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Vol. 49, Issue 291

In the news

Minimum wage to rise to $10.19 Alaska’s minimum wage is set to increase 30 cents on Jan. 1, 2020. The wage will increase from $9.89 an hour, to $10.19 an hour. In 2014, Alaskans voted to raise the minimum wage by $1 in both 2015 and 2016, and required the rate to be adjusted annually for inflation, according to an October press release from the Office of the Commissioner of the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Tips do not count toward the Alaska minimum wage. To adjust for inflation, the state uses the previous calendar year’s Consumer Price Index for urban consumers in the Anchorage Metropolitan Area. The index is a measure of the average change in prices paid by urban consumers over time. Last year, minimum wage rose 5 cents, from $9.84 to $9.89. In 2017, 2018 and 2019 the minimum wage only rose 5 cents. By law, Alaska’s minimum wage must remain at least $1 per hour over the federal minimum wage, which is $7.25. Alaska is among 30 states with minimum wages above $7.25. Washington state, California and Massachusetts have state minimum wages of $12 and Washington, D.C., offers workers a minimum of $14 an hour.

Fishing disasters declared for 7 states, 3 coasts NEW ORLEANS — U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross has declared fishing disasters for seven states on three coasts. “Fishing is the cornerstone of countless coastal economies and has been a way of life for generations of Americans,” he said in a brief news release Wednesday. “This determination acknowledges the critical role fisheries play in our communities, and the risks they face from natural disasters and other causes beyond their control.” Ross’ action makes people and businesses eligible for NOAA fisheries disaster assistance. Congress has See news, Page A6

Index Local . . . . . . . . . . A3 Opinion . . . . . . . . A4 Nation & World . . . . A5 Public Safety . . . . . . A6 Sports . . . . . . . . . A7 Arts . . . . . . . . . . A9 Classifieds . . . . . . A11 TV Guide . . . . . . . A13 Comics . . . . . . . . A14 Check us out online at www.peninsulaclarion.com To subscribe, call 283-3584.

Pick ‘Em

Performers put on dinner theater mystery

NFL Week 4 arrives with hopes of improvement

Arts & Entertainment / A9

Sports / A8

CLARION

53/29 More weather, Page A2

W of 1 inner Awa0* 201 Exc rds fo 8 e r Rep llence i o n rt * Ala ska P i n g ! res

P E N I N S U L A

Thursday, September 26, 2019 Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

Sunny

s Clu

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$1 newsstands daily/$1.50 Sunday

Swan Lake Fire boosts power rates for some By Victoria Petersen Peninsula Clarion

A transmission line damaged by the Swan Lake Fire is causing power costs to rise for residents living north of Sterling, Julie Hasquet, corporate communication manager for Chugach Electric said. The peninsula communities of Cooper Landing, Hope, and Moose Pass — which are serviced by Chugach Electric — and Seward,

which is serviced by the city, will see power bills go up, but communities south of Cooper Landing will not be impacted. The power cost increases — which are expected to be 3% to 6% higher than normal, until the transmission line is back in service — will be noticed by customers in the next few months, a Monday press release sent by Chugach Electric said. South of Sterling, power from Bradley Lake remains available in

communities serviced by Homer Electric Association, Bruce Shelley, Homer Electric Association director of member relations said. Earlier this summer, the Swan Lake Fire damaged a transmission line connecting the Bradley Lake Hydroelectric Project to the Chugach power lines, and connecting power lines in the Matanuska Susitna Valley and Fairbanks. The Bradley Lake Hydroelectric

Project is the largest of seven hydroelectric facilities in the state, and produces up to 10% of the energy needs along the rail belt, the release said. The project provides power to Chugach Electric, the city of Seward, Homer Electric Association, Municipal Light and Power, Matanuska Electric Association and Golden Valley Electric Association. Hasquet said See rates, Page A3

D.C. delves into impeachment probe By Lisa Mascaro, Mary Clare Jalonick and Julie Pace Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump pressed the leader of Ukraine to “look into” Joe Biden, Trump’s potential 2020 reelection rival, as well as the president’s lingering grievances from the 2016 election, according to a rough transcript of a summer phone call that is now at the center of Democrats’ impeachment probe. Trump repeatedly prodded Volodymyr Zelenskiy, new president of the East European nation, to work Inside with U.S. Attorney General ■■ House Speaker William Barr and Nancy Pelosi’s Rudy Giuliani, path to saying “yes” to starting Trump’s personal lawyer. impeachment At one point in inquiry. Page A5 the July conversation, Trump said, “I would like for you to do us a favor.” The president’s request for such help from a foreign leader set the parameters for the major U.S. debate to come — just the fourth impeachment investigation of an American president in the nation’s history. The initial response highlighted the deep divide between the two parties: Democrats said the call amounted to a “shakedown” of a foreign leader, while Trump — backed by the vast

Evan Vucci / Associated Press

President Donald Trump listens Wednesday during a multilateral meeting on Venezuela at the InterContinental New York Barclay hotel during the United Nations General Assembly.

majority of Republicans — dismissed it as a “nothing call.” The call is one part of a whistleblower complaint about the president’s activities that have roiled Washington and led Democrats to move ahead with an impeachment

inquiry of the Republican president on the cusp of the 2020 campaign. After being stymied by the administration, members of the House and Senate intelligence committees took their first look at the complaint late Wednesday. Republicans kept largely

quiet, but several Democrats, including Intelligence committee chairman Adam Schiff, called the classified account “disturbing.” Some from both parties want it to See probe, Page A2

Borough accepting invocation applications By Victoria Petersen Peninsula Clarion

Applications to offer invocations during Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly meetings are now open on the borough’s website. Any Kenai Peninsula Borough resident can sign up to provide an invocation, which is described on the borough’s website as a short prayer or a solemnizing message offered

at the beginning of each assembly meeting for the benefit of the assembly, accommodating for the spiritual needs of the public officials. Any person wishing to provide an invocation must submit a dated, written request to the clerk’s office. Residents approved to provide invocations will be scheduled on a firstcome, first-served basis. Each resident may only ask to provide one invocation at a time,

and no one will be schedule to offer an invocation at consecutive assembly meetings, or at more than four assembly meetings in any calendar year. The assembly requests by the language of its policy that no invocation should proselytize or advance any faith, or disparage the religious faith or non-religious views of others, the borough’s website said. For the remainder of 2019, four

more assembly meetings are scheduled. Angela Roland will be providing an invocation Oct. 8. George R. Holly Jr. will provide an invocation Oct. 22. Assembly member Willy Dunne will provide an invocation at the Nov. 5 borough assembly meeting. On Dec. 3, Tom Anthony will provide the assembly meeting invocation. The borough’s invocation policy See invocation, Page A3

Citizen scientists catch site of belugas By Brian Mazurek Peninsula Clarion

Citizen scientists from around the state scanned the waters of the Cook Inlet last weekend for the third annual Belugas Count! event. On Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., 15 public viewing stations were set up around Cook Inlet, from Tyonek to Goose Bay to Homer, where people could come and assist the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in their annual tally of the endangered Cook Inlet beluga whale. One station was set up in Kenai at Erik Hansen Scout Park, which overlooks the mouth of the Kenai River as it flows into Cook Inlet. Volunteers Grace Kautek and Ed Schmitt staffed the Kenai station and provided beluga-watchers with information

about the animals as well as extra binoculars, hot coffee and snacks. Schmitt is the president of the board for the Alaska Wildlife Alliance, of which Kautek is also a member. Both were involved in the Kenai count last year, and Kautek took a break from her day job at the Alaska Zoo in Anchorage to visit family and help with the count. By noon on Saturday, belugawatchers had already spotted 14 belugas that had made their way up the Kenai River. Locals have reported beluga sightings on the Kenai River for decades, and sightings are highest in the spring and fall for one reason: fish. “They use the river as a funnel,” Kautek said. “They’re coming when the tide is lower and there’s less water in the river so the fish are channeled See belugas, Page A3

Brian Mazurek / Peninsula Clarion

Alaska Wildlife Alliance member Grace Kautek looks out over the Kenai River for signs of belugas during the third annual Belugas Count! event at Erik Hansen Scout Park in Kenai on Saturday.


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Peninsula Clarion

Thursday, September 26, 2019

AccuWeather 5-day forecast for Kenai-Soldotna ®

Today

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Monday

Mostly sunny

Mostly cloudy

Cloudy, spotty showers in the p.m.

Periods of rain

Intervals of clouds and sunshine

Hi: 51

Hi: 54

Hi: 56

Hi: 53

Lo: 29

Lo: 35

Lo: 43

Lo: 43

RealFeel

Sun and Moon

The patented AccuWeather.com RealFeel Temperature® is an exclusive index of the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

Sunrise Sunset

10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m.

45 52 52 51

New Sep 28

Today 7:57 a.m. 7:53 p.m.

First Oct 5

Daylight Day Length - 11 hrs., 55 min., 47 sec. Daylight lost - 5 min., 31 sec.

Alaska Cities City Adak* Anchorage Barrow Bethel Cold Bay Cordova Delta Junction Denali N. P. Dillingham Dutch Harbor Fairbanks Fort Yukon Glennallen* Gulkana Haines Homer Juneau Ketchikan Kiana King Salmon Klawock Kodiak

Yesterday Hi/Lo/W 53/47/r 48/42/r 40/31/c 46/37/sh 54/46/pc 53/44/r 46/32/sh 42/21/c 53/34/pc 54/45/r 46/31/sh 47/27/pc 47/40/r 47/37/r 53/49/r 51/41/r 52/48/r 52/51/r 40/28/c 52/42/c 55/50/r 57/44/pc

Moonrise Moonset

Hi: 54

Tomorrow 8:00 a.m. 7:50 p.m.

Full Oct 13

Today 4:12 a.m. 8:00 p.m.

City Kotzebue McGrath Metlakatla Nome North Pole Northway Palmer Petersburg Prudhoe Bay* Saint Paul Seward Sitka Skagway Talkeetna Tanana Tok* Unalakleet Valdez Wasilla Whittier Willow* Yakutat

Kotzebue 44/39

Lo: 40

Unalakleet 46/41 McGrath 48/27

Last Oct 21 Tomorrow 5:53 a.m. 8:12 p.m.

Yesterday Hi/Lo/W 43/33/pc 41/38/sh 53/53/r 45/33/c 48/30/sh 44/34/sh 45/36/r 54/50/r 36/32/c 52/38/r 54/40/r 55/49/r 54/49/r 41/34/sn 43/31/sh 47/33/sh 42/36/sh 47/42/r 43/35/r 46/37/r 43/33/r 50/45/r

Anchorage 50/36

City

Albany, NY Albuquerque Amarillo Asheville Atlanta Atlantic City Austin Baltimore Billings Birmingham Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo, NY Casper Charleston, SC Charleston, WV Charlotte, NC Chicago Cheyenne Cincinnati

76/50/s 84/56/pc 95/63/s 85/54/s 93/65/s 82/52/s 97/70/pc 84/54/s 67/50/pc 95/62/s 66/47/t 72/48/s 76/59/pc 77/55/pc 70/37/s 90/71/pc 87/48/s 91/62/pc 79/63/pc 78/46/s 86/53/pc

71/48/sh 85/56/pc 86/64/s 85/63/t 94/73/s 85/56/s 96/71/s 87/56/s 73/42/sh 93/71/s 69/46/pc 78/47/pc 81/58/s 69/50/sh 81/42/pc 90/74/s 78/52/pc 93/68/s 71/58/s 83/46/pc 78/54/pc

City

Cleveland Columbia, SC Columbus, OH Concord, NH Dallas Dayton Denver Des Moines Detroit Duluth El Paso Fargo Flagstaff Grand Rapids Great Falls Hartford Helena Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Jackson, MS

83/57/pc 96/68/s 83/53/pc 70/43/pc 97/77/pc 85/56/pc 80/49/pc 75/60/pc 77/59/pc 67/53/sh 91/66/pc 65/50/pc 71/37/pc 74/63/sh 66/39/pc 76/49/pc 66/48/pc 85/75/pc 91/72/pc 81/59/pc 95/71/s

74/50/pc 96/71/s 77/50/c 78/45/pc 95/74/s 77/52/c 88/51/pc 73/62/pc 72/50/s 64/51/pc 91/67/pc 66/50/pc 63/43/pc 67/51/s 64/35/pc 79/49/s 66/43/pc 86/75/sh 90/72/s 76/54/pc 93/68/s

City

Jacksonville Kansas City Key West Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Midland, TX Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Norfolk Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix

Temperature

From Kenai Municipal Airport

CLARION E N I N S U L A

Kenai Peninsula’s award-winning publication (USPS 438-410) The Peninsula Clarion is a locally operated member of Sound Publishing Inc., published Sunday through Friday. 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 1, Kenai, AK Phone: (907) 283-7551 Postmaster: Send address changes to the Peninsula Clarion, 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 1, Kenai, AK Periodicals postage paid at Kenai, AK

Copyright 2019 Peninsula Clarion

Who to call at the Peninsula Clarion News tip? Question? Main number ................................................... 283-7551 Fax................................................................... 283-3299 News email ............................news@peninsulaclarion.com

General news Erin Thompson Editor............................ ethompson@peninsulaclarion.com Jeff Helminiak Sports & Features Editor..... jhelminiak@peninsulaclarion.com Victoria Petersen Education......................... vpetersen@peninsulaclarion.com Joey Klecka Sports/Features .................... jklecka@peninsulaclarion.com Brian Mazurek Public Safety .................... bmazurek@peninsulaclarion.com Kat Sorensen Fisheries & City ................ ksorensen@peninsulaclarion.com

Circulation problem? Call 283-3584 If you don’t receive your newspaper by 7 a.m. and you live in the KenaiSoldotna area, call 283-3584 before 10 a.m. for redelivery of your paper. If you call after 10 a.m., you will be credited for the missed issue. Regular office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. General circulation questions can be sent via email to circulation@ peninsulaclarion.com. The circulation director is Randi Keaton.

For home delivery Order a five-day-a-week, 13-week subscription for $57, a 26-week subscription for $108, or a 52-week subscription for $198. Use our easypay plan and save on these rates. Call 283-3584 for details. Weekend and mail subscription rates are available upon request.

Want to place an ad? Classified: Call 283-7551 and ask for the classified ad department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or email classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com. Display: Call 283-7551 and ask for the display advertising department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Contacts for other departments:

Publisher ....................................................... Jeff Hayden Production Manager ............................. Frank Goldthwaite

Precipitation

From the Peninsula Clarion in Kenai

24 hours ending 4 p.m. yest. . 0.05" Month to date .......................... 3.70" Normal month to date ............ 2.68" Year to date ............................. 9.18" Normal year to date .............. 12.26" Record today ................. 1.16" (1965) Record for Sept. ............ 7.07" (1961) Record for year ........... 27.09" (1963)

Valdez 49/29

Juneau 52/37

(For the 48 contiguous states) High yesterday Low yesterday

Kodiak 56/41

110 at Death Valley, Calif. 25 at Bridgeport, Calif.

Sitka 53/44

State Extremes

Ketchikan 53/42

High yesterday 57 at Kodiak Low yesterday 21 at McKinley Park and Denali N. P.

Today’s Forecast

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

96/71/pc 83/69/pc 88/79/s 94/71/pc 89/68/pc 86/69/pc 90/57/pc 90/71/pc 89/73/s 94/73/s 79/67/pc 71/58/c 92/57/sh 92/72/pc 79/58/s 80/62/s 92/69/pc 74/59/pc 92/68/s 81/59/s 89/73/pc

95/71/s 75/65/pc 87/80/pc 88/68/pc 80/66/pc 80/66/pc 82/60/pc 85/72/pc 89/77/pc 96/71/pc 70/57/pc 70/59/pc 83/65/t 92/73/s 81/59/s 90/71/s 83/72/pc 74/65/pc 92/71/s 84/58/s 85/70/t

City

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Pittsburgh Portland, ME Portland, OR Rapid City Reno Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Santa Fe Seattle Sioux Falls, SD Spokane Syracuse Tampa Topeka Tucson Tulsa Wash., DC Wichita

77/48/pc 71/48/pc 73/55/pc 60/51/c 85/52/s 100/63/s 77/53/s 95/76/pc 76/69/pc 96/67/s 82/45/s 69/54/pc 62/58/c 67/40/pc 78/49/pc 94/75/pc 84/67/pc 84/64/c 93/69/pc 84/61/pc 87/67/c

74/46/c 74/51/pc 70/52/pc 80/45/pc 89/56/pc 88/60/s 81/57/pc 97/73/s 75/66/pc 79/62/s 83/48/pc 67/52/c 70/58/pc 68/43/pc 69/50/sh 92/74/s 78/66/pc 82/63/t 82/74/pc 88/62/s 79/71/pc

City

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Acapulco Athens Auckland Baghdad Berlin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Magadan Mexico City Montreal Moscow Paris Rome Seoul Singapore Sydney Tokyo Vancouver

90/78/t 82/68/pc 59/51/sh 105/73/s 63/55/r 88/75/pc 84/60/s 63/49/s 72/59/sh 78/57/pc 46/37/sh 75/57/t 68/54/sh 45/34/sh 66/57/sh 79/61/pc 79/56/pc 81/77/t 68/51/s 81/67/pc 61/52/pc

88/78/t 81/69/s 57/53/sh 110/74/s 69/55/pc 86/75/s 82/64/s 70/42/s 69/55/sh 81/55/s 45/32/pc 75/55/t 66/48/r 52/35/c 71/57/sh 79/59/pc 82/64/pc 87/78/pc 68/56/sh 78/67/pc 62/49/pc

Showers and thunderstorms will extend from the interior Northeast to the southern Plains today. Showers and storms are expected over the interior Southwest. Rain will fall from Washington to Montana.

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation

Cold -10s

Warm -0s

0s

Stationary 10s

20s

Showers T-storms 30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

70s

Flurries 80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2019

Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

P

High .............................................. 54 Low ............................................... 38 Normal high ................................. 54 Normal low ................................... 37 Record high ....................... 60 (2001) Record low ........................ 18 (1992)

Glennallen 45/27

World Cities Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Readings ending 4 p.m. yesterday

National Extremes

National Cities Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Almanac

Seward Homer 54/36 54/34

Cold Bay 55/48

Unalaska 53/50

Internet: www.gedds.alaska.edu/ auroraforecast

Kenai/ Soldotna 53/29

Kenai/ Soldotna Homer

Dillingham 53/42

Today’s activity: MODERATE Where: Weather permitting, moderate displays will be visible overhead from Utqiagvik to as far south as Talkeetna and visible low on the horizon as far south as Bethel, Soldotna and southeast Alaska.

