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APRIL/MAY 2020

The Pocono Mountains' Magazine

Complimentary

Pocono Living M A G A Z I N E

• The Art of Joyce Love • Peaceable Kingdom • Earth Day at 50


Pocono Magazines, LLC PUBLISHING

Pocono Living Magazine© & Pocono Family Magazine© 1929 North 5th Street Stroudsburg, PA 18360 570-424-1000 pmags@ptd.net www.poconomagazines.com PUBLISHER/EDITOR Larry R. Sebring larry@poconomagazines.com ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVES Linda St. John, 570-856-8155 MAGAZINE & WEB DESIGN Smart Blonde Creative Food & Wine Editor Jamie Bowman PHOTOGRAPHY & ART Ricky Batista James Chesnick Julie Enterline John Galarza M. Harmon Marlana Holsten Barbara Hornstra Vinzon Lee Ann LeFevre Barbara Lewis Harry Loud Maritza McFaline

William McKee Veronica Murray Lisa Newberry Andrei Protsouk Lynn Pryor David Sandt Matt Siptroth Tom Stone Dave Trainer Nancy Tully Linda Weaver Linda Zak

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Roseanne Bottone Jamie Bowman Kimberly Blaker Kathy Dubin-Uhler Marty Wilson Amy Leiser Suzanne McCool Amanda Kuhn John L. Moore William M. Williams Jim Werkheiser Janet Mishkin Allison Mowatt ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Kristen Sebring Linda Spalluto

Pocono Living Magazine and Pocono Family Magazine,

PROUD MEMBERS OF

two regional publications filled with articles, features and photography exploring and capturing the real Pocono Mountains living experience.

Our publications can be found at many locations

throughout the Pocono Mountains region, and are available by subscription.

The information published in this magazine is believed to be accurate, but in some instances, may represent opinion or judgment. The publication’s providers do not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information and shall not be held liable for any loss or damage, directly or indirectly, by or from the information. © 2019 Pocono Magazines. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be copied, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the expressed written permission of the publisher.


Now, in addition to our state-of-the-art facilities in Allentown and Bethlehem, we’re proud to announce the latest addition to our family – the Women & Babies Pavilion at St. Luke’s Anderson Campus. Now open!

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NEW PATIENTS WELCOME! APRIL/MAY 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 3


“Wisdom is not a product of schooling but of the lifelong attempt to acquire it.”   ― Albert Einstein

> P hoto by Marlana Holsten

4 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© APRIL/MAY 2020


What’s Inside April/May 2020 FEATURES 8 The Story of Daniel Brodhead 14 Earth Day 16 1% for Nature 20 Winners of the 2019 Historic Preservation Awards 24 The Art of Joyce Love

38

Peaceable Kingdom

44 Two Simple Questions May Lower Your Pet’s Medications Costs Considerably 46 Hikes and Outdoor Adventures with Pocono Living: Glen Run Nature Park 50 Billy’s Tips for Controlling Crabgrass 52 In and Around the Poconos

COVER By: Marlana Holsten

APRIL/MAY 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 5


John L. Moore continues to pursue his lifelong interests in Pennsylvania’s colonial history and archaeology. The Northumberland writer has published 11 non-fiction books about Pennsylvania’s 16th and 17th century. John’s latest book, 1780: Year of Revenge, is currently available in book stores or from the online bookstore Sunbury Press Inc. This book is the 3rd volume in his Revolutionary Pennsylvania Series and tells the story of Indian raids all across the Pennsylvania Frontier - including the Poconos and Minisinks - in the year following General Sullivan’s 1779 invasion of the Iroquios homeland. Over the years John has participated in archaeological excavations of Native American sites along the Delaware and Susquehanna Rivers. A professional storyteller, he recently took part in the Heritage Festival at Frances Slocum State Park near Wilkes-Barre. He told the true story of Frances Slocum, a 5-year-old girl who lived as a Native American after being kidnapped by Indians during the American Revolution. The park was named for her.

Jamie Marra Jamie Marra is a freelance writer, Penn State graduate, and lifelong resident of the Poconos. A teacher by day and a writer by night, Jamie spends her free time running and cheering for the Nittany Lions on game day.

Amy Leiser Amy Leiser is a local resident and historian who has been working with the Monroe County Historical Association for 19 years. In addition to the live tours, research assistance, and museum that the organization keeps available, Leiser offers her knowledge and assistance with family charting and genealogy. Visit www.monroehistorical.org

Photo courtesy of Pixabay

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

John L. Moore


ENTER YO UR BEST SH OTS

Your photos could be seen by more than 26,000 readers when you enter them in Pocono Living Magazine’s Annual Photo Contest. The contest is open to amateur photographers only. (Those who do not earn a majority, over half, of their income as photographers). You may enter no more than 15 images, so choose your best shots. Categories are “Scenics”, “Wildlife”, “Florals”, and “Historical Structures”. Only photographs that are representative of the Pocono Mountains should be submitted. Individual photos should be attached to an email message and sent to: pmags@ptd.net. Photos submitted must be high resolution, (300 dpi), jpg or tiff files or they cannot be used. You must include your full name in the title with each photo submitted as you would like it to appear in the magazines. We will contact you for your mailing address to receive your prize if your photo is chosen as a winner in the contest. Winning photos, along with the names, and hometowns if available, of each winner will appear in the October/November 2020 issue of Pocono Living Magazine and the Pocono Magazines.com website. Some lucky participants may have their photo featured as a cover on Pocono Living Magazine!

PRIZES AWARDED: 1st Place: $100.00 in Gift Certificates to Local Restaurants & Shoppes 2nd Place: $75.00 in Gift Certificates to Local Restaurants & Shoppes 3rd Place: $50.00 in Gift Certificates to Local Restaurants & Shoppes Honorable Mentions: One year subscription to Pocono Living & Pocono Family Magazines. In the event of a tie, prize money will be split among the winners.

RULES OF THE CONTEST: 1. Contest open to amateur photographers only. 2. Contest opens April 1, 2020 and closes August 1, 2020. 3. Enter electronic files by email to: pmags@ptd.net. One photo at a time. 4. Submitted photos must be as an attachment to an email message, (not within the body of the email), and be high resolution (300 dpi), jpeg or tiff files. 5. Please include your contact information (phone number, mailing address & email address) with the submission. 6. Each contestant may submit no more than 15 photographs. Choose any combination of categories. 7. Photos submitted may be judged for inclusion in this year’s contest, and in all future year’s contests, so you have several chances to be a winner. 8. Entered photos must have been taken recently, from January 2012 to present and be of a scene or subject found in the Pocono Mountains only. 9. Categories are: Scenics (landscapes, rivers, lakes, waterfalls, etc.), Wildlife, Florals, and Historical Structures. 10. Judging will take place in August and September 2020 and winners will appear in the October/November issue of Pocono Living Magazine. 11. Winners will receive gift certificates within 90 days after being published. 12. Contestants will retain all rights to their photography, but agree that Pocono Magazines, LLC and Pocono Mts. Publications, LLC may use their photos from time to time in the magazines that they publish and on the Pocono Magazines.com website provided proper credit is given to each photographer. Questions? Email the editor at: pmags@ptd.net

Photo courtesy of Pixabay

Pocono Living Magazine 2020 PHOTO CONTEST


“Once known as Analomink Creek, the Brodhead Creek forms the boundary between Stroudsburg and East Stroudsburg. This photo was taken in Stroud Township’s Brodhead Creek Park, about three miles north of Stroudsburg.”

