{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

The Pocono Mountains' Magazine

Complimentary

Pocono Living M A G A Z I N E

• The Art of Marie Liu • Promised Land State Park • The Infamous Walking Purchase


Pocono Magazines, LLC PUBLISHING

Pocono Living Magazine© & Pocono Family Magazine© 1929 North 5th Street Stroudsburg, PA 18360 570-424-1000 pmags@ptd.net www.poconomagazines.com PUBLISHER/EDITOR Larry R. Sebring larry@poconomagazines.com ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVES Linda St. John, 570-856-8155 MAGAZINE & WEB DESIGN Smart Blonde Creative Food & Wine Editor Jamie Bowman PHOTOGRAPHY & ART Ricky Batista James Chesnick Julie Enterline John Galarza M. Harmon Marlana Holsten Barbara Hornstra Vinzon Lee Ann LeFevre Barbara Lewis Harry Loud Maritza McFaline

William McKee Veronica Murray Lisa Newberry Andrei Protsouk Lynn Pryor David Sandt Matt Siptroth Tom Stone Dave Trainer Nancy Tully Linda Weaver Linda Zak

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Roseanne Bottone Jamie Bowman Kimberly Blaker Kathy Dubin-Uhler Marty Wilson Amy Leiser Suzanne McCool Amanda Kuhn John L. Moore William M. Williams Jim Werkheiser Janet Mishkin Allison Mowatt ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Kristen Sebring Linda Spalluto

Pocono Living Magazine and Pocono Family Magazine,

PROUD MEMBERS OF

two regional publications filled with articles, features and photography exploring and capturing the real Pocono Mountains living experience.

Our publications can be found at many locations

throughout the Pocono Mountains region, and are available by subscription.

The information published in this magazine is believed to be accurate, but in some instances, may represent opinion or judgment. The publication’s providers do not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information and shall not be held liable for any loss or damage, directly or indirectly, by or from the information. © 2019 Pocono Magazines. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be copied, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the expressed written permission of the publisher.


ST. LUKE’S GENERAL SURGERY The name you know. The surgeons you trust.

surgeons are certified by the American Board of

Our general surgeons perform traditional, laparoscopic and robotic surgery for numerous conditions including:

Surgery and provide some of the most innovative

• Colon and Rectal Surgery

procedures available today.

• Abdominal Surgery

Choose your surgeon with the same care that you choose your family physician. Our general

At St. Luke’s University Health Network, we are proud to provide our communities with access to the region’s leaders in general surgery. It is all part of our mission to provide the highest quality of care delivered with expertise, compassion and close to home.

• Hiatal Hernia and Hernia Repair • Gallbladder Disease • Breast Biopsies • Appendicitis • Cyst and Lipoma Removal • Hemorrhoids When you need expert surgical care close to home, trust the surgeons of St. Luke’s General Surgery.

Gerardo Garcia, MD General Surgeon

Sumayah Hargette, MD General Surgeon

3565 Route 611 - Suite 300, Bartonsville, PA • sluhn.org • 484-526-2200 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 3


“People who know little are usually great talkers, while men who know much say little.”   ― Jean Jacques Rousseau

> P hoto by Marlana Holsten

4 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020


What’s Inside February/March 2020 FEATURES 7 A Triumphant Return 11 The Walking Purchase 20 Follow the Road to Safe Winter Driving 22 The Art of Marie Liu

36

The Blizzard of 1958

40 Paradise Fish Hatchery Oldest in State 44 Hikes and Outdoor Adventures with Pocono Living: Promised Land State Park 46 Pet Health Tips for an On-the-go Lifestyle 48 Skiing and Riding in the Poconos

COVER By: Tom Stone

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 5


CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

John L. Moore John L. Moore continues to pursue his lifelong interests in Pennsylvania’s colonial history and archaeology. The Northumberland writer has published 11 non-fiction books about Pennsylvania’s 16th and 17th century. John’s latest book, 1780: Year of Revenge, is currently available in book stores or from the online bookstore Sunbury Press Inc. This book is the 3rd volume in his Revolutionary Pennsylvania Series and tells the story of Indian raids all across the Pennsylvania Frontier - including the Poconos and Minisinks - in the year following General Sullivan’s 1779 invasion of the Iroquios homeland. Over the years John has participated in archaeological excavations of Native American sites along the Delaware and Susquehanna Rivers. A professional storyteller, he recently took part in the Heritage Festival at Frances Slocum State Park near Wilkes-Barre. He told the true story of Frances Slocum, a 5-yearold girl who lived as a Native American after being kidnapped by Indians during the American Revolution. The park was named for her.

Suzanne McCool Suzanne is a native of the Poconos and a former schoolteacher and former Monroe County Commissioner. She has recently published her own book, and lives with her husband Terry in Stroudsburg. Today, Suzanne enjoys writing, traveling and visiting her grandchildren.

Amy Leiser Amy Leiser is a local resident and historian who has been working with the Monroe County Historical Association for 19 years. In addition to the live tours, research assistance, and museum that the organization keeps available, Leiser offers her knowledge and assistance with family charting and genealogy. Visit www.monroehistorical.org


A TRIUMPHANT RETURN By: Brian Hardiman

I

was beginning to have my doubts as I stood there in the cold and snow. We had been waiting and watching in this one spot for over twenty minutes but still nothing. Furiously wiggling my toes and fingers did little to thwart the numbness setting in. A quick scan of the now restless group showed others stomping their feet and huddling together in a losing effort to stay warm. At least I’m not the only one suffering, I thought to myself.

Photo courtesy of Marlana Holsten

And then it happened…I don’t remember who was the first to see it and call out, but suddenly all eyes were on the spectacular sight that appeared almost magically before us. Frozen extremities were quickly forgotten and the conversation about last weekend’s party abruptly ended. An adult bald eagle, with wings pumping slowly, passed by the hushed group of onlookers at eye level, held its course down the river, and disappeared, like a vision, around the bend. It was simply awesome.

This eagle sighting occurred in the Poconos on a field trip in February, 1984, when I was a student in Dr. Larry Rymon’s Ornithology class at East Stroudsburg University, and it was the very first bald eagle that I (and most of the class) had ever seen in the wild. It is one that will be forever etched in my mind.

“An adult bald eagle, with wings pumping slowly, passed by the hushed group of onlookers at eye level, held its course down the river, and disappeared, like a vision, around the bend. It was simply awesome. Standing on the banks of a remote section of the Delaware River that day was in itself exhilarating and memorable -- snow was falling and the flakes accentuated the green of the towering hemlocks around us. There were no traffic noises to be heard, only the soothing sounds of the rushing water below us. Yes it was cold, but the thrill and anticipation of possibly seeing a bald eagle trumped any hardship. Besides, Dr. Rymon said this was the best place to see a bald eagle, and everyone knew that Doc (as he was affectionately called by his students) had the bird gods on his side. After we actually did see that eagle (just as Doc had predicted), his legendary status only grew. Eagle sightings back in 1984 were an uncommon event. At that time there was only a very small wintering population in the Poconos and no nesting eagles at all. Today, because of the increase of the local wintering and nesting populations, you don’t need a legend like Doc Rymon to find bald eagles. You just need to know when and where to go. FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 7


Photo courtesy of Emily Harrison

“Among the best places to see bald eagles is along the Delaware River. Even in the coldest winters, stretches of the Delaware will have open water that provides fishing and other foraging opportunities for these birds.�


The best time to see bald eagles in the Poconos is during the non-breeding winter months when the small resident population is supplemented by wintering birds that are forced south to our area by the frozen waters up north. The eagle numbers are highest at this time and visibility is best with the lack of foliage. Wintering eagles start moving into our area in December, with peak numbers usually seen in January and February. These numbers drop off in March as the eagles disperse and move back north. Among the best places to see bald eagles is along the Delaware River. Even in the coldest winters, stretches of the Delaware will have open water that provides fishing and other foraging opportunities for these birds. Locations in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area (DWGNRA) offer excellent chances to see bald eagles. This 70,000 acre National Park Service site has outstanding eagle habitat that meets the needs of wintering and nesting birds. The river provides food, and the stands of large deciduous and coniferous trees provide perches for foraging and roosting and sites for nesting. Some of the best viewing areas in DWGNRA are the river access sites at Smithfield Beach, Bushkill, Dingmans Ferry, and Milford. Eagles can often be seen perched at river’s edge or soaring overhead on their large, flat plank-like wings. A really lucky observer may even see an eagle snagging a fish from the river or picking a duck off the water’s surface or from midair. Eagles are opportunistic and will take other prey as well. I once saw an eagle carrying a gray squirrel in its talons, and another time while leading an eagle field trip, my group and I watched an eagle grab a muskrat from the river, fly off with it low across the water with the muskrat’s tail dragging, and land on a rock where it ate the animal. Bald eagles are also scavengers and my groups, on more than one occasion, have seen multiple eagles feeding on a winter-killed deer. To many the bald eagle symbolizes courage, freedom, and

wilderness. It was selected by Congress in 1782 as the national symbol of the United States, despite the objections of Ben Franklin who felt the bald eagle possessed poor moral character (reflected in its behavior of pirating food from other species) and

was a poor choice next to Franklin’s own wild turkey. In my humble opinion, I believe the appropriate choice was made. Eagles are birds of strength, beauty, and size, and different species have been chosen as the national symbols of countries around the world. The bald eagle is the only eagle species found exclusively on the North American continent, and it would be difficult to imagine any other bird, wild turkey or otherwise, as our national symbol. Majestic and regal, an adult bald eagle is unmistakable with its

striking white head and tail contrasting against the dark brown body. This adult plumage is attained at about five years of age. Immature birds, on the other hand, are basically brown throughout with varying degrees of white mottling depending on age. Bald eagles are impressive birds in terms of size—they can stand thirty inches from head to tail with wingspans reaching seven feet. The weight of these birds can range from about eight to fourteen pounds, with females larger than males (the sexes, otherwise, are similar in appearance). Once on the brink of extinction throughout most of its range, the bald eagle has made a remarkable comeback. Habitat loss, human persecution, and especially DDT contamination all played a role in eagle populations plummeting. At the time of European settlement, there was an estimated 100,000 bald eagles in North America. By 1963, less than 500 nesting pairs were known to occur in the contiguous United States. The bald eagle would soon be designated as an endangered species at the federal and state levels. A number of factors were responsible for the recovery of our national symbol. The banning of DDT was crucial in this turnaround, as well as protection of the species and its habitat provided under state and federal Endangered Species Acts. Increased education efforts to reduce human persecution and the improvement of water quality were also boons to the eagle population. Another major contributor to the bald eagle recovery were reintroduction programs implemented by various states including Pennsylvania. These efforts gave the population a jumpstart in areas where historically eagles once nested.

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020POCONO POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE©9 9


SHOP NEW. SHOP VINTAGE . Photo courtesy of Marlana Holsten

SHOP LOCAL .

Combined, these recovery efforts have produced dramatic results. As recently as 1980, there were only three known eagle nests in the state of Pennsylvania. Today the state’s nesting population is well over 100 pairs, with a number of these birds nesting right here in the Poconos. Other states have experienced similar increases. As a result, in 2007 the bald eagle was removed from the federal list of endangered and threatened species. However, it is still afforded federal protection by the Bald Eagle Protection Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, as well as being protected by endangered species laws at the state level.

It’s not just a day of shopping here in the Pocono Mountains—it’s an experience. Wander our historic streets. Explore our art galleries. Find unique local goods. And stop for a bite at one of our top-rated neighborhood restaurants along the way. Discover all of our shopping and sights now at PoconoMountains.com.

10 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

“The bald eagle is the only eagle species found exclusively on the North American continent, and it would be difficult to imagine any other bird, wild turkey or otherwise, as our national symbol. Once only a rare winter sight in the Poconos, now it is not surprising to see a bald eagle any day of the year in our area. Their presence is a testament to the outstanding quality of our natural environment here in the Poconos. Looking back on that day along the Delaware when I saw my first bald eagle with Doc and my classmates, I never imagined that 25 years later the bald eagle would make the triumphant return that it has. In that time I have seen literally hundreds of bald eagles, and every one is special, but I’ll never forget that first one. 


THE WALKING PURCHASE By John L. Moore Photos courtesy of John L. Moore

I

ndian war parties swept into the Poconos in late 1755 and early 1756 and raided pioneer homesteads in the mountains north of Easton and Bethlehem.

Many of the warriors had lived in the region until the sons of William Penn cheated them in a controversial real estate transaction known as the Walking Purchase, then forced them to vacate their lands. This happened during the French and Indian War, a conflict over control of the Ohio River between the French living in Canada and Great Britain’s colonies along the Atlantic Seaboard. The French sent their Indian allies into eastern Pennsylvania, where the Delawares, most of them then living along the Susquehanna River, welcomed them. “I learned that our enemy Indians had fixed upon a place upon the east branch of Susquehanna, called Nescopecken, for their headquarters, from whence they sent out (war) parties to annoy us,” Gov. Robert H. Morris said in a Feb. 2, 1756, letter to Col. George Washington of Virginia. The chief at Nescopeck was a Delaware named Nutimus, who had once lived near Easton and who had been among the chiefs who signed the 1737 Walking Purchase treaty. The warriors living in Delaware towns along the Susquehanna willingly took up the hatchet. On Jan. 1, 1756, for instance, “the Delaware chief Teedyuscung led a band of about 30 Indians into Lower Smithfield Township, Monroe County, destroying the plantation of Henry Hess, killing Nicholas Colman and a laborer named Gotlieb, and capturing Peter Hess and young Henry

> Indians raided Edward Marshall’s homestead along Jacoby Creek at present-day Portland twice in 1757. They killed his wife Elizabeth and son Peter. Hess, son of Peter Hess and nephew of Henry Hess, the owner of the plantation,” historian C. Hale Sipe said in his 1929 book, “Indian Wars of Pennsylvania.” In establishing his colony in the late 1600s, William Penn had purchased land from the Lenape Indians several times. During the 1730s, the proprietors of Pennsylvania, who were Penn’s sons, pressed the Lenape to sell more land. Reluctantly, the Indians, who were becoming known as the Delawares, agreed, but they intended to sell only land in Bucks County, well south of the Lehigh River. The terms of the treaty allowed for men FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 11


> Map of the Walking Purchase representing the Penns to define the western boundary by walking from a tree near Wrightstown, and to continue “as far as a man can go in one day and an half.” The northern end of this boundary would be fixed at the point where the walkers stopped.

“The walkers moved at such a fast pace that they crossed the creek well before mid-day, having already traveled about 16 miles. About 20 miles farther north, they crossed the Lehigh River and kept on going, following an old trail.” Nutimus and the other chiefs had expected colonists and natives to take a leisurely pace when the walk was conducted in September 1737, but the Penns had other ideas. “The persons employed by the colonial authorities to perform the walk … were athletes famous for their abilities as fast walkers; and, as an inducement for their making this walk a supreme test of their abilities, a compensation of five pounds in money and 500 acres 12 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

of land was offered the one who could go the longest distance in the allotted time,” Sipe said. The athletes – Solomon Jennings, James Yates, and Edward Marshall – had instructions from Sheriff Timothy Smith to walk, but not run, as fast as they could. In 18 hours – 12 on Sept. 19, the first day, and six on Sept. 20, the second – the walkers covered more than 60 miles, stopping several miles beyond present-day Jim Thorpe in Carbon County. The sheriff and other colonial officials conducting the event had brought horses along for Indian witnesses to ride if they couldn’t keep up with the walkers. The Indians were furious. They had expected the walk to be leisurely, with the northernmost boundary being Tohickon Creek, a Bucks County stream that flows from west to east and joins the Delaware at the present-day village of Point Pleasant. But the walkers moved at such a fast pace that they crossed the creek well before mid-day, having already traveled about 16 miles. About 20 miles farther north, they crossed the Lehigh River and kept on going, following an old trail.


> T his historical marker stands in vicinity of Edward Marshall’s homestead along Jacoby Creek at present-day Portland.