Prudhoe Bay 38/28

Fairbanks 45/29

Talkeetna 51/26

Bethel 52/44

Today Hi/Lo/W 44/39/r 48/27/c 55/43/sh 45/42/c 45/27/pc 44/20/pc 47/30/s 50/36/sh 38/28/pc 52/46/r 54/36/s 53/44/sh 52/43/sh 51/26/s 44/27/c 42/22/pc 46/41/c 49/29/s 47/30/s 47/35/s 48/28/s 56/36/sh

Aurora Forecast

Anaktuvuk Pass 33/19

Nome 45/42

* Indicates estimated temperatures for yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W 54/45/pc 50/36/s 39/30/pc 52/44/c 55/48/c 57/31/s 42/25/pc 39/19/s 53/42/c 54/50/c 45/29/pc 45/27/pc 45/27/s 49/20/s 52/41/sh 54/34/s 52/37/sh 53/42/sh 44/34/r 55/36/c 52/38/sh 56/41/pc

Utqiagvik 39/30

Probe From Page A1

be made public. Congress is also seeking an in-person interview with the whistleblower, who remains anonymous. Trump spent Wednesday meeting with world leaders at the United Nations, a remarkable TV split screen even for the turbulence of the Trump era. Included on his schedule: a meeting with Zelenskiy. In a light-hearted appearance before reporters, Zelenskiy said he didn’t want to get involved in American elections, but added, “Nobody pushed me.” Trump chimed in, “In other words, no pressure.” The next steps in the impeachment inquiry were quickly developing a day after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi launched the probe. A rush of lawmakers, notably moderate Democrats from districts where Trump remains popular, set aside political concerns and urged action. One option Pelosi is considering, pressed by some lawmakers, is to focus the impeachment inquiry specifically on the Ukraine issues rather than the many others Congress has already been investigating. “For me, that’s what’s important,” said Rep. Elissa Slotkin, D-Mich., among the new lawmakers in Congress with national security backgrounds. She said it’s “just an egregious idea that the president of the United States can contact a foreign leader and influence him for dirt on a political opponent. … That can’t be normalized.” Pelosi announced the impeachment probe Tuesday after months of personal resistance to a process she has warned would be divisive for the country and risky for her party. But after viewing the transcript on Wednesday, Pelosi declared: “Congress must act.” Trump, who thrives on combat, has all but dared Democrats to move toward impeachment, confident that the specter of an investigation led by the opposition party will bolster rather than diminish his political support. “It’s a joke. Impeachment, for that?” Trump said during a news conference in New York. He revived the same language he has used for months to deride the now-finished special counsel investigation into election interference, declaring impeachment “a hoax” and the “single greatest witch hunt in American history.” Republicans largely stood by the president and dismissed the notion that the rough transcript revealed any wrongdoing by Trump. “I think it was a perfectly appropriate phone call, it was a congratulatory phone call,” said Rep. Liz Cheney, the No. 3 House Republican. “The Democrats continually make these huge

Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press

Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer, of New York, holds up a copy of a White House released rough transcript of a phone call between President Donald Trump and the President of Ukraine as Schumer speaks to the media Wednesday about an impeachment inquiry on Trump.

claims and allegations about President Trump, and then you find out there’s no there there.” The Trump administration also continued to raise questions about the whistleblower’s motives. According to a Justice Department official, the intelligence community’s inspector general said in letter to the acting director of national intelligence that the whistleblower could have “arguable political bias.” The memo released by the White House was not a verbatim transcript, but was instead based on the records of officials who listened to the call. The conversation took place on July 25, one day after special counsel Robert Mueller testified on Capitol Hill about his investigation into Russia’s 2016 election interference. In the 30-minute phone call with Zelenskiy, Trump encourages the Ukrainian leader to talk with Giuliani and Barr about Biden and his son Hunter, who served on the board of a Ukrainian gas company. Immediately after saying they would be in touch, Trump references Ukraine’s economy, saying: “Your economy is going to get better and better I predict. You have a lot of assets. It’s a great country.” At another point in the conversation, Trump asked Zelenskiy for a favor: his help looking into a cybersecurity firm that investigated the 2016 hack of the Democratic National Committee and determined it was carried out by Russia. Trump has falsely suggested Crowdstrike was owned by a Ukrainian. In the days before the call, Trump ordered advisers to freeze $400 million in military aid for Ukraine — prompting speculation that he was holding out the money as leverage for information on the Bidens. Trump has denied that charge and the aid package does not come up in the conversation with

Zelenskiy. Trump has sought to implicate Biden and his son in the kind of corruption that has long plagued Ukraine. Hunter Biden served on the gas company’s board at the same time his father was leading the Obama administration’s diplomatic dealings with Kyiv. Though the timing raised concerns among anti-corruption advocates, there has been no evidence of wrongdoing by either the former vice president or his son. Biden said it was “tragedy” that Trump was willing to “put personal politics above his sacred oath.” He singled out Trump’s attempts to pull Barr and the Justice Department into efforts to investigate Biden, calling it “a direct attack on the core independence of that department, an independence essential to the rule of law.” While the possibility of impeachment has hung over Trump for many months, the likelihood of a probe had faded after special counsel Robert Mueller’s TrumpRussia investigation ended without a clear directive for lawmakers. Since then, the House committees have revisited aspects of the Mueller probe while also launching new inquiries into Trump’s businesses and various administration scandals that all seemed likely to drag on for months. Details of Trump’s dealings with Ukraine prompted Democrats to quickly shift course. By the time Pelosi announced the probe, two-thirds of House Democrats had announced moving toward impeachment probes. The burden will probably now shift to Democrats to make the case to a scandal-weary public. In a highly polarized Congress, an impeachment inquiry could simply showcase how clearly two sides can disagree when shown the same evidence rather than approach consensus.


Peninsula Clarion

Rates From Page A1

everyone along the rail belt will be impacted, not just Chugach Electric customers. With no Bradley Lake power coming north of Sterling, Chugach Electric and other power

Invocation From Page A1

has sparked yearslong controversy. Last October, the borough lost a lawsuit against plaintiffs represented by the American Civil

Belugas From Page A1

… when that happens, they pretty much just open their mouth and wait for the fish to come in.” Since the belugas had already made their way up the Kenai River to feed by noon, Schmitt said that they were recommending that people go out to the Kenai City Dock or the wildlife viewing platform on

Thursday, September 26, 2019

A3

companies to the north are using more natural gas to compensate. Natural gas is more expensive than hydroelectric power. For Chugach Electric, 10% of their power comes from Bradley Lake. The transmission line has been out of service for several weeks, according to the press release, at the request of fire crews. “We want our members to have

notice that they will see rates increase as a result of this fire due to damage to the transmission line that connects Chugach to the Bradley Lake Hydroelectric Project,” Chugach CEO Lee Thibert said in the press release. “This is a case of a natural disaster impacting the power grid, and we will continue to work with fire managers and our neighboring

utilities to find out when it’s safe to go in and assess the damage and make a plan for repairs.” The Swan Lake Fire is more than 167,000 acres and is estimated to be at 81% containment. Hot spots remain along the transmission line, which have kept crews from getting to the area for a full damage assessment. A recent aerial survey showed

fire damaged more than 60 poles and associated structures, the release said. In conjunction with the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, Homer Electric Association is developing plans to assess fire-related damage to transmission lines along the Sterling Highway, a Wednesday press release from Homer Electric Association said.

Liberties Union of Alaska in a fight over its invocation policy, which allowed certain groups and individuals to offer an invocation at the beginning of each meeting. The plaintiffs, Lance Hunt, an atheist, Iris Fontana, a member of the Satanic Temple, and Elise Boyer, a member of the Jewish

community in Homer, all applied to give invocations after the policy was established in 2016. All three were denied because they didn’t belong to official organizations with an established presence on the peninsula. They sued and the ACLU Alaska agreed to represent them.

Anchorage Superior Court Judge Andrew Peterson ruled the invocation policy violated the Alaska Constitution’s establishment clause, which is a mandate banning government from establishing an official religion or the favoring of one belief over another. Article 1, Section 4 of the constitution

provides that “no law shall be made respecting an establishment of religion.” Last November, the assembly voted against appealing the Superior Court decision and passed an updated invocation policy allowing more people the ability to give invocations at assembly meetings.

Kalifornsky Beach Road to get a better look. The vantage point at Erik Hansen Scout Park offered a great view of the mouth of the river, but the trees and the bluffs limited the sight lines further up the river. “We’re hoping as they come back out they’ll line up and we’ll be able to get a better count,” Schmitt said. “They went in probably just before we were setting up and split into two groups: one went up by the cannery and one stayed by the city dock.” Schmitt said that about 25 people

had visited the viewing station by noon. Some people brought chairs for extending viewing while others just stopped by briefly to see how things were going. Kautek said that the beluga count is important to keep track of the population that exists in the Cook Inlet — a population that is genetically distinct from other belugas found around Alaska and has been considered endangered since 2008. In the 1990s, over-hunting brought the Cook Inlet beluga count from 1,300 to just 300

in 1999. Since then, there has been a moratorium on beluga hunting, but the population continues to hover between 300 and 400. “It’s alarming because once you stop killing something, the population tends to rebound,” Schmitt said. “And that doesn’t seem to be happening with these whales.” At about 1:30 p.m., Schmitt received a call from volunteers farther up the river that reported the belugas were headed back toward the inlet. Everyone on the scene grabbed their

binoculars and waited patiently, hoping for a glimpse of a beluga back or a spout of water shooting up from the river — but to no avail. Kautek guessed that the belugas had essentially gone into “travel mode,” meaning they surface only briefly and move quickly, making them harder to spot than when they’re feeding or idling. Either way, 14 was the final count for the Kenai station, while 58 belugas were counted across all the stations that day.

around the peninsula 7th annual craft bazaar Our Lady of the Angels Catholic Church will host a craft bazaar Friday, Oct. 11 from 12-6 p.m. and Saturday, Oct. 12 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at 225 S. Spruce St., Kenai. Contact Lori at 283-3315 or Karen at 907-350-0843 to reserve a craft table ($30 and $40).

Caregiver Support Meeting Caregiver Support Meeting-Training DVD on Caregiving: Vital Signs will take place Tuesday, Oct. 1 at 1 p.m. at the Sterling Senior Center. This program helps caregivers learn how temperature, pulse, respiration, blood pressure and pain assessment provide valuable information about their care partner’s health.

Al-Anon support group meetings Al-Anon support group meetings are held at the Central Peninsula Hospital in the Kasilof Room (second floor) of the River Tower building on Monday at 7 p.m., Wednesday at 7 p.m. and Saturday at 9 a.m. Park around back by the ER and enter through the River Tower entrance and follow the signs. Contact Tony Oliver at 252-0558 for more information.

Teens On Target Program Teens On Target program is an eight-week firearm training course for girls ages 12-17, cost is $35. The program will take place Wednesdays at Snowshoe Gun Club. We instruct firearm safety, skills and self defense. Message our Facebook page Kenai Peninsula Women on Target or call 262-9592.

Alaska Mental Health public meeting The Alaska Mental Health Board and Advisory Board on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse will host public meetings Tuesday-Thursday, Sept. 24-26 at Kenai Visitor & Cultural Center.

Northern Dene Astronomical & Sky-Related Knowledge showcase The KPC Showcase presents Northern Dene Astronomical & Sky-Related Knowledge with Ph.D Student Christopher M. Cannon, Department of Anthropology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, on Thursday, Sept. 26 at 6:30 p.m. Cannon will discuss his decade of research with Athabaskan (Northern Dene) consultants, documenting traditional astronomical and sky-related knowledge, focusing on the ancient traveler-transformer figure and its expression as a large or whole-sky constellation visible in the northern winter sky. In the Commons at Kenai Peninsula College, Kenai River Campus.

Women Who Care meeting The Soldotna/Kenai 100+ Women Who Care group will be meeting Sept. 26 from 6-7 p.m. at the Soldotna Library. Registration opens at 5:30 p.m., meeting starts promptly at 6 p.m. All members in good standing will have a chance to pitch for a cause or nonprofit they support. Three names will be drawn, those three will make their pitch, and the group will vote, the winning nonprofit will receive $100 from every member of the group, just under $10,000. All the money stays local, if you are a member, bring a friend. For more information find us on Facebook.

Peninsula Dog Obedience Group Peninsula Dog Obedience Group will be offering a beginning obedience/novice rally class and competition obedience/advanced rally class starting on Sept. 26. We also have ongoing agility prep, trick dog and scent work indication classes on Saturday. For more information, contact us at

rael@ptialaska.net or visit our Facebook page (PenDOG).

Kenai Fine Art Center events September is fundraiser month for the Kenai Fine Art Center with art donated by area artists. The Silent Auction runs the entire month from Sept. 5-27. Patrons have the option to pay a “pay it now” price at any time. Tickets are on sale now for the Auction event on the 28th. This event has the remaining silent auction items, live auction items, food, music and door prizes. These tickets are usually sold out and individuals should not expect availability during the last few days of September. Tickets are available for $35 from board members or at the Kenai Fine Art Center.

Fireweed Guild FiberFest The Annual Fireweed Guild FiberFest will be held on Saturday-Sunday, Sept. 28-29 from 10 a.m.-5 p.m., at the Soldotna Sports Center. Join us to celebrate natural fibers — from sheep, alpacas, llamas, rabbits, musk ox, goats and even dogs! See the many products produced from these fibers by talented Alaska artists. There will be classes for adults and free children’s activities, fiber vendor booths along with a fiber animal exhibit and sheep shearing demo. Local food trucks will be present outside the venue for a tasty lunch or snack. Bring your spinning wheel or your knitting/crochet project and join the Fiber Friends Circle and socialize with other fiber enthusiasts! The entrance is free and there will be a raffle to win some beautiful handmade fiber products. Come meet local artists and show your appreciation for Alaska’s fiber industry. For inquiries, contact Nancy at 252-4863. See you there!

CES open house CES will be holding an Open House on Saturday, Sept. 28 from 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

Sterling Senior Center breakfast The Sterling Senior Center will be serving breakfast on Saturday, Sept. 28 from 9 a.m.-noon. Menu includes bacon, sausage, pancakes, scrambled eggs, and biscuits and gravy. Adults $10, children $5. Everyone welcome. Further info, call 262-6808.

Cook Inlet Aquaculture Association Meeting Cook Inlet Aquaculture Association Board of Directors will meet Saturday, Saturday, Sept. 28 at 10 a.m., in the conference room at its Kenai office located at 40610 Kalifornsky Beach Road. The meeting is open to the public and an agenda will be posted at www.ciaanet.org.

Spay/neuter clinics postponed Safety concerns for its employees, resulting from uncertainties related to wildfires and road conditions, have caused the Alaska SPCA to postpone spay/neuter clinics scheduled to take place in Soldotna on Sept. 28 and 29.

North Pacific Fishery Management Council meeting in Homer The North Pacific Fishery Management Council is meeting in Homer on Sept. 30-Oct. 9. We have prepared a press release which outlines some of the specifics and I’m attaching it to this email, along with a brief summary of each of the agenda items. Notably, the Council will be holding its first “Introduction to the Council Process” workshop on Tuesday, Oct. 1, from 5:30-7 p.m. at the Best Western. It will offer a brief outline of what topics are on the agenda and provide an opportunity to learn about the Council process and how to participate.

Pathway of Poetry, Poetry Contest Calling for Entries! Pathway of Poetry, Poetry Contest,

September is Suicide Prevention Month Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death. Each year, more than 44,000 individuals die by suicide  For every one death, there are 25 attempts. Know the signs, visit www.nami.org or www.afsp.org  

Contact The LeeShore Center at 283-9479 for information.

The LeeShore Center is proud to be a United Way agency

theme “Man’s Best Friend.” Winning poems will be displayed on a trail in Daubenspeck Family Park, which is also the home of the future Kenai Dog Park. Adults 18 years or older are invited to participate. Deadline is Monday, Sept. 30 Notifications will be Saturday, Oct. 12 at the Kenai Pumpkin Festival. Registration forms are available at: Kenai Senior Center and Kenai Community Library or online at www. kenai.city/parksrec/page/parks-and-recreation-forms. For additional information call 907-283-8262. This Poetry Contest is brought to you by the Kenai Parks, Recreation & Beautification, Kenai Community Library, Kenai Senior Center and Friends of the Kenai Community Library.

Hospice grief group Hospice Grief Group eight-week course starts Tuesday, Oct. 1 and runs through Nov. 19. We will begin at 5:30 p.m.. Contact Lee at 262-0453, for information and to sign up (required). Free.

Evening of Classics The Redoubt Chamber Orchestra will present the annual Evening of Classics concert on Friday, Oct. 4 at 7 p.m. at Christ Lutheran Church in Soldotna. This annual fundraiser, hosted by Simon Nissen, is for the Kenai Peninsula Orchestra and will feature several selections by the Redoubt Chamber Orchestra under the direction of Tammy VollomMatturro, along with soloists and other ensembles. We will again auction off the baton for a chance to conduct the last piece in the program, and an art auction for a piece by Olya Silver. Join us for a fun-filled evening of quality music and lots of laughs. Cost is $15. Youth 18 and under are free. Tickets available at the door.

Hospice direct care and office volunteers Are you looking for a way to better help our community, want to volunteer but aren’t sure where you might fit? Hospice of the Central Peninsula is looking for direct care and office volunteers! Come take the 22-hour training and figure out where you fit with Team Hospice. Fall training will be held October 4, 5, 11, 12. Must attend all four days. Register online at www.hospiceofcentralpeninsula.com or call the office at 262-0453 and speak to Toni.

KPB Solid Waste winter hours KPB Solid Waste facilities will be closed on Sundays for the winter from Oct. 6, 2019 through April 26, 2020. For more information contact the KPB Solid Waste Department at 907-262-9667.

Sterling Community Center Oktoberfest Sterling Community Center Oktoberfest will take place Saturday, Oct. 12. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Brats, beer, pork and cider. With live music provided by the Alaska Polka Chips. Tickets $20. Silent and live auction. Call 907-2627224 for more info or tickets.

REDOUBT MEDICAL CLINIC Caring, Comprehensive Family Practice

907-283-6030 All ages and all insurances accepted. Walk-ins welcome. DOT/CDL physicals $190. Sports physicals. Well Child exams. Open 9-5 Monday -Thursday, 9-4 Friday.

416 Frontage Rd., Ste 200, Kenai


Opinion A4

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Peninsula Clarion

CLARION P

E N I N S U L A

Serving the Kenai Peninsula since 1970 Jeff Hayden Publisher ERIN THOMPSON. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editor RANDI KEATON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Circulation Director FRANK GOLDTHWAITE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Production Manager

The opinions expressed on this page are solely those of the authors and do not represent the views of The Peninsula Clarion or its parent company, Sound Publishing.

What others say

With the growing gig economy, new rules are needed

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ritics, and some cheerleaders, too, are greeting a California bill as an Uber-killer. They may be right. But the legislation known as AB5 did not start with the ridehailing industry, and its role in this country’s conversation about labor will not end there, either. AB5, which the Golden State legislature passed last week, codifies a state case revolving around truck drivers who argued their companies intentionally misclassified them as contractors to save money, even as they hauled goods for tens of hours a week. The rule is essentially this: Workers are company employees if the company controls how they do their work, or if that work is core to the company’s business. This spells trouble for gig-economy start-ups that run on outsourcing. Ride-hailing juggernauts in particular, already in precarious financial shape, are crying out that it represents an existential threat. Uber has said the legislation doesn’t apply to it because driving is outside the usual course of its business of … coordinating driving trips. It has also said it will sponsor a referendum for voters to overturn the law. And it has said that if it loses both the definitional argument and the referendum, the app as we know it faces certain doom. Well, Uber and Lyft certainly have brought convenience to many users. But if it turns out their model depends on unfair exploitation of labor, then the model does not deserve to survive. It’s important to understand this: The California bill is not asking ridesharing companies to give health insurance to every driver who picks up a ride or two between running errands. Employees will have to meet the 30-hour weekly threshold for full-time work to get the benefits mandated for full-time workers. Still, the bill creates some confusing incentives. Will gig companies gravitate toward hiring mostly workers who can contribute well over 30 hours a week, to avoid responsibility for all those part-timers? Or will they do the opposite, limiting hours to keep more drivers part-time so they won’t have to provide so many full-time perks? Nothing in the bill forces companies to yank away flexible schedules, but they might do it anyway — at least for the less reliable laborers who value flexibility most. Ride-hailing companies propose solving their problem with a compromise that retains drivers as contractors but entitles them to earn a minimum wage and band together to bargain, even as contractors. But that might not solve a problem that extends well beyond ride-hailing companies: Americans increasingly work for multiple employers in multiple capacities, and they are losing out on protections because of it. Researchers and some lawmakers have been experimenting with alternative setups that would make injury insurance, paid leave and other benefits “portable” and prorated, with each firm contributing to a fund in proportion to an employee’s labor. Another route, most notably gaining currency in the health-care arena, would be to open up government-sponsored benefit plans to anyone who paid in. California’s bill will not be the last word, but it will be useful if it kick-starts a nationwide rethinking of labor rules that embrace both flexibility and fairness. — The Washington Post, Sept. 17

letter to the editor

We support Jesse Bjorkman for borough assembly Public service is a privilege. Every day we have the opportunity to make our community a better place. For those of us who have chosen public service as a profession, it is clear that the work we do matters. Public servants impact people’s lives in very tangible ways, providing needs that are critical to our communities. In choosing our elected officials, we must elect individuals who truly value public service and have the ability to bring people together to accomplish a common goal. We believe Jesse Bjorkman, candidate for borough assembly, is that person. In interacting with Jesse both personally and professionally, he is one who demonstrates transparency, excellence, understands the importance of working with others and most importantly, leads by example. Politics can be a messy business — the public desires electing officials who are ethical, compassionate and committed. These are the characteristics we have come to know when describing Jesse Bjorkman. Ted and Elaina Spraker Soldotna

Letters to the Editor E-mail: news@peninsulaclarion.com The Peninsula Clarion welcomes letters and attempts to publish all those received, subject to a few guidelines: ■■ All letters must include the writer’s name, phone number and address. ■■ Letters are limited to 500 words and may be edited to fit available space. Letters are run in the order they are received. ■■ Letters addressed specifically to another person will not be printed.

