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THE POCKLINGTONIAN 2010/11


THE POCKLINGTONIAN 2010/11 Editor: Editor's Assistant: Editorial Committee: Photography: Design: Printer:

Miss Louise A Lamb: lambl@pocklingtonschool.com Mrs Bryony Marshall Emma Hawcroft, Edward Hetherington and Hannah Hutchinson Mike McKinstry Martin Malarkey: bryarystudio@btconnect.com Linden Richardson: lindenrichardson@aol.com

The editorial committee would be delighted to hear your views on this year's publication. To contact us, please e-mail the editor.


I

t is difficult to describe the feeling of holding a new-born, shining copy of The Pocklingtonian. Smelling distinctly of newness, weighty in your hands, it is a true labour of love, write Edward Hetherington and Emma Hawcroft (U6).

The role of editor in a school magazine is a strange one, as we have both discovered over the past two years. Deadlines are missed, photos are lost and articles are edited (or hacked). However, somehow, somewhere, something happens and everything seems to come together. This year, the new Editor, Miss Lamb, has undertaken the role with ease and confidence whilst bringing a sense of calm to all our meetings, creating one of the best magazines to date. Joined by Hannah Hutchinson we have found peace and seclusion in the female haven that is the English Office (sorry Ed and Mr Newhouse!) on Thursday afternoons; gathered round a table, jostling for space with cups of tea, Otter pads and edible delights, harvesting the fruits of a busy year. Editing, organising content, researching and interviewing are just a few of the many jobs we carry out to ensure the smooth production of the magazine. 2011 also saw a magazine first: an official photographer, Mike McKinstry, who has helped make this year’s publication so colourful and vivid. The team also took to the road in Michaelmas term when we visited Carcanet’s offices in Manchester. There we had the chance to chat with and question Judith Wilson, the Managing Director; an invaluable experience. We both now realise what we and our peers are leaving behind. It has been a joy this year to contribute towards a magazine which celebrates all that makes Pocklington special. We hope that in years to come it will continue to showcase the best of this unique and happy place. We are privileged to have worked on it. Readers will notice that summer reports from both 2010 and 2011 appear in this edition, as we move to accommodate the full academic year within one magazine. I regret that due to certain restrictions, results have not been published in their entirety. I must here express my gratitude to James Reckitt (L6), Steve Ward and Andrew Dawes for their photographic contributions. Above all, sincere thanks to my superb editorial team and the guidance and support of Bryony Marshall, without whom much of this would not have taken shape. LAL

The new School Coat of Arms is a tidying up of the extant one. A glance at those visible around the School will show the variety of interpretations currently in use and the heraldic disasters which have crept in. It has been designed by Steve Ellis and researched by Alan Heaven. A paper with further details is available on the School portal.

THE POCKLINGTONIAN

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HEADMASTER

‘‘

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbour. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.

‘‘

Mark Twain

I

want Pocklington to be a school where pupils have the opportunity to “throw off the bowlines” and “explore” and “discover”. I have been delighted that throughout the year pupils have taken the lead in many aspects of school life of which the following are just a few examples. HISTORIA held its first student led event, ‘The Cawood Lectures’, inspired by Annabel Cawood (U6), with the following presentations: ‘Is the USA Britain's spoilt child? - The Special Relationship’ by Emma Hawcroft (U6) ‘America's Secret History’ by Annabel Cawood ‘History in Imagery’ by Edward Hetherington (U6) ‘Lenin: Fiction’ by Hugh Stubbins (U6) ‘Civil War, huh ...what is it good for? Actually, it’s good for Empire’ by Ross Cronshaw (U6)

Also within the History department: G

Chris Iyer (U6) taught a lesson to 1st year students on castles which he researched and prepared with Mr Hall

G

Ned Donnan (L6) taught two lessons to his sixth form peers on the Falklands conflict

G

On the recent Battlefields trip, Hugh Stubbins gave the exhortation at the Menin Gate during the Last Post ceremony (a major honour) in front of at least 500 people.

G

James Reckitt (L6) and Nathan Waddell (L6) came up with the idea of using the wireless connection in the History department to type notes on lessons whilst in progress directly onto Google documents. The notes were then uploaded onto the Department website, enabling those students stuck at home during the winter snow chaos to be a part of the lessons in real time.

On the music front, for the first time at the annual soloist concert two boys performed their own compositions. Finlay Henderson (4WIL) gave a premiere of his Mazurka in C minor on piano, while Will Winlow (5WIL) performed his own piece on classical guitar, challenging the audience with his use of minimalist principles and microtones. Whilst at Friday morning church, Rob Harris (U6) led a choir that he had assembled, performing Stainer’s ‘God So Loved the World’ and ‘In the Departure of the Lord’ by John Bull. The Combined Cadet Force provides excellent opportunities for pupils to develop their leadership. This has been exemplified through Hannah Crompton (U6) and I was privileged to be at RAF Cranwell on Sunday 3 July to see her awarded a Sir Geoffrey de Havilland Flying Foundation Medal for CCF achievement. This recognises at a national level her engagement with CCF which has included completing the Air Cadet Leadership Course, graduating with a distinction, and a Gliding Scholarship leading onto an Advanced Solo Gliding Qualification. Hannah is now a Flight Staff Cadet at RAF Topcliffe training as an Instructor. I would like to thank all of the cadets who take on leadership roles within the CCF. It is also important that Pocklingtonians engage in the local community. George Jibson (2GRU) has been seeking over recent months to establish an Imagination Library. The charity, founded in 1996 by Dolly Parton, aims to provide every child within our area access to books up to the age of five. I would also like to thank the girls of Faircote who took part in the Edinburgh Moonwalk as part of their efforts to raise funds for Breast Cancer charities. In reflecting on examples of pupil leadership over the school year, there will be many that have not been acknowledged. However, I do hope that it will provide a sense of our pupils’ engagement and encourage others to throw off the bowlines.

MER

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HEADS OF SCHOOL

A

s an 11 year old just starting out in Pocklington the prefects seemed almost telepathic, appearing out of thin air to aid in a crisis (albeit a lost folder: but a crisis nonetheless to a first year me), recalls Miranda Bond (U6). I know now that the role of the prefects is much more about planning and cooperation than psychic tendencies - indeed as Heads of School we could have achieved very little without the unwavering support of our prefect body - though perhaps I should not spoil the illusion? Over the year I have managed to settle somewhat into the role. The forced laughter and seemingly unending silences which accompanied my first meeting with Hugh and the Headmaster have lapsed into a more comfortable and consistent mild social awkwardness. There really is no etiquette to tell you how to behave when you are sitting in front of the man who has charge of your permanent record whilst attempting not to be eaten by his sofa! Though our weekly meetings with the Headmaster have often been productive, they have not always yielded the results we would wish. The innate conflict between our need as Heads of School to understand its inner workings for the benefit of our peers and our natural position as wards of the school is one that is almost impossible to resolve. The post has not by any means been a litany of disappointments. I have developed many useful skills: my patented inbuilt radar has given me the tracking ability of an avenging Fury, detecting a missing top button at twenty feet, an un-tucked shirt at fifty! Yet in spite of my assumed role of harbinger of doom (in many ways being sent to the back of the lunch queue is equivalent to the last judgement!) the position of Head Girl is usually much more benevolent. Helping a first year to find a classroom may seem like a trivial event, but I still remember the prefect who took the time to show me to the RS cottages personally. I hope that as Head Girl I can leave a similar impression as that prefect did for me, six years ago. I figure I must have made a half decent hash of it: after all, the rumours that my father paid Mr Ronan for my appointment died down after a couple of months!

I

t took about a week for the perceived glamour of being Head Boy to wear off, regrets Hugh Stubbins (U6).

We soon settled into the general routine of making duty rotas and meeting with the Headmaster on a Saturday. Conducting weekly assemblies, Miranda and I also soon learnt to tread the fine line between ‘detached professionalism’ and unwanted stand-up comedy, with attempts at the latter being met by a throng of bleary eyed sixth formers staring blankly back at us. Having to listen to the Heads of School speak every Wednesday morning has created a flaky, veiled respect which has kept us on our toes. Over the year it has become clear that the isolated role is somewhat a hangover from the past. Seeing it as a continuation is not meant with any disrespect; Pocklington relies on its tradition for its very identity. The key to being Head Boy though is to pretend to know what you’re meant to be doing, even when you really don’t (which is most of the time). This is a façade I have successfully managed to maintain all year; for instance, telling anyone who will listen how I was emailed about whether the school was allowed to install a new door going into Wilberforce court; and confirming that I’m sure it was true that if Miranda and I did decide to marry and elope then the Head would be forced to buy us our first marital home. In terms of keeping control, we settled into an unplanned two-pronged attack: Miranda would blitzkrieg anyone with her gingery wrath whilst I would attempt to work on a more local level to foster love and security for all. However, in all seriousness, whether in sport, drama or music, this has been a special year; it has bred in me a true appreciation of this unique school and its impeccable standards. In my eleven years here, so much has been given to me. I hope that I have managed to give at least some of it back.

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SCHOOL

Rob Peel

A

young boy picked up a Christmas present. He was eleven. It was David Attenborough’s Zoo Quest for a Dragon. He read it; he liked it. He made an immediate mental note that he would become a Biology teacher at a famous Northern school. Simple. Educated at his Headmaster father’s Norfolk school (the Broads at this stage did not have any interest for him), he made use of the school’s extensive grounds and its cumbersome astronomical telescope to foster his passion. Some years later, Robert found himself at Pocklington School on teaching practice from York University under the guidance of Geoff Currey who was the only Biology teacher in a school which did not even take the subject at O’ level! So dynamic was Mr Peel that he was poached from King Edward’s, Stourbridge and began full-time employment here in 1972. Rob has many strings to his bow and soon he was running the Scouts, coaching 2nd XV rugby, initiating conservation work at Allerthorpe Common, skiing, bird watching and starting the Natural History Club. Many pupils and staff have greatly benefitted from Rob’s positivity and expertise in these fields over the years. He is always totally committed and endlessly enthusiastic.

Pastorally, he has contributed significantly to school life. He began as a resident House Tutor with Keith Robinson, moved to Dolman Day under Chris Solomon, eventually taking over as Housemaster from 1979 to 1984. He then took over at Wilberforce Lodge from David Rumbelow and next took on Faircote (as Housemaster). He also tutored Gruggen Day, LVI Dolman, 4 Dolman and, finally, 2 Dolman. Quite a record of pastoral care. His conservation work has been seen at Allerthorpe Common, Kilnwick Percy, Pocklington Crematorium and the Remembrance Garden, as well as other areas on school campus. He can be spied every Thursday with a motley band of Sixth Form ‘helpers’, heading purposefully out in his brown wellies to fix more problems in the countryside he values and respects so much. Music is a huge passion and Rob can always be relied upon to add his wonderful tenor voice (“meltingly beautiful” – Ed.) to all ‘real’ musical events. He does not see the point of ‘pop’, despite having had five children, who have presumably subjected him to at least some elements of his alien music! He is willing to dumb down or dress up occasionally for charity events, however, and I vividly recall him singing along to my bass playing in a version of ‘She’ by Elvis Costello. He sang in rather an upper class, operatic way, instantly adding gravitas to the genre. Rob teaches with great panache in his own inimitable style and is much valued in the Biology Department. He has run the Charity Committee, been in charge of Lost Property, been responsible for our school calendar, contributed to sports tours and basically been our Jack of All Trades. (He would say, in his modest fashion, Master of None!). As you can see, Rob has filled his life with Pocklington and as he himself says, “What will I do when I leave?” I think I may have an inkling. He will walk, run, garden, sing, read, do DIY, support his three sons and two daughters in all they attempt, sketch/paint, watch films/plays, support England rugby, maybe return to turning pots, travel extensively and cook lovely meals for Marion, Lucy and Katy as they return from a hard day’s work.

He himself was a fine athlete and a County standard flanker. In the latter capacity he ran the aforementioned 2nd XV for 13 years, then the U15s, U14s and finally the 3rd XV – a fate which befalls all senior rugby coaches if they stay at the school long enough! Rob would probably be able to tell you just how many fixtures he has refereed in his time. He was also the prime mover in organising and playing in three Staff v Parents matches as well as several games against Pocklington RUFC. The Staff remain unbeaten to this day. Rob’s hamstring ‘pinging’ after two industrious minutes in one of those contests will stay with those of us within 100 metres of the incident for many years to come. I know that some of Rob’s favourite school memories will come from his Orkney, Fair Isle and Shetland bird watching/archaeology trips. He wonders just how the Health and Safety blanket would cover those outings in the ‘modern world’. Nine ski jaunts under the esteemed Malcolm Milne were also very successful. Then there were the coach trips, under the wing of his ‘SCENE’ Natural History Club, to such places as the Moors, Bempton Cliffs, Brimham Rocks, Alnmouth, Craster and the Farne Islands. All were hugely enjoyable and beneficial for up to 200 pupils at its height. Visiting speakers and film shows all added to the diversity and interests the club engendered.

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THE POCKLINGTONIAN

I have found this task difficult because Rob’s contribution will only ever be truly measured in the memories of all the pupils who have benefitted from his skills, interests and enthusiasms. He will be sorely missed by all but we know he deserves a rest after a lifetime of dedication! Martin Butcher, Rob’s overseer and guru, wanted to add endless anecdotes and ripping Boys’ Own yarns to this tribute. I wouldn’t let him. End of... MPN


Sue Bosworth

S

ue Bosworth is retiring this summer after 24 years at Pocklington School, spent mainly but not exclusively in teaching English to overseas students.

She’s the one about whom English pupils ask, “Who’s that teacher?” English pupils currently in school may not have encountered her in the classroom, although some OPs may remember her as a Latin teacher; and some former Lyndhurst pupils may remember Language Awareness lessons. However, she is most valued and respected by the many foreign students whom she has helped immeasurably as they make the transition from home to a new country. Her expertise has eased and accelerated their progress, providing a supportive environment neatly tucked away from the bustle of school life. As a Francophile, she was happy to keep her French alive by accompanying School visits to Paris, Lyon and the Loire Valley. Indeed, she hopes to indulge her love of travel in retirement and would be pleased to meet former pupils on her trips abroad. In addition to Rob Peel and Sue Bosworth’s retirements, Keith Robinson, sports master at Lyndhurst and former physics teacher and Housemaster at Pocklington, is leaving the school after 42 years. Altogether, the three hold 105 years’ service between them. We wish them all the very best. They will be much missed. LAL

Lydia Gray

I

have lived in Pocklington for nearly 12 months now, so I am not new to the area. I am a passionate sportswoman: I have tried my hand at almost everything! My main sport is netball; I used to represent Humberside at school level and later played for Loughborough University. I have also swum competitively for the East Riding and participated in water polo matches at Loughborough. Water polo is perhaps my ideal sport, as it combines two of my strongest skills: swimming and hand-eye coordination. Away from sport, I am a great fan of horror films and thrillers. Having said that, my favourite films are ‘Labyrinth’ and ‘Anchorman’ (one of the funniest things I have ever seen). I look forward to seeing you around school!

Sharon Chiverton

I

am very pleased to be joining Pocklington School and the Science department this year. It was during my sixth form studies that I thought teaching was the career I would like to pursue. I studied Botany and Zoology at Reading University followed by a PGCE at Cambridge University. During my teaching career I have been privileged to live and work in some wonderful places, including Stamford in Lincolnshire and Oundle in Northamptonshire. My family relocated to Yorkshire two years ago and have been delighted by the welcome we have received. We have enjoyed many walks and cycle rides in the beautiful surrounding countryside of the Moors and the Wolds. It is only recently that my family has initiated me into the world of camping. I have now experienced torrential rain near Pickering, hurricane Bill in Cornwall, loud music in the lakes and relative peace in North Wales. I’m beginning to get the hang of it! Tennis is another recent hobby: I have enjoyed playing against family and friends at Dunnington since our arrival. I am looking forward to working with everyone here and very much appreciate the warm welcome I’ve received.

Brenda Wilson

B

renda Wilson retired at the end of Summer Term 2010 after 36 dedicated years of teaching. She spent the last eight years of her career at Pocklington where her happy and caring personality made a great difference to so many pupils who had hurdles to overcome with regard to learning. She made individually tailored revision cards, played games, thought of mnemonics, encouraged wide reading and generally improved the life chances of young people. The success stories are endless and our pupils will always be grateful to her. As her leaving day approached, the learning support room was full of flowers, chocolates and gifts for this kind lady for whom nothing was too much trouble. It has been a great privilege to work with her. Before teaching at Pocklington, Brenda worked in a number of schools as a Maths teacher and a Special Educational Needs Coordinator. She is now enjoying her retirement and filling her time with her young granddaughter and her hobbies which are mainly craft-based, although rumour has it that she has taken up cycling, too! Everyone at Pocklington misses her and wishes her a long and happy retirement. LD

Adam Hall

I

have a bizarre sense of humour and a love of all things history, especially military history. My hobbies include writing, film making and cooking. I was educated at Leeds Grammar School, which gave me my love of Drama, the Cadet Force, History and teaching. After studying Ancient History and Archaeology at Liverpool University, I completed a PGCE at Southampton. Along the way, I did some ballroom dancing, took up Psychic Investigation and married my girlfriend of many years. Teaching has always been my passion, history most of all. I believe in the power of history to educate us about ourselves and to show us what we are truly capable of. I am greatly involved in the Cadet Force, having served as an Instructor for three years during my time at Liverpool, and consequently love Army life and the great outdoors, especially the bleak and stunning parts. Pocklington may be my first teaching post, but I have always called Yorkshire home – may it ever be so!

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SCHOOL

Daniel Cimmerman

I

was born on 31 August 1979 in Middlesborough. I now live in Leeds city centre.

I studied Fine Art at Leeds University and have lived in several places since, including London, Manchester, and, further afield, Tokyo. I lived in Japan for over a year, teaching English as a foreign language. I love Tokyo and Japanese culture as a result of my time there. My interests include travelling, music, food, art and design. I have a particular love of Italy and Italian food, having just spent two weeks in Tuscany and Liguria this summer. I have had two of my own paintings exhibited in the National Portrait Gallery in London. For my sins, I am a Middlesborough FC fan!

Helen Scott

I

’m a new member of the Maths department and a resident house tutor in Faircote (2010-2011). I’m also involved in the Army section of the CCF and look forward to spending some weekends away in the mud! In my spare time I enjoy and (try to!) pursue lots of outdoor activities including running, cycling and hiking. My recent claim to fame is coming fourth in the (over-something) ladies Olympic distance triathlon at Castle Howard and appearing in a magazine as a result. My second claim to fame is appearing as an extra in a Bollywood movie, but that’s another story. I spent the majority of my school life in Belgium, returning to the UK to study Maths at university. After my degree I qualified as an accountant and over the course of six years, I was lucky enough to work in London, Sydney and the French Alps. Some of my friends and family may argue that “working” in the French Alps is an overstatement, so I have to keep reminding them that I was only on the slopes for 60% of the time, which left plenty of time for work! After my lovely time in France, I decided it was time to join the real world again and complete my teacher training at York. To cut a long story short, that is how I ended up at this lovely school. I’ve been made to feel incredibly welcome by all the students and staff at the school as well as all the girls and staff in Faircote. Thanks to all!

Ed Long

H

ailing originally from Edinburgh, I went on to study Archaeology there and was able to go on fieldtrips to Jordan and Portugal in the summer holidays. Having then decided not to become an archaeologist, I tried to become a philosopher at York University before exploring other careers in sales and banking, before revisiting what I thought I should have been doing all along; teaching. I studied for my PGCE at Durham University, and living in York, Pocklington was the perfect school to end-up in. I am obsessed by cricket, playing for Heworth CC in York for some years, and following English cricket in general. For my sins, I also follow Scottish rugby, but the less said about that the better.

James Playford

I

am originally from the South East coast of England. After graduating from Goldsmiths, University of London I taught in London before moving overseas. I have been fortunate enough to have lived and worked in Hong Kong, the USA and Italy. In addition to teaching I have published educational textbooks and websites, delivered teacher training and sat on the Design and Technology Association’s Innovation Group Committee. My favourite pastime is travel and I have visited many fascinating places and countries including Australia, Laos, China, Russia and Brazil. My partner and I are very excited about our move to Yorkshire and are looking forward to getting to know you all better.

Rebecca Leah

I

joined Pocklington School as a part-time Geography teacher in September and am thoroughly enjoying being part of such a dynamic, supportive and well resourced department. I qualified as a geography teacher two years ago and have spent the following time working at various schools within Manchester. Prior to my PGCE I completed a degree in Environmental Studies and I also spent a year travelling around New Zealand, where the unbelievable scenery helped to increase both my enthusiasm and in some cases understanding of Geography. I feel very privileged to be offered the opportunity to work at such a prominent and dynamic school. The staff and pupils alike have already made me feel very welcome and I am pleased to have already taken part in one of the many wonderful fieldtrips the Geography department offers. I am greatly looking forward to the rest of my time here.

Michael Beacham

H

aving studied History at Newcastle University I spent a brief period working with the Darlington Building Society, before quickly realising teaching was the route I wished to pursue. I completed a PGCE at Durham University and Pocklington is my first school as a qualified teacher. I am a keen sportsman and have the misfortune of supporting Middlesbrough FC.

Barbara Neish

I

took part in a teacher exchange with Catherine Postlethwaite. I have been teaching in state and private schools in Australia for 12 years. Some of my interests are traveling, cycling and walking. Even though the weather was cold on my arrival in England, I had a very warm welcome at Pocklington.

Julia Haldane

I

’ve really enjoyed my time here so far. Both the staff and students have been very welcoming. I taught Spanish, French and Italian in London and I then decided to spend a few years overseas with my family. I lived in the United Arab Emirates for a year and then moved to Thailand where I taught for nine years at Bangkok Patana School, a British International school. The climate in North Yorkshire is certainly a big change! 6

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APPOINTMENTS 2010/11 Head Boy Head Girl Deputy Head Boy Deputy Head Girl

Hugh Stubbins Miranda Bond Michael McKinstry Tanya Rose

Heads of House (boarding) Dolman Charles Jude Faircote Emily Peters Fenwick-Smith Rob Honeyman

Dolman Gruggen Hutton Wilberforce

Heads of House (day) Joe Knight, Lucy Rymer Dan Atkinson, Claire Stowell Phoebe Cowley Tom Hall, Mary Wilson

School Prefects Eamonn Bedford Charles Jude Abbie Brant Jessy Pang Milly Brice Emily Peters Hannah Crompton Adam Richardson Lorrain Fisher Aimee Schofield James Flint Jenny Sedcole Edward Hetherington Harriet Slater Chris Iyer Lisa Stillie

THE DAY HOUSE SYSTEM

F

ollowing the end of the First World War, in the Lent Term of 1919 the then Headmaster, P C Sands, introduced the House System more or less as we know it now. Four day houses were created: Dolman, Gruggen, Hutton and Wilberforce. They were named after John Dolman (or Dowman) founder of the School; Rev Frederick James Gruggen, Headmaster 1848-1872; Rev Charles F Hutton, Headmaster 1889-1910; and WilliamWilberforce, OP, Member of Parliament and campaigner for the abolition of slavery. Until 1919, School House, Dolman House and Wilberforce Lodge had been separate from the Day Boys. One of the reasons behind the change was to try and break down the very real sense of division between the boarders and day boys. There was also a sense of social division – hard for us to understand now – between boarders whose parents were financially able to send them to school and boys from the local area who were awarded free places (a requirement of the local authority at that time). According to A History of Pocklington School (1988) it was felt that a day house system would enable the ‘sons of the labourer’ to mix more easily with the ‘sons of better placed parents’!

STAFF NEWS In boarding, Tom Taylor steps down from his position as Housemaster of Dolman after a full nine years at the helm. Andy Towner leaves St John’s – read what his boys have to say about junior boarding in this magazine. Over the crossing, Faircotians bid farewell to Anna Hallam after her three outstanding years as Housemistress. All have given so very much to their respective houses and the boarders under their care. Happily, they remain in school so that we can pester them with extra work (they’ll need something to fill their time!). We welcome Wendy and Ian Wright to Dolman and Helen and Tristan Alexander-Hymers to Faircote and wish them all the very best for the new academic year.

Tom Taylor

Andy Towner

Emma Cunningham returned from maternity leave following the birth of Harry before Christmas. We are delighted to see her back in the Drama department. Sarah Wass left at Christmas to prepare for the birth of her first child, Isaac Henry, who was born on 20 February.

Sarah Wass

Catherine Postlethwaite also left at Christmas – for Australia! She embarked on an exchange with Barbara Neish, who took over her French and German classes for a time this year. You can read more about both members of staff and their experiences later in this magazine. Upon her return from Australia, Catherine and Martin Davies announced their engagement. Congratulations to you both!

Catherine Postlethwaite

Congratulations to Nikki Scott-Somers (née Whatford), who married Alastair over the summer. By the time you read this, Nikki and Hannah McNelly will have climbed Kilimanjaro in a superb fund-raising challenge (photograph below). In the romantic coup of the year, Hannah was proposed to by Mark at the top of mountain! Luckily, she said yes…

Nikki Scott-Somers

Immediately after the introduction of the new system, inter-house rivalry became very keen. It continues to this day in sport, drama and music. In the 1980s and 90s the day houses were again pitted against boarders on occasion. This led to much disgruntlement in competitions such as House Music, where the day houses complained that the boarders had an unfair advantage in their ability to get together and practise after school. This particular element of the system has changed within the last ten years. Hannah McNelly, Jo Denison and Nikki Scott-Somers get ready for action

In our more recent past, various amendments have been made to the system in order to reinforce it. Students now have registration in houses at the beginning of each day, and this has, indeed, strengthened the system. All boarders are allocated to a day house. This does mean, for example, that Dolman boarders are spread amongst all four day houses, but pupils now have a strong sense of belonging to their own house, as well as a feeling of kinship with others both older and younger than themselves. Families join the same day houses; and we have students now whose parents and possibly even grandparents share this affinity with them. AJE

More wedding bells in the history department…Ed Long will marry his fiancée in August 2012. Kirsten Clow will begin her maternity leave at the end of term. Finally, hot off the press: news of a baby Hughes! Congratulations to Gareth and Rachel.

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ACTIVITIES

CHARITY WEEK We were blessed with predominantly fine weather, particularly on the day of the School Walk when it was dry underfoot, bright-skied (but not sunburningly so) and pleasantly warm.

A

fter ten years of Ian Sheppard’s hard work, from now on it will be Steve Nesom's task - fittingly so as it was he who devised the 15 mile route twenty years ago when Tony Pickering (then Headmaster) inaugurated the idea of a School Walk, on that occasion to raise money for the local All Saints' Church Appeal. Nowadays our proceeds go much further afield. There were the usual events - fairs, gungeing, large-scale musical chairs (won by Tom Moore), cake-stalls, a concert and a return of Slave Day and its entertaining prequel, the slave auction. The committee of sixth-formers was enthusiastic and collaborative throughout, especially when it came to the Concert: Messrs Heaven, Ryan and Sheppard gave generously of their time and were impressed by the committee's efforts. This year's concert may have lacked some of the variety of previous Charity Concerts but it went down well with the audience, as did the judging by Janet Farmer (Pocklington Arts Centre) and Ollie Wride (OP, and emerging star in the Freddie Mercury mould). Their first prize, embracing both performance and originality, went to Alice Boyes (Vocal, and accompanied by Olivia Turner): ten free tickets to Ollie's concert in the O2 arena just after the end of term. In the end we raised just under £12,000 (which was well over the £10,000 target) and the proceeds were distributed as follows: The Mkwakwani School Project (KENYA)

£5,000

Seeds for Development (UGANDA)

£2000

Holme Hall Sue Ryder Holme (HOLME ON SPALDING MOOR)

£1500

Help for Heroes (HANTS)

£1500

Hearing Dogs for the Deaf (BIELBY)

£1000

St Leonard's Hospice (YORK)

£500

DrugFAM (UK)

£200

Committee: Tom Brant, Millie Brice, Lorrain Fisher, Jenny Sedcole, Henry Stockley, Hugh Stubbins and Mary Wilson. RJP

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SCHOOL WALK 2010

T

his was the tenth school walk to be organised by Ian Sheppard! What an achievement! Over the years he has fine-tuned his planning and the event has run more and more smoothly each time. The weather was kind and as always the walk of 24 kilometres through the Yorkshire Wolds made a different impression on every individual depending on what stage they were at and who they were walking with at the time. It is a memorable experience to get away from the school site and to be able to experience our local countryside at first hand. Here are some ideas of what can be seen; if you didn’t see them this time around, perhaps you will look out for them next year. We spotted a memorial hospital dating from the 19th century; sheltered housing provided by the council in the 20th century; a nature reserve around Saint Helen’s Spring which was a place of Christian celebration in former centuries; ashes, beeches, oaks, pines, crops of barley and wheat and a fantastic field of poppies; a church dating from the eleventh century; a snatch of Roman road; earthworks dating from 2000BC; and a red kite! As we looked further afield we saw York Minster, at least four power stations, Emley Moor transmitter mast, the Pennines and the White Horse at Sutton Bank. It was great to be out as a school amidst such heritage, much of which we so easily take for granted. Thanks to all staff and students who made the walk possible and to all sponsors who between them raised just over £6,500. SCN

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ACTIVITIES

Charity Week 2011 Tuesday saw a stiff breeze wafting nearly one hundred balloons from the 1st XV pitch in a race which took them not far above the church and over the Wolds. Their destinations remain a secret to this day. The winner was drawn out of a hat: Jack Garvey the lucky person to win a voucher from the Gliding Club.