> J acoby Creek flows over an old dam in Portland. Edward Marshall lived near the stream in 1757 when Indians twice raided his homestead. They killed his wife Elizabeth and son Peter. 14 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020


According to Joseph Knowles, who rode a horse that carried supplies for the walkers, as the men approached the Lehigh, “the Indians … began to look sullen and murmured that the men walked so fast, and several times that afternoon called out and said to them, ‘You run, that’s not fair, you was to walk.’ ”

“Thus, the western boundary of the purchase stretched from Wrightstown to just beyond Jim Thorpe. The Delaware River formed the eastern border, and the surveyors taking part in the expedition drew a line from Jim Thorpe northeast to the mouth of Lackawaxen Creek on the Delaware River.” After Jennings dropped out in late morning, Yates took the lead. “On the first day of the walk, it was almost as much as Edward Marshall could do to keep up with him,” said William J. Buck in his 1886 “History of the Indian Walk.” The walkers continued for 12 hours and stopped about 10 miles north of Bethlehem where the trail crossed Hokendauqua Creek, near the Northampton County village of Kreidersville. They camped for the night. In the morning, when no Indians showed up to witness the completion of the walk, several men in the sheriff’s party went to a nearby Delaware village and asked the chief, Lappawinzo, to send some Indians along as witnesses. But Lappawinzo refused. He replied that the walkers had already obtained “all the best of the land and they might go to the devil.” In the end, a few Indians came along. The morning of Sept. 20 was rainy, but Yates and Marshall still had a half day’s walk to perform. They headed north toward the Lehigh Gap, then along a trail that followed the river. At present-day Jim Thorpe, they turned toward the northeast. At some point, Yates, “growing lame and tired,” quit. Marshall continued for another few miles, stopping only when he had walked for a six hours – or half a day. Thus, the western boundary of the purchase stretched from

Classic American Fine Dining Wednesdays Pasta & Live Music! Fridays

Jumbo Cajun Shrimp Six for $6 & Live Music! Bar Social 4 -5 p.m. Tues - Sun Drink Features & Half Price Apps

• 5 pm Reservations Receive 20% Off • Business Rt. 209 • Snydersville, PA • 570-992-6634 (Just 5 miles south of Stroudsburg)

www.stonebar.com

Schisler Museum of Wildlife & Natural History

McMunn Planetarium East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania

Wildlife exhibits and planetarium shows for explorers of all ages! Hoeffner Science & Technology Center Normal Street & Ransberry Avenue East Stroudsburg, PA 18301

570.422.2705

esu.edu/museum FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 15


PENN’S HEIRS ORDER THE WALKING PURCHASE AN EXCERPT FROM “TRADERS, TRAVELERS, AND TOMAHAWKS”

T

he peace that William Penn and the Delaware Indians established during the 1680s lasted until 1755, when the French & Indian War engulfed Pennsylvania. Descendants of the peaceful Indians who had befriended Penn suddenly attacked the colony’s frontier and killed hundreds of settlers. When asked why, a Delaware chief named Teedyuscung explained that his people had been cheated of thousands of acres along the Delaware River. He referred specifically to the Walking Purchase of 1737, and explained the war parties were avenging the land fraud that Penn’s heirs had committed against them. He asserted that the Indians had long wanted revenge for being forced from their homelands, and had patiently waited nearly 20 years for a convenient time to take reprisals. Predictably, the Penns and their agents quickly denied Teedyuscung’s assertion, but their political foes jumped on Teedyuscung’s band wagon and joined the chief in blaming the Penns for alienating Pennsylvania’s long-time Indian allies. Teedyuscung’s charge of fraud quickly developed into a political controversy that flared and sputtered for years. Over time, the issue became so partisan that today it is difficult to determine what actually took place. Many primary source materials that historians have used in evaluating the Walking Purchase were written in the late 1750s as pro-Penn and anti-Penn partisans marshaled—and in some cases, may have even made up—

16 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

evidence either to prove or disprove the chief’s allegation. Thus, we are left with a thicket of conflicting accounts generated during a highly politicized dispute. Some modern century historians have agreed with the Delaware chief’s charge of fraud; others have concluded that the Penns employed sharp but not crooked practices, and didn’t actually cheat the Indians. Teedyuscung himself eventually withdrew his accusation, but only after accepting a bribe from the governor of Pennsylvania. One modern writer even describes the payment as “a generous present.” There are many letters, journals, depositions and other first-hand accounts of the Walking Purchase. A close reading of secondary and readily accessible primary sources clearly shows that the Walk of September 1737 angered and provoked the Delawares while the walkers were still conducting it. The Indians immediately began showering protests and objections on the government officials who were part of the expedition to see that the Walk was carried out in the way that the Penn brothers and their agents wanted it done. During the 1730s, two sons of William Penn—Thomas and John—wanted to make money by selling land in the northern part of the colony they had inherited, but the Delaware Indians still occupied much of the territory they wanted to sell. Many decades earlier, in 1686, William Penn apparently had purchased land between the Neshaminy

and Tohickon creeks north of Philadelphia, but a dispute between Indians and colonists had arisen over the boundaries of this purchase, and the Indians remained in possession of the land. Even so, the Penn brothers had begun selling tracts north of Tohickon Creek to white colonists before performing the 1737 walk. Solomon Jennings, for instance, had purchased 200 acres along the Lehigh River near present Bethlehem in March 1736 and was living there by the summer of 1737. The Walking Purchase is one of the most colorful, complex and controversial dealings that the Pennsylvania colonial government ever had with the Delaware Indians. The tactics employed by the Pennsylvania officials clearly angered the Indians and provoked them to violence even before the party of Pennsylvanians had returned to the settlements south of the Lehigh River. Historians have been unable to examine the document at the root of the entire controversy—the 1686 deed. It seems that after Teedyuscung leveled his charge of land fraud, the document mysteriously disappeared from the papers of the Penn family.


> M arshalls Creeks flows alongside Seven Bridge Road near Milford Road in Marshalls Creek. The stream may be named for Marshall’s brother John. Wrightstown to just beyond Jim Thorpe. The Delaware River formed the eastern border, and the surveyors taking part in the expedition drew a line from Jim Thorpe northeast to the mouth of Lackawaxen Creek on the Delaware River. The purchase included 1,200 square miles. It took in the Minisinks region and much of Monroe County, including Brodheadsville, Delaware Water Gap, East Stroudsburg, Marshalls Creek, Mount Pocono, Saylorsburg, and Stroudsburg. James Hughes, a Bucks County man, worked with the surveyors who measured the line between Jim Thorpe and Lackawaxen. He said that as the surveyors “returned from running the line,” they stopped north of modern Easton to see Tatamy, a wellknown Indian “who informed ‘em that the Indians since the walk had poisoned to death one Lappakoo, an Indian who against the minds of the Indians in general had consented to the walk and now see it so unreasonably performed were so incensed against him as to put him to death.”

Other Indians also expressed outrage. For instance, Lappawinzo told Marshall in late 1737, “The walkers should have walked for a few miles and then have sat down and smoked a pipe, and now and then have shot a squirrel, and not kept upon the run, run all day.” For five years, Nutimus and the other Delawares refused to leave their lands. In 1742, the Penns arranged for the Iroquois Indians to evict them. At a treaty in Philadelphia, the Iroquois orator Canassatego told the Delawares, “You ought to be taken by the hair of the head and shaked severely till you recover your senses.” Canassatego admonished the chiefs: “This land that you claim is gone through your guts. You have been furnished with clothes and meat and drink by the goods paid you for it, and now you want it again like children.”

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 17


> C hief Lappawinzo

“Tatamy, who had previously received a grant of 300 acres from the Penns as a reward for his services as an interpreter, became the only Delaware who won approval to remain”. The Iroquois ordered them to move, either to the Wyoming Valley on the North Branch or to Shamokin at the forks of the Susquehanna. “Don't deliberate, but remove away,” Canassatego declared. Nutimus and the others “in great and silent grief, went directly home, collected their families and goods, and, burning their cabins to signify they were never to return, marched reluctantly to their new homes," Sipe reported. 18 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

> M arshalls Creeks courses over the Buttermilk Falls along Route 209 near East Stroudsburg. The stream may be named for Marshall’s brother John.