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Thursday, september 26, 2019

Voices of the peninsula | Carrie Henson, Soldotna

Strong voter turnout builds a strong community I

was recently speaking to a young woman (in her early 20s) and I asked her why she doesn’t vote? Her response was, “I am always working, and my lunch hour is much too precious to waste voting.” I told her that the polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. so she could go before or after work. She did not say anything else but the look on her face suggested that she really had no interest in voting. Kenai Peninsula voter turnout is abysmal. We are lucky to get 20% of registered voters to the polls. This is deeply concerning to me because even though voting didn’t seem to matter to her, it really matters to many borough residents whose lives are impacted by the decisions our local representatives make. It matters to those who use CARTS to get to and from work every day. It matters to the single mother who lost her job due to funding decisions made by the borough administration. It matters to students who want to participate in the JumpStart program in order to get ahead in college credits before they even finish high school. It matters to vulnerable children who are helped by the Head Start program. It matters to all students who depend

on our representatives to value their education and value their teachers. It matters to borough employees who provide vital services to all borough residents, for which their livelihood depends. They are all friends, neighbors, coaches and volunteers in our community. This young woman is very kind and intelligent, so I know if she took the time to inform herself of the candidates and propositions, she would make good decisions when she voted that would benefit borough citizens. It seems the lower the voter turnout the more likely we are to get bad policymakers in office that have their own agenda and are not concerned about doing what is best for the community. We need more young, busy, and hardworking community members using their voice at the polls to help the community thrive. We have great benefits in the community for seniors — from the senior property tax exemption to the many great senior centers that we have in almost every community in the borough that provide great programs such as Meals on Wheels. And why do we have these great programs? Because seniors vote! If we want a comprehensive

community college with many options for growth, college-age students need to vote. If we want great programs and an excellent education for our children, parents of all ages need to vote. If you are a young woman making your own way, you need to vote for all these other people because someday you will be one of them and will need someone to help speak for you. Your vote matters even if it does not matter to you. As a community we need to instill more empathy and civic responsibility in our citizens from a very young age. Everyone should be compelled to inform themselves and vote as a civic duty. We should make it as easy as possible for citizens to register, inform themselves, and vote. Our community does a pretty good job at this already so it is up to each of us to realize that even if we personally don’t have a stake in this election our friends and neighbors do, and we should show up for them. If you have not or do not know if you are registered to vote, do it today! Educate and inform yourself on your voter districts and what candidates and propositions you will be voting on today! Then Vote on Oct. 1!

alaska voices | David Vesper

State downgraded to C+ due to lack of progress in shared parenting efforts

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ot much has changed in statutes since the National Parents Organization issued a “B” to Alaska in its 2014 Shared Parenting Report Card. Currently, “Neither parent … is entitled to preference in awarding custody” under a state statute, still egalitarian due to its referred gender neutral language. Also, Alaskan “courts may award shared physical custody” as long as the court can determine a 10-point factor. However, the lack of presumption, either in a policy statement or statutory requirements in temporary or final orders, is still nonexistent. Therefore, egalitarian outcomes of presumptive 50/50 shared physical custody are not assured despite allowed in Alaska. Alaska also falls behind the times. Today, dual-income families, regardless of marital status, are the norm rather than the exception. Parents are trending away from marriage and more towards co-habitation. According to the Pew Research Center, fathers are spending more time with their children than previous generations. The correlation of dual-income families and increased father involvement in child-rearing responsibilities indicates the traditional dichotic gender roles are on the decline and shared parenting duties are the norm in today’s households.

However, when unmarried parents separate or were never entered into a loving relationship, fathers must petition the court for custodial/ visitation rights under state statute. The rebuttable presumption of shared physical custody does not apply to unmarried parents as well. Domestic Violence is a predominant issue in Alaska. Courts shall consider “any evidence of domestic violence … or a history of violence between the parents” when determining child custody. In April 2018, Kentucky passed the first-in-thenation “shared parenting law” with the passage of HB 528. After 12 months of full implementation of HB 528, there are early indications of success in reducing domestic violence incidents. Kentucky has had a significant drop of domestic violence claims and more than an 11% decline of new cases of child custody in court filings from May 2018 through May 2019. The “friendly parent factor” also contributed to the early success, allowing the judge “to consider which parent would be more likely to help the other have a meaningful relationship with the child.” This soft-touch approach considers parenting time more valuable than the financial aspects — which can be contentious at times — of parenting. Alaska can benefit from this approach given the early positive

outcomes of Kentucky’s shared parenting law. As a result of the lack of progress in shared parenting legislation, Alaska has earned a downgraded C+ grade in the 2019 Shared Parenting Report Card. But, there is hope for Alaska. In March 2019, Rep. George Rauscher introduced the HB 85 Shared Parenting bill. In its current form, Alaska’s shared parenting bill mimics much of the same language as Kentucky’s successful shared parenting law. If successful in passage of its current form, HB 85 calls for the rebuttable presumption of 50/50 shared physical custody, presumes both parents equal regardless of marital status, intends to encourage mediation for parents in determining their own parenting schedule, and can reduce the plague of domestic violence in the state. Research and evidence show the benefits for children in shared parenting situations and Kentucky is proving it. Alaska needs to progress forward — not backward. David Vesper is the state director for the nonprofit Alaska Fathers’ Rights Movement and the regional director for the Fathers’ Rights Movement West Region. He is a retired Army combat veteran and graduated in 2018 from the University of Alaska-Anchorage with a degree in International Studies with a focus on Global Social Science Track and minors in Political Science and History.


Nation & World A5

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Peninsula Clarion

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peninsulaclarion.com

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thursday, september 26, 2019

How the speaker got to ‘yes’ By Lisa Mascaro Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Mr. President, she told him, “Undo it.” With those two words, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi offered Donald Trump one last chance to avoid becoming only the fourth president in office to face impeachment proceedings . By then, it was too late. The night before, she already had started handwriting a draft of the speech she would deliver to the nation. This account of the turn of events of recent days is based on interviews with lawmakers and aides. Some spoke on condition of anonymity to because they were unauthorized to detail private conversations and events. Pelosi’s decision to launch an impeachment inquiry Tuesday was set in motion even before that early morning phone call, the inevitable response to an administration that repeatedly defied Congress before refusing to turn over a whistleblower’s complaint against the president. Trump pleaded innocence when he called Pelosi, D-Calif., shortly after 8 a.m. Tuesday, dashing to deliver his address at the United Nations. At first he wanted to talk about gun violence legislation. Then the conversation turned to the fallout from a whistleblower’s complaint that he pushed Ukraine president Volodymyr Zelenskiy to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden, a current Democratic presidential candidate. “You know, I don’t have anything to do with that,’” Trump said about the administration’s refusal to turn over the complaint to Congress. Pelosi took the call at her apartment in Washington as she was preparing for work. She responded that by withholding the complaint, Trump was asking his acting director of national intelligence to break the law. The speaker never tipped her hand that the impeachment announcement was coming later that afternoon, when she would stand before American flags and address the nation from her balcony in the Capitol. But she may have led Trump to believe what was coming. She had been thinking and planning for this moment for some time, and she let Trump know the gravity of the situation before they both hung up. She was late for her morning meetings. Pelosi has been the voice of restraint in the House, declining to take up the cause of impeachment as the House pursued its oversight of the administration in the aftermath of former special counsel Robert Mueller’s report. Her approach was always a bit incongruent for the congresswoman from liberal San

Andrew Harnik / Associated Press

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi steps away from a podium Tuesday on Capitol Hillafter reading a statement announcing a formal impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.

Francisco, where so many of her own constituents wanted to see Trump impeached long ago. But for Pelosi, who wore an American flag pin, rather than her speaker’s mace broach, on her blue dress Tuesday, impeachment was always a last resort. She had lived through the impeachment of one president, Bill Clinton, and fended off calls to impeach another, George W. Bush, the last time Democrats had the majority and she was speaker. She viewed impeachment as too political, too divisive. Behind her calculus was a desire to protect dozens of centrist lawmakers, those who won elections last fall in previously Republican districts where Trump remains popular. But her position was becoming untenable. It wasn’t just the allegation of Trump turning to a foreign leader for election help that turned the tide toward impeachment. Even more alarming to lawmakers was the administration’s refusal to turn over the complaint, as expected by law. Pelosi, who helped write the whistleblower statutes and create the office of the director of national intelligence after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, understood the stakes as much as anyone. This is part of “her own DNA,” said Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas. Pelosi had worked the phones all weekend, talking to Democrats in between delivering remarks at memorial service Saturday for journalist Cokie Roberts in Washington and Sunday for Rep. James Clyburn’s wife, Emily, in South

Carolina, as news reports unspooled more details of the Ukraine call. Pelosi started telling some veteran lawmakers who had been withholding their views to go ahead and get out front of her. She talked with Chuck Schumer, the Democratic leader in the Senate, and told the New Yorker where she was headed. At the same time, a group of freshmen lawmakers with national security backgrounds started working the phones. They were calling and texting each other over the weekend wanting to make their own statement in support of impeachment proceedings. By Monday, they reached out Pelosi and told her, in a 5 p.m. phone call, that their opinion article backing an impeachment inquiry was about to be published in The Washington Post. She was not surprised. Pelosi had been in New York all day and was attending a dinner as part of the U.N. General Assembly session. On a 9 p.m. flight back to Washington that night, Pelosi started handwriting her own thoughts. It was the speech she would deliver to the American public the next day. As the House prepared to gavel in Tuesday, more and more members started adding their names to the impeachment calls. Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., the influential civil rights leader, was about to deliver a speech saying it was time. And then the president called.

Iran leader: Region ‘on the edge of collapse’ Associated Press

UNITED NATIONS — Iran’s president used the world’s stage on Wednesday to warn that security in the Persian Gulf could unravel with a “single blunder” and its fragile peace be guaranteed only by the region’s countries, not through U.S. intervention or Washington’s “merciless economic terrorism.” President Hassan Rouhani accused the United States of engaging in “international piracy” against his country by re-imposing economic sanctions after Washington withdrew from the 2015 nuclear deal with world powers. Tehran “will never negotiate with an enemy that seeks to make Iran surrender with the weapon of poverty,” Rouhani said in his highly anticipated speech at the U.N. General Assembly. “Stop the sanctions so as to open the way for the start of negotiations.” His words came shortly after U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo

announced additional U.S. sanctions targeting Iran’s ability to sell its oil, this time imposing penalties on six Chinese companies and their chief executives for continuing to transport Iranian crude. “We’re telling China and all nations, know that we will sanction every violation of sanctionable activity,” Pompeo said at an event for United Against a Nuclear Iran, a lobby group opposed to the nuclear deal, a few blocks from where Rouhani was speaking at the United Nations’ headquarters. Tensions in the Middle East have risen as the nuclear deal unravels under U.S. pressure and Iran turns back to expanding its nuclear enrichment program, despite previous compliance with it for up to a year after Trump’s withdrawal from the accord. The escalating crisis has raised concerns of a direct conflict -- a scenario that all parties, including bitter rivals Iran and Saudi Arabia, have stressed they want to avoid.

The United States, meanwhile, has sent military reinforcements and heightened its security presence around the Persian Gulf. In his U.N. speech on Tuesday, Trump described Iran as “one of the greatest threats” to the planet. Rouhani said U.S. wars in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria had failed, with Washington “unable to resolve the more sophisticated issues” plaguing the Middle East. “Security shall not be supplied with American weapons and intervention,” he said. “Security cannot be purchased or supplied by foreign governments.” While Rouhani’s manner was measured, his words were ominous. “Our region is on the edge of collapse, as a single blunder can fuel a big fire,” he said, adding that it will become secure only when U.S. troops withdraw. The divide between the Washington and Tehran runs right through the narrow Strait of Hormuz, a critical shipping waterway at the mouth of the Persian Gulf where a fifth of

the world’s oil passes each day. Months of lower-level attacks on oil tankers near the strait and Iran’s shooting down of a U.S. surveillance drone over the waterway have been blamed on Iran. The most stunning attack unfolded earlier this month when drones and missiles struck key oil sites in Saudi Arabia, jolting global oil prices and temporarily knocking out nearly 6% of daily global crude oil production. Iran has denied any involvement in the attacks, and says any strikes by the U.S. or Saudi Arabia will lead to “all-out war.” Saudi Arabia has invited U.N. investigators to assess where the strikes were launched from, and says Iranian weapons were used. Rouhani used his time at the podium to appeal to Iran’s neighbors, saying their destinies are intertwined. The free flow of oil “could be guaranteed,” he said, when there is security for all the region’s countries.

Endangered Species Act rules draw lawsuit By Gene Johnson Associated Press

SEATTLE — Seventeen states sued the Trump administration Wednesday to block rules weakening the Endangered Species Act, saying the changes would make it tougher to protect wildlife even in the midst of a global extinction crisis. The lawsuit, in federal court in San Francisco, follows a similar challenge filed last month by several environmental groups, including the Humane Society and the Sierra Club. The new rules begin taking effect Thursday. They for the first time allow officials to consider how much it would cost to save a species. They also remove blanket protections for animals newly listed as threatened and make it easier for creatures to be removed from the protected list. “It’s a death by a thousand cuts for the Endangered Species Act,” said Democratic Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson, announcing the lawsuit in a Seattle news conference. The law, signed by President Richard Nixon

in 1973, has been credited with helping prevent the extinction of more than 220 species, including bald eagles, grizzly bears and humpback whales. It requires the government to list species that are endangered or threatened. The law also protects about 1,600 plant and animal species, designates habitat protections for them, and assesses whether federal activities will hurt them. Critics have long complained that the environmentalists have weaponized the law to block economic activity such as logging and mining, infringing on property rights. The Trump administration and congressional Republicans have said the new rules will improve the law’s enforcement. The revisions “fit squarely within the President’s mandate of easing the regulatory burden on the American public, without sacrificing our species’ protection and recovery goals,” U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said when the changes were announced last month. Scientists say that globally about 1 million

species are at risk of extinction, mainly because of habitat destruction by humans, overfishing and climate change. The states challenging Trump’s rules are California, Massachusetts, Maryland, Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Michigan, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont and Washington. The District of Columbia and New York City were also named as plaintiffs. They argue that the rules changes contradict the goals of the Endangered Species Act and that the administration failed to provide a reasoned basis for the changes or analyze their environmental impacts as required by federal law. The lawsuit cites challenges faced by creatures that include piping plovers in Rhode Island, orca whales in Washington state and desert tortoises in the Mojave Desert in Nevada. “We are running out of time,” said Michael Ross, vice chairman of the Snoqualmie Indian Tribe in Washington. “These changes aren’t in the right direction.”

around the Nation & world

Lawmaker urges FAA to consider pilots’ skills globally A key lawmaker is calling on U.S. regulators to take into consideration the skill level of pilots around the world and not just the United States when making improvements to Boeing’s grounded airplane. Rep. David Price, D-N.C., also said Wednesday that he wants assurances that the Federal Aviation Administration is reviewing its practice of delegating some work to employees of aircraft manufacturers. Price chairs a House subcommittee that approves FAA funding. During a hearing before Price’s panel, FAA deputy administrator Daniel Elwell agreed that the agency needs to consider that planes certified in the U.S. are flown worldwide, but said its obligation is to regulate U.S. airlines and manufacturers. “I’m sorry,” Price cut him off, “but these are aircraft that are operating all over the world.” Boeing is making changes to its 737 Max airliner after two deadly crashes, and Price said he wants the company and the FAA to consider “what is it going to take to operate that plane safely” beyond just the U.S.

Bill giving pot businesses access to banking passes The U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill Wednesday that would grant legal marijuana businesses access to banking, a measure that would clear up a longstanding headache for the industry. The bill, called the SAFE Banking Act, passed 321-103 on the strength of nearunanimous support from Democrats and nearly half of Republicans. Its prospects in the Senate are uncertain, but supporters said the amount of Republican support in the House was a good sign. Thirtythree states have legalized cannabis for medical or recreational use. But the federal prohibition on the drug has made it difficult for businesses in the multibillion-dollar industry to get bank accounts, loans and other financial services. The bill would allow businesses legitimately operating under state laws to access loans, lines of credit and other banking services, while sheltering financial institutions from prosecution for handling marijuana-linked money.

Earthquake shakes eastern Indonesia, damage being evaluated JAKARTA, Indonesia — A strong inland earthquake struck eastern Indonesia on Thursday, causing people to flee to higher ground in panic. There was no immediate report of major damage or casualties. The U.S. Geological Survey said the magnitude 6.5 quake was centered 23 miles northeast of Ambon, the capital of Maluku province at a depth of 18 miles. Rahmat Triyono, the head of Indonesia’s earthquake and tsunami center, said the inland earthquake did not have the potential to cause a tsunami, but witnesses told television stations that panicked people along coastal areas ran to higher ground anyway. The national disaster mitigation agency said authorities are still gathering information about damage or injuries in affected areas. Indonesia, home to nearly 270 million people, is prone to earthquakes and volcanic eruptions due to its location along the “Ring of Fire,” the string of seismic faults encircling the Pacific Ocean.

Guilty plea in case of man forced by police to lick urinal HONOLULU — A former Honolulu police officer has pleaded guilty to failing to report that an officer forced a homeless man to lick a public urinal. Reginald Ramones is one of two officers arrested and charged with depriving the man of his civil rights. As part of a plea agreement, Ramones pleaded guilty Wednesday to a lesser charge that he knew a fellow officer committed a civil rights violation and didn’t inform authorities. — Associated Press


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police reports Information for this report was taken from publicly available law enforcement records and includes arrest and citation information. Anyone listed in this report is presumed innocent. ■■ On Sept. 16 at 11:13 p.m., the Kenai Police Department received multiple 911 calls regarding a REDDI (Report Every Dangerous Driver Immediately) vehicle near Mile 9 on the Kenai Spur Highway. An officer was able to locate that vehicle and attempted to conduct a traffic stop on it. The officer observed the vehicle crash into several other vehicles before coming to a stop. Kenai police contacted the driver, Inez Pingayak, 33, of Kenai. After further investigation, Pingayak was arrested driving under the influence, reckless endangerment, and first-degree failure to stop at the direction of a peace officer and was taken to Wildwood Pretrial. ■■ On Sept. 14, Justin Farkas, 30, of Anchorage, was cited by Seward Wildlife Troopers for fishing with a weighted treble hook in fresh water in Salmon Creek. Bail was set at $120 in Seward Court. ■■ On Sept. 14, Sungup Paek, 71, of Anchorage, was cited by Seward Wildlife Troopers for snagging and retaining a

silver salmon in fresh water at Salmon creek. The silver salmon was seized and given to a local charity. Bail was set at $140 in Seward Court. ■■ On Sept. 13, Kevin Hayes, 37, of Anchorage, was cited by Seward Wildlife Troopers for fishing with a weighted treble hook in fresh water in Salmon Creek. Bail was set at $120 in Seward Court. ■■ On Sept. 13, Troy Gladle, 53, of Sunny Brook, Florida, was cited by Seward Wildlife Troopers for not having a fishing license in possession when contacted while he was fishing in Salmon Creek. Gladle was given a correctable citation, with bail set at $220 in Seward Court. ■■ On Sept. 8, Chien Huang, 47, of Taiwan, was cited by Seward Wildlife Troopers for fishing in closed waters in Sawmill Creek. Three salmon were seized and given to a charity. Bail was set at $180 in Seward Court. ■■ On Sept. 7, Josef Simeth 58, of Germany, was cited by Seward Wildlife Troopers for fishing with an illegal weighted fly in fresh water in Salmon Creek. Bail was set at $120 in Seward Court. ■■ On Sept. 7, Gustav Konigseder, 64, of Germany, was cited by Seward Wildlife Troopers for fishing with an illegal weighted fly

in fresh water in Salmon Creek. Bail was set at $120 in Seward Court. ■■ On Sept. 7, Seunghoon Back, 33, of Anchorage, Alaska, was cited by Seward Wildlife Troopers for fishing with a weighted treble hook in fresh water in Salmon Creek. Bail was set at $120 in Seward Court. ■■ On Sept. 6, Sergio Basalo, 20, of Seward, was cited by Seward Wildlife Troopers for having an over possession limit of silver salmon he had harvested from Salmon Creek. The silver salmon were seized and given to a local charity. Bail was set at $140 in Seward Court. ■■ On Sept. 21 at 12:15 a.m., Alaska State Troopers received a 911 call from a residence in Nikiski reporting that Brandie Cornell, 40, of Soldotna, was creating a disturbance. Upon troopers’ arrival, Cornell refused to comply with troopers, charging at them. Cornell assaulted a trooper and was taken into custody. Investigation revealed that Cornell had damaged about $1,800 worth of another person’s property while trespassing. She was arrested for third-degree criminal mischief (domestic violence), fourth-degree assault on a police officer, resisting arrest, disorderly conduct, and

first-degree criminal trespass. She was taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility without bail. ■■ On Sept. 20, Alaska Wildlife Troopers arrested Brittney Mackey, 30, of Soldotna, and Dennis Poston, 62, of Soldotna. Mackey, who was on conditions of release from a prior arrest with the Pretrial Enforcement Division (PED), was charged with two felony counts of fourthdegree misconduct involving controlled substances and one misdemeanor count of violating conditions of release. Poston, who was Mackey’s thirdparty custodian for the PED release, was charged with two misdemeanor counts of fifthdegree misconduct involving controlled substances and one misdemeanor count of violating custodian duties. ■■ On Sept. 20 at 8:24 a.m., Alaska State Troopers received a patrol request for suspicious vehicles on Tagala Avenue in Soldotna. Troopers responded to a known drug house on the street and located Joseph Cooper, 53, of Soldotna, who had two outstanding arrest warrants. Cooper was arrested on his warrants, which were for failing to appear on original charges of first-degree criminal trespass, fourth-degree theft, fifth-degree

criminal mischief, and violating conditions of release. Cooper was taken to Wildwood Pretrial on $500 bail. ■■ On Sept. 20 at 3:18 p.m., Alaska came into contact with Tavian Borowski, 27, of Anchorage, at an address on Littmitz Avenue in Nikiski. Investigation revealed that Borowski had an outstanding warrant for her arrest. She was arrested and taken to Wildwood Pretrial on $100 bail. ■■ On Sept. 20 at 2:45 p.m., Alaska State Troopers received a call concerning a possible theft on Teal Drive in Kasilof. During investigation, troopers were tipped-off about the whereabouts of David Pine, 40, of Kasilof, who had an outstanding warrant for his arrest. Pine was located at an address on Earl Court in Kasilof and arrested for his warrant, which was for the original charge of driving while license revoked. He was taken to Wildwood Pretrial with 30 days to serve. ■■ On Sept. 20 at 9:06 p.m., Alaska State Troopers stopped a green 1996 Dodge Intrepid for an equipment violation on Bastien Drive in Nikiski. Investigation revealed that Tamsen L.D. Brewer, 35, of Nikiski, was operating the vehicle while her license was revoked. Brewer has 10 prior convictions for

driving while license revoked, suspended or canceled, making this a misdemeanor. Further investigation revealed that Brewer also did not have motor vehicle insurance. She was arrested for driving while license revoked and no insurance and was taken to the Wildwood Pretrial. ■■ On Sept. 20 at 11:51 p.m., Alaska State Troopers stopped a green 1993 Ford Taurus for a moving violation on Stubblefield Drive in Soldotna. Investigation revealed that David A.W. Jackinsky, 36, of Soldotna, was operating the vehicle while his license was suspended. Jackinsky has 10 prior convictions for driving while license revoked, suspended or canceled, making this a misdemeanor. Further investigation revealed that Jackinsky also did not have motor vehicle insurance. He was arrested for driving while license suspended and no insurance and was taken to Wildwood Pretrial. ■■ On Sept. 18 at 3:54 p.m., Alaska State Troopers came into contact with Christopher Middleton, 35, of Nikiski, at an address on Duke Street in Nikiski. Investigation revealed that Middleton had an outstanding warrant. He was arrested and taken to Wildwood Pretrial on $1,500 bail.

