Page 1

ENGAGE

Talk to the PROS

EDUCATE

Training & Careers options

EMPOWER

Start your journey NOW!

FALL 2019

WOW! WHAT A SUMMER

Girlz BUILDING THEIR OWN SUCCESS!

You Gotta Read This

HOW TO BUILD A

Cool # SKATEPARK MORE THAN MONEY, Does Where You Work Matter?

Apprenticeship

Week Nov 11-17 TAKE OUR SURVEY

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$4.99 | A Publication of the Oregon Building Congress


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Building Futures

Fall | Winter 2019

Table of Contents Features

Departments BUZZWORTHY Your News & Events Recap Path to the Trades Apprenticeship Week!

ENGAGE

Talk to the PROS

EDUCATE

Training & Careers options

EMPOWER

Start your journey NOW!

FALL 2019

P5

WOW! WHAT A SUMMER

Girlz BUILDING THEIR OWN SUCCESS!

You Gotta Read This

HOW TO BUILD A

Cool # SKATEPARK

P6

MORE THAN MONEY, Does Where You Work Matter?

Girlz Building Their Own Success

P23

Careers Blue is the new White

P25

Apprenticeship

Week Nov 11-17 TAKE OUR SURVEY

WIN $100 SEE PAGE 47 FOR DETAILS

$4.99 | A Publication of the Oregon Building Congress

Industry Profiles Finishing Trades P27

Sheet Metal

P29

Masons

P31

Ironworkers

P33

Resources Learn + Earn + Love your JOB! P36

Advertisers

P8

How to Build a SKATEPARK

A Summer You Gotta Hear About P11

P21

Does where you work matter?

This isn’t your “dirty jobs” industry About the cover

Index

P44

Reader Survey Enter to Win

P45

Special thanks to the participants of this year’s SummerWorks program and the Pacific Northwest Carpenters Institute (PNCI) for taking time to pose for our front cover this issue. Top: Mike Enns. Row 3: Yamilet Rendon-Hernandez, Mayra Contreras, Caitlin Newman-Sanders. Row 2: Lexie Tallman, Brian Cruz, Marshall Baldwin. Front: Jose Pahua Fernandez, Ezana Bahru, Tiece Ledbetter.

HOW TO USE THIS MAGAZINE Building Futures magazine is a work readiness publication focused on introducing readers to the construction trades. While there are other sectors one could consider, the construction industry offers a unique education and training module called apprenticeship – structured and state-programs that provide for paid on-the-job training like none other. As you look through our pages, keep an open mind – this isn’t your “dirty jobs” industry, but rather an industry that is technologically advanced, with countless entry points for training and employment opportunities you may never have thought of.

BuildingFuturesMag.com|FALL 2019|BUILDING FUTURES|3


INTRODUCTION | FROM THE PUBLISHER

WELCOME! to this fall’s issue of

Building FUTURES MAGAZINE

FALL 2019 · VOLUME 23 · ISSUE 2

buildingfuturesmag.com PUBLISHER Denise Rothwell CONSULTANT Tom Goodhue, Executive Director of the OBC EDITORS Ben Ikenson, Corodon Fuller GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tanya Mutton, SidekickCreations.com PHOTOGRAPHERS Lynn Howlett Photography (Cover)

F

ront-and-center this issue is National Apprenticeship Week (NAW) from November 11th to 15th. Now in its fifth year, NAW is a weeklong national celebration bringing together businesses, communities, and educators to showcase their apprenticeship programs. It’s a great opportunity for career-seekers (like you) to get valuable information and to participate in events, tours, and learning opportunities to familiarize yourself with the trades. You can start your journey on page 6, where we’ve mapped out a “Construction Career Path” for you. It includes suggestions to help you start thinking about which path you might want to take and how to get there. Take a look. Next, have you ever wondered about what it takes to build a skatepark? These gathering places are the product of a lot of labor and expertise that might be invisible at first. It takes the technical know-how of architects, tradespeople, and – of course – skateboarders! We think you’ll see these concrete jungles differently after reading our story!

I don’t know about you, but the construction industry had a busy summer. As with every summer, numerous trades sponsored construction camps for students, ranging from basic career awareness to licensed pre-apprenticeships. To learn more about these amazing programs, we followed a few and talked to attendees to find out what they learned. One construction camp we followed gave 11 high school juniors on-the-job experience alongside some of the biggest contractors in the state working on everything from their own schools to the Oregon Zoo! The summer changed their lives, and we hope it will inspire you to take on a similar challenge. New in this issue is our “Industry Profiles.” Here you’ll find more insight into individual trades, and on pages 36-43, an expanded list of pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship training programs around the state. Building Futures magazine is your magazine. Take the time to let us know what you think and to enter to win $100 – we’re listening! Enjoy.

Tom Goodhue, Executive Director Oregon Building Congress

4|BUILDING FUTURES|FALL 2019|BuildingFuturesMag.com

CONTRIBUTION WRITERS Josh Zolin, CEO., Windy City Equipment Services David Wilson, PH.D., The Harver Company ADVERTISING/EDITORIAL INQUIRIES denise@pnwsm.com OREGON BUILDING CONGRESS Tom Goodhue, Executive Director 9450 SW Commerce Circle, Suite 101 Wilsonville, OR 97070 503-685-8313|tgoodhue@obcweb.com SHAPING THE FUTURE OF CONSTRUCTION WITH NEW IDEAS, RESOURCES, AND CAREER OPPORTUNITIES Building Futures magazine is a product of the Oregon Building Congress and is published biannually by PNWSM-Media. To subscribe, visit buildingfuturesmag.com. ©2019 Oregon Building Congress. All rights reserved. Contents of this magazine may not be reproduced, transmitted, or distributed in any form, in whole or in part, without prior permission of the publisher. Mention of any product, or opinions expressed by bylined articles, do not constitute the endorsements or opinions of the magazine. Information obtained by Building Futures magazine is from sources believed to be reliable. However, while every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained herein, Building Futures magazine is not responsible for errors or omissions, or the results obtained from the use of such information. Building Futures magazine assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials and reserves the right to reject any editorial and advertising submissions.

PNWSM–MEDIA Denise Rothwell, Owner 170 W Ellendale, Suite 103, PMB# 205 Dallas, OR 97338 503-420-4326|denise@pnwsm.com


BUZZWORTHY Winning Plumbers and Steamfitters!

The Plumbers and Steamfitters, UA290 apprenticeship held their annual apprenticeship contest April 6-7. Apprentices used their learned skills to complete projects held in four disciplines — plumbing, pipefitting, HVACR, and welding.

Did you enter to win?

Building Futures presented 3 lucky winners of the “Spring Issues Survey Monkey Readership contest” with $100 each! “I’m really appreciative that I was chosen as the winner. Building Futures is a great magazine that I enjoyed reading and helps educate young people about the trades.” — Dominic Church

This year’s winners were:

Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers Local 1

participated in this year’s Western States Apprenticeship Contest held in Honolulu. Hawaii on June 22, 2019. Competing against 10 other states, Local 1apprentice winners were:

Chaz Ehlers, Plumber Richard Eisenbeisz, Steamfitter Kurt Beagley, HVAC/R Cody Halme, Welder

1st Place: Kristoffer Erickson, PCC (Pointer Caulker Cleaners) 2nd Place: Juan Arroyo, Brick Work

1. Josh Sowell 2. Andrea Johnston 3. Dominic Church

Portland WorkForce Alliance Annual Youth Careers Expo

$54,000 in scholarships awarded Roofing Competition Livermore, California hosted the 9th Annual West Coast Roofers Apprenticeship Competition. The competition included 30 apprentices who displayed their skills in multiple roofing systems that included Waterproofing, Heat Welding, Shingles, Torch Down, Coatings and Tool Identification. Go to YouTube, 2019 Roofers Apprentice Competition, to see more on the event.

Congratulations Winners! 1st Snuffy Jones ($500) 2nd Froylan Vasquez ($250) 3rd Juan Cerritos ($150)

Portland, OR – The Schweiger Memorial Scholarship Fund and Advanced American Construction (AAC) of Portland recognized 11 students for their remarkable academic and personal achievements and demonstrated desire to pursue a career in construction.

This year’s winners were: Travis Waggener Franklyn Correa Kristian Hellberg Grace Ray Ian Birrell Vlad Slivkov Brett Meador Kacy Childress Nathaniel Koenig Farren Linne

AGC Summer Externship Educators from around Oregon and SW Washington visited multiple construction businesses, apprenticeship training programs, and jobsites during a 2-week program to better understand the skills and competencies needed to perform construction-related occupations in the skilled trades. Ask your teacher what they learned!

Bringing together more than 7,000 students and 70 high schools across Oregon and SW Washington, this annual show connects employers with students and provides hands-on learning, demonstrations, mock interviews, career workshops, and a chance to talk to employers and colleges.

Oregon Tradeswomen’s Annual Career Fair Inspiring the next generation of tradeswomen to pursue apprenticeship and careers in the construction industry, this experiential event provided participants an opportunity to learn skills during hands-on workshops, try out tools and equipment used in construction, talk with experienced tradespeople, and more! ■

BuildingFuturesMag.com|FALL 2019|BUILDING FUTURES|5


CONSTRUCTION

CAREER PATH Middle School Career Awareness

High School or Technical Center

Industry Apprenticeship

Professional

Community or Technical College

Entry Level

University Degree

Assistant Project Manager

Foreman

Superintendent

Project Manager

Welcome to the Fall issue of Building Futures Magazine ⊲⊲To readers considering careers in the trades, we are delighted to provide what we believe is an invaluable resource in Building Futures magazine. In this issue you will find opportunities to explore training and apprenticeships in the construction trade – programs that will equip you with the knowledge and skills you need to build a successful career in construction. Before you invest time and money in a college education or apprenticeship training, ask yourself: what kind of work do I want to do – not just now, but what will feel like a career and provide me job satisfaction and financial security?