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his year we completed our five year support programme for the Mkwakwani Project by giving them £3000 from the proceeds of Charity Week. Our overall donation has therefore reached £20,000. Other beneficiaries included Dove House Hospice, SmileTrain, Andrea’s Gift and two OPs, Dan Williams and Fraser Henderson, who are working, climbing mountains and raising money for Childreach International and Light in Africa respectively. The remainder went to the British Inspiration Trust set up by Phil Packer, our speaker on Speech Day 2010. The Middle School Fair was a festive success and Sophia Eggleston triumphed in the musical chairs. Wilberforce ‘won’ the 6th form cake break bake, raising just under £150. The concert – once again dominated by singing – was won by Jason James and Rob Foot. The final event, the ever-colourful staff gunging, saw Messrs Adams, Peel, Dare and Misses McNelly and Scott smothered in goo, much to the amusement of some dangerously close spectators! We raised £4835.55 this year and thanks must go to the L6 committee who worked hard and efficiently to bring off each event so smoothly. Next year, Mr Hutchings and Miss Scott take the reins as Mr Peel disappears into the sunset. As a parting gesture, he sold some of his ties for auction, fetching just under £154.66, which was sent to SmileTrain. RJP

LOWER SCHOOL EXCHANGE This year saw an Anglo-Australian exchange as Miss Postlethwaite travelled Down Under after Christmas and Mrs Neish arrived in Pocklington for the start of Lent Term. Here, Hannah Hutchinson (L6) interviews both staff about their experiences at school.

What has it been like being the tutor of 1 Gruggen? Miss P: Nice, lovely. 2 Gruggen (my first year form last year) are brilliant; the nicest form ever! There are some characters in current 1 Gruggen too. Any favourite moments? I’ve really enjoyed working with Mr Andrews; he’s a good tutor. I also enjoy working with the younger age groups. I don’t really know why, they’re just a bit more enthusiastic and keen. They still get excited about things and you can try any activity with them and they’ll get involved and go for it, like House events and sport. Also, I’m really looking forward to the Christmas trip we have planned. We’re going ice skating and then out for a meal with all of Lower School Gruggen.

What are you looking forward to in Australia when you leave on your exchange? I’m looking forward to just going; I’ve never been before so I’m looking forward to maybe travelling around the country and going to New Zealand during one of the holidays. I’m also looking forward to a different teaching experience and maybe even picking up new techniques to bring back here. I’ll be working in a Catholic secondary school with about 1000 pupils, so it’s a bit bigger than here at Pocklington. It’s a mixed school, so there won’t be anything new there. I’ll be teaching French still and something called ‘Society & Environment Studies’; I’m guessing it’s a bit like citizenship and I’m intrigued to find out more – it could be interesting! Anything you’re not looking forward to? Spiders! Also all the other various ‘interesting’ wildlife. My form has been scaring me by researching about all manner of horrible deadly creatures that live out there. Also, I don’t know anybody out there, so that’s a little bit daunting. However, they seem to have a lot more sport out there so I’ll be teaching and playing a bit more tennis and netball. How did you find out about the exchange? I’ve known about it ever since teacher training; however, you need 5 years of teaching experience. Ever since I heard about it I decided I either wanted to go to New Zealand or Australia. Well, we wish you well and hope you have a great time!

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How did you hear about the exchange? Mrs N: It was a few years ago from the Independent Education Union. I’ve always wanted to teach overseas; especially in Europe as I’m originally from Germany so it would be nice to be back over here again. How did you end up living in Australia? I was born in Germany but my husband is Australian, so we ended up just travelling back there. We’ve been living there for over 25 years now. Are there many differences between Australia and here? Yes, the exam process especially. Our weather is a bit different too; there are a lot more cyclones! The first year Gruggeners asked me if we’d ever had a tidal wave, but luckily we haven’t whilst I’ve been living there. They also asked me about the heat, but it varies depending on where you live. The living style is different too; although Australia is so much larger than England, we only have a third of the population. Most people live on the coast in cities like Sydney and Melbourne. For every one square kilometre, there are roughly two people. When I explained all this to the first years they seemed in awe, except for one boy who muttered, ‘That’s why we’re better at cricket then...’ How have you found your first few weeks at Pocklington? It’s been very busy. Obviously with any new school you do the same few things; you try to familiarise yourself with the physical layout of the building. Also you try to get used to the department and your fellow staff and where all the resources are. Has it been very welcoming here? It’s been very welcoming. Everyone has been so helpful and supportive. What are your form group like? They’re very nice. They’re a second year group that I took over from Miss Postlethwaite. They asked me some very interesting questions about Australia, such as: ‘How many kangaroos are there in Australia?’ and ‘Is New Zealand better at rugby than Australia?’ What do you hope to gain from this experience? I hope to gain an insight into different education systems and to get to know my form and help them throughout the time I’m here.

MISS P IN AUSTRALIA

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n January 2011, I embarked upon a teaching exchange to St Mary MacKillop College, Canberra, as part of the LECT exchange programme. I arrived at the beginning of January and was fortunate to have three weeks of holiday before term began. During the three weeks, I visited Melbourne, Sydney and the New South Wales coast in the glorious January sunshine. During my time in Canberra, I cycled to school each day and lived right next to a conservation area, often seeing kangaroos as I set off early in the morning. Fortunately I had no nasty encounters with snakes or spiders during my time there, much to my relief! My school was relatively large with 2000 pupils split between two campuses. I was based at the junior campus for Years 7-9 and taught French and English to Years 7 and 8. I taught classes of thirty and so had many names to learn very quickly. There were many similarities between Pocklington and St Mary MacKillop. The staff were very welcoming and the majority of the pupils motivated and keen to learn. There were, however, some interesting differences. Firstly, it really struck me how fortunate our pupils are in their choice of extracurricular activities. Surprisingly, for such a sporty nation, there were no after school sport or music clubs at St Mary MacKillop. Teams for various sports would participate in one-day competitions but there were no weekly fixtures and no musical ensembles. The school felt eerily empty at 3.45pm! Secondly, there were no public examinations to work towards. The pupils are assessed internally in Year 12 and then the marks are moderated. I found that there was much less academic pressure on the pupils but that this did result in a less disciplined attitude to their studies for some. My four months in Australia have been a most beneficial experience. I met many fantastic people and made some lifelong friends. I joined a tennis club, attended weekly yoga classes and started Bollywood dancing lessons! It was refreshing to try new things and take myself out of my comfort zone. It was fascinating to gain an insight into another country’s education system and to observe other teaching styles. Furthermore, the experience highlighted what a superb school Pocklington is and how much I enjoy teaching here. CJP

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ACTIVITIES

HISTORIA

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he second year of the revamped and repackaged History Society, HISTORIA, has, it is widely agreed, surpassed the heights of the first. The school held ten talks, ranging from the Crusades to Barack Obama and the Great War to Norman England. Our guest speakers have also been from a mixture of backgrounds, all experts in their fields and all giving up their free time to talk to our students. The usual mix of teachers and University Professors were joined this year by the High Sherriff of East Yorkshire and Graham Stuart MP. The most notable event, though, had to be The Cawood Lectures, when a number of our enthusiatic 6th form students gave talks themselves on an area of great personal interest – it was a remarkable achievement and a remarkable HISTORIA year all round. GJH

LOWER SCHOOL HISTORY

Pupils spent a day out at Rievaulx Abbey...

...Trebuchet, HISTORIA's younger brother, put crowns on the heads of unsuspecting first and second formers...

And Tom Oughtred encountered a camouflaged friend!

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LITERARY SOCIETY

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ouis de Bernières does not have sat nav; neither do I. In my case, this is not critical: I haven’t been asked to sign a book for years. (It did happen once. A case of mistaken identity, allegedly.)

The author of Captain Corelli’s Mandolin did finally reach Pocklington via a series of minor roads in Lent term – and how thankful we were that he did. This was a masterly presentation, rich in anecdote and diversion. “He can really talk!” was the consensus; and it is rare indeed to hear someone combine memory, literature and history so deftly. This was a real treat for members of the 6th form Literary Society and a timely spur for budding authors to get writing, “Anything, anywhere, anytime.”

We were fortunate to host two other well-known writers this year in the English Department. G P Taylor, author of Shadowmancer, Wormwood and Tersias, entertained Lower School pupils with a reading from his work and some hilarious autobiographical tales. Tickets sold almost immediately for the visit of Chris Ryan, former British Special Forces operative and soldier turned novelist. Such a literary celebrity needed no introduction and ensured a capacity audience in the TST. LAL

SIXTH FORM SOCIETY

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his year the Sixth Form Society has gone from strength to strength, with speakers from both the Upper and Lower Sixth giving talks, writes Tom Burke (L6). As the new President, I had the dubious honour of opening the year with 'Blair: Saint or Sinner'. The talk saw many eyebrows raised and strong views given from members of staff and pupils alike. The December presentation was given by a new L6, James Reckitt, on ‘Why Computers will be obsolete by 2020’. Despite the bad snow, many arrived to listen to James and the talk was a success, with many leaving with much greater knowledge of the potential of technology.

Sixth Form Society returned after Christmas with Ross Cronshaw giving an entertaining speech on ‘The Supernatural’ and the changing perceptions and interpretations of several classic supernatural monsters. Ross’s talk showed a lighter side to the Society, refreshing many people after the stress of January exams. The March talk was given by another U6, Mike McKinstry, on ‘Science vs Religion: Can’t we just have a rational conversation?’ This thoughtprovoking talk was attended by many staff and pupils, and Mike dealt effectively with a very difficult range of questions. The year was rounded off by a talk on ‘Euthanasia: The Right to Die’ by Aggie Jakubowska. Although U6 had left school by this point, many L6 and members of staff attended. Unsurprisingly, this topic triggered many questions, which provided strong grounds for debate.

EXTENDED PROJECT QUALIFICATION

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he opportunity to branch away from the school curriculum presents itself rarely, if at all; so when I heard about the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ), I was instantly attracted, writes Edward Hetherington (U6). I was also drawn to this venture because you don’t get marked down for getting things wrong – genius! (On reflection, had I fully considered the ‘5,000 word essay’, ’70 hours of research’ and ‘indepth presentation’ that were proposed to us over Summer Term 2010, I would probably have given the EPQ a miss. I’m glad I didn’t!) The EPQ allows a student to choose any topic they want to research and explore, resulting in a 5,000 word essay; or to write a creative piece such as a film, short story or play, supported by a 1,000 word commentary. This year’s group of imaginatively named ‘EPQers’ consists of Joe Knight, Emma Hawcroft, Rob Foot, Rob Harris and Edward Hetherington. Between us, we are studying an eclectic array of subjects: the Mental Health Act and its ethics; a comparison between the actions of Tony Blair and Harold Wilson; composers and their environments; ethics and Guy de Maupassant...the possibilities are endless! I had no idea what I was letting myself in for, but I can now say that this project has taught us a vast amount. We have learnt to plan work properly, be in total control of a subject area, develop a greater sense of self-discipline and create definite deadlines. The real beauty of the EPQ is that it does not draw on existing knowledge but on what you gain whilst undertaking it. All you need is infinite commitment and determination. You don’t even have to know anything about what you want to research because, as Einstein said: ‘If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?’ Admittedly, the EPQ isn’t for everyone; the very idea of it pains many of my friends. However, for those who do decide to give it a go, be adventurous – and good luck!

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ACTIVITIES

ALLEN SOCIETY

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ollowing a successful year led by former chairs of Allen Society Mike McKinstry and Emily Peters - we continue to promote science among 6th form pupils and the Pocklington community, writes Jonathan Chu (L6). The new academic year kicked off with Darwin and Sexual Selection, presented by Professor Tim Birkhead, from the University of Sheffield, in October. Pleasingly, the lecture was attended by an audience of over 100 people, including 6th form scientists, teaching staff, Governors and parents. In January, Dr Kelvin Tapley, Senior Lecturer from the University of Leeds, gave a talk on colour chemistry: From Cosmetics to Cars, and from Smart Materials to Marketing. After a one-hour long lecture, we all learnt how colour science really relates to every single part of our daily lives. Mr Phil Male, the former Chief Strategy Officer at Cable & Wireless, came in March to give a talk about GPS and Triangulation; Cloud Computing and Online Safety; New Devices for Commission and Operation. The talk really opened our eyes and made us see the exciting future of computing science. Allen Society had the pleasure to have Professor Paul Kaye, from the University of York, in the Summer Term to speak on the topic of immunology – New Vaccines for Old Diseases. Although the talk was held during the exam season, the enthusiasm shown by our L6 students lit up the atmosphere of the night, especially during the question and answer session. The response to the intriguing lecture was ‘very interesting’ and ‘simply fascinating’. This was no doubt proven by the fact that Professor Kaye stayed behind for almost an hour to face numerous questions fired at him by audience members! Aggie and I value the opportunity given to us by Mr Hutchings to run Allen Society. We will go from strength to strength to organise yet more interesting lectures in the next academic year. At the moment, we are looking at the possibility of hosting a talk on Quantum Computing in September.

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION PRIZE

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n Science, Jesse Chu and Tom Fuller received ‘Highly commended’ for their entry for the RSC Bill Bryson Prize for Science Communication. They were in a very small group of shortlisted students who were in final contention for the Secondary School prize for 2011. The theme for the competition was “Chemistry - our life, our future” and they produced a short film looking at an alternative fuel obtained from growing plants. Congratulations to both boys on their superb achievement. JM

GREEN COMMITTEE

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t the end of Lent term 2011, Mrs Alexander and Dr Clow took over the Green Committee.

Thanks to the hard work of previous chair Mr Allen, the Pocklington Foundation Group has already been granted Bronze and Silver Eco School status. We are now taking steps towards gaining our first Green Flag award, which we aim to have in place by next summer. The Green Committee consists of teaching staff from both schools, support staff, students and governors. We are very proud of the many green ideas and concepts that have already been implemented. These include: the introduction of a full paper recycling scheme across both schools; a fully utilised biodiversity programme, with the introduction of bat boxes and a beautiful woodland area to encourage insect and other wildlife use; and a ‘Healthy Living’ campaign, introduced by the catering manager, Mr D’Arcy. These significant green changes have already gained us the Silver award. We are hoping to strengthen our links with other schools in the area which already have the prestigious Green Flag, in order to draw on their ideas and experiences in this specialist field. If anyone is interested in joining the Committee, please see either Dr Clow or Mrs Alexander for more information. HTA

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YOUNG ENTERPRISE Young Enterprise has enjoyed a highly successful year. This year’s company is called POCKSYE – Pocklington School Young Enterprise, after the board’s approval of Liam Corbally’s witty idea, writes Managing Director Jonathan Chu (L6).

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OCKSYE is a designer, retailer and supplier of silicone rubber wristbands. For retailing, we have two brands: Hull City AFC and Yorkshire born ‘n’ bred wristbands. As a supplier, we have an exciting product called the DesignManufacture-Delivery all-in-one package. We held sales days in York and Hull trade fairs. However, some of our bigger orders have come through our all-in-one package service. This is through contacting companies via email to see if they would be interested in our product. We are proud to say that some places have taken us up on this offer, notably Boston spa school who bought 150 wristbands for their event – ‘Battle of the Bands’. Other clients include Arco, Young Enterprise Humber Board and English Schools Cricket Association. We also contacted and organised a meeting with Hull City AFC to obtain a trade mark licence and selling permit from them. Highlights of our year now followed: we attended two trade fairs, one at the MacArthur Glenn designer outlet in York and the other at St Stephen’s in Hull, where we were awarded with the Best Sales Team award. We sold both our Hull City AFC and the Yorkshire born‘n’ bred bands. We also attended the One Hull business forum, where we gave a nervewracking presentation to some of Hull’s top businessmen, as well as displaying our products at our trade stand. A major boost was two live radio interviews with Vixen 101. We were also reported in the Pocklington Post, York Press, and Hull Daily Mail. At the end of the year, we took part in the Young Enterprise HSBC Innovation Awards Competition. After qualifying for the sub-regional final, we went to Bridlington Spa to present to the finalist teams and many guests from the business world. We were thrilled to leave with six awards: Information Technology; Human Resources; Marketing and Sales; Best Company Report; Best East Riding of Yorkshire Company; and Humber

Sub-region Company of the Year. At the Regional Final, we attained two awards: Communications; and Best Company Report and Accounts. There have been moments of frustration this year. Nonetheless, everyone in the company feels they have learnt a great set of skills and we can all say that the hard work has been both worthwhile and rewarding. The company is now undergoing a transitional process into becoming a real legal company. I would like to thank Mr Tomaszewski, and our Business Advisers, Tim Carlisle and Colin Wilson, for all the time and advice they have given to us. Finally, a massive thank you to the rest of the POCKSYE team for being so supportive and patient this year. If you are interested in purchasing some wristbands for your marketing campaign or to promote your events, please do not hesitate to contact us on pocksye@gmail.com. Innovative, all Inclusive and hassle free: this is just too good a company to wind up in 2011.’ - Thomas Martin, Joint MD of Arco. Ltd. ‘I need to get one of these (Yorkshire born ‘n’ bred wristbands)! My university friends are making fun of my Yorkshire accent!’ - A female customer we met in York on May 1st.

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ACTIVITIES

MASTERCHEF

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horizo, red onion and red pepper... three specified ingredients…and sixty minutes. Ali Moran (U6), this year’s winner of the school’s annual cookery competition for the third year running, tells Emma Hawcroft (U6) of his success and his ambitions for the future. ‘The week before the competition, I put my school work aside and focused on my priorities: ready to rustle up the winning master-piece! I had been waiting all year for this event to come round, and now it was time. Preparation began by leafing through cookery books and scouring the internet for the perfect recipe. At my local restaurant, ‘Graze on the Green’ in Rosedale, where I work, I quizzed the chefs for tips and advice on a suitable dish, allowing me to be a little more experimental with my presentation (as I have learnt from recent years that this is the key!). Given that this was my third year taking part, the pressure really was on to try and prove myself once more. The day before the big event, I sent my Dad to buy the ingredients; little did he know he would be £30 out of pocket! A practice run the day before enabled me to perfect my recipe, knowing full well that the competition would be tough. My fellow competitors this year were Annabel Cawood, Will Mason, Barnaby Platt, Charles Jude, Aimee Long and Harriet Slater, and joining us were three teachers: Mr Donaldson, Miss McNelly and Mrs Wilson. Between us, we conjured up a range of dishes, from risotto to seafood paella.

The day arrived. Weighed down by my ingredients plus the three compulsory ones, I set to work. My two dishes were a chorizo and red pepper pizza and a second plate of a tomato and mozzarella stack, a chorizo and prawn kebab and hasselback potatoes with cayenne pepper to add a fiery taste! After much deliberation, the judges, Mr Ronan, Mr Houltham and Neil Bartram (the manager of Pocklington Sainsbury’s), surprised me by choosing me as the winner! My interest in cooking, helped by my part time job and work experience at the Michelin-starred Harome’s The Star Inn, has inspired me to study a degree in Culinary Arts at university. I admire Andrew Pern, the owner of The Star Inn: he is local and has had so much success. My ambition, one day, is to be a successful retailer with an empire of farm shops, delis, pubs and restaurants!’

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WARHAMMER

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any people have asked me, “What is Warhammer/Warhammer 40,000/Lord of the Rings?” writes Daniel Merrison (5DOL).

They are all wargames, is the simple answer, and all of them can be played here in school. Every game is different, with each “game system” allowing for a different strategy and play. Think of these matches as a more complicated game of chess. Each piece has its rules, and its limits as to what it can do. Some can only move small distances, and some can be very versatile. To play any of these games you need a tape measure, dice, at least two rule books and your models, preferably painted. When you start, try not to read through the whole of your 100-odd page tome of rules; about half of it will be useful. If you don’t have an army, try buying the starter set for which ever system you like. You can go to a Games Workshop and find out about their games systems. They might give you an introductory game so you can see what the system is like and, if you enjoy it, dig in and have fun. If you want to find out more, join us in ICT 3 on a Thursday for games, converting and painting. If you need any more information, find me or Mrs Wilson (ICT 3).

ICT GAMING

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he ICT department linked up with Mr Lyndsey West (OP and current parent) for the 2nd Annual Platform Epos Event (Platform 2011) in Hull.

SIXTH FORM ICT

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s part of our continuous search for new technologies and scientific knowledge, our L6 ICT pupils visited the new Computer Science department at the University of York this summer. The tour consisted of the facilities on the new campus including the software and hardware labs, an insight into a new development of Human Computer Interaction being developed in the home and the impressive vision laboratories performing cutting edge spectroscopic research. Dr Will Smith elaborated on how shape analysis is being studied with a view to developing techniques in the world of animation and CGI. Jack Whitlock underwent a head scan to create a 3D facial recognition model that is part of an exciting area of research in computer vision (pictured). Subsequently, Prof Richard Wilson gave the students an informative presentation on breakthroughs being made in pattern recognition and computer vision theories.

The pupils worked in pairs and were asked to plan their own original game concept, including choice of platform and storyboard behind the ideas. All the pupils worked extremely hard on the plans, generating some great designs, from a ‘Psychotic Penguin’ application for the Iphone, to an interactive shooter game using the Kinnect. The pupils demonstrated originality and critical thinking in their ideas and the ICT department managed to whittle down the many entries to 1st, 2nd and 3rd prizes. Well done to everyone in the 2nd year for all their hard work and many congratulations to the winners! 1st Prize: Oliver Peeke-Vout and Emma Huddlestone with ‘Psychotic Penguin’ for the Iphone. 2nd Prize: James Wightman and Beth Roberts with ‘Pixel Pig’ for the Iphone or Ipad. 3rd Prize: Joe Dyrdal and Grace Jackson with ‘Target’ for the Xbox Kinnect. HTA

The trip gave the pupils a taste of a higher education environment and an idea of the range of university courses available in Computer Science. We hope they have the vision to see beyond the classroom at Pocklington! MSW

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BOARDING

ORCHARD There are four ‘Lyndy’ boarders in Orchard: Charlotte Pearman (5jz), Charlotte Tucker-Lowe (6jz), Jasmin Donnelly (5jx) and Issy Knight (6jx). Here are a few of our comments about life in junior boarding!

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e get assigned our prep on weekdays. After Prep we have a short, fun activity and then go up to prepare for bed. Mrs Midwinter always helps us and cheers us up with stories about The Fair Orchard Maidens. She is the Learnéd Weather Forecaster! At weekends, we have a range of different activities on Saturdays (with the Lyndhurst teachers) and on Sundays (with the whole of Orchard). We like art and craft, the high ropes course, dry slope skiing, the cinema and Waterworld. Overall, boarding is fun but can be challenging at times.

I am enjoying boarding; though I am sad because I had to leave my old friends, I have made new ones, writes Rebecca Witty (1WIL). I like the bedrooms because they have plenty of room. I also like the fact that we have a dog in the house. I love dogs!

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Miss Scott was shy when she first joined us, but as the year went on she showed how kind, loving, helpful, clever and beautiful she could be, remembers Lauren Coatsworth (1GRU). She was and still is basically my big ‘sissy’! I don’t know what I’d do without her. She never shouts or moans and she always asks you nicely, from the moment you wake up until lights out. We all miss her but she’s gone to see George. I’m hoping that when I’m older and have saved up all my pennies I can visit her in New Zealand!

Orchard is a friendly place. All the girls are really nice and very caring towards each other, believes Jenny Russell (2HUT). Although I do get homesick, there are many activities to take my mind off things, such as swimming, sport and crafts. I have been here for nearly four years: I started in year 5 and am now in 2nd form. Katie and Jemma have also been here since year 5, while Adelle and Emily came in 1st form. In my time here I have been on a few Sunday trips. They have all been great – especially Flamingo Land!

All the Orchard girls feel like my sisters, writes Beth HatfieldChetter (1DOL). Even though I’ve only been here a few months, when Miss Scott left, it was as if I’d known her for years. We were all so upset to see her go. In house, activities are fun stuff! Swimming on a Thursday night and drama on Friday evenings are great. Sometimes, though, we just like to sit down and watch a film!

Your expedition to the Magic Forest begins here... On Sunday you will be awoken from your dainty slumbers at 8.10am by the Learnéd Weather Forecaster. You will put on your robes and go with all haste to the Refectory. After that we will provide the Books of Song to the mysterious residents of Pocklington. When the Period of Soul Searching is completed, we will cross the painted road back to the Land of Orchard.

Flamingo Land is one of my favourite trips of the boarding year. It is a GREAT day, enthuses Georgia Covell (1DOL). When we get there we wait for the teachers to get our tickets. Then we’re split up into groups and go round the rides before lunch. We have the whole afternoon to explore and have more fun before we get too tired and go back to school!

At 10.50am, we will board the tin can with wheels to fight a battle against the hobgoblins (ahem! – Ed.) of the Land of St John. A banquet in a precious paper wrapper will be provided. You will splatter the opposing army with coloured spells. On our return we will be tired, dirty and hungry – but we will have vanquished our enemies. Or will we? JEM

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BOARDING

ST JOHN’S What better way to end six long, gruelling yet rewarding years in St John’s than letting the boys speak for themselves? After all, it is their voices we hear long after we leave.

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St John's is a home from home

Most people’s favourite is the Boarders’ Christmas Dinner. There are goodbye speeches and music is played and there are usually one or two groups of singers. After the entertainment some awards are handed out, like ‘most likely to be a millionaire’, which the pupils have voted for previously. We then leave the dining room and go to the music school where they play 5 minute movies that have been made by each house. We then have a disco and in the middle the staff band play a few pieces.

In December, we spent three hours on a Saturday morning making a 7ft igloo with our Mr Towner. Over the last three years I have really enjoyed my time in St John’s, and will be sad to leave the building at the end of this school year. In St John’s we have a set routine, believes Henry Foster (5jy); we see Miss Smith for free time between 4pm and 5.30pm, then we go to the dining hall for dinner and do activities between 6pm and 7pm. We do our prep between 7pm and 8pm. I think it is perfectly fair to do prep for an hour. (What a well trained young man! Ed.) Now my favourite time is free time, which lasts until 9pm. This is the time I call my parents. And if it is a tuck night I eat some tuck and I have a laugh with my mates. I go on the Xbox with them which is really fun. Our tuck nights at the boarding house are Tuesday, Thursday and the weekend. In the boarding house we have duties, too, such as tidying the common room or games room, putting laundry in the right basket, washing up or putting the shoes in the boot room.

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In the games room we have four computers, an Xbox, a dart board, a pool table, a piano keyboard and lego. We have an electrical cabinet to keep our electricals safe when we’re not using them. We all have a roommate so if we are ill or homesick at night they can get the teacher who is on duty. In the common room we have four leather sofas with Sky TV! When I started Pocklington School I was a bit nervous at first but the people there were very kind, recalls Aaron Baxter (2DOL). I share a room with Boss and he was very welcoming. There are a lot of things to do: go on the Xbox, watch TV and play outside. There’s an air hockey table and a pool table. I found it easy to be away from my family because it was so homey. Activities each evening during the week are really fun and the whole boarding house enjoys them, writes Boss Kelly (2WIL). There are a wide range of activities that we do. Some days last term we went to Allerthorpe and played blocky which is when you played hide and seek in the dark. We also did a course of trampolining. On Thursdays, Mrs Newhouse takes us swimming. On Fridays Mr Parker takes us for activities and we usually play football or blocky. My favourite activity is with Mr Sykes on Monday because we play blocky and softball with the girls and we all really enjoy it. Boarding is All in all, weekly boarding is awesome.

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t John’s is a home from home where you will make lifelong friends and experience unforgettable moments, writes Robert Smith (1HUT). The main events everyone looks forward to are the Theme Park trip to Light Water Valley, Boarders’ Christmas Dinner, Bonfire Night and, last but not least, the Theme Park and Zoo trip to Flamingo Land.

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I have been in boarding for three terms now, writes Andrew Quinn (1DOL). I enjoy boarding very much. I particularly like the weekends. My favourite weekend was probably when


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We have the time of our lives

we went snowboarding. Before we went on this activity I had never done snowboarding or skiing before! Another activity that I particularly enjoyed was paintballing (Delta Force). I loved the orange and red smoke bombs. They were definitely a good way to stop the opposition from seeing us! We all had a few bruises at the end but it was very good!

Weekends in the boarding house are amazing, thrills Jacob Brown (1DOL). We have school on Saturday, but as soon as the day pupils are gone we have the whole place to ourselves! Because school finishes at 2pm, we have 3½ hours of free time where we usually go into town, eat, watch TV and play on the Xbox until tea time. After tea we watch a film which comes on subscription and changes every week. After it finishes we go to bed, and as a weekend treat we’re allowed our iPods We're the and PSPs late into the night!

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On Sunday, we have the time of our lives; we don’t wake up until 8.30am and then have breakfast at 9am! It’s a hard life isn’t it?! Depending on when our Sunday activity is, we go to church, with Rev Rob. After that we go on our “day out activity” with Orchard girls,

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ones that have all the fun!

which can be cinema, bowling, Big Fun (a big soft-play area) and many other awesome places. The fun thing about the weekends is that not all the boarders stay; it’s as if we’re the ones that have all the fun, while the others have to got home. So really, weekends are heaven!