Jan. 22, 2018. He was sentenced to three months in prison, concurrent with time to serve in another case, fined a $100 court surcharge, a $200 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to pay $500 cost of appointed counsel, and ordered to pay restitution. ■■ Jacob Franklin Moody, Jr., 27, of Sterling, pleaded guilty to one misdemeanor count of attempted first-degree vehicle theft, committed Mar. 28, and one felony count of first-degree promoting contraband and one misdemeanor count of fourthdegree misconduct involving a controlled substance, committed Mar. 29. On the felony count of first-degree promoting contraband, imposition of sentence was suspended and he was placed on probation for three years, fined a $200 court surcharge and a $200 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to pay $200 cost of appointed counsel, ordered to pay restitution, ordered to have no contact with victim, forfeited all items seized, and ordered, among other conditions of probation, not to consume alcohol to excess, not to use or possess any illegal controlled substances, including synthetic drugs and marijuana, not to possess, apply for or obtain a medical marijuana card or act as a caregiver while under supervision, and ordered to complete a substance abuse evaluation and comply with treatment recommendations. On the misdemeanor count of attempted first-degree vehicle theft, he was sentenced to 220 days in jail, ordered to pay restitution, forfeited items seized, ordered to have no contact with victim, and placed on probation for one year. On the misdemeanor count of fourthdegree misconduct involving a

controlled substance, he forfeited items seized, was ordered to pay restitution, ordered to have no contact with victim, and placed on probation for one year. All other charges in this case were dismissed. ■■ Patrick Arnaldo Rascon, 27, of Anchorage, pleaded guilty to firstdegree vehicle theft, committed Feb. 24. He was sentenced to two years in prison, fined $250, a $200 court surcharge and a $200 jail surcharge, ordered to pay $100 cost of appointed counsel, ordered to pay restitution, had his license revoked for 30 days, and ordered to have no contact with victim. All other charges in this case were dismissed. ■■ The following dismissals were recently handed down in Kenai District Court: ■■ Charges of two counts of thirddegree assault (causing fear of injury with a weapon) and one count of violating condition of release against Zachariah Glen Kasukonis, 39, of Soldotna, were dismissed. Date of the charges was June 23. ■■ A charge of violating condition of release for a felony against Zachariah Glen Kasukonis, 39, of Soldotna, was dismissed. Date of the charge was July 17. ■■ A charge of violating condition of release against Jacob Moody, 27, or Sterling, was dismissed. Date of the charge was Apr. 26. ■■ A charge of third-degree theft against Joaine M. Chivers, 44, of Kenai, was dismissed. Date of the charge was Oct. 8, 2005. ■■ Charges of one count of fourth-degree theft and one count of violating condition of release against Jaycee C. Hermann, 19, of Kenai, were dismissed. Date of the charges was May 16. ■■ A charge of violating condition of probation against Derrick Hurd, 26, of Sterling, was dismissed. Date of the charge was June 17.

court reports The following judgments were recently handed down in Kenai District Court: ■■ Darrell Ray Stevens, 30, of Nome, pleaded guilty to improper use of registration, title or plates, committed Aug. 23. He was fined $150, a $100 court surcharge, and a $50 jail surcharge. All other charges in this case were dismissed. ■■ Amy Elizabeth Kyriss, 29, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to an amended charge of fourthdegree assault (causing fear of injury), a domestic violence offense committed Aug. 6. She was sentenced to 360 days in jail with 310 days suspended, fined a $100 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to pay restitution, ordered to have no contact with victim unless written permission is filed with the court, and was placed on probation for 12 months. All other charges in this case were dismissed. ■■ Eric Ryan Luna, 33, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to one count of violating a domestic violence protective order, committed Sept. 4, 2017. He was fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to pay restitution, and placed on probation for 12 months. All other charges in this case were dismissed. ■■ Zachariah Glen Kasukonis, 39, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to fourth-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance, committed May 4. He was sentenced to 30 days in jail with all but time served suspended, fined $500, a $100 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete a substance/alcohol abuse assessment and follow all recommendations, forfeited items seized, ordered to have no contact with a specifically named person unless written consent is in the court file, and was placed on probation for 12 months. All other charges in this case were dismissed. ■■ Zachariah Glen Kasukonis, 39, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to violating condition of release for a felony, committed July 29. He was sentenced to five days in jail and fined a $100 court surcharge and

a $50 jail surcharge. ■■ Peter Kelly Larrow, 49, of Sterling, pleaded guilty to driving under the influence, committed Oct. 31, 2018. He was sentenced to 270 days in jail or on electronic monitoring with 267 days suspended, fined $5,000 with $1,500 suspended, a $75 court surcharge, a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended and $66 for the first three days plus $14 for each additional day of monitoring ordered, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, had his license revoked for 90 days, ordered ignition interlock for six months, and placed on probation for one year. All other charges in this case were dismissed. ■■ Frank J. Marotta, 44, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to fourth-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance, committed May 24. He was fined $500 and a $100 court surcharge, ordered to complete a substance/ alcohol abuse assessment and follow all recommendations, forfeited all items seized, and placed on probation for 12 months. ■■ Jacob Franklin Moody, 27, of Sterling, pleaded guilty to fifth-degree criminal mischief, a domestic violence offense committed Jan. 12. He was fined a $100 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to pay restitution, forfeited all items seized, ordered to have no contact with victim, and placed on probation for one year. All other charges in this case were dismissed. ■■ Lewis Oreagan, 37, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to violating condition of release for a felony, committed July 11. He was sentenced to 30 days in jail and fined a $100 court surcharge and a $50 jail surcharge. ■■ Brian Ward Stanley, 56, of Palmer, pleaded guilty to driving under the influence, committed Aug. 11. He was sentenced to 150 days in jail with 130 days suspended, fined $4,000 with $1,000 suspended, a $150 court surcharge, a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended and $1,467 cost of imprisonment, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety

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appropriated $165 million for such help for fiscal 2019 and the Commerce Department decides allocations to eligible fisheries, the statement said. The statement said a regional disaster occurred for Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama because of “extreme flooding events in the Gulf of Mexico.” Alaska and California each had multiple requests approved; one for both Georgia and South Carolina will help shrimpers and shrimp processors. An unusually cold spell in January 2018 killed the vast majority of shrimp overwintering in estuaries, Erin Weeks, spokeswoman for the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, said in an email. California requests for the red sea urchin and sardine fisheries were approved, Jordan Traverso, spokesman for the state Department of Fish and Wildlife, said in an email. Ross also approved a request from the Yurok Tribe of Klamath, California, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration spokeswoman Kristin Brown said in an email. Tribal Chairman Joseph L. James’ letter to Ross in February said last year was the third in a row that the tribe hasn’t been able to catch enough Chinook salmon from the Klamath River to sell any. The Pacific sardine fishery has been closed since 2015, California Gov. Gavin Newsom

Action Program treatment, had his license revoked for one year, ordered ignition interlock for 12 months, ordered not to possess, consume or buy alcohol for two years, and placed on probation for 24 months. ■■ Andy Robert James Constantine, 20, of Tyonek, pleaded guilty to one count of an amended charge of fourthdegree assault, a domestic violence offense committed May 28, 2018. He was sentenced to 360 days in jail with all but time served suspended, fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete an anger management program or a mental health assessment and follow all recommendations, ordered to pay restitution, ordered to have no contact with victim, and placed on probation for 24 months. All other charges in this case were dismissed. ■■ Allen Robert Miranda, 33, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to fifth-degree criminal mischief, committed May 17. He was fined $250, a $100 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered not to consume or buy alcohol for 360 days, ordered to complete 25 hours of community work service, ordered to pay restitution, and placed on probation for 12 months. All other charges in this case were dismissed. The following judgements were recently handed down in Kenai Superior Court: ■■ Tao Lau Yancey, 41, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to third-degree assault (causing fear of injury with a weapon), committed June 18, 2018. He was sentenced to two years in prison with one year suspended, credited for time already served, fined a $100 court surcharge and a $200 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to pay restitution, forfeited all items seized, ordered, among other conditions of probation, not to consume alcohol to excess, not to use or possess any illegal controlled substances, including synthetic drugs, ordered to complete anger management counseling and a violence rehabilitation program, ordered to have no

wrote Ross in June. A disaster was declared for the first two years; Wednesday’s action brings it up through 2019. Both of Alaska’s pending requests were approved, Brown said. Those were for the Pacific cod and sockeye salmon fisheries in 2018. Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said Ross’ action could qualify Louisiana for millions of dollars in federal aid. “I appreciate President Trump and Secretary Ross for this emergency declaration, which is critically important to our fishing industry in Louisiana. … Our shrimpers, oyster farmers and fishers suffered greatly as Louisiana engaged in a historic flood flight this year, including two openings of the Bonnet Carré spillway, as the river was in flood stage for 211 days,” he said in a news release. Midwestern floodwaters pouring into the Gulf of Mexico from rivers and the spillway have killed oysters, hurt fish catches and damaged livelihoods, Edwards told Ross in June. Fresh water from the spillway affected Mississippi and Alabama, dramatically reducing salinity in the Mississippi Sound and causing toxic algae blooms that closed all of Mississippi’s beaches. It dumped trillions of gallons of fresh water into the Sound, Joe Spraggins, executive director for The Mississippi Department of Marine Resources, told the Senate Commerce Committee on Wednesday. — From Peniinsula Clarion staff and news services

contact with victims in this case except through a licensed broker or attorney, ordered to submit to search directed by a probation officer, with or without probable cause, for the presence of weapons, and was placed on probation for three years after serving any term of incarceration imposed. All other charges in this case were dismissed. ■■ Eric Ryan Luna, 33, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to an amended charge of third-degree assault, committed Oct. 11, 2017. He was sentenced to 24 months in prison with 21 months suspended, concurrent with time in another case, fined a $100 court surcharge and a $200 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to pay restitution, ordered, among other conditions of probation, not to use, possess or consume any alcoholic beverages or illegal controlled substances, including marijuana or synthetic drugs, ordered to submit to search directed by a probation officer, with or without probable cause, for the presence of alcohol, controlled substances, drug paraphernalia and evidence of controlled substance transactions, ordered not to associate with individuals who use or sell illegal controlled substances nor enter or remain in placed where illegal controlled substances are used, manufactured, grown or sold, ordered to complete a substance abuse evaluation and comply with treatment recommendations, ordered to successfully complete a batterer’s intervention program, ordered to have no contact with victims in this case, and was placed on probation for three years after serving any term of incarceration imposed. ■■ Eric Ryan Luna, 33, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to failure to appear on a felony charge, committed

Today in History Today is Thursday, Sept. 26, the 269th day of 2019. There are 96 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On Sept. 26, 1789, Thomas Jefferson was confirmed by the Senate to be the first United States secretary of state; John Jay, the first chief justice; Edmund Randolph, the first attorney general. On this date: In 1777, British troops occupied Philadelphia during the American Revolution. In 1892, John Philip Sousa and his newly formed band performed publicly for the first time at the Stillman Music Hall in Plainfield, New Jersey. In 1907, New Zealand went from being a colony to a dominion within the British Empire. In 1955, following word that President Eisenhower had suffered a heart attack, the New York Stock Exchange saw its worst price decline since 1929. In 1960, the first-ever debate between presidential nominees took place as Democrat John F. Kennedy and Republican Richard M. Nixon faced off before a national TV audience from Chicago. In 1964, the situation comedy “Gilligan’s Island” premiered on CBS-TV. In 1977, Sir Freddie Laker began his cut-rate “Skytrain” service from London to New York. (The carrier went out of business in 1982.) In 1986, William H. Rehnquist was sworn in as the 16th chief justice of the United States, while Antonin Scalia joined the Supreme Court as its 103rd member. In 1990, the Motion Picture Association of America announced it had created a new rating, NC-17, to replace the X rating. In 1991, four men and four women began a two-year stay inside a sealed-off structure in Oracle, Arizona, called Biosphere 2. (They emerged from Biosphere on this date in 1993.) In 1996, President Clinton signed a bill ensuring two-day hospital stays for new mothers and their babies. In 2003, President George W. Bush and Russian President Vladimir Putin (POO’-tihn) opened a two-day summit at Camp David. Ten years ago: Film director Roman Polanski was arrested by Swiss police on an international warrant as he arrived in Zurich to receive a lifetime achievement award from a film festival. (Polanski had fled the U.S. in 1978, a year after pleading guilty to unlawful sexual intercourse with a 13-year-old girl. Polanski spent two months in a Swiss jail and served seven months of house arrest before Switzerland’s government decided against extraditing him to the United States.) Pope Benedict XVI began a three-day pilgrimage to the Czech Republic. Five years ago: Fire broke out in the basement of a suburban Chicago air traffic control center, temporarily halting operations at O’Hare and Midway airports; an FAA contract employee, Brian Howard, was accused of cutting cables and setting the fire before slashing his throat. (Howard pleaded guilty to willfully destroying an air navigation facility and using fire to commit a felony, and was sentenced to 12 1/2 years in prison.) American warplanes and drones hit Islamic State group targets in Syria and Iraq as the U.S.-led coalition expanded to include Britain, Denmark and Belgium. Former first daughter Chelsea Clinton gave birth in New York to her first child, a daughter named Charlotte. One year ago: As Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh prepared for a public Senate hearing on an allegation from a California professor that Kavanaugh had sexually assaulted her when they were teens, a third accusation of sexual misconduct came from a woman who said she saw Kavanaugh “consistently engage in excessive drinking and inappropriate contact of a sexual nature.” President Donald Trump said his view of sexual misconduct allegations against powerful men, including his Supreme Court nominee, was affected by “a lot of false charges” that he said had been made against him by women he said had been “paid a lot of money” to make those charges. Today’s Birthdays: Retired baseball All-Star Bobby Shantz is 94. Actor Richard Herd is 87. Country singer David Frizzell is 78. Actor Kent McCord is 77. Television host Anne Robinson is 75. Singer Bryan Ferry is 74. Actress Mary Beth Hurt is 73. Singer Olivia Newton-John is 71. Actor James Keane is 67. Rock singer-musician Cesar Rosas (Los Lobos) is 65. Country singer Carlene Carter is 64. Actress Linda Hamilton is 63. Country singer Doug Supernaw is 59. Rhythm-and-blues singer Cindy Herron (En Vogue) is 58. Actress Melissa Sue Anderson is 57. Actor Patrick Bristow is 57. Rock musician Al Pitrelli is 57. Singer Tracey Thorn (Everything But The Girl) is 57. TV personality Jillian Barberie is 53. Contemporary Christian guitarist Jody Davis (Newsboys) is 52. Actor Jim Caviezel (kuh-VEE’-zuhl) is 51. Actress Tricia O’Kelley is 51. Actor Ben Shenkman is 51. Actress Melanie Paxon is 47. Singer Shawn Stockman (Boyz II Men) is 47. Music producer Dr. Luke is 46. Jazz musician Nicholas Payton is 46. Actor Mark Famiglietti (fah-mihl-YEH’-tee) is 40. Singer-actress Christina Milian (MIHL’-ee-ahn) is 38. Tennis player Serena Williams is 38. Actress Zoe Perry is 36. Thought for Today: “Pity the meek, for they shall inherit the earth.” -- Don Marquis, American journalist-author (1878-1937).


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Ostrander set to embark on 1st World Championships Recently graduated pro runner will face tough test Friday in stacked women’s 3K steeplechase field Staff Report Peninsula Clarion

Pro runner Allie Ostrander will begin her journey at the IAAF World Athletics Championships in Doha, Qatar, with a Friday semifinal heat race in the women’s 3,000-meter steeplechase. Ostrander, a recent Boise State

graduate that ran for Kenai Central High School from 2011 to 2015, is making her first appearance at a world championship track meet, but will face seriously stiff competition. Ostrander is slotted in the second of three heats Friday evening in Doha, which is morning for Alaskans. The heat is scheduled for 7:55

a.m. AKDT, and can be seen on NBC Sports Gold, an online subscription streaming service. Ostrander will join fellow American Courtney Frerichs in heat two, which features 15 total runners. The top three of each heat automatically advance to the final, as well as the next six-fastest times, meaning 15 move on out of a total 43 entered

runners across the three heats. Ostrander currently runs for Brooks Running, a Seattle-based company that designs and markets performance wear for runners. Ostrander holds a 2019 best of 9 minutes, 31.44 seconds, seeding her seventh in her heat, although the next fastest time is just fractions of a second quicker (Ethiopia’s

Lomi Muleta at 9:31.03). The thirdfastest 2019 time in her heat is a 9:09.75 owned by Frerichs, meaning Ostrander is looking at a near 22-second deficit to automatically qualify for the final. The women’s steeplechase final will be Monday at 10:50 a.m. AKDT, and will be broadcast on the Olympic Channel.

Twins win AL Central, Brewers clinch playoff spot CINCINNATI (AP) — The Milwaukee Brewers wrapped up their second straight postseason appearance Wednesday night, with Ryan Braun’s grand slam sparking a 9-2 victory over the Cincinnati Reds that also tightened the NL Central race. The Brewers have won six in a row and 17 of 19 despite losing MVP Christian Yelich to a broken kneecap, vaulting from also-ran to at least a wild card. There’s more at their fingertips — the division-leading Cardinals lost again, slicing their lead over the Brewers to 1 1/2 games. Milwaukee trails Washington by one game for the wild card lead. The Brewers jogged onto the field and formed a scrum by second base after when Junior Guerra got Christian Colon on a grounder for the final out.

TWINS 5, TIGERS 1 DETROIT (AP) —Luis Arraez and Eddie Rosario homered, Randy Dobnak allowed one hit in six innings and Minnesota beat Detroit, then won the AL Central title when Cleveland lost to the White Sox in Chicago. Minnesota earned its first division title since 2010 and only its second postseason appearance since then. The Twins (98-60) have their highest victory total since the 1970 team also won 98 games.

ASTROS 3, MARINERS 0 SEATTLE (AP) — Zack Greinke came within two outs of pitching the third no-hitter by Houston this year, losing his bid on a single by Seattle rookie Austin Nola in the ninth inning. Greinke (18-5) was in complete control while trying for his first career no-hitter.

He drew cheers from the orange-shirted Astros fans when he took the mound to begin the ninth and retired Tom Murphy on a grounder. Nola, in an 0-for-16 slump, was up next and dumped a liner into shallow left-center field. Center fielder Jake Marisnick made a diving attempt but came up well short and pounded his fist on his leg. Greinke gave up another single to Tim Lopes and was replaced after throwing 108 pitches. Will Harris got his third save.