8 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© APRIL/MAY 2020


THE STORY OF DANIEL BRODHEAD By John L. Moore Photos courtesy of John L. Moore

> Col. Daniel Brodhead IV

D

aniel Brodhead IV arrived in present-day East Stroudsburg as a small child, the son of Daniel Brodhead III, who had acquired land along Analomink Creek in what became Monroe County. The boy’s father was in his early 40s when he brought his family to Pennsylvania and founded East Stroudsburg. Before then, the Brodheads had lived in New York’s Hudson River Valley in a village called Marbletown, about 90 miles northeast of East Stroudsburg. As a young man living in New York, Brodhead joined the colonial militia, “serving first as private and later as lieutenant,” John W. Jordan reported in his 1911 book, Colonial and Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania. Eventually, he “attained the rank of captain.” Before leaving for Pennsylvania, Brodhead “had been a merchant in Albany, New York, as early as 1726, and in 1730 was a licensed trader among the Indians,” Jordan said.

wrote in his 1928 classic, “Indian Villages and Place Names in Pennsylvania.” The Brodhead family prospered, as did Dansbury. In time, the Moravian Church based in Bethlehem became active in the hamlet, and the elder Brodhead converted to the Moravian faith. In 1753, the Moravians built a small church and school at Dansbury.

“Before leaving for Pennsylvania, Brodhead “had been a merchant in Albany, New York, as early as 1726, and in 1730 was a licensed trader among the Indians.”

Arriving in the Poconos in 1737, Brodhead “bought 1,000 acres of land at Stroudsburg,” Jordan said.

The Dansbury Cemetery, located along Main Street in Stroudsburg just west of Brodhead Creek, was part of the Moravians’ original Dansbury Mission.

Few Europeans lived north of the Blue Mountain when the Brodheads began clearing land for a farm and building a house and barn,.

When Brodhead III became ill during the summer of 1755, he sought medical treatment at Bethlehem. He died there in July and was buried in the Moravian cemetery.

The elder Brodhead named his new settlement Dansbury, and the stream soon had a new name. “Since 1737 it has been known as Brodhead’s Creek,” the late George P. Donehoo

Brodhead’s death occurred just as the French and Indian War was beginning. In late 1755, the fighting spread across Pennsylvania’s eastern frontier. A war party of about 200 Indians APRIL/MAY 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 9


COL. BRODHEAD’S STRIKE FORCE FIGHTS SENECA INDIANS ON THE ALLEGHENY AN EXCERPT FROM SCORCHED EARTH: GENERAL SULLIVAN AND THE SENECAS

T

he peace that Colonel Daniel Brodhead, the American commander at Fort Pitt, led an expedition up the Allegheny River in 1779 to destroy Indian towns along the upper river. On August 11, Brodhead left the fort and marched upriver “with 605 rank and file, including militia and volunteers,” and one month’s provision. Carpenters had built flat boats for the occasion, and the boats took most of the soldiers and their provisions nearly 60 miles up the Allegheny. An escort of about 100 men tended a small herd of cows brought along to provide fresh beef. The campaign took place as thousands of troops under Major General John Sullivan were preparing to march up the Susquehanna River and invade the Iroquois homeland. The soldiers encountered a large group of Seneca. In a Sept. 16 letter, the colonel told Gen. George Washington that an advance guard “consisting of 15 white men . . . and eight Delaware Indians, under the command of Lt. Hardin of the 8th Pennsylvania Regiment, discovered between 30 and 40 warriors coming down the Allegheny River in seven canoes. When the Indians spotted the soldiers, they “immediately landed, stripped off their shirts and prepared for action, and the advanced guard immediately began the attack.”

10 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© APRIL/MAY 2020

Brodhead said that he saw “six of them retreating over the river without arms.” He added, “the rest ran away leaving their canoes, blankets, shirts, provision and eight guns.” His soldiers found five dead Indians, “and by the signs of blood, several went off wounded.” Only two soldiers and one of

Brodhead’s Delaware scouts were wounded. Brodhead proceeded almost 200 miles up the Allegheny. He passed Buckaloon, an Iroquois town at the river’s confluence with Brokenstraw Creek near present-day Irvine, Pa., and went on to nearby Canawago, a Seneca town near present-day Warren, Pa. Both were deserted. From Canawago, Brodhead’s force took a forest path for about 20 miles that seemed to lead away from the river, but as the soldiers came down a hill, they saw the Allegheny and found “a number of corn fields and . . . several towns which the enemy had deserted . . . Some of them fled just before the advanced guards reached the towns and left several packs of deer skins,” Brodhead said. In one town, “we found a painted image, or war post, clothed in dog skin.” “Besides this, we found seven other towns, consisting in the whole of 130 houses, some of which were large enough for the accommodation of three or four Indian families,” the general said. The fields impressed Brodhead. “I never saw finer corn although it was planted much thicker than is common with our farmers,” he said.

The soldiers destroyed the farms. “The troops remained on the ground three whole days destroying the towns and corn fields,” Brodhead wrote, adding: “The quantity of corn and other vegetables destroyed at the several towns, from the best accounts I can collect from the officers employed to destroy it, must certainly exceed 500 acres which is the lowest estimate, and the plunder is estimated at $30,000.” Brodhead said the settlement extended for about eight miles along the Allegheny. “The great quantity of corn in new ground and the number of new houses built and building” suggested that many Seneca and Munsee Indians planned to live there, he said. “The greatest part of the Indian houses were larger than common, and built of square and round logs and frame work.” By September 14, the colonel and his soldiers were back in Pittsburgh. Editor’s note: The Munsee Indians once lived in the Minisinks region of the Delaware River Valley. The Pennsylvania colony evicted them in 1742.


raided settlements in the Poconos in early December. “All houses and families thereabouts were attacked by the Indians at daylight and burnt down by them,” survivors told colonial authorities. Also burned was the church the Moravians had built at Dansbury.

“The rifle regiment and musketry battalion were so broken up that General Washington ordered the three battalions to be considered as a regiment, under the command of Lt. Col. Brodhead, until further orders.” The Brodheads defended their farm vigorously. Two neighbors, John McMichael and Henry Dysert, said later “that they saw the barn … on fire about nine of the clock in the morning, … and that they heard shooting and crying at Broadhead's house almost the whole day.” The men said that when they last saw the farm in late afternoon, “the dwelling house … was yet unburnt, being, as they supposed, defended by the people within it.”

When the firefight ended, the Brodheads had saved the house. The next month, Pennsylvania soldiers built Fort Hamilton along Pocono Creek about a mile west of Dansbury. The fort and its garrison couldn’t save the house in a subsequent raid. In June 1757, “Indians burned Brodhead's house, which they had failed to destroy in the attack of December 10, 1755,” Pennsylvania historian William A. Hunter reported in Forts on the Pennsylvania Frontier. Two decades later, as Pennsylvania and the other rebellious colonies mobilized for war with England, the Daniel Brodhead who came to the Poconos as a child became lieutenant colonel of a battalion of riflemen in the American army. Born in September 1736, Daniel Brodhead IV was the seventh child of Hester and Daniel Brodhead III. He apparently grew up in Dansbury, had become a surveyor, and moved to Reading where he lived prior to the American Revolution. Brodhead’s battalion fought in the Battle of Long Island in August 1776. The regiment to which his battalion belonged suffered many casualties. “We had to fight them front and rear under every disadvantage,” Brodhead said later.

APRIL/MAY 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 11


> D ansbury Cemetery was part of the Dansbury settlement established along Brodhead Creek by Daniel Brodhead III. It is located along Main Street in Stroudsburg just west of the stream.

> K nown today as the Dansbury Cemetery, this graveyard was as part of the Dansbury Mission established by the Moravian Brethren in 1743.