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BOARDING

FAIRCOTE

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his time last year I had never done a marathon, I wasn’t able to properly speak and understand English and I certainly had never been part of a community like the one in Faircote ever before, reflects Marie Knobloch (L6). When I go back to Germany I will miss film nights, horror film nights (which were sometimes not so scary), daily chats in the office and more glamorous events like Faircote Dinner and the Pink Party so much. I will even miss the daily complaints about the showers and the workload simply because as soon as I don’t hear these complaints anymore I will be back in Germany where I will miss everyone in Pocklington and here in Faircote so much. Thank you so much Mrs Hallam for being the best Housemistress I could have imagined and thanks to Miss Scott for always being such a wonderful and understanding person and of course thanks to Miss Lamb who always has an open ear and who helped me through the last 6 miles of the ‘Moonwalk’. Last but not least thank you so much to the girls in Faircote, you are just the best and I will miss you all so much!

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s I write, summer is still outside; we are in that pleasant, somnolent ‘no man’s land’ of late August, when precise dates are delightfully forgotten.

How then to summarise the year? Those in boarding will know that this is very difficult: so much occurs which is impossible to capture. What we can say is that beneath the activity and charge of this house lies a mix which is distinctively ‘Faircotian’: affectionate, quirky and spirited, with dashes of impudence and a healthy dollop of irreverence. No doubt we should blame Mrs Hallam for inculcating such subversive behaviour. I must say that the Blue Baby’s guest appearances last term were truly spectacular: quite how Ellie McCabe survived the shock, I will never know. Hours spent huddled around YouTube, searching for vile skin diseases and watching the horrendous ‘Salad Fingers’ will live long in the memory… Despite their unusual house lives, the girls have continued to flourish in school. Alex Riddell sang beautifully in performance last term and has just produced her first CD. Upon her arrival at the tender age of 14, Alice Wilton entered the 1st XI hockey squad and has remained there ever since. Emma Adesile continues to play saxophone in Swing Band, recently participating in their trip to Berlin. We were especially proud of some wonderful GCSE results, including Abbie Kearney’s haul of eight A*s. At AS level, Jeannie Law gained just reward for her hard work with four A grades. Congratulations to our new school prefects (Sophie Duncan, Sarah Veitch and Alex Howard) and to Ellie McCabe, our Deputy Head Girl. Upon return from Easter, Sixth form boarders turned out to support our Pink Party. Planned and directed by the Moonwalkers (Lisa Stillie, Sophie Duncan, Lizzie Oughtred, Marie Knobloch, Laurie White and Hannah Hutchinson), the evening was a real success, raising nearly £300 for Breast Cancer Research. Along the way, we found time to plaster the dining hall in pink and string decorated bras from the ceiling, much to Mr D’Arcy’s disbelief… An institution begun by Mrs Hallam and now in its third year, May’s Faircote Dinner – on the theme of ‘Masquerade’ – gave the girls their chance to dress up in style. The L6 and U6 speeches were fitting last words on their peer and staff relationships: warm, witty and struck through with real feeling. The traditional end of year barbeque, tinged with sadness and replete with memories, offered us a chance to reflect on the remarkable strength of

spirit which has flourished here in recent years. Our U6 leavers have led by example and provided a fine unit at the top of the house. They will be much missed. This is a very special house. The girls’ tolerance, energy and good humour are precious qualities which embody so much of Mrs Hallam’s own character and are tribute to her remarkable transformation of Faircote. We have had a memorable year and feel sure that Mr and Mrs AlexanderHymers will take on the mantle of Houseparents with a fine group of young ladies behind them. LAL

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BOARDING

DOLMAN

At the end of the Michaelmas Term, we had a Christmas shopping trip to the Designer Outlet where a large group of lads also took to the ice to show off their skills.

Dolman Curry Night. Mrs Jude, Charles’s mum, cooked another fabulous series of Indian dishes on the buffet at the Dolman Curry Night. Traditional Indian dress was optional.

The traditional game of outdoor twister gets underway at the Dolman summer barbecue. Alan Lee assists Adam Richardson in his Yoga crane position in the foreground.

Olly Tyson demonstrating a near faultless technique with just the right angle of tilt to speed up the spins. 24

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Just before the Christmas dinner we said goodbye to Jenny Bean who retires from nearly 25 years of cleaning after the boys of Dolman. Charles Jude, Head of House, presents her with some flowers.

Mr Taylor has been supporting Dolman lads for 9 years as Housemaster and 12 as Housetutor!

The competition heats up but Wallsy is unfazed and continues to play to the crowd. THE POCKLINGTONIAN

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BOARDING

FENWICK-SMITH

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oarding has played a big part in my life, believes Harry Reynolds (4DOL). Whenever a person starts boarding it is always difficult to settle in but in FenwickSmith I settled in with the help of Mr Loten and Mrs Dowson, our day matron. The staff are all very welcoming and Mr Loten always makes time for people needing help.

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Boarding has played a big part in my life

For me, boarding started off with homesickness, recalls Archie Williams (5GRU). However, thanks to Mr Loten, Mrs Dowson and Mr Kilsby, I got through the first few weeks and managed to become a more stable student here at Pocklington. The friends I have are the best. Fenwick-Smith is the gemstone of the boarding community as it is a luxury to stay in! At weekends the staff put on trips for us, keeping us occupied; or, if not, a football match or sporting activity is organised for the majority of the day. Boarding life All in all, boarding life brings out the brings out the best in us as we thrive as part of such a friendly community. best in us

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BOARDING IN PICTURES

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MUSIC

HOUSE MUSIC Once again the House Music Festival served up a series of musical treats to packed audiences.

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horal items were seen as a strength for all Houses, with three of the four opting to offer two choral pieces in their programme. Hutton, accompanied by Georgina Lloyd on piano, sang Queen’s ‘Somebody to Love’ and Billy Joel’s ‘And So It Goes’. Both were effective, though the few male voices available found the pieces challenging. Gruggen sang two a cappella arrangements and, whilst they struggled with the chromatic passages in ‘I Get Around’, the Zulu piece ‘Asikha Thali’ was a real tour de force, receiving special praise from the adjudicators. Dolman produced two pieces which were widely differing; ‘Time to Say Goodbye’ with voices blending in powerful four-part harmony, as well as ‘Gold Digger’ in a superb arrangement, including rapping and the first use of a cajón in school. Wilberforce’s sole choral item was a crisp and effective home-produced arrangement of Lady Gaga’s ‘Bad Romance’ complete with beat-box. The quality of instrumental work was most encouraging – and we were treated to a welcome change from the often over-used swing band repertoire pieces. Wilberforce presented two items here, and certainly their performance of ‘Going Home’, with a superb guitar solo by Freddie Hetherton, was most enjoyable. Gruggen donned checked shirts to perform a deep-south influenced ‘Sweet Home Alabama’ whilst Hutton assembled a small orchestra to play the ambitious ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’. However, perhaps the highlight of the instrumental items was Dolman’s ‘Move on Up’. Beginning with a Stomp-influenced introduction, the audience heard rhythm patterns evolve, played by sweeping brushes, basketballs and waste bins (as well as some tap dance!) before the band joined for an exciting arrangement featuring a strong horn section. Each House concluded with their special item. Wilberforce presented ‘I Wanna Be Like You’; a superb band, a sax-playing gorilla, but in a key which did not suit young voices. Gruggen gave a strong performance of ‘Does Your Mother Know’, with exciting dancing and singing, though technical problems with guitar amps frustrated the band. Dolman’s ‘Thriller’ used theatrical smoke for the first time in a House Music Festival, and whilst the performance looked superb, there were some concerns over the sense of ensemble in the bridge section of the song. Hutton once again showed their strength in this area in an exuberant performance of ‘Umbrella’ where the enthusiasm of all performers shone through. After careful deliberation, the trophy was awarded to Dolman, a wellreceived decision. MK

"A GREAT EVENT"

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o lift our spirits, one of our form tutors told us that if we all looked silly together, it would look FAB! He eventually made us do the Macarena, recall Emily Wright and Beth Roberts (2DOL). The first performance was great (despite our nerves) and Dolman probably got the best feedback, although every other house put in equal effort. In the break between ‘Goldigger’ and ‘Thriller’, there were about 40 of us backstage covering our faces in blue and white face paint, with sixth formers backcombing everyone’s hair! (We had to look like zombies.) Everyone tried their best to be silent as eyeliner, lipstick and hairspray went everywhere in those last frantic moments before the finale. I never thought a makeover could get quite as furious as that! The finale was a huge success, and, what’s more, I actually felt I wanted to do it again and again! You would have thought it would be completely nerve-wracking standing up in front of 200 people like that, but it was so much fun! When we found out that Dolman had won, all I remember was jumping out of my seat and screaming with joy. It was a great event, one of my favourites. I will definitely take part for many years to come!

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CHAMBER CHOIR On February 8, the Chamber Choir went to Leeds Grand Theatre to watch a production of the world-famous Carmen, composed by Bizet, produced by Opera North, remembers Jonathan Chu (L6).

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was particularly excited to see this performance because Carmen is the first and only opera I have ever taken part in – in Year 3. I was one of those primary school kids who was bemused throughout all the practices, accidentally joined the children’s chorus and ended up performing in concert. Carmen is the story of a woman, Carmen, on the margins of society, driven by a fierce, uncompromising desire for personal liberty, and of a man, José, who, in the grip of sexual obsession, tries to own her. Like many other operas, Carmen starts with a promising relationship which soon conflicts as problems are gradually revealed and the plot unravels, ending with the tragic death of a main character. Nevertheless, the performance was the cream of opera – the dramatic instrumentals built up the tension, coupled with the brilliant singing of some powerful sopranos and blasting basses. In addition, this specific production was a modernised version mixed with some humorous choreography, which gave the opera a very refreshing and different style. Fortunately, we acquired front row seats this time. This allowed to us to enjoy the acting at a much closer range, and more importantly, the orchestral and choral sound was much more dynamic, as the orchestra and the singers were literally in front of us. Overall, we relished the performance and look forward to next year’s trip.

SOLOISTS’ CONCERT

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hamber Choir started the school year singing ‘Lord for thy tender mercy’s sake’ in the Commemoration service. This was an excellent performance which truly set the standard for the year ahead, recalls Miranda Bond (U6). The choir next gave a stylish performance in the Christmas carol service. The service is always a highlight of the school calendar but this year a particularly poignant rendition of ‘Whence is that goodly fragrance flowing’ brought a tear to the eye of many a congregation member and performer alike: especially those like me for whom this was their last carol service. The sorrow was soon dispersed however with a joyful delivery of ‘Tomorrow shall be my dancing day’; the infectious melody, beautifully executed by the massed choir, stayed with the audience for some time afterwards. The Winter Concert involved an incredibly tender version of Rachmaninov’s ‘Tebye poyem’; however, this performance in the TST simply could not compete with the atmosphere in York Minster when the choir performed the same piece to a capacity audience during the Homestart Concert in aid of the Homestart charity, York. Olivia Turner’s haunting solo floated beautifully across the gentle harmonies from the rest of the choir and the Minster’s 11 second echo made it truly magical. ‘Tebye poyem’ is not a rousing piece and the choir showed a restraint in singing it which belied their years. It was a consummately professional performance which left the audience wanting more. After the school’s solo they joined the rest of the schools involved in the concert to perform three pieces: Bruckner’s ‘Ave Maria’, a challenging piece unaccompanied; Vaughan Williams’ ‘Let all the world in every corner sing’; and finally, a song written especially for the Homestart concert which received its debut performance, Dr Richard Shepherd’s ‘The Spacious firmament on high’. The 500 strong choir gave the performance of a lifetime. Singing such a fantastic piece with so many talented young people was one of the most remarkable and enjoyable experiences I have encountered in my five years with the Chamber Choir. We went on to perform two of those pieces, ‘Ave Maria’ and ‘The spacious firmament on high’, in the Spring Concert with aplomb. The pieces sounded different when sung by a much smaller number but the Chamber Choir’s volume filled the TST as well as that huge choir had filled the Minster.

The Lent term Soloists’ Concert is always an enjoyable event as it allows pupils of varying experience a chance to perform to a small but supportive audience, and this year’s event was no exception.

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he first half was dominated by pupils from the 1st to 4th form and the standard of performance showed much of the potential on offer in these young musicians. Special mention must go to the confident trumpet playing of Tom Baarda and Daniel Johns; both tackling challenging pieces with alacrity and excitement. We also were treated to two original compositions, a first for this event. Finlay Henderson gave a premiere of his Mazurka in C minor on piano, and Will Winlow performed his own piece on classical guitar, challenging the audience with his use of minimalist principles and microtones.

In the second half, more experienced soloists took to the floor in a variety of styles. Charlotte Prescott performed Chopin’s Mazurka in A, whilst Robert Foot took on the challenging Clarinet Sonata No 2 by Brahms. In a contrasting mood, Anna Wilkinson gave a tender performance of Edward German’s Romance and Olivia Turner performed Janacek’s reflective On an Overgrown Path. However, perhaps the highlight of the evening’s performances was the flamboyant saxophone playing by Alice Boyes; Nigel Wood’s Schwarzer Tanzer sounding quite superb.

A special mention should also go to Robert Harris, who has taken a small bunch of intrepid singers and conducted us as we performed in school church services. They have been an enjoyable addition to these services and a credit to pupils’ input to music at Pocklington. Having sung with the choir for so many years I will be truly sad to leave them behind. However, on the evidence of this year, I am convinced that they will continue to grow from strength to strength. I look forward to coming back to the 2011 carol service and hearing just how far they have come.

MK THE POCKLINGTONIAN

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MUSIC

MUSIC SOCIETY 2010

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his was my first year of Music Society and, after about six weeks of rehearsals and several sore throats, I reached my decision: I should have started it years ago, muses Hannah Hutchinson (L6).

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t’s been used and abused in ways that Carl Orff could never have imagined; it is represented in over 300 currently available recordings and performed sometime, somewhere, just about every day of the week. Carmina Burana is the most over-exposed piece of the 20th century music – a description most fitting to its content – and it really does take an exceptional performance to reassert its brilliance. This was one. Conductor Mr Kettlewell was able to give Orff’s infectious rhythms and lusty choral unisons a renewed sense of purpose. From the very first pedal point of the two pianos and timpani and the blazing declamation ‘O Fortuna’, he rekindled the kind of fervour which Orff would have been overjoyed to hear. The Pocklington School Music Society Chorus were thrilling in their singing. From the sheer power of the opening, to the stunning contrasts in ‘Reie’, where the rousing ‘Swaz hie gat umba’ was beautifully juxtaposed with the tender singing of altos and tenors in ‘Chume geselle min’, there was no minute detail overlooked in this performance. Tom Burke’s ‘Omnia sol temperat’ soon set the standard for some superb solo singing in the performance. Later, ‘In taberna’ (‘In the Tavern’), we had Mr Loten’s roasted swan acting out his sweaty ordeal as if his life depended on it; impossibly high tenor shifting into agonising falsetto. Then there was John Micklem Cooper’s inebriated Abbott of Cockaigne slurring his sermon whilst exercising communion of a rather different kind.

This year we sang Orff’s Carmina Burana. It was a real pleasure to be part of such an eclectic group and create such a fabulous sound. The first rehearsal was so nerve-wracking; this was the first time I had ever done anything on this scale musically. But after some jokes from both Mr Kettlewell and Mr Taylor on piano, we were away; when we all sang together, I was amazed at how good it all sounded! The piece is written in Latin and German and after several coaching sessions on pronunciation and furious scribbling on copies, we managed to sing the piece as it was originally intended to be sung. On the night the music was outstanding. Mr Kettlewell is an amazing director and when you weren’t singing it was a joy to watch him work his magic over the adult choir, the Ragazzi choir (made up of Lyndhurst children) and the orchestra. He coaxed fantastic sounds out of all three; a true master of the trade. Listening to the soloists was a treat in itself; Olivia Turner hit notes only dreamed of by most people and Mr Loten added a certain je ne sais quoi to the performance with his Swan Solo. As well as putting on a great performance, Music Society has given me the opportunity to make new friends, as you talk to people you normally wouldn’t see throughout the school day. It has also encouraged me to continue with singing; as a result, I have joined Chamber Choir. Bring on next year!

Out in ‘The Court of Love’, soprano Miss Smith and the combined junior choirs of Lyndhurst and Pocklington Schools gave their own reflections on ‘Love flying everywhere’; whilst the dulcet tones of Olivia Turner, dressed in red, offered a ravishing ‘In trutina’, sung it seemed on an eternal sigh of desire. The glittering finale of the work was ‘Blanziflor et Helena’ where, somewhat confusingly, the Virgin Mary and Venus, goddess of love, vie for supremacy in six-part harmony. The magnificent conclusion to the evening’s performance brought together young and old in glorious harmony. This annual event encourages a wide engagement of the Pocklington community: pupils, staff, OPs, parents, and friends of the school, inspiring all from the novice singer to those who are accustomed to performing on a much larger stage than this. With such memorable music resounding in the audience’s ears, long may this tradition continue!

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ou may know Olivia Turner as a 5th form pupil who excels at tennis, playing the saxophone and the clarinet; or you may have heard her playing the piano as she and Alice Boyes went on to win last year’s Variety Concert. Olivia does not come from a musical family, but she loved music at Woodleigh School and her parents and grandparents encouraged her when she expressed musical interest. But it is here at Pocklington that music has really flourished in her life, especially singing. From her entry into the school, her musical standard has been ever increasing. She took her Grade 8 singing last year, when she was fourteen; she is taking Grade 8 clarinet, Grade 8 music theatre and Grade 7 piano this term and takes Grade 8 saxophone next term. Olivia has wanted to be an opera singer since she was a small girl and of course it is this ambition which drives her; but the furtherance of this would not be possible without the support of her teachers and, most importantly, her own single-minded ambition and dedication. She has

OLIVIA TURNER natural talent, but is constantly striving to perfect her ever-increasing repertoire of very demanding pieces, where she has the ability to make the most difficult piece sound effortless. Olivia competes in music festivals all over the North; she had a very successful 2010, winning at Cottingham, Pontefract and Wharfedale. 2011 has only just begun and already she is winning again; she competed in at least five festivals in the first five months of the year. One of the most important of these is the David Cloven Festival of Singing, held annually in Sheffield; the only festival dedicated entirely to young singers. She successfully competed in the final, winning money and trophies; she was also awarded the Edith Batty salver, for the most promising singer aged fifteen or under. By the time you read this she will probably have competed in many other festivals in the pursuit of musical perfection. Is she a young star in the making? I, amongst others, certainly think so. Good luck Olivia! KM

PALMS 13 We are Palms13; we’re a band consisting of Finlay Henderson and myself and we play music purely for the love of it, writes Billy Risso-Gill (4GRU).

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etween us we play eight instruments and have been lucky enough to record two albums in a recording studio.

We started playing music together during our music lessons in 2nd year and it took off from there! Later on, we began writing songs and performed in the Variety Concert. By Easter 2010 (aged 13), we had been fortunate enough to have recorded our own album and placed it, available for download, on iTunes. The Pocklington Post interviewed us after this and we were delighted to see ourselves on a half-page spread! We also use YouTube for publicity. We post videos of our songs and occasionally blogs onto our channel. We now have over 28,000 views altogether (over 10,000 on an individual video) and over 1,400 subscribers. You can find us on Facebook and listen to our songs for free on MySpace. Last summer, we went back to the studio and recorded four songs for a mini album, also placed on iTunes. We also played in the Variety Concert once more and Party at Pock, which we loved! What next? We are currently recording a new single and are looking forward to doing more gigs. Watch this space. Since this report was submitted, Palms13 came second in an online contest and received critical acclaim (and a few column inches) in ‘The Pocklington Post’. Ed.

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MUSIC

SWING BAND

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he Swing Band started the year with a blast as usual, performing two sets during a private party at the Merchant Adventurers’ Hall in York, September 2010. This provided the perfect setting for old hands to get back into the swing of things (pun intended) and for newer members of the group to experience playing a performance with the band, writes Ross Cronshaw (U6). Two concerts swiftly followed each other in November, a performance for the Pocklington Arts Society held in Woldgate College (alongside other musical talents) and the school’s own Winter Concert, at which the Swing Band rounded off an evening of superb entertainment with their new piece, ‘Bandstand Boogie’. The highlight of 2011 was the school’s annual Spring Concert, held in March of this year where the new arrangement of ‘Disco Dr Who’ was given its first airing. Special mentions must go to the members of the band in the Upper Sixth, who will be leaving at the end of this term. Barnaby Platt and Joe Knight will be leaving the trumpets, Jason James will be departing from the alto saxophone section, Tom Stafford on guitar, Charles Jude from the tenor saxophones and Chris Iyer on drums. Also leaving is Robert Foot, who began life in the depths of the alto sax section and has since moved onto piano. Having been a member of the band since the start of my 1st year in school, I have had the full experience that being part of such a fantastic group can offer – four amazing foreign tours, regular performances of superb quality music in the local area and the chance to develop one’s musical skills with other performers of a similar age. Indeed, I write in the expectation of a fitting finale: our biennial trip abroad, this time to Berlin, in July. I’m proud to have served seven years in the Swing Band under Mr Kettlewell, and wish the group all the best in the future.

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MUSIC IN PICTURES

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ART

ART

Constructivism, Gerald Fenton

1st form masks

3rd form Warhol portraits

Constructivism, Marie Knobloch (L6)

Constructivism, Sophie Appleyard (L6)

Abraham Lincoln, Hank Liu (U6)

Constructivism, Emma Hessay (L6) Jarvis Cocker, Georgie Lucas (L6) 34

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Surrealism, Ashley Foreman (L6) Mao, Ray Tang (L6)

Mick Jagger, Sophie Stuart (L6)

Constructivism, Olivia Swaine (L6)

Polly Robinson (U6)

Surrealism, Matthew Horrocks (L6)

Twiggy, Amy Kendall (L6) THE POCKLINGTONIAN

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DESIGN

DESIGN

Barra Ward A traditionally turned wooden game, using laser cut acrylic components, based on a marble maze. The bowl shape is designed to wobble on the table and allow the user to steer a ball around a laser cut maze.

Chris Pratt A contemporary table lamp produced using modern plastics and laser cutting which allows the user to change elements to make it suit their own decoration.

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Matt Horrocks A modern exterior light to provide both subtle illumination at night and to act as a sculptural decoration during the day.


Rob Green A three dimensional take on snakes and ladders, making full use of laser cutting to produce the ladders and plastic based vacuum forming to produce the snakes.

Emma Hessay A Japanesque mood lamp using modern timbre materials, laser cutting and contemporary images applied onto polypropylene sheeting using an industrial dye sublimation printing process.

Olly Cooper A traditional chess or draughts board made from wood but designed to look like an injection moulded tool box. The playing pieces are contained within the box which has been made with an integrated handle.

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ORIGINAL WRITING

ENCOUNTER The mesmerising Brisk smell of outdoors, fresh, crisp. Washed away, soft breeze

A WINDOW OF OPPORTUNITY

Grinding, snapping twigs From high in the trees, falling; The ground hard and hushed.

I once thought that you were most vulnerable when you had no shoes on. In gymnastics at school, I saw people differently When they had bare feet. Anything that was sharp and was on the floor Could hurt the soft bridge of their foot, And if they needed to escape, They wouldn’t be able to run across the gravel. Unfamiliarity exposes people. They become reliant on an outside source That could be wrong anyway. That’s why children are an easy target. Just feed them lies and they are too Naïve to know any different. I say; Ignorance is not always bliss. When you sleep you become isolated From reality, and you are defenceless. Dreams will tease your neurones and Their riddles blur your vision, but alien Sounds can bring you to a state of Uncomfortable drowsiness. Vulnerability is at its greatest when Someone or something that you Cherish is taken away from you. An innocent teddy lost on a journey. A beautiful daughter taken by disease. I underestimated the power of grief. It has eaten into my gut, drained my Muscles and seen into my core, as Simple as looking into a window. And now I am going to retaliate. When looking for a victim I will apply these four facts. Emily Wride (5WIL)

A slight tinge of sand Caught by the curious eye; Plump and cuddly Freely, conquering, The koala’s unperplexed For the day ahead; Everything seems so – So tranquil and comforting Like a real life dream. Amy Robinson (2GRU)

THE PERFECT OTHER I remember my three most memorable moments Each occurred amidst my time with you Those key milestones represent us – Each symbols of what our lives were. The first, was when my eyes first found you That split second where you held my gaze. I saw the corner of your mouth twitch upwards, A secret smile, a silent appeal from your lips to mine. Every detail of you then is etched into my memory Your hair, framing your countenance, like maroon silk; That expression, in even the harsh artificial light, Perfection to the most crude of critics. The second, when I first spoke to you, As you smiled from across the counter. We had found one another, at last, after endless searching; Together, never to leave each other’s sight. One of my favourite things about you Is how we convey messages without words. We need no verbal signals for this occasion, This special moment, ready The final, third, memorable moment with you Does not need a sound at first. The silence builds the tension, the adrenaline Is overwhelming. Yet somehow, I must wait. I wait until you come to me. You look radiant, As always, and wearing lingerie which you know I love. It isn’t the same, but it will do. Your looks compensate for The wrong piece of clothing. Close enough, Close enough to her. Yes, I have it this time, You are the one, the perfect replacement. It is time for me to show myself, to make you gasp With a few of my favourite things. I knew you would like my surprise. They always do. Antonia Selvey (5DOL)

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THE CANDY HOUSE I glided up the warm steps of gooey fudge and gingerly pushed on the brashly coloured doors; they were as strong as Brighton rock, and wouldn’t budge. I cunningly licked the door handles and the once brittle locks dissolved into syrupy gossamer. I rammed into the slabs of candy and they shuddered open, squealing with delight across the crystallised doormat. I gawped when I saw the inside. Its spongy marble cake flooring, its high airy ceilings (with elegant stucco, piped in creamy icing by delicate hands) and the thick, primary school colours that painted themselves all over the house like a rainbow paints the sky. The brilliant sun punctured trickles of light through the translucent windows, made out of a tooth-rotting film. This house had a dream-like feel, as if I could pinch myself and wake up in the real world. I gleefully bounced over the sponge floor and spotted a concealed balcony, hidden by clots of black, twisted liquorice ivy, invisible from the outside. I gingerly trod onto it and the whole structure wheezed and groaned under my weight, like an aching man’s lungs fighting for breath. I rested my hands on the low fence, even my soft hands crumbling the surface of it. Flowers, but not as we know them, were scattered throughout, as if a child had spilled their dinner through the cotton-tipped clouds. Candy swirls, like an amazed child’s eyes, innocent and round; gum drops, like sugared purses of softened pleasure; crystallised fruits; chocolate chunks; the list would go on forever. Huge, shimmering statues of boiled sweets in glistening wrappers stood planted all about. The trees, eerily still, their glazed leaves frozen in stillness, made the steady watches of time things of dreams. The smell was overpowering. Mixes of rich sugar, honey, bitter liquorice and a zesty lemon cut through them all. I swept my hands off the fence and licked at the powered dust that was coating them. The taste and the scent flowed in perfect harmony with each other, each sense puncturing one another like synchronised swimmers rippling through the water. Bliss. I stumbled back inside; my eyes had branded rainbows onto my eyelids and my throat was thick with fear of this being reality. I heard a thudding and drew back into the shadows, only to realise that the noise was my own heart crashing into my restrained ribcage, as a caged animal would crash at the bars of its cell. I pinched myself – and it hurt. Fear was seeping in through my collar, trickling down my back, burning through my skin. It was only when I saw faces in the shadows, greasy, spotty faces, faces that were there in the corner of my eye but not when I looked directly at the space, faces that had given in to the intoxicating sights, smells and tastes, that I ran. I hurtled through the hallway, crashed through the doors, scrambled down the steps and choked down the driveway. I whipped my head back to make sure I wasn’t being followed. The menacing clots of velvety, sooty ivy were strikingly sharp against the na ve pastels of brick; they were more conspicuous now than when I’d arrived. I fixed my sights straight ahead, my feet twisting and slithering on the pellets of zest I was pounding. A lure, a snare, a decoy, a delusion. Whatever this house was, I wasn’t falling into it.

Beth Roberts (2DOL)

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DRAMA

HOUSE DRAMA 2010 We were privileged to have the final evening judged by Mr Martin Barrass, of York Theatre Royal Pantomime fame. He was a wonderful adjudicator and was overwhelmed by the high standard of theatre on show.

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olman performed an edited version of Bernard Marie Koltes’s powerful psychological thriller based on a true story – Roberto Zucco. Hugh Stubbins and Chris Iyer expertly directed their skilful cast in this tale of a serial killer, a young lost soul driven to commit terrible crimes without motive. After a technical glitch left them without their fabulous projection material on the final night, it was credit to their professional and mature approach that they remained a force to contend with. Chris was the joint winner of the Creative Excellence prize for his video editing work. Gruggen performed a stylised theatrical adaptation by Tom Brant of the classic Brothers Grimm fairytale, Snow White. The cast was commended for its ensemble work and highly creative telling of this original story, expertly guided by Claire Stowell and Miranda Bond. The prize for the Best Actress award was presented to Hannah Hutchinson for her portrayal of the Future Mirror. Wilberforce performed an intriguing and chilling version of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. Ross Cronshaw and Zak Branchette worked as co-directors to bring this classic tale of split-personality to life in its most devilish form. A great use of the stage in the TST led us into Victorian England with suitably atmospheric musical accompaniment. Finally, Hutton took us ‘down the rabbit hole’ with Alice in Wonderland! Edward Hetherington let us see inside his mind with this crazy tale of Alice as she encountered strange beings from Cheshire Cats to Dodos. The cast and crew had immense fun creating this snippet of the Lewis Carroll masterpiece and it clearly showed in their performance. Hutton won Best House and Edward was also awarded the prize for Creative Excellence. The way in which all four houses worked together to produce a fantastic evening of entertainment was phenomenal; I was so proud of all their hard work and dedication. The standard has once again been raised by the multiple talents of this year’s U6. Well done to you all! HTA

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OH WHAT A LOVELY WAR!