NATIONALS 5, PHILLIES 3 WASHINGTON (AP) — Wilmer Difo drove in the go-ahead run with an RBI single in the seventh inning and Anibal Sanchez pitched seven solid innings to help Washington beat Philadelphia. The Nationals maintained a one-game lead over Milwaukee in the race for the top NL wild card.

DIAMONDBACKS 9, CARDINALS 7 PHOENIX (AP) — Pinchhitter Paul Goldschmidt grounded into a gameending double play with two runners on the base and NL Central-leading St. Louis fell short in a ninth-inning rally against Arizona. St. Louis and Arizona were back on the field about 11 hours after the Diamondbacks’ 3-2 victory in 19 innings, a game that took nearly seven hours. Cardinals starter Michael Wacha was pulled in the second inning with tightness in his right shoulder.

PIRATES 4, CUBS 2 PITTSBURGH (AP) — The collapsing Chicago Cubs

Seahawks’ Willson likely to play soon By Tim Booth AP Sports Writer

RENTON, Wash. (AP) — Luke Willson was about to get on a flight Tuesday for another tryout and another shot at landing an NFL job. He was at the San Francisco airport waiting to board when he got word from his agent that his destination was changing. “So I walked over two terminals and flew to Seattle instead,” Willson said Wednesday. The Seahawks brought the popular tight end back because of a need at the position. Seattle traded tight end Nick Vannett to Pittsburgh in exchange for a fifth-round pick and the Seahawks didn’t feel they had a player on their practice squad who could do what they needed with Vannett gone. Willson is essentially a plug-and-play replacement and is likely to get immediate action Sunday against Arizona as one of only two tight ends on Seattle’s roster. While he spent last year in Detroit, Willson spent his

first five seasons with the Seahawks. He understands the system, the environment and has a history of playing with a number of the Seahawks players. “How fortunate could we be to get a guy that we love and knows our program,” coach Pete Carroll said. “Just a lifeblood, energy guy in the program as well and a really good ball player. We made a switch. We got a chance to get Luke back in it. We’re fortunate there.” Willson hasn’t posted gaudy numbers in his career. His career high in catches is 22 back in 2014 and he had four TD receptions in the 2017 season, his last with the Seahawks. A year ago in his only season with Detroit, Willson had 13 catches for 87 yards in 14 games. But his personality has resonated throughout Seattle’s locker room in the past, which makes bringing him back an easy move for the Seahawks. The weeks were long for Willson after he was cut by Oakland at the end of training camp and he went through a handful of tryouts.

were eliminated from playoff contention shortly before losing their eighth straight game, falling to Pittsburgh.

WHITE SOX 8, INDIANS 3 CHICAGO (AP) — Shane Bieber got tagged early and Cleveland lost ground in the AL wild-card race, falling to Chicagot. The Indians’ loss clinched the AL Central title for Minnesota.

METS 10, MARLINS 3 NEW YORK (AP) — Pete Alonso hit his major leaguehigh 51st home run, one short of the rookie record, and Jacob deGrom made his last overpowering pitch for a repeat Cy Young Award as New York routed Miami in an easy win that wasn’t enough to keep the Mets in the playoff hunt.

RAYS 4, YANKEES 0 ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — Charlie Morton and the Tampa Bay bullpen combined on a one-hitter and the Rays held their lead in the AL wild-card race, beating New York.

BRAVES 10, ROYALS 2 KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Josh Donaldson had a careerhigh three doubles while driving in four runs, Dansby

Milwaukee Brewers’ Ryan Braun, center, celebrates in the dugout after hitting a grand slam off Cincinnati Reds starting pitcher Tyler Mahle during the first inning of a baseball game Wednesday in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Swanson had a career-high four hits while driving in two, and NL East champion Atlanta cruised past Kansas City.

RED SOX 10, RANGERS 3 ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) — Christian Vázquez, Mitch Moreland and Rafael Devers homered, and Rick Porcello won what could be his final start for Boston.

BLUE JAYS 3, ORIOLES 2

scoreboard BASEBALL

American League East Division W L x-New York 102 57 Tampa Bay 95 64 Boston 83 75 Toronto 65 94 Baltimore 52 107 Central Division x-Minnesota 98 60 Cleveland 93 65 Chicago 69 88 Kansas City 58 101 Detroit 46 111 West Division x-Houston 104 54 Oakland 95 63 Texas 75 83 Los Angeles 71 87 Seattle 66 92 x-clinched division

Pct GB .642 _ .597 7 .525 18½ .409 37 .327 50 .620 _ .589 5 .439 28½ .365 40½ .293 51½ .658 _ .601 9 .475 29 .449 33 .418 38

Wednesday’s Games Minnesota 5, Detroit 1 Toronto 3, Baltimore 2 Oakland 3, L.A. Angels 2 Tampa Bay 4, N.Y. Yankees 0 Boston 10, Texas 3 Chicago White Sox 8, Cleveland 3 Atlanta 10, Kansas City 2 Houston 3, Seattle 0 Thursday’s Games Minnesota (TBD) at Detroit (Zimmermann 1-12), 9:10 a.m. Boston (TBD) at Texas (Minor 13-10), 10:05 a.m. Cleveland (Civale 3-3) at Chicago White Sox (Cease 4-7), 4:10 p.m. Houston (Miley 14-6) at L.A. Angels (Barria 4-10), 6:07 p.m. Oakland (Manaea 3-0) at Seattle (Hernández 1-7), 6:10 p.m. National League East Division W L x-Atlanta 97 62 y-Washington 89 69 New York 83 75 Philadelphia 79 79 Miami 55 103 Central Division z-St. Louis 90 69 z-Milwaukee 88 70 Chicago 82 76 Cincinnati 73 85 Pittsburgh 67 91 West Division x-Los Angeles 102 56 Arizona 82 77 San Francisco 76 82 San Diego 70 88 Colorado 68 90 x-clinched division y-clinched wild card z-clinched playoff berth

000 000 020—2 7 0 100 101 00x—3 5 0

Ynoa, P.Fry (5), Brooks (6), Bleier (8) and Wynns; Waguespack, Adam (7), J.Romano (8), Font (8), Giles (9) and Maile. W_Waguespack 5-5. L_Ynoa 1-10. Sv_Giles (22). HRs_Toronto, McKinney (12), Tellez (21). Rays 4, Yankees 0 New York Tampa Bay

000 000 000—0 1 1 200 001 01x—4 9 0

Loaisiga, J.Happ (2), Kahnle (7), Gearrin (7), Tarpley (7), Cessa (8), Chapman (8) and Higashioka, Romine; Morton, D.Castillo (7), Drake (8), N.Anderson (8), Kittredge (9) and d’Arnaud, Zunino. W_Morton 16-6. L_Loaisiga 2-2. HRs_ Tampa Bay, Wendle (3), A.García (20). Red Sox 10, Rangers 3 Boston Texas

032 002 102—10 12 0 300 000 000—3 7 1

Porcello, T.Kelley (7), J.Taylor (7), Brasier (8), Cashner (9) and Vázquez, León; Allard, Farrell (4), B.Martin (6), J.Hernández (7), Gibaut (9), Guerrieri (9) and Federowicz. W_Porcello 14-12. L_Allard 4-2. HRs_Boston, Vázquez (23), Moreland (19), Devers (32). White Sox 8, Indians 3 Cleveland Chicago

001 020 000—3 6 1 301 100 30x—8 14 0

Bieber, Cimber (6), O.Pérez (7), Clippard (7), Karinchak (7) and R.Pérez; Detwiler, Marshall (6), Bummer (7), Herrera (8), J.Fry (9), Colomé (9) and Collins. W_Detwiler 3-5. L_Bieber 15-8. Sv_Colomé (30). HRs_Cleveland, Ramírez (23). Chicago, L.García (8), W.Castillo (11). Astros 3, Mariners 0

Pct GB .610 _ .563 7½ .525 13½ .500 17½ .348 41½ .566 _ .557 1½ .519 7½ .462 16½ .424 22½ .646 _ .516 20½ .481 26 .443 32 .430 34

Wednesday’s Games Arizona 9, St. Louis 7 Milwaukee 9, Cincinnati 2 Washington 5, Philadelphia 2 N.Y. Mets 10, Miami 3 Pittsburgh 4, Chicago Cubs 2 Atlanta 10, Kansas City 2 San Francisco 2, Colorado 1 L.A. Dodgers 6, San Diego 4 Thursday’s Games Milwaukee (Anderson 7-4) at Cincinnati (Castillo 15-7), 8:35 a.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 15-5) at San Diego (Lucchesi 10-9), 11:40 a.m. Colorado (Freeland 3-11) at San Francisco (Beede 5-10), 11:45 a.m. Philadelphia (Vargas 7-8) at Washington (Strasburg 17-6), 12:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Quintana 13-8) at Pittsburgh (Musgrove 10-12), 3:05 p.m. Miami (Yamamoto 4-5) at N.Y. Mets (Wheeler 11-7), 3:10 p.m. All Times ADT Twins 5, Tigers 1 Minnesota Detroit

Blue Jays 3, Orioles 2 Baltimore Toronto

000 000 230—5 9 2 100 000 000—1 2 1

Dobnak, Duffey (7), T.May (8), Littell (9) and Garver; Norris, VerHagen (4), Schreiber (8), G.Soto (8), Hall (9) and Greiner. W_Dobnak 2-1. L_VerHagen 4-3. HRs_Minnesota, Arraez (4), E.Rosario (32).

Houston Seattle

200 000 001—3 7 0 000 000 000—0 2 0

Greinke, Harris (9) and R.Chirinos; Kikuchi, Warren (7), Guilbeau (8), Magill (9) and T.Murphy. W_Greinke 18-5. L_Kikuchi 6-11. Sv_Harris (3). HRs_Houston, K.Tucker (3). Braves 10, Royals 2 Atlanta Kansas City

000 023 041—10 14 0 010 100 000—2 8 0

Tomlin, Newcomb (4), O’Day (5), L.Jackson (5), Blevins (7), Greene (8), Melancon (9) and Flowers; M.Montgomery, J.Barnes (5), Fillmyer (6), T.Hill (7), Hahn (8), Staumont (8), K.Zimmer (9) and Viloria. W_L.Jackson 9-2. L_J.Barnes 1-4. D-Backs 9, Cardinals 7 St. Louis Arizona

002 111 002—7 10 2 200 007 00x—9 8 2

Wacha, Mayers (2), Gant (4), G.Cabrera (5), Fernandez (6), T.Webb (6), Leone (8) and Wieters; M.Kelly, Y.López (7), McFarland (8), Sherfy (9), Bradley (9) and Ca.Joseph, Avila. W_M.Kelly 13-14. L_Fernandez 0-1. Sv_Bradley (17). HRs_St. Louis, Arozarena (1). Arizona, Flores (9). Brewers 9, Reds 2 Milwaukee Cincinnati

611 000 100—9 11 0 100 100 000—2 5 1

Lyles, J.Jackson (6), Claudio (7), Black (8), Ju.Guerra (9) and Grandal; Mahle, Mella (3), S.Romano (6), Herget (8) and Barnhart. W_Lyles 12-8. L_Mahle 2-12. HRs_Milwaukee, Braun (22), Thames (24), Hiura (19). Cincinnati, E.Suárez (49). Pirates 4, Cubs 2 Chicago Pittsburgh

010 000 100—2 6 0 000 200 02x—4 9 1

Lester, Kintzler (7), Wieck (7), Phelps (8) and Contreras; Agrazal, Liriano (7), Feliz (8), Kela (9) and Baron. W_Feliz 4-4. L_Wieck 1-2. Sv_Kela (1). HRs_ Chicago, I.Happ (8). Nationals 5, Phillies 2 Philadelphia Washington

000 100 100—2 8 1 000 100 22x—5 8 1

Smyly, Morin (7), Álvarez (8), Nicasio (8) and Knapp; A.Sánchez, Suero (8), Strickland (8), Doolittle (9)

TORONTO (AP) — Rowdy Tellez hit two solo home runs, Jacob Waguespack pitched six shutout innings and Toronto beat Baltimore.

GIANTS 2, ROCKIES 1 SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Jaylin Davis hit his first career home run to end it with one out in the ninth, sending San Francisco past Colorado.

DODGERS 6, PADRES 4 SAN DIEGO (AP) — Joc

and Gomes. W_A.Sánchez 11-8. L_Morin 1-3. Sv_Doolittle (29). HRs_Philadelphia, B.Miller (11). Washington, Kendrick (17), B.Dozier (20). Mets 10, Marlins 3 Miami New York

000 000 003—3 4 1 342 000 10x—10 12 1

Dugger, Chen (3), Jos.Smith (6), Conley (7), Noesí (8) and Alfaro; deGrom, Bashlor (8), Gagnon (9) and W.Ramos, Nido. W_deGrom 11-8. L_Dugger 0-4. HRs_Miami, Alfaro (18). New York, P.Alonso (51). Giants 2, Rockies 1 Colorado San Francisco

000 000 100—1 8 0 001 000 001—2 7 2

Melville, Diehl (6), Y.Almonte (7), Pazos (7), D.Johnson (9) and Wolters; Samardzija, Ty.Rogers (7), Suarez (8), S.Anderson (8), Abad (8), Wil.Smith (9) and Vogt. W_Wil.Smith 6-0. L_D.Johnson 0-2. HRs_San Francisco, Ja.Davis (1). Dodgers 6, Padres 4 Los Angeles San Diego

210 010 101—6 10 2 300 001 000—4 7 0

Stripling, Sadler (4), Ferguson (5), Y.Garcia (6), Floro (6), J.Urías (7), D.May (8), K.Jansen (9) and Ru.Martin; Lamet, Perdomo (6), Bednar (7), Stammen (8), Jav.Guerra (9) and Mejía. W_Floro 5-3. L_Bednar 0-1. Sv_K.Jansen (32). HRs_Los Angeles, Pederson (35), C.Taylor (12), E.Ríos (4).

SOCCER

Major League Soccer Eastern Conference W L T Pts GF GA New York City FC 17 5 10 61 61 39 Philadelphia 16 9 7 55 57 46 Atlanta 17 12 3 54 54 41 D.C. United 13 10 9 48 42 38 New York 14 13 5 47 53 48 Toronto FC 12 10 10 46 54 50 New England 10 10 12 42 47 54 Chicago 9 12 11 38 48 43 Montreal 11 17 4 37 43 59 Orlando City 9 14 9 36 41 46 Columbus 9 15 8 35 37 46 Cincinnati 6 22 4 22 30 74 Western Conference Los Angeles FC 20 4 8 68 81 35 Minnesota 15 10 7 52 51 41 LA Galaxy 16 13 3 51 53 51 Seattle 14 10 8 50 50 49 Real Salt Lake 14 13 5 47 43 40 Portland 13 13 6 45 47 46 FC Dallas 12 11 9 45 48 43 San Jose 13 14 5 44 51 51 Colorado 11 15 6 39 54 60 Houston 11 17 4 37 44 55 Sporting Kansas City 10 15 7 37 47 59 Vancouver 7 15 10 31 33 55 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Wednesday, September 25 New York City FC 4, Atlanta 1 Minnesota 2, Sporting Kansas City 1 LA Galaxy 2, Real Salt Lake 1 Los Angeles FC 3, Houston 1 New England 2, Portland 2, tie Philadelphia 2, San Jose 1 Sunday, September 29 Toronto FC at Chicago, 1 p.m. Orlando City at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. Philadelphia at Columbus, 1 p.m. Atlanta at Montreal, 1 p.m. New York City FC at New England, 1 p.m. D.C. United at New York, 1 p.m. FC Dallas at Colorado, 3:30 p.m. Vancouver at LA Galaxy, 3:30 p.m. Los Angeles FC at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m. Houston at Real Salt Lake, 3:30 p.m. Seattle at San Jose, 3:30 p.m. Portland at Sporting Kansas City, 3:30 p.m. All Times ADT

TRANSACTIONS

BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB and MLBPA — Extended the administrative leave for New York Yankees RHP Domingo Germán through the conclusion of the World Series. American League LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Claimed 2B Keon Wong off waivers from Tampa Bay. Transferred RHP Griffin Canning to the 60-day IL. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Reinstated RHP Frankie

Pederson homered twice, including his franchiserecord ninth leadoff shot, and pinch-hitter Edwin Rios had a tiebreaking shot in the seventh to help Los Angeles beat San Diego.

ATHLETICS 3, ANGELS 2 ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) — Matt Chapman hit a tworun homer with one out in the ninth inning and Oakland boosted their playoff chances, rallying past Los Angeles.

Montas from the restricted list. Designated C Beau Taylor for assignment. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Assigned RHP Ryan Dull outright to Buffalo (IL). Recalled RHP Yennsy Diaz from New Hampshire (EL). Selected the contract of RHP Ryan Dull. Placed OF Lourdes Gurriel Jr. on the 60-day IL. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA — Named Mike Callahan NBA G League training and development lead for the referee operations department. Promoted referees John Butler, Nate Green and Evan Scott from the NBAGL. MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES — Named Joe Branch assistant general manager. SACRAMENTO KINGS — Signed G Tyler Ulis. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS — Signed S Chris Banjo. ATLANTA FALCONS — Placed S Keanu Neal on IR. Waived P Matt Wile. Signed OL John Wetzel. Signed S Jamal Carter from the practice squad and TE Carson Meier to the practice squad. BUFFALO BILLS — Signed WR Jordan Veasy to the practice squad. CINCINNATI BENGALS — Released HB Jordan Ellis from the practice squad. Signed CB Greg Mabin to the practice squad. DENVER BRONCOS — Waived WR River Cracraft. Signed WR Fred Brown from the practice squad and WR Trinity Benson to the practice squad. DETROIT LIONS — Released RB Nick Brossette and DE Jonathan Wynn from the practice squad. Signed WR Chris Lacy and DT Ray Smith to the practice squad. HOUSTON TEXANS — Signed WR Tyron Johnson to the practice squad. MIAMI DOLPHINS — Released DE Tank Carradine. Signed OT Andrew Donnal. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Signed QB Cody Kessler. Signed TE Jason Vander Linden to the practice squad. NEW YORK GIANTS — Terminated the contract of TE Eric Tomlinson. Signed LB Nate Stupar. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS — Signed LB Stephone Anthony. Placed LB Kaden Elliss on injured reserve. OAKLAND RAIDERS — Released WR Ryan Grant. Signed LB Justin Phillips from the practice squad and LB Quentin Poling to the practice squad. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — Waived WR Greg Ward. Signed CB Craig James from the practice squad. PITTSBURGH STEELERS — Released LB Robert Spillane from the practice squad. Signed TE Alizé Mack to the practice squad. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Traded TE Nick Vannett to Pittsburgh for a 2020 fifth-round draft pick. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — Signed LS Garrison Sanborn to a one-year contract. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Placed QB Blaine Gabbert on IR. Signed DL Patrick O’Connor from the practice squad and WR Ishmael Hyman to the practice squad. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Signed TE Jerome Cunningham. HOCKEY National Hockey League CALGARY FLAMES — Signed F Matthew Tkachuk to a three-year contract. DALLAS STARS — Loaned Gs Landon Bow and Jake Oettinger, LW Joel Kiviranta and RW Joel D’Esperance to Texas (AHL). Returned C Ty Dellandrea to Flint (OHL). DETROIT RED WINGS — Assigned D Alec Regula to London (OHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Assigned D Julian Melchiori to Binghamton (AHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERS — Assigned D Sebastian Aho and Grant Hutton and Fs Kieffer Bellows, Arnaud Durandeau, Scott Eansor, Ryan Hitchcock, Mason Jobst, Otto Koivula, Jeff Kubiak, Kyle MacLean, Nick Schilkey and John Stevens to Bridgeport (AHL). NEW YORK RANGERS — Assigned F Phil DiGiuseppe, G Adam Huska and D Tarmo Reunanen to Hartford (AHL) and D Matthew Robertson to Edmonton (WHL). SEATTLE — Named Cammi Granato pro scout. COLLEGE NCAA — Named Gina Lehe managing director of communications/strategy and branding, effective Nov. 4. NEW JERSEY CITY — Named Jason Ecklof assistant men’s wrestling coach. SIENA — Named Michelle Swanson volunteer assistant diving coach. TENNESSEE — Announced LBs Will Ignout and Shanon Reid and WR Jacquez Jones have left the football team.