According to the Pennsylvania Archives, “the rifle regiment and musketry battalion were so broken up that General Washington ordered the three battalions to be considered as a regiment, under the command of Lt. Col. Brodhead, until further orders.” Brodhead’s command was brief. He became ill and returned to Pennsylvania on sick leave. Brodhead returned to the Continental Army in March 1777 as colonel of another regiment, the 8th Pennsylvania, which fought at the battles of Brandywine and Germantown later that year. In 1778, after leaving Valley Forge in June, Brodhead took his men to the Susquehanna River’s West Branch to fight Indians “who were ravaging Wyoming and the West Branch valley.” After that, he led the regiment west to Pittsburgh to help in defending the western frontier. In 1779, Brodhead became commanding officer of the Continental Army’s Western Department and reported directly to General Washington. The letters they exchanged often 12 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© APRIL/MAY 2020

dealt with Brodhead’s difficulties in obtaining adequate food, clothing and military supplies for his soldiers, who were spread across a territory that included West Virginia, Ohio and western Pennsylvania. His soldiers depended heavily on supplies shipped by horsedrawn wagons over the Allegheny Mountains from Carlisle some 180 miles to the east. Writing from Fort Pitt on Aug. 21, 1780, Brodhead told Washington that lack of supplies hampered his ability to move against Indians siding with the British. “Had I provisions I should be happy to march against some of the hostile Indian towns,” Brodhead said, “but unfortunately I have not more than a day’s allowance of bread and very little beef.” Washington replied, “Your distress for provision, considering the distance you are from supplies, and the approach of winter


> T he Reverend John Heckewelder

At Fort Pitt, Brodhead depended on trusted informants to keep him posted about enemy activity. His sources included the Rev. John Heckewelder, a Moravian missionary who lived with the Delaware Indians and who spoke their language fluently.

is very alarming.” He told Brodhead to force civilians in the region to provide the army with food. “Necessity must … justify the measure of taking by impress what the inhabitants can spare,” Washington said. At Fort Pitt, Brodhead depended on trusted informants to keep him posted about enemy activity. His sources included the Rev. John Heckewelder, a Moravian missionary who lived with the Delaware Indians and who spoke their language fluently. Another was Killbuck, a Delaware chief who remained loyal to the Americans even after many Delawares sided with the British. Killbuck was at Fort Pitt in February 1781, when an influential war chief, Captain Pipe, persuaded many Ohio Delawares to abandon the alliance they had made with the Americans and to join the British. Returning to Ohio, Killbuck learned these Delawares intended to attack the Americans “immediately at the change

of this moon.” He stopped at the Moravian mission where Heckewelder lived, and Heckewelder helped him write a letter of warning to Brodhead. “The men are getting ready to go and fight you,” Killbuck said. The pro-British warriors intended “first to destroy all the Delawares that are friends to the (United) States, and then to proceed to … Fort Pitt.” In late April, Brodhead led a force of about 300 men into the Ohio country and attacked an important Delaware town called Goschocking. They met little opposition, burned the town, and destroyed a nearby village before returning to Pittsburgh. Brodhead credited Killbuck and another Delaware with assisting his expedition. “Captain Killbuck and Captain Luzerne, upon hearing of our troops being on the Muskingum, immediately pursued the warriors, killed one of their greatest villains and brought his scalp to me,” Brodhead reported.  APRIL/MAY 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 13


EARTH DAY AT 50 By Jamie Marra

I

f there’s one thing we can all agree on, it’s that here in the Pocono Mountains, we are fortunate to be surrounded by nature. But when you’re lucky enough to be immersed in this kind of beauty every day, it’s easy to take it for granted. This year, let’s take time to show a little appreciation for nature by celebrating Earth Day. Since 1970, Earth Day has been held on April 22 to encourage people to be more environmentally conscious. Prior to 1970, pollution and excessive consumption of nonrenewable resources were prevalent in the United States, and many citizens were blissfully unaware of the dangers these issues posed to the Earth and their own health. Wisconsin Senator Gaylord Nelson was determined to increase awareness of the risks being posed to the planet and decided to take action. On April 22, 1970, the first Earth Day took place in the United States as a “national teach-in on the environment” at many university campuses. Various events and rallies took place throughout the nation to encourage citizens and lawmakers to help protect the Earth. Later that year, the United States created the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and passed the Clear Air, Clean Water, and

14 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© APRIL/MAY 2020

Endangered Species Acts. Each year, the event became more and more popular, and in 1990, Earth Day went worldwide. This year marks the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, and in Monroe County, plenty of Earth Day activities have been planned! Get a headstart on the Earth Day fun with Jim Thorpe’s annual Earth Day celebration on Saturday, April 18. Participate in a Lehigh River clean-up and enjoy live performances and food. Plus, there are plenty of activities and crafts for the kids! On Saturday, April 25, visit Northampton Community College’s Monroe Campus from 10am-3pm for family fun, including live music, guest speakers, children’s activities, and, of course, food. You can even take a tour of NCC’s green campus. Admission is free, so be sure to bring the whole family! The Pocono Environmental Education Center, commonly known as PEEC, will hold its Earth Day Festival on Saturday, April 25, from 11am-4pm. At just $5 per car, your entire family can enjoy hands-on learning stations, hikes, and


Photo courtesy of Pixabay

Wisconsin Senator Gaylord Nelson was determined to increase awareness of the risks being posed to the planet and decided to take action. On April 22, 1970, the first Earth Day took place in the United States as a “national teach-in on the environment” at many university campuses.

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exhibits, along with food, crafts, and music. As one of the premiere environmental education centers in the region, PEEC is the perfect place to spend your Earth Day.

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Interested in getting a little exercise while enjoying the great outdoors? Join ForEvergreen Nature Preserve for the Creek 5K on Sunday, April 26. This scenic trail run follows the Brodhead Creek within Stroud Township’s ForEvergreen Nature Preserve, located at 1539 Cherry Lane, East Stroudsburg. The day begins with a Kids Dash and 1-mile Dog Trot at 9:30am followed by the 5K run/ walk at 10am. But the fun doesn’t stop after the run! Grab a bite to eat, enjoy wine tastings from Eagles Rest Cellars, and participate in educational Earth Day programming. Proceeds from this year’s race will benefit local conservation efforts and the ForEvergreen Nature Preserve. Register in advance by contacting info@phlt.org. Whether you’re planting trees, cleaning up the environment, or spending time outdoors, take time to do your part in making the Poconos (and our Earth) a great place to be!  APRIL/MAY 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 15


> Paradise Valley, Far and Away Photo by Nicholas A. Tonelli 16 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© APRIL/MAY 2020


1% FOR NATURE By Jamie Marra

1%,

0.1, 1/100. No matter which way you spin it, 1% is 1%. It may not seem like much, but imagine what 1% could do. What if we had 1% more energy or 1% more time? What if we gave 1% to help others or help keep our community beautiful? Since its inception in November 2018, 1% for Nature has made it its mission to “support the conservation and public enjoyment of wildlife habitat, trails, streams and parks in Monroe County, Pennsylvania.” Established by a grant from the William Penn Foundation, 1% for Nature raises funds to distribute to eligible local nonprofits and municipalities, including school districts, community colleges, and even the county. Funds may be used for the purchase or preservation of property. Active recreation projects, like trails, access points for paddling and fishing, and even trailhead signs and kiosks, can be established or improved. And in just its first year, 1% raised over $9,000 to support these initiatives!