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his year’s school play, once again directed by Mr Heaven and assisted by Mrs Marshall, took the form of Joan Littlewood’s Oh What a Lovely War! which charts the First World War, from the expansive ambitions of various nations prior to the conflict, to the slaughter of millions of men on the battlefields of Europe. Told through the high energy of the actors, the production combined music of the period, arranged by Mr Kettlewell, and multimedia elements, with images projected onto a large screen at the back of the stage to create a fun-filled Christmas package of sketches, dances, role-swapping and audience involvement, recalls Hugh Stubbins (U6). The cast was made up of both young and old, with U6 and L6 actors extremely well supported by a host of 5th form talent. Ross Cronshaw performed commandingly as Sir Douglas Haig, with Tanya Rose, Anna Wilkinson and Tom Burke leading the main vocals, the rest of the cast ably assisting. The feel of the piece was established from the off; after Edward Hetherington as the MC had warmed up the audience with a few “jokes I got out of my Christmas crackers”, the cast strode out of the wings wearing Pierrot costume, the traditional outfit worn by seaside entertainers in the 1920s, and broke into the amusing and vigorous song ‘Johnny Jones’. This set the pace of the play, as each scene assaulted the audiences’ senses and emotions, resulting in the tearful climax of the final song ‘Goodbyeee’, following the slow and painful deaths of many of the soldiers in the piece. Perhaps the stand-out scene of the play, however, was that of the Recruiting Sergeant. Mr Hall, in his first year of teaching at the school and motivated by a keen interest in the Forces, took the role of the Drill Sergeant, who marched down through the audience, insulting his potential recruits on-stage. His inspired, screeching monologue will be the lasting memory of this production for many. The final night of the production certainly lived up to its billing; Mr Heaven had stated the piece would be “Moving, horrific, funny and celebratory, this sing-a-long show will live in your memory for years to come”. This certainly proved to be the case. On the last night especially, in the last ever performance in the school for many of the U6, the whole cast gave their all to create an astounding piece of drama which culminated in a memorable finale. The performance was made all the more special by the fact that due to the treacherous snow and ice conditions, a week of rehearsals had been lost. This production was true testament to the strength, talent and commitment of Pocklington School’s brilliant Drama Department and also created a poignant reminder of the effect that war creates on all of us.

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DRAMA

OLIVER! Oliver! is this year’s Lower School play. George Jibson (2GRU) looks forward to the event.

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t is a very exciting time at the moment. The rehearsals are going well and we are all having great fun. Mrs Alexander, Mr Kettlewell and Mrs Cunningham are doing such an amazing job! They are managing to make some really hard work very enjoyable. Each rehearsal seems chaotic, but by the end, we seem to have it all worked out and it looks amazing! It’s difficult to believe that we only started in January when you see what we have already achieved. I certainly can’t wait to see how it all turns out and I know that everyone else feels the same. To be given the main part of Oliver is such a privilege for me. I can’t wait until June to see this fantastic production come to life!

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AMAZING!

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ven as the Summer Term came to an end, the set had been taken down and costumes packed away, all the cast, crew and countless audience members were still humming and singing in corridors, cars and classrooms, smiling at the wonderfully happy memories that they all had of this fantastic musical production! For myself and Mr Kettlewell, our Musical Director, it was an absolute pleasure to be involved in the adaptation of such a well-known and well-loved novel. Backstage is always filled with laughter and tears of joy at the end of each production and Oliver! was no exception. I am so proud of everyone involved, from the Workhouse Boys and Girls and the fabulous Londoners, to the amazing band who brought so much to the production with fantastic live music; from the superb Josh Baines who filled the TST with such presence in his role as Fagin, to Fagin’s boys, the bar girls and Nancy and Sally, wonderfully played by Olivia Flanagan and Yasmin Remblance. There was no-one who didn’t give their very best every night. And finally to George Jibson, who was, I am sure everyone agreed, the best choice as the sweet and innocent Oliver – a voice that sent shivers down your spine and a sense of humour that had us all laughing even during the harder rehearsals. As Director of seven Lower School plays over the years, it was wonderful to end on such a high note and work alongside a wonderful cast and crew. HTA

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DRAMA

TOM KAY If you have even the slightest interest in theatre, exploit your facilities. You will never find their potential; theatre’s boundaries have always been and will continue to be pushed, from Epidaurus to Armageddon, muses Tom Kay (OP).

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hen I was at school, the Art and Drama departments were my refuge. Pete Edwards will never let me forget that it was he who gave me my first role in his musical ‘The Delta Ball’ (written well before and probably stolen by the producers of The Lion King) where I played the young lion cub (and not, as Sir Tom Stoppard asked on his visit to the theatre’s opening, ‘The mouse?’, clearly confused by my head dress and whiskers). The show was to christen the then TSC, now appropriately renamed TST, (at last!). It is also people like Bryony Marshall, Emma Cunningham and of course Alan Heaven whom I have to thank. A few years out in the world and you realise just how much staff investment there is in individual pupils. All of the above are artists and theatre people and I have the utmost respect for them. Theatre is not bound to the bricks and stones of these great buildings but carried by the people who populate and run them. If the National or Globe or indeed TST should fall down tomorrow, God forbid, we could always bring the plays to the streets (or, in Pocklington’s case, its fields) and indeed the show would go on. We need these people to inspire us to find our own way. Alan did exactly this with great subtlety: it was he who first mentioned RADA and instilled in me the belief that I could go for it. I didn’t know that it was the place for me until the last hour of the fourth and final audition. At that moment, I just knew. This is something I’ve learnt over time – to always trust my gut. For those of you who would like to go into theatre, go for it! You will never know of what stuff you are made if you don’t push and battle with yourself. Actors are born and not made, but there are ‘seeds’ of an actor, what they call raw talent. This must be nurtured, which is why you must train, because it is only once you have acquired the tools that you can put

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them to use. Skill comes first and emotion second: it is the most skilful actor who moves us most. Acting for an actor is something chemical which you cannot help and you cannot do without. However, it is always good to have other things to interest you, whether it’s painting or mucking around in the garden. We can do all the research and historical referencing we like until we’re blue in the face, but if you haven’t lived then how do you know what pain Hamlet is talking about? How do you know what love feels like to Juliet? You have to learn to say ‘yes’ to whatever life throws at you, even if it may seem dangerous. I’m just at the beginning, with a hell of a journey to go, but I couldn’t be doing anything else. Life is too short, and to say I live doing what I love most and get paid for is a great privilege. I haven’t fallen out of RADA into great roles at the Royal Court or films with Meryl Streep (like some of my more fortunate colleagues), but I’m not defeated. It just makes you look at things differently. You learn patience and remember what it is to be ambitious.


MEDIEVAL YORK MYSTERY PLAYS Looking at the bare wagon, the pile of cloth and the angular bits of wood, you couldn’t really blame other performers for raising an eyebrow. After all, it was the dress rehearsal and they had arrived with towering structures of 4 x 2 and plywood. We had Steve Ryan and a screwdriver.

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e were outside the National Railway Museum before the first of two Sunday performances for the four-yearly cycle of the medieval York Mystery Plays. This time the school had been approached directly by the Company of Merchant Adventurers and given the best play of the lot to perform on their behalf: The Last Judgement. All of the plays are based on Bible stories. Here, God passes his verdict on mankind – mostly we’re ungrateful sinners – and raises the dead so that the Saved (a minority) can be separated from the Damned (you and me) by Jesus. Devils accept the latter eagerly. We chose to stage it in a raw, folk style, incorporating some traditional songs for the judged souls to sing to contrast with Musical Director Allison Bond’s gorgeous Latin harmonies, which the angels enjoyed. A pair of devils sprinted and jumped around amongst the audience on pro-jump stilts while a masked Lucifer strode on, accompanied by his demons. Best of all, the play ended with a danse macabre in which the actors joined hands with the audience and followed the monstrous Death figure (a folk play ‘horse’ called Mari Lwyd) through the legs of Lucifer and into Hell. As the final play, we began near the Minster at four in the afternoon and hauled the wagon to a further three sites around York, finishing by dragging it back to the Railway Museum around eight in the evening. Considering that it had been pulled to its starting place at seven that morning, it made for a long but marvellous day. A tricky first performance: Lucifer toppled over, the audience sat so close that the stilt runners couldn’t move and a bin prevented the set from opening. After that, everything flowed as it should, including the processional with its pounding drums, whistles and music. The performers were outstanding, the music exhilarating, Cheryl White’s costumes beautiful and the crowd response quite overwhelming. This was a true Pocklington event, embracing all ages. Our thanks especially to the Friends and former staff who pitched in: John Williamson, who came with his mighty melodeon; Ed Brindley, who looked magisterial as God; Tristan Heaven (OP), the authentic-looking bearer of the colours; Diane Heywood, who replaced Grace Andrews when she was taken ill and had all of five minutes to learn the part. The set? As the organiser put it: ‘any fool could see that you can’t drag a plywood structure fifteen miles along the A1079.’ Steve’s set was ingenious and based entirely on blue and white cloth. Wings rose, God stood in the sun, apostles became painted statues in archways. Not only were we ready to perform; we looked amazing. AWH

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SPORT

RUGBY

SEVENS

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hat could have been! Lack of consistency and self-belief hurt this side in big games not to mention the importance of goal kicking. At the Northern Schools tournament, a disappointing performance against King Henry VII and a shocking referee against Calday Grange cost us a place in the salver competition but a solid performance against Bromsgrove and a whopping win against Welbeck gave the boys confidence going forward. At Fylde, a dream first day saw us beat Bromsgrove, St Ambrose and Wickersley Sports College but lose to a very strong Ellesmere side. Our final game versus Myerscough College (Sale Sharks Academy) was a disappointing performance and a consequent loss saw us drop from 2nd in the pool to 4th on points difference. This meant we played Adams Grammar School (the eventual plate winners) in the first round of the plate and unfortunately lost 35-5, ending our tournament hopes. At the Hymers tournament, a poor opening perfomance against Ashville (12-19) and a close loss to QEG’s Wakefield ended our chances of entering the cup competition. After a big rev up, the boys lifted their game and beat a huge Barnard Castle ‘B’ 19-17 in a very physical match. In the quarter final of the plate, the boys got into the groove with a 60-0 thrashing of Read and in the semi-final an efficient 28-0 win over Hymers ‘B’. In the plate final, a close contest against Yarm which went down to the wire saw the boys come out on top 17-12, winning the first piece of silverware for the 1st VII in 6 years. The National Sevens at Rosslyn Park saw the team pitted against some real unknown teams. Our first game against Cowbridge saw a 19 all draw played out (missing a kick in front of the posts which would later come back to haunt us). Our second game against King John School saw a comfortable 33-14 win. Our third game against the unknown Llanhari team saw us go down 27-7 and effectively knock us out of the competition. Our final game was a cracker. Despite the disappointment of not qualifying for the next round, the boys managed to pull themselves together and play the perfect game of sevens, beating Oaklands College (the Saracens Rugby Academy), 43-0. A tremendous performance which highlighted to the boys what they could do when focused, trusting the systems we had put in place and believing in each other. A big thank you needs to go to the squad for all their hard work and effort in terms of pre-season fitness training and devotion to the team. They have set the bench mark for future 1st VII teams, and I hope they continue to play rugby upon leaving Pocklington.

Overall:

Played 14

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Won 6

Drawn 1

Lost 7

1ST XV A season of real highs and lows was underpinned by a team who struggled with consistency and self-belief in big games.

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trongly led by the physicality of Alex Torkington and Ed Falkingham, the squad was rarely bettered in the scrum thanks to the imposing front row of Ed Green, Jeremy Deas and Andrew Arden. This set a solid platform for the likes of James Flint, Isaac Green and Joe Knight to dictate the pace of the game, and unleash the flying wingers Pearson and Fenton. Solid wins over Ashville, St Peter’s, Silcoates and Worksop gave the boys some much-needed confidence. However, a lack of consistency hurt us and close losses to Woodhouse Grove, Nottingham High School and a poor performance against Mt St Mary’s brought us back to square one. In terms of the Daily Mail Cup, the team went further than any other before making it into the semi-final of the pool, beating Scarborough 6th form 83-5, Scarborough College 71-0 and annihilating St Peter’s for the second time in the season 29-5, in what was by far the best performance of the season. The next round game against an elusive Ampleforth side was unfortunately a step too far, as we succumbed 24-14. On tour in Holland, the boys played some entertaining rugby, beating Delft RFC 70-0 in a ‘warm-up’ match before taking on the Netherlands U18 side. The big match was played at the Dutch National stadium in Amsterdam which boasted excellent facilities and a fine surface for some running rugby. Despite being outsized, the boys were determined to make their superior skill set outshine the opposition. The game got off to a bang with Ed Falkingham scoring from a solid scrum within the first 90 seconds of the match. The boys did not look back! A brace of tries from the ‘flying’ Gerald Fenton and a last minute touchdown from captain Alex Torkington sealed a famous win for the school, 20-0. Many thanks must go to the boys for all their hard work, commitment and determination this season - they have been a pleasure to coach.

Overall: SAH

Played 15

Won 9

Lost 6


2ND XV

3RD XV

This has been a frustrating but highly enjoyable season in which a very talented side rarely lived up to their potential for a sustained period of time. Our record of played 9, won 3 lost 6 tells little of the story, with three of these defeats by a converted try or less, writes Adam Richardson (U6).

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he inconsistency of our season was highlighted from the first game. Up against a strong Woodhouse Grove side and having had just one full training session, we played some of our best rugby of the season in the first 15 minutes to lead by two scores. However, a poor start to the second half and lack of match fitness meant we eventually lost 19-33.

This theme was repeated with unwanted frequency as we lost games against Ashville, Worksop and St Peter’s respectively through poor execution and finishing after dominating large periods of the game. A good win at Trent College with a strong first half performance and an excellent effort from our forwards gave an injury depleted team a good victory 52-5 away at Mt St Mary’s, with Tom Moore and Alan Lee outstanding value throughout. The highlight of the season came in our penultimate match against Silcoates. Led by outstanding performances by several U6 playing their final home game, notably Sam Mortimer, Ross Marshall and player of the season, Hugh Stubbins, the whole team finally produced the all-round performance we were looking for to win 38-0. Other notable performers throughout were Tom Roberts and Harry Lawton in the front row, second row Ben Welch, Joe Shaw and Oliver Norgate in the centre and Joe Bedford, our players’ player of the season, at full back. Finally I would like to thank the commitment of all players and the coaches involved, which as usual could never be questioned. It was this attitude which made the season a very enjoyable one. I wish all the remaining players the best of luck for the new year!

he 3rd XV once again battled manfully against considerable odds. The opposition was inevitably strong, either being the 1st XV of smaller schools or sides peppered with huge Upper Sixth boys or quality U16 players. The fly half for the Leeds 3rd XV was a hockey international who was only available occasionally to play competitive rugby. One of those occasions was, of course, against Pocklington 3rd XV. He scored 5 tries and spoilt an otherwise very equal and well contested game, the final result being 52-27! Where we came across teams on a similar footing we did well and managed to gain one win against Fyling Hall 1st XV and one very close result at Worksop where we narrowly lost 7-12.

The boys turned up to training with a good heart and some puppy-like enthusiasm. Justin Sweetman was a captain who led by example from the back row. Matt Horrocks was an ever-present hooker and showed real determination and bravery. Jake Dale was energetic and tackled hard, Jake Sherwood was an outstanding back row presence and much promise was shown by newcomers Jack Whitlock, Mustafa Alsudani, Simon Hodgson, Iain Moorhouse and Doruk Canbolat in various positions. Anthony Blythe was top point scorer from scrum half, a position he shared with Will Hick. Ted Foster and Tom Moore played sensibly at fly half, Chris Pratt and James Bisson were elusive backs and Freddie Wride, Harry Hetherton, Jerome Remblance and Ashley Foreman always made telling appearances for us. Overall there was player development to be admired, some definite highlights, more points than last season and some real promise for next. MPN

2ND XV - COACH'S VIEW

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his has not been an easy season for a very young and inexperienced team, but the players have given their all, grown in ability and confidence throughout the year and have laid down good foundations for their futures as school 1st XV and club players.

Some excellent rugby was played at times; indeed, the opening thirty minutes of the season, against traditionally strong opponents Woodhouse Grove, could almost have been used as an RFU video demonstrating how to coach speed, continuity, support play and decision making. Sadly, we ran out of steam in the second half as bigger and older opponents took their toll but this match set the tone for much of the season; a tremendous, fighting effort against stronger opponents, resulting in a narrow defeat by a single score. There were some excellent results along the way, including a final canter in the sun against Silcoates and a superb, early season victory over Trent College, but this match will be remembered for the horrific injury to George Hetherton, which overshadowed all the good things the players had done and dented their confidence for some considerable time. Many more players were lost to injury or the necessary demands of the 1st XV and as a result, we never quite managed to get the continuity required to achieve a lasting improvement in team play. Thirty-one players represented the team in just thirteen matches, which explains a great deal but all deserve congratulations for their efforts in adversity. The team was superbly led by Adam Richardson and Hugh Stubbins, as captain and vicecaptain, respectively, whilst the accolade for most improved player went, deservedly, to Ben Welch, a tower of strength in the second row. We say goodbye to these three, plus Tom Moore, Sam Mortimer, Joe Shaw and Tom Stafford and wish them well in their future careers; theirs are not small boots to fill. Squad: A Richardson (capt), H Stubbins (v capt), A Bahik, J Bedford, G Berry, T Brown, J Dale, T Foster, A Flanagan, A Foreman, G Hetherton, H Hetherton, W Hick, H Lawton, A Lee, T Moore, S Mortimer, O Norgate, J Remblance, T Rhodes, T Roberts, J Sherwood, T Sowersby, T Stafford, R Towse, B Welch, J Whitlock and F Wride. RPB THE POCKLINGTONIAN

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U16 XV

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he U16s made a fantastic start to the season: after 10 minutes of our first match against Woodhouse Grove, a team which regularly had beaten them easily, we were two scores ahead, after two smashing tries! We went on to win comfortably. In every match, bar one, we achieved our best ever result against our opponents, achieving victories away at Barnard Castle, Hill House and Worksop College, whilst being narrowly defeated by Leeds, St Peter’s, Trent College and, narrowly and very unluckily, Hymers and Mt St Mary’s. Unfortunately, fixtures were ravaged by the weather, with only two matches surviving the big freeze. The first saw us beat Fyling Hall 1st XV comfortably 37-8. Our final game was an away defeat to Nottingham. Overall this has been a successful 15s season, with great wins over Woodhouse Grove, Barnard Castle and Worksop College, which were feisty affairs which saw us overcome difficult odds to pull off fantastic and deserved victories.

Star men have included Jack Sowersby, who has led by example; Jake Claughton and Jack Bogg amongst the backs; Olly Norman, Tom Semeniuk, Jordan Smith and George Hampshire amongst the forwards. They have been a pleasure to work with, and we look forward to seeing how many of them can progress successfully into senior rugby. Squad: Anderson, Bogg, Brash, Claughton, Covell, Dhir, Dunn, J. Fletcher, Green, Hampshire, Horsley, Knowlson, Norman, Oddell, Rae, Redfern, Russell, Semeniuk, Smith, Sowersby, Sullivan, Ward, West, Winlow. Most Effective Forward – Tom Semeniuk Most Effective Back – Jake Claughton Most Improved Player – Jordan Smith Player of the Season – Jack Sowersby The 15-man sevens squad have made great strides this season, and their improvement has been plain to see as the season progressed.

strongly to produce excellent wins against Mt St Mary’s 20-14, (who had beaten us earlier in the season) and Ashville 17-7 (who have always heavily defeated us at 15s). Sadly other results conspired against us, so it was the Plate semi-finals for us. Yarm were put to the sword effectively in the semi, which meant that we were to play Mt St Mary’s again in the final. Coincidentally all four of our group won their semis, proving how well we had played! Mount were really up for revenge, and scored a good individual try to put us under pressure. With Jake Claughton lying injured, we still managed to score the equalising try to get back in the game, but then Mount scored again. However, we came back again and again, scoring three great tries to finish up worthy winners! This meant silverware at last – which this group of players really deserved. Then it was off to Rosslyn Park. The first match against Cwmtawe did not go well, and a 12-12 draw was poor reward. More crucially our injury jinx struck again – Jake Claughton got a crack on the jaw and played no further part in the tournament, whilst in the final play, Luis Covell landed awkwardly after a tackle and suffered a very badly broken wrist! Our second match saw us up against Pangbourne, who seemed the strongest team in our group. A 19-0 score-line at half-time confirmed this. Our final game of the season saw us playing for pride against London Oratory, which included two England U16 players. We started superbly, never giving them a chance and took a 7-0 lead to half-time. They equalised early in the second half, but they couldn’t cope with our fierce defence; after a flare-up, their captain was deservedly sin-binned, having felt the power of Olly’s Mum’s brolly. (Ouch. Ed.) We ran in two more tries to seal a magnificent victory 19-7. It was a fitting way to end the season, and a just reward for all the effort put in by a most determined and committed group of players. Sevens Squad: Bogg, Claughton, Covell, Dunn, J Fletcher, Green, Hampshire, Horsley, Norman, Oddell, Redfern, Russell, Sowersby, Ward, Winlow Sevens Player of the Season – Jack Sowersby

First came the Pocklington Invitational Tournament, where despite our usual ‘still on the bus’ first half against Woodhouse Grove, we came back

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DAG/IMD


SAXONS “Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away” – George Paver, overheard inspiring his team mates prior to a game

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an you hear it? That's right; it's the distant sound of the Saxon war cry. And the SaXons certainly went into battle this season. This season goes down in history as the most successful Saxon campaign, obviously inspired by the Saxons of yesteryear.

It all began on another bleak September afternoon. The inaugural Saxons had long moved on and some, such as the legendary, dominating, explosive Ryan Tiplady, had decided to hang up their boots for good. Now it was time for the next cohort of warriors, the fresh faced assassins…The New Breed. They arrived with shock and awe and right from the off displayed an amazing combination of speed and heart with a skill level surpassing many of their foes. This year, major investment was made on two fronts: Mr Newhouse was brought in on a lucrative rolling contract as Master in Charge of Champagne Rugby and midway through the season the management pulled off a major coup in the transfer market with the arrival of a South African scrum-half of premier pedigree. After seeing the first training session, Elite Director of Saxon Rugby, Mr Hughes, had set the bar high this year with the target of a 50% winning ratio. The Saxons destroyed it with a 62.5% finish. Notable performances were the 54-7 demolition of Worksop, the 57-5 annihilation of Mount St Mary’s, the 45-0 Armageddon which was Trent and the against all odds 15-7 victory against Fylinghall A team. There were so many stars: the cerebral assassin captaincy of Billy RissoGill; the dangerous yet controversial new centre that was Wes To; the volatile Matt “Ali” Springett; dancing spaghetti legs Ned Dixon; Fin “Hollywood” Henderson; the amazing turnover King Mason; Hugh “Beast” Robinson; Matt “safe hands” Heuck and so many more… Matt Springett won top try scorer, Man of the Season and the Harrison Dunn award for Flaming Feet of Fire. Most improved player: Man of Steel: IMPACT player award: Forward Award: Back Award: Captain’s Award:

Shreyas Gopal. Wes To. Fred Weeks. Connor McCabe. Fraser Davis. Billy Risso-Gill.

To summarise the season we will leave it to Assistant Director of Saxon Rugby (following on from his retirement from his playing career), George Rainforth, who said - "Never before in my life have I found the endeavours of mankind so inspirational. The sheer beauty of their brutality and technical brilliance was a marvel to behold. It was a true honour to work with the Saxons." Until next season...the Saxons return from the battlefields of war... GJH (Gareth ‘Hyperbole’ Hughes)

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U15 XV

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his was a mixed season for the U15s, with some narrow losses and superb victories, recalls James Thompson (4GRU).

The team performed well throughout the season and especially enjoyed competing in the Daily Mail Cup which was our first taste of knock-out cup rugby. We started the competition in outstanding form and convincingly beat GSAL by 30 points in the opening round. A disappointing loss then followed in the next round against St Peter’s, who were strong in the forwards and kept hold of the ball well. As the season progressed there were some impressive victories and the team really developed. The forwards were getting stronger each game, with Connor McCabe and Hugh Robinson moving up from the B team and proving themselves excellent ball winners. James Pavlou had a superb season at 6 and was outstanding in defence in every game. The backs proved to be as reliable as ever and had a very consistent season. Liam Hessay, Peter Axup and Tom Slater combined well on numerous occasions to create some skilful tries and make some key tackles. The overall improvement in the team saw a very impressive victory against Worksop towards the end of the season, which was very pleasing as this was a defeat for the team last year. I would like to thank all the boys for their hard work and commitment throughout the season. I have high hopes for next year.

U14B XV his has been the U14B’s most successful season, winning three of their matches, more than they have managed in previous years. A vast number of boys have trained hard and represented the school, often playing in unfamiliar positions as they learn the game the hard way. Some will go on to push for A team slots as their skills have developed and many will represent senior sides higher up the school.

T

U14A XV

Squad: F Hetherton, C Blair, A Holdstock, K Cheung, M Barnett, A Curtis, H Rainforth, T Fuller, H Curtis, D Cleaver, W Fox, M Curtis, S Huddlestone, E Gray, J Pearson, J Crump. GB

N

o matter which perspective this season is approached from it must be considered a success for the U14A squad. The number of matches won, the number of tries scored, but more importantly the level of performance: all add weight to this contention. From the start of the season with a crushing victory over Woodhouse Grove the mould was cast. Fast service from the forwards was delivered to elusive backs and tries were inevitably the result. Victories were usually by large margins: Ashville, Barnard Castle, Mt St Mary's were all dispatched in grand style. Defeats were narrow, punctuated with dogged defence and a will to prevail, albeit not always successfully. The nucleus of this side will form the backbone of a successful 1st XV in seasons to come, the combative Will Sayer, the energetic Charlie Sleigh, the General at fly half in James Hanley and the try scoring machine (18 in total) that is John Hanley, will all be ones to watch. Squad: J Laudage, J Glew, W Sangwin, B Kelly, J Soanes, W Stephenson, J Hanley, B Byas, C Sleigh, J Wainwright, W Sayer, S Garvey, J Parkinson, W Bettison, T Hick, L Elwes and T Guest.

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U13 XV I have on more than one occasion been on the receiving end of ‘a good drubbing’ at the hands of Pocklington teams. I was therefore both excited and honoured to be handed the task of coaching the U13s. ‘Brilliant,’ I thought, and soon had Mrs Alexander dusting off the mantlepiece in preparation for all the silverware.

W

ith just one training session, we arrived at Silcoates for our first game of 2011. Unfortunately we conceded a soft try in the closing minutes of the game and ultimately lost 12-17. The next game against Nottingham finished 38-10. It was a heavy defeat but we showed guts and determination over the course of a very physical contest, and managed to penetrate the opposition goal line twice through Will Hampshire and a bloody nosed Ross Walker. Things were looking up.

Terrington Hall was the venue for our first sevens tournament of the season, with a 10 stone weight limit for all players. Our group at Terrington was a mixed bag, but the boys, led superbly by Sam Bunce, performed extremely well with notable wins against Woodleigh and Aysgarth. The final group game against Terra Nova was especially important. Despite playing Barcelona style rugby we were three tries behind at half-time, owing largely to some soft tackling and a very tall, gifted winger. Drastic measures were required, so at half time I lied... and told the boys that they would be going back to lessons in the afternoon if they didn’t win the game. Three converted tries later, we had overturned our deficit to win the game 26-20. In the semi final we faced Durham. After an early gift to them we found ourselves behind by 7 points; then, despite great individual tries from Alex Varley and Ed Walker, we eventually lost 22-12. En route to the semi final of the Plate at Woodhouse we were outclassed by a solid, well drilled team from QEGS but had notable wins against Yarm, Horsforth and Audenshaw in the quarter final. Alex Varley, Sam Bunce, Will Burns and Angus Field were solid over the course of the tournament, but it was a newcomer to the game, Aaron Baxter, who proved his worth in attack as he ran home a number of tries for the team. Our next tournament was at home, on small pitches, which was perfect for our boys. Losing narrowly (17-12) to Ashville and winning 50-0 and 10-7 against Yarm and Hymers respectively would suggest that we can mix it up with the best. In the Cup semi-final, we faced RGS Newcastle. I think that Bradley Wilson angered them by scoring first in a lovely, well worked try under the posts. Soon after, the flood gates opened and despite our best efforts and some typically superb tackling from Edward Medforth, we lost the game. I would like to thank MPN, JS, SAH, SS and DB for all their coaching and cajoling. A special vote of thanks goes out to our growing band of supporters who braved the conditions throughout the season. Finally, I would like to thank every one of the boys who played in the U13 team this term. You have also been a much-needed source of enthusiasm and good humour. Congratulations and every success in the future. TH

THE POCKLINGTONIAN

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U12A XV

U12B XV

L

T

osing so dramatically in the last play of our own weekend sevens final is probably the best thing that could have happened to this team. At some stage in the future, at a similarly crucial point of an important match, they will be able to pull from the memories and feelings of that day and prevail because of it. Whilst this remarkable team are still unbeaten in the full game, the sevens season was less of a resounding success and though this team is one of the strongest I’ve coached it is not invincible…and nor should it be. We learn far more in our response to failure than we do from success and the gracious reaction to that last minute defeat far eclipsed any of the season’s victories.