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Thursday, September 26, 2019

Peninsula Clarion

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Thursday, september 26, 2019

Rough week? Prognosticator turns to daughter for advice By Nolan Rose For the Peninsula Clarion

Another rough week has left all of us at Pigskin Prognosticator Headquarters searching for answers. Picking winners in the NFL is really hard, but we’re certainly making it look more difficult than it is. A 5-10 performance against the spread in week 3 leaves us at 20-27 for the year. That’s not good enough and Clarion faithful certainly deserve better. That starts this Thursday! Go Pack go! Bad Beat of the Week: Which bad beat would you like to choose? The Buffalo Bills carried a twotouchdown advantage well into the second half and failed to cover a six-point spread. The Kansas City Chiefs had a 30-13 advantage over the Baltimore Ravens in the fourth quarter and that didn’t turn out well. The Patriots held a 30-7 lead in the fourth quarter and benched Tom Brady to give the backup QB some reps, the backup immediately threw a pick six and New England failed to cover. It was a rough week. I could go on…

Eagles @ PACKERS -4 Finally, a Thursday night game worth watching! Are the Pack back? The Cheese Heads look to start 4-0 by notching their third home victory of the season over the Eagles. Star receiver Davante Adams has yet to reach the end zone this season for the Pack, look for that to change against a beleaguered Eagles secondary. Packers win 23-17

SEAHAWKS @ Cardinals +5 The Seahawks were awful last Sunday losing to a New Orleans Saints team without Drew Brees. Seattle started the game with a

three-and-out and the following punt resulted in a Saints touchdown. Things got worse from there. Seahawks RB Chris Carson has fumbled the ball four times in three games. This feels like an early season must win for the Hawks with both the Rams and 49ers at 3-0 in the NFC West. Seahawks win 27-20

Titans @ FALCONS -4 Titans QB Marcus Mariota has looked awful two consecutive weeks after a surprising opening performance in a victory over the Browns. This line feels a little fishy. Every gambling Joe will be on the Falcons -4 in Atlanta, but how can you side with the Titans after the last two weeks? Both teams are sitting at 1-2 and in desperate need of a win. Falcons win 30-20

PATRIOTS @ Bills +7 Darth Belichick and his antiaging Padawan, Tom Brady, look to continue their early season dominance in Buffalo against the surprising 3-0 Bills. The Bills have impressed but certainly the Patriots represent a huge step up in competition. Buffalo has wins over the Jets, Giants, and Bengals. Those three teams are a combined 1-8 on the season. We’ll find out if the Bills are for real this Sunday. The play here is that they’re not quite ready for primetime. Patriots win 33-16

CHIEFS @ Lions +6.5 It doesn’t matter who lines up at receiver for the Kansas City Chiefs. Sammy Watkins, Demarcus Robinson and Mecole Hardman have all posted huge games for the Chiefs this season. Superstar TE Travis Kelce hasn’t had his turn but look for that to change this week. As long

as QB Patrick Mahomes is healthy, it’s really hard to bet against KC. Chiefs win 38-27

Raiders @ COLTS -6.5 The Raiders got their lunch money stolen up in Minnesota last Sunday. Can the Fighting Chucky’s bounce back against a surging Colts team in Indiana? Ex-Colts QB Andrew Luck is a distant memory. Jacoby Brissett has filled in admirably and the Colts have a great opportunity to reach 3-1 with another good performance this weekend. Colts win 28-21

Chargers @ DOLPHINS +15.5 When you’re off to a rough start to the season, you start looking for something, anything to help. I turned to my three-year-old daughter, Kalea, and asked her who was going to win, the Chargers or Dolphins? She went with the Dolphins in emphatic fashion. There it is, folks. This is the stonecold lock of the week! Dolphins win 21-20

Redskins @ GIANTS -2.5 Led by newly-anointed starting QB, Daniel Jones, the Giants overcame an 18-point deficit to topple the Bucs in Tampa last Sunday. Jones’ heroics have changed the vibe of a stale Giants team overnight. With Eli Manning under center the Giants knew what they had and that it was no longer enough to win football games. Jones gives the team hope and hope can go a long way. The Redskins don’t have hope. Giants win 27-17

BROWNS @ Ravens -7 This

line

feels

like

an

over-correction to public appeal. The Browns were supposed to be this year’s Cinderella team, but instead their division rival, the Baltimore Ravens, have captured everyone’s attention through three weeks. The play here is that the Ravens are a little overrated with wins over the Dolphins and Cardinals hardly impressing. The Browns go into Baltimore and steal one. Browns win 23-19

Panthers @ TEXANS -4.5 Panthers backup QB Kyle Allen replaced an injured Cam Newton and led Carolina to an impressive win over the Desert Bats in Phoenix. Is this another Wally Pipp moment? Cam has looked average for years and Allen provided the Panthers with a spark. Another good performance on Sunday and Cam’s days could be numbered. The Texans will provide a formidable challenge for youthful upstart. Texans win 30-17

Bucs @ RAMS -9.5 The Rams vaunted offense is overdue to get back on track after last year’s lackluster finish. The defense, led by all-world DT Aaron Donald, hasn’t had any issues. The Rams can pressure the opposing QB like few teams in the league. Bucs passer Jameis Winston is famous for turning the ball over under duress. That’s a bad mix for the Bucs and great news for Rams backers. Rams win 35-13

Vikings @ BEARS -2 This feels like a coin toss game. Bears QB Mitchell Trubisky is a bad football player, but that Chicago defense is incredible. Pass rusher Khalil Mack is the only defender in the league that can compare with

Chuck Winters 42107 Kalifornsky Beach Rd, Soldotna, AK 99669 (907) 335-5466

the Rams’ Aaron Donald. Mack can single-handedly ruin another team’s offensive attack. The Bears won’t score enough points to pull away from the Norwegians, but a late field goal will be the difference. Bears win 13-10

JAGS @ Broncos -3 Jacksonville may have finally found it’s leading man in Gardner Minshew. Mustache-mania has spread across northern Florida and the hapless Donkeys are about to feel the burn of a close shave. What does Denver do well? Joe Flacco is terrible. The once great defense feels uninspired. How long until Donkey faithful start clamoring for John Elway’s firing? Jags win 24-17

COWBOYS @ Saints +2.5 The Saints won without longtime starter and NFL great Drew Brees last week in Seattle. Can they make it two in a row this Sunday with Dallas in town? This looks like the best Fighting Jerry’s team since the early 90’s. Dak Prescott has taken another leap, they still have a strong rushing attack, and the defense is formidable. Only Jerry Jones can screw this up and he will at some point, but not this week. Cowboys win 30-17

BENGALS @ Steelers -4 Both of these teams are very bad at football and neither team can afford a win this weekend if they’re serious about earning the first overall pick in next year’s draft. Every time the Red Rocket completes a pass, take a drink. We have to make this game entertaining somehow. Bengals win 28-20



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Congrats to our Week 3 Winner! Vern Nusunginya of Soldotna guessed all 13 games correctly - winning via tiebreaker!

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4Eagles @ Packers

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Sports Reporter Peninsula Clarion

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4Seahawks @ Cardinals 4Seahawks @ Cardinals 4Seahawks @ Cardinals Vikings @ Bears 4

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Last Week: 12 of 16 Standing: 36-48

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thursday, september 26, 2019

Mystery invites audience to guess ‘whodunit’ By Joey Klecka Peninsula Clarion

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hen looking for someone to direct their latest show, “Crab Cakes and Murder,” the Kenai Performers stage group went to one of the peninsula’s most experienced hands. The murder mystery dinner theater show, which runs Sept. 27 and 28 and Oct. 4 and 5, brings a familiar face to the central peninsula theater scene. Michael Druce, a retired high school drama teacher who still remains active in the theater community on the central peninsula, will direct the show. Druce hasn’t directed a play since 2015, but wrote the script for the dinner theater production that will run on consecutive weekends. All four evenings start with dinner at 6:30 p.m. and the show at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $45 and available at River City Books, online or at the door. “Crab Cakes and Murder” will be Druce’s ninth show for the Kenai Performers over the last decade. Druce said by his count, he’s produced 42 shows at SoHi over a two-decade run from 1993 to 2013. Including the work he did before that, Druce estimates he has about 140 shows under his directorial belt. “I haven’t retired at all,” Druce stressed. “It’s just the last show I did direct was 2015. The reason I haven’t done anything in between was because I’ve had some things going on.” The experience shows, according to his staff of actors. After all, setting the stage for a good murder mystery doesn’t just happen by accident. “Mike’s been writing murder mysteries for many years, so he’s got the formula down pretty well,” said Jamie Nelson, a veteran

actor who has worked with Druce for years. “He almost always produces what he writes, and so he’ll write what he thinks is a solid script, and as he’s directing it, he’ll come up with slightly better ideas than he originally had.” This particular show is produced by Donna Shirnberg, who will join Druce in setting the environment for a murder mystery that enhances the best talent the peninsula has to offer. Veteran actor Ian McEwen said Druce’s attention to detail goes a long way in setting up the actor for success. “He definitely understands the style of humor that works well for something like this,” McEwen said. “You’ve got to have terrible puns and lame jokes … he enjoys working with the staff to find ways to make the audience laugh. He gives us a great framework to hang stuff on, and then we find bits and pieces.” The current show employs all the required twists, turns and props of any good murder mystery, which will engage the audience at times to help sift through the evidence of “whodunit?” The audience will sit center stage as the events take place, including a funeral scene in which the audience itself is treated as if they’re attending. Druce said that dynamic establishes an intimacy that isn’t felt on a traditional stage environment. “People will respond more, they will laugh more as a group,” Druce said. “It’s a whole different dynamic.” Druce said compared to the traditional proscenium stage, which distances the audience from the action, the murder mystery plot will deliver at the feet of the crowd. “It tends to be more interactive,”

Joey Klecka / Peninsula Clarion

Jamie Nelson (left), Tracy Stange, Teri Zopf-Schoessler and Ian McEwen rehearse a scene for the upcoming play “Crab Cakes and Murder” on Sept. 18 at the Kenai Performers studio in Soldotna.

Druce said. “If you’re an actor, there’s a good possibility that when someone swings their chair in, you’re going to step on their foot. You’re that close to it.” The show will include the audience in the funeral of the late Captain Savage Raines, the owner of Peg Legg Seafoods, who tragically dies at sea. The plot follows the questionable intentions of each character as they seek to gain from the untimely death of the Raines, played by Allen Auxier. A host of family members try to wiggle their way into his inheritance, including his wife Peggy Legg Raines (Teri ZopfSchoessler), the captain’s brotherin-law Stone Crabbe (Nelson), the captain’s youngest daughter DeCadence Raines (Tracy Stange)

and twin daughters Misery (Audra Faris) and Calamity (Lacey Jane Brewster) Raines. McEwen’s character, the sheriff Sandy Shoals, makes his appearance as the investigation into Raines’ death deepens. “I like how absurd it is,” Nelson said. “The circumstances and the stakes are artificially hilarious.” McEwen said the two goals of the show is for people to have a great time and to get the audience involved, and said the challenge comes from gauging the feel of an audience and making up a quip on the spot. “I ask them what they think of a piece of evidence,” he said. “It all depends on the feel of the moment.” McEwen’s experience and quick

wit is what makes him the right man for the job, Druce said, and McEwen said he has embraced the role. “It is always fun when you get to break that fourth wall and change it up,” McEwen said. “It’s fun to get out there and let the audience feel like they’re inside the scene.” With his long experience and resume of successful productions, Druce is expecting a full house and happy crowd. “My personal goal is I want audiences to come here and have a good time,” Druce said. “Typically it’ll be a Friday night — the weekend is starting and people are getting off work. My goal is I want them to have a fun time. If they enjoy themselves, that’s what we want.”

Zellweger on her empathy, adoration for Judy Garland By Jake Coyle Associated Press

TORONTO — For Renee Zellweger, the task of becoming Judy Garland was too daunting to contemplate all at once. Such a character needed to be assembled piecemeal: a bit-by-bit metamorphosis starting with the voice, followed by workshopping the songs and then building in the mannerisms, the hair, the make-up, the stage presence, and so on. “It was a series of experiments, an exploration that we all shared trying to understand and see what was possible, seeing what we could conjure,” says Zellweger. “It was always in motion.” The accumulation of all those layers, in Rupert Goold’s “Judy,” can feel like a magic act. There are no signs of the nearly two years of work that went into Zellweger’s Garland, just the dazzlingly detailed final draft. “I felt like we took hundreds of little steps away from Renee,” says Goold, the British theatre director. And yet as much as Zellweger’s performance is a wholebodied acting feat, it’s not mere mimicry. Her Garland may be

David Hindley / Roadside Attractions

This image released by Roadside Attractions shows Renee-Zellweger as Judy Garland in a scene from “Judy,” in theaters Friday.

show-stopping Oscar bait, but it’s also a delicate and deeply felt character study. Its power lies in the fusion between Zellweger and Garland — how they naturally connect despite diverging in drastic ways. Both were American sweethearts whose public personas, forged at the heights of fame, cleaved away from them. “I understand the differences between the projections that land on a public persona and the

truth of the human experience,” says Zellweger. “There are certain things about her experiences that I understand having lived the life inside Hollywood.” In “Judy,” based on Peter Quilter’s stage musical “End of the Rainbow,” Zellweger, 50, is playing Garland in 1968, at 46, just months before she died of an accidental overdose. Garland, having exhausted all her other opportunities, is performing

calendar Events and exhibitions ■■ Kenai’s 4th Annual Fall Pumpkin Festival will take place Saturday, Oct. 12 from noon-3 p.m. at Millennium Square (415 Spur View Dr., Kenai). Introducing, for the first time this year, the $2 Pumpkin Pick which includes a Hay Maze and Pumpkin Painting. There will also be food trucks, scarecrows, music, hay rides, petting zoo, face painting and more family fun for everyone! Call Kenai Parks, Recreation & Beautification Department at 907-283-8262 for additional information. You can also find this event on our Facebook page. ■■ Sterling Community Center Oktoberfest will take place Saturday, Oct. 12. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Brats, beer, pork and cider. With live music provided by the Alaska Polka Chips. Tickets $20. Silent and live auction. Call 907-262-7224 for more info or tickets. ■■ KDLL Adventure Talks has a presentation on biking the Hebridean Way — 250 miles along the islands off the northwest coast of Scotland. Tune in at 10 a.m. Oct. 16 for a discussion with Matt and Sarah Pyhala about the planning and logistics of an international biketrip. Then come to the live presentation at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 17 at the Kenai Visitors and Cultural Center. Admission is free for KDLLmembers, $5 for nonmembers. ■■ True Tales, Told Live and KDLL public radio has a storytelling event at 6 p.m. Oct. 25 at Odie’s Deli in Soldotna. The theme is “Tail Tales: Stories of Animal Encounters,” with live music by Recess Duty. Admission is free. For more information or to sign up to tell a story,check out True Tales, Told Live on Facebook, or call Jenny Neyman with KDLL at 907-394-6397. ■■ True Tales, Told Live and Soldotna Parks and Rec offer a storytelling workshop from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday nights in November at theSoldotna Regional Sports Complex. Learn how to craft a story from start to finish in this four-week series.

The cost is $15 for the entireworkshop or a $5 weekly dropin fee. Sign up at Soldotna.org. For more information, visit True Tales, Told Live on Facebook, or callJenny Neyman at 907-394-6397. ■■ The KDLL Fall Membership Drive will be held Oct. 24, 25 and 26 on air at 91.9 FM. Volunteers are needed. Contact Jenny Neyman atjneyman@kdll.org or 907-394-6397 ■■ The Kenai Performers annual murder mystery dinner theater will take place Friday-Saturday, Sept. 27-28, and Friday-Saturday, Oct. 4-5. We are thrilled to present the world premiere of “Crab Cakes and Murder,” written and directed by Mike Druce. At Kenai Performers PAC, 44045 K-Beach (Behind Subway). Doors open at 6 p.m. Dinner at 6:30 p.m. Show at 7:30 p.m. $45 per person. Tickets available at: River City Books, at the door, or online at https://squareup.com/store/kenaiperformers. Menu: crab cakes, build your own tacos (chicken or beef), salad bar, black beans, brown rice, cake. ■■ The Redoubt Chamber Orchestra will present the annual Evening of Classics concert on Friday, Oct. 4 at 7 p.m. at Christ Lutheran Church in Soldotna. This annual fundraiser, hosted by Simon Nissen, is for the Kenai Peninsula Orchestra and will feature several selections by the Redoubt Chamber Orchestra under the direction of Tammy Vollom-Matturro, along with soloists and other ensembles. We will again auction off the baton for a chance to conduct the last piece in the program, and an art auction for a piece by Olya Silver. Join us for a funfilled evening of quality music and lots of laughs. Cost is $15. Youth 18 and under are free. Tickets available at the door. ■■ The KPC Showcase presents Northern Dene Astronomical & Sky-Related Knowledge with Ph.D Student Christopher M. Cannon, Department of Anthropology, University of Alaska,

See calendar, Page A10

— sometimes gloriously, often shambolically — a five-week run of shows at the London cabaret Talk of the Town. Plagued by health and financial woes, she’s been chewed and spit out by the Hollywood machine that made her the star of “The Wizard of Oz” and “A Star Is Born.” She’s also haunted by flashbacks with MGM chief Louis B. Mayer, who turned her into one of the most famous people on the planet but who also fiercely controlled her. The executive is depicted as being responsible for her addiction to diet pills, preying on her insecurities (he called her “my little hunchback”) and, according to an unpublished memoir by Garland, regularly groped her. “Judy,” which opens in select theatres Friday, is about an indomitable performer whose deepest traumas have come from the very thing she loves. It has obvious parallels to the current .MeToo era of Hollywood. Zellweger, herself, was one of Harvey Weinstein’s most consist stars. He was partly or significantly behind Zellweger’s three Oscarnominated roles (“Bridget Jones’s Diary,” “Chicago” and “Cold Mountain,” for which she won).

Zellweger has said her experiences with the producer never approached the kind of abuse others have detailed. But the Texas-native (whose highprofile romances have included Jim Carrey, Jack White, Bradley Cooper and Kenny Chesney, to whom she was briefly married) is well acquainted with the way an onslaught of fame and the cycles of show business can turn destructive. “She’s delivering to expectations that can be extraordinary for a sustained period of time. I know what it’s like to do that for a limited period of time,” Zellweger says of Garland. “I can imagine what that must be like — that your identity and your joy and your ability to take care of yourself is wrapped up in constantly delivering something that requires that you not.” “Judy” is the apotheosis of a resurgence for Zellweger. Her performance has so bowled over festival audiences that she’s widely considered this year’s front-runner for the best actress Oscar. Speaking at the Toronto International Film Festival earlier this month, Zellweger — effervescent and See garland, Page A10

Poet’s

Corner Latte You Say? Ordering at a non-Starbucks shop, I, for an extra large “latte”, money down I plop Always glad to support “the other places” whenever I can. Starbuck’s universe of the bean is a giant machine. Hurrah for the lowly vendor, who dreams. As a latte purist, shake of vanilla and cinnamon I resist. Hot, hot is the only way to

serve. With intrepidation, I do not swerve. “Aaah” … I savor. Such a nice flavor. No need to have a coffee date. I find my company first-rate. It’s a cliche to say, but this treat starts my day. Eyes fully open — ready — for work or whatever. Stopping for a latte is such a worthwhile endeavor. Latte, latte — always my choice. To you, a cup I hoist! — By Hedy-Jo Huss


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Thursday, September 26, 2019

Peninsula Clarion

Writers’ Conference to take 1-year hiatus Calendar From Page A9

By Michael Armstrong Homer News

After an 18-year straight run, the annual Kachemak Bay Writers’ Conference will go on hiatus for one year and won’t be held in 2020, the Kachemak Bay Campus announced on Tuesday. Sponsored by KBC, the local branch of Kenai Peninsula College, University of Alaska Anchorage, the conference held at Land’s End Resort in mid June brought together nationally recognized writers and poets with students attending from Alaska and the Lower 49 states. Faculty also included local writers and poets, including Rich Chiappone, Erin Hollowell and Nancy Lord. About 150 students attended, many of them visiting from out of town. The hiatus comes in the midst of budget cuts to the University of Alaska imposed by Gov. Mike Dunleavy, according to a press release. Faced with vetoes of $130 million by Dunleavy to the university budget, the UA Board of Regents signed a compact with Dunleavy that reduced the cuts to $70 million over three years — still deeper than the cuts the Alaska Legislature had made. “As the University continues to make efforts

to downsize, it is important to look at all programming and evaluate its impact on its core mission of educating students,” said KPC Director Reid Brewer in the press release. “This one-year hiatus will provide campus leadership an opportunity to review the conference’s purpose and scope, and to make changes necessary for its continued success.” The re-evaluation of the writers’ conference came about from a larger look at university and KBC programs prompted by Dunleavy’s budget cuts. “Every campus is looking at things that are good and bad with each of the programs,” Reid said on Tuesday. “… The plan is we can take a step back, look at the program, and come forward refreshed into the future. It’s kind of a chance to evaluate that particular program.” KBC Director Emerita Carol Swartz led the writers’ conference from its start in 2002 and through this year, when she ran it after retiring as director. Brewer said he didn’t know if Swartz would continue to direct the conference. He also said he didn’t think the conference would move from its location at Land’s End. Swartz did not return messages seeking comment. “The important part is to look at how we

can serve both students and the community,” Brewer said. “How is the conference meeting that need?” The conference has been funded partially by an endowment from Caroline Musgrove Coons, a legacy created by the Coons estate after her death to support writing programs in Homer. Corporate and other donations also support the conference as well as registration fees. Brewer said a lot of the cost of the conference is for staff hours and logistics at the university and KBC. “We have to look at how we spend money in the future and be very thoughtful about how staff time is used,” Brewer said. Brewer said the college is starting to get the message out about the hiatus. The planned keynote speaker for 2020 was Andrew Sean Greer, the 2018 Pulitzer Prize winner for fiction. “When we start thinking about the 2021 conference and what it will look like, we’ll start planning for it next spring,” he said. “…We’re trying to look at this as a positive instead of something negative, instead of looking at it in a bad direction. We’re thinking of ways to make it a stronger conference.” Reach Michael Armstrong at marmstrong@ homernews.com.

