned that they have neither military stores or provisions, so that, if they [the Indians] should suddenly attack that part of this county, … the country must fly before the enemy.” Writing from Fort Penn on Oct. 25, Stroud cautioned that the “Indians that we fear … will come down Delaware River with canoes.” They might land at the mouth of a creek “which is just above our settlement … or perhaps they may come a little lower, as … I know of nothing to prevent them,” he said. Stroud’s correspondence suggests that four years later, the soldiers at Fort Penn continued to be short of ammunition and firearms. On April 28, 1781, the colonel reported that hostile Indians had gathered on both the Pennsylvania and New Jersey sides of the Delaware above Stroudsburg. He requested that militia officials at Easton “send us a supply of flints, ammunition and arms, but especially flints and ammunition, to be hurried up here with all speed.” One of the last mentions of Fort Penn occurs in a July 4, 1781 letter that Colonel Stroud wrote. It detailed an Indian attack that had just occurred in the mountains about 20 miles northwest of Stroudsburg. “I collected as many men as I could in haste, … and followed their track till dark night, and found that they had entered into the Great Swamp.” It was so “dark, we could not follow the track.” In the morning, Stroud “started after them … as soon as it was light, and we found the place where they had stopped that night.”

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When the warriors realized the militia had picked up their trail, “they scattered and turned so much among the laurel and logs and thickets that we were obliged to quit the pursuit,” Stroud said. OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 13


STATE PARKS OF THE POCONO MOUNTAINS By Allison Mowatt

E

xperience the breathtaking beauty of the fall season in the Pocono Mountains. Brilliant peeps of color sweep through the trees in rustic hues of deep red, bright yellow and burnt orange. If you love viewing the fall foliage, then the Poconos is the perfect place to explore. If you’re visiting Monroe, Carbon, Pike or Wayne counties to see the amazing shades and also have some fun outdoors, why not head to one of the region’s many state parks?

About 3,000 acres, Promised Land State Park is surrounded by 12,464 acres of Pennsylvania's Delaware State Forest, which consist primarily of beech, oak, maple and hemlock trees. Two lakes and several small streams add to the park's natural, scenic beauty and simple charm. The Promised Land Lake is about 422 acres and the Lower Lake is 173 acres, both providing excellent opportunities for fishing.

Whether hiking, biking, picnicking, viewing wildlife, camping, or hunting, getting to know the area’s state parks is an optimal experience where you can immerse yourself in the sights, sounds and scents of autumn. Taking scenic driving routes through the Pocono Mountain's back roads will allow you to see the flaming colors on your way.

There are about 50 miles of hiking trails in the park and the surrounding state forest. Some points of interest include hiking Bruce Lake Road to a natural glacial lake, gazing at the little waterfalls along Little Falls Trail or walking around Conservation Island. Hiking remains a favored activity at Promised Land and it’s the perfect way to spend an afternoon during peak fall foliage season.

Wherever you decide to go, celebrating the fall season here is the perfect way to reconnect with loved ones and enjoy the abundance of nature.

Some of the park’s unique features include an eagle observation area, and The Masker Museum, which is open seasonally and has interactive stories, artifacts and displays.

Read on for a guide on the state parks within the Pocono Mountains. Here you’ll learn about some of their amenities, unique features and a multitude of seasonal recreation opportunities.

Call (570) 676-3428

PROMISED LAND, 100 LOWER LAKE RD, GREENTOWN, PA

Promised Land State Park is a popular choice among visitors and local residents. It is a park for all seasons located about 10 miles north of Canadensis, along Route 390. In this wooded region, tourists and local residents can choose from an endless possibility of activities such as hiking, biking, hunting, horseback riding, picnicking, camping, swimming, boating, fishing, ice fishing, snowmobiling, cross country skiing and more. 14 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

PROMPTON, WEST SHORE RD, PROMPTON, PA

Prompton is operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and has a 250-acre lake with 26 miles of marked hiking trails surrounding it. The park is approximately 1,000 acres and offers many things to do all year long. There is access to the 2 1/2 mile lake that is perfect for paddling and fishing. There are also picnic areas, a disc golf course, a scenic waterfall at the northern end of the trail system and abundant wildlife where people may even see nesting eagles. The trail system is multi-use and can be utilized all year round for cross country skiing and snowshoeing in the winter and hiking, mountain biking and jogging in the spring, summer and fall.