Performance and character are the keys though, and throughout the season this team has shown plenty of both. The two standout players comment on both aspects of the game below. Both have enjoyed epic seasons. Tom Loten managed the switch to fly half smoothly and distributes the ball, carries and kicks sublimely. So often this ball has appeared as a direct result of the effortless timing of Benedict Fawcett in the tackle and in the ruck. The unsung heroes as so often is the case are the forwards and it has been one of the team’s great strengths that these six have been able to carry, drive and turn over so effectively. Tom outlines the path to victory in our Thursday 7s tournament win: At Pocklington 7s we first played Cottingham High School where we didn’t perform well and lost by 2 points. Then we faced Read who were weak and we scored over 50 points to nil. Next we played Silcoates and won comfortably, with Benedict Fawcett, Jimmy Quinney and Lewis Medley doing well in the pack. Then we were through to the semifinal against Birkdale who weren’t as strong as we thought they would be and won. That put us in the final against Silcoates again who we hammered in the group stages…which we did again to win the tournament!! Here Benedict outlines some high points of the season in the full game: The first match was against Woodhouse Grove. We were keen to impress Mr Towner in our first game with some new players joining the team and some leaving. In the end it was an easy win with the standout players being Tom Loten, Jonty Atkinson, Jack Garvin and Jimmy Quinny. The game against South Hunsley was very physical but we kept composure and won. The score was 44-0. The best players: Jack Garvin, Jonty Atkinson, Tom Loten, James Laudage, Jimmy Quinney and Toby Stephenson. Silcoates was a rusty game by our standards. It was the first match back from Christmas after the long break and the score was 33-7. The following excelled: Willam Nicholson, Jaeger Iveson, Jack Garvin, Jack Medforth, Josh Hall and James Laudage. Finally, Nottingham High School. It was a very tough match, probably our hardest of the season. In the first half we were trying too hard to score a try. The strongest players were Jack Garvin, Jimmy Quinney, Lewis Cavill and Jaeger Iveson. I would add my own notable match which was an emphatic 44-0 win over Leeds away from home. It was one of the greatest two half performances I have ever seen. Poor Leeds (who I thought were the strongest side we played this year) were just swept aside in this tide of controlled and aggressive play. A real example of the potential level of this team. Whilst the season ended with a bang which wasn’t in our favour this time, there will be a time for revenge and it will taste sweet. After all, we never lose, we just run out of time… AET

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he first match of the season was against Woodhouse Grove at home. It was supposed to be a ‘friendly’, recalls Oliver Beckett (1GRU).

Unfortunately, we lost 19-17. It was very close, however, and we just lost it in the dying seconds. Benji Smales, Anthony Rose and Callum Stubbs all played very well. The second match was against Barnard Castle and we knew we had to win. Everybody contributed to a good win with a massive 55-0 score over inexperienced opponents. Ollie Beckett, Anthony Rose and Lewis Medley all played with great skill. The next match was against The Grammar School at Leeds. The team were very confident after an easy win against Barnard Castle. At half-time we were winning 17-7, but suddenly two of their tries gave them the win. Overall they beat us in the rucks, mauls and scrums. Boys who stood out were Lewis Medley, Will Baines and Harry Isenstein. The final match was against Mount Saint Mary’s. This was an easy first-half win as we always had the ball. It finished up 35-10. Both their tries were in the second half and running blind. There were particularly fine performances from Jack Newton-Taylor, Adam Harrison and Hamish Sleigh.


A

fter our annual ‘blip’ against Barnard Castle, the girls picked themselves up and went from strength to strength. Every player involved gave her absolute best, whether it was in games, fitness or matches.

GIRLS' HOCKEY 1ST XI This was always going to be a difficult season, with so many established players leaving the team last year. How wrong could Miss Metcalfe be!

The ups and downs were certainly character building: Alice Wilton defending lifted balls with her head; Abbie Brant being rugby tackled over and over again (it’s the only way anyone can get the ball off her!); Caitlin Bond being knocked out by a flying elbow; Aimee Schofield suffering a cracked collar bone – despite all the padding; and our minibus adventures! A season highlight must be the match against Hymers, in which every single player on the team was at her best. Frustratingly, Hymers scored with ten seconds to go to win 21, but in a game like that the score didn’t matter! Other stand-out moments included beating Queen Margaret’s 5-0 and, for the second year running, winning Ampleforth’s Invitational Sevens Tournament. We are saying goodbye to three incredible girls this season. Lucy Rymer fought her way into the 1st XI for her final year at school, playing some superb hockey and always giving her all! It is difficult to put into words Aimee Schofield’s time at Pocklington. She has been hugely influential and I don’t think she has ever realised how good she really is! She was described by Ampleforth’s coach as ‘the best keeper on the circuit’. A fantastic accolade! Finally, we come to Abbie Brant; in Mr Atkinson’s words, the hockey equivalent of Ronaldo! It has been a fantastic seven years with Abbie. We both started at Pocklington on the same day as shy, retiring individuals – how things have changed! I have watched her grow from a football-obsessed little girl who had never played hockey, to a young lady with incredible passion and ability for her sport. Only those close to her really appreciate the volume of work Abbie has put in to earn her place in the England U18 squad. Thoroughly deserved! The girls have been an absolute joy to work with. Well done and good luck in all that you go on to do.

Overall: Played 13 Won 9

Drawn 1 Lost 3

SAM

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2ND XI With relatively few girls remaining from last season’s successful team, major changes and a new young group had to be established.

B

ut what a talented group of girls moved up into the squad! Keen to develop their skills and displaying great commitment, they developed into a fantastic team. Their record of almost 40 goals for and only 4 against demonstrates how both attack and defence contributed to such an outstanding season.

Goalkeeper Hatty Lord made some fantastic saves. Defence players Serena Leach, Georgina Beavers, Grace Pimlott and Vicky Hodgson worked well together, allowing few oppositions to penetrate the shooting ‘D’. In midfield, experienced 2nd XI player Miranda Bond was superb at the centre and controlled much of the midfield play. She was well supported by Lucy Bryan, Emma Adesile, Brittany Hopkins and Lucy Snowden. Spearheading the attack, Jules May, along with Laura Reeson, Becky Soanes and Kayleigh Kilsby, made a very effective, fast attacking combination which resulted in many great goals. The team was well captained by Laura, who directed and encouraged the team throughout the season. Her own determined play in all the games resulted in her scoring in almost every match! Highlights of the season included victories over Barnard Castle, Hymers, Queen Margaret’s and Ampleforth. The team has been a pleasure to work with and thoroughly deserve their success. I look forward to coaching many of them in the 2011 season.

Overall:

Played 10

JD

Won 10

3RD XI This large squad of girls was keen to play hockey and worked hard on their skills throughout the season. Unfortunately, the opposition cancelled several matches and due to the bad weather in December only six games were played in total.

T

he season began with a very closely contested game against Barnard Castle, resulting in a 4–4 draw. The next match too was a very close game with a narrow 1–0 defeat by Hymers.

This was followed by a great 4–0 victory over Giggleswick with Emily Wride scoring a hat trick! In the next match against Fylinghall 1st XI, despite displaying some great teamwork, the girls lost 3–0. However, a great 4–0 victory over Ashville 2nd XI and a 1–1 draw with Ampleforth completed a very satisfying season. The girls were well led by captain Emma Hawcroft, whose positive manner, enthusiasm and encouragement to her team contributed greatly to their success. For some, this is their final year of school team hockey, and I would like to thank them for their commitment. I do hope they will continue to enjoy playing hockey in the future.

Overall: Played 6 Won 2 Drawn 2

Lost 2

Squad: Hawcroft E (capt), Mondaca R, Pang J, Sedcole J, Soanes L, Slater H, Heuck B, Atkinson S, Chidley H, El Jassar I, Goodwin A, Kama T, Kearney A, Littlejohn S, Prescott A, Stephenson E, Wride E. JD

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U15 XI Due to the snow, the U15 XI had four matches cancelled against Queen Margaret’s, Hymers, Hull Collegiate and St Peter’s. This was especially unfortunate, as the girls were beginning to knit tightly and develop well as a team.

T

here were fine performances in all areas this season. Forwards Sara Eggleston, Sophie Burn and Izzy Platt led the attack with gusto and panache, whilst midfield players Katy Peel, Lily Laverack, Daisy Clough, Issy Smith and Molly Beharrell kept the team going in the centre of the pitch. In defence, Georgina Lloyd, Laura Bisson and sweeper Emma Loten were consistently effective. Sophie took the prize as top scorer for the season. All girls have gelled as a team and worked positively throughout. Well done!

Overall:

Played 10

Won 6

Lost 4

RS

THE POCKLINGTONIAN

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U14 XI

U13 XI

he U14s have had a superb season and deserve high praise for their commitment to training sessions and their match play. The majority of girls in the year group have attended practices each week and so the squad as a whole is very strong. The girls have been an absolute pleasure to work with for the last three years and I shall miss training with them next season. Thanks to Piet Rinky for his excellent help with the coaching.

T

his has been quite a mixed season for the U13 girls. They have played some excellent hockey on occasions but this has not been consistent across the season.

The A team have had an outstanding season. They have improved a huge amount since last year and have won nearly all their fixtures. Annabel Fawcett has been an outstanding captain and Lydia Ford deserves a special mention for her excellent goalkeeping. Great play also came from Emilia Bean, Emily Hallam, Lucy Krebs, Emelia West, Camilla Eggleston, Ruby Anderson, Ellie Medley, Millie Atkinson, Hayley Harrison, Charlotte Horsley and Lucy Wride.

The U13 squad went on tour to Stamford School in Lincolnshire. They played hockey on the Saturday and netball on the Sunday. Unfortunately they lost the hockey but won one of the netball matches on the Sunday. A great time was had by all.

Annabel, Millie and Ruby have also represented the 1st XI in several fixtures this term. Well done!

The girls now need to raise their game next season and start scoring goals. They have to become an attacking team rather than a defensive team! There is a lot of ability to work with here: they just need to realise it in 2011.

Overall: Played 13, Won 9, Drawn 2, Lost 2. The B team have had an equally impressive season. They won all their matches and could have given many of the A teams from other schools a good game. Yasmin Remblance has been a most enthusiastic captain. The squad included the following girls: Alice Cullen in goal; Pippa Lawton and Ellie Baarda, who have been the most improved players this year; Olivia Flanagan, Annabelle Redfern, Karima Iredale, Hatty Moor, Alex Riddell, Flo Taylor and Alana Dobson.

Overall:

Played 4

Won 4

The C team played two matches, winning one and drawing the other. The D team had one game this season, which they drew. Well done to all who played this season! CJP

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T

Overall(A): Played 14 Won 6 Drawn 1 Lost 7 Overall(B): Played 2

Won 1 Lost 1

Squad: Pidgeon J, Glew M, Robinson A, Fenny G, Risso-Gill S, Lancaster S, Summerton K, Huddlestone E, Frisby-Pape H, Leach N, Watkins A, Kama A, Esa M, Holding A, Banks O, Fairbank J, Judge-Clayden F, Jackson G, Wright E, Bean A, Wagstaff K, Crowther A, Barnes D.


U12A XI The U12A hockey team has enjoyed an outstanding season due to hard work, enthusiasm and super team spirit. It has been an excellent season and to watch all the girls develop their skills has been very exciting.

T

he team consists of a superb defensive line lead by captain Lucy Eggleston who has shown her clear potential this season. There has been some outstanding domination on the wing from Angela Curtis and great work up front by Emily Boddy, who manages to score in almost every game! They have been ably assisted by twins, Nicole and Ella Marshall, with Thea Davis working well in the centre. Special mention should go to brave goalkeeper, Tracy Fofie, who has been very impressive. A highlight of the season was the 4-1 win against Barnard Castle, which showed the early potential of a blossoming team. Above all, it has been a sheer pleasure working with this committed group of youngsters. I would like to thank senior captain Abbie Brant for her support and her inspiration to the team. We look forward to next season and building on an excellent foundation!

Overall: MSW

Played 11

Won 9

Drawn 1

Lost 1

U12B XI

I

t has been a fantastic season for the U12B team, with a large number of girls contributing to their success. As the girls have improved their skills and developed their awareness over the term, there have been many contenders for the B team, which has meant real competition for places and great commitment to training. A number of girls have played consistently well: Lucy Duggleby, as captain, has helped to form a very strong midfield, from where she has started to distribute the ball very well; and Marianna Hankin has developed her strength and stick skills significantly. Others who have made significant contributions include Jasmine Bunn, who has scored a large number of goals; Leyla Iredale, Georgia Covell and Becca Mann, who have become strong defenders; and Maddie Ford, who has shown herself to be a very capable centre forward. The girls have been ably assisted by two goalkeepers this term – Jenny Newall-Watson and Martha Cullen, both of whom have saved some very important goals. Congratulations must go to all who have contributed to the team, for their hard work and great team spirit, which has lead them to a number of victories over schools such as Ampleforth, Mount St Mary’s and Silcoates. They have been a pleasure to work with and show fine promise for next year. HSM

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1ST XI

W

e had a promising start to the season with a home fixture against a strong Ampleforth side, showing grit, determination and enthusiasm for the duration, recalls Will Mason (U6). However, simple errors held the 1st team back from converting several opportunities into goals, meaning an unsuccessful first match. Unfortunately this foreshadowed a large majority of the season, which included 8 losses, 1 drawn match (against Worksop) and 1 win against the OPs. At several points in the season, Mr Horne’s, Mr Rinke’s and Mr Davies’ hard work finally seemed to come to fruition, including managing to secure a 2-1 defeat against Hall Cross, during which Tom Brant was assessed for his Level 1 umpiring qualification. We also secured the first win against a strong OP side for at least 10 years, with Ed Smith OP commenting on having “a cracking game” against a significantly improved 1st team. The season has pushed the team to new heights in playing, coaching and umpiring, and has tested all of us to pull together when injuries started to mount up towards the final game, keeping morale from dropping after more convincing defeats. It has been a pleasure to play alongside this team and coaches since my start in hockey three years ago. I feel that boys’ hockey at Pock will continue to attain new levels of competitiveness and wish all the current and future first team boys all the best in their hockey careers. This year’s 1st XI: Will Mason (capt), Chris Iyer, Will Burn, Barney Platt, Tom Brant, Tom Beachell, John Micklem Cooper, Ray Tang, Chris Pratt, Guy Harland, Bosco Ng, Elliot Dobson, Tom Benthall and Zak Los.

2ND XI

A

fter a stuttering first game of the season against Ampleforth, the 2nd XI soon found their feet under the captaincy of Sam Berridge.

This has been the strongest 2nd XI for many years and it has been good to have a full season of competitive fixtures. The team has gained stability from the more experienced Lower Sixth players; Waddell, Chappelow and Johnson have been a solid trio in defence. It has also been good to see relative newcomers make such a positive impression. Callum Turnbull has developed into an effective centre forward being the team’s top scorer by some margin and is likely to be a regular in the 1st team next season. The same can be said of a number of this side who have continued to develop in terms of strength, game awareness and skill. Scott Dyson has also excelled in defence and much of the team’s success has been aided by consistent keeping from Jake Galley. The highlight of the season was probably the 4-0 win over Ashville which involved some tidy finishing by Turnbull and a driving attack from Berridge. At its best, the team has shown the ability to spread the ball wide to the likes of Woodhouse and Williams. Playing this kind of attractive hockey is something to take forward into next year where the future looks very bright in the hands of a positive and committed squad of players.

Overall:

Played 8

Won 3

Drawn 1

Lost 4

BOYS’ HOCKEY

U12, U13, U15 XI

T

his has been a positive season for the U12s, with mixed results. Fantastic wins over Hymers and Hall Cross, but in contrast we suffered defeat at the hands of St Olave’s A. The interest shown by all the boys in this year group makes for a most promising future at Pocklington. I am very excited at their future prospects. Not only do we have some very skilled players, but the depth of the squad is such that they are feeding off each other and developing really well. Well done! This has been a season of mixed fortunes for the U13s. We started off with a rude awakening against St Martin’s where we suffered a heavy defeat, but we radically improved all season, culminating in our highest ever finish in the Pocklington Invitational 7 a side, in 3rd place. We had good results against St Olave’s at both mini and 11 a-side, and fantastic wins for As and Bs versus Hall Cross and Hymers. Again, this is a year group with great interest in hockey who are progressing well. They will grow in the seasons to come, and will hopefully be able to compete more physically than they have this year, as this has been the only factor keeping them from success. Special mention must go to our goalkeepers, who made a massive contribution this year. The U15s had a season that promised a lot, but didn't quite live up to expectations. We competed to a very high level against strong opposition, setting a high standard from the offset. Sublime victories over Ashville and St Peter’s, but we never seemed to get into top gear in the U15 regional tournament, and didn’t progress into the next round. The season finished with two wins, a draw and three losses. This squad will bring added depth into the senior teams next year, and the competition for team places will be hard fought. It definitely bodes well for the future of boys’ hockey at Pocklington. Special mention must go to Will Broadbent and Max Galley, who had very consistent and solid seasons. George Hobson is the most improved player overall.

U14 XI

T

he entire U14 squad has enjoyed a wonderful journey, many of the boys playing hockey for the first time in their lives and realising what a great game it is. They now know the extreme level of fitness required for future seasons! Results would suggest that it may not have been the successful season that one would have liked; this has no bearing at all on what this group of boys has achieved. It would be unfair to pick any one individual out as the whole squad has developed and worked as one unit and will start next season in a very healthy place. Well done to you all.

This year’s 2nd XI: Sam Berridge (capt), Jake Galley, Andrew Johnson, Scott Dyson, Chris Hornsey, Ed Chappelow, Nathan Waddell, Forrest Cheung, Oliver Robinson, Ben Woodhouse, Archie Williams, Callum Turnbull, Rob Green, Philip Johnston, Cameron McLenaghan, Josh Male, Jonathan Chu, Tom Burke, Tom Lee, Gaby Mok and Will Broadbent. MJD & SJB 58

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SQUASH

A

fter a comprehensive victory at Worksop, we rarely had a full side available. Several close defeats have been frustrating, especially after some excellent individual performances.

The 2nd V managed a very pleasing ‘double’ over Ampleforth and it is encouraging that the team is mainly comprised of 5th formers, who have gained useful experience at this level. The strength of the school undoubtedly lies at the younger end, with only two defeats (and both of them 3-2) in total from 19 matches played! Special mention must go to Olly Peeke-Vout, unbeaten in the U13s and U14s at number one and to Jack Garvin, who only lost once at number two at the same level. All players deserve credit for an excellent season. Squash colours are awarded to James Bisson and Jerome Remblance.

NETBALL

1ST VII

A

fter a physically and mentally tough season, the first team won six out of their nine matches, writes Sophie Duncan (L6).

Results as follows:

1st V:

Played 9

Won 1

Lost 8

2nd V:

Played 5

Won 2

Lost 3

U15 V:

Played 7

Won 6

Lost 1

U14 V:

Played 7

Won 6

Lost 1

U13 V:

Played 5

Won 5

In House matches, the senior competition was won by Gruggen. The middle and lower school competition was predictably close, with an amazing finish between Gruggen and Dolman (tied on 158 points after 15 individual matches). Dolman ran out winners by 10 sets to 8. My thanks to JS and GJH for their help this season. TML

The team consisted of a range of players, from 4th form to U6. Lucy Peel never gave up in her first season for the 1st VII and Miranda Bond played excellently in defence. Our best performance was against the challenging Hull Collegiate where all the girls played fantastically and we came away with a win. The 2nd VII, captained by Juliet May, only lost two of their nine matches. They had many notable performances, especially against Queen Margaret’s. Maggie Bean and Lucy Bryan worked superbly as a shooting pair and were well supported by Brittany Hopkins in defence. The 3rd VII, captained by Mary Wilson, played a good season with excellent shooting from Hatty Lord and Chloe Rayner, who took everything from training and transferred it into games. Georgina Beevers had an amazing season and was a credit to the team in skill and attitude. The 4th team, despite not having many fixtures, always played well as a team. Well done to all; I look forward to next season!

FOOTBALL

I

t was disappointing that the senior league could not run this year due to lack of teams. However, both the intermediate and junior leagues were well-contested.

The junior league was unusual, in that only 61 goals were scored in 20 matches. It was therefore no surprise that the top scorers, ‘LIMBO DIMBO’, ended the season as champions, finishing 2 points clear of ‘ENGLAND ALL STARS’. Congratulations to the winning 1st year team of Angus Field, Oscar Cavill, Jonty Atkinson, Tom Loten and James Laudage. In contrast, the intermediate competition was a goal fest, with 118 strikes in 24 matches. Well played to ‘CRAZY UNITED’ – Tom Hick, Will Sangwin, Will Fox, Joe Laudage and James Healey – who won the title by 3 points from ‘NOBBY’S NUTS III’ (Crikey! Ed.). My thanks to IJA for refereeing the junior fixtures. TML

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U13 VII

T

wenty three girls have shown great commitment by attending U13 practices regularly and the extra lunchtime shooting practice has truly paid dividends. It has been good to see all the girls working well together to improve their own individual skills and develop into good team players.

U12 VII This season, our main problem was footwork and keeping possession. We were also having problems looking for the correct places for our team members, writes Emily Boddy (1DOL).

O

ur first match was at Bootham School; I can’t really remember the score but it was a super win for us and Lucy Eggleston shot very well. Our second match was against St Olave’s and from the first goal we could tell we were in trouble! They were very good, a lot taller than us and they scored many more goals than we did.

The A team have faced some tough opposition this season, but have always given their best effort and produced some impressive play. With a little more fine-tuning of their skills they have the potential to develop into a great team. The B team have had an outstanding season, winning all of their matches and scoring an incredible 129 goals! They achieved notable victories over Hymers, St Olave’s, QM’s, Silcoates and Hull Collegiate. The C team played four matches, gaining victories against Hymers, St Olave’s and QM’s and a draw with Silcoates. Well done to all the girls, you have been a pleasure to coach and I look forward to seeing great progress in the future!

The next match was as bad as the last and it was about to get a whole lot worse! The next match was at The Mount and when we got there it turned out we had to play two matches; one against The Mount and another against Reigate, who were on tour. We started off with a positive attitude; we were the first to score and that put a smile on our faces, with Nicole Marshall and Lucy Eggleston shooting. However, our opponents then came back with even stronger ability and caught us up in a blink. The score ended up 17-12. Then it was Reigate’s turn and our heads had started to drop: we lost this game 21-12. It was hard going against this amazing touring side. In March we had an invitational tournament at home. There were eight teams, with an A and a B team for Pocklington. Earlier in the week one of our best defenders, Jeni Newall-Watson, had a nasty injury, so we were not at full strength. At the start of the tournament our A team said they were going to do it for her and we won the first two games and drew the third. Then we were up against really hard teams and we lost the rest from there but we came sixth overall and the Bs came seventh out of eight.

A Team:

Played 10

Won 4

B Team:

Played 8

Won 8

C Team:

Played 4

Won 3

Lost 6

Drawn 1

A team squad: Emma Huddlestone, Georgie Fenny, Sofia Risso-Gill, Amy Robinson, Adelle Kama, Jess Pidgeon, Olivia Banks, Annie Holding. B & C team squad: Alice Watson, Hannah Frisby-Pape, Marni Esa, Megan Glew, Grace Jackson, Katrina Summerton, Flo Judge-Clayden, Natasha Leach, Sarah Lancaster, Olivia El-Jassar, Daisy Barnes, Anna Holdstock, Emily Wright, Amy Crowther. JD

U14 VII Overall:

Played 8

Won 1

Lost 7 record of won 3, drawn 1 and lost 5 does not fully reflect the effort and commitment shown by the U14A netball team this year, argues Alexandria Riddell (3DOL). The season had some ups and downs but the teamwork and enjoyment still shone through and this made it an honour to captain them. Throughout the season we were able to keep our heads held high and we never gave up trying to win every game.

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Significantly, we managed to get into the Yorkshire regional netball tournament where we finished 7th overall; we had a good day out and it was a tremendous experience to compete. Throughout we all worked well as a team, continually looking to improve. We complemented each other with strengths in different areas. For example, Emelia Bean and Millie Atkinson were outstanding in defence, always fighting to keep the ball out of the shooting area and most of the time succeeding. Emily Hallam and Charlotte Horsley with their fantastic shooting ensured we came close to winning a number of our games. Then there was the centre court with Hayley Harrison, Katie Stuart, Camilla Eggleston and Alexandria Riddell working tirelessly to get the ball up the court and in to the hands of the shooters. Overall, the team could have had better results, with more wins, but at least we tried our hardest throughout and we were able to have fun along the way!

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2ND XI 2010 CRICKET

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he season has been tremendously successful in that the boys have completely ‘turned around’ a poor start and have also developed as players and people. This, to me, is the essence of schoolboy sport, learning good practice for their future teams and clubs and, in the process, gaining enjoyment and improved skills.

1ST XI 2010 season of mixed fortunes. A number of games, notably the two local derbies against Hymers and St Peter’s, were particularly close encounters.

Charlie Cawood was an enthusiastic captain, much loved by his team. He showed good humour, good grace and a big heart at all times. He will look back on his experience with pride but also a little personal disappointment at his own statistics. However, he batted beautifully at Hymers College to see us to victory there.

Chris Suddaby continued his development and captained the team extremely well, showing astute understanding of the game throughout the season. He finished the summer as the leading run scorer and wicket taker.

His vice captain, Toby Brown, was also a true character. He led the way in the bowling department with 18 wickets, including twice taking 5 wicket hauls with his left arm swing.

Many other players made significant contributions. James Flint and Roger Moorhouse forged a secure opening partnership and Issac Green’s legspin became a potent weapon as the season progressed.

Matt Axup (92), Tom Brader (54) and Olly Tyson (63) were the only ones to get above the half century in batting, but Julian Lawrence and Adam Richardson also averaged over 20, the latter being a sound wicket keeper for most of our season.

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However, as the record shows, there were just too many occasions when we didn’t put all of the skills together as a team. Many players will be with the team next season and I hope that the extra year will stand them in good stead.

Overall:

Played 14 Won 2 Drew 3, no result 2 (rain)

Lost 7

In the bowling, three boys, Toby aside, took ten wickets or more; they were John Micklem Cooper (10) with his left arm medium pace; Eamonn Bedford (12), right arm quick; and the promising Iain Moorhouse (14) with his leg spin. Tom Sowersby, Tom Brader and Liam Corbally also took useful wickets on occasion. Other regulars who had rather a lean time of things were Will Burn and Chris Iyer. They both contributed well in the field, however, as did stand-in keepers Will Hick and Hugh Barlow. The following boys also made 2nd XI appearances at different times during the season’s course: Henry Lavarack, Jerome Remblance, Tom Benthall, James Bisson, Olly Smith and Tarek Mursal.

DB

1ST XI 2011

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he team can look back on the season with real satisfaction, with convincing victories over Hymers, MCC and the touring South African team to name but a few.

As I mentioned earlier, we began badly by losing to Ampleforth and Worksop. From here on in we played some great cricket in defeating Ashville, Bootham 1st XI, Hymers College, Scarborough College 1st XI and the Pocklington Old Boys’ team. We also achieved draws against Leeds GS and Woodhouse Grove before losing our final game to St Peter’s York.

The defeat to Leeds Grammar was a disappointment and Woodhouse proved to be too strong but the way in which the boys have fought through the season has been a great credit to them all.

Five wins, two draws and three defeats was the final tally. Many of these boys will be with us next year and must be congratulated on their efforts.

Isaac Green has led the team with great enthusiasm and engineered a tremendous team spirit.

MPN

James Flint, with over 400 runs, has been the backbone to the batting with significant contributions from Will Burn, Adam Richardson and the captain himself. The three seamers, Dan Atkinson and the two Sowersbys, Tom and Jack, have worked tirelessly and been well-supported by the leg-spin of Ian Moorhouse. Will Hick’s final ball stumping to clinch the game away at Hymers further reinforces the improvement that has been made in this area.

Overall:

Played 14

Won 7

Lost 7

DB The U15 six-a-side team at Leeds Grammar School where they came a very close second, winning 4 out of 5 of their matches. Left to right: J-P Pavlou, S Perryman, O Smith, O Medforth, J Bird, S Gopal and L Hessay.

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2ND XI 2011

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wo easy wins began the season and notable performances in these games came from Liam Oddell who scored 90 against Hill House and Jake Claughton who hit 70 not out against Ashville. A hard fought victory against Leeds GS followed with runs from Alex Torkington (45) and Eamonn Bedford (38 no) and seven of the wickets shared between spinners Rob Ashton and Jerome Remblance, write Eamonn Bedford (U6) and MPN. Next to suffer was Woodhouse Grove School. We defeated them by 7 wickets. Jake Claughton again batted well with 36 not out and all six bowlers were excellent. A fantastic Old Pocklingtonian fixture was won by 2 wickets. The Old Boys certainly had some talent and got to 166 all out. The school won with seven overs to spare, young Liam Hessay scoring 42. Our bowling has had real accuracy and variety with left arm, off spin and leg spin all featuring. The medium pacers have been unerringly accurate.