Rock and roll ‘intellectual’: Robert Hunter, Grateful Dead’s poetic lyricist, dies at 78 By John Rogers Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Robert Hunter, the man behind the poetic and mystical words for many of the Grateful Dead’s finest songs, has died at age 78. Hunter died Monday at his Northern California home with his wife, Maureen, at his side, former Grateful Dead publicist Dennis McNally told The Associated Press on Tuesday. The family did not release a cause of death. “We loved Bob Hunter and will miss him unimaginably,” Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart said, adding the lyricist was “a visionary wordsmith extraordinaire.” Although proficient on a number of instruments including guitar, violin, cello and trumpet, Hunter never appeared on stage with the Grateful Dead during the group’s 30-year run that ended with the 1995 death of lead guitarist Jerry Garcia, his principal songwriting partner. When he did attend the group’s concerts, he was content to either stand to the side of the stage or, better yet, sit anonymously in the audience. It was in the latter location, he told The Associated Press in 2006, that he received his greatest songwriting compliment, from a man who had no idea who he was. “He turned to me during ‘Cumberland Blues’ and said, ‘I wonder what the guy who wrote that song a hundred years ago would think if he knew the Grateful Dead was doing it,’” he recalled, referencing the colorful tale of hardscrabble American miners. Other of Hunter’s most memorable Grateful Dead songs include “It Must Have Been the Roses,” ”Terrapin Station,” ”The Days Between,” ”Brown Eyed Women,” ”Jack Straw, “Friend of the Devil,” ”Box of Rain,” ”Uncle John’s Band” and “Black Muddy River.” Although the man who spoke to him during “Cumberland Blues” couldn’t know it, he had perfectly captured Hunter’s songwriting brilliance contained in all of those songs: the ability to craft lyrics that sounded so timeless that listeners were certain they had heard them before. It was a skill he matched seamlessly with a boundless knowledge of subjects running the gamut from classic literature to street life, which in turn allowed him to write authoritatively about everyone from card sharks and hustlers to poor dirt farmers and free-spirited lovers. All of those stories he seasoned with a poetic skill some would say rivaled even that of Bob Dylan, with whom he sometimes collaborated. “He’s got a way with words and I do too,” Dylan told Rolling Stone magazine in 2009. “We both write a different type of song than what passes today for songwriting.” “There was nobody like Bob Hunter and there never will be,” Hart said Tuesday. “He explained the unexplainable and the words struck deep.” “Truckin’,” arguably Hunter and the group’s best known song (and the one containing the memorable line, “What a long, strange trip it’s been”) was designated a national treasure in 1997 by the Library of Congress. In more than a dozen verses it chronicled

Garland From Page A9

unguarded, wearing jeans and sneakers — had little to say about that. But making “Judy,” she said, was “magic.” Since childhood, Garland has existed intertwined with own visions of Hollywood. “Her influence is indelible,” she says. “How you dream with her.” Like her subject, Zellweger has negotiated her own battles with the ups and downs of the film industry. After a string of forgettable films and fatigued from constantly going movie-tomovie, she took a six year hiatus from acting beginning in 2010. “From the inside, there’s been no break. There’s just been working in a different capacity that allowed for other things that a person needs to do when you live once,” Zellweger says. “I needed to do a little growing and learn

Evan Agostini / Invision

Robert Hunter performs at the 46th Annual Songwriters Hall Of Fame Induction and Awards Gala in New York on June 18, 2018.

the travails of a touring band, among them the Grateful Dead’s 1970 drug bust after a show in New Orleans: “Busted, down on Bourbon Street. Set up, like a bowlin’ pin. Knocked down. It gets to wearin’ thin.” Another song, “Ripple,” which was set to a maddening beautiful melody that Garcia composed on guitar, contains the lines Hunter once said he was most proud of: “Reach out your hand, if your cup be empty. If your cup is full, may it be again. Let it be known there is a fountain. That was not made by the hands of men.” Once asked by The Associated Press who his influences were, he laughed and replied that, “just to throw people off,” he would often cite both the great 19th century theatrical songwriting team of Gilbert and Sullivan and the American folk music balladeer Woody Guthrie. After a moment’s reflection, he added more seriously, “Actually, that’s pretty close to the truth.” Other influencers included novelists James Joyce, John Steinbeck and Hans Christian Andersen, musician Josh White and the traditional European ballads published by American folklorist Francis James Child. Born Robert Burns on June 23, 1941, Hunter was 7 when his father abandoned him and his mother, resulting in his spending several years in foster homes. It was an experience he said scarred him emotionally and left him feeling forever the outsider. When he was 11, his mother married McGraw-Hill publishing executive Norman Hunter, who gave the boy a new last name and an appreciation for such peerless writers as William Saroyan and T.S. Elliot. Hunter toyed with becoming a novelist himself but music called and by his senior year of high school he was playing trumpet in a fusion Dixieland-rock band. He attended the University of Connecticut for one year where he

studied drama, became a Pete Seeger fan and turned his interest to folk music. He met Garcia in 1960 at a production of the musical “Damn Yankees,” introduced by a former girlfriend who by then was Garcia’s first wife. The pair quickly formed a folk music duo called Bob and Jerry. Both homeless for a time, they lived out of their cars, parking them side-by-side in a Palo Alto, California, vacant lot. They survived those days, both would say later, by eating tins of pineapple Hunter had pilfered from a military installation during his brief time in the National Guard. Hunter had moved to New Mexico by the time Garcia, Bob Weir, Bill Kreutzmann, Phil Lesh and Ron “Pigpen” McKernan had formed the Grateful Dead. Hart would join soon after. When Garcia asked him to send some lyrics along that could be set to music Hunter quickly responded with future Grateful Dead classics “China Cat Sunflower” and “St. Stephen.” Garcia then asked him to return to the San Francisco Bay Area and write for the band. Eventually Hunter would write for all of the group’s members, and when the Grateful Dead was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994 he was included as the lyricist. He and Garcia were inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2015. Over the years Hunter also released nearly a dozen albums of his own, published several volumes of poetry and co-wrote songs with Dylan. He also published two books translating the works of German poet Rainer Maria Rilke. “Bob was an intellectual and I can’t tell you that there are a lot of intellectuals in the rock and roll business. But Bob was an intellectual,” longtime friend Barry “The Fish” Melton of Country Joe and the Fish said by phone from Paris Tuesday. Hunter’s survivors include his wife and daughter Kate.

some different things and have some authentic exchanges to fill the well again.” “It was necessary,” she adds. “I wasn’t healthy. You can’t sleep three hours a night for a sustained period of time and it not have consequence.” A red carpet appearance in 2014 returned Zellweger to headlines, with tabloid reports and online commentary focusing on how she looked different. Zellweger at the time said she was “living a different, happy, more fulfilling life, and I’m thrilled that perhaps it shows.” She penned an op-ed titled “We Can Do Better” lamenting the superficial double-standards women are held to. In 2016, Zellweger returned with “Bridget Jones’s Baby” and a handful of projects have since followed. But “Judy” is something else. That Zellweger was the choice for the role, Goold says, was both natural and a reach. Zellweger, he notes, is blonde, sweet, comic — in many ways far from the forceful diva that

Garland was. But her emotional connection to Garland added a deeper empathy. “We talked about what it is to be a female performer over 40, how that was Garland and to a degree how that’s been for Renee as well. But not a lot,” says Goold. “It felt like a very intimate, very gentle filmmaking process. It felt like we were capturing something in a cupboard. She responded to that.” What they ultimately conjured, piece by piece, reaches a crescendo in a climactic rendition of “Over the Rainbow.” “Judy,” in the end, is no tragedy. It’s a celebration of a resilient icon for whom trouble didn’t melt “like lemon drops.” “When you understand what led her toward those circumstances, it’s impossible to dismiss it simply as sad. This is a woman who’s heroic,” says Zellweger. “She always showed up and she kept going. That sets her apart from people who are simply extraordinary. She’s one in a million years.”

Fairbanks, on Thursday, Sept. 26 at 6:30 p.m. Cannon will discuss his decade of research with Athabaskan (Northern Dene) consultants, documenting traditional astronomical and sky-related knowledge, focusing on the ancient travelertransformer figure and its expression as a large or whole-sky constellation visible in the northern winter sky. In the Commons at Kenai Peninsula College, Kenai River Campus. ■■ Spelman Evans Downer Ecotopia North Painting Exhibition will be hosted at Gallery Turquoise North at Mile 49.5 Sterling Highway, Cooper Landing from Oct. 5-13, 4-8 p.m. Additional viewings by appointment. Contact 310-261-5383 or visit Spelman Evans Downer on Facebook. 25% of the proceeds will benefit Trout Unlimited to support their work with the Save Bristol Bay organization. ■■ September is fundraiser month for the Kenai Fine Art Center with art donated by area artists. The Silent Auction runs the entire month from Sept. 5-27. Patrons have the option to pay a “pay it now” price at any time. Tickets are on sale now for the Auction event on the 28th. This event has the remaining silent auction items, live auction items, food, music and door prizes. These tickets are usually sold out and individuals should not expect availability during the last few days of September. Tickets are available for $35 from board members or at the Kenai Fine Art Center. ■■ Calling for Entries! Pathway of Poetry, Poetry Contest, theme “Man’s Best Friend.” Winning poems will be displayed on a trail in Daubenspeck Family Park, which is also the home of the future Kenai Dog Park. Adults 18 years or older are invited to participate. Deadline is Monday, Sept. 30 Notifications will be Saturday, Oct. 12 at the Kenai Pumpkin Festival. Registration forms are available at: Kenai Senior Center and Kenai Community Library or online at www.kenai.city/parksrec/ page/parks-and-recreation-forms. For additional information call 907-283-8262. This Poetry Contest is brought to you by the Kenai Parks, Recreation & Beautification, Kenai Community Library, Kenai Senior Center and Friends of the Kenai Community Library. ■■ The Annual Fireweed Guild FiberFest will be held on SaturdaySunday, Sept. 28-29 from 10 a.m.-5 p.m., at the Soldotna Sports Center. Join us to celebrate natural fibers — from sheep, alpacas, llamas, rabbits, musk ox, goats and even dogs! See the many products produced from these fibers by talented Alaska artists. There will be classes for adults and free children’s activities, fiber vendor booths along with a fiber animal exhibit and sheep shearing demo. Local food trucks will be present outside the venue for a tasty lunch or snack. Bring your spinning wheel or your knitting/crochet project and join the Fiber Friends Circle and socialize with other fiber enthusiasts! The entrance is free and there will be a raffle to win some beautiful handmade fiber products. Come meet local artists and show your appreciation for Alaska’s fiber industry. For inquiries, contact Nancy at 252-4863. ■■ Sterling Community Center FallFest 2019: Mark your calendar for our Fall Craft and Vendor Fair on Saturday, Oct. 26, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Open to the public. There will be vendors, local crafts, food and drink, craft workshops, and much more! To reserve a space or for more information, please call 907-262-7224 or stop in Monday-Friday between 9:00 a.m. and noon, 38377 Swanson River Road, Sterling.

Entertainment ■■ The Flats Bistro in Kenai presents live dinner music Thursday and Friday from 6:30-8:30 p.m., featuring Garrett Mayer on Thursdays and Mike Morgan & Matt Boyle on Fridays. For reservations (recommended) please call The Flats Bistro at 907-335-1010. Please watch this space for more music at The Flats this fall. ■■ Don Jose’s Restaurant in Soldotna features live music every Thursday from 6-9 p.m. Please call 907-2625700 for reservations and info. ■■ The Place has Karaoke starting at 9 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 21. ■■ Acapulco, 43543 Sterling Highway in Soldotna, has live music at 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. ■■ A bluegrass jam takes place on the first Sunday of the month at from 1-4 p.m. at the Mount Redoubt Baptist Church on South Lovers Loop in Nikiski. ■■ Veronica’s in Old Town Kenai has Open Mic from 6-8 p.m. Friday. Call Veronica’s at 283-2725. ■■ The Alaska Roadhouse Bar and Grill hosts open horseshoe tournaments Thursday nights at the bar on Golddust Drive. For more information, call 262-9887. ■■ An all acoustic jam takes place every Thursday. The jam takes place at Christ Lutheran Church in Soldotna on the first Thursday of the month, and at the Kenai Senior Center during the rest of the month. Jam starts at 6:30 p.m. ■■ Odie’s Deli in Soldotna has live music Friday from 6-8 p.m. and Pub Quiz night every Wednesday from 6-8 p.m. ■■ AmVets Post 4 has reopened in its brand new building on Kalifornsky Beach across from Jumpin’ Junction. Eligible veterans and their families are invited to stop by to find out more about AmVets and their involvement in the Veteran community. ■■ The Bow bar in Kenai has karaoke at 9 p.m. Thursdays.


Classifieds

A11 |AXX PENINSULA CLARION | PENINSULACLARION.COM | Thursday, September 26, 2019 | PENINSULA CLARION | PENINSULACLARION.COM | xxxxxxxx, xx, 2019

Alaska Trivia

Young Bald Eagles leave the nest in 10 to 12 weeks.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF ALASKA THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT AT KENAI In the Matter of the Estate of RONALD JOHN ANDERSEN, Deceased. Case No. 3KN-19-00208 PR

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF ALASKA THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT AT KENAI In the Matter of the Estate of CLYDE CLABORN MULLICAN, Deceased. Case No. 3KN-19-00178 PR

NOTICE TO CREDITOR NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned Personal Representative of the estate, at DOLIFKA & ASSOCIATES, P.C., ATTORNEYS AT LAW, P.O. Box 498, Soldotna, Alaska, 99669. DATED this 17th day of September, 2019. PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE /s/CHRIS KENNEDY Pub:Sept. 19, 26 & Oct 3, 2019 874239

NOTICE TO CREDITOR NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned Personal Representative of the estate, at DOLIFKA & ASSOCIATES, P.C., ATTORNEYS AT LAW, P.O. Box 498, Soldotna, Alaska, 99669. 58634_1 DATED this 11th day of September, 2019. PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE /s/DIANA M. CHASE Pub:Sept. 19, 26 & Oct 3, 2019 874233

LOCATE GREAT BARGAINS

You’ll find bargains galore in the Peninsula Clarion’s classifieds. There’s something for everyone— at a price anyone can afford! Call today to list your bargains for a quick sale.

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

Newspaper Carrier Now Accepting Applications Delivery Areas: * K-Beach Rd * South Soldotna * Anchor Point/ Ninilchik This is a great opportunity to be your own boss as an independent contractor and earn up to $1000 a month! Requirements: 5/23/05 PMand available Page 1 * Prospect must11:36 be reliable for early morning deliveries 5 days a week (Sun, Tues- Fri, for approximately 2-4 hours between 1 a.m. and 7 a.m.) * Have a valid Alaska drivers license * Must have a dependable vehicle for Alaskan roads and driving conditions * Furnish proof of insurance * Have a copy of current driving record (due upon contracting)

58634_1

Applications available at the Peninsula Clarion 150 Trading Bay Rd, Kenai For questions call 283-3584

Alaska Trivia The wolverine has a reputation of being so ferocious that it can harass and run off a Grizzly Bear.

CAN A BALL GAME LEAVE A CHILD WITH PERMANENT SIDE EFFECTS?

React to sports with rage and kids learn aggressive behavior. Keep your cool and kids learn to do the same. To learn more about preventing aggressive or violent behavior, call 877-ACT-WISE for a free brochure. Or visit ACTAgainstViolence.org.

You’re always teaching. Teach carefully.

www.peninsulaclarion.com

283-7551

ACT Against Violence is a joint project of the American Psychological Association & the National Association for the Education of Young Children.


Classifieds

A12 | PENINSULA CLARION | PENINSULACLARION.COM | Thursday, September 26, 2019

AXX | PENINSULA CLARION | PENINSULACLARION.COM | xxxxxxxx, xx, 2019

AUTOMOBILES FOR SALE 2005 Subaru Wagon 2.5 AT Loaded Heated Mirrors/Seats Runs excellent, no rust, drove from Oregon Excellent condition, 161k miles new timing belt and breaks $5975 503-936-9579

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

FOR RENT

2009 Dodge Charger Mint Condition 49k miles, RT package All Wheel Drive 5.7 V8,358 HP Too many extras to list! Call between 4-9pm No test pilot! 603-520-8234

2 bedroom trailer Sterling AK W/D $650/mth $500 deposit, $400 pet fee plus lights/gas Call April 420-7739 or 262-6076 leave message

FURNISHED APARTMENTS FOR RENT

BEAUTY / SPA

Apartment for Rent Near Longmere Lake 2 bed, furnished, w/d all utilities paid, $950 +$350 deposit, no pets 907-398-9695

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

For Sale 55 Acres Vacant Kenai Land. Parcel totals 55 acres with split zoning designations. Southerly 15+/- acres fronting Beach Access Rd zoned Industrial Heavy, remaining 40+/-acres zoned Rural Residential. Approx. 2.8 cleared-acres improved with gravel/sand base material in NE corner of IH zoned section. 1,770+/-feet of Bridge Access Rd. frontage. Access to east side of parcel via Childs Avenue. Asking Price: $475,000 Contact: Curt Nading Commercial Real Estate Alaska (907) 261-7302 Curt@crealaska.com

For more safety tips visit SmokeyBear.com

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Need some room in the garage? Sell your old sporting & camping gear with a classified Ad today! Classifieds Dept.

1 large bedroom In-floor heating Washer, dryer, & dishwasher heated garage No smoking or pets Singles or couples preferred Handicapped Accessible $1,100 monthly rent First month’s rent and $1,000 deposit to move in 6-month lease required Call 283-4488

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT OFFICE SPACE RENTAL AVAILABLE 609 Marine Street Kenai, Alaska 404 and 394sq,ft, shared entry $1/sq.ft 240sq.ft.Shared conference/Restrooms $0.50/sq.ft 283-4672

283-7551

classi fieds@peninsulaclarion.com

Great teachers do things

differently...

N ew t o n s Unive rsal Law of Gravitation lesson

For all the advancements in automotive safety, the most sophisticated safety devices are the ones already attached to the driver. America’s orthopaedic surgeons, in partnership with automakers, urge every driver to keep hands on the wheel and eyes on the road. Visit DecideToDrive.org.

Nominate outstanding teachers for the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics & Science Teaching – the nation’s highest honor for mathematics and science teachers, awarded by the White House. N ew t o n s Unive rsal Law of Gravitation lesson For more information and nomination forms, please visit www.paemst.org. Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics & Science Teaching

Service Directory 3820-AAOS-AutoAlliance-SafetyFeatures_News_WSJ.indd 1

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Notices

Notice to Consumers The State of Alaska requires construction companies to be licensed, bonded and insured before submitting bids, performing work, or advertising as a construction contractor in accordance with AS 08..18.011, 08.18.071, 08.18.101, and 08.15.051. All advertisements as a construction contractor require the current registration number as issued by the Division of Occupational Licensing to appear in the advertisement. CONSUMERS MAY VERIFY REGISTRATION OF A CONTRACTOR. Contact the AK Department of Labor and Workforce Development at 907-269-4925 or The AK Division of Occupational Licensing in Juneau at 907-4653035 or at www.dced.state.ak.us/acc/home.htm

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TV Guide A13 | PENINSULA CLARION | PENINSULACLARION.COM | Thursday, September 26, 2019 WEEKDAYS MORNING/AFTERNOON A (3) ABC-13 13 (6) MNT-5 5 (8) CBS-11 11 (9) FOX-4 4 (10) NBC-2 2 (12) PBS-7 7

8 AM

B

CABLE STATIONS

(20) QVC

137 317

(23) LIFE

108 252

(28) USA

105 242

(30) TBS

139 247

(31) TNT

138 245

(34) ESPN 140 206

(35) ESPN2 144 209

(36) ROOT 426 687 (38) PARMT 241 241

M T W Th F M T W Th F M T W Th F M T W Th F M T W Th F M T W Th F M T W Th F M T W Th F M T W Th F

M T (43) AMC 131 254 W Th F M T (46) TOON 176 296 W Th F

(47) ANPL 184 282 (49) DISN

(50) NICK

M T 173 291 W Th F M T 171 300 W Th F

(51) FREE 180 311 (55) TLC

9 AM

M T 183 280 W Th F

B

(6) MNT-5

5

(8) CBS-11 11 (9) FOX-4

4

4

(10) NBC-2

2

2

(12) PBS-7

7

7

4 PM

4:30

5 PM

CABLE STATIONS

108 252

(28) USA

105 242

(30) TBS

139 247

(31) TNT

138 245

(34) ESPN 140 206 (35) ESPN2 144 209

1:30

Strahan, Sara & Keke Divorce Divorce The Talk ‘14’ Paternity Simpsons Days of our Lives ‘14’ Molly Go Luna

2 PM

2:30

General Hospital ‘14’ Judge Judy Judge Judy Mel Robbins Varied Dish Nation Dish Nation Tamron Hall ‘PG’ Nature Cat Wild Kratts

3 PM

3:30

Jeopardy Inside Ed. 25 Words 25 Words Dr. Phil ‘14’ Wendy Varied The Kelly Clarkson Show Varied Programs

TV A =Clarion DISH B = DirecTV 5:30

6 PM Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’

6:30

7 PM

7:30

Wheel of For- Grey’s Anatomy Tom gets tune (N) ‘G’ new responsibilities. (N) ‘14’

8 PM

8:30

9 PM

(56) D

(57) T

(58) H

(59)

(60) H

(61) F

(65) C (67)

(81) C

(82) S

PRE !