The trails are beautiful and very well marked giving hikers and mountain bikers the perfect outdoor experience. Call (570) 945-3239

HICKORY RUN, WHITE HAVEN, PA

Hickory Run is 15,990 acres and has three state park natural areas, miles of trout streams, and over 40 miles of hiking trails. People of all ages can enjoy the park and there are a variety of things to do including picnicking, camping, swimming in season, fishing, hunting, disc golfing, and orienteering and geocaching courses. In the winter, people can also cross country ski, ice skate and snowmobile.

Among some of the park’s standout offerings are Hawk Falls Trail with a 25-foot waterfall, and Boulder Field, a large boulder strewn area and a National Natural Landmark. Call (570) 443-0400

BIG POCONO, CAMELBACK RD, TANNERSVILLE, PA

Scenic views and high vistas are what you can expect here. Big Pocono is a rugged state park right above Camelback Mountain in Monroe County. A paved, 1.4 mile drive circles the mountaintop, providing awe-inspiring views of PA, NY, and NJ. The park features 8.5 miles of trails. Some are very challenging, with steep, rough grades, so inexperienced hikers should be cautious.

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINEŠ 15


In addition, people can enjoy picnics with fantastic views, mountain biking, horseback riding and downhill skiing in the winter. If you’re interested in exploring this state park, be sure to get there before the end of deer season in December. The park closes and reopens in the spring. Call (570) 894-8336

BELTZVILLE, 2950 POHOPOCO DR, LEHIGHTON, PA

This 3,002 acre park is located along Pohopoco Creek and feeds the 949-acre Beltzville Lake. The creek is great for trout fishing and the lake’s shoreline is 19.8 miles, making it an ideal spot for boating and fishing. In season, the sand beach becomes very popular and the swimming area is a great option for people of all ages. There are 15 miles of trails for hiking and biking, varying in length, so there is something for everyone. The trails follow wooded paths, old roads and mowed walkways. In the winter, people enjoy cross country skiing or snowshoeing on nine miles of trails. Other seasonal park amenities include boat rentals, water-skiing and ice boating. One of the park’s unique features is an original covered bridge, which was constructed in 1841 and originally used for horse and buggy traffic. The bridge was relocated between the picnic areas and the beach for pedestrian public use. Call (610) 377-0045 16 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

GOULDSBORO, ROUTE 507 & STATE PARK RD, GOULDSBORO, PA

Located in Monroe and Wayne counties, Gouldsboro State Park encompasses 2,800 acres and a 250-acre lake. The lake is great for fishing or boating. Boat rentals and swimming are also available in season, as well as ice skating during the cold months. Other activities include hiking on the 10 miles of trails, picnicking at one of the five wooded picnic areas, hunting in season and mountain biking on eight miles of trails. The hiking trails can also be used for cross country skiing in the winter if there’s the right amount of snow. An interesting fact about this park is about 20,000 years ago, a large sheet of ice about a mile thick, covered the area. Evidence of the glacier can be seen in the rocky soil known as glacial till and the number of bogs. People can enjoy watching for wildlife throughout this rugged habitat. Call (570) 894-8336

TOBYHANNA, 114 CAMPGROUND RD, TOBYHANNA, PA

This park is also located in Monroe and Wayne counties, just 20 minutes from Gouldsboro State Park. It includes 5,440 acres, with a 170-acre lake. The park is open all year and some of the seasonal recreation includes hiking, biking, picnicking, swimming, fishing, boating, camping, hunting, snowmobiling, ice fishing and ice skating.


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Tobyhanna is a Native American word, which means “a stream whose banks are fringed with alder.” Visitors can explore ten miles of hiking trails, about five miles of mountain biking trails, and enjoy snowmobiling and ice skating. The park provides a one-way snowmobile trail 5.1 miles long. Call (570) 894-8336

LEHIGH GORGE, WEATHERLY, PA

This is a state park unlike any other. With a beautiful gorge going through the Pocono Plateau for about 21 miles, there are unparalleled views of a unique landscape of steep slopes, rocky ledges, and side streams that meander into waterfalls. Whitewater boating and biking are activities people flock to this area for. The park is located in Carbon and Luzerne counties and follows the Lehigh River from the outlet of the Francis E. Walter Dam at the northern end to the town of Jim Thorpe at the southern end of the park. The Lehigh Gorge Trail follows more than 20 miles of the D&L Trail, which is the foundation of the 165 mile Delaware and Lehigh National Heritage Corridor. The abandoned railroad grade along the river provides optimal biking, hiking, sightseeing and photography.