U15 XI 2010

This has been a great season with great team spirit encouraged by Captain Bedford who has marshalled his young side with humour and experience. There were more terrific cameos which have not been specifically mentioned. Above all it has been a collective effort.

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The following boys appeared under the 2nd XI banner: E Bedford, J Claughton, T Benthall, J Micklem Cooper, J Remblance, J Lawrence, J Hanley, L Hessay, L Oddell, C Iyer, R Ashton, A Williams, A Torkington, M Evans, J Sowersby, D Atkinson, S Clough, S Dyson, C Hornsey, J Sherwood, L Corbally.

PLAYING RECORD Hill House School 170 for 6 (L Oddell 90, T Benthall 23 no) Hill House 36 all out Won by 134 runs Ashville School 223 for 5 (J Claughton 79 no, T Benthall 37, J Remblance 29, E Bedford 26 no) Ashville 116 (T Benthall 4-14) Won by 167 runs Leeds GS Leeds 130 all out (R Ashton 4-30, J Remblance 3-24, A Torkington 45, E Bedford 38 no) School 131 for 7 Won by 3 wickets Woodhouse Grove Woodhouse Grove 102 for 6 (T Benthall 2-18) School 106 for 3 (J Claughton 36 no, J Remblance 22) Won by 7 wickets OPs OPs XI 166 all out (J Remblance 3-8, E Bedford 2-30) School 168 for 8 (J Claughton 34, L Hessay 42) Won by 2 wickets

he pre-season knowledge that we would be losing three of last year’s most successful players to tennis did not augur well and there was a certain amount of resultant pessimism regarding our prospects. However, greatly to their credit, the remaining members of the squad viewed this as an opportunity rather than an obstacle; those who gained the resultant promotions always rose to the occasion and nobody ever let the team down. As a consequence, although statistically this was not the most successful cricket team that I have been involved with, it was the most positive, enthusiastic and enjoyable to coach. Indeed there were a number of very considerable successes, including rare victories over Ampleforth and St Peter’s and the narrow (1 wicket) defeat at Woodhouse Grove. The final record was a fair reflection of the hard work and determination shown by all of the players, though with a modicum of luck it could have been even better. Everyone contributed to the team’s success with Chris Hornsey’s 24 wickets at 9 apiece and Jack Sowersby’s 15 at 10 leading the bowling. Rob Ashton with 218 runs at 22 and Jake Claughton with 260 at 26 were the leading run getters, whilst Liam Oddell behind the stumps, Tom Benthall, Rob Ashton, Jake Claughton and Elliott Dobson were the most reliable of fielders in what were generally excellent team performances. The squad was superbly lead by Tom Benthall; the best U15 captain I have known. He always played positive cricket, keeping all of his players involved and enthusiastic, whilst showing a real flair for handling the bowling changes and field placements. Most commendable of all, though, was the way in which every individual upheld the very best traditions of this, the most sportsman-like of all games. They took a proper degree of pleasure in their own and the team’s successes, supported each other in adversity and were always generous towards their opponents (several of whom, it must be said, fell well short of their own high standards). My thanks for such an enjoyable season are due to all of the players, to their parents for their reliable and knowledgeable support and especially to Mrs Wilson for her skilful coaching, precision in scoring and ever cheerful support and companionship.

Overall:

Played 7

Won 5

Lost 2

Squad: Benthall T (capt), Ashton R, Claughton J, Clough S, Dobson E, Dyson S, French A, Hornsey C, Oddell L, Pillmoor R, Semeniuk T, Sowersby J, White M, Williams A. RPB

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U14A XI 2010

U14 XI 2011

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he U14s made a slow start to the season. This was due to a number of boys having out-of-school commitments which made it impossible to field a settled side.

Once the team was established, we made good progress and the highlight of the season was winning the East Yorkshire section of the Lord Taverner’s knock-out cup. The boys are now in the last 64 of the National round. The squad played with interest and enthusiasm but needs to work on technique. The batting was brittle at times and many boys need to improve the basics. However, a few names stand out. Oliver Smith scored a fine 93 not out v Woodhouse Grove. He is a very talented boy who should score runs for the 1st XI in the future. Liam Hessay scored 107 not out v Hull Collegiate but his main contribution was with the ball, taking 13 wickets with his left arm pace. Shreyas Gopal captained the side extremely well without the need for the usual teacher input. Well done! The season ended with more wins than defeats, something which did not look likely at the start of the season. Good luck next season in the Nationals.

he match at Ashville saw Ben Byas make 40 to set his season off well and lead the team to a good total of 121. Ashville were looking comfortable until Will Fox took 2 quick wickets near the end. Unfortunately this was not enough and Ashville went on to win this tight game in the last over, recalls Will Stephenson (3DOL). In the second match of the season we played Cottingham in the Cup which ended up to be an easy game as they batted first and only got 30 which we got for the fall of just one wicket. The Scarborough College game was not very successful. We batted first and made only 80 runs, with Alex Curtis top scoring with 20. We started off bowling well but it ended up not being good enough as they knocked us off for two wickets. In the fourth match against Hymers, we started off well with Hymers getting 136 for 8 off 25 overs, leaving us a chaseable target because of an all-round fielding and bowling performance. Ultimately, we were unable to chase these runs down and ended up being 66 all out. We next played Leeds Grammar whose openers both reached their 80s before getting out, giving them 186 for 5 off their 25 overs. We needed to pull off an incredible batting performance to win but unfortunately that never happened, as we were 64 for 8 after our overs and only Tom Hick batted well, with 30 not out.

A win was needed and it nearly came as we batted first and got 139 for 5 in 25 overs with 51 from Will Stephenson and 30 from Alex Curtis. This was a target we thought we could defend but unfortunately we were unable to do this as they got these runs quite comfortably in the end. Finally, in the second round in the cup against Driffield, we batted first again and got 106 in 20 overs which again was a good score. It ended up that this was more than enough after Driffield were bowled out for 25. Squad: Will Stephenson (capt), Ben Byas (w), Alex Curtis, Mikey Curtis, Sam Garvey, Tom Hick, Toby Guest, Cameron Blair, Will Fox, Tom Loten, Jim Hanley, Marc Sewell, Jack Wainwright (w), Josh Parkinson, Charlie Sleigh and Will Sangwin.

Overall:

Played 12

Won 6

Lost 4

Drawn 2

Squad: Gopal S (capt), Glew A, Smith O, Thompson J, Bedford R, Mason H, Pavlou J-P, Risso-Gill B, Hobson G, Medforth O, Megginson S, Axup P, Hawcroft D, Hessay L, Mok G, Bird J, Hanley J, Stephenson W.

U13 XI 2010

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DW

tough season saw the boys participate in 16 fixtures, highlighted by some fine individual and team performances. This gave a number of boys the opportunity to play ‘A’ team cricket, but we were often found wanting against stronger sides with good core skills.

U14B XI 2010

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lthough the U14B side had only a few games, I was impressed by the level of commitment and the quality of play shown throughout the season.

An early season opener against Fulneck got us off to a very encouraging start and there were hopes of going unbeaten, as the squad looked strong and had strength in depth. The next game was a tough match against Worksop where David Hawcroft shone and took 5 wickets to leave them 67 all out. Unfortunately this target seemed very easy to reach and as the wickets started to fall the whole team was getting nervous! However, the tail end held out to win by 2 wickets. The weather then cancelled a few fixtures and left us with only 1 remaining game against St Peter’s. After a very closely-fought game, Pocklington just fell short by 14 runs. Overall, this was a very enjoyable season of cricket. Well done to all who played.

Strong wins against Read, Scarborough College, Hill House and Hull Collegiate gave the boys confidence and helped us to a fine all-round team performance against a strong Ashville side. However, inconsistency with the bat let the squad down against stronger opposition and always meant we had to play catch up cricket. The team was ably led by James Hanley (who went on to represent Yorkshire), who along with Will Stephenson formed the back bone of the batting and bowling. Ben Byas demonstrated some find fielding and all-round potential all season. Cameron Blair was the most consistent of the batsmen, scoring runs freely with his unorthodox style, whilst Tom Hick showed plenty of potential as his development as an off spin bowler continues. The development of this team continues and a greater focus on their basics should see them develop into a strong side for the future. Well done to all who played. SAH

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U12 XI 2010 U13 XI 2011

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his season has been a mixed with good results and disappointing results, writes Olly PeekeVout (2WIL). We have improved as a team and have come away with two big victories (Leeds Grammar and Terrington) and we have pushed many teams to a nerve racking end, taking Hymers down to the last ball, a match to remember with Pock scoring 160 with the bat, the best performance all season. Jonty Atkinson and Tom Foster have batted well with Edward Medforth crashing up the run rate. Matthew Wilde also bowled brilliantly against Woodhouse Grove taking four wickets. There have been many memorable catches this season but Alex Varley’s catch against Terrington has to be the best. Edward Medforth has been first class behind the wickets always looking for the stumpings. Even with the outstanding performances by many people Tom Loten still must be Player of the Season, hitting 50 no twice, he has been exceptional all-round.

O

verall this was a hugely successful season for this promising U12 side. What is particularly pleasing is that even though the team perhaps lacks stand-out stars, this is more than made up for by a terrific team spirit, a willingness to learn, and bouncebackability (new entry to the OED! – Ed.). The platform for a successful season was set in the very first game, with a comprehensive victory over St Martin’s. Two further victories followed, including an exceptional bowling performance by Will Burns against Ranby House (16-4) and a masterful display of straight batting from Matt Besford against Headlands (53 not out). Despite suffering their first defeat against a very strong batting side of Ashville, the team demonstrated that vital quality of bouncebackability (it’s catching!), with victories in three of the next four matches, which included a first victory in the County Cup against Driffield. However, in the latter half of the season, fatigue started to set in. The bowlers abandoned the corridor of uncertainty for the marquee of easy boundaries. The batsmen were playing shots that were more across the line than Frank Lampard’s ‘goal’ against Germany! But unbeknownst to Mr Taylor and Mr Webb, the boys were merely conserving their efforts for a final assault on the County Cup! The local derby clash against Woldgate in the semi-final showcased all their talents. Burns (75 not out) and Medforth (60 not out) set a mammoth total that Woldgate were never likely to challenge given the metronomic accuracy of Besford’s bowling (18-3). The best was saved until last. The final pitched Pocklington against Market Weighton. Pocklington batted first, setting a respectable target of 113-6, largely down to a wristy 31 by Tom Foster and a lusty 30 by Brad Wilson. The game was on a knife edge. Could Pocklington triumph? The boys never gave Market Weighton a chance. Foster put in a true captain’s performance, taking 3-15, and Oliver Peeke-Vout ended the season in superb style, taking a hat trick in a tremendous display of straight bowling. This U12 team have tasted success early, and they like it. They are certainly a team to watch in the future...

Overall:

Played 14

Won 9

Lost 5

JAT

U12 PLAYING RECORD School 159 AO v St Martins 37 AO School v St Olaves School 79 AO v Ranby House 64 AO School 145-7 v Headlands 61 AO Ashville College 226-1 v School 149 AO School 168-4 v Read School 49 AO School 132-5 v Hymers College 133-2 Driffield School 50 AO v School 52-3 85 AO v Hill House 80-8 School 56 AO v GSAL 58-3 Fulneck 92-9 v School 77 AO School 139-5 v Cundall Manor 103-9 School 39 AO v Woodhouse Grove 40-1 School 162-2 v Woldgate 111-8 113-6 v Market Weighton School 43 AO

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Won by 122 runs Rained Off Won by 15 runs Won by 84 runs Lost by 77 runs Won by 119 runs Lost by 3 wickets Won by 7 wickets [County Cup] School Won by 5 runs Lost by 7 wickets Lost by 15 runs Won by 36 runs Lost by 9 wickets Won by 51 runs [County Cup] School Won by 70 runs [County Cup Final]


GIRLS’ TENNIS 1ST VI 2010

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enior girls’ tennis had another very successful year in 2010. There were some outstanding performances from the 1st VI who played and won all five of their friendly matches against Silcoates, Queen Margaret’s, Hymers, Barnard Castle and Mount St Mary’s. The 2nd VI played four matches, winning three against Barnard Castle, Hymers and Mount St. Mary’s and losing to Queen Margaret’s at the start of the season.

The U18 IV team were involved in the York League and the Aberdare Cup again and, for the second year in a row, successfully won the York League trophy. The girls played and beat their rivals Poppleton 5-1 and St Peter’s 4-2 with excellent performances from Sarah Megginson, Katie Atkinson, Emma Loten, Sophie Duncan and Fenella Hobson. The girls got through to the fourth round of the Aberdare Cup after victories against Wakefield Girl’s but after a 3-3 result versus St Peter’s they just lost out on the championship tie-break 10-7. This was a very close match, showing great endurance and high level performances. RS

1ST VI 2011 Senior Girls’ tennis has had a good season in 2011, despite the short term and exams, reports Fenella Hobson (U6).

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he 1st VI played 4 matches. We won two against Hymers, a very strong opposition, but lost the others against Queen Margaret’s and Ampleforth. However, the team was not at full strength on these fixtures. The 2nd VI played two and won two against Hymers, showing lots of strength and depth in the team. The U18 York League team consisted of Emma Loten, Sophie Duncan, Abbie Brant and Fenella Hobson (capt). Others who played as reserves were Frankie Marsh, Emma Hessay, Serena Leach and Lucy Bryan. We had an extremely close match against Poppleton with a final result of 3-3; however, the games total was 26-24 to Poppleton. We had to concede a set due to injury, which was unfortunate. Another close match against St Peter’s ended 4-2 to Pocklington, with some excellent play against our strongest opposition. A convincing win came against Bootham (5-1) and a draw with the Mount (3-3) went down to games again, Pocklington just losing out 26-24. Notable individual performances came from Emma Loten, who was unbeaten this season in singles. Fenella Hobson played an excellent singles against No 1 seed at Bootham and also played some strong doubles with her partner, Abbie Brant. Frankie Marsh and partner Olivia Turner have played some excellent matches together and have gone from strength to strength. 2nd VI newcomers Georgina Beevers and Imogen Barker have boosted the strength of the team, winning all their matches this season.

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U15 VI 2010

U14 VI 2010

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We were fortunate to retain the consistently strong performances of captain Frankie Marsh and Lucy Bryan at first couple, with relative newcomers Emily Wride and Livi Turner stepping in at second. The first four struggled against some accomplished teams but they will need this kind of experience next year. In particular, the ability to stay in long baseline rallies and land the killer blow is strongly tested at U15 level. All four girls had moments of real progression and should be proud of their achievements this season. Cath Medley, Vicky Hodgson, Becky Soanes, Kath Stahl and Maggie Bean all played strong games at third couple. The B team pulled off some impressive wins, including a 6-0 demolition of Bootham. Each player did extraordinarily well to balance tight summer commitments with sports fixtures.

The first four have all played at a high level, with Lily Laverack and Alice Preece, accompanied by Ellie Stephenson and Laura Bisson, playing as the first couple at various points through the term. Other mentions must go to Kate Pratt and Katy Peel, the third couple, who have developed considerably over the term and who won all their matches at a recent fixture away at Hymers. All 24 girls who played in the U14 team in the fixture against Hymers did extremely well, with the C and D teams winning their fixtures.

he U15s encountered some tougher opposition this year than last. Although some wins were decisive, other matches sorely tested the girls’ resolve.

his was a successful season for the U14 squad, which resulted in some very pleasing individual performances.

The girls have also won the York League for the second year in a row, which is an excellent achievement. Well done to all those who played. HSM

Having taken this team through from U13 level, I have never failed to be impressed by their attitude. Their attendance at practices, genuine cheerfulness and desire to do their best are sterling qualities which I will always remember. I wish them all the best next year in the senior ranks. LAL

U15 VI 2011

U14 VI 2011

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The squad consisted of Lily Laverack, Alice Preece, Ellie Stephenson (capt) and Laura Bisson as U15IV league players. Other notable performances and contributions came from Emma Hutchinson, Katy Peel and Kate Pratt.

Some excellent performances came from Ellie Medley (capt) and doubles partner Hayley Harrison. Other notable contributions came throughout the season from Millie Atkinson, Emelia West, Charlotte Horsley and Annablle Redfern.

In the U15 Aegon League, we won one match and had another conceded by Bootham who were unable to field a team.

In the U14 York League, we played four matches and won one. In friendly ties, we played five and managed to win four. Victories included matches against Silcoates, Hymers (A and B teams) and Ampleforth.

he U15 team enjoyed a strong season, writes Ellie Stephenson (4DOL).

In friendly matches, we played five and won three. Overall, a very pleasing summer!

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he U14 Girls teams have had a good season, competing in both the York League and friendly matches, reports Ellie Medley (3GRU).

Finally, all girls in 3rd form played against Hymers and demonstrated some excellent tennis even though some had not played for a long time and others had not even played before! Well done to everyone.


U13 VI 2010

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he U13s have had a very successful season. Both the A and B teams have won the majority of their matches and have really improved thanks to their good attendance at the weekly training sessions.

The A team played very well in the AEGON league and only lost one match to St Olave’s. Very well done to all those involved. Ellie Medley, Millie Atkinson, Natasha Leach (U12), Hayley Harrison and Emelia West all represented the A team and played very well throughout.

U13A:

Played 7

Won 6

Lost 1

U13B:

Played 5

Won 3

Lost 2

CJP

U12 VI 2010

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he girls did not have many fixtures this season and will play more next year when they are U13s. They have done well in the few they have played, and there are certainly some talented players in the year group. Natasha Leach, Megan Glew, Georgie Fenny, Sofia Risso-Gill, Amy Robinson and Jessica Pidgeon have all attended practices regularly and represented the school.

U12A:

Played 2

Won 1

U12B:

Played 1

Won 1

U12C:

Played 1

Drawn 1

Lost 1

CJP

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REPORT 2011 BOYS’ TENNIS

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REPORT 2010

In the national AEGON championships, the U15 team of Olly Smith, Liam Hessay, George Hobson and Olly Medforth won their group fairly comfortably, before recording a fine 4-2 victory in the final against Ampleforth ‘A’. The team thus progresses to the north-east regional knockout rounds in September. The highlight of their regular season was certainly an impressive 8-1 drubbing of St Peter’s early in the term.

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t senior level, injury to Alex Torkington was a huge blow to the 1st VI, whose best performance came upon his return in a 7-2 home victory over Worksop. Regulars Stuart Pearce (captain), Louis Los, Olly Barber, Ben Dawes and James Bisson (who stepped up from U15 to senior level with ease) all played their part in a respectable season. Colours, already held by Stuart, Alex, Louis and Ben, were awarded to Olly and James. The 2nd VI were sometimes guilty of being slow starters, with their best victory being a 6-3 win at Leeds in early May. Just a little more power, aggression and consistency was needed at times! The senior house tennis competition was won by Dolman, finishing ahead of Gruggen by four games in total. The U15 team qualified for the North East regional knockout phase of the national AEGON competition after defeating Bootham 5-1 in the York area, whilst they enjoyed fine victories over St Peter’s and Leeds. Zak Los, Rob Sullivan, Alex West and George Redfern also helped the 2nd VI when players were unavailable. The U14 team deserve special congratulations for winning the York League for the first time in a decade. An early 4-2 victory at Bishopthorpe proved vital, as a poor performance in a 4-2 defeat at Copmanthorpe left the team needing a comfortable win at St Peter’s in the final fixture. How they responded, with a superb 6-0 triumph! Well played to the squad of Olly Smith, Liam Hessay, George Hobson, Olly Medforth and Fraser Davies. The U15/U14 house tennis competition was won by Dolman, who just pipped Hutton and Gruggen by three games in total. The U13 team, consisting mainly of U12s, found the going tough in the AEGON competition, but will hopefully have benefitted from it and gained match experience for the future. With four strong players moving up from Lyndhurst, the prospects for 2011 look very promising.

he 1st VI enjoyed victories against Silcoates, Ashville and Hymers, with a draw in a shortened match at Worksop. The 2nd VI found the going tough against more experienced and more consistent opposition.

The U14 team won its first four matches in the York League to set up a title showdown at Poppleton LTC. Sadly, the unavailability of two of our regular players proved costly, as the team lost 4-2. The best moment of the regular season came in a 5-4 victory over Hymers. The sensations of the term, however, were the U13 squads. In the AEGON event, the ‘A’ team of Angus Field, Oscar Cavill, Jonty Atkinson and Tom Loten defeated St Olave’s, Malton School, Norton College, Lady Lumley’s and Bootham without dropping a set. Our ‘B’ team of Olly PeekeVout, Adam Harrison, James Laudage and Anthony Rose finished runners-up, winning four and drawing one of their matches. The ‘A’ team goes forward to the north-east regional knockout rounds in September. Congratulations to Angus Field, who won all of his singles matches this season at U13 and U14 level. In the Northern Schools’ U14 championships, Angus and Olly Peeke-Vout reached the last sixteen, as did Joe Laudage and Will Sangwin. In the U12 section, a quite remarkable day unfolded, as Jonty Atkinson and Tom Loten cruised through to the quarter-finals, as did Oscar Cavill and James Laudage. Jonty and Tom then defeated Bradford GS and King James’s, Knaresborough, whilst Oscar and James saw off St John Fisher, Dewsbury and Altrincham GS to set up a Pocklington showdown! Jonty and Tom won 10-4. House tennis took place just before the end of term, Wilberforce emerging triumphant. TML

My thanks go to DAG, PMD, JS, GJH, MRE and PJD for their help with games sessions and fixtures this year. The teams’ playing records this term were as follows:

TML

The teams’ playing records this term were as follows:

1st VI 2nd VI U15 U14 U13

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Pl 12 9 7 10

W 5 4 4 7

L 7 5 3 3

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(1 win from 1 in the AEGON competition) (6 wins out of 7 in the York League: winners) (AEGON competition)

1st VI 2nd VI U15 VI U14 VI U13 IV U13 ‘B’

Pl 5 3 7 8 6 6

W 3 0 6 6 6 4

D 1 0 0 0 0 1

L 1 3 1 2 0 1


ATHLETICS Every year it appears that athletics at Pocklington becomes stronger, with more pupils competing and choosing it as an option than ever before.

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he standard is improving in line with this trend. This year, we have seen some truly impressive individual performances from certain pupils. John Soanes, Georgia Ross, Georgie Fenny and George Redfern all achieved remarkable times in their chosen events. The U13 girls’ team was excellent all season, gaining 2nd place at the Woodleigh, 3rd position at the Independent Girls’ meet and winning at Barnard Castle. Not to be outdone, the U13 boys topped the table at Woodleigh. With such a talented crop of young athletes, there is much to look forward to in coming years. SS

SPORTS DAY Sports Day 2010 was a great day for sport; and furthermore, a great day for Hutton! It was my first experience of a Pocklington Sports Day and the sun was shining on athletes, staff and spectators, recalls Bradley Wilson (2HUT).

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e were eager to get out onto the track after several weeks of training. Mr Sykes was keen to see us give our best and put in a strong Lower School effort. I doubt he expected us to actually achieve such heights of success, but event after event saw my Housemates triumph. I started it off with a winning 200m sprint; it was great to lead from the front and have the crowd cheering me on! Moreover we were successful in both track and field. Hutton first years were winning everything they threw at us. Javelin champs were Ed Medforth and Julia Fairbank; I broke the first year shot put record and our jumpers, Will Wraith and Will Burns, took some beating. Marni Esa matched my wins in 100m and 200m sprints, so it was clear that Hutton was bringing it home. Plenty of excitement took place over the day with Middle and Upper school students showing us how they do it. They seemed so much bigger and faster compared to us and our Hutton captain Tarek Mursal led by example with a super throw in the shot put. We were never really sure who was leading overall – things were looking good for Hutton; several talented athletes were putting in some PBs, while 2nd year success for John Soanes and Georgia Ross from Wilberforce ensured they won best athlete awards in Lower School. We thought it would all go down to the relays and the excitement was mounting. It is not always easy finding four top sprinters in one form, but the races were tense and thrilling, with Hutton girls winning both Lower School events, while we came a close second to Wilberforce. The day came to a close with awards being handed out to athletes beating county standards. It was a proud Pocklington moment for many and above all for members of Hutton, who were proclaimed champions of Sports Day 2010! THE POCKLINGTONIAN

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SPORT

NORTHERN PREP SCHOOLS

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n Tuesday 14 June 2010, Pocklington was invited to the biggest Northern Prep School athletics events for U9, U11 and U13 pupils at Huntington Stadium, writes John Soanes (3WIL). Participating for the U13 boys were John Soanes, Will Sangwin, James Hanley, Charlie Sleigh, Will Stephenson, Daniel Cleaver, Will Sayer, Lawrence Elwes and Will Bettison.

It was a good day, with even better results, as the team got nine wins out of twelve events. This included a new record being set in the 1500m by John Soanes with the time of 4 min 59 seconds; he also won the 100m, 200m and the discus. Other good results were produced by James Hanley (winner of the 300m and 800m), Will Sangwin (1st in the long jump) and the team also won the 4×100m and 4×400m relay. The boys’ team finished in the top three in nearly every event except the shot putt and won overall by over 34 points. All of the girls battled strongly throughout and ended up with very good results, recalls Ruby Anderson (3HUT). Excellent performances from Millie Atkinson and Georgia Ross in the long jump resulted in 1st and 2nd places. There were fine attempts at all field events from all of the girls including Lydia Ford, Charlotte Horsley, Katie Wagstaff and Georgie Fenny. The girls also gave it their all on the track events, with Ruby Anderson winning the 100 metre race and Millie Atkinson winning the 200m. In the end the girls did extremely well and came 2nd overall, just one point off 1st place! The day was finished off with a fun and entertaining tug of war, which the boys also won; the girls faced a tough Queen Margaret’s side who just managed to beat them in the final after a hard first leg.

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U15 2011

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he team spirit and enthusiasm shown by the U15s this season was really impressive. Notable wins included Ashville, Read (24-7), Hull Collegiate, a draw against Ampleforth and only one loss (to St Peter’s).

ROUNDERS

U15 2010

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he U15 teams have progressed well this season. Their team spirit and enthusiasm for the game have been really impressive.

Frankie Marsh should be mentioned for her brilliant batting skills, Maggie Bean and Kayleigh Kilsby for their excellent bowler backstop combination and Caitlin Bond, Vicky Hodgson, Grace Pimlott, Ellie Wright and Lucy Peel for their exceptional skills as deeps. These girls were ably assisted by Brittany Hopkins, Sarah Atkinson, Rebecca Soanes, Lucy Bryan, Abbie Buttery and Lucy Snowden in their excellent fielding around the posts. Notable victories were over Queen Margaret’s, Cundall Manor, Ashville, Mount St Mary’s and Hull Collegiate. Unfortunately, the opposition cancelled two of the matches so the ‘B’ team only managed to play one game – but what a contest it was! Pocklington just scraped home against a determined St Peter’s. The following were ‘B’ team members: Emma Adesile, Alex Reay, Alix Coole-Varlow, Elizabeth Hallam, Natalie Quinn, Tui Kama, Charlotte Kelly, Laura Arnott and Abbie Kearney. A great season of rounders for a fantastic group of girls!

Overall: JK

Played 7

Won 6

Lost 1

Daisy Clough, Sophie Burn and Ellie Stephenson should be mentioned for their brilliant batting skills; Kate Pratt and Ellie for their excellent bowler and backstop combination; and Alice Wilton, Isabella Smith, Annie McIntyre, Sophie Burn, Katy Peel and Laura Bisson for their skills as deeps. Sara Eggleston, Faye McFarlane and Isobel Platt also provided excellent fielding around the posts and as sweepers. Outstanding Girls of the Season: Kate Pratt, Sophie Burn and Ellie Stephenson. Unfortunately, the ‘B’ team only played two matches out of the three that had been arranged as Silcoates was rained off. This included a notable win was against Ampleforth but St Peter’s proved to be too strong. The following girls all played with distinction, showing real commitment to the game and spirit throughout both matches: Clare Schofield, Beth Todd, Molly Beharrell, Lucy Williams, Georgina Lloyd, Cassie Secker, Aimee Kearney, Amelia Hutchinson, Ellie Brown, Elizabeth Graham, Eve Shallcross, Imogen Heaven and Lucinda Rix. Outstanding Girls of the Season: Hanna Walls, Clare Schofield and Beth Todd. JK

U14 2010

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his was a successful season for the U14A team, losing only one game throughout the season.

Ellie Stephenson proved a superb captain, controlling the game well from backstop and leading by example. Daisy Clough must also be mentioned for her determination with her batting – practice makes perfect and she’s not far off that! Notable victories were over Queen Margaret’s, Ashville, Bootham, and Mt St Mary’s.

Overall:

Played 6

Won 5

Lost 1

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SPORT

U13 2010

U12 2010

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ll of the girls who played in the A, B and C teams continued to develop both their batting and fielding skills during the season and nearly the whole year group attended weekly practices. The U13 teams collectively had a superb season, winning 9 out of 12 matches. The three matches they lost were hard-fought and the end score was very close! The A team played extremely well in the Terrington Tournament and finished 3rd in the league, just missing out on the semi-finals. In matches, we saw excellent batting from several girls, including Alex Riddell, Lydia Ford, Camilla Eggleston, Millie Atkinson and Ellie Medley. Olivia Flanagan has developed into a superb fast bowler and Katie Stuart and Yasmin Remblance both demonstrated excellent skills at backstop. Lydia, Alex and Ellie were great value in deep field whilst Camilla and Georgie Field proved safe hands on second post. Annabel Fawcett worked well with the backstop to get the opposition out on first post and Evie Metcalfe also represented the team well this season. All of the girls showed remarkable commitment and determination throughout the season and always demonstrated fantastic team spirit. They are a credit to Pocklington. It has been a pleasure to watch them all develop their skills and work with them, so a big ‘thank you’ from me!