As we approach National Apprenticeship Week this November 11th through 17th, it’s a perfect time to participate in the many statewide training programs, tours, and events advertised in the spring issue of Building Futures Magazine. It’s also the perfect time to evaluate the benefits of trade apprenticeships, which are appealing to a wider and wider segment of the population – and for good reason. Consider the following statistics: ●● The average cost of a Bachelor’s degree is over $127,000. The average trade school degree only costs $33,000. On average, a trade school degree saves you $94,000 compared to a Bachelor’s degree, and you earn your degree while you are getting paid. ●● The average 20-year net income for apprenticeship students is $441,330 more than the 20-year average for Bachelor’s degree recipients. There are many other reasons why more young people are foregoing college and opting to learn trades, including the fact that apprentices develop lifelong skills that translate directly into career experience. If you’re reading this magazine, chances are you’re already leaning toward a career in the trades. That, in itself, is exciting. There are a lot of great opportunities out there, and we hope Building Futures Magazine helps point you in the right direction.

6|BUILDING FUTURES|FALL 2019|BuildingFuturesMag.com


As we approach National Apprenticeship Week this November 11th through 15th, it’s a perfect time to participate in the many statewide training programs, tours, and events.

Next, look at where you might want to work. This is very important. There are so many different types of companies, specialties, and even work cultures to consider. Learning about these companies will help you consider the various types of work done in construction and the skills required to perform that work. We have a number of outstanding companies advertising in this issue. These companies care about you and your success. Feel free to contact them to learn more about who they are. Some questions you might ask are: ●● What kind of work do you specialize in, and why? ●● What do you love about the work, and what do you wish was different?

Senior Management

CEO, Executive, Owner

●● Who are your employees or the types of people you hire? ●● What kind of training and experience do you look for? ●● How would you describe your company’s culture? ●● If I were to aspire to come and work for you, what kind of advice would you have for me?

Start by writing a resume

Now it’s time for some research

A resume is a good way to assess yourself, by looking at your interests and any work experience you may have. What does it tell you about yourself? If you have decided to pursue training or employment in the construction trades, you’ll want to make sure your resume reflects activities that demonstrate related experience such as:

Before you apply to a training program, do some research. You can find a list of training programs in our resource section on pages 36-43 of this issue. Take time to learn as much as you can about the programs and their requirements. Then, feel free to contact them.

●● Construction-Related Volunteering. Volunteering shows commitment to your community and the ability to work alongside others with tools. It’s a great way to build the “hands-on” section of your resume if you lack trade-related experience. ●● Industry-Related Classes. List any industryrelated classes you might have taken. These will demonstrate your investment and motivation to learn more about the trades. ●● Interests and Hobbies. Don’t just list them. If you can, provide photos of any building and repairing projects you have done. Show your experience using hand and power tools and other trade-related skills such as problem solving, measurement, and planning. ●● Letters of Recommendation. Provide any letters of recommendation that will speak to your work ethic, attitude, and physical and mechanical ability.

●● Ask for the training director when you call. ●● Introduce yourself and tell them the reason for your call – that you are considering a career in construction. ●● Have a list of prepared questions on hand, such as asking for more detail about their programs, instructors, and career pathways once training is completed. ●● You might ask if it’s possible to meet with program representatives or take a tour of training facilities. ●● Ask if you can speak with one of their trainees or a contractor they work with.

BuildingFuturesMag.com|FALL 2019|BUILDING FUTURES|7


FEATURE

Building Bowls, & s e p Half-Pi s p m a R l a c i t r e V

Skateparks Require Many Skilled Trades Skate parks are community gathering places where skateboarders can hone their chops practicing ollies, kick-flips, grinds, and other moves. But building the parks themselves requires its own set of technical expertise, from initial architectural design and landscaping, to plumbing, metal fabrication, and concrete work. “Concrete skatepark building is an incredibly specialized trade,” explains Catherine Coulon, longtime skateboarder and co-founder of Evergreen Skateparks, a Portland-based company of about 20 employees that has built dozens of parks across the globe – and locally. Windells, for example, is a 40,000 square foot “concrete jungle” that sprawls through the woods on the campus of Windells Snowboard Camp on Mt. Hood. “The design, shaping, placement, and finishing all require precise alignment and craftsmanship in order for the park to work functionally. To reach the higher echelon of a world-class skatepark, the builders must have the keen eye that only a skateboarder combined with a craftsman can achieve.”

STEPS TO BUILD A SKATEPARK

1

Develop a conceptual design for architect to create construction documents and specifications, drainage plans, and CAD files.

2

Excavate and clear site; install plumbing pipes and drainage system.

8|BUILDING FUTURES|FALL 2019|BuildingFuturesMag.com

3

Compact the dirt to create the skate-able shapes out of earth.


4

Set preliminary forms and steel coping.

5

Shortcrete is sprayed through a hose at a high velocity.

6

Float and hand-trowel concrete.

7

Clean, caulk, paint and detail work.

TRADES INVOLVED

8

Skate (Quality control!)

1. 3D designer and architect. 2. Heavy equipment operator (excavator, skid steer, roller, backhoe) and underground plumber. 3. Laborer. 4. Steel fabricator. 5. Welder. 6. Concrete mason. P

BuildingFuturesMag.com|FALL 2019|BUILDING FUTURES|9


#wealth

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EQUALITY

www.pnci.org

BUILDING OPPORTUNITIES

FOR THE NEXT GENERATION

Bremik Construction is serious about building—both construction projects and the careers of our employees. We provide the training, tools, and opportunities to build the skills of our team members. www.bremik.com/careers

10|BUILDING FUTURES|FALL 2019|BuildingFuturesMag.com


FEATURE | SUMMER INTERNSHIP

WHAT A

SUMMER!

Working on some of the city’s biggest construction sites,

students from area high schools remodeled schools, hospitals,

Gavin Lund,

zoo exhibits, and more. Here’s what they had to say:

Barlow High School Anderson Construction

CARPENTERS SUMMER CAMP FFAs Daniel Ruiz-Romero completed his junior year in high school, he applied for a spot at the Carpenters Summer Camp. Along

Camp Participants

of working with Fortis Construction on a major renovation of Gresham High School – his own school! When asked what he thought he’d enjoy most, he answered, “Destroying with and 10 other Portland-area high the other half of my high school. (I school students, he was accepted and love destruction!) And of course, started an eight-week paid internship working to help rebuild my school.” program sponsored by the Pacific Most students agreed that the first Northwest Carpenters Institute and the week was the hardest. The day Pacific Northwest Regional Council started early with students waking of Carpenters. Working at job sites up at 5 a.m. and making sure they around the city under the direction were “geared up” and of some of the region’s leading contractors, Asked to share something ready to go with their the students earned a work boots, safety gear, about construction that wage while receiving and a packed lunch. After people may not know, instruction in workplace that came getting to the Joshua Webb replied, safety, occupational safety jobsite on time for the “Construction is just a and health, ergonomics, bunch of people working morning stretch with the handling materials for together toward a goal. construction team and a construction, use of They may argue and be a reminder for everyone to common hand tools little rough but at the end stay safe! in the trade, and basic of the day, on every site I We asked the students first aid and CPR. They never saw someone not what other challenges also got the chance to help someone else.” they encountered over the study the fundamentals summer. Joshua Webb, of blueprint reading and a student at Reynolds applied mathematics for carpentry, Learning Academy who worked on and to learn the importance of good a job site for Van Lom Construction, communication skills and work ethic. said, “My biggest challenge was Before they headed out to the accepting that once you’re there, jobsites, students were supplied tool you’re treated like an adult. If anything bags, basic hand tools, boots, hard though, they’re glad to see some of hats, and safety glasses. Geared our generation considering a career up, students were each assigned in trades and in the end I really a contractor to shadow on projects enjoyed the experience. The program ranging from renovating schools, really opens your eyes to the career hospitals, commercial buildings, and opportunities in construction, and it parking structures to rehabbing exhibits taught me to be safe, responsible, and at the Oregon Zoo. to work harder than I ever have before.” Daniel’s assignment provided Continued on Page 13 him a rare and exciting opportunity

Logan Masoupmanah, Barlow High School Anderson Construction

Daniel Ruiz-Romero, Gresham High School Fortis Construction

Henry Kirkpatrick, Benson High School Fred Shearer & Sons

Wyatt Hulse,

Sheridan High School The Harver Company

Damian Woodruff, Banks High School Howard S. Wright,

a Balfour Beatty company

Hayden Soltvedt,

Grant High School Lease Crutcher Lewis

David Chappell, Jr.,

Roosevelt High School Perlo Construction

Austin Drury,

Milwaukie High School Skanska Construction

Dinah Sosa-Martinez, Benson High School Skanska Construction

Joshua Webb,

Reynolds Learning Academy Van Lom Concrete

BuildingFuturesMag.com|FALL 2019|BUILDING FUTURES|11


OUR SUCCESS STARTS WITH YOU. lewisbuilds.com | @lewisbuilds

BuildingFutures-LeaseCrutcherLewis-2019-09-27.indd 1

9/27/2019 3:03:36 PM

bf-2018-fall-FortisConstruction-0.16-page-2018-08-23.indd 1

8/23/2018 2:59:00 PM

We deliver a higher standard built on team collaboration, accurate scheduling and highly refined budget analysis, with an elevated focus on safety and sustainability throughout the entire construction process. CORPORATE HQ 503.624.2090 | www.perlo.biz 11450 SW Amu St | Tualatin, OR 97062

We work hard, we take care of our people, and we always do what’s right. 12|BUILDING FUTURES|FALL 2019|BuildingFuturesMag.com


FEATURE | SUMMER INTERNSHIP

Continued from Page 11 ◂◂Logan Masoumpanah, student at Barlow High School on the Bremik jobsite

Proud of what they had accomplished by summer’s end, almost all of the camp participants said they were interested in pursuing apprenticeships and jobs in construction. Why? We had to ask: Q: WHAT DID YOU ENJOY ABOUT THE PROGRAM? Damian Woodruff: I enjoyed the experience because I got to see how well carpenters and the other trades all work together and around each other to finish the project. I could also see how well these people bond over time and communicate with each other.