It’s not just a day of shopping here in the Pocono Mountains—it’s an experience. Wander our historic streets. Explore our art galleries. Find unique local goods. And stop for a bite at one of our top-rated neighborhood restaurants along the way. Discover all of our shopping and sights now at PoconoMountains.com.

In the winter, people often participate in snowmobiling and cross country skiing. Call (570) 443-0400 For more information on these state parks, visit www.dcnr.pa.gov. OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 17


POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE

2019 PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST

FIRST PLACE

Young Fawn by Tom Stone

18 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


- WILDLIFE -

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 19


SECOND PLACE TIE

Common Loon by Lynn Pryor • NIKON COOLPIX P610

20 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


SECOND PLACE TIE

Eagle in Flight by Tom Stone

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 21


THIRD PLACE TIE

Perched Bald Eagle by Emily Garrison • NIKON COOLPIX P900

22 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


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THIRD PLACE TIE

Great Blue Heron by Carol Harrington • CANON POWERSHOT SX60 HS

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HONORABLE MENTION

Black Bear Stare by Barb Lewis • NIKON COOLPIX P1000

HONORABLE MENTION

Love You Daddy by Pat Coyle • OLYMPUS D-3 24 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


HONORABLE MENTION

Morning Bath at Mountain Springs Lake in Reeders by Harry Loud • PANASONIC DMC-FZ200

HONORABLE MENTION

Baby American Robin Chicks in Nest by Ronald Dickey • Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XT OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 25


- SCENICS -

FIRST PLACE

Morning on Mountain Springs Lake by Harry Loud • NIKON D200 26 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


SECOND PLACE TIE

Winter Sunrise by Ronald Dickey • APPLE iPHONE 8 PLUS

SECOND PLACE TIE

Serene Waterfall by Ricky Batista • Canon EOS 5D Mark III OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 27


THIRD PLACE TIE

Crisp Fall Day by Ronald Dickey • NIKON COOLPIX P900


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THIRD PLACE TIE

White Birch in Reeders by Harry Loud • NIKON D200

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HONORABLE MENTION

Delaware Water Gap by Ronald Dickey • APPLE iPHONE 6 PLUS

HONORABLE MENTION

A View of the Gap from the 16th Hole by Ann H. LeFevre • Canon EOS REBEL T3i 30 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


HONORABLE MENTION

Stars on the Lake by Ricky Batista • Canon EOS 5D Mark III


Evening Reflections by Maurice Harmon • OLYMPUS E-M5MarkII

32 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


Gray Forest by Neil Boushell • NIKON COOLPIX L820

Idyllic Autumn Day at Skytop Lake by Ronald Dickey • APPLE iPHONE 6 PLUS OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 33


Waterfall in Spring by Dave Trainer


CAR & TRUCK REPAIRS PA STATE INSPECTION LICENSE PLATES TITLE TRANSFERS ACE TRUCKING & REPAIRS, INC. 316 CLAY AVENUE STROUDSBURG, PA

(570) 421-2704

Air Tours

of the Poconos

A Glorious Autumn Day by Ann H. LeFevre • Canon EOS REBEL T3i

Charter Flights Flight Training Other Air Services

Gift Certificates Available

Pocono Mountains Airport - 188 Airport Drive, Tobyhanna, PA

1-800-321-5890

MoyerAviation.com

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 35


Summer Cascade by Ray Caswell • OLYMPUS E-M5MarkII

36 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


Autumn Lake by Neil Boushell • NIKON COOLPIX L820

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 37


Autumn Sunrise by Ricky Batista • CANON EOS 5D MARK III

38 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 39


Autumn Along the Road by Ricky Batista • CANON EOS 5D MARK III

40 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


Fast Waters at Bushkill Falls by Vinzon Lee • OLYMPUS E-M5


Autumn From Above by Ricky Batista • DJI

Waterfall by Tom Stone 42 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


A Wagon in the Pasture by Ann H. LeFevre • CANON EOS REBEL T3i


- FLORALS -

FIRST PLACE TIE

Suspended Beauty by Pat Coyle • OLYMPUS E-M1 44 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