Tatamy, who had previously received a grant of 300 acres from the Penns as a reward for his services as an interpreter, became the only Delaware who won approval to remain. He appeared before the Pennsylvania provincial council on Nov. 20, 1742 and explained “that he was desirous of continuing to live there in peace and friendship with the English,” Robert B. Swift writes in “By Great Rivers.” The Delawares neither forgot nor forgave Edward Marshall. In his history, Buck reported that with an Indian war raging, the woodsman took “his family into New Jersey where they remained until the spring of 1757.” That May, Marshall left his homestead along Jacoby Creek south of the Delaware Water Gap to cut logs. While they were away, 16 Indians raided the cabin, which was near the present-day Portland. His children escaped. However, Buck said, “Eldest daughter Catharine, aged about 14, was shot at in running. The ball entered her right shoulder and came out below her left breast, but she


CAR & TRUCK REPAIRS PA STATE INSPECTION LICENSE PLATES TITLE TRANSFERS ACE TRUCKING & REPAIRS, INC. 316 CLAY AVENUE STROUDSBURG, PA

(570) 421-2704

Air Tours

of the Poconos

Charter Flights Flight Training Other Air Services

Gift Certificates Available

Pocono Mountains Airport - 188 Airport Drive, Tobyhanna, PA

1-800-321-5890

MoyerAviation.com

ran on and hid herself in a stream of water by which she staunched the flow of blood and eluded their search.” The warriors captured Marshall’s wife Elizabeth, but killed and scalped her when she was unable “to travel fast enough” to keep up with the war party as it fled the scene. A few months later Indians hit the cabin again. Marshall still wasn’t at home, but “his eldest son Peter Marshall was killed,” Buck said. Buck said that Marshalls Creek likely takes its name from the walker’s brother, John Marshall, “who we know by (tax) records was still living there in 1774, having two children under 21 years of age residing with him and taxable for two head of cattle.” The historian said that he explored the possibility that Marshalls Creek was named for Edward Marshall, but “we will here state that we cannot find that he had any residence in that vicinity.” 

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 19


Photo courtesy of Pixabay

“While you can’t change the driving conditions, you can help ensure your vehicle is prepared to navigate them safely.


FOLLOW THE ROAD TO SAFE WINTER DRIVING Courtesy of ARA

F

rom lower air temperatures and falling snow to icy roads and even reduced visibility due to fewer daylight hours, winter driving poses a number of challenges. While you can't change the driving conditions, you can help ensure your vehicle is prepared to navigate them safely. Consider the following tips for getting your car in shape before colder temperatures hit:

overdrive the beams of your headlights. Drive at a speed that keeps you within your field of vision.

INVEST IN PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE. Consult your owner's manual for recommended preventive maintenance according to the odometer reading you're approaching. If an oil change is called for, make sure you receive oil with the correct viscosity for your vehicle at this time of year. Oil tends to thicken as it gets colder, and oil that's too thick won't do its job properly.

MAXIMIZE YOUR VISIBILITY. Replace worn wiper blades generally, they should be replaced every six months - and ensure that your heater and defroster are working properly to aid in window clearing. Before you start driving, always remove all snow and ice from the hood, roof and trunk surfaces of your vehicle, not just the windshield, and defrost all windows.

your belts and hoses and test the battery. Battery cables should be properly connected and free of corrosion or harsh wear and tear. If they're not, fix them now.

CHECK YOUR TIRE PRESSURE. Recommended tire

CONSIDER PUTTING ON SNOW TIRES. If you live in an

pressures for your car can usually be found on the inside of your driver's-side door frame. Properly inflated tires will help ensure you have the best traction possible on wet or icy roads. Have a professional check the tire pressure often, as tires lose approximately one pound per square inch of pressure for every 10 degrees Fahrenheit of temperature drop.

PREVENT FLUID FREEZING. A variety of fluids are needed

to keep your car running efficiently, and require different techniques to prevent them from freezing. Fill your windshield washer reservoir with a winter-rated washing solution. Keep your gas tank as full as possible. Have a shop check for your manufacturer's recommended mix of antifreeze (coolant) and water inside your radiator.

LIGHT THE WAY. Make sure your headlights, taillights and turn

signals are all in working order. Clear them of snow each time you drive. If driving in fog, heavy rain or snow, be sure to not

EXAMINE UNDER THE HOOD. Have a shop take a look at

area that's prone to heavy snow, particularly if you have hills to navigate, snow tires will give you extra traction and help you avoid sliding or getting stuck.

PACK AN EMERGENCY KIT IN YOUR CAR. Even the wellmaintained car can get stranded in deep snow or inclement weather. Some things you might want to keep in the car: blankets, first aid kit, windshield scraper, jumper cables, safety goggles, small shovel, bag of sand or cat litter or even tire chains for traction, tool kit, waterproof matches, highway flares, brightly colored cloth or "help" sign, bottled water and energy bars. PLAN EXTRA DRIVING TIME. Whether it's rainy, snowy or

icy, your car is at risk of hydroplaning, slipping or sliding if you drive too fast. Allot extra time to get to your destinations during winter months so you don't have to rush. ď Ž FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINEŠ 21


22 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020


FEATURED ARTIST

MARIE LIU

M

arie Liu didn't expect to become so enthralled with the Poconos when she moved to Milford from New York State in 2009, but her work since then has been entirely focused on elements of the region that she seeks to reveal through her oil paintings. The Delaware River, pristine creeks, woods scenes and waterfalls, that are so abundant here, have provided her with endless inspiration and are the perfect place for a landscape artist.  Being grateful, her paintings serve as a tribute to those agencies and organizations that work to protect these areas for our benefit. She was honored to be the Resident Artist of the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area for one year, from 2015 - 16.  Focusing her creative energies on exploring and interpreting the Park through all four seasons, researching the history, and engaging with visitors was a highpoint of her professional life; culminating in exhibits at Kittatinny and Dingmans visitors centers. She not only portrayed the beauty of the Park, but was also cognizant of it's unique history, strove to portray that in her paintings. Her work can be seen at the ARTery Gallery in Milford, a cooperative that is owned and operated by artists.  She will also be exhibiting at the new Gallery at Brodhead Creek Heritage Center in East Stroudsburg from July - September 2020.  Visit her website at https:// mliuart.com.  and view videos about her experience as Resident Artist and her affinity for Pinchot and Grey Towers on her You Tube channel: Marie Liu Art. 

DELAWARE WATER GAP HISTORY

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 23


RED TAILS ABOVE THE DELAWARE

24 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020


WALPACK VALLEY

LIVING SYMPHONY FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 25


HACKER FALLS MOON DANCE

26 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

FACTORY FALLS


DINGMANS FALLS GLOWING IN SPRING

PENN’S WOODS

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 27


RACHEL LOUISE CARSON was an American marine biologist, author, and conservationist whose book Silent Spring and other writings are credited with advancing the global environmental movement. Wikipedia

GIFFORD PINCHOT was an American forester and politician. He served as the 4th Chief of the U.S. Division of Forestry, as the 1st head of the United States Forest Service, and as the 28th Governor of Pennsylvania. Wikipedia

28 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020


THEODORE ROOSEVELT, JR. was an American statesman, politician, conservationist, naturalist, and writer who served as the 26th president of the United States from 1901 to 1909. He served as the 25th vice president from March to September 1901 and as the 33rd governor of New York from 1899 to 1900. He dramatically expanded the system of national parks and national forests. Wikipedia

JOHN MUIR also known as “John of the Mountains” and “Father of the National Parks”, was an influential Scottish-American naturalist, author, environmental philosopher, glaciologist, and early advocate for the preservation of wilderness in the United States of America. Wikipedia

POCONO RUSHMORE OF CONSERVATION

Marie Liu

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 29


CYCLE

30 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

SARAH’S GARDEN

SHOHOLA FALLS


GONE FISHIN

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 31


DINGMAN’S FALLS

32 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020


CHILD’S PARK, FULMER FALLS

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 33


INDIAN LADDERS

34 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

RAYMONDSKILL FALLS


FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 35


Photos courtesy of Pixabay

“In areas of Pennsylvania near us, the storm dumped 60 inches of snow, the greatest amount of snow attributed to one storm in PA’s history”

36 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020


THE BLIZZARD OF 1958 By: Suzie Fretz McCool

L

ast year’s Winter of 2019 in the Pocono Mountains, especially in March 2019, led my sister (Linda Fretz Musselman) to remark to me, “You know, our worst storms were always in March.” Then we both recalled the Blizzard of 1958, when we were young and lived in Paradise Township on Carlton Road. That storm is something we would never forget! The snowfall of the Blizzard of 1958 spanned March 18 through March 23, 1958. It blanketed the Mid-Atlantic States. In areas of Pennsylvania near us, the storm dumped 60 inches of snow, the greatest amount of snow attributed to one storm in PA’s history. Gouldsboro and Tobyhanna to the north of us measured five feet of snow, which may be counting the depth of the snow drifts. Stroudsburg to our south recorded 35 inches. We, in Paradise Township measured four feet of snow, according to my parents, John and Viola Fretz. We became snowbound. Thank goodness my parents prepared as best they could, grocery shopping in advance, never realizing how intense, brutal and historic this storm would be. We stacked firewood by the fireplace and as much as we could fit on our front porch. We knew we had to keep the fire going in case we lost power. However, I don’t remember us losing power. I know we did during the Flood of 1955 which was caused by the two hurricanes – Connie and Diana. I remember we cooked in our fireplace during the power outage. The 1955 storm wreaked massive destruction throughout Monroe County. That is a story for another day.