SPONSOR SUPPORT

Dinah Sosa-Martinez: It made it easy to go back to work knowing I was going to enjoy what I was doing. Not only that but I really appreciated how safety was a main concern for Skanska. I also enjoyed the schedule itself. I found that I was at home at a reasonable time, and could really separate my personal life and work. David Chappell: I was treated just like one of the other guys and everyone was even a little sad to see me go at the end. Gavin Lund: Everyone was willing to teach and make sure I understood how to do what we were doing and why we were doing it, which helped a lot. Also, I wasn’t expecting to like concrete work as much as I did, but it turned out to be really interesting and fun. The whole process of how these structures are built from the ground up was really cool to watch. Henry Kirkpatrick: My favorite part was seeing an empty floor turn into rooms in a

matter of weeks – very satisfying work. Joshua Webb: I liked being in the field and actually seeing the inside view of what it’s like to work in construction. Not only did I learn a lot about carpentry this summer, I was exposed to all types of trades and learned about their experiences also.

Q: WHAT CHALLENGES DID YOU FACE AND HOW DID YOU OVERCOME THEM? Dinah Sosa-Martinez: I had to get used to waking up at 5:00 am and trying to do as well as possible until 3:00 pm. But toward the end of the second week, I started to get used to the physical labor and I began to really enjoy it. Gavin Lund: Before this experience, I had never set foot on a job site, or had any construction experience outside of shop classes at school. As you can imagine, it was pretty overwhelming during my first week. I didn’t know the names of a lot of the tools. I didn’t know where anything was and I didn’t know who anyone was. But the people I worked with were the reason I was able to overcome that. They all helped me get settled in and after about a week, it didn’t feel so foreign. Continued on Page 15

PNCI’s Carpenters Camp would not be possible without the support of many local construction firms who employed the students through the eight-week program. Here’s what they had to say about the program:

“We’ve had the chance to see firsthand the positive impacts that these fulltime paid internships can make in the lives of high school students. We’re proud to be helping them and the industry by encouraging the next generation of construction professionals.” – Jim Kilpatrick, Fortis Construction

“The foreman of the project that our student worked on this year is a Construction Camp graduate from 10 years ago. It’s exciting to see him have the opportunity to mentor a new camp participant, and show him where a career in the trades can take him.” – John Park, Fred Shearer & Sons

“What makes this program special is that it allows students to be out in the field collaborating with our team of trained professionals on an active project. We appreciate the opportunity to bring more individuals into the industry and look forward to helping build new careers in construction.” – Devin Kooperman, Perlo Construction

“Our student had a good work ethic, willingness to accept challenges, and was a great example of what we’d like to see in future generation carpenters. We look forward to seeing him in the trade after his schooling.” – Kris Banta, Howard S. Wright, a Balfour Beatty company

“Hayden Solvedt was an asset to my crew and a pleasure to work with. I’ll miss his work ethic and hope he returns after he graduates high school.” – Chad Holtz, Lease Crutcher Lewis

BuildingFuturesMag.com|FALL 2019|BUILDING FUTURES|13


CONCRETE

Building:

Structural / Civil Virtual Design and Construction

Roads Oregon Futures Bridges Airports

EXPERTS AT WHAT WE DO

Success Starts Here

www.kniferiver.com/careers

www.vanlomconcrete.com

Proud of our people, Proud of our projects, Building a Strong America®

SUPPORTING TODAY’S STUDENTS TO DEVELOP TOMORROW’S LEADERS At Howard S. Wright, a Balfour Beatty company, we build partnerships that foster innovation, a diverse workforce, the growth and development of equity subcontractors, and community engagement. We are committed to making a difference in the communities where we work and live.

www.balfourbeattyus.com/portland

14|BUILDING FUTURES|FALL 2019|BuildingFuturesMag.com

Pictured: Students participating in Howard S. Wright’s High School Career Day with Portland Workforce Alliance.


Continued from Page 13

FEATURE | SUMMER INTERNSHIP

Hayden Soltvedt: There were a lot of challenges I faced as I was completely new and clueless to practically everything in the trade. Probably the most helpful thing was asking questions to learn new things and get clarification.

Q: WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO ANOTHER STUDENT CONSIDERING THE PROGRAM? Joshua Webb: Do it. I went into this program unaware of the opportunities it has opened for me. I met amazing people and learned so much. My mentor has been the greatest help into seeing the real construction world and teaching me more than someone who wasn’t actually there could. Not only did I meet people, I will have a contact at Van Lom in case I want to go work for them after high school. David Chappell: Treat it as a once-ina-lifetime opportunity. Very few students throughout the state get accepted so if you don’t want to be there, you’re taking up space for someone else who might have wanted it more than you. Gavin Lund: Make as many connections as possible and save everyone’s phone number because these are the people who can help get you into an apprenticeship program when the time comes. Daniel Ruiz-Ramirez: Do it because you will have fun and you will experience a badass job! Continued on Page 16

Hayden Soltvedt, from Grant High School and his supervisor, Phil Kreiger with Lease Crutcher Lewis at the Oregon Zoo

SKANSA morning stretch

PNCI’s Construction Camp summer internship program is one of several opportunities available to high school students and recent graduates to learn more about careers in the construction industry – a path to meaningful work, high-level skills, job security, great wages and benefits, shared experiences, and other advantages. For more information and to see current opportunities, go to www.pnci.org.

Wyatt Hulse, student at Sheriden High School on the Harver Company jobsite BuildingFuturesMag.com|FALL 2019|BUILDING FUTURES|15


FEATURE | SUMMER INTERNSHIP Continued from Page 15

WE THINK THAT HENRY KIRKPATRICK SUMMED IT UP BEST:

Everyone I have talked about my experience with has been proud of me, since most people my age are either wasting their days doing nothing or just working fast food. People are still telling me that I should go to college, but that is just not what I want to do right now. I don’t want to get in debt and take 4+ years while not making money, when I could start working right out of high school making $23 an HOUR.

▲ Gresham High School Remodel. Contractor: Fortis Construction

SPONSOR SUPPORT “Josh came to us with a can-do attitude and did not hesitate to jump on any task asked of him. It was great to have him on board. This is a great opportunity for these young folks and lets them know there is another career path other than college.” – Dan Benfield, Van Lom Concrete

“Gavin was a great addition to our team this summer. He is driven, professional, and will be a great addition to the construction industry. We are looking forward to welcoming him back to Andersen Construction postgraduation.” – Bill Mobley, Anderson Construction

16|BUILDING FUTURES|FALL 2019|BuildingFuturesMag.com

“Dinah and Austin are both amazing students. I am thankful that Skanska had the opportunity to show both of them what great possibilities our industry holds for their careers. This program has been successful for 13 years, I hope to see it continue to provide invaluable experiences for the kids.” – Dan Clark, Skanska

“Wyatt did a great job integrating into the Harver Company culture. He had a great attitude and was always fun to be around – we enjoyed having him work with us.” – Kevin Hula, The Harver Company

“During Logan’s summer camp experience, we showed him a wide diversity of carpentry tasks including concrete formwork, placing and finishing concrete, rough carpentry, installing door hardware, and construction logistics. Logan’s positive ‘can do’ attitude made it easy to teach him, and we hope to work with Logan in the future!” – Josh Ring, Bremik Construction


CONSTRUCTING HOPE CAMP FFConstructing Hope, a preapprenticeship summer camp geared toward low-income and minority, at-risk youth aged 15 to 19, lets participants explore pathways to sustainable, rewarding careers in the skilled trades.

Last summer, the program conducted

Instructor Charlene Getchell of the Carpenters Institute led the first section, introducing participants to safety and tool identification. As the three-week session progressed, the kids put their new knowledge into practice, first by building individual wood flower pots. Eventually, divided into two large groups with designated crew leaders, they competed for bragging rights in constructing a playhouse-style tiny home. Students also got tours of training facilities such as IBEW Local 48 (the local electricians union), Laborers Local 737, and the Metro Central Waste Management Facility.

a five-week camp introducing students to carpentry and related skills including construction math – important to calculate, say, how many linear feet of lumber you need for a project. Through classroom discussions and field trips to active job sites in both urban and wildlife settings, camp participants learned about many

The second section of camp was a weeklong introduction to green building practices. It included discussions on weatherization, the shortcomings of standard construction, climate change, and the importance of energy efficiency. Students learned about job opportunities in the green energy sector, and spent a day volunteering to help weatherize the homes of local senior citizens

aspects of the trades, including “green jobs” and the green building sector. ■

The third and final section of the camp involved a variety of field trips. Students got to visit and explore the Pixar exhibit at OMSI, where they learned about the engineering and math involved in animation. They visited architectural sites in Portland and spent a day at Zenger Farms, where they learned about the interrelationships between food production, nutrition, and community – as well as the importance of the earth to indigenous populations. On their last day of camp, students learned about money management strategies to prepare for the stipend they received at the end of camp.