APRIL/MAY 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 17


> Photo by Nicholas A. Tonelli While modeled after a similar program in Colorado, 1% for Nature is completely unique to the Poconos. “What’s different about this model is we’re working with the business community. They can participate without spending a dime of their own money if they don’t want to,” explains Samantha Holbert, Director of 1% for Nature. While some businesses will choose to make a flat donation, others opt to raise funds creatively. From donating 1% of a day’s profits to pledging $1 per item sold, businesses are able to give back with the help of their customers. “Some businesses have gotten really creative. We’ve benefited from kickball games, bottles of wine, and scavenger hunts!” enthuses Holbert. Looking for a way to help? 1% for Nature has some exciting partnerships happening in April. Shop at Pocono Soap in Stroudsburg and for every bar of soap purchased during the month of April, $2 will go directly to 1% for Nature. Satisfy your sweet tooth at Kitchen Chemistry, located on Main 18 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© APRIL/MAY 2020

Since its inception in November 2018, 1% for Nature has made it its mission to “support the conservation and public enjoyment of wildlife habitat, trails, streams and parks in Monroe County, Pennsylvania.” Street in Stroudsburg, during the week of April 25, and 10% of your cupcake purchase will go directly to 1%! Treats for tress? Now that’s an idea we can get behind! If your car is ready for maintenance, visit Best Auto Used Cars & Service Center in Tannersville. All month long, Best Auto will donate $5 for oil changes and $10 for oil changes with tire rotations to 1% for Nature.


SHOP NEW. SHOP VINTAGE .

SHOP LOCAL . > Cherry Valley, photo by Nicholas A. Tonelli

> Delaware Water Gap, by Jared Gilbertson Mark your calendar for Bike-N-Brew on Saturday, April 18, sponsored by ShawneeCraft Beer and Edge of the Woods Outfitters. The 16-mile bike ride begins at 10:30am and ends with food and cold brews at the Shawnee Inn. If running is more your speed, register for the Creek 5K on Sunday, April 26, at the ForEvergreen Nature Preserve in Stroud Township. This year, 1% for Nature has teamed up with the Brodhead Watershed Association and the Pocono Heritage Land Trust to support local conservation efforts. With a Kids Dash, 1-mile Dog Trot, and 5K walk/run, this event has something for everyone. After the race, treat yourself to wine tasting from Eagles Rest Cellars - you’ve earned it!

It’s not just a day of shopping here in the Pocono Mountains—it’s an experience. Wander our historic streets. Explore our art galleries. Find unique local goods. And stop for a bite at one of our top-rated neighborhood restaurants along the way. Discover all of our shopping and sights now at PoconoMountains.com.

For more information on how you can get involved in 1% for Nature, visit www.1fornature.org. To stay informed about upcoming events and business promotions, be sure to “like” them on Facebook. Whether you’re a business owner, Monroe County resident, or visitor, you can help keep the Poconos a beautiful place to live, work, and play.  APRIL/MAY 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 19


WINNERS OF THE 2019 HISTORIC PRESERVATION AWARDS By Amy Leiser, Executive Director, Monroe County Historical Association Photos courtesy of the Monroe County Historical Association

> Abeloff-Lambert Home, owned by Pearse and Lindsey Lambert, Stroud Township

T

he Monroe County Historical Association honored owners of historic buildings who have shown their dedication to preserving, enhancing, and promoting Monroe County’s wealth of historic structures at their Annual Meeting and Awards Luncheon on Sunday, February 23, 2020 at the Shawnee Inn and Golf Resort, Shawnee-on-Delaware. Three categories of buildings were judged: Commercial, Publicly Funded, and Private Residence. The 2020 winners in the three categories were: Commercial Property – 616 Main Street (currently occupied by RAW Urban Winery & Hard Cidery and Mackey Photo & Video), Borough of Stroudsburg; Publicly Funded – Fenner, Snyder, & Robacker Homestead,

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Hamilton Township; and Residential Property – “AbeloffLambert Home” owned by Pearse and Lindsey Lambert, Stroud Township. The Heritage Resource Award was given to the Old Mill at Sciota (also known as Brinker’s Mill), Hamilton Township. Monroe County Historical Association Executive Director Amy Leiser said, “Our organization is pleased to recognize the owners of these historic properties and cultural sites, and the volunteers who help keep our past alive. We appreciate their dedication in helping to maintain the historic fabric of our community.”


> Commercial Property – 616 Main Street (currently occupied by RAW Urban Winery & Hard Cidery and Mackey Photo & Video), Borough of Stroudsburg

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Leiser also commented, “This is the 15th year we’ve acknowledged owners of historic properties. We are always looking for additional structures to highlight and we welcome suggestions of other Monroe County sites that deserve recognition.” The Monroe County Historical Association is a cultural and learning center that assists our diverse community of residents and visitors in connecting the county’s past with the present. Visit the website at www.monroehistorical.org for more information on the organization. 

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APRIL/MAY 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 21


> Heritage Resource Award: The Old Mill at Sciota (also known as Brinker’s Mill), Hamilton Township.

“Our organization is pleased to recognize the owners of these historic properties and cultural sites, and the volunteers who help keep our past alive. We appreciate their dedication in helping to maintain the historic fabric of our community.”

22 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© APRIL/MAY 2020


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A

lthough Joyce has worked in other mediums, she finds working in watercolor to be the most enjoyable. Its simplicity and portability not to mention its lack of vapors, etc make it an ecofriendly medium.

Nature is a great inspiration for much of what she paints. The Poconos is rich with scenes that allow her to share her visual impressions of florals and landscapes on paper. Some of her favorite paintings have been inspired by scenes in the Poconos. Though mostly self-taught, her educational background includes a degree from Penn State University which included some art classes, plus additional ones at Tyler School of Art and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in Philadelphia. After moving to the Poconos, she took adult education courses at the former Monroe County Vo Tech School, the Monroe County Technical Institute, the Pocono Arts Council, workshops through the Pocono Watercolor Associates and from various artists in NY, West Virginia, North Carolina, the Lehigh Valley and Central PA. Most classes have been in watercolor but acrylics, oils, calligraphy, graphic arts, etc. are in her repertoire as well. Local artists Sally Millspaugh and Tim Weaver have had a major influence on her artwork. Anyone reading this is urged to take advantage of the artistic activities available in the Poconos. Go to an art exhibit, take some art lessons or simply take your camera with you on a walk and enjoy living in an area that surrounds you with so much natural beauty. ď Ž

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“P OT T E D P R I M R O S E ”


“C H E R RY B LO S S O M ”

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“L E H I G H R I V E R I N FA L L”

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“B I R C H E S O N T H E L A K E AT S U N S E T ” 34 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© APRIL/MAY 2020


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PEACEABLE KINGDOM By Marie Liu

L

ong after Penn’s Treaty with the Lenape in 1681, the event would be memorialized over and over again by Quaker preacher and artist Edward Hicks. In a series of 62 paintings he depicts Quaker colonists and Lenape Indians shaking to the Treaty of Shackamaxon. These ubiquitous folk images have become so popular and familiar to us in this century, yet I for one never realized that there was actually more than one version or that the mountains featured in many of these paintings, were none other than the most iconic scene in the Poconos.

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Virtually all paintings in this series titled Peaceable Kingdom or Penn’s Treaty depict William Penn and his Quakers at the Treaty of Shackamaxon with Chief Tammany and the Lenape. Two very different groups peacefully coming together to form an agreement to secure land for the future city of Philadelphia. Sometimes Hicks portrayed them at the actual Piedmont site under a giant Elm tree (Penn’s Treaty), others featuring the Delaware Water Gap in the background, while beasts and babies play in the foreground (Peaceable Kingdom). Using this similar


cast of characters, he repaints this theme over and over, with variations, yet all possessing the same unmistakable, primitive, and almost cartoon-like imagery, made so popular in modern times by its appearance on item such as towels, rugs, blankets, mugs, t-shirts, etc. Yet how many of us noticed that there were more than one of the images? Easy to overlook, as the subject matter and style were so similar. Besides, who would ever imagine someone creating 62 versions of a painting? Was he obsessive compulsive? Or perhaps a perfectionist trying to improve his idea, or possibly so convinced of its message that he wanted to spread it far and wide? Likely all of the above (Walt Whitman spent 4 decades writing and re-writing Leaves of Grass. The first edition having 12 poems and final edition over 400) as artists are likely to have a dose of compulsion, perfectionism and conviction that drives what they do. Edward Hicks was born to Anglican parents in 1780 in Bucks County PA. His father, a loyalist, was left penniless after the Revolutionary War and his mother died when he was 18 months old. He was then raised by family friends on the Twining

“These ubiquitous folk images have become so popular and familiar to us in this century, yet I for one never realized that there was actually more than one version or that the mountains featured in many of these paintings, were none other than the most iconic scene in the Poconos.”