FIRST PLACE TIE

Zinnia by Peter Gonze • OLYMPUS E-M1

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 45


SECOND PLACE TIE Butterfly in Spring by Lynn Pryor • NIKON COOLPIX P610

46 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


SECOND PLACE TIE Last Dance by Ann H. LeFevre • Canon EOS REBEL T3i

PoconoFourWheelDrive.com

Ken’s Auto Service Center Quality Repair

With a Price That’s Fair Rte. 447 & Brushy Mt. Rd., East Stroudsburg, PA 18301

570-424-2258 www.kensautoservicecenter.net Oil Change State Inspections Tune Ups

Maintenance Brakes Tires

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 47


THIRD PLACE TIE

Iris in Bloom by John Galarza • CANON EOS 7D

THIRD PLACE TIE

Water Lily at Camp Streamside by Ann H. LeFevre • CANON POWERSHOT SX50 HS 48 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


HONORABLE MENTION

Iris After a Rainshower by Ray Caswell • OLYMPUS E-M5MARKII

HONORABLE MENTION

Always Together by Pat Coyle • OLYMPUS E-M1 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 49


Spring in Bloom by Ray Caswell • CANON E-M5MARKII

50 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


Serving Breakfast & Lunch

Open 7:30am - 2:30pm • Closed Tuesdays • B.Y.O.B (570) 664-2888 • 517 Main Street, Stroudsburg, PA

facebook.com/thecurecafe

Rudy’s

Coneflower by Pat Coyle • OLYMPUS E-3

Your Neighborhood Tavern Established in 1933 90 Washington Street, East Stroudsburg, PA 18301 570-424-1131

Stroud Television & Appliances 219 N. 9th Street Stroudsburg, PA

570-421-7700 www.StroudTVandAppliances.com OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 51


52 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


- HISTORICAL STRUCTURES -

FIRST PLACE TIE

Zimmerman Grist Mill in the Late Afternoon Sun by Ann H. LeFevre • CANON EOS REBEL T3I OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 53


FIRST PLACE TIE

Fenner Snyder Robacker Homestead by Marlana Holsten • CANON EOS 30D

54 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


ANTOINE DUTOT

Museum & Gallery The history of Delaware Water Gap & fine art exhibits in an old brick schoolhouse. www.dutotmuseum.com 24 Main Street, Rt 611 Delaware Water Gap, PA 18327 Open: 1 - 5pm, Sat. & Sun., May - October (570) 476.4240

Visit us at the Farmer’s Market!

Open Daily 9am - 6pm (570) 992-5615 • www.gouldsproduce.com 829 Frable Rd, Brodheadsville, PA 18322

M

K

inisin hotel

Fruit Pies, Burgers, Pot Pies, Sandwiches, Pastries, Gifts, Jams & Jellies

www.VillageFarmer.com

1/2 mile off of Rt. 80 exit 310 GPS Broad St. Delaware Water Gap 570-476-9440

m -8p am y!! 8 n da Ope ever ting! Sea ide s ek Cre Hot Dog & Slice of Apple Pie always $2.95! Over 30 Flavors of pies baked fresh daily No High Fructose Corn Syrup!!!

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 55


SECOND PLACE TIE

Autumn in the Air by Ann H. LeFevre • CANON EOS REBEL T3I

56 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


William H. Clark Funeral Home, Inc. The Caring Professionals

1003 Main Street, Stroudsburg, PA 18360 570-421-9000 | www.wmhclarkfuneralhome.com Gary A. Raish, Supervisor

733 Main Street Stroudsburg, PA Cupcake Shop & Nostalgic Candy

Exciting “How-to” Culinary Classes

570-730-4944 ldiemer@ptd.net www.Kitchen-Chemistry.com

SECOND PLACE TIE

Sunshine Over the Water by John Galarza • LG VS987

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 57


THIRD PLACE

Cattell Cabin at Big Pocono State Park by Tom Stone • NIKON D750

58 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


Serving fine food & spirits in an elegant setting

owtree Inn Will

(570) 476-0211 • www.thewillowtreeinn.net 601 Ann Street, Stroudsburg, PA

Shawnee General Store Since 1859

In the heart of Shawnee on the Delaware! (570) 421-0956 542 River Road, Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA