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Continued on Page 19 Constructing Hope 405 NE Church Street

Constructing Hope

BuildingFuturesMag.com|FALL 2019|BUILDING FUTURES|17


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Continued from Page 17

CAPERNTERS SUMMERWORKS CAMP FFThis past summer, in collaboration with Worksystems SummerWorks program, the Pacific Northwest Carpenters Institute provided a threeweek, 100-hour state-approved pre-apprenticeship program to 12 participants aged 18-24. The program is geared to people who are interested in the construction trades, who see themselves as practical problemsolvers, who care about craftsmanship, and who like to work with their hands, use tools, and make things. This year’s participants got an introduction to jobsite safety, blueprint reading, construction measurement, power tools, construction industry culture, and the trained carpenters’ place in the industry. To learn more about the program, Building Futures Magazine sat down with this year’s class and asked them why they decided to participate.

WHAT THEY HAD TO SAY! “I wasn’t just trying to look for a job. I was looking for a career. And because we will be doing very different work, by the end I feel that I will have a better idea of what trade to go into.” – Hernandez Cruz, age 18 “I was curious about the world of trades and carpentry really stood out the most. A free, three-week course before jumping straight into an apprenticeship sounded like a smart thing to do.” – Caitlin Newman-Sanders, age 21

“It was the best option to get some experience and get my foot in the door, as it were.” – Alexis “Lexi” Tallman

“I’ve been in the trades for years but went nowhere; this was my best shot at getting into the GC apprenticeship.” – Michael Enns, age 24

“I always wanted to follow construction since I was little, and building houses has been a dream of mine.” – Ezana Bahru, age 18

THE PROGRAM IS GEARED TO PEOPLE WHO ARE INTERESTED IN THE CONSTRUCTION TRADES, WHO SEE THEMSELVES AS PRACTICAL PROBLEMSOLVERS, WHO CARE ABOUT CRAFTSMANSHIP, AND WHO LIKE TO WORK WITH THEIR HANDS, USE TOOLS, AND MAKE THINGS.

Because getting accepted into an apprenticeship program can be a major challenge, one big benefit of the SummerWorks Pre-Apprenticeship program is that it builds the knowledge and skills participants will need to submit a strong application to an apprenticeship program. Successful participants will have more confidence in their apprenticeship application and interviewing process – and a stronger foundation for their future success. ■

BuildingFuturesMag.com|FALL 2019|BUILDING FUTURES|19


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THE HARVER COMPANY Building Pathways to Career Success in Construction ⊲⊲Nobody can foretell the future, but what if you could plan for a career path that offered you freedom to use your strengths creatively, a sense of community, and ways to make a meaningful difference in the world, while making good wages from the start? Can the trades provide clear pathways to these values? The Harver Company, a walls and ceilings union subcontractor in Portland, Oregon, is working to do exactly that. They are endeavoring to change the culture of construction while creating compelling opportunities for people to enter the trades. Concentrating not just on the job, but on the people who make up their team, they are building a workplace where people want to work. Giving opportunities for people to get in while they’re young, emphasizing safety, innovation, education, and being driven by mission, they are one of the companies forging the way ahead.

“I like the work and that I already have a relationship with a company as I look towards starting my apprenticeship.” Construction companies continue to struggle to fill craft positions so it’s important to build skills in young people. Junior and senior high school students and young adults have opportunities to spend their summers experiencing the trades through the Pacific Northwest Carpenter Institute’s summer camp program as well as through summer jobs for young adults who are setting their eyes on their futures. “The good wages available even when just starting, without having to stare down thousands in school

BuildingFuturesMag.com|FALL 2019|BUILDING FUTURES|21


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debt to get into a career, were big factors,” said one of Harver’s summer employees, a college student looking at her future prospects. Another young woman, a recent high school graduate, commented, “I like the work and that I already have a relationship with a company as I look towards starting my apprenticeship.” All of us of any age work best when we serve in a culture of safety— physical safety, yes, but also safety to be ourselves, to be creative, to make mistakes and learn from them. So, from the office to the jobsite, Harver is training its team to show that every person of any age or background is valued and has an important role to play, by using team-building activities and modeling best practices. When people feel safe, they also feel free to innovate. Our world has challenges and problems that require innovation, so those with creative skills from science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and yes, the arts have a place in construction! It’s not just about materials and hand tools. Construction is incorporating the latest tech, like 3-D printing, augmented reality, building information modeling, and use of drones. The owners of The Harver Company, Kevin Hula and Art Cortez are encouraging their team to think outside the box, to ask what ideas are out there and how their team can maximize its potential as an industry leader. Like any other field, success here requires a commitment to lifelong learning. Nobody knows it all so education and training are crucial. Thus, Harver has created an in-house school (The Harver Academy) offering a full range of interactive classes, mentorship, coaching sessions, and meetings, to supplement apprenticeship programs. All of this is supported by

regular assessments to see how well these activities are moving towards the mission, which brings us full-circle. If you ask Art and Kevin what they want for the company, they’ll say they want to lead the industry, to build the well-being of every person on their team and of their local community, and for every person to know they are a part of something bigger than themselves, part of a family. Why do they think more people will want to pursue a career here? Because they know that what they’re doing is more than construction. It is the hard work of leadership and culturebuilding. As Daniel Coyle has expressed it, being driven by purpose is “not as simple as carving a mission statement in granite… It’s a never-ending process of trying, failing, reflecting and above all learning. High-purpose environments don’t descend on groups from on high; they are dug out of the ground, over and over, as a group navigates its problems together and evolves…” ■


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DEPARTMENT | CAREERS

BLUE is the new WHITE By Josh Zolin ⊲⊲I sat in the guidance counselor’s office for what was probably the seventh time in three months, listening to this wellintentioned man tell me that if I wanted to maximize my success, I needed to go to college. All I could think was, “What the heck does this guy know about success?” After all, he knew nothing about me personally. All he knew was that he was responsible for guiding kids toward promising futures, and, like so many other responsible adults, he thought the only way to accomplish that was to get them to college. In high school, I couldn’t go an hour without someone asking me how my grades were, what I scored on my ACTs, and where I was planning on going to school. You can imagine the looks when I told them I had a 3.6 GPA and scored a 26 on my ACTs, but had ZERO intention of going to college. Not that I have anything against college. I just knew my efforts (and dollars) could be better spent doing something else. As it turned out, briefly, that “something else” was being lit on fire and thrown from five-story buildings as a Hollywood stuntman. Before long, I left the Golden State to go work turning wrenches in the trenches as a food service equipment technician at my dad’s company.

“At first it was hard. Then it got harder. But eventually I found myself proud to be learning new skills, helping people solve problems, and building what would eventually become a wildly successful company.” I was 28 when I took over as CEO, and, you know what I realized? All of

my degree-toting peers had between 30 and 100k in student loan debt and were making 40k per year at best. They would be paying back those loans for the next 10 to 20 years! Consider this: The average college budget for one academic year is $25,290. That’s $101,160 spent over four years. The average salary for an apprentice is $31,200. Even at the national average of a three percent increase every year (much less than in the skilled trades), you would have been paid $130,529 after four years. Meanwhile, I was already pulling in six figures, and on my way to running a multimilliondollar company. I had found my version of success completely by accident and without a college education. That’s why I wrote Blue is the New White: The Best Path to Success No One Told You About – Until Now. To shatter the stigma of the “college = success” mentality and to let young people know that they have options to achieve success, including through careers in the skilled trades. The book teaches people to look past the grease stains, uniforms, and hardhats to understand the truth behind the trades. This is an industry with unlimited possibilities, positions, and benefits. It supports fundamental values like helping people, work ethics, and self-esteem. Not to mention the pay in most trades blows away that of a college graduate. So, if you’re in high school and, like so many, unsure of what you want to do for the rest of your life, at least know your options. College will always be there if you decide you need it. But if you have doubts, roll up your sleeves and dig into a trade. ■

⊲Josh was a Hollywood stuntman before going to work in the trenches

We hear a lot about how much money can be made in the skilled trades, but there are countless personal benefits, too. One of the most rewarding is the opportunity to help people. In fact, in a recent anonymous survey, when I asked my techs what motivated them besides money, the most common answer was helping people. They simply love getting to see a customer’s face after solving a problem and saving the day. When somebody says, “Thank you! Thank you a thousand times!” you can feel good about what you do. That’s enough satisfaction in and of itself, knowing that you earned someone’s trust and changed their entire perception of what you do—and all in an hour’s work. Josh Zolin is the author of Blue is the New White: The Best Path to Success No One Told You About – Until Now and the CEO of Windy City Equipment Services, a restaurant equipment repair and HVAC company.

BuildingFuturesMag.com|FALL 2019|BUILDING FUTURES|25


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Skills required for all of the finishing trades include manual dexterity, eye-hand coordination, and physical fitness.

●●

For both glaziers and floor finishers, an ability to read blueprints and solve arithmetic problems quickly and accurately is also is required.

●●

Glaziers and painters should be unafraid of heights and possess a good sense of balance as they often work at great heights while painting or installing windows and skylights.

●●

Painters must have an eye for detail as well as knowledge of many types of finishes, their properties, and their applications.

●●

THE

JOB

PAINT, WINDOWS, FLOORS & WALLS, WE DO IT ALL!

The median salary in 2018 for:

$57,340 $43,550 $40,830 $39,940

Additionally, because finishing trades people are on job sites they interact directly with clients, other contractors, interior designers, and architects, and they should possess good communication and customer service skills.