> P eaceable Kingdom Oil painting by Edward Hicks

APRIL/MAY 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 39


> P enn’s Treaty Oil paiting by Edward Hicks

Farm and was there introduced to Quakerism. At 13 years old, he became an apprentice to a coach maker where he learned the craft of coach painting. At 20 he left the firm to become an independent coach and decorative painter. He also began attending Quaker meetings and after several years became a member of the Society of Friends (the term Quaker was an unflattering label given to the members of the Society of Friends for their physical quaking during spiritual trance). Hicks marries, starts his large family and becomes a Quaker preacher. Eventually though, unable to maintain his work as a preacher and painter at the same time, he left preaching. Decorative painting remained his main source of income, although he often made easel or studio paintings for family and friends, not for sale. Unrestrained by rules of his congregation, he was able to freely express his own conception of his faith through these easel paintings and in particular, the Peaceable Kingdom series. Inspired by the bible chapter Isaiah 11: 6 – 8, “The wolf shall 40 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© APRIL/MAY 2020

dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the young goat, and the calf and the lion and the fattened calf together: and a little child shall lead them.” which was the perfect metaphor for the utopian dream that the Quakers had founded their new colony in the new world on. This theme, of wild animals communing with children would become Hick’s message, his artistic sermon. The predator and prey living side by side in harmony, all in submission to the innocence of a child. The powerful yielding to the powerless, the calming of primitive aggressions to bring about harmony in the world. Repeated by the image of Quakers and Indians coming together to live in peace and harmony. Penn sought to coexist with the Lenape. He learned their language and rituals because he intended to live side by side with them, “…with your love and consent, that we may always live together as neighbors and friends”. He purchased his land from them and Penn’s Treaty was described by French


philosopher Voltaire as ‘the one treaty with the Indians that the whites have never broken’. The Lenape saw this agreement as the dawning of a new era of cooperation between themselves and settlers. Chief Tammany is recorded having said that the Lenape and the English colonists would "Live in peace as long as the waters run in the rivers and creeks and as long as the stars and moon endure." These words have been memorialized on the statue of Tammany that stands in Philadelphia to this day. He also includes the Delaware Water Gap scene to convey the idea of Penn’s colony expanding and bringing these ideals of a peaceable kingdom upriver as the Philadelphia colony grew. Worth noting here the names of Mt. Minsi (term to describe the Lenape tribe of this tri-state area) and Mt. Tammany (named for Chief Tammany) once having the profile of an Indian naturally sculpted in the rock surface high above.

“ Unrestrained by rules of his congregation, he was able to freely express his own conception of his faith through these easel paintings and in particular, the Peaceable Kingdom series. ” As relates to the Feb/March issue of Pocono Living article “The Infamous Walking Purchase”, William Penn came to America after receiving 45,000 acres along the Delaware River from James Duke of York as payment for his Admiral father’s service to the crown during the Anglo–Dutch Wars. Disgusted by the inequality he saw in Europe, William joined a group called the Philadelphians in challenging the Church of England and was imprisoned. Once released (through his father’s petition to the King), young William was anxious to

AUTHOR

MARIE LIU

M

arie Liu didn't expect to become so enthralled with the Poconos when she moved to Milford from New York State in 2009, but her work since then has been entirely focused on elements of the region that she seeks to reveal through her oil paintings. The Delaware River, pristine creeks, woods scenes and waterfalls, that are so abundant here, have provided her with endless inspiration and are the perfect place for a landscape artist.  Being grateful, her paintings serve as a tribute to those agencies and organizations that work to protect these areas for our benefit. She was honored to be the Resident Artist of the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area for one year, from 2015 - 16.  Focusing her creative energies on exploring and interpreting the Park through all four seasons, researching the history, and engaging with visitors was a highpoint of her professional life; culminating in exhibits at Kittatinny and Dingmans visitors centers. She not only portrayed the beauty of the Park, but was also cognizant of it's unique history, strove to portray that in her paintings. Her work can be seen at the ARTery Gallery in Milford, a cooperative that is owned and operated by artists.  She will also be exhibiting at the new Gallery at Brodhead Creek Heritage Center in East Stroudsburg from July - September 2020.  Visit her website at https://mliuart. com.  and view videos about her experience as Resident Artist and her affinity for Pinchot and Grey Towers on her You Tube channel: Marie Liu Art.  APRIL/MAY 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 41


leave for America to develop on his land the dream of a city founded upon the Quaker ideals of brotherly love, tolerance, and equality. His design for the city was based upon avoiding the over-crowded, disease ridden and dangerous city life of Europe. His plans included wide streets, no dark alleys where nefarious activities could be conducted, green parks as buffers for fire, no garrisons or walls (as his relations with Indians was good) and plenty of farm land to sustain the city. His plans were to become inspiration for future cities. His was the first colony based on freedom and democracy that would set the foundation not only for Philadelphia but also for our new nation post-Revolutionary War. Our founding 42 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© APRIL/MAY 2020

fathers used these same ideals when formulating their vision for the United States. Historians in the 20th century have also suggested the Iroquois Confederacy’s system of government influenced the development of the United States form of government. As history would have it, Penn’s ideal city would quickly deteriorate when he left for England to settle a land dispute. Upon his return to Philadelphia years later, he was appalled by the number of taverns and the deviant behavior that he witnessed. In 1701 he authors the Charter of Privilege, outlining the basic rights of citizenship and establishes the first democratically elected legislature.


THE POTTING SHED Let us create something beautiful for you EXQUISITE FLORAL • GIFTS • HOME DECOR (570)424-1174 931 Ann Street • Stroudsburg, PA 18360

“His was the first colony based on freedom and democracy that would set the foundation not only for Philadelphia but also for our new nation postRevolutionary War. Our founding fathers used these same ideals when formulating their vision for the United States. “

Classic American Fine Dining Wednesdays Pasta & Live Music! Fridays

Jumbo Cajun Shrimp Six for $6 & Live Music! Bar Social 4 -5 p.m. Tues - Sun Drink Features & Half Price Apps

• 5 pm Reservations Receive 20% Off • Business Rt. 209 • Snydersville, PA • 570-992-6634 It is known that some Quakers had slaves and Penn himself owned slaves. Sad that his own lofty belief in equality did not extend to the black race and will forevermore be a mark against him for the hypocrisy that revealed. Perhaps he was just a product of his time, but several Quakers disagreed with the practice and rebelled against it, including Frances Pastorious, who founded Germantown and wrote the Germantown Quaker Petition Against Slavery, the first abolitionist document in North America. And also, tragically after Williams death his sons would engineer the fraudulent and despotic Walking Purchase that would lead to the final and complete eviction of the Lenape from the region of the Poconos that they so cherished. 

(Just 5 miles south of Stroudsburg)

www.stonebar.com

Rudy’s

Your Neighborhood Tavern Established in 1933 90 Washington Street, East Stroudsburg, PA 18301 570-424-1131

APRIL/MAY 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 43


Photo courtesy of BPT

2 SIMPLE QUESTIONS MAY LOWER YOUR PET'S MEDICATION COSTS CONSIDERABLY Courtesy of BPT

I

f you own a pet, you're in good company. In fact, 67% of U.S. households own a pet, according to the 2019-2020 National Pet Owners Survey by the American Pet Products Association. Pets provide unconditional love and countless memories, and in return they look to their humans to care for them as best as possible. While regular exercise, a balanced diet and annual wellness exams are essential for keeping pets healthy, sometimes they require more care. This includes when an animal needs a medication, which can be costly, especially if it's for a chronic condition.