Overall:

Played 14

Won 11

he U12 ‘A’ and ‘B’ teams both had an excellent season. Following two narrow defeats early in the term (both by 2 rounders), the teams worked hard on their skills and went from strength to strength. Megan Glew proved to be a good, accurate bowler and worked well together with backstops, Sofia Risso-Gill and Natasha Leach. Post fielders Emily Wright, Emma Huddlestone, Hannah Frisby Pape and Marni Esa took many superb catches and stumpings. Great catches and accurate throws by the deep fielders, Julia Fairbank, Amy Robinson, Amy Redhead, Annie Holding, Grace Jackson and Adelle Kama prevented many rounders. In batting, every team member managed to score at some point in the season, but notable high scores came from Georgie Fenny, Marni, Sofia, Natasha, Emma, Julia and Adelle.

Team members not mentioned above who contributed greatly to the team’s successful season were Katie Wagstaff, Amy Crowther, Sarah Lancaster, Olivia El Jassar and Katrina Summerton. Notable victories were over Ashville, Hull Collegiate, Silcoates and St Olave’s.

Lost 3 Overall:

Played 11

Won 9

Lost 2

NCW JD

U13 2011 ll who played in the U13 ‘A’ and ‘B’ teams continued to develop both their batting and fielding skills through weekly practices.

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In matches, we saw excellent batting from several girls, including Julia Fairbank, Adelle Kama, Megan Glew, Hannah Frisby-Pape and Sofia Risso-Gill. Megan Glew, Katrina Summerton, Sarah Lancaster and Amy Crowther all worked very hard on their bowling skills and Natasha Leach developed into a superb backstop. She put in an excellent performance against Read which resulted in a win by only 2 rounders – everyone was holding their breath when the score was read out and the girls cheered when they heard they had won. This was my highlight of the season! Julia Fairbank, Grace Jackson and Georgie Fenny were great in deep field this season, whilst Amy Robinson and Livi El Jassar both performed well at second post. Amy even developed her own technique to stop the ball (which others struggle to replicate!) but it proved very effective indeed! Adelle Kama was outstanding; she took some superb catches and her vision on the field was excellent. Well done! Hannah Frisby-Pape worked very well at first post with backstop to get the opposition out on first post and Emma Huddlestone proved effective either on a post or in deep field. Anna Holdstock’s throwing and batting are both developing nicely. Marni Esa, Amanda Bean, Emily Wright, Daisy Barnes and Amy Redhead also represented teams with credit this season. All of the girls showed remarkable commitment and determination throughout the season and always demonstrated fantastic team spirit – they are a credit to Pocklington. A big “thank you” from me! NCW

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U12 2011

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n a relatively short season, the girls displayed great commitment, attending practices regularly and working hard on developing their team play and tactics.

Early in the season they had two narrow defeats in very exciting matches against Queen Margaret’s (15 ½ -13 ½) and Ashville (13½-13). This was followed by a draw at Silcoates. However, fine victories over St Martin’s (13-4½), Read and Silcoates ‘B’ helped to even out the averages. Unfortunately, fixtures against St Olave’s and Bootham had to be cancelled due to the weather. Every girl played her part in the matches, always giving her best effort, but special mention must go to Angela Curtis who was outstanding, taking many superb catches and scoring regularly for the team. Other high scoring batsmen were Nicole Marshall, Ella Marshall and Emily Boddy. A great group of girls to coach! Squad: E Boddy, J Bunn, F Chappelow, L Coatsworth, G Covell, M Cullen, A Curtis, T Davies, L Duggleby, L Eggleston, T Fofie, M Ford, M Hankin, B Hatfield-Chetter, E Marshall, N Marshall, J Newall-Watson, A Sangwin, R Smreeti,

Overall: JD

Played 7

Won 3

Drew 1

Lost 3


TRAMPOLINING Trampolining is… A great way to learn new skills and get fit – Ellie Brown (4WIL) The best sport: we all love our coach! – Aimee Kearney (4HUT) A relaxing way to end the school day – Elizabeth Graham (4DOL) Exhilarating! – Eve Shallcross (4GRU)

With trampolining you can… Do all sorts of competitions with your friends – Marianna Hankin (1WIL) Master lots of new techniques – Angela Curtis (1GRU)

It takes you to new levels… Winning the National Championships when I was eleven with a team of my best friends. Being selected for the Yorkshire Squad. From beginner to a competitive trampolinist! – Kayleigh Kilsby (5GRU)

You’re never too young to start… I love bouncing up and down, up and down and up and down – Mary Hallam (5jx) We get to do flips! – Hannah East (4jx) You get to go to awesome places – Tiger Brash (5jx) Last year, I was chosen to represent Yorkshire at the English Championships in Gloucester, writes John Chatterton (5HUT). I enjoy helping the younger children progress: its rewarding watching them achieve new moves. I would recommend the sport to anyone! I began trampolining in 2004, recalls Alix Coole-Varlow (5WIL). Before I left Lyndhurst, I managed to achieve my front somersault. I carried on at senior school and started coaching the junior pupils, which improved my self confidence. I have made many firm friendships through the sport and am over the moon that I have now reached my back somersault, too! Before I came to Pocklington, I had never really got into sports, but trampolining is something I really enjoy, writes Elizabeth Hallam (5DOL). The highlight of this year was landing my front somersault, something I never would have believed possible before! The greatest part is not only achieving something as an individual but watching other people achieve something, too, reflects Catherine Medley (5GRU). Trampolining boosts confidence and inspires you to do different things. Recently, my biggest achievement was coming first in the recent Regional G competition.

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CCF

WELBECK 2010 After a freezing night under canvas, the teams were thankful for a hearty breakfast prior to the start.

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he girls began with some target shooting. Four scored in the 40s: Livi Crompton, Lucy Snowden, Rebecca Soanes and Lucy Peel. An overall score of 226 was attained by the team. The boys scored 289 with Barra (61), Tom (54) and Luis (41) excelling. The boys’ team lit up the fitness stand with a score of 627, over 60 points higher than any previous team. The girls shocked the Welbeck staff with their ability to perform correct press ups as they had only witnessed other girls doing press ups with their knees on the floor! In the pool, Kayleigh Kilsby came into her element and anchored the girls’ team. The boys swam well, with Tom Horsley thrashing the water with his eyes closed, swimming dramatically off line (much to the amazement of his teammates, who nearly took the roof off with their vocal instructions). Tom was oblivious to it all until he ran out of breath and popped his head out of the water to see what on earth was going on! In the Jacob’s ladder ascent, Livi, Maggie, Becky and Lucy S formed the girls’ team. It took them 11.5 minutes to drag themselves to the top of 8 horizontal poles held together by chains. The boys’ group of Archie, Jake, Barra and Liam completed the climb in 9.5 minutes which was also a fantastic effort considering the struggle Archie had to overcome with the height between poles near the top. When it came, tea was very welcome. Needless to say, with over 200 cadets camping in the same area, getting to sleep was not easy! Day Two began with the heavens opening at 4.30am. The rain eased off by breakfast time and the day’s activities were conducted in dry conditions. However, the girls were into a very physically demanding command task that required them to haul themselves upside down along a climbing rope. They all managed to hang on through sheer grit and determination. The boys, being bigger and heavier, had their difficulties with this stand but also managed to finish the task. A combination of hard work and not a little physical effort saw both teams finish the 14 tasks by lunchtime on the Sunday. GK

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BOYS Paddy Russell Jake Claughton Barra Ward Archie Williams Luis Covell Liam Oddell George Redfern Tom Horsley

GIRLS Olivia Crompton Kayleigh Kilsby Lucy Peel Maggie Bean Lucy Snowden Caitlin Bond Emily Wride Rebecca Soanes


COLTS’ CANTER The rain was atrocious. Ironically, it stopped just as the competition ended…

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he Pocklington team was led by Cadet Colour Sergeant Rob Honeyman. His group consisted of Juliet May, John Micklem-Cooper, Alex Lyon, Guy Harland, Barra Ward, Oliver Norman and Rufus Watson. The first task was the inspection. Each team had to show pieces of equipment they should have, demonstrate their rifles were immaculately clean. The final scores show that Pocklington came first on the inspection phase. After this, the team was split into pairs to demonstrate their prowess at four different aspects of cadet skills, the rifle, map and compass, first aid and field craft. Rob and John went on field craft which involved a question paper to be completed by one and an observation post for the other. Somewhere along the way the boys fell down because our overall position for this stand was second to last. The rifle pair was Rufus and Barra. They had to perform some rifle drills, fill a magazine with rounds of ammunition and strip and reassemble the rifle. Juliet and Guy attempted the map and compass paper whilst Alex and Olly tackled the first aid challenge. All in all the results were not what we had hoped for.

HANNAH DAWSON

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uring the Easter holidays (2010) I spent my time at RAF Topcliffe on a Gliding Scholarship, writes Hannah Dawson (U6).

I completed all my flights within the vigilant glider! I felt the course was fantastic especially when I was in control of the glider as this really improved my flying skills and techniques. I would recommend the Scholarship to any of the RAF cadets: it was definitely worth it! Additionally, in summer 2010 I participated in the Air Cadet Leadership Course. I enjoyed the challenging but yet fulfilling time I spent at RAF Cranwell.

Following on from the pairs’ stands the team then had to complete a 6 mile march across the training area to Wathgill camp. It was definitely a collective effort as Alex suffered fairly early on. The team rallied round and coaxed him on whilst dividing his kit amongst themselves. By the end of the march they finished with a creditable time which gave them sixth place in that phase. The shoot was the final element. All eight had to shoot 10 rounds at targets that remained up for 60 seconds after they had run 100m. The scoring was not great, with Juliet getting the best total of 6. The team score, however, was only beaten by Ampleforth. Pocklington finished in 6th place: a fine achievement in such inclement conditions. GK

The course itself gave me a great deal of confidence for leading others through many demanding tasks. It also taught me to take other people’s points of view into consideration and to how to work effectively in a team as well as individually. By the end of the week, I felt proud of what I had achieved. I have taken many of the lessons from Cranwell on board and look forward to testing my leadership skills in the new academic year.

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CCF CAMP 2010 The sight of teenagers having to get out of bed at 5am was a great way to start the week. The fire alarm ensured the queue for breakfast was enormous…

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hat night we celebrated Ellie McCabe’s 16th birthday with a cake expertly divided by Mrs Randell. Mr Hall used his ‘Crocodile Dundee’ knife to slice it, to the amusement of all present.

Camp returned to Wathgill, Catterick this year, with the ranges at Battle Hill near Barnard Castle. Kayleigh Kilsby and John Micklem-Cooper were the top shots. The cadets had the opportunity to fire at some clay pigeons, too, with some success: Joe McNelis hit all three of his. After this, the cadets had to run 100m, load and fire 10 rounds at their targets. We scored a total of 46 and Langley scored 34. The range package ended with the cadets getting the chance to fire the Light Support Weapon. The LSW fires on automatic, which surprised some! The evening was taken up with our own Drill competition. The cadets were split into 3 groups: one girls’ section, led by Aimee Schofield, and two boys’ sections led by Rob Honeyman and Sam Mortimer. The girls went first, followed by Rob’s section. However, when one of the cadets passed wind rather loudly, Sam utterly lost his composure! The girls’ section won overall. Tuesday started with Orienteering and a 3 mile course down at Shieba training area. The cadets threw themselves into this and broke the previous record set by another school on the Sunday. Guy Harland was particularly quick around the course. The afternoon saw them move to Fishpond Wood for the Leadership/command tasks led by Sheffield UOTC. Jake Fletcher and Rob Green came to the fore and demonstrated some impressive leadership skills. The next day brought Adventure Training at Ellerton Park. The package consisted of climbing, canoeing, kayaking, raft building, archery and volleyball. Juliet May led her team on the building of a raft and Tom 76

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Semeniuk excelled at archery. Chris Pratt was likened to a monkey as he clambered all over the climbing walls. Natalie Quinn and Alice Goodwin seemed to find plenty of time to pose for the cameras, whatever the task! Thursday began with tactics. Half the day involved preparing and executing an ambush. The other half was section attacks across open, undulating rough ground. It was also Annabel Prescott’s 15th birthday: what a way to spend it! The cadets then entered the next phase, attacking Sheffield UOTC staff, who were waiting to ambush us at various points. The attacks came thick and fast, eventually ending at around 10am. Ryan Duncan and James Johnstone (OPs) finished the day’s training with the cadets on what was now a sunny day. I must mention at this point Archie Williams and Mr Whippy (?! – Ed.). That evening we had a BBQ organised by Harry Hetherton and Ryan. We said goodbye to Capt Tanya Randell as she leaves the school to move to Wales. An excellent week’s training – and some very tired teenagers! GK


CRANWELL 2010

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ull of anticipation, thirteen members of the RAF section at Pocklington School travelled to RAF Cranwell in Lincolnshire for the National Schools competition on Sunday 28 November, recalls Hannah Dawson (U6). The event consisted of a range of different CCF activities. These included fitness, drill, aircraft recognition, command tasks, first aid and shooting. The team worked hard preparing for the competition and everybody worked excellently during the weekend and showed their full potential, despite the snowy conditions! Our group came second in the drill competition which was wonderful news as this was the first time that Pocklington has come second at Cranwell. The team work throughout the command tasks really paid off. We came seventh out of fifteen overall; a personal best for the school! I would like to thank all of the team for their efforts; well done to all. Thank you to Flight Lieutenant Dare and Pilot Officer Spencer for taking us all to Cranwell. It gave us all a chance to expand our RAF experiences and allowed us to meet new people with similar interests.

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CCF

CCF CAMP 2011 “Are we downhearted? No!” Not though there was no transport to take us to Wathgill Camp; no use of the training area assigned to us, due to regular and territorial soldiers having priority; not though there was no Range Work on the Sunday due to MOD cuts… Thankfully, Miss Scott and Mr Hallam got us there in the school minibuses; and clay pigeon shooting and marksmanship skills on the indoor range made fine substitutes for range work. On Monday, Sheffield UOTC supervised an afternoon of command tasks, after orienteering skills (which proved tiring not only to the cardiovascular systems, but also the brains of some). Our cadets worked alongside those of Barnard Castle and enjoyed the competitive nature of the stands. Competition continued during the obstacle course; our beating the Barnard Castle team was not mentioned more than fifty times in the Officers’ Mess for the rest of the week! Tuesday saw enthusiastic participation in archery, raft-building, canoeing, kayaking, climbing and volleyball; the cadets’ enthusiasm shrugging off the only rain of the week. Wednesday’s Field Training was first-rate and skills learnt were put to good use for the night exercise that evening. Ryan Duncan (OP) demonstrated how to use the 24 hour ration pack (boxes thoroughly enjoyed by the cadets) and demonstrated Harbour Skills. Ponchos were used as bivvis and quiet descended as cadets became ‘tactical’ for the duration of the exercise: Mr Hall, thanks to Mrs Kilsby’s skills with the first aid casualty simulation kit, made a realistic downed pilot. He was successfully found and rescued by Sgt Adam Dale’s section in the woods and returned to the harbour. The busy woods, filled with ‘enemies’ and regular and TA soldiers on exercise, made the finding of a ‘lost’ canister tricky work for Sgt Simon Hodgson’s section; but they too were successful in completing their task. Kayleigh Kilsby co-ordinated sentry duty from 1am onwards, after the leaders had finally bedded down; but by 5.15 the planned ‘attack’ started (led by Mrs Kilsby falling unceremoniously over the fence!). We were successful in defeating the enemy’s three positions. Miss Scott’s burning of the empty ration boxes at the subsequent breakfast was not as successful, as she forgot to take account of wind direction. She was not allowed near the barbeque embers that evening… Mr Hall and Ryan demonstrated ‘house clearing’ on the old farm buildings, whilst Mr Kilsby demonstrated use of the Light Support Weapon. The final day saw ‘high ropes’ adventure activities at ‘Adrenalin’ and an obstacle course which, thanks to an obsession with health and safety measure by the owners, rather curtailed the enthusiasm of our cadets to race across the obstacles. Many thanks to Ryan Duncan, Mr Hall, Mrs Kilsby, Miss Scott and Mr Hallam for supporting an excellent week. GK

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ACLC 2011 Charlotte Prescott (L6) spent a week of her 2011 summer break at Cranwell, also taking part in the Air Cadet Leadership Course (ACLC).

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adets are split into teams of 10 and designated flight A, B, C or D. The daily routine begins with a 5.30am wake up, to be ready for 6am and days end at around 10.30pm. Activities include fitness, leadership tasks, lectures and drill. Two nights are spent our in the field - one in a tent one one under a bivouac, living off rations.

HANNAH CROMPTON

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was awarded the Sir Geoffrey De Havilland Flying Foundation Medal on 3 July 2011 at Royal Air Force Cranwell during the annual Air Squadron Day, writes Cadet Warrant Office Hannah Crompton (U6).

The Sir Geoffrey de Havilland Flying Foundation is a charity which supports aviation education and helps young people to fulfil their ambition to be able to ‘reach for the sky’.

One of my favourite parts of the week was 'Ex Top Dog' which included orienteering and a log run, writes Charlotte. Team morale was at an all-time high at this point! All in all the course is about mind over matter. ACLC is a mentally and physically challenging course, however the passing out parade in front of College Hall at Cranwell makes it all worthwhile and is an experience I will never forget.

RAF CAMP 2011 his was a fantastic camp thanks to the support of the Air Cadet liaison team at RAF Shawbury and the enthusiasm and hard work of all staff and cadets involved.

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The first weekend was spent on a familiarisation exercise and leadership tasks together with an airfield rescue exercise, drill practice and sports activities. Next came visits to the fire section, the aircraft storage facility and air traffic control before the highlight of the week: a twenty minute flight in a Squirrel Helicopter with 705 Naval Air Squadron. The evening was spent on the high ropes course including the ‘leap of faith’ and many other challenging exercises. Cadets visited the Cosford Air Museum and flew in Grob Tutor, two-seater planes in which they all relished the opportunity to take the controls themselves and enjoyed the thrill of aerobatics! Evening activities included ten pin bowling and laser quest. Wrekin Havoc was the next cadet challenge – a navigational exercise involving map work and route planning. This was followed by a night on patrol bivouacking under the stars. The following day’s activities included a visit to the National Memorial Arboretum in Airewas, near Burton-on-Trent and a chance to relax on a visit to Waterworld near Stoke-upon-Trent before returning to camp for a careers brief and more sport. On the final day of this busy camp cadets prepared a review for the Air Cadet Liaison Officer which is was followed by drill practice and the long awaited drill competition. This was won by Squirrel Flight. Our final day also happened to be ‘Families Day’ on the base and cadets were fully involved marshalling which gave them a ring-side seat for the flying displays. On show were the Blades Acrobatic Team, RN Swordfish, the Kingair, a fly-by buy USAF (67 SOS) MC 130 P, the RN Lynx, the Chinook, a fly-by by USAF (492nd Fighter Sqn) F-15E Eagle, a British Memorial Flight Spitfire display, a Griffin helicopter role demonstration and the highlight of the afternoon – the Red Arrows display team. Camp ended with the traditional paper plate cadet presentation and the more formal presentation with the following prizewinners: Best Shot - Sean Perryman Most Improved Cadet - Jordan Littlewood Best NCO - Alix Coole-Varlow Best Cadet on Camp - Bethany Todd Cadets who attended: Ryan Tiplady, Matthew Heuck, Jake Galley, Jake Smart, Sean Perryman, Laura Reeson, Alix Coole-Varlow, Hannah Dawson, Bethany Todd, Jordan Littlewood, Hannah Crompton and Olivia Crompton. PMLD

The entire day was a truly wonderful experience. Upon arrival at RAF Cranwell, I was whisked away into a hangar to practice the drill for the forthcoming ceremony. This was daunting at first, but I quickly got the hang of it after a few improvised drill movements. As soon as everything ran through smoothly with the Air Cadet National Marching Band, it was time for the presentation. With each award the successes of the winners were announced. It was an honour to accept the prestigious award from the Air Chief Marshal Sir Michael Graydon; this provided a pinnacle moment to my cadet career with Pocklington Combined Cadet Force. After an inspiring speech by the Commandant of the Air Cadets, Air Commodore Barbara Cooper, the award winners and supporters headed off to the Daedalus Officers’ Mess for lunch. On the day I was kindly supported by the Headmaster, Head Flight Lieutenant Patrick Dare, my parents and my sister Olivia. After lunch, the cadets were offered flights with members of the Air Squadron and 7 AEF. I was lucky enough to fly in a Piper Cub and a Cessna which was absolutely thrilling, emphasising what the Air Cadet Organisation is really about. My time with Pocklington Combined Cadet force has been truly phenomenal in terms of the opportunities I’ve had. This includes representing the RAF section of the CCF nationally at the Royal British Legion Festival of Remembrance in the presence of Her Majesty the Queen and serving as a Flight Staff Cadet at RAF Topcliffe, gaining my advanced gliding qualification and training to become an instructor. I have also learnt a huge amount about teamwork, leadership and work ethic through the CCF and have thoroughly enjoyed leading the Contingent this year. I look forward to leading my last camp at RAF Shawbury next week and hope to join a University Air Squadron this autumn to pursue my passion for flying.

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TRIPS

LOWER SCHOOL HOUSE CAMP 2010 Once settled in at Llandudno, we drove to Beaumaris in Anglesey for a Puffin Island boat cruise. Several pupils were keen to sit at the front of the boat to see whether or not they could remain dry...

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n Tuesday, we travelled to Colwyn Bay to a pottery studio. The aim was to create an original design on a plate, which was then put in a kiln and glazed. James Falkingham, as promised, managed to paint a tractor on his plate! Mrs Newhouse, Mrs Wilson, Dr Clow, Mr Sykes, Miss Postlethwaite and Mr Peel all displayed their artistic talents. Well done to James Conner who was awarded the prize for Best Plate. The next day, we visited the Snowdon Railway. True to form, the view was somewhat disguised by mist! In the evening we went ten pin bowling: an evening of fun and serious competition. Mr Donaldson proved to be the star of the night! We went down to the beach and had a game of rounders on the final day. Miss Metcalfe was the manager of the girls’ team and Mr Sykes was the manager of the boys’ team. Never was a game more competitive, with more pride at stake. After this, a ruthless sand castle competition. Again the competitive nature of the pupils shone through. House Camp 2010 was an excellent, active few days. Olivia Banks, David Hutchinson and Edward Wightman were awarded the ‘good eggs’ of the trip for their super enthusiasm and willingness to do all that was asked of them throughout the holiday. Thanks to Mr Donaldson, Mr Sykes, Mr Peel, Miss Metcalfe, Miss Postlethwaite, Mrs Wilson and Dr Clow for making the trip possible. MN

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LOWER SCHOOL HOUSE CAMP 2011

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n the way to Bamburgh, a visit to The Forbidden Corner, Middleham promised a labyrinth of tunnels, chambers, follies and surprises. It did not disappoint!

On our first morning, we all went to the Grace Darling museum where the pupils were able to act out the famous rescue made by Grace and her Father in 1838. In the afternoon we visited a Bird of Prey Centre, where the pupils had the opportunity to come face to face with a number of birds and watch a superb display. In the evening the pupils enjoyed playing crazy golf and letting off steam in the soft play centre at Seahouses. We then, of course, had the obligatory visit to the amusements, with many pennies placed in the slot machines! The next morning, we went to the Pot-A-Doodle Do Centre. The aim was to create an original design on a plate, which was then put in a kiln and glazed. Everyone thoroughly enjoyed this session and there were some super designs. Mrs Newhouse, Dr Clow, Mrs Lord and Miss Postlethwaite all displayed their artistic talents! The winner of the pupils’ best plate award has yet to be decided…In the afternoon we made our way to Seahouses where we enjoyed a super boat trip around the Farne Islands. We also drove across the causeway to Lindisfarne where we enjoyed a lovely walk to the Castle. On the return walk we sampled some of the local ice cream! After dinner that night Miss Postlethwaite organised a ‘Beetle’ Drive which was great fun. On Thursday, we travelled to the impressive Alnwick Castle. Here the pupils found out about the Harry Potter connection and also enjoyed acting out the skirmishes that occurred between the English and Scottish armies. House Camp 2011 was an excellent, active few days and the pupils were wonderful company. We were very lucky with the weather which meant that we saw this area at its best. I would like to thank Miss Postlethwaite, Mrs Wilson, Dr Clow, Miss Gray, Mrs Lord, Mr Bond and Mr Newhouse for giving up their time and making this trip possible. MN

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PARIS TRIP 2010 During the May half term holiday, 40 second year pupils spent five days in Paris. We travelled to Dover by coach, with Mr and Mrs Butcher, Miss Postlethwaite, Mrs Peel, Mr Sykes and Miss Sellers. We were excited but I couldn’t believe we were all talking way past midnight, recalls Tom Lynch (3WIL).

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he château is about an hour out of Paris and set in its own grounds with an outdoor swimming pool and football pitches. The first evening we played team games outside before going to our rooms

to bed.

The next day, we drove into Paris and went up the Eiffel Tower. We visited the Arc de Triomphe and went around the roundabout a few times so that we could see it properly (hmm…sounds as though someone got lost! – Ed.). Afterwards we drove down the Champs Elysées on the coach where all the names on the shops have to be in white lettering to fit in. We also went to the Sacré Coeur at Montmartre and looked round the square to get souvenirs, caricatures and portraits done. Later in the stay we went to Parc Astérix: Miss P told us all that we were free to explore in groups of three and that we should return to a particular point at around 2pm. Then she let everybody go. Woooo! There are lots of rides, such as Zeus (which is a rollercoaster) and there is a big log flume which ends in a massive water pool. The remote-controlled pirate ships were great fun. The arcades were really good and there is a water slide which was AMAZING and very WET!! These along with many more fun rides made for an excellent day. On day four we went to the Stade de France. It holds 80,000 people! We had a tour around the whole stadium including the changing rooms and the tunnel. Then we went to a shop called Décathlon and bought chocolates, rugby balls and American footballs. After that we planned to go

FRENCH EXCHANGE 2010

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llons y! De Paris à Besançon – une très jolie ville en Franche Comté où se trouve le Lycée Jules Haag, notre échange, ecrivent Emma Hawcroft, Edward Hetherington (U6) et Mme Marshall.

Les bons souvenirs!

Message du 10/11/10 14:14 De: "Clémentine Simon" Objet: RE: échange Un grand merci aux équipes enseignantes françaises et anglaises. Les moments échangés avec Millie en l'occurence furent chaleureux, agréables et instructifs pour toute la famille, malheureusement ses moments furents trop courts à notre goût... Même si cela vous demande beaucoup de travail, continuez dans cette voie... Ces moments de partage avec des gens différents sont vraiment bénéfiques tant au niveau pédagogique et aussi humain... Un grand merci à vous pour votre implication, merci pour nos enfants... et Bravo pour cet échange! Sophie SIMON

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for an evening cruise on the Seine but unfortunately we didn’t make it because we were stuck in traffic for ages. The final day meant an early start. We stopped en route at the market to buy some souvenirs and food to eat whilst on the train. Thanks to all the teachers who accompanied us on the trip. Nous nous sommes très bien amusés!


BERLIN STUDY TRIP 2011

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his year’s U6 Study Trip to Berlin took place at the start of the Easter holidays, and, as usual, it was great preparation for the forthcoming German exams.

Thursday – a visit to Tacheles (local funky art collective) Friday – a walking tour (all the sights in 4 hours – Museuminsel, Gendarmenmarkt, Hackescher markt, Bebelplatz, Friedrichstrasse, Reichstag, Brandenburg Gate, Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, Site of Hitler’s Bunker, Goering’s Reichsministry Building); a bus tour (unofficial) and shopping in KaDeWe (the ‘German Harrods’) Saturday – tours of the Olympic Stadium and Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp; rock concert Sunday – visits to two fleamarkets and a football match Monday – Checkpoint Charlie Museum; visit to Stasi Prison Tuesday – visits to the Reichstag and the Zoo (students’ choice) Wednesday – flight home! All three students agreed that it was the best school trip they had ever done. Many thanks to the U6 trio of Olly Barber, Lorrain Fisher and Rob Honeyman for their company and of course to our French Assistante, Jackie, for making the trip easy to run and a pleasure to lead!

What we have learnt: Lorrain likes monkeys; Rob likes seeing penguins feeding; Jackie likes giggling; Herr Galloway likes Flea Markets; and Olly likes the TV Tower and Brazilians! Birds don’t sing on sites of former concentration camps. Berliners like practising their English, even when you speak to them in German… The best football team in Berlin is Union Berlin! Union Berlin! Union Berlin! Tour guides come in all shapes and sizes, and mad Kiwis and kindly German grandmothers are much better than pompous English historians! The Heart of Gold Hostel is incredibly cool and it’s open 24/7. If we’re doing lots of walking, Ugg boots are better (really?! – Ed.). Giggling is infectious, and Olly’s trolleys are everywhere in Berlin! Jackie is not Irish! Berlin is the coolest city on the planet! DAG

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BOTSWANA 2011

was laid on and Patty and Gunther, our generous hosts, said an emotional farewell to Group One.