MORE INFORMATION

FINISHING THE JOB Some jobs begin at the end, literally — after a new or renovated project has been constructed, such as a skyscraper, airport, bridge, office, or school, that’s when the “finishing” trades come in. The finishing trades crafts encompass commercial and industrial painting, glazing and glasswork, floor covering installation, and drywall finishing, among others. The work of these tradespeople is seen daily by millions of people. ●● Painters prepare a variety of surfaces (wood, masonry, drywall, plaster, concrete, synthetics, stucco, and metal) prior to applying paint, high-performance coatings, waterproofing, fireproofing, varnish, shellac, wall coverings, and special decorative finishes.

Painters

●●

FINISHING

Floor Covering

IMPORTANT QUALITIES FOR FINISHING TRADES

FINISHING TRADES

Glazers

— Cam Crenshaw, Floor Factors

INDUSTRY PROFILE

Tapers

“A QUALITY FLOOR COVERING JOB CREATES A QUALITY ENVIRONMENT. AFTER THE JOB IS FINISHED, THE FLOOR COVERING IS A DAILY REMINDER OF THE IMPORTANCE OF OUR WORK.”

●● Glaziers, also known as architectural glass and metal technicians, are responsible for selecting, cutting, installing, replacing, and removing all types of glass in both homes and high rise buildings. ●● Floor coverers work with plans or blueprints to measure and install materials for the best possible finished floors, and must also be able to inspect floor surfaces for imperfections and know how to correct any flaws prior to beginning the job. ●● Drywall finishers, also called “tapers,” prepare unfinished interior drywall panels for painting by taping and finishing joints and imperfections to create a uniform surface. ■

Use Building Future magazine’s resources to contact your local training program for more information.

Paint & Wall Covering Trades: Learn about surface prep, coatings applications, wall covering installation, and decorative finishes on projects from buildings and bridges to warehouses, ships, and public facilities. Signatory Painting Contractors Training: 503-287-4856 paintertraining.org Glaziers, Architectural Metal, and Glass Trade: Learn to cut, fit, and install glass, curtain walls, windows, mirrors, doors, glass framing systems, and specialty glass in commercial buildings and residential projects. Mt. Hood Glass Association Training: 503.491.7359 Floor Covering, Carpet & Soft Tile Applicator Trade: Learn to prepare a surface for flooring, and install everything from commercial and residential carpet, laminates, and tile to vinyl, linoleum, and decorative surfaces. Signatory Floor Covering Contractors Training: 503.481.4320 Drywall Finishing Trade: Learn to prepare gypsum board walls and ceilings for final paint or wall covering applications by taping and finishing the seams in sheets of drywall. Associated Wall and Ceiling Contractors Training: 503-287-4856 paintertraining.org BuildingFuturesMag.com|FALL 2019|BUILDING FUTURES|27


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28|BUILDING FUTURES|FALL 2019 | BuildingFuturesMag.com


“IT’S A BEAUTIFUL PROCESS OF ‘ORIGAMI WITH METAL,’ WHERE WE TAKE FLAT METAL AND MAKE IT INTO COMPLEX AND FUNCTIONAL SHAPES.”

INDUSTRY PROFILE

SHEETMETAL WORKERS

SHEET BY

SHEET SHEET METAL REPRESENTS ONE OF THE MOST DIVERSIFIED SKILLED TRADES

Projected national growth from 2018 to 2028: 8 percent.

154,400

143,000 2018 number of sheet metal workers

2028 projected number of sheet metal workers

FABRICATING A BETTER WORLD, SHEET BY SHEET “The sheet metal trade is one of the few trades that fabricates pretty much everything we install. It’s a beautiful process of ‘origami with metal,’ where we take flat metal and make it into complex and functional shapes,” says Lisa Davis, a sheet metal industry leader and field rep for the International Training Institute. As one of the most varied and diversified of all skilled trades, sheet metal workers provide services that touch almost everyone across society. They design, create, install, and repair sheet metal products, including roofing, gutters, and siding; and they fabricate and install fittings and ductwork used in the construction industry for heating, ventilating, air conditioning (HVAC) and refrigeration systems in residential, commercial, and industrial applications, among others. Some of the skills that apprentices can expect to learn throughout a four-

to five-year apprenticeship include welding, metallurgy (to understand the properties of metals and their production and purification), and even creating 3-D drawings to be utilized for Building Information Modeling (BIM), as well as basic math and geometry skills (to determine the amount and dimensions of material required). “People are often intimidated by the math, but don’t be,” says Davis. “We teach you everything you need to know, and the ways to apply it in a useful way to the work you’ll be doing!” The work you’ll be doing for a company that is part of the Sheet Metal Workers Union may vary depending on the company. You may find yourself working for an HVAC duct service shop, or a fabrication and installation company, or even an architectural firm creating beautiful building exteriors or entryways. ■

IMPORTANT SKILLS AND TASKS REQUIRED OF SHEET METAL WORKERS ●●

Select types of sheet metal according to plans.

●●

Perform welding on all types of materials.

●●

Install metal sheets with supportive frameworks.

●●

Fabricate, install, and repair ductwork for HVAC systems in commercial buildings and homes.

●●

Test, adjust, and balance mechanical systems.

●●

Work both in the field and in the shop utilizing mathematics and pattern layout development methods.

●●

Cut, bend, and shape sheets of metal, using specialized fastening devices such as bolts, rivets, screws, and solder.

●●

Use hand and power tools and equipment including shears, breaks, punches and forming presses, edging and crimping machines, hammers, grinders, and other tools.

“When your training is complete, and you learn all aspects of sheet metal work, you will have the ability to build almost anything from commonly used materials.” – Wayne Wineland, chair for the Mid-Valley Sheet Metal Workers JAC.

Use Building Future magazine’s resources to contact your local training program for more information. BuildingFuturesMag.com|FALL 2019|BUILDING FUTURES|29


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“WORKING WITH SOME OF THE MOST DURABLE MATERIALS IN CONSTRUCTION, MASONRY WORKERS HELP BUILD THINGS THAT CAN LAST FOR HUNDREDS OF YEARS.”

INDUSTRY PROFILE

MASONS

BUILT TO

LAST

The trade spans an array of work, with several specialties. ●● Brickmasons and blockmasons, for instance, specialize in building and repairing walls, floors, fireplaces and other structures using brick, terra cotta, precast masonry panels, concrete block, and other materials. ●● Cement masons and concrete finishers place and finish concrete f or walls, sidewalks, beams, columns, and panels. ●● Stonemasons build stone walls and set stone exteriors and floors using two types of stone: natural-cut stone such as marble, granite, and

During on-the-job training and apprenticeships, aspiring masons can expect to learn a variety of skills, from reading blueprints in order to calculate the needed materials, to laying out patterns, forms, and foundations. They’ll become experts at cutting materials to size, mixing mortar or grout, aligning structures vertically and horizontally using levels and plumbs, and much more – all foundations, so to speak, of a durable trade. “The idea of building something that lasts way into the future is powerful,” says Shawn Lenczowski of the Oregon and SW Washington Trades Joint Apprenticeship and Training Committee. “And it can lead to a lifelong career where you can point to the pride that goes into the projects that you have built with your own hands.” ■

Use Building Future magazine’s resources to contact your local training program for more information.

191,000

87,000

17,100

Terrazo Finishers

Stonemasons

limestone; and artificial stone, made from concrete, marble chips, or other masonry materials. ●● Terrazzo workers and finishers blend fine marble chips into epoxy, resin, or cement to create decorative walkways, floors, patios, and panels.

Brickmasons Blockmasons

Working with some of the most durable materials in construction, masonry workers help build things that can last for hundreds of years, from massive hydroelectric dams to interstate highways. In the construction industry, masons typically use bricks, concrete blocks, concrete, and natural and manmade stones to create walls, walkways, fences, and other masonry structures.

Cement Masons Concrete Finishers

Masonry workers held about 298,000 jobs in 2018, with employment in the specialties distributed as such:

2,800

$

Every year, the International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers, based in Portland, awards three scholarships to students with stipends of $5,000 per year for up to four years. The U.S. Bates Scholarship program (www.bac1or.org/news/bac-batesscholarship) is an annual competition conducted through the National Merit Scholarship Program. To be eligible for the program, students must: ●● Be entering college in the fall of 2021. ●● Have a parent or step-parent who is a U.S. BAC member in good standing. ●● Plan to take or have taken the “PSAT” exam in October 2019. Please check with your high school to schedule the exam. ●● Apply for the U.S. Bates Scholarship. The deadline is March 31, 2020.

BuildingFuturesMag.com|FALL 2019|BUILDING FUTURES|31


MASONS CRAFTWORKERS IN THE TROWEL TRADES ARE DIVERSIFIED: Pointer Caulker Cleaners Stone/Marble Masons Terrazzo Workers Bricklayers Tile setters Finishers

Photo credit: Toledo Images

“Today I was asked, ‘Isn’t bricklaying hard?’ and I said, ‘Well yeah, but with determination and willpower, you can do anything!’” — Kristie Reeves, Journeyman Bricklayer

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INDUSTRY PROFILE

“WHEN YOU’RE AN IRONWORKER, YOU’RE BUILDING NORTH AMERICA’S INFRASTRUCTURE.”

IRONWORKERS

ON THE

IRON BUILDING BRIDGES AND SOARING TOWERS THAT SCRAPE THE SKY!

IMPORTANT QUALITIES FOR IRONWORKERS

13%

Balance

Ironworkers often walk on narrow beams, so a good sense of balance is important to keep them from falling while doing their job.

7%

Sweat, skill, and savvy, it’s just part of the job!

Depth perception Ironworkers

Others

DID YOU KNOW?