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Fortunately, if you discover your pet needs a medication, you have options for managing the expense. Few people are aware that by asking your veterinarian two simple questions, you could lower your costs considerably: * Is this medication available at my pharmacy? * Will you write me a prescription that I can fill at my pharmacy?

USING YOUR LOCAL PHARMACY FOR PET PRESCRIPTIONS

Many pet parents don't know that most of the medications their pets use are the same ones people use, potentially


at the same or a different dosage. That means that many of the pharmacies you visit for your needs can also be used for your pets' prescriptions. The top five conditions pets share with people are diabetes, asthma, infections, anxiety and depression. What's more, filling your pets' prescriptions at a retail pharmacy is often less expensive than getting it filled through the vet, plus it saves time because you can get all your family's prescriptions at once, including your furry family members.

HOW TO GET PET PRESCRIPTION DISCOUNTS

To save even more on your pets' prescriptions, consider using a pharmacy savings card, like the Inside Rx Pets savings card offered by Inside Rx. This free prescription savings card helps reduce costs up to 75% on pet medications when purchased at a local pharmacy or when ordered for home delivery. The card can be downloaded and presented at one of the 50,000 participating pharmacies located across the U.S. and Puerto Rico. These include national chains such as Kroger Family of Pharmacies, CVS and Walgreens. Learn more at insiderx.com/pets. Always follow prescription directions Remember, it's important to follow your veterinarian's recommendations for the prescription and dosage and not try to manage your pet's condition on your own. Do not use over-the-counter (OTC) pain relievers you buy for yourself with your pet as experts note this can be dangerous. "Although these products are approved for use in people, many of them are not safe for pets. For example, acetaminophen can cause severe illness, and even death, in pets. Talk to your veterinarian before you give any medication to your pet," the American Veterinary Medical Association states. To keep prescription drug costs manageable for pets, ask these two simple questions and explore savings options at your local pharmacy. Laws vary by state, but over 40 states require veterinarians to write a prescription if asked, so it's worthwhile to inquire. You'll help your pets feel their best while helping ease your budget as well. Sixty-seven percent of U.S. households, or about 85 million families, own a pet, according to the 2019-2020 National Pet Owners Survey conducted by the American Pet Products Association (APPA). 

A trained dog is a happy dog.

Dog Training & Obedience in Stroudsburg

www.SitStayNPlay.net

570.872.9748 1501 North 5th Street • Stroudsburg, PA 18360

Creekside

PET CREMATORY

Compassionate Care That Lasts Forever Located at Stroudsburg Cemetery on Dreher Avenue 570-420-9599www.CreeksidePet.net / 570-421-4501 www.CreeksidePet.net APRIL/MAY 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 45


HIKES & OUTDOOR ADVENTURES WITH POCONO LIVING By Amanda Kuhn

GLEN RUN NATURE PRESERVE

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L

Photo courtesy of Bob Hare, Pocono Photo Club

ocal bike riders rejoice! Another seemingly endless Pocono winter has passed and spring is finally upon us. While winter always tends to overstay it’s welcome, to bike aficionados, the ice and snow are always undesirable guests. With signs of spring all around us, it’s time to dust off your bike and head out on your first excursion and we know the perfect place to blow off the proverbial stink. The winding trails of Glen Run Nature Preserve offers plenty to see and explore on a bike or on foot. Located just outside of Stroudsburg, the nearly 200-acre Glen Run Nature Preserve offers four miles of hiking and biking trails. The switch back trails which were built by the Pocono Bike Club are not only fun to ride but beautiful to behold. Views of Cherry Valley, a glimpse of the Delaware Water Gap, and an excellent Stroudsburg overlook from the point of Godfrey Ridge are in store. The ridge also marks a watershed divide with the northern portion of the preserve located in the McMichael Creek watershed and the southern in the Cherry Creek watershed. Because this preserve is classified as special

APRIL/MAY 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 47


regulation waters, fishing is limited to artificial lure catch and release only. Another one of the preserve’s distinguishing features is the foundation of the historic Churleigh Inn. It’s here you will find the impressive view of Stroudsburg and a small manmade lake nearby that is nestled among the ridges.

“With signs of spring all around us, it’s time to dust off your bike and head out on your first excursion and we know the perfect place to blow off the proverbial stink.”

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Glen Run Nature Preserve was acquired by The Pocono Heritage Land Trust in 2015 and the organization continues to manage the 182-acre property. This non-profit is dedicated to land conservation in the Poconos. Working cooperatively with landowners and the local government, the PHLT strives to preserve land with environmental, scenic or recreational value. While developing land means economic rewards for some, conserving land means rewards for everyone including pure


Photo courtesy of Eric Goins, Pocono Photo Club

Hunting Fishing

Camping Bowhunting

... EVERYTHING! 585 Main Street Stroudsburg PA 570-421-7950

drinking water, clean air, healthy wildlife, thriving forests and a better quality of life. If you’re an avid biker and would like to explore the Glen Run Nature Preserve or similar preserved land the Pocono Bike Club hosts weekly rides and regular events. The Pocono Bike Club serves cyclists of all types and works to enhance the sport in our area. For more information on upcoming events or to join the club visit poconoblikeclub. com or follow them on Facebook. Glen Run Nature Preserve is open to all visitors. If biking isn’t your favorite activity, the winding trails are also great for hiking and appeal to all experience levels. Parking is located off of Bangor Mountain Road.To learn more about the preserve and The Pocono Heritage Land Trust visit their website at phlt.org. 

1471 Rt. 209 Brodheadsville PA

570-992-3865

Feel the Excitement!

Enjoy a unique, fun activity in a climate controlled environment! 85 North 1st Street • Stroudsburg PA 18360 570-424-2940

PoconoPistol.com APRIL/MAY 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 49


Stroud Television & Appliances 219 N. 9th Street Stroudsburg, PA

5 EASY STEPS

570-421-7700 www.StroudTVandAppliances.com

to wake up your lawn Courtesy of BPT

T

here are a lot of things people miss during the winter flip-flops, shorts and warm sunshine. But one of the things homeowners miss the most is the sight of green grass.

PoconoFourWheelDrive.com

For months their lawns go into hibernation and disappear under a blanket of snow. Once the temperature starts to rise and the days start getting longer, many are eager to get outside and restore their lawns to their former glory. But in order to get a lush green lawn that is the envy of your block, it’s crucial to get to work at the beginning of spring. The lawn experts at Lowe’s have shared five key steps you can take right now to ensure you have a beautiful and healthy yard all year long.

1. TUNE UP YOUR EQUIPMENT

Ken’s Auto Service Center Quality Repair

With a Price That’s Fair Rte. 447 & Brushy Mt. Rd., East Stroudsburg, PA 18301

570-424-2258 www.kensautoservicecenter.net Oil Change State Inspections Tune Ups

50 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© APRIL/MAY 2020

Maintenance Brakes Tires

Before you start work on your lawn, you want to make sure your mower is ready for the season. This means changing out the oil, tightening up any loose bolts or fasteners and starting the season with fresh spark plugs. You should also make sure the air filter is clean, and don’t forget to have your blade sharpened. Be sure to follow the manufacturer’s instructions.