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 37


Photos courtesy of Pixabay

Getting back to the Blizzard of 1958, I have told this story to many friends over the years but have never written it down until now. Here it goes. As I recall, from my little kid perspective, the storm did not seem to want to quit. My sisters and I kept looking out the windows to see how high the snow was getting, because Linda, Paulette, and I loved snow. We weren’t afraid, at first. We envisioned getting out the next morning to make snow people, snow horses, and forts. Of course we would make snow angels and go sledding and have snow ball fights with the other neighborhood kids. Carlton Road was a great neighborhood to grow up in. There were at least 15 kids around to play with, including Larry and Jimmy Joe Hardy, if they were visiting their grandmother Sarah Carlton, who owned the house across the street from us. 38 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

At that point, we didn’t realize that we would become snowbound. As the storm progressed, we heard sirens and so forth and knew that our civil defense members who lived down the street were being called out. Then we knew that this was a serious storm! What actually happened, as the storm relentlessly progressed, is that people who were enroute to places in Paradise Township or Mount Pocono could not reach their destinations. There were people stranded at the bottom of the hill below our house near the Merry Hill Road. Several people abandoned their cars there and trudged through very deep snow seeking shelter. Ours was the first house with a light in the window they would have seen. There was a knock on the door. My parents, John and Viola Fretz, greeted four weary, very cold and bedraggled travelers. They were not connected to each other. One was a chef headed


William H. Clark Funeral Home, Inc. to Mt. Airy Lodge. Another was a priest, possibly headed to Villa of our Lady on Woodland Road or St. Mary’s in Mount Pocono. The last two were a young couple headed to Pocono Gardens Lodge for their honeymoon! My parents made them as comfortable as possible.

“We envisioned getting out the next morning to make snow people, snow horses, and forts. Of course we would make snow angels and go sledding and have snow ball fights with the other neighborhood kids.”

The Caring Professionals

1003 Main Street, Stroudsburg, PA 18360 570-421-9000 | www.wmhclarkfuneralhome.com Gary A. Raish, Supervisor

733 Main Street Stroudsburg, PA 570-730-4944 ldiemer@ptd.net

Cupcake Shop & Nostalgic Candy

Exciting “How-to” Culinary Classes

www.Kitchen-Chemistry.com

One of the men slept on the sofa, the other in an easy chair near the warm, crackling fire. We gave the honeymooners our sunroom, which served as an extra bedroom at times, or as a playroom for my sisters and me at other times. The next morning, as plows attempted to clear roads, the chef and the priest were rescued by people in trucks or fourwheel drive vehicles. However the honeymooners were not. They were stuck with us. No one from Pocono Gardens was able to come for them apparently, and the resort was only two miles away! Our car was buried in our driveway and their car was buried under a snowdrift somewhere down the hill by the Merry Hill Road.

Shawnee General Store Since 1859

In the heart of Shawnee on the Delaware! (570) 421-0956 542 River Road, Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA

So, for the better part of a week, until the storm let up, this young couple stayed with us and spent the beginning of their honeymoon in the heart of a family who had three little girls staring at them. We all had meals together. My parents, who had been in the hotel business most of their lives, cooked many wonderful meals which everyone enjoyed together. They would watch TV with us after dinner and then retire to the sunroom. I even remember breaking out a box of Girl Scout cookies I was supposed to be selling – thin mints. Throughout the years, I have often wondered about these four accidental visitors. Did they ever tell their friends, kids, and grandkids about the ferocious Blizzard of 1958 in the Poconos? Would anyone believe their story?  FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 39


PARADISE FISH HATCHERY OLDEST IN STATE By: Amy Leiser, Executive Director Monroe County Historical Society

O

n March 9, 1970, by an act of Legislature, the brook trout was named the official state fish of Pennsylvania. An excerpt of the document reads:

"The Brook Trout is the only trout a native of Pennsylvania waters. A choice of most epicures, it is the most beautiful and widely distributed member of the salmon family in the State and is found in the small, cold mountain streams and lakes and in the spring-fed limestone streams of the valleys. The Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) is hereby selected, designated and adopted as the official State fish of Pennsylvania. 1970, March 9, P.L. 161, No. 61, § 1."

40 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

In 1902, a Monroe County business created an industry to sell this native fish species to the public. The Paradise Brook Trout Co. was the first licensed trout hatchery in Pennsylvania. Founded by a group of businessmen from Pennsylvania and New Jersey, the hatchery is still operating today on Route 191 in Paradise Township. The founders chose the 110-acre Monroe County location because of its ideal environment for raising and farming fish — open fields and natural springs. The group worked to make a series of ponds and raceways fed by several springs with gravity providing the force for water to flow through the system


Fruit Pies, Burgers, Pot Pies, Sandwiches, Pastries, Gifts, Jams & Jellies

www.VillageFarmer.com

“ The Paradise Brook Trout Co. was the first licensed trout hatchery in Pennsylvania. Founded by a group of businessmen from Pennsylvania and New Jersey, the hatchery is still operating today on Route 191 in Paradise Township.”

Photos courtesy of Pixabay

Photos courtesy of the Monroe County Historical Society

1/2 mile off of Rt. 80 exit 310 GPS Broad St. Delaware Water Gap 570-476-9440

m -8p am y!! 8 n da Ope ever ting! Sea ide s ek Cre Hot Dog & Slice of Apple Pie always $2.95! Over 30 Flavors of pies baked fresh daily No High Fructose Corn Syrup!!!

P&S GARAGE Servicing the Poconos since 1975

Scott Dreisbach owner

570-223-8874

9080 Franklin Hill Road East Stroudsburg, Pa www.psgaragepa.com

Strunk C. Tree Service 570 - 350 - 3966

24/7 Emergency Service - Fully Insured Tree Removal - Tree Trimming - Stump Grinding Cabling - Bucket Truck Service - Landscaping FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 41


Photos courtesy of Pixabay

and, ultimately, into Paradise Stream. The first brood stock of brook trout for the hatchery came from this stream, a branch of Brodhead Creek that flows through the property. The fish continue to be raised in as natural a setting as possible. In 1922, the investors in the hatchery hired George Stack Sr. as foreman to oversee the business. Over the years, Stack slowly purchased stock in the company, and by 1967, George Stack Jr. bought the company. Today, Stack’s daughter, Beth Martin, manages the hatchery. The hatchery raised brook trout exclusively until the 1940s, when rainbow and brown trout were added to their own system of ponds. Eggs from the hatchery were shipped to nearly every state in the United States and to foreign markets in Europe, Africa and Asia.