Ironworkers Local 29 works with National Women’s pre-apprentice

With a 2019 median salary of $77,219, ironworkers represent a rapidly growing segment of the American workforce with a projected job growth of 13 percent from 2016 to 2026, nearly double the average growth rate of seven percent for all occupations.

F US Department of Labor

of a building or road, no other trade would be able to install their work. That’s why ironworkers are the most respected tradesperson in the construction industry. “When you’re an ironworker, you’re building North America’s infrastructure,” says Jason Fussell, apprenticeship coordinator for Ironworkers Local 29. “The possibilities of training, earning, providing, advancing, and building are endless.” There is

no limit to what ironworkers can do! ■

Hand-eye coordination Ironworkers must be able to tie rebar together quickly and precisely. An experienced worker can tie rebar together in seconds and move on to the next spot; a beginner may take much longer.

Physical stamina

BUILDING THE WORLD AROUND YOU Have you ever looked up at a towering city skyline and wondered, “Who built that?” Who built that giant pink building that towers over Portland’s skyline or the more than 8,000 bridges we have throughout Oregon? Proud union ironworkers built every one of those structures along with just about every other kind of building, bridge, or industrial structure you can name. That’s right: every day hardworking, dedicated ironworkers put sweat, skill, and savvy into the bridges that link us together, the stadiums where we watch our sports heroes play, and of course, the soaring towers that scrape the sky. Without ironworkers to erect the skeleton

Ironworkers must be able to judge the distance between objects and themselves in order to work safely. Ironworkers often signal crane operators who move beams and bundles of rebar.

Ironworkers must have physical endurance because they spend many hours each day performing physically demanding tasks such as moving rebar.

Physical strength

Ironworkers must be strong enough to guide heavy beams into place and tighten bolts.

Unafraid of heights

Ironworkers must not be afraid to work at great heights. For example, as they erect skyscrapers, workers must walk on narrow beams—sometimes over 50 stories high—while connecting girders.

Use Building Future magazine’s resources to contact your local training program for more information.

BuildingFuturesMag.com|FALL 2019|BUILDING FUTURES|33


WE CAN HELP

211

CONNECT WITH 211.

CHOOSE HOW TO CONNECT Call 211 Text your zipcode to 898211 Visit 211info.org

211

Use our mobile app

ACROSS OREGON AND SW WASHINGTON

211 info

Tradespeople

211info is the quickest way to connect to resources that can help

are in high-demand with jobs providing high-wages.

CONTACT 211 FOR HELP

NOW is the time to become the Electrician, Plumber, or Carpenter you’ve always wanted to be!

Food

FFPRE - APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM

GET HANDS ON EXPERENCE

participating in an 8-week course, where you’ll: ◘ Get real construction experience ◘ Meet industry professionals ◘ Go on site tours ◘ Get OSHA certifications COURSE INFORMATION TO EVERYONE ◘ Overcome math anxiety in a supportiveOPEN environment An 8-week course, covering: ◘ Visit training centersCONTACT o Applied mathematics Shawn Wonnacott

Connecting. Informing. Empowering.

Housing “This is just the kind of experience you need to help you with your decisions about training and a career in construction!” — Lance Corley, Training Director

Childcare Utilities

FREE PRE-APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM

Healthcare and more...

o Measuring accurately

o Getting into an apprenticeship CONTACT o Writing a resume for the trades WorkSource Rogue Valley o Tool and material identification 541.244.3230 shawnw@worksourcerogue.org o Construction culture (541) 244-3230 Being successful in the trades www.constructyourfuture.com/roguevalley Talent Development Specialist

o

WorkSource Rogue Valley is an equal opportunity employer and operates equal opportunity programs. Auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities

34|BUILDING FUTURES|FALL 2019|BuildingFuturesMag.com

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HEARD ABOUT

“Apprenticeship Ambassador”

NAW?

is listed – they can tell you more!

National Apprenticeship Week, Nov 11 - 17, 2019

Check below to see if your school’s

GET A JUMP ON!

Contact your Apprenticeship Ambassador to get on board!

Al Kennedy HS

Brandi Baker Rudicel

Harrisburg HS

Alan Wicks

River’s Edge Academy

Mindy White

Amity HS

Savannah Stanton

Hermiston HS

Cristina Cuevas

Riverside HS

Elizabeth Rosen

Astoria HS

Beth Frausto

Hidden Valley High

Carla Carter

Riverside SD

William Pullen

Bend HS

Bekki Tucker

High Desert ESD

Regine Childs

Riverside SD

Rhonda Brennan

Bend HS

Mr. Crawford

J Bar J Learning Center

Pam Price

Salem Keizer SD

Nada Bushey

Bend HS

Stacia Biancucci

Jefferson HS

Tim Morse

Salem Keizer SD

Rosa Rivera

Bend HS

Jesse Lockwood

Kelso HS

Joe McWilliam

Salem Keizer SD

Amy Caulder

Benson Polytechnic HS

Luke Hotchkiss

Kennedy HS

Robby Morrissey

Sheridan HS

Laura Monroe

Benson Polytechnic HS

Susan Kaller

Klamath Falls City SD

Jared McCleve

Sheridan HS

Donna Bahr

Catalyst HS

Luke Bartlett

Klamath Union HS

Matthew Hill

Sky View MS

Jenny La Duca

Catalyst HS

Connie L Rice

Knappa HS

Ms. Heather Douglas

South Albany HS

Alisha Young

Central HS

Judie Thompson

La Pine HS

Kelsey Jaeckel

Southern Oregon ESD

Karla Clark

Chehalem Valley MS

Madeline Kozloff

Medford 540C

Matthew Luoto

Stanfield MS

Kristen Wright

Chehalem Valley MS

Lisa Thomas

Mountain View MS

Judy Brown

Stayton HS

James John

Columbia River Youth Corps Jim Martin

Neah-Kah-Nie HS

Esther Troyer

Sweet Home HS

Peter Larson

Crater HS

Tom Pugh

Newberg HS

Mike Blackwell

Sweet Home HS

Alain Brown

Crescent Valley HS

Greg Nicol

North Marion HS

JR Rogers

Sweet Home MS

Mrs. Andrea Neal

Culver HS

Cindy Lofts

North Marion HS

Sherie Moran

Sweet Home MS

Donna DiPietro

Dallas HS

Anna Tally

North Marion HS

Patricia McClintock

Sweet Home SD

Shelly Ottre

Eagle Point HS

Sarah Beauvais

North Salem HS

Leticia Jaramillo

Vernonia SD

Beth Kintz

Forest Grove HS

Catherine Davis

Perrydale SD

April Schorr

West Albany HS

Dolly Victorine

Gervais HS

April Joy-Koer

Perrydale SD

Brock Ferguson

West Albany HS

Kaysha Burgess

Gladstone HS

Lynnda Prom

Philomath HS

Jessica Motter

West Albany HS

Jacqueline Kahler

Grant HS, PPS

Doug Mella

Rainier SD

Shalana Harrison

West Albany HS

Casi Brown

Greater Albany SD

Christy Fitzpatrick

Redmond HS

Thomas Wheeler

Woodburn HS

Mario A. Garza

Harrisburg HS

Mary Ahern

Ridgeview HS

Renee Hamiligon

Yamhill-Carlton HS

Trevor da Silva

Don’t have an Apprenticeship Ambassador yet?

Scan this QR Code TODAY! >>> www.wesd.org


CAREER CHOICES

TRAINING and CAREER CHOICES

There are many training programs and locations throughout the state of Oregon and SW Washington. For additional information you can contact any training program and they will assist you. In addition, you may contact the Oregon Apprenticeship and Training Division

SCAN ME OR GO TO: BIT.LY/35JQ9VL

“Pay” associated with various crafts uses 2019 prevailing wage in Multnomah County, OR for full-time journey workers.

ARCHITECT - Pay: $78,470 JOB⊲⊲ At the start of a project, architects meet clients to discuss their requirements. Architects prepare and present initial proposals, typically in the form of a sketch design including feasibility studies or site reports. As the project progresses, they maintain communication with the client, providing detailed plans, specifications, budgets, schedules, and progress reports. They also arrange meetings to resolve any problems that occur during the design or construction phase. TRAINING:

Architects must be licensed and complete a professional degree in architecture and pass an Architect Registration Examination.

36|BUILDING FUTURES|FALL 2019|BuildingFuturesMag.com


BOILERMAKER - Pay: $80,474 JOB⊲⊲ Boilermakers work with steel, aluminum, and other metals to build, repair, and maintain boilers, cranes, tanks, pipelines, cable-ways, pressure vessels, and structural frames. They rig and lift loads with rope, steel cables, and chains, and operate power tools. TRAINING:

Union: Southern Oregon Boiler Operators JATC Phone: 541-245-7912 Area: 4 & 5

CARPENTER - Pay: $78,470 JOB⊲⊲ Carpenters construct, erect, install, and repair structures and fixtures made from wood, steel, and other materials. They are involved in many different kinds of construction such as: millwrights, piledrivers, scaffold erectors, shipwrights, tradeshow workers, floor coverers, and building insulators. TRAINING:

Non-Union: Oregon SW Washington Carpenters JATC Phone: 503-256-7300 Email: info@nwoc.com Website: www.nwcoc.com Area: Area: 1, 2, 3, 6 & 7 Non-Union: Lane/Douglas Counties Carpenters JATC Phone: 503-256-7300 Email: info@nwoc.com Website: www.nwcoc.com Area: 3 & 4

Union: Oregon SW Washington Carpenters JATC Phone: 503-287-3708 Email: training@pnci.org Website: www.pnci.org Area: Statewide

CONSTRUCTION MANAGERS - Pay: $91,370 JOB⊲⊲ Construction project managers control the time, cost, and quality of construction projects. They plan and coordinate all aspects of the construction process, including hiring contractors and working with engineers, architects, and vendors. TRAINING:

Construction firms typically prefer managers have a combination of construction experience and a bachelor’s degree in a construction related filed.