HONORABLE MENTION

Cabins by Carol Harington • CANON POWERSHOT SX60 HS

the

Dressing Room pretty clothing Iridium Cut Loose Pacificotton Uru Comfy USA Bryn Walker Flax Latico Bernie Mev Oh My Gauze! + more 114 Washington St. East Stroudsburg, PA 570-420-0994 T-F: 10a-5p Sat: 10a-4p Su-M: closed

www.TheDressingRoomPA.com

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 59


QUIET VALLEY FARM THE MIDDLE YEARS by Janet F. Mishkin, Curator

M

any people may not realize the continuing significance of agriculture in the state of Pennsylvania. In today’s world, agriculture is Pennsylvania’s leading economic enterprise, in traditional as well as unexpected ways. One of Pennsylvania’s nicknames is the “snack food” capital – because we maintain headquarters of businesses that produce pretzels, potato chips and chocolate. Pennsylvania has a thriving dairy industry, but we also see forest production, fertilizers and agricultural chemicals as significant industries in the Keystone State. Meat, poultry, breed stock and fish products continue to hold part of the market, with Pennsylvania being one of the

60 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

largest egg producing states and the leader in egg safety under the Pennsylvania Egg Quality Assurance Program (PEQAP). We must also look to the changing nature of agriculture. New concepts in agriculture include production of software for farmers and biotechnology firms. Farming is increasingly involved in the world of high tech to be more efficient. Although the focus of Quiet Valley Living Historical Farm has always been nineteenth century agrarian life, we can expand the story into the 20th century through the Hess, Wicks and Oiler families. As the nation approached the millennium in 1900, the so-called “Gilded Age” saw progress in the form of

Photo courtesy of Janet Mishkin

> M arsh Farm, 1907


570-992-6161 www.quietvalley.org Guides in Period Clothing Recreate Life during a tour of a 19th Century Pennsylvania German Farm Summer Tours June 15 - September 2, 2019

Tuesday - Saturday 10am - 5pm, Sunday Noon - 5pm

Photo courtesy of Janet Mishkin

Also Saturdays 6/1, 6/8, 9/7, 9/14 (10am - 4:00pm)

June 15 Summer Garden Party & Farm to Table Experience July 20 Music in the Valley August 10 Heritage Craft Day August 24, 25 Pocono State Craft Festival October 12, 13 Harvest Festival October 25, 26, 27 Spooky Days December 7, 8, 14, 15 Old Time Christmas

> B ack: Wendell Wicks, Benny, Alice Wicks Front: Zandee, Sue and Thad Wicks

Schisler Museum of Wildlife & Natural History

industrial and manufacturing technology. Some technological advancements, such as reapers and threshers, tractors and mowers, aided agricultural production. With the rise of steam power, traction engines became more common. There were the inevitable clashes with horse power, so much so that the Pennsylvania General Assembly passed an act in 1885,

We must also look to the changing nature of agriculture. New concepts in agriculture include production of software for farmers and biotechnology firms. Farming is increasingly involved in the world of high tech to be more efficient.

McMunn Planetarium East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania

Wildlife exhibits and planetarium shows for explorers of all ages! Hoener Science & Technology Center Normal Street & Ransberry Avenue East Stroudsburg, PA 18301

570.422.2705

esu.edu/museum OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINEŠ 61


Photo courtesy of Marlana Holsten

62 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


RATED 5-STARS ON TRIP ADVISOR

Photo courtesy of Janet Mishkin

instructing drivers of traction powered equipment to yield the right-of-way to horse driven vehicles by stopping the engines and assisting the horses to pass. (Pennsylvania Agriculture and Country Life, Fletcher p 51) In many ways, the 20th century owners of Quiet Valley typify the agrarian history of the state.

> Q uiet Valley Farm, 1903 New equipment was not the only change in agriculture. Just as teachers attended local and state institutes to advance their instructional skills, farmers needed opportunities to gain new knowledge of farming practices. Prior to World War I, the United States Congress passed the SmithLever Act in 1914 “to provide for cooperative agricultural extension work between the agricultural colleges in the several states….” (Smith-Lever Act) In 1862 by Act of Congress, public lands had been donated to “provide colleges for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts” creating universities such as Penn State and Cornell. The Smith-Lever Act married the universities to the county cooperative extensions as a means to promote practical knowledge and instruction to rural communities. Federal funds from the Act had to be matched with state and local funds; at the annual Teachers’ Institute in January, 1916, a committee began the process to establish a county agency. Roy Decker was the first Monroe County agent, serving from 1916 to 1930. Monroe County Cooperative Extension celebrated their 103rd anniversary in 2019. (Monroe County Cooperative Extension 1916 – 1991)

A bed & breakfast sanctuary where mind, body, and spirit flourish in a relaxing woodland setting. 570.476.0203 | SANTOSHAONTHERIDGE.COM 121 SANTOSHA LANE | EAST STROUDSBURG, PA 18301