42 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINEŠ FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

While one may not think of a hatchery as a farm, it is. The ideal age for a female trout to produce eggs is three years. A mature, 3-pound female will lay about 3,000 eggs which take 30 to 45 days to hatch, depending on water temperature. The youngest fish are kept in ponds high on the property, where the spring-fed water ranges in temperature from 47 to 50 degrees F. Within a year or so, the fish grow to 10 to 12 inches in length. During this time, and for the next five or so years of life, the fish are separated by size into a succession of downstream ponds. This system allows clients of the hatchery to purchase specific numbers of fish based on both species and size. During early operations, fish from the hatchery traveled by horse and buggy in milk cans to the train station where the product would be shipped to market. Originally, the largest


Pocono Slate Belt Shooting Association

Photos courtesy of the Monroe County Historical Society

A trapshooting club located in Bangor, Pennsylvania

Open to the public. Practice on Tuesdays. 9am till 2pm 4pm to 8pm (after April 1st)

Kitchen 7am - 3pm Trap shooting 9am - 3pm

610.588.7888

psbsa.com

744 Lake Minsi Dr., Bangor, PA 18013

“ Originally, the largest part of the business was supplying trout to New York City restaurants and vendors, including the Fulton Fish Market.

www.saylorsburglumberpa.com

part of the business was supplying trout to New York City restaurants and vendors, including the Fulton Fish Market. Today, the main business is selling trout to local fishing clubs for stocking waterways. An early advertisement brochure from Paradise Brook Trout Co. states, “A good Trout Stream without any Trout Is like a play of Hamlet with Hamlet left out.” This historic Monroe County business celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2002. The Paradise Brook Trout Co. was run by the Stack family for more than 75 years until it was sold in 2009. While some modernization has occurred over the years, a majority of the work at the hatchery is still done the “old-fashioned” way.  Paradise Brook Trout Co. is open to the public. For information on the hatchery, call 570-629-0422. FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 43


Photo Courtesy of Friends of Delaware State Forest and Promised Land State Park

HIKES & OUTDOOR ADVENTURES WITH POCONO LIVING By Amanda Kuhn Photos courtesy of the Hickory Run State Park Facebook page

PROMISED LAND STATE PARK

W

hether you’re planning for spring or brave enough to face the frozen temps, Promised Land State Park is primed for exploration all year long. Located in Pike County, approximately 10 miles north of Canadensis, Promised Land is aptly named for it’s abundance of wildlife, dense forest and remarkable scenery. Spanning almost 3,000 acre, the park is surrounded by 12,464 acres of Pennsylvania’s Delaware State Forest. As you meander along Route 390 on your drive to Promised Land, you’ll quickly note the beech, oak, maple and hemlock trees closing in around you. Two lakes and several streams are also tucked into these rich woodlands, adding more beauty to your exploration and activities to experience during your visit. It’s hard to imagine that by 1903, the area now known as Promised Land State Park was almost completely treeless after being repeatedly clear-cut by early settlers who erected sawmills to process the large stand of conifer and hardwood trees. The loss of trees resulted in the loss of wildlife as well. In 1902 - 1904 the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania purchased the land and in 1905 the land became the

44 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

fourth official PA state park. From there, the commonwealth planted over 370,000 trees. In 1933, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), created by President Roosevelt to relieve unemployment during the Great Depression, transformed the area in and around the park and established many landmarks that still exist today. Every August the legacy of the CCC is celebrated at the park. Hiking throughout the park remains one of the most popular activities regardless of the season. There are roughly 50 miles of trails including Bruce Lake Trail which leads to a natural glacial lake, and Little Falls Trail. The trails lead through areas of historic and scenic interest. Certain trails can also be used for biking, horseback riding, even snowmobiling in the winter months. Swimming, boating, picnicking, fishing, and geocaching are just a few more activities you can enjoy at the park. During the months of April through October, interpretive and recreational programs are offered on Friday and Saturdays and from June through early September weekly nature arts and crafts are available for children of all ages courtesy of the conservation


191

6

1600

1700

WAYNE

Blooming Grove

390

507

N

17 50 16

Mountain

50

55

Eg y

Meadow

pt

l Trai

Road

1600

Canadensis

Trail

Old

61

Swam p

Pass

Shoe

00

Bruce Lake

59

La ke

17

West

1600

00

ad o w

80

17

62

1750

Trail

00

1750

Stroudsburg

MONROE

Br.

l Trai

Bru

50

16

84

1750

pt Me

18

Gre

N.J.

Big Pocono

CARBON

n tow en

209

Egypt Meadow Lake

Eg y

Pa ther

611

Road

Mt. Pocono

1750

60

56

402 447

940 80

1550

Porters Lake

191

1650

390

447

380

Tobyhanna & Gouldsboro Tobyhanna

1700

To I-380 Exit 4 25 miles

ce

57

1700

il

s

Cros

ce 17

50

63

50

Tr.

in

Tra

Trail

ns

Cut

1800

Trail

ha

00 18

Trai l 50

il

100

36

16

50

1800

Kle

1750

17

2

47

101

1700

52

51

17

Wallow

PRIVATE LAND

Cut

wn Bro

Bear

Old

La ke

Bru ce

Balsam Swamp

Tra

To Greentown, 4 miles

58

l Trai

1700

Bru

1650

Trail

ns ha K l e in

Greentown

Tra

il

Snow

Road

Lake

1650

To US 6, 17.9 miles

84 EXIT 26 390

PROMISED LAND

LACKAWANNA

1650

N 84

PIKE

Roemersville Rd.

Greentown

Shiny

6

Paupack 84

1700

Cro

38

ss

1850

ke

La 1850

e Bruc

00 18

n

Ru

Wallow

Rd .

Trai l

1900

Lake

00 18

Trail

Rid ge

Inlet

Little

Multi-use Trail: Hiking, Snowmobiling

t

Whittaker

6

ld

Tra

ke

13

Road

Power

Auditorium

7

Road

88

Pickerel

89

Point

Sh

Deerfield

ore

87

Run

da

ry

84

1850

Parking Paved

Private Land

Snow

50

1800

86

Inlet

Trai l

DELAWARE

390

STATE

FOREST

1650 1700

41.29944 , -75.21406 41.34137, -75.20773 41.31816 , -75.20682

CONTOURS ARE ON 50 FT. INTERVALS

0

170

1600

50

17

South To Canadensis, 7.5 Mi.

1/4

0 0

1/2 KILOMETER 1/4 MILE

41.30654 , -75.20472 41.30185 , -75.19357 8. Little Falls Trailhead

4. Boat Rental 1/4

IN AN EMERGENCY DIAL 911

41.31854 , -75.21382 6. Conservation Island 7. Masker Museum

3. Day Use Area

Compass Course

Bicyling

5. Bear Wallow Cabins

1. Park Office 2. Bruce Lake Parking Area

1800

PA Natural Area

Gate

GPS Coordinates Decimal Degree Lat. Long.

0

185

50

18

State Forest Hunting

Parking Unpaved

83

t 17

Snow

rle y

State Park Late Season Archery

Swimming Beach

Promised Land Lake

1850

Bu

State Park Archery Only

Playground

3

Trail

State Park Hunting

Picnic Pavilion

Lake Laura

CCC

Inle

85

State Park No Hunting

Picnic Area

82

Shanty

Trai l

ad

un

rley

Shanty

Ro

Bo

Falls

Bu

50

Sanitary Dump Station

Showerhouse/Restrooms

94

50

50

17

Camping Cottages

Restrooms

180

DAY USE AREA ENLARGEMENT

17

Demo Deer Exclosure

Rustic Cabins

Water

Lake

1800

Refreshment Stand

Lake

79

113

North

Fishing Pier Camping

1750

0

Bruc e

81

Conservation Is.

1800

91

Boat Launch

Amphitheater and Park Museum

111 112

18

1

Shoreline Mooring

Public Phone

il

97

92

Boat Rental

Blue Symbols Mean ADA Accessible

il

Tower

Trail

00

18

PROMISED LAND STATE PARK Park Office/ Camping Registration

Tra

Trail

Eagle

Boundary

Ba

Tra il

1800

115

La

00

16

Trail

78

80

1750

17

18

k

Oa

1800

Red

Tr.

Pickerel Point

1750

Oak

Inlet

Big

Ridgefield Point

Ave.

r we Lo

Tr.

Tr.

18

1750

Wayside

Trail Intersection Number

Big

Inle

Promised

Land

Trail

17

Saw

nner Ru

Tr.

Red

104

Skyview

1750

50

-

ge

o

Sn

VILLAGE OF PROMISED LAND

19

10

PROMISED LAND STATE PARK 100 Lower Lake Road, Greentown, PA 18426-9735 570.676.3428 • dcnr.pa.gov

180

Cross-country Skiing Recommended

8

50

96

12

Brook

Horseback0 Riding

00

18

17

99

ill

With so much to do at Promised Land State Park you just might decide to camp there instead. Offering seven camping areas that vary from rustic to full hookup, camping at Promised Land is very popular during the warmer months so be sure to call ahead. For more information on Promised Land State Park and all the extensive information and opportunities you can find there, visit the DCNR website. 