DRYWALL INSTALLER/FINISHER - Pay: $79,159 JOB⊲⊲ Fasten drywall panels to the inside framework of building. Prepare panels for painting by taping or finishing joints. Work with ceiling tile installers to build walls. Prepare panels by sawing, drilling, or cutting holes in panels for electrical outlets, airconditioning units, and plumbing. TRAINING:

Union: OR & SW-WA Drywall Finishers JATC Phone: 503-287-4856 Website: www.rtctraining.org Area: 1, 2, 3 & 4

Union: OR & SW Washington Carpenters JATC Phone: 503-287-3708 Website: www.pnci.org Area: 2 & 3

BuildingFuturesMag.com|FALL 2019|BUILDING FUTURES|37


ELECTRICIAN - Pay: $96,106 JOB⊲⊲ There are different categories of electricians including inside wiremen who install the power, lighting and controls in commercial and industrial buildings. Limited energy technicians install circuits and equipment for low voltage systems like phones, computer networks and security systems. Residential wiremen install electrical systems in houses. *For an even more detailed list of additional locations go to: www.oregon.gov/boli TRAINING:

Union: NIETC JATC (NECA/IBEW Electrical JATC) Inside Electrical – Ltd. Energy Technicians, Class A & B JATC – Ltd. Residential Electrician JATC Phone: 503-262-9991 x5059 Website: www.nietc.org Area: 1, 6 & WA Non-Union: IEC - Independent Electrical Contractors Inside Electrical – IETC Training Ctr. – Ltd. Energy Technicians, Class A & B – Ltd. Residential Electrician JATC Phone: 503-598-7789 Website: www.iecoregon.org Area: 1, 2, 6 & WA State Non-Union: Protective Signaling JATC Ltd. Energy Technician - Class A Phone: 503-475-6396 Website: www.protectivesignalingjatc.org Area: 1 & WA State Mixed: Mid-Willamette Industrial TATC Area II Limited Energy Electrical JATC Website: www.linnbenton.edu/business/apprenticeship Area: 2

Union: Central Electrical JATC, Inside Electrician Ltd. Energy Technician - Class A Phone: 541-917-6199 Website: www.cjatc.org Area: 1, 2, 3 & 7 Mixed: Southern Willamette-Valley Ltd Energy Electrical JATC Phone: 541-279-1543 Website: www.nwapprenticeship.org Area: 3, 4 & 5 Union: Crater Lake Electrical JATC, Inside Electrical – Ltd. Energy Technicians – Ltd. Energy Technician - Class A & B Phone: 541-773-5888 Website: www.clejatc.org/applicant.html Area: 4, 5 & 7 Non-Union: Central OR Ltd Energy Electrical JATC, Inside Electrical – Ltd. Energy Technicians – Ltd. Energy Technician - Class A & B Phone: 541-279-1543 Website: www.nwapprenticeship.org Area: 7

ELEVATOR INSTALLER/MECHANIC - Pay: $113,365 JOB⊲⊲ Assemble, install, maintain, and repair electric or hydraulic freight or passenger elevators, escalators, dumbwaiters, or moving walkways and similar equipment in new and existing buildings. Modernize outdated equipment. TRAINING:

Union: OR-SW-WA Elevator Industry JATC Phone: 503-252-5852 Website: www.neiep.org/Help/Default.aspx?id=ElevatorIndustryFAQ Area: Statewide

FLOORING INSTALLER - Pay: $59,604 JOB⊲⊲ Install, replace, and repair all types of carpets, plastic laminates, and other decorative coverings in buildings, airplanes, ships, swimming pools, stores, automobiles, and athletic fields using manual and power tools to measure, hammer, cut and shear, spread and stretch, and prepare floors. TRAINING:

Union: OR & SW-WA Floor Covering JATC Phone: 503-481-3420 Website: www.finishingtradesinstitute.org Area: Statewide

38|BUILDING FUTURES|FALL 2019|BuildingFuturesMag.com


GLAZIER/WINDOW INSTALLER - Pay: $81,706 JOB⊲⊲ Glaziers – architectural metal and glass workers – fabricate, fit, and install framing systems and plate-glass windows, skylights, mirrors, store fronts, facades, and specialty glass in commercial and residential buildings. TRAINING:

Union: OR SW-WA Glaziers, Architectural Metal & Glassworker JATC Phone: 503-491-7359 Website: www.mhcc.edu/GlassWorkers Area: 1, 2 & 3

IRONWORKER - Pay: $77,219 JOB⊲⊲ Ironworkers erect the structural framework for high rise buildings, bridges, power plants, and towers. They place reinforcing steel in concrete forms for roadways, foundations, and structures. Welding, ornamental, rigging, and machinery moving are also a part of this trade. TRAINING:

Union: Pacific NW Ironworker & Employer JATC Phone: 503-775-0877 Website: www.nwiw.com/CONTACT29.htm Area: Statewide

LABORER - PAY: $66,721 JOB⊲⊲ Skilled and unskilled, laborers prep the worksite for construction or demolition. They are responsible for loading and unloading building materials, running equipment, and setting up scaffolding and other temporary structures. They are essential to highway construction, building, and environmental remediation. TRAINING:

Union: Oregon Laborers JATC Phone: 541-740-4753 Website: www.oregonlaborers.com Area: Statewide

Non-Union: Oregon Columbia Laborers JATC Ltd Energy Electrical JATC Phone: 503-256-7300 or 1-800-309-1442 Website: www.nwcoc.com Area: Statewide

MASONRY TRADES (MULTIPLE) - Pay: $69,914 JOB⊲⊲ Masonry trades include cement masons who work on roads and bridges; bricklayers; marble, slate and tile setters, terrazzo workers; and finishers who use concrete blocks, bricks, and manmade or natural stone to build fences, walls, walkways, and other masonry structures. TRAINING:

Union: Oregon SW-WA Mason Trades JATC Phone: 503-234-3781 Website: www.bac1or.org Area: Statewide, Bricklayer, Marble Setter, Terrazzo Worker, Finisher & Tile setter Area: 1: Caulker

Non-Union: Oregon Columbia Masons TATC Phone: 503-256-7300 Website: www.nwcoc.com Area: 1, 2, 3 & 7, Bricklayer Area: 1, 2, 3 & 7, Cement Mason Union: Oregon & SW-WA Cement Masons JATC Phone: 503-408-8555 - 866-408-8555 Email: jatc@cementmasons555.org Area: Statewide

BuildingFuturesMag.com|FALL 2019|BUILDING FUTURES|39


MILLWRIGHT - Pay: $61,190 JOB⊲⊲ Millwrights are skilled construction mechanics who use precision machinery to install, dismantle, repair, reassemble, and move machinery, conveyor systems, escalators, giant electrical turbines, and generators in factories, power plants, and construction sites. TRAINING:

Union: OR SW Washington Carpenters JATC Portland: 503-287-3708 Tangent: 541-601-4104 o Redmond: 877-287-9282 Email: training@pnci.org Website: www.pnci.org/index.lasso Area: Statewide

OPERATING ENGINEER - Pay: $99,069 JOB⊲⊲ Operating and technical engineers operate the bulldozers, motor graders, backhoes, paving machinery, and cranes that help to form highways, site infrastructure, and skylines. They work mines, dig wells, survey sites, pave and grind roads, and drill and hoist steel and slabs. They also do the final grading as well as maintain/repair machinery. Non-Union: OR/Columbia Heavy Equip Operator JATC TRAINING: Phone: 503-256-7300 or 1-800-309-1442 Union: Website: www.nwcoc.com OR SW-WA IUOE LOCAL #701 & AGC JATC Area: Statewide Phone: 503-650-7701 Website: www.oetraining.org Non-Union: Area: Statewide Knife River Oregon JAC Phone: 541-928-6491 Website: www.kniferiver.com Area: 1, 2, 3, 4 & 7

PAINTING & WALL COVERING - Pay: $62,526 JOB⊲⊲ Painters prepare wood, masonry, drywall, plaster, concrete, and metal surfaces prior to the application of paint, high performance coatings, waterproofing, fireproofing, and decorative finishes in residential and commercial settings. Painters work on marine vessels, commercial buildings, residences, and industrial plants and bridges. TRAINING:

Union: Oregon & SW Washington Painters JATC Phone: 503-287-4856 Website: www.rtctraining.org Area: Statewide. Area 1, Traffic Control Painter

PILE DRIVER - Pay: $75,027 JOB⊲⊲ Pile drivers work with pile-driving rigs that drive metal, concrete, or wood piling into the earth to hold back dirt during excavations, and as a fundamental part of the foundation system for skyscrapers and concrete pilings that hold up docks, wharves, and bridges. TRAINING:

Union: OR SW WA Carpenters JATC Portland: 503-287-3708 or 877-287-9282 Tangent: 541-601-4104 or 877-287-9282 Redmond: 877-287-9282 Website: www.pnci.org

40|BUILDING FUTURES|FALL 2019|BuildingFuturesMag.com


PLASTERERS AND STUCCO MASONS - Pay: $78,867 JOB⊲⊲ Plasterers finish interior walls and ceilings of residential and commercial

buildings, apply plaster on masonry, metal and wire lath (stucco), or gypsum. Most of these finishes are applied by hand.