Except for the Delaware River area and some parts of the West End, Monroe County does not have the best lands for farming. By the late 19th century, agricultural trends moved toward more sheep farming, poultry farming, orchards and dairy farming. (PHMC website) Quiet OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 63


The Depper family era ended at Quiet Valley Living Historical Farm in 1913 when Thomas R. Hess purchased the farm from Horace and Emma Marsh, fifth generation descendants. For the first time in the history of the farm, there was a mortgage on the property. Thomas lived here initially with his sister Margaret. He married in 1922. The Hess family, Thomas, his wife Anna and their son Alvin, resided on the farm until 1958. Typical of many Pocono family farms during the Depression era, Thomas and Anna created Spring Run Farm, offering bed and breakfast to summer tourists. To create income, the farm wood lots were 64 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINEŠ OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

Photo courtesy of Janet Mishkin

Photos courtesy of Marlana Holsten

Valley’s last family descendants raised sheep, chickens and apple orchards. Most farmers planted a variety of crops and pasturelands to meet the family needs with some additional produce to sell. Much of the surplus served local resorts during the tourist season or was traded with neighbors. The farms of the Pocono area were slightly less mechanized, probably because the terrain was not ideal for large equipment. (PHMC website)

Most farmers planted a variety of crops and pasturelands to meet the family needs with some additional produce to sell. Much of the surplus served local resorts during the tourist season or was traded with neighbors. clear cut during the Hess tenancy. Although there were few attempts to modernize the farm buildings and house during the Hess era, we do know that there was a pick-up truck and gasoline engine. It is unclear whether or not there was a tractor for use.


Photos courtesy of Marlana Holsten

The

AGENCY Because the world keeps turning Insurance since 1942

Serving the Poconos for over 70 years CHOOSE DREHER BECAUSE WE CARE! BUSINESS & PERSONAL INSURANCE Theodore G. Butz, CPCU

Monroe County farms were almost exclusively owner operated. The 1924 Agricultural Census for Hamilton Township indicated that of 88 farms in the township, 85 were owner operated. Census records also show that men frequently held other jobs off the farm at least part of the year to make financial ends meet. Although this would suggest that women increasingly did more of the farm work, it is difficult to determine to what extent.

551 Main Street, Stroudsburg, PA 18360 570-421-6141

www.dreherinsurance.com

We are all familiar with Alice “Gram” Wicks, but we need to understand the role played by Alice’s husband, Wendell, in establishing Quiet Valley. Following their marriage on December 10, 1936, Wendell and Alice came to Monroe County when Wendell was hired as farm manager for Shawnee Valley Farm, owned by H.H. Farrington of New York. Shawnee Valley Farm was located along the Delaware River, where some of the best farming land could be found. Wendell, Alice and their growing family lived there from 1937 to 1948. With a degree from Cornell University in Agricultural Economics, Wendell’s interests were far reaching beyond his basic duties. With OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 65


Mr. Farrington, he owned a herd of award winning registered Aryshire cows. At a sale held on April 24, 1948, the purebred herd was described as “…probably the most famous herd of registered dairy cows ever developed in Monroe County.” (The Record, April 26, 1948) Although Aryshires were dairy cows from Scotland desirable for giving more butter fat content, the Wicks later changed to raising Holsteins which gave more volume of milk. Wendell also raised replacement calves after they had been weaned until they would be sold for meat. From the late 1940s to the early 1950s, Wendell participated in the Federal Project designed to teach farming practices to returning World War II veterans. Such programs continue today. The USDA, with the 2008 Farm Bill, created the OAO – Office of Advocacy and Outreach – to assist transitioning 66 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

21st century veterans into farming, ranching and other related jobs. (www.outreach.usda.gov/veterans.htm) He later served in the Federal Soil Conservation Service for 10 years that included soil testing and construction of farm ponds. In his spare time, Wendell did wood carvings and turnings, as well as serve on several boards including the Monroe County Cooperative Extension. It was his work throughout the county that brought him to the Quiet Valley property. In 1950, the Wicks family bought Wing Lake farm in East Stroudsburg. As always, farming is a family venture and daughter Sue Wicks Oiler recalls driving the farm truck at age 10 while brother Zandee Wicks, two years younger, helped with the haying. They always had at least one cow and extra milk would be sold to the neighbors. Milking machines made dairy work easier. They raised 4,000 baby chicks in 16 week intervals.