2. EVALUATE YOUR LAWN Once all the snow has melted, set aside some time to walk over your lawn. Take note of any dead spots, snow mold or raw patches of earth that need reseeding. Bring a rake with you to clean up


BILLY’S

Photo courtesy of Pixabay

Lawn & Garden

dead leaves or break up any thatched areas that may have formed over the winter.

3. TAKE CARE OF SNOW MOLD If you find a spot of snow mold and other types of lawn fungus that are common in early spring, take a rake and gently break up the matted grass so it can dry. Oftentimes, this will be enough to dry out the mold and get the grass in the area growing again. However, depending on the extent of the damage, you might have to patch or reseed the area.

4. RESEED WHERE NEEDED For the bare spots as well as areas of your lawn that are looking a little thin, overseeding is a great way to return it to its full, lush state. Spread grass seed over the area you want to patch, add some fertilizer and about a half inch of topsoil and gently rake the mixture in with the grass and soil. Thoroughly water these patches every day until the seeds begin to germinate.

5. PLANT WHILE IT’S STILL COOL The cooler temperatures in spring are ideal for roots to take hold before the hot summer weather arrives. This is why spring is the best time to seed your lawn. Also, if you’ve been thinking of planting any shrubs or trees, you should do it before it gets too warm.

TIPS Warmer weather is coming and so is your lawn’s worst enemy - crabgrass. The key to controlling crabgrass is preventing those pesky crabgrass seeds from germinating in the first place. Here’s how.

Crabgrass loves sunshine, so while you should mow your lawn regularly, don’t cut the grass too short. Thick, long grass will keep sunlight from reaching the soil surface and thus help prevent crabgrass from germinating. Purchase a pre-emergent herbicide in order to stave off crabgrass before it becomes an issue. A pre-emergent should be applied evenly across the entire lawn before soil temperatures rise above 55°F. Not sure how to check the soil temperature? Budding shrubs and trees are usually a good indicator of when to apply a pre-emergent, or check out gddtracker.net, an online tool that gives ideal pre-emergent application times based on the air temperature in your area. If your lawn is freshly seeded, apply the pre-emergent once you’ve mowed three times. Otherwise, you risk killing the grass you’re trying to grow! Are you too late? Has crabgrass already started to set up shop in your yard? Use a post-emergent herbicide to rid yourself of this pesky problem. Post-emergents should only be applied to visible crabgrass, not the entire lawn. And remember, even with the use of a pre-emergent, you may still need to spot treat with a post-emergent.  Edited by: Jamie Bowman

Canfield’s Pet & Farm

315 Main Street, Stroudsburg, PA 570-421-1821


EVENTS IN & AROUND THE POCONOS EARTH DAY CELEBRATION

Monroe County Conservation District and Monroe Campus Northampton Community College in Tannersville announce 2020 Earth Day Celebration. On Saturday, April 25th from 10am – 3pm organizations, businesses and local agencies throughout Monroe County have organized a county-wide event to celebrate the conservation successes of the past 20+ years in Monroe County and the 50th Anniversary of Earth Day!

THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE

THE MOUNTAINS FOR THE HOLIDAYS. Celebrate the holidays surrounded by great company and even better cuisine in the Pocono Mountains. From romantic dinners by candlelight to farm-to-table experiences, our local chefs are serving up something for every palate. Visit PoconoMountains.com to see all of our mouth-watering dining options and make your reservation.

The day includes: Musical Entertainment featuring Chris London, Regina Sayles, Woodrow and The Lost Ramblers! There will also be children’s activities, electronics recycling and tire amnesty sponsored by The Waste Management Authority, speakers and exhibits highlighting local environmental business, organizations and agencies. The day will also feature the Pocono Arts Council’s Earth Speaks Exhibit from 1-3pm. Free Admission! It’s a day you won’t want to miss! For more information about Earth Day, visit http://www. mcearthday.org or call the Monroe County Conservation District at (570) 629-3061, Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. For more information on other programs we offer visit our website at mcconservation.org.

WINTER PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT BY POCONO PHOTO CLUB THE GALLERY AT BCHC

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Now - March 22nd Come enjoy the beautiful winter themed photography by members of Pocono Photo Club while it is still on display! Starting in April, Artwork by Don Baylor will be on display. Take a sneak peak of his work, here.


m -8p am y!! 8 n da Ope ever ting! Sea ide s ek Cre Hot Dog & Slice of Apple Pie always $2.95! Over 30 Flavors of pies baked fresh daily No High Fructose Corn Syrup!!!

Fruit Pies, Burgers, Pot Pies, Sandwiches, Pastries, Gifts, Jams & Jellies

www.VillageFarmer.com

1/2 mile off of Rt. 80 exit 310 GPS Broad St. Delaware Water Gap 570-476-9440

> P hoto by Marlana Holsten

TAP TAKEOVER WITH BRODHEAD WATERSHED ASSOCIATION

Saturday, March 14:

BWA is taking over the taps at Mountain View Vineyard, Winery & Distillery … because great-tasting beverages start with clean and abundant water! On this day, $1 from every DRAFT beverage (wine, too!) sold will go back to BWA.

DELAWARE RIVER FLY TRI WITH TROUT UNLIMITED

Saturday, May 16:

This triathlon-inspired endurance event offers a unique opportunity to experience the wonder of the Poconos and the Delaware River from different vantage points while adding an element of friendly competition. Registration for the 2020 event is SOLD OUT. Volunteers are still needed. Volunteers for the 2020 event will get priority for registering for the 2021 event.

COMPOSTING CLASSES WITH THE WASTE AUTHORITY

Multiple Dates

Why spend money on potting soil, fertilizers, and other items for your garden when you can make your own for free, by composting waste you already have? Turn your scraps into rich soil for planting. The cost is $25 to register per class which is instructed by a certified Master Gardener. Every participant will go home with a backyard composter valued at $99!

P&S GARAGE Servicing the Poconos since 1975

Scott Dreisbach owner

570-223-8874

9080 Franklin Hill Road East Stroudsburg, Pa www.psgaragepa.com

Strunk C. Tree Service 570 - 350 - 3966

24/7 Emergency Service - Fully Insured Tree Removal - Tree Trimming - Stump Grinding Cabling - Bucket Truck Service - Landscaping APRIL/MAY 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 53


William H. Clark Funeral Home, Inc.

APRIL EVENTS AT PEEC

The Caring Professionals

1003 Main Street, Stroudsburg, PA 18360 570-421-9000 | www.wmhclarkfuneralhome.com Gary A. Raish, Supervisor

733 Main Street Stroudsburg, PA Cupcake Shop & Nostalgic Candy

Exciting “How-to” Culinary Classes

570-730-4944 ldiemer@ptd.net

GIRL SCOUT BADGE FESTIVAL

Saturday, April 4 – 9:30am-4:00pm • $25/Scout Brownies will work on their Senses and Outdoor Art badges. Juniors will fulfill the Animal Habitat badge. Cadettes and Seniors will participate in our GS Ranger program. Overnight options are available for all age levels, ask for more information! Payment is required at registration. Space is limited - call early! Overnight accommodations with meals are available for $43/person.

www.Kitchen-Chemistry.com

BRIDGE THE GAP: BIKE THE MCDADE

Sunday, April 5 – 1:00-4:00pm • Free

Join us for a bike ride along the McDade Trail! We will provide all equipment and transportation. Please bring a water bottle and wear sturdy footwear. We will have extra water and snacks available. *Lead support provided by the William Penn Foundation*

BRIDGE THE GAP: SPRING PEEPER SEARCH

Sunday, April 5 – 7:30-9:00pm • Free

These tiny tree frogs have thawed out and are active again in our forested wetlands. Listen to the impressive choir made by these vocal amphibians as we carefully catch, study, and release them. Bring a flashlight for better searching! *Lead support provided by the William Penn Foundation*

SALAMANDERS, FROGS, AND MORE!