It would be difficult for some of the best writers and journalists in the world to commit the adventure of SaBoZa Group Two to page, believes Tom Brant (U6). Dan Brown would be flummoxed by tickling in Serowe, JK Rowling, baffled by the green lady at Livingstone and Terry Pratchett would struggle with the rugby teams in Heathrow.

After their departure, we started work at a local rehabilitation centre. We undertook maintenance on the playground after a hail storm had caused severe damage. A team built a ramp for wheelchair access to the outdoor space. Another section of the group painted the inside of the building and a team built a storage shed at the rear of the building, to enable the centre to use classrooms currently filled with old, broken and disused equipment. I honestly have never seen so much life in a man as Mr Peel agonised over every tiny detail (including a short excursion onto the partially built roof).

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Worthy of note also was a trip to the Khama Rhino Sanctuary (the only one in Botswana) where we saw (yep, you guessed it) rhinos and their calves (cubs? babies?). The trip was organised because Steph had put a lot of effort into making educational materials for them and it was only right that she saw the fruits of her labours. We also went on another safari (less said about that one the better, I think). Suffice to say Rob (our leader) earned his salts that evening…and then some! Finally, we celebrated Will’s nineteenth birthday and left for Ellisras, South Africa, for a well-earned rest.

roup Two’s academic and pastoral expertise came in the form of Doc Mac, Mrs Pratt and Mr Peel (in his final act as a Pock teacher).

Meeting on a cold and wet morning in Pocklington (déjà vu?! Ed.), we left for Livingstone which, contrary to Harry’s belief, is in South Zambia. Arrival in Livingstone marked the beginning of several activities: canoeing down the Zambezi, safaris, a sunset cruise and a guided tour to Victoria Falls. It also gave us an opportunity to be introduced to African currencies.

It was an amazing trip. It was a beautiful place. They were brilliant people. Going there to do what we did gave us all a warm glow of pride and a tan, but it also made us think about our own lives at home. Do we really need facebook, an Xbox or even an iphone? The truth is, no, we do not. We met people in a desperate situation with very little, their hopes falling on the shoulders of two groups of teenagers, and they were, without doubt, the happiest people I have ever met. Pope is a labourer we met in Serowe who worked with us on very physically demanding tasks. He was also a volunteer who didn’t stop for a break when we did. Edgar is an office worker at the school who we saw day in, day out, shovelling sand to build the shed. That kind of enthusiasm for no financial gain I found moving and honourable. It’s something that perhaps we don’t see enough of in our society. Was it worth the effort and time to get there? Without question.I’d therefore encourage everyone to do it, take the chance and go for it. It was worth every ounce of effort.

An interesting economics fact: as a result of massive inflation in some parts of Africa, the paper money is printed on is often worth more than the money itself. In Zambia we discovered this wonder and it landed with a worrying ‘clang’. The smallest note (no coins!) available was a fifty kwacha which was, at the time, worth about 67p. Before leaving Zambia and its culinary delights (just ask anyone about my legendary chilli con carne) we met our driver Zenzo and truck [Johnny] Cash. In the following days and nights we travelled south through Botswana, observing lions in Chobe, the Makgadikgadi salt pans and, much to Mr Peel’s delight, lots and lots of birds in the Okavango Delta. Arriving in Serowe, Botswana, we met Group One at the goat farm which would be our home for the next five days. A braai (a South African BBQ) 84

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SWING BAND IN BERLIN Our first performance took place at the Braurei Meirei in Potsdam, the town made famous by the conference that took place in the nearby Cecilienhof Palace in 1945, recalls Ross Cronshaw (U6). Mr Kettlewell decided it would be apt to replace the tagline of ‘Tequila!’ with the brewery’s own ‘Hefeweizen!’ which the locals shouted with enthusiasm – not always during the chorus! Afterwards, the band enjoyed complimentary drinks, courtesy of the brewery, provided in gigantic, litre steins that had the sixth formers’ eyes popping with excitement. Our second performance was located at ‘Beach61’ - an inland, manmade beach volleyball area with several courts on it. The concert was made difficult by the presence of rain, which had the first saxes and the trumpets shifting around to keep both music and instruments dry whilst playing. Our final set took place at Schleusenkrug, in a very pretty garden with plenty of outside seating for the audience. We were struck with a sense of irony when a passing train loudly sounded its horn during the solo section of `Choo-Choo-Ch’-Boogie`. This was a fantastic final performance for the tour, and a superb last gig for the U6 leavers, a special mention to whom must go out; with the saxophone section losing Ross Cronshaw, Charles Jude and Jason James; the trumpets losing Barnaby Platt and Joe Knight; the departure of Robert Foot from keyboards and Chris Iyer on drums; and Tom Stafford on guitar. The tour was a fantastic experience for all, especially the non-music related activities such as visits to local history museums and palaces, as well as kebab stalls (which sell undoubtedly the best fast food I’ve ever purchased!). A special thank you to the fantastic team of German translators headed by Mr Galloway and ably assisted by pupils Josh Male and Ed Chappelow.

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GERMAN EXCHANGE

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he German school in Alfeld is very big compared to Pock, writes Faye McFarlane (4WIL): it has 5 floors and over a hundred classrooms! We all went to school on both the Fridays, I had double German, double PE and on the first Friday, double Politics, and the second, Music and Biology. We started school at 7:45, which meant we had to get up at 6:00! And it ended at 1:00 so you had the rest of the afternoon off to spend with your family, unless there was an activity planned. Their lessons are 45 minutes long and you don’t wear a school uniform, which was a nice We started change!

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school at 7:45, which meant we had to get up at 6:00!

Matt Springett (4DOL) writes: the family I was staying with met up with Ali and Josh’s family and we went to Hamburg at the weekend. We walked around the town and went to a café where we all struggled to order a hot chocolate and a sandwich in German. Then we went to visit a church and we climbed up the stairs to get to the top of the tower. The view was amazing: we could see all of Hamburg! After we came down we went to the harbour where we went on a boat trip and we saw huge boats and a Navy Destroyer. On Sunday, we met Mikey and Jake and went to a spectacular castle. It was absolutely huge! After we finished the tour I went to the swimming pool and we met up with everyone else. It was a lot of fun and I could have stayed there until it closed at 8.45. At the weekend, I visited Hanover with Erika, her mum and her younger sister, remembers Emma Loten (4DOL). Hanover is quite big and has loads of shops. After lunch we carried on shopping, which gave me a chance to buy some traditional German presents for my family, such as a 86

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Hanover beer mug! On Saturday night we went to see Love and Other Drugs at the cinema. It was very difficult to understand in German, but it was good to see Sam and Jake You don’t after speaking German all day! On wear a school Sunday, we had a breakfast of croissants, bread rolls with ham and uniform, cheese, and cereal. At 2 o’clock we which was a went to the new swimming pool in nice change! Alfeld with all the other exchangees. It was great fun and we stayed there till about 8 o’clock. It was good getting to know all the Germans, especially Moritz and Leon. The weekend was great because it gave me time to get to know Erika and her way of life.

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The 11th annual German Exchange took place this year and, as you can see from some of the photos, a great time was had by all, both in Pocklington in September/October, and in Alfeld in February.

In the village below the Harz Mountains there was an iced pond, recalls


Henry Smith (4DOL). It held my weight for a few seconds, then the ice cracked and I fell in the water. I got dragged out before anything other than my left leg got wet. Then we all went into a café and had hot chocolate. We took a cable car up the mountain. Emma was scared and screamed a lot in the cable car! When we got to the top, everyone took pictures and then started to walk around the mountain. It was about -10 degrees: Mr Galloway’s beard froze and so did my wet jeans…

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Galloway’s beard froze…

Aimee Kearney (4HUT) reports: when we got to Wolfsburg we went straight to the Phaeno museum, we had to wait a while for a person to give us an introduction. The first place we went in the museum was to a slanted house, it was very weird as you couldn’t stand up straight. The museum was an interactive science museum, with lots of different activities to try out. On the train back there were some young Germans and their German teacher, asking us lots of questions about England and about our trip. On Thursday, first we had a couple of lessons in school (Music and French and we sang fireflies by Owl City) before we went to the shoe-last museum on the outskirts in Alfeld, writes Shreyas Gopal (4HUT). It was designed by Walter Gropius, who invented the Bauhaus style. It was revolutionary as workers had more sunlight so there were fewer accidents. We were shown round the factory and then we were shown around some of the monuments in the town, such as the Roman style town-hall and the blue rock. In the afternoon, at about 5, we all went bowling in the 7 Hills Bowling Centre. We played two games and were beaten by the Germans in both of them. It was fun and we all had a very good time even though the Germans were insanely good! This year’s German exchange was my fourth exchange, and my fourth time visiting Germany. It is a daunting thought to imagine a young foreign person, who you have never met, staying in your house for a week, and following you on your seemingly boring everyday life, believes Josh Male (L6). However the first day nerves soon settled and their visit to England passed smoothly. The trips karting and to Flamingo Land were, again, the highlight of the week. The visit to Germany, however, brought new towns, new sites, and new experiences to the German exchange. They were not disappointing. The weekend activities with families involved a trip to Hamburg, which I have

never previously visited; and which was, although cold, thoroughly enjoyable. The highlight of the week for me was the trip to Wolfsburg, which normally brings a trip to Autostadt (car town); this year however things were slightly different and we visited Phaeno, an experimental science museum. As usual, everyone was sad to leave Germany on the last day, which shows that, once again, the trip was a success. Hopefully next year I will be able to see friends made on this trip again. Stella and Marilena, two pupils from Alfeld, recall their experience of the exchange in perfect German. (See Herr Galloway for a translation! – Ed.) Am Donnerstag, dem 17. Februar trafen wir die Engländer dann schließlich wieder. Doch einige von ihnen kamen aus verschiedenen Gründen nicht nach Deutschland, sodass wir an ihrer Stelle viele neue Gesichter sahen. Leider waren es insgesamt nur 13 englische Schüler, die zu uns kamen, sodass 2 von uns ohne Partner blieben.

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On the 5th day, writes Alexander Chappelow (4WIL), we travelled with the train and the bus, to Peine, a town with a chocolate museum. We made our own chocolate, which didn’t end too cleanly. Whilst waiting for the chocolate to cool, we were given a tour of the museum. After the tour we regretfully received our “creations”, and left. After that, we visited the main town to do some shopping. We all got very lost in the town and spent half our time It was about -10 working out how to get back to the degrees: Mr train station!

As usual, everyone was sad to leave Germany on the last day

Während des Aufenthaltes hier in Deutschland besichtigten die Engländer einige Städte und Sehenswürdigkeiten hier in der Umgebung. Mal mit und mal ohne uns. Auf dem Plan standen unter anderem Peine und Wolfsburg. In Wolfsburg besuchten wir gemeinsam mit unseren Partnern das Phaeno, ein Experimentier-Museum voller aufregender und spannender Versuche. Anschließend hatten wir Zeit durch die Stadt zu bummeln und gegebenenfalls etwas zu kaufen. Es war ein besonders guter Tag!

An einem anderen Tag sind wir in einem Bus in den Harz gefahren, dort fuhren wir zuerst mit Hilfe einer Kabinenbahn den Burgberg hinauf und machten dort eine kurze Wanderung. Auf dem Berg herrschte ein eisiger Wind und wir alle froren ganz schrecklich, da wir uns nicht warm genug angezogen hatten. Danach fuhren wir nach Wernigerode, dort machten wir in Gruppen eine Stadtrallye und gingen nebenbei noch ein bisschen einkaufen. Den meisten von uns hatte der Donnerstag-Abend, welcher auch der letzte Abend mit unseren Partnern war, am besten gefallen. Zuerst gingen wir bowlen, wir spielten 2 Runden und alle hatten ihren Spaß. Wie sich später herausstellte, hatten beinahe alle den gleichen Gedanken gehabt, nach dem Bowlen zu McDonalds zu gehen, sodass wir unseren letzten gemeinsamen Abend noch mit einem leckeren Essen und guter Laune beendeten. Wir hatten alle eine super gute Zeit! Und als dann am Freitagnachmittag der Zug vom Alfelder Bahnhof losfuhr, liefen einigen von uns die Tränen über das Gesicht und planten insgeheim schon einen Besuch bei ihren neuen Freunden ein.

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GREECE 2010 October half-term has long been associated with the legendary Classics trip. This year, Mr Andrews, Mr Edwards, Mr Butcher, Miss McNelly and Mrs Wilson (plus 45 very excited pupils) embarked on an unforgettable Greek adventure, reminisces David Dickinson (L6).

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e departed in the customary midnight slot and soon found ourselves basking in a haze of Athenian sunshine. After settling in, we decided to venture out to pay a visit to the National Archaeology Museum to admire some artefacts, including the spectacular death mask of Agamemnon from Mycenae. We also picked up a brief history of Greece, partly from the museum, but mostly from the The Oracle, aka Mr Andrews. We returned to the hotel after a memorable journey through the delightful district of Omonia (or ‘Ammonia’ as it became known) in the outskirts of Athens, to drop dead in our beds after a tiring first day. We saw the stunning Acropolis and the ancient Agora on Monday. We were fortunate not only to be guided around the sites by Mr A, but also to be stunned by the tour skills of Ross Cronshaw (when there were no tourist licence police around, anyway!). We enjoyed seeing the Plaka shopping district, where, after some expert haggling, we all managed to buy some souvenirs. On Tuesday morning, we explored the Acropolis Museum, witnessed the unveiling of a new statue and also saw some of the Parthenon marbles…well, the ones which the ‘terrible’ British hadn’t ‘stolen’ anyway! We transferred to Delphi, which had some spectacular views. The evening’s entertainment a visit to local nightclub, ‘DownTown’, with some interesting dancing from Mrs Wilson and Charlie Ward. The following day we saw the temple of Apollo, where the Phythia spoke her riddles of the Oracle, and the ‘Omphalos’, or ‘belly button’ of the earth! Unfortunately the stadium was closed to the public on this occasion; at least it saved Mr Andrews from another sporting injury and more stitches! Of course, the highlight of the day was to hear Mr Edwards’s fascinating theory about the history of the settlement, involving the discovery of the two-headed gorilla population of ancient Greece. At Olympia, we saw the Olympic site, where the Games began. Here we witnessed a modern wrestling match – between Paddy Russell and Jack Brash. The next event in the ‘Pocklington Olympics’ was the unforgettable 100 metre dash, in which Paddy brought home the gold for Yorkshire and won a few admirers along the way! (Of course, Dr Wilson, medicine woman, was there in the wings in case of any injury.)

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Transferring to Tolo, we spent the last two days visiting incredible towns such as Epidauros, with its well-preserved amphitheatre. Then on to Corinth, though unfortunately pooh-sticks in the Corinth Canal wasn’t as great a success as we had hoped. (This was partly because we couldn’t see the sticks in the water, which was 90 metres below!) We also visited Nauplion, where we descended (and Mr Butcher crawled) the 1000 steps from the ancient fortress to the town, where many were diagnosed with ‘shaky-legs’ syndrome! We were all upset to leave Greece behind, and to end another hugely successful Classics trip. I’m sure everyone involved will have fond memories of it and we all owe a huge thank you to the teachers involved. To finish, has anyone seen Akbar?


BATTLEFIELDS 2011 – BREAKTHROUGH ON THE WESTERN FRONT

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hilst Lord Kitchener Webb remained in Blighty to focus on recruitment with the support of Prime Minister Ronan, Field Marshall Sir Gareth Hughes remained in command of operations on the Western Front as the Pocklington Pals returned for their second year of action. The ranks were swelled with new recruits as well as the return of a few battle hardened veterans, under the new command structure of Hughes, Powell, Hall and Sykes. Hopes were high. This year the trip expanded by a day and thus was able to take in the start of the war with a particular focus on the BEF’s first action at the Mons Canal banks. Roughly following the retreat west, the group then took in the 1915 battles of Neuve Chappelle and Loos. Over the following days the Somme front was explored and then two days followed in and around Ypres itself with a focus on Passchendaele and Messines Ridge in particular. The trip was also notable for the pilgrimages many students made to visit graves of their relatives or to simply follow their path. This really was walking history in its most poignant form. One of the highlights for many was the act of remembrance at the Menin Gate in which four Pocklington Students took part and, in a moment of deep solemnity, Head Boy Hugh Stubbins addressed the hundreds of the gathered with the exhortation to the fallen. Moving, reflective, thought provoking and also very good fun, this was one of the very best trips I have ever had the pleasure of taking. The students were exemplary in every way and great company throughout. I, for one, am counting the days before our return in 2012 when I can see great prospects for advancing the war in our overall favour. Victory is in sight. GJH

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LONDON 2010 On a cold Sunday morning at York railway station, 55 pupils and 5 staff members gathered ready for the train trip down to London, recalls Ryan ‘Tippers’ Tiplady (5GRU).

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fter the mad stampede eventually after some negotiated swaps which included the promise of a free coke can in return for the seats, we pulled away from York and ploughed on towards London. No sooner had we got off the train than we hit our first problem: tube improvement works. The staff had the precarious task of trying to negotiate 55 pupils through the London tube network, but we all managed to get off at Aldgate East station and we made our short walk to the City Hotel. Before we took the tube to Westminster, we had the ceremonial head count in the 5 different teams: Team Hall, Team Iddon, Team Hughes, Team Webb and the greatest of all, Team Long or ‘Team Frankie’! First stop on our tour of Westminster was the Churchill war rooms which was Churchill’s secret bunker during WW2. However, the likes of the Alexs (Dhir and West), Angus Clark and Jack Bogg thought that it would be funnier to run in the background of a news report in front of the HM treasury building! The walking tour down Whitehall started with Jack Brash amongst others showing his patriotism by buying oversized top-hats with the Union Jack on them. We watched the changing of the guard, probably the most interested being Archie, who was clamouring onto people’s shoulders so he could video it. At Tower Hill, pupils had 20 minutes free time before the Ripper tour and invaded the Ben & Jerry’s store, buying friends or family London souvenirs; step forward Alex Dhir again with his new Union Jack boxers! At 5:30 pm we began our Ripper Tour where we toured the streets of East End London, stopping at various points where our excellent guide would give us information about the area and how it was linked to Jack the Ripper. On our return, Mr Hughes and I had an argument about which way the hotel was. We made a bet, “the loser shall buy the other a drink”;

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after a consultation with a map, Mr Hughes had to concede that I was right and he would have to buy me a Coke at dinner. The next morning we took the tube to Westminster for a guided tour of the Houses of Parliament. Before we had to go through security and that meant that we got our own ID cards! We had gained a lot of knowledge of what happens in Parliament and its history. We then went to the Imperial War Museum where we studied the history of conflicts from around the globe. The next point of call was Covent Garden where pupils were released to go and buy some last minute gifts. Mr Hughes gave me £10 to buy Alex French a gift as he could not come on the trip. I hope I found the perfect gift: Union Jack sunglasses! Many thanks must go to all of the staff members who led a fantastic trip which pupils will remember for many years to come. Thanks to Mr Hall, Mr Webb, Mr Long “Frankie!”, Mrs Iddon and Mr Hughes.


HOLY ISLAND 2011

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e all missed the Royal Wedding, apart from Tom Burke, who wanted to watch it so much that he met us at Scotch Corner, just so he could see Kate’s dress, writes David Dickinson (L6). After stopping off at Durham to explore a section of the Harry Potter set at the cathedral, with Sophie Appleyard discovering the actors had left some wands behind, we then travelled up to Holy Island. The evening was spent in deep reflective discussion and the creation of the ‘biscuit barrel of belief’. The following morning we explored the island, visiting St Cuthbert’s Hermitage, and the castle, which was deemed a suitable place for a rave by Georgie Lucas. We later went to Bamburgh, where Mike McKinstry and Charlie Ward showed us the art of sand dune jumping, and there were opportunities for James Reckitt to complete his ‘¿Dónde está Achbar?’ photo album, starring Charlie. That evening we visited the ‘magic tree’ which Georgie and Mike had managed to track down with the aid of some leprechauns, and then travelled to the nearby dunes to light the Rev’s Chinese lantern, almost setting the surrounding area of land on fire! The final morning was set aside for private exploration of the island, with a group highlight being the Lindisfarne mead shop, and then the uneventful (if that’s what you call the Rev’s driving) journey home, exploring the religious significance of ‘the iPad’, with many a ‘CACAAW’ sound coming from the students.

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WATERSPORTS 2010 After some tuition, it was time to get wet. Half of the group went kayaking whilst the other half attempted to balance on windsurfing boards without the sails attached. Some people took to the windsurfing in what was a light breeze more quickly than others. Olly Smith and Lydia Ford mastered it rather quickly!

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he programme was planned prior to our arrival and contained instruction and participation in kayaking, windsurfing, catamaran sailing and dinghy sailing.

Apart from the water based activities we spent half a day at a high ropes course where Steph Bargate was in her element. The other half was spent at a waterpark with numerous slides and rides. Needless to say, the staff never saw much of the pupils! The pace was frantic and the activities continued each evening with the staff entertaining the pupils with a variety of challenges and games until it got dark. My thanks to the staff who such a successful trip possible: Mrs Kilsby, Mrs Dowson, Mrs Hazelock and Mr Kevin Norman. GK

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WATERSPORTS 2011 The group was split into two manageable teams for the following activities: canoeing, catamaran sailing, dinghy sailing, mountainbiking and windsurfing. We all came together for the day out to the High Ropes and Aqualand.

T

he pupils lapped up the activities and every evening the instructors raved about the pupils’ enthusiasm and energy levels. At 7pm the instructors entertained the group with fun games and competitions which were either based on the beach or in the water. By 9pm every evening the pupils would wash up, change and go to enjoy the entertainment on offer around the campsite. The campsite had received a makeover during the winter and now hosts an excellent set of shops, club, arcades and food outlets. One evening, the pupils were invited to experience a ‘French Affair’. This involved one of the centre instructors dressed up as a French waiter serving up frogs’ legs, snails and mussels. There was the usual teenage response: “err, what’s that?” and “I’m not eating that!” With a little encouragement from the staff most of the pupils tasted at least some of the food. Unfortunately, Ben Byas spent the early hours of the next morning very unwell… On one other evening we went as a group to Biscarrosse Plage, a small town on the coast some 20 miles away to sample the night life. An excellent market, cafes, shops and street entertainers made for a great evening. The High Ropes activity threw up a few surprises. Many of the group attempted and completed the very demanding “Purple” route. This involved riding a bike at 30ft in the air. I decided to display my prowess at cycling by promptly falling off and dangling on the end of a rope, much to the delight of many! The Aqualand waterpark was pretty crowded due to the excellent weather. All returned with tales of their daring deeds. On the final Saturday, the centre manager, Cat, arranged for everyone to go on the “Disc” or “Banana”, both of which are towed at pace behind a speedboat. Most of the boys and girls were up for this and with some encouragement Mrs Kilsby was persuaded to participate. Unfortunately, Josh Parkinson had to come with the three staff. Josh had to have a hearing test on his return to the beach following his exposure to Mrs Kilsby’s screaming… I would like to thank both Mrs Kilsby and Miss Dowson for their brilliant support throughout the week. GK

THE POCKLINGTONIAN

93


U6 LEAVERS' DESTINATIONS

94

Cronshaw

Ross

University of York Archaeology

Atkinson

Lauren

University of Liverpool Business Studies and French

Falkingham

Edward

Royal Agriculture College Agriculture and Farm Management

Beachell

Thomas

Northumbria University Computer Science

Fisher

Lorrain

Leeds Metropolitan University Business and Management

Bedford

Eamonn

University of Liverpool Biomedical Science

Flint

James

University of Sheffield Economics

Berry

Gregory

Manchester Metropolitan University Business Management with Legal Studies

Foot

Robert

University of Manchester Music

Bond

Miranda

University of Cambridge, St John's College Classics: Greek and Latin

Green

Edward

Loughborough University Industrial Design and Technology

Branchette

Zak

Newcastle University Politics

Green

Isaac

Royal Agriculture College Agriculture and Farm Management

Brant

Abigail

Leeds Metropolitan University Sports Coaching

Hall

Thomas

University of York Accounting, Business Finance & Management

Brant

Thomas

Rose Bruford College Stage Management

Harris

Robert

University of Edinburgh Philosophy

Brice

Melissa

University of West England, Bristol Adult Nursing

Hawcroft

Emma

Durham University History

Burn

William

University of Sheffield Civil Engineering (4 years)

Hetherington Edward

Kings College London French (4 years)

Cawood

Annabel

University College London Law

Ho

Kwan Yin

University of Nottingham Pharmacy (4 years)

Chan

Wai Chi Vincci

University of Bristol Economics

Holbrough

Eleanor

Leeds Metropolitan University Childhood Studies

Cheung

Sin Man Angel

University of Manchester Economics and Finance

Honeyman

Robert

Staffordshire University Psychology

Costoya Hall Olivia

Queen Mary University, London French and Hispanic Studies (4 years)

Iyer

Christopher

Newcastle University History

Cowley

Phoebe

University of Manchester Pharmacy

James

Jason

University of Huddersfield Engineering Foundation (General)

Crompton

Hannah

University of Leeds Geological Sciences

Jeffrey

Edward

Swansea University Classics

THE POCKLINGTONIAN


Knapton

Charlie

Newcastle University Agriculture (deferred choice)

Stockley

Henry

University of Sussex Law with Politics

Knight

Joseph

University of Sheffield Medicine (Phase One)

Stowell

Claire

University of Manchester Adult Nursing

Knowlson

Benjamin

Leeds Metropolitan University Business and Management

Stubbins

Hugh

University of Cambridge, Jesus College History

Lawrence

Julian

Leeds Metropolitan University Event and Festival Management HND

Torkington

Alexander

University of Northampton Construction Management

Lee

Kwun Lok Alan

Nottingham Trent University Environmental Science

Turner

Thomas

Northumbria University Business with Finance

Lee

Pui Yan Priscilla University of Bath Mathematics and Statistics

Wade

Camilla

Manchester Metropolitan University Retail Marketing Management (Sandwich)

Liu

Kai Hang

Goldsmiths Media and Communications

Walters

Steffan

University of Kent Physics

Long

Aimee

Southampton Solent University Writing Fashion and Culture

Ward

Charles

University of Hull Physics

Marshall

Ross

Sheffield Hallam University Design Technology

Waring

Thomas

Harper Adams University College Agriculture

Mason

William

Northumbria University Mechanical Engineering

Welch

Benjamin

University of Cumbria Outdoor Leadership

Wilson

Mary

Mondaca

Rocio

University of Manchester Law

University of Huddersfield Chemistry with Forensic Science

Atkinson

Daniel

Moore

Tomas

University of Wales Trinity Saint David Philosophy and History

Eligible for clearing, but considering applying 2012

Foreman

Ashley

Moran

Alistair

University of Derby Hospitality and Culinary Arts

Eligible for clearing, but considering applying 2012

Jude

Charles

Nash

Sophie

Sheffield Hallam University Occupational Therapy

Eligible for clearing but starting a Business Apprenticeship

Ng

Ka Chun Matthew

University of Birmingham Psychology

Pang

Wing Yue

University of East Anglia Pharmacy

Peters

Emily

University of Liverpool Marine Biology

Non - UCAS Arden

Andrew

Gap Year

Barber

Oliver

Employment

Brader

Thomas

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design De Montfort University

Dawson

Hannah

Policing and Community Studies Bishop Burton College

Grant

Douglas

Employment

Hardy

George

Employment

Hobson

Fenella

The Executive PA Diploma Oxford Media and Business School

Philip

Thomas

Heriott Watt University Quantity Surveying

Platt

Barnaby

University of Central Lancashire Multimedia Development

Qu

Jiawei Victor

University of York Mathematics

Richardson

Adam

University of Sheffield Mechanical Engineering (4 years)

Rogerson

Daniel

University of York Physics James

Jessica

Gap Year

Rose

Tanya

Newcastle University Medicine (stage 1 entry)

Mainprize

Joshua

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design Central St Martins College of Art and Design

McKinstry

Michael

Gap Year

Mortimer

Samuel

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design Exeter College

Robinson

Polly

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design Leeds College of Art and Design

Rymer

Lucy

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design Leeds College of Art and Design

Shaw

Joseph

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design Hull College

Towse

Robin

Seeking employment

Ryan

George

University of East Anglia History

Schofield

Aimee

Northumbria University Applied Sport and Exercise Science

Sedcole

Jennifer

University of Nottingham Medicine

Slater

Harriet

University of Lincoln Bioveterinary Science

Stafford

Thomas

Leeds Metropolitan University Music Production

Stillie

Lisa

University of Glasgow English Literature

THE POCKLINGTONIAN

95


STAFF OFF DUTY

Casual confidence before the Staff Relay...

Mrs Marshall and Mrs ScottSomers with their prize-winning moustache-growing entrant.

Pink Panther Hallam was disappointed at the lack of porridge provided in the library. Mrs E consoles...

Here's something I made earlier...

I said get me two German beers!

If you see this man in school, do not approach him. "Can I stop smiling yet?"

96

THE POCKLINGTONIAN


Mrs Ward feigned pleasure at her prize for a year's library service.

"Ha ha we've got the only two chairs on the field!"

History Department induction.

Mr Hughes did not take kindly to their late essays...

Messrs Dare and Donaldson needed reminding that the school walk is a serious matter.

1st XV team talk.

Give Mr Peel enough rope and he'll escape.


Pocklington School West Green Pocklington YORK YO42 2NJ Tel +44 1759 321200 www.pocklingtonschool.com

The Pocklingtonian 2010/11  

The Pocklingtonian 2010/11: Pocklington School's annual magazine. Thank you to all pupils and staff who contributed to this edition and in p...

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