Photos courtesy of Marlana Holsten

All the chicks had to be vaccinated before they could be sold to market, another indication of technological changes. In 1961, Zan was particularly excited when they purchased a new Ferguson tractor that could run the hay baler. Zan drove the tractor to Stroudsburg to earn extra money plowing snow! (oral history) This family background prepared the way for the establishment of Quiet Valley Living Historical Farm in 1963. While Wendell and Alice had initially viewed the property as a real estate investment, their own experiences of farming practices helped them redirect their energies into this vision. Although Wendell died in 1974, the creative force of Alice, with the assistance of daughter Sue and son-in-law Gary Oiler, continued the dream that lives today.

A trained dog is a happy dog.

Dog Training & Obedience in Stroudsburg

www.SitStayNPlay.net

570.872.9748 1501 North 5th Street • Stroudsburg, PA 18360

Creekside

PET CREMATORY

Compassionate Care That Lasts Forever Located at Stroudsburg Cemetery on Dreher Avenue 570-420-9599www.CreeksidePet.net / 570-421-4501 www.CreeksidePet.net OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINEŠ 67


Photo courtesy of Marlana Holsten

Quiet Valley’s 45th annual Harvest Festival is Saturday and Sunday October 12th & 13th from 10am to 5pm. This year’s theme is “Farms – Center of the Community”. Come out and see 19th century agricultural, harvest, and heritage craft practices. Enjoy old fashion entertainment, country foods, children’s activities and more.

68 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE

THE MOUNTAINS FOR THE HOLIDAYS. Celebrate the holidays surrounded by great company and even better cuisine in the Pocono Mountains. From romantic dinners by candlelight to farm-to-table experiences, our local chefs are serving up something for every palate. Visit PoconoMountains.com to see all of our mouth-watering dining options and make your reservation.

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 69


HIKES & OUTDOOR ADVENTURES WITH POCONO LIVING Photo courtesy of Friends of Big Pocono

By Amanda Kuhn

BIG POCONO STATE PARK & THE CATTELL CABIN

Near the turn of the 20th century, owner Henry S. Cattell knew the beauty of his land was something to be shared. In 1908, Cattell constructed a stone cabin on the summit of Camelback Mountain, now known as The Cattell Cabin. The cabin was left unlocked to provide shelter for anyone who ventured up the mountain. In 1928, twelve years after Cattell’s death, the PA Game Commission bought the land and then leased it to the organization we now know as Camelback Ski Corporation in 1950. Three years later, 70 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

With sweeping views of the Kittatinny Mountain range, sights of three different states, and plenty of cliffs and overlooks, Big Pocono State Park is the idyllic spot to observe the beauty of NEPA. Photo courtesy of Friends of Big Pocono

I

t’s clear from the expansive views you’ll find at Big Pocono State Park why it was given its name. With sweeping views of the Kittatinny Mountain range, sights of three different states, and plenty of cliffs and overlooks, Big Pocono State Park is the idyllic spot to observe the beauty of NEPA. The park’s 1,306 acres of rugged terrain include 8.5 miles of hiking trails, some of which can even be enjoyed by mountain bike or horseback. Whether you’re seeing these vistas for the first or fiftieth time, they are a remarkable reminder of just how impressive Mother Nature can be.


Photo courtesy of @wizarddresden

6683 Route 191 in the heart of Mountainhome, PA • Alzheimer’s & Dementia Memory Cafe - New Program • Music Therapy for People living with Dementia • Alzheimer’s Caregiver Support Group

Call for details!

These FREE programs are offered in partnership with: Pocono Mountains Community Fundraiser 570.481.4330 • www.thefriendlycommunitycenter.org

P&S GARAGE Servicing the Poconos since 1975

the Pennsylvania Department of Forests and Waters (now DCNR) acquired 1,306 acres of the land for the purpose of creating a State Park. In 1954, Big Pocono State Park officially opened. The Cattell Cabin remained, serving as an office and nature museum for many years. Big Pocono State Park is a mountaintop, so many of its trails are extremely steep with rough grades. Experienced hikers can trek up the rocky slopes of the North and South Trails which extend down the east side of the mountain. These trails offer hikers a challenging 600-foot elevation change in under a mile. On the Indian Trail and the upper loop of the South Trail you’ll find a much easier hike. This route forms a two-mile loop which includes a portion of the old railroad grade and is fairly flat. Whether you choose to hike to the summit of Big Pocono or follow the paved roadway around the summit, you’ll see some of the best views in the Poconos.