TRAINING:

Union: The Plasterers Local 82 Phone: 503-254-4022 Website: www.plastererslocal82.com/info/Apprenticeship Area: Statewide

PLUMBERS/STEAMFITTERS/PIPEFITTERS - $105,330 JOB⊲⊲ Plumbers install piping for water systems, drain, waste and vent systems, irrigation, water mains, bathroom accessories, and gas. Steamfitters assemble and install pipe to carry water, steam, compressed air, gases, etc. HVAC/refrigeration fitters install, maintain, and service refrigeration, heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems. Pipefitters lay pipe for storm or sanitation sewers, drains, and water mains and perform any combination of tasks such as grading trenches or culverts, positioning pipe, or sealing joints. TRAINING:

Union: OR SW-WA NW-CA Plumbers and Steamfitters JATC Tualatin: 503-691-1997 Eugene: 541-726-1131 Redmond: 541-419-5128 Medford: 541-821-1282 Eureka: 541-821-1282 Website: www.ua290.or Area: Statewide Non-Union: North Coast Plumbers JATC Phone: 503-861-9487 Area: 1 Non-Union Area I Plumbers JATC Phone: 503-675-0548 Website: www.areaonejatc.com Area: 1 Non-Union Area II Plumbers JATC Phone: 503-991-5203 Website: www.area2app.com Area: 1, 2 & 6

Non-Union Area III Plumbers JATC Phone: 541-636-3592 Area 3 & 4 Non-Union Area IV (Coos Bay) Independent TAC Area V (Rogue Valley) Plumbers JATC Area VII Plumbers JATC Phone: 541-344-6473 Area: 3, 4 & 5 Non-Union Klamath Basin Plumbers JATC Phone: 541-880-2234 Website: www.klamathcc.edu Area: 5 Non-Union Ontario TATC Phone: 208-452-4970 Area: 6 Non-Union Blue Mountain TATC Phone: 541-278-5854 Website: www.bluecc.edu Area: 6 & 7

ROOFER - PAY: $79,493 JOB⊲⊲

Roofers and waterproofers replace, repair, and install the roofs, waterproofing, and air barrier systems of buildings using a variety of materials including shingles, slate, asphalt, aluminum, wood, or related drainage materials.

TRAINING:

Union: OR/SW-WA Roofers & Waterproofers JATC Phone: 503-546-4235 Website: www.orswroofersapp.com Area: Statewide

BuildingFuturesMag.com|FALL 2019|BUILDING FUTURES|41


SHEET METAL /HVAC WORKER - Pay: $84,087 JOB⊲⊲ Sheet metal workers fabricate and install fittings and duct work for heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems in residential, commercial, and industrial applications. They set up and operate equipment to cut, form, and attach metal together for applications such as metal roofing and stainlesssteel work for restaurants, kitchens, and hospitals. TRAINING:

Union: Portland Sheet Metal Worker JATC Phone: 503-257-1022 Website: www.sheetmetal-16.org Area: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 & 7

Non-Union: Mid-Valley Sheet Metal Workers JAC Phone: 503-399-5255 Website: www.chemeketa.edu/programs-classes/program-finder/apprenticeshipsheet-metal Area: 1 & 2 Non-Union: Sheet Metal JATC Phone: 503-726-5433 Website: www.abcpnw.org Area: 1 Non-Union: Area III Sheet Metal/HVAC Env Sys JATC Phone: 541-279-1543 Website: www.nwapprenticeship.org Area: 3, 4 & 7

Non-Union: South Central Oregon Sheet Metal JATC Phone: 541-245-7912 Website: www.roguecc.edu/workforce Area: 5

SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING INSTALLER - Pay: $63,580 JOB⊲⊲ Install or repair solar energy systems designed to collect, store, and circulate solar-heated water for residential, commercial, or industrial use. TRAINING:

Non-Union: Renewable Energy JATC Phone: 541-279-1543 Area: Statewide

W I KNOW I CAN NO D AN , IS TH DO D UL CO I E M THEY TOLD 42|BUILDING FUTURES|FALL 2019|BuildingFuturesMag.com


APPRENTICESHIP

PRE-APPRENTICESHIP

Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job training and related classroom instruction under the supervision of a journey-level craft person or trade professional, in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation.

Pre-Apprenticeship Programs are a wonderful opportunity to obtain the basic knowledge and skills necessary to compete for entry into approved apprenticeship programs. These programs are short in duration and provide participants classroom and hands-on instruction in safety, tool use, and more. Below is a list of adult and youth pre-apprenticeship providers. Contact these providers to find out more information on their programs and class schedules

ADULT APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM PROVIDERS Constructing Hope 503-281-1234 www.constructinghope.org Carpenters Trade Preparation 503-287-3708 www.pnci.org/apprenticeship.lasso Chemeketa Community College 503-589-7747 www.chemeketa.edu/programs-classes/program-finder/ apprenticeship/high-school-pre-apprenticeship-program CREW - Coffee Creek 503-570-6400 https://doc/OPS/PRISON/pages/cccf.aspx

YOUTH PRE-APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM PROVIDERS Benson Polytechnic High School 503-916-5100 www.bensonhs.pps.k12.or.us/construction.php Cascadia Technical Academy 360-604-1050 x 2158 http://cascadiatechnicalacademy.org

Ironworkers National Women’s 503-775-0877

Job Corps - Oregon https://recruiting.jobcorps.gov/Home/ Locations/OR

Ironworkers Pre-Apprenticeship 206-244-2993 www.iw86appr.org

Job Corps - Washington https://recruiting.jobcorps.gov/Home/ Locations/WA

NECA/IBEW Electrical Training Center 503-262-9991 www.nietc.org

US Dept of Labor 1-800-733-JOBS (5687) www.dol.gov

Oregon Tradeswomen Inc (OT) 503-335-8200 x 21 www.tradeswomen.net

Portland Youth Builders 503-286-9350 http://pybpdx.org

IMPACT NW Manufacturing Bridge 503-660-3173 https://impactnw.org/programs/youthfamily/urban-opportunities/ pathways-to-manufacturing

Reynolds Learning Academy 503-667-4673 www.reynolds.k12.or.us/rla/trading-program

Portland Community College Swan Island Trades Center 971-722-5651 www.pcc.edu/programs/apprenticeship/pre-trades.html

Reynolds High School HVAC 503-667-3186

Portland Opportunities Industrialization Center (POIC) 503-737-7222 www.portlandoic.org/contact

St Helens High School, Building Const Dept 503-633-7416 www.sthelens.k12.or.us/Domain/140

Rogue Community College Construction Program 541-245-7912 https://go.roguecc.edu/department/apprenticeship Trades Related Apprenticeship Coaching (TRAC) WA Corrections Center for Women 206-244-2993 www.iw86appr.org Center for Advanced Learning (CAL) 503-667-4978 www.calcharter.org

BuildingFuturesMag.com|FALL 2019|BUILDING FUTURES|43


DEPARTMENT|ENGAGE A special note of appreciation to all of the advertisers and sponsors of Building Futures magazine. Your generous support provides thousands of young adults access to information, training, and employment opportunities throughout Oregon and SW Washington. CONTACT THESE COMPANIES – THEY CARE ABOUT YOU AND YOUR FUTURE IN CONSTRUCTION

ABC Roofing Company https://abcroofingco.com

18

Roofers Union, Local 49 Hamilton Construction Company www.roofersunionlocal49.com 24 www.hamil.com 24

Airway Science for Kids http://wp1.airwayscience.org

19

The Harver Company Sheet Metal Institute www.sheetmetalinstitute.org BK www.harverco.com 22

Anderson Roofing https://andersonroofing.net

24

Van Lom Howard S Wright, Balfour Beatty Company www.vanlomconcrete.com 14 www.balfourbeattyus.com 14

Associated General Contractors – Oregon Columbia Chapter www.build-oregon.com 26

Independent Electrical Contractors of Oregon www.iecoregon.org 28, 34

Willamette Promise www.wesd.org/willamettepromise 35

WPI, Western Partitions http://wpibuilds.com 26 Ironworkers Training Center, Local 29 30 www.iw29appr.org 20 Bear Electric, Inc. www.bearelectric.com 28 Knife River Corporation www.kniferiver.com 14 Bend Heating and Sheet Metal www.bendheating.com 23 Lease Crutcher Lewis https://lewisbuilds.com 12 The Blueprint Foundation www.theblueprintfoundation.org 19 Milwaukee Tools www.milwaukeetool.com 20 Bratton Masonry (360) 735-0656 31 NW College of Construction https://nwcoc.com IFC, 19 Bremik Construction www.bremik.com 10 Oregon & SW Washington Roofers & Waterproofers Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers www.orswroofersapp.com 18 BAC Local1, Oregon www.bac1or.org 32 Oregon Building Congress www.obcweb.com 19 Building Futures Survey Monkey P & C Construction www.buildingfuturesmag.com IBC http://builtbypandc.com 32 Constructing Hope Pacific NW Carpenters Institute www.constructinghope.org 19 /www.pnci.org 10 Crater Lake Electrical Training Center Perlo Construction, LLC www.clejatc.org 34 http://perlo.biz 12 The Finest in Finishing Trades Plumbers and Steamfitters, www.finishingtrades.org 2 Apprenticeship Training, Local 290 Fortis Construction, Inc. http://ua290.org 28 http://fortisconstruction.com 12 R & H Contracting www.rhconst.com 26 Fred Shearer & Sons, Inc. www.fredshearer.com ` 18 Associated Wall & Ceiling Contractors of Oregon and S.W. Washington, Inc. www.awcco.or

International Union of Operating Engineers, I.U.O.E. 701 www.oetraining.org 1

Goodfellow Brothers, LLC www.goodfellowbros.com 32 44|BUILDING FUTURES|FALL 2019|BuildingFuturesMag.com


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