Mountain Biking

Pa rk

21

M

The Masker Museum, open early May through mid-October, includes a natural history section featuring mounted animals (including a large black bear), interactive displays of natural features found in the area, children’s books, field guides, and a bird observation area. The Civilian Conservation Corps section of the museum features interactive stories, displays, and artifacts that tell the story of the CCC in Promised Land. It is the largest state park museum in Pennsylvania.

Hiking Trail

ad

1750

108

98

DELAWARE STATE FOREST

103

volunteers. Families can also join in a family fishing program designed to develop fishing skills.

t

107

Tr. 102

00

0

Run

Self-guiding Trail

Nes

Ro

23

Mill 00

TRAIL INFORMATION

s

93

Tr.

K L E I N H A N S

Trail Name

Shore

North

8

109

il

180

Crane

1750

Little Falls

17

Whitta ker

Lower

24

endron dod

Spike

Lake

R ho

Tr.

3

76

74

0

185

Trail 73

4

75

66

76

1800

SEE DAY USE AREA ENLARGEMENT

5

Tra

ok

er ck Su

Wildlife Observation Station

Villa

26

Bro

94

Lower

17

il

1800

27

66

1750

ck

a up pa

50

17

Lower Lake

Oak

67

Pines

42

Tr.

Telephone

Direction of Travel to Next Point

Bru ce

Tr. Bo

72

Bear Wallow

33

BEECHWOOD AREA

106

9

Tra

La ure l 69 70

ry Bounda

RHODODENDRON AREA

NORTHWOOD AREA 28

w llo Wa ar

en

00

41

Be

0

50

all W

16

ek

17

25

Rock

18 00

Mt.

un

00

50

18

Emergency Route Black Arrow on Yellow Background

Tr.

il Tra

ry da

Trail Lake

Hill

18

43

Tree

er w To

170

nc h

EQUESTRIAN 34 CAMPING AREA

1750

50

Bra

16

Cre

TRAIL SIGNING SYSTEM

Intersection Number

1850

H emlo ck

40

75

1800

Recreational Activities Permitted on this Trail

1800

Trail

Trail

Ridge

50

Dam

18

00 17

E.

Trail

l Trai Big

30

0

BRUCE LAKE NATURAL AREA

68

46

l Trai

31

64

45

35

ow

Dog

k

Oa

Rock

175

39

FOREST

all W

Birches

S

STATE

g on

ar

DELAWARE

Be

White

Photos courtesy of PMVB

32

Over look Trai l

65

VILLAGE OF PROMISED LAND

44

il

50

17

Tra

Ridge

r

Bea

41.31662 , -75.20931

41.31430 , -75.23504

All State Park and State Forest Trails are open to hiking.

Rev. 7/13/17

TOP ACTIVITIES AT PROMISED LAND STATE PARK 1. Take a hike on Little Falls Trail 2. View the eagles’ nest from the Wildlife Observation Station. 3. Visit the Masker Museum 4. Paddle your kayak on Promised Land Lake. 5. Explore the Delaware State Forest. 6. When it’s hot, cool off at the beach! *Top activities provided by the PA Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 45


Photo courtesy of Family Features

PET HEALTH TIPS FOR AN ON-THE-GO LIFESTYLE Courtesy of Family Features

P

eople who lead busy lives often seek convenient and healthy choices when it comes to taking care of their own wellbeing. For pet parents, a little creativity can make it easy to deliver the same level of care for their beloved pets, even when the pace of life accelerates. Pet obesity is at an all-time high and pet owners need easy and accessible ways to keep their furry friends healthy, whether they're on the go with their pets or inside on a busy day trying to keep up with dogs' and cats' regular routines. These tips from the experts at Petcurean can help you maximize your schedule for better pet care:

MULTI-TASK WITH YOUR FOUR-LEGGED FRIEND IN TOW. If you

live in a walkable city, take your pet with you while running errands. Pets are welcome at an increasing number of locations, so plan your jaunt accordingly. If your community is more suitable for driving, you can still consider inviting your dog or "adventure cat" to tag along; the fresh air, change of scenery and companionship can do you both some good.

MAKE TIME FOR TIME. Your attention is among your pet's chief

needs, so find ways to ensure those cravings for affection and attention get met. It may mean allowing your pup to rest next to you while you tap away on a keyboard or letting your cat perch 46 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

on the counter while you apply your morning makeup. The key is making sure you work some quality time together into every day.

FIND SIMPLE FEEDING OPTIONS. For humans, a busy day may

mean a meal gets pushed back or even missed altogether, but you can curb hunger with a quick snack. Pets thrive on routines and schedules and rely on their owners to take care of meal planning, so finding ways to keep their meals on track is extra important. For more convenient feeding, look for a re-closeable

“For pet parents, a little creativity can make it easy to deliver the same level of care for their beloved pets, even when the pace of life accelerates.” option like Petcurean's Now Fresh and Go! Solutions wet food recipes, which are available in sustainable, recyclable, BPA-free Tetra Pak cartons with easy-open tear strips. Being 40% more compact than cans, they also take up less space at home or onthe-go. Cooked directly in the package using premium-quality ingredients, the recipes are created with optimal pet nutrition in


mind and feature four innovative distinct textures - shredded, minced, stewed and pate - to suit the unique taste preferences of your dog or cat. The food, which can be served as a treat, topper or complete and balanced meal on its own, also better enables combination wet and dry feeding to suit a variety of pet nutrition preferences that can vary by age, breed size and other factors.

A trained dog is a happy dog.

PARTNER WITH ANOTHER PET LOVER. You probably won't

have to look hard to find a friend or neighbor who shares your struggles making time to get your pup the exercise and attention he or she craves. Enlist a dog or cat exercise buddy so you can make arrangements to take turns walking and playing with each other's pets along with your own.

GET CREATIVE TO INSPIRE MORE ACTIVITY. Indoor cats can be difficult to exercise and provide enough stimulation. However, easy entertainment isn't hard to find. Next time you're at the grocery store, grab a bunch of empty boxes and make your own playground. Place some boxes upright and some on their sides, and toss some catnip and favorite toys in the boxes so your cat can exercise and stay entertained jumping in and out for hours. Explore more ideas for making pet care work with your lifestyle at Petcurean.com/newsletter-signup.  Source: Petcurean

Dog Training & Obedience in Stroudsburg

www.SitStayNPlay.net

570.872.9748 1501 North 5th Street • Stroudsburg, PA 18360

Creekside

PET CREMATORY

Compassionate Care That Lasts Forever Located at Stroudsburg Cemetery on Dreher Avenue 570-420-9599www.CreeksidePet.net / 570-421-4501 www.CreeksidePet.net FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 47


SKIING AND RIDING IN THE POCONOS Courtesy Pocono Mountains Visitors Bureau 800POCONOS.COM

BIG BOULDER

8 LIFTS ~ 15 TRAILS ~ VERTICLE 475’ Winter fun for everyone offering 15 slopes, 7 terrain parks, 100% snowmaking and great grooming! Snowsport Learning Center for Kids! Night skiing and riding. Snow tubing with 12 chutes, 5 lifts including a conveyor lift. P. O. Box 1539, Blakeslee, PA 18610 570-443-8425 (Snow Report and Phone Number) Web Site: jfbb.com ~ Email: info@jfbb.com

BLUE MOUNTAIN SKI AREA 12 LIFTS ~ 37 TRAILS ~ VERTICLE 1082’

Ski or Ride PA’s highest vertical with 37 trails (3 new for this year including Glade skiing and a children’s learning trail)! Blue has the regions only BigAirBag (a huge air-filled pad cushions the landing for aerial maneuvers) and six and four passenger high speed lifts. Five awesome terrain parks for all abilities. 21 tubing slides. Groups welcome. 1660 Blue Mountain Dr., Palmerton, PA 18071 610-825-7700 48 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

Web Site: skibluemt.com ~ Email: information@skibluemt.com


THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE

THE MOUNTAINS FOR THE HOLIDAYS.

Photo courtesy of Pixabay

Celebrate the holidays surrounded by great company and even better cuisine in the Pocono Mountains. From romantic dinners by candlelight to farm-to-table experiences, our local chefs are serving up something for every palate. Visit PoconoMountains.com to see all of our mouth-watering dining options and make your reservation.