Saturday, April 18 – 10:00am-12:00pm • $5 Amphibians are stirring in the woods! Join us as we explore nearby breeding pools for salamanders, frogs, and egg masses. We’ll provide nets and collection jars for gentle, up-close study. Wear boots and clothes that can get muddy or wet.

Shawnee General Store Since 1859

In the heart of Shawnee on the Delaware! (570) 421-0956 542 River Road, Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA

54 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© APRIL/MAY 2020

ECOZONE DISCOVERY ROOM!

Saturday, April 18 – 1:00-4:00pm • $2 per person Climb into a bald eagle’s nest, crawl into a bat cave, explore a beaver lodge, and dig in a fossil pit! Explore


The this indoor discovery room and enjoy hands-on exhibits on natural history, sustainability and the local environment. No registration required.

POCONO KNITTING RETREAT

April 23-26 • $280 Full Workshop - Call for day rates Knit an easy brioche cowl or basket using two highly contrasting yearns, perfect for an introduction to the technique. Includes lodging and meals!

AGENCY Because the world keeps turning Insurance since 1942

Serving the Poconos for over 70 years CHOOSE DREHER BECAUSE WE CARE! BUSINESS & PERSONAL INSURANCE Theodore G. Butz, CPCU

551 Main Street, Stroudsburg, PA 18360 570-421-6141

www.dreherinsurance.com

EARTH DAY FESTIVAL

Saturday, April 25 – 11:00am-4:00pm • $5 per car Help us celebrate the Earth! There will be hands-on learning stations, interpretive hikes, conservation exhibits, crafts, food, music, and much more! Pre-registration is NOT required.

BIRDS AND BREWS

May 1-3 • $215 / Call for commuter & day rates Spring migration has begun! Join us for a wonderful weekend of bird watching and beer tasting. Enjoy guided hikes that teach how to identify birds by sight, sound and habitat. Program is geared towards beginners and experts alike. Saturday night we’ll provide transportation to one of our local breweries and the 1st round is on us! Includes two nights of lodging and meals from Friday dinner through Sunday lunch.

GARY’S

MEAT MARKET Good, Old Fashioned Quality Meats Fresh Cut Daily

Famous for Our Homemade Ring Bologna & Kielbasi. Fully Stocked Deli with Everyday Reasonable Prices!! Phone: 570-420-9764 | M-F 9am-6pm, Sat 9am-5pm 1411-B Chipperfield Dr, Stroudsburg, PA 18360

RUN, HIKE, CRAWL: PEEC 5K

Saturday, May 2 – 8:00 Registration / 10:00am Race Begins $25 Early Bird/$30/$35 Race Day Take a journey through the woods of the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. Our 5k runs through our main campus and a variety of different woodland habitats on two of our gorgeous trail loops. Top 3 participants for male and female in each age group receive awards. Early Bird Registration by April 2nd guarantees participants a t-shirt. Call for more details – Maximum of 100 spaces!

APRIL/MAY 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 55


ECOZONE DISCOVERY ROOM!

Saturday, May 2 – 1:00-4:00pm • $2 per person Climb into a bald eagle’s nest, crawl into a bat cave, explore a beaver lodge, and dig in a fossil pit! Explore this indoor discovery room and enjoy hands-on exhibits on natural history, sustainability and the local environment. No registration required.

PLANT SALE!

May 9 & 10 – 9:00am-4:00pm • Free admission

K

EDIBLE & MEDICINAL PLANT WALK

Saturday, May 9 – 10:00am-12:00pm • $5 Photos courtesy of Pixabay

M

inisin hotel

Choose from a variety of native and deer resistant flowers and grasses to beautify your yard at our annual plant sale! Sun loving and shade loving plants will be available. Remaining plants will be sold through the following week so stop by to check them out! PEEC Members will be able to join us for a pre-sale on May 8th from 5 – 7pm.

Nature provides food & natural remedies for us in the form of many plants. Join us on a hike focused on wild edible & medicinal plants. No collecting will be done in the Park.

Serving fine food & spirits in an elegant setting

owtree Inn Will

(570) 476-0211 • www.thewillowtreeinn.net 601 Ann Street, Stroudsburg, PA

MEMORIAL DAY FAMILY CAMP WEEKEND

Memorial Day Weekend: May 22-25 Adults $225 / Child, Commuter, Day Rates Available Bring your family and friends to experience the best of what PEEC has to offer. Interpretive hikes, animal presentations, canoeing, campfire and more! Includes three nights of lodging and meals from Friday dinner through Monday lunch.

BRIDGE THE GAP: POND PADDLE

Saturday, May 30 – 10:00am-12:00pm • Free Join us for a paddle around our ponds! Beginners are welcome – we teach you everything you need to know! Dress appropriately – you may get wet. Call in advance to reserve a boat. *Lead support is provided by the William Penn Foundation.*

ECOZONE DISCOVERY ROOM!

Saturday, May 30 – 1:00-4:00pm • $2 per person

56 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© APRIL/MAY 2020

Climb into a bald eagle’s nest, crawl into a bat cave, explore a beaver lodge, and dig in a fossil pit! Explore this indoor discovery room and enjoy hands-on exhibits on natural history, sustainability and the local environment. No registration required.


APRIL/MAY 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 57


Theatre Year Round in the Poconos SHAWNEE ON THE DELAWARE, PA

You May Also Enjoy

Pocono Family Magazine

• Godspell April 2, 2020 - April 11, 2020

• C&K’s Beauty & the Beast - A Dance Story April 17, 2020 - April 19, 2020

• Steel Magnolias April 30, 2020 - May 3, 2020

• Love, Lies and the Lottery May 8, 2020 - May 31, 2020

• A Year with Frog & Toad June 6, 2020 - June 20, 2020

(570) 421-5093 www.theshawneeplayhouse.com

Available at Local Businesses & by Subscription Pocono Magazines, LLC 1929 North Fifth Street, Stroudsburg, PA 18360 570-424-1000 • pmags@ptd.net

Next Issue of

Pocono Living Magazine

Pocono Mountain Public Library Tobyhanna, PA 570-894-8860 www.poconomountpl.org

Clymer Library Pocono Pines, PA 570-646-0826 www.clymerlibrary.org

Western Pocono Community Library Brodheadsville, PA 570-992-7934 www.wpcl.lib.pa.us

Eastern Monroe Public Library Branches Hughes Library (main branch) Stroudsburg, PA 570-421-0800 www.monroepl.org Pocono Township Branch Tannersville, PA 570-629-5858 Smithfield Branch Marshalls Creek, PA 570-223-1881 Bookmobile 570-421-0880 x49

58 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© APRIL/MAY 2020

Photo courtesy of Pixabay

Barrett Paradise Friendly Library Cresco, PA 570-595-7171 www.barrettlibrary.org


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8:00 am - 2:00 pm Rain or Shine 1:30pm memorial day Helicopter & Airplane Rides ~ Airplane & Military Displays Veterans Helicopter & Airplane Ridesceremony ~ Airplane & Military Displays Kids Activities ~with Antique Cars ~ Pocono Raceway Pace CarHelicopter & Airplane Rides ~ Airplane & parachute Jump Rain Rainor orShine Shine

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APRIL/MAY 2020 POCONO LIVING MAGAZINE© 59


EARN THAT DEGREE, PRIMA. Y O U D E S E R V E I T.

Prima survived cancer thanks to her health partner’s team of experts, their access to hundreds of clinical trials, and their membership in the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Alliance. With a new lease on life, Prima’s now pursuing a career in oncology nursing — and knows things about it you’d never find in a textbook. Learn more at LVHN.org/cancer or by calling 888-402-LVHN.

Profile for LARRY SEBRING

Pocono Living Magazine April/May 2020