Scott Dreisbach owner

570-223-8874

9080 Franklin Hill Road East Stroudsburg, Pa www.psgaragepa.com

Strunk C. Tree Service 570 - 350 - 3966

24/7 Emergency Service - Fully Insured Tree Removal - Tree Trimming - Stump Grinding Cabling - Bucket Truck Service - Landscaping OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 71


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Mullally’s Café Supporting

Hospice House:

Greater Pocono

Wednesday, October 9, 2019 Donating

11:30 am ∞ 8:00 pm

20% all day

Menu: Dine In or Take Out

In beautiful Historic 1790’s John Stroud Home

No coupons

on food

570-421-6081

Sponsored by SHS Class of 1953

j. j. james

72 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

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On a clear day at the summit you can see Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York. The north side of the mountain holds views of Pocono Plateau and the Catskill Mountains. On the south side, you’ll see parts of the Appalachian Train in the Kittatinny Mountain range. Restrooms, picnic tables, and fire places are all available at the summit. While the park facilities are maintained by DCNR and Camelback Mountain Resort, trails are maintained in cooperation with the Pocono Outdoor Club. The park closes in December, the day after the end of deer hunting season, and reopens as conditions permit in the spring. You can enter the park from Route 715 in Tannersville. For more information on Big Pocono State Park visit the DCNR website, dcnr.pa.gov/StateParks. Camelback Rd. Tannersville, PA 18372 570.894.8336

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Photo courtesy of Friends of Big Pocono

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psbsa.com

744 Lake Minsi Dr., Bangor, PA 18013

Rev. 12/10/18

Whether you choose to hike to the summit of Big Pocono or follow the paved roadway around the summit, you’ll see some of the best views in the Poconos.

Otter Lake CAMP RESORT

• 60 acre lake with 300 campsites • Paved roads • Electric, water and cable TV hook-ups; 100 campsites have sewer hook-ups • 8 heated bathouses, store, laundry and propane • Boating, boat rentals and fishing (no fishing license required)

Photo courtesy of Friends of Big Pocono

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• Indoor pool with 2 Jacuzzis and Sauna • Outdoor Pool • Swimming Beach • Lighted tennis, racquetball and basketball courts • Softball field • Game room, planned activities • Open all year • Woodall 5W rated

P.O. Box 850 • Marshalls Creek, PA 18301 570-223-0123 Reservations only: 800-345-1369 www.otterlake.com

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 73


Theatre Year Round in the Poconos

SHAWNEE ON THE DELAWARE, PA

You May Also Enjoy

Pocono Family Magazine

• Born Yesterday

Oct 4, 2019 - Oct 20, 2019

• Broadway Fright Fest Oct 13, 2019

• Miracle on 34th Street

Nov 8, 2019 - Dec 22, 2019

• A Christmas Wizard of Oz

Nov 15, 2019 - Dec 21, 2019

• The Nutcracker Ballet

Nov 30, 2019 - Dec 20, 2019 (570) 421-5093 www.theshawneeplayhouse.com

Available at Local Businesses & by Subscription Pocono Magazines, LLC 1929 North Fifth Street, Stroudsburg, PA 18360 570-424-1000 • pmags@ptd.net

Next Issue of

Pocono Living Magazine DECEMBER 2019/JANUARY 2020

The Pocono Mountains' Magazine

Complimentary

Pocono Living M A G A Z I N E

Pocono Mountain Public Library Tobyhanna, PA 570-894-8860 www.poconomountpl.org

Clymer Library Pocono Pines, PA 570-646-0826 www.clymerlibrary.org

Western Pocono Community Library Brodheadsville, PA 570-992-7934 www.wpcl.lib.pa.us

Eastern Monroe Public Library Branches Hughes Library (main branch) Stroudsburg, PA 570-421-0800 www.monroepl.org Pocono Township Branch Tannersville, PA 570-629-5858 Smithfield Branch Marshalls Creek, PA 570-223-1881 Bookmobile 570-421-0880 x49

74 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

Photo courtesy of Pixabay

Barrett Paradise Friendly Library Cresco, PA 570-595-7171 www.barrettlibrary.org


OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 75


IMAGINARY PARTNERS

Life is full of partners. Your health deserves one, too. With eight hospital campuses, topranked Heart, Cancer and Surgery Institutes and the only children’s hospital in the region, we’re here for you and your family at every stage of life. Learn more at LVHN.org.

Profile for LARRY SEBRING

October/November 2019 Pocono Living Magazine  

October/November 2019 Pocono Living Magazine