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 49


Photos courtesy of Pixabay

CAMELBACK MOUNTAIN RESORT 15 LIFTS ~ 34 TRAILS ~ VERTICLE 800’

Two high speed quads, only halfpipe in area; 100% snowmaking. 100% Night Skiing; two terrain parks. Groups welcome. Snow tubing with single and double tubes. One Camelback Road, Tannersville, PA 18372 570-629-1661 Web Site: skicamelback.com ~ Email: sales@camelback.com

50 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020


The

AGENCY

JACK FROST

10 LIFTS ~ 30 TRAILS ~ VERTICLE 600’ Winter fun for everyone offering 30 slopes, 1 terrain park, 100% snowmaking, and great grooming! Snowsport Learning Center for Kids! One park terrain park and glade skiing and riding. Snow tubing with 5 chutes and 2 lifts.

Because the world keeps turning Insurance since 1942

Serving the Poconos for over 70 years CHOOSE DREHER BECAUSE WE CARE! BUSINESS & PERSONAL INSURANCE Theodore G. Butz, CPCU

551 Main Street, Stroudsburg, PA 18360 570-421-6141

www.dreherinsurance.com

P O Box 1539, Blakeslee, PA 18610 570-443-8425 (Snow Report and Phone Number) Web Site: jfbb.com ~ Email: info@jfbb.com

GARY’S

MEAT MARKET

SHAWNEE MOUNTAIN

11 LIFTS ~ 18 TRAILS ~ VERTICLE 700’ Family and Beginner Friendly. Shawnee is also the closet ski area to Metro NYC and New Jersey. With 23 trails, New High Speed Quad, Terrain Parks and Snow Tubing, Premier Learning Center and 100% Snowmaking. Shawnee is Winter Fun. Minutes Away.

Good, Old Fashioned Quality Meats Fresh Cut Daily

Famous for Our Homemade Ring Bologna & Kielbasi. Fully Stocked Deli with Everyday Reasonable Prices!! Phone: 570-420-9764 | M-F 9am-6pm, Sat 9am-5pm 1411-B Chipperfield Dr, Stroudsburg, PA 18360

1-80, Exit 309, Shawnee On Delaware, PA 18356 Snow Report: 800-223-4218 Phone: 570-421-7231 Web Site: shawneemt.com ~ Email: info@shawneemt.com

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 51


SHAWNEE MOUNTAIN

11 LIFTS ~ 18 TRAILS ~ VERTICLE 700’ Family and Beginner Friendly. Shawnee is also the closet ski area to Metro NYC and New Jersey. With 23 trails, New High Speed Quad, Terrain Parks and Snow Tubing, Premier Learning Center and 100% Snowmaking. Shawnee is Winter Fun. Minutes Away.

Rudy’s

1-80, Exit 309, Shawnee On Delaware, PA 18356 Snow Report: 800-223-4218 Phone: 570-421-7231

90 Washington Street, East Stroudsburg, PA 18301 570-424-1131

Serving fine food & spirits in an elegant setting

owtree Inn Will

(570) 476-0211 • www.thewillowtreeinn.net 601 Ann Street, Stroudsburg, PA

52 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

Photos courtesy of Pixabay

Your Neighborhood Tavern Established in 1933

Web Site: shawneemt.com ~ Email: info@shawneemt.com


Stroud Television & Appliances 219 N. 9th Street Stroudsburg, PA

570-421-7700 www.StroudTVandAppliances.com

PoconoFourWheelDrive.com

SKI BIG BEAR

6 LIFTS ~ 18 TRAILS ~ VERTICLE 650’ Make memories at Ski big Bear at Masthope Mountain. Offering skiing, snowboarding and tubing. On-site rental shop and lessons available. Eighteen trails, six lifts, terrain park and 100% snowmaking makes sure there is something for the whole family to enjoy. HC 1 – 1A353, 192 Karl Hope Blvd., Lackawaxen, PA 18435 570-685-1400 (Snow Report and Phone Number) Web Site: ski-bigbear.com Email: bigbear@Ltis.net

Ken’s Auto Service Center Quality Repair

With a Price That’s Fair Rte. 447 & Brushy Mt. Rd., East Stroudsburg, PA 18301

570-424-2258 www.kensautoservicecenter.net Oil Change State Inspections Tune Ups

Maintenance Brakes Tires

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 53


Theatre Year Round in the Poconos

SHAWNEE ON THE DELAWARE, PA

You May Also Enjoy

Pocono Family Magazine

• Death of a Salesman Feb 14, 2020 - Feb 23, 2020 Rebel Stages presents... Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman, is about the death of the American dream after post-World War II optimism. An American classic that resonates with today’s audiences.

• Headshot Workshop with Kenneth Card March 7, 2020 Every Actor needs a headshot! Get three different “shots” by the famous Kenneth Card for only $75! • You must provide your own stylists. • Time slots will be assigned throughout the day. • Register now!

(570) 421-5093 www.theshawneeplayhouse.com

Available at Local Businesses & by Subscription Pocono Magazines, LLC 1929 North Fifth Street, Stroudsburg, PA 18360 570-424-1000 • pmags@ptd.net

Next Issue of

Pocono Living Magazine

Pocono Mountain Public Library Tobyhanna, PA 570-894-8860 www.poconomountpl.org

Clymer Library Pocono Pines, PA 570-646-0826 www.clymerlibrary.org

Western Pocono Community Library Brodheadsville, PA 570-992-7934 www.wpcl.lib.pa.us

Eastern Monroe Public Library Branches Hughes Library (main branch) Stroudsburg, PA 570-421-0800 www.monroepl.org Pocono Township Branch Tannersville, PA 570-629-5858 Smithfield Branch Marshalls Creek, PA 570-223-1881 Bookmobile 570-421-0880 x49

54 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

Photo courtesy of Pixabay

Barrett Paradise Friendly Library Cresco, PA 570-595-7171 www.barrettlibrary.org


FOREVER IN OUR HEARTS

ELISA CHASE It takes a little darkness for us to stop and cherish the beautiful world we live in and the people that surround us each and every day. Elisa was a rare treasure, and had a gift for giving, not just to her family, but she gave her heart to the entire community. Her kind deeds changed lives, a natural born giver. She listened with her heart, and always made you feel special and never alone. She encouraged and supported, she listened and cared, she moved in a direction of better times to come. No matter what was going on in her world, Elisa found the time to help, even if it was just for a few moments. It’s amazing how love and support can transform your life forever. A person such as Elisa brightens the world every day for the rest of us. A person that made you feel special and important. A person that loved life, loved people, loved friendship, loved laughing and loved “FOOD”. She was a wife, a daughter, a friend, a teacher, a co-worker. a shining spirit in our community!

She was “Elisa Fabulous”.

pocono967.com FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 55


M OT H E R H O O D P A RT N E RS M OT HLVPG E RObstetrics HOOD A RT N E RS and P Gynecology and P Gynecology M OT HLVPG E RObstetrics HOOD A RT N E RS LVPG Obstetrics and Gynecology

“ “ “

My midwives at LVPG Obstetrics and Gynecology were so gentle. They truly valued my wish to My midwives at LVPG Obstetrics and Gynecology have a more natural birth. From my delivery were so gentle. They truly valued my wish to experience to at myLVPG postpartum care, I knew I found My midwives Obstetrics and Gynecology have a more natural birth. From my delivery the rightwere partnergentle. in Lehigh Valley Health Network. They trulycare, valued my wish to experienceso to my postpartum I knew I found a more natural birth.Health From myN’delivery the right have partner in Lehigh Valley Network. TRUMA S MOM experience to my postpartum care, I knew I found TRUMA N’ S MOM the right partner in Lehigh Valley Health Network.

” ” When you choose LVPG OB-GYN, you’ll ” have access to specialized high-risk TRUMA N’ S MOM

pregnancy and the highest in Monroe County. When you choosecare LVPG OB-GYN, you’lllevel haveNICU access to specialized high-risk pregnancyLVHN.org/midwife care and the highest level NICU in Monroe County. | 888-402-LVHN When you choose LVPG OB-GYN, you’ll have access to specialized high-risk LVHN.org/midwife | 888-402-LVHN pregnancy care and the highest level NICU in Monroe County. LVHN.org/midwife | 888-402-LVHN

Profile for LARRY SEBRING

February/March 2020 Pocono Living Magazine  

February/March 2020 Pocono Living Magazine