^ H

+

5 S

8

September 22 - 28,26, 2019 SEPTEMBER 2019 FR 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30

(:01) How to Get Away ABC News at (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live ‘14’ (:37) Nightline (N) ‘G’ With Murder “Say Goodbye” 10 (N) (3) A (N) ‘14’ Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Mike & Molly Mike & Molly Last Man Last Man Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent Dateline ‘PG’ DailyMailTV 2 Broke Girls How I Met Pawn Stars ‘14’ ‘14’ Standing ‘PG’ Standing ‘PG’ Architect is killed with a screw- “Gemini” The detectives look (N) ‘14’ Your Mother “Sleeping Gi- (6) M driver. ‘14’ for a racist. ‘14’ ‘14’ ant” ‘PG’ The Ellen DeGeneres Show KTVA 5 p.m. CBS Evening KTVA 6 p.m. Evening News Young Shel- (:31) The Uni- (:01) Mom Carol’s Sec- Evil Kristen is hired by the KTVA Night- (:35) The Late Show With James Cor (8) C (N) ‘PG’ First Take News don (N) ‘PG’ corn ‘14’ (N) ‘14’ ond Act (N) Catholic Church. (N) ‘14’ cast Stephen Colbert (N) ‘PG’ den NFL Football Philadelphia Eagles at Green Bay Packers. (N) (Live) Total Packers Packers Live OutdoorsFox 4 News at 9 TMZ (N) ‘PG’ TMZ ‘PG’ Entertainment Two and a man/Buck Tonight Half Men ‘14’ (9) F McNeely Judge Judy Judge Judy Channel 2 NBC Nightly Channel 2 Newshour (N) Superstore Perfect Har- The Good (:31) Sun(:01) Law & Order: Special Channel 2 (:34) The Tonight Show Star- (:37) Late ‘PG’ ‘PG’ News 5:00 News With “Cloud 9.0” mony “Pilot” Place (N) ‘PG’ nyside “Pilot” Victims Unit (N) ‘14’ News: Late ring Jimmy Fallon (N Same- Night With (10) N Report (N) Lester Holt (N) ‘14’ (N) ‘PG’ (N) ‘PG’ Edition (N) day Tape) ‘14’ Seth Meyers NOVA “Treasures of the BBC World Nightly Busi- PBS NewsHour (N) Father Brown Mrs. McCar- Death in Paradise The team Midsomer Murders “The Professor T. “Double Life” A Amanpour and Company (N) Earth: Metals” The unique News ness Report thy’s goddaughter disappears. goes to London. ‘PG’ Glitch” Midsomer University. first-year law student disap (12) P properties of metals. ‘G’ ‘G’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ pears. ‘14’

(:01) A Million Little Things “Coming Home” (N) ‘14’

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

Last Man Last Man Last Man (8) WGN-A 239 307 Standing Standing Standing Down Home with David (N) (Live) ‘G’ (20) QVC 137 317 (23) LIFE

Wendy Williams Show Hot Bench Hot Bench Court Court Protection Protection Young & Restless Mod Fam Bold Rachael Ray ‘G’ Paternity Live with Kelly and Ryan The Dr. Oz Show ‘PG’ Dinosaur Cat in the Sesame St. Splash

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud ABC World (N) ‘PG’ (N) ‘PG’ ‘PG’ News

(3) ABC-13 13

WE

In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night JAG “Force Recon” ‘14’ JAG ‘PG’ Blue Bloods ‘14’ Blue Bloods ‘14’ Blue Bloods ‘14’ JAG ‘PG’ In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night JAG “The Guardian” ‘14’ JAG “Code Blue” ‘14’ Blue Bloods ‘14’ Blue Bloods ‘14’ Blue Bloods ‘14’ Dog Dog In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night Dog Dog Dog Dog Dog Dog In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night JAG “Rendezvous” ‘14’ JAG ‘14’ Blue Bloods ‘14’ Blue Bloods “Blues” ‘14’ Blue Bloods ‘14’ Last Man Last Man In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night JAG “Ghost Ship” ‘PG’ JAG ‘PG’ Blue Bloods ‘14’ Blue Bloods “Rectify” ‘14’ Blue Bloods ‘14’ Last Man Last Man Alegria Footwear (N) ‘G’ Joan Rivers Classics Jayne & Pat’s Closet (N) (Live) ‘G’ Martha Stewart - Garden Martha Stewart - Fashion G.I.L.I. with Jill Martin ‘G’ PM Style With Amy Stran (7:00) Countdown to Christmas “Holiday Decor” ‘G’ HomeWorx Holiday Decorating With Pat (N) (Live) ‘G’ Gourmet Holiday (N) (Live) ‘G’ Santa’s Best (N) (Live) ‘G’ Countdown to Christmas House to Home by Valerie - Holiday Edition (N) ‘G’ Countdown to Christmas “Holiday Decor” (N) ‘G’ Gourmet Holiday (N) (Live) ‘G’ At Home With Carolyn (N) (Live) ‘G’ Skechers (N) (Live) ‘G’ Clarks Footwear (N) ‘G’ Fall Cleanup (N) (Live) ‘G’ Breezies Intimates Bright Ideas With Jennifer (N) (Live) ‘G’ (7:00) philosophy - beauty Isaac Mizrahi Live! (N) ‘G’ Journey by Lois Hill Silver philosophy - beauty (N) (Live) ‘G’ Urban Decay Cosmetics philosophy - beauty ‘G’ Holiday Gift Preview ‘G’ The Closer ‘14’ The Closer ‘14’ The Closer ‘14’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘14’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ The Closer ‘14’ The Closer ‘14’ The Closer ‘14’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ The Closer ‘14’ The Closer ‘14’ The Closer ‘14’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Cheerleader Generation Cheerleader Generation Cheerleader Generation Cheerleader Generation Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ UnREAL (N) ‘MA’ UnREAL “Wild Card” ‘MA’ UnREAL “Cold Call” ‘MA’ UnREAL “No Limit” ‘MA’ UnREAL “Tilt” (N) ‘MA’ UnREAL “Bluff” (N) ‘MA’ UnREAL (N) ‘MA’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU NCIS “Baltimore” ‘14’ NCIS “Swan Song” ‘14’ NCIS “Pyramid” ‘14’ NCIS ‘14’ NCIS “Restless” ‘PG’ NCIS ‘PG’ NCIS ‘PG’ NCIS ‘PG’ Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Seinfeld Seinfeld Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Burgers Burgers Seinfeld Seinfeld ‘G’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Seinfeld Seinfeld Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘14’ Seinfeld ‘G’ Seinfeld Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘14’ Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Charmed ‘PG’ Supernatural ‘PG’ Supernatural ‘PG’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ “How to Be Single” (2016) Dakota Johnson. Charmed ‘PG’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘PG’ Supernatural ‘14’ “The Bourne Legacy” (2012) Jeremy Renner. Charmed ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ “Maleficent” (2014) Charmed ‘PG’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Bones ‘14’ Bones ‘14’ “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story” (2016) Charmed ‘PG’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Bones ‘14’ Bones ‘14’ Bones ‘14’ Bones ‘14’ SportsCenter (N) (Live) NFL PrimeTime (N) (Live) NFL Live (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Around Interruption Monday Night Countdown (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Outside NFL Live (N) (Live) NBA: The Jump (N) (Live) High Noon Question Around Interruption SportsCenter (N) (Live) American Game SportsCenter (N) (Live) Outside NFL Live (N) (Live) NBA: The Jump (N) (Live) High Noon Question Around Interruption SportsCenter (N) (Live) MLB Baseball SportsCenter (N) (Live) Outside NFL Live (N) (Live) NBA: The Jump (N) (Live) High Noon Question Around Interruption SportsCenter (N) (Live) CFB 150 Countdown SportsCenter (N) (Live) Outside NFL Live (N) (Live) NBA: The Jump (N) (Live) High Noon Question Around Interruption SportsCenter (N) (Live) College Football First Take Jalen & Jacoby (N) NBA: The Jump (N) (Live) High Noon Question NFL Live SportsCenter (N) (Live) NBA: The Jump First Take Jalen & Jacoby (N) NFL Live Football High Noon Question Daily Wager (N) (Live) NFL Great Super Bowl First Take Jalen & Jacoby (N) NFL Live Football High Noon Question Daily Wager (N) (Live) NFL Live First Take Jalen & Jacoby (N) NFL Live Football High Noon Question Daily Wager (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) First Take Jalen & Jacoby (N) NFL Live Football Max Question Daily Wager (N) (Live) MLB Baseball The Rich Eisen Show (N) (Live) ‘PG’ Paid Prog. Paid Prog. The Dan Patrick Show (N) ‘PG’ College Football The Rich Eisen Show (N) (Live) ‘PG’ Paid Prog. Everstrong The Dan Patrick Show (N) ‘PG’ Golf Life Focused The Rich Eisen Show (N) (Live) ‘PG’ Paid Prog. Paid Prog. The Dan Patrick Show (N) ‘PG’ Destination West Coast The Rich Eisen Show (N) (Live) ‘PG’ Paid Prog. Paid Prog. The Dan Patrick Show (N) ‘PG’ MLS Soccer The Rich Eisen Show (N) (Live) ‘PG’ Paid Prog. Paid Prog. The Dan Patrick Show (N) ‘PG’ MLS Soccer Bar Rescue ‘PG’ Bar Rescue ‘PG’ Bar Rescue ‘PG’ Bar Rescue ‘PG’ Bar Rescue ‘PG’ Two Men Two Men Two Men Two Men Varied Programs Stooges “Death Race 2” (2010, Action) Luke Goss, Ving Rhames. “Die Hard” (1988, Action) Bruce Willis, Alan Rickman, Bonnie Bedelia. “Pulp Fiction” (1994) John Travolta. “Anaconda” (1997) Jennifer Lopez, Ice Cube. “Pulp Fiction” (1994, Crime Drama) John Travolta, Samuel L. Jackson. “The Shawshank Redemption” (1994) Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman. (:15) “Death Warrant” (1990) Robert Guillaume (:15) “Ender’s Game” (2013) Harrison Ford, Asa Butterfield. (:45) “The Fugitive” (1993, Suspense) Harrison Ford, Tommy Lee Jones. Minority Rpt M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H (:40) “Minority Report” (2002, Science Fiction) Tom Cruise, Colin Farrell. (12:55) “John Carter” (2012, Science Fiction) Taylor Kitsch, Lynn Collins. Stooges (:45) “Animal House” (1978) John Belushi, Kevin Bacon. (:15) “Ace Ventura: Pet Detective” (1994) (:15) “Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls” (1995) (:15) “The Hangover” Ben 10 ‘Y7’ Teen Titans Victor Victor Total Drama Total Drama Gumball Gumball Gumball Gumball Total Drama Total Drama Teen Titans Teen Titans Gumball Gumball Ben 10 ‘Y7’ Teen Titans Victor Victor Total Drama Total Drama Gumball Gumball Gumball Gumball Total Drama Total Drama Teen Titans Teen Titans Gumball Gumball Ben 10 ‘Y7’ Teen Titans Victor Victor Total Drama Total Drama Gumball Gumball Gumball Gumball Total Drama Total Drama Teen Titans Teen Titans Gumball Gumball Ben 10 ‘Y7’ Teen Titans Victor Victor Total Drama Total Drama Gumball Gumball Gumball Gumball Total Drama Total Drama Teen Titans Teen Titans Gumball Gumball Ben 10 ‘Y7’ Teen Titans Victor Victor Total Drama Total Drama Gumball Gumball Gumball Gumball Total Drama Total Drama Teen Titans Teen Titans Gumball Gumball Dr. Dee: Alaska Vet Dr. Jeff: RMV The Zoo ‘PG’ Secret Life-Zoo Pit Bulls and Parolees Pit Bulls and Parolees Varied Programs Mickey T.O.T.S. ‘Y’ T.O.T.S. ‘Y’ Puppy Pals Muppet Giganto Vampirina PJ Masks Puppy Pals T.O.T.S. ‘Y’ Academy Ladybug Amphibia Big City Big City Big City Mickey T.O.T.S. ‘Y’ Puppy Pals Puppy Pals Muppet Giganto Vampirina PJ Masks Puppy Pals T.O.T.S. ‘Y’ Academy Ladybug Amphibia Big City Big City Big City Mickey T.O.T.S. ‘G’ Puppy Pals Puppy Pals Muppet Giganto Vampirina PJ Masks Puppy Pals T.O.T.S. ‘Y’ Academy Ladybug Amphibia Big City Big City Big City Mickey T.O.T.S. ‘Y’ Puppy Pals Puppy Pals Muppet Giganto Vampirina PJ Masks Puppy Pals T.O.T.S. ‘Y’ Academy Ladybug Amphibia Big City Big City Big City Mickey T.O.T.S. ‘G’ Puppy Pals Muppet T.O.T.S. ‘Y’ Giganto Vampirina PJ Masks Puppy Pals T.O.T.S. ‘Y’ Academy Ladybug Amphibia Big City Big City Big City Bubble Bubble Bubble Bubble Bubble Bubble Blaze Ricky Zoom PAW Patrol PAW Patrol “Ice Age: The Meltdown” (2006, Children’s) SpongeBob SpongeBob Bubble Bubble Bubble Bubble Bubble Bubble Blaze Ricky Zoom PAW Patrol PAW Patrol SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob Bubble Bubble Bubble Bubble Bubble Bubble Blaze Ricky Zoom PAW Patrol PAW Patrol SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob Bubble Bubble Bubble Bubble Bubble Bubble Blaze Ricky Zoom PAW Patrol PAW Patrol SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob Bubble Guppies ‘Y’ Bubble Guppies ‘Y’ Bubble Guppies ‘Y’ Bubble PAW Patrol PAW Patrol PAW Patrol SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob Baby Daddy 700 Club The 700 Club Varied Programs Movie Varied Programs 900 Pound Man: Race The 685-Lb. Teen ‘PG’ Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. Dr. Pimple Popper ‘14’ American Gypsy Wedding American Gypsy Wedding Say Yes Say Yes Unexpected ‘14’ Unexpected ‘14’ The Little Couple ‘G’ The Little Couple ‘G’ The Little Couple ‘G’ The Little Couple ‘G’ The Little Couple ‘G’ The Little Couple ‘G’ Pregnant Behind Bars ‘14’ Pregnant Behind Bars ‘14’ Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. Dr. Pimple Popper ‘14’ American Gypsy Wedding American Gypsy Wedding Say Yes to the Dress Pregnant Pregnant Pregnant Pregnant Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. Dr. Pimple Popper ‘14’ American Gypsy Wedding American Gypsy Wedding Say Yes to the Dress Secretly Pregnant ‘14’ Secretly Pregnant ‘14’ Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. Dr. Pimple Popper ‘14’ American Gypsy Wedding American Gypsy Wedding Say Yes to the Dress

6 THURSDAY AFTERNOON/EVENING A

B = DirecTV

9:30 10 AM 10:30 11 AM 11:30 12 PM 12:30 1 PM

Good Morning America The View ‘14’ The Doctors ‘PG’ Channel 2 Morning Ed Dateline ‘PG’ Providence Providence (7:00) CBS This Morning Let’s Make a Deal ‘PG’ The Price Is Right ‘G’ Injury Court The People’s Court ‘PG’ Judge Mathis ‘PG’ The Real ‘PG’ (7:00) Today ‘G’ Today 3rd Hour Today-Hoda Curious Go Luna Daniel Tiger Daniel Tiger Sesame St. Pinkalicious

4 2 7

(8) WGN-A 239 307

8:30

A = DISH

Last Man Standing

CAB

Last Man Last Man Last Man Last Man Dog’s Most Wanted “A Married ... Married ... How I Met How I Met Elementary “Through the (8) W Standing Standing Standing Standing Huntsville Hunt” ‘14’ With With Your Mother Your Mother Fog” ‘PG’ Haute Hippie Tribe - Fashion Koolaburra by UGG (N) philosophy - beauty (N) (Live) ‘G’ Louise et Cie Shoes (N) philosophy - beauty (N) (20) (N) (Live) ‘G’ (Live) ‘G’ (Live) ‘G’ (Live) ‘G’ Wife Swap “Cooper/ Kukta” Wife Swap A family obsessed Wife Swap “Flannagin/Logan” “Escaping the NXIVM Cult: A Mother’s Fight to Save Her Beyond the Headlines: Es- (:03) “Escaping the NXIVM Cult: A Mother’s Fight to Save Obsessed with entering with motorcycles. ‘PG’ A family lives a pioneer life- Daughter” (2019, Drama) Andrea Roth. A mother fights to caping the NXIVM Cult With Her Daughter” (2019, Drama) Andrea Roth. A mother fights (23) sweepstakes. ‘PG’ style. ‘PG’ save her daughter from a sex cult. Gretchen Carlson to save her daughter from a sex cult. NCIS Searching for a missing “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1” (2010, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert (:10) “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2” (2011, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe, Ru- Chicago P.D. “Assignment of (28) Marine. ‘14’ Grint. Harry sets out to destroy the secrets to Voldemort’s power. pert Grint, Emma Watson. Harry may have to make the ultimate sacrifice. the Year” ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Family Guy Family Guy The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang Chasing the Cure “Chasing The Big Bang The Big Bang Conan “Al Seinfeld “The Seinfeld ‘PG’ Conan “Al ‘14’ ‘PG’ Theory ‘14’ Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ the Cure 108” (N Same-day Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ Franken” (N) Soul Mate” Franken” ‘14’ (30) Tape) ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘PG’ (2:00) “Rogue One: A Star “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” (2014, Action) Chris Evans, Scarlett Johansson. Chasing the Cure “Chasing “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” (2014, Action) Chris Evans, Scarlett Johansson. (31) Wars Story” (2016) Capt. America and the Black Widow face an unexpected enemy. the Cure 108” ‘14’ Capt. America and the Black Widow face an unexpected enemy. College Football Navy at Memphis. From Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium in Memphis, Tenn. SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter With Scott Van SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) College Football Navy at (34) E (N) (Live) Pelt (N) (Live) Memphis. WNBA Basketball Los Angeles Sparks at Connecticut Sun. WNBA Basketball Las Vegas Aces at Washington Mystics. UFC Fight CFB 150: Golf Asia-Pacific Amateur Championship, Second Round. From Sheshan Golf Club in Shang (35) E Game 5. (If necessary). (N) (Live) Game 5. (If necessary). (N) (Live) Flashback Greatest hai, China. (N) (Live)

MLS Soccer: Revolution at (36) ROOT 426 687 Timbers Mom ‘14’ Mom ‘PG’ (38) PARMT 241 241

Mariners Mariners Pre- MLB Baseball Oakland Athletics at Seattle Mariners. From T-Mobile Park in Seattle. (N) Mariners Seahawks Seahawks MLB Baseball Oakland Athletics at Seattle (36) R Spotlight (N) game (N) (Live) Postgame Press Pass Press Pass Mariners. Mom ‘PG’ Mom ‘14’ Mom ‘14’ Mom ‘14’ “Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen” (2009, Action) Shia LaBeouf, Megan Fox, Josh Duhamel. Sam “Star Trek Beyond” (2016, Science Fiction) (38) P Witwicky holds the key to defeating an ancient Decepticon. Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto. (3:55) “Independence Day” (1996, Science Fiction) Will Smith, Bill Pullman, Jeff Goldblum. “The Hangover” (2009) Bradley Cooper. Three pals must (:15) “Ace Ventura: Pet Detective” (1994, Comedy) Jim Car- (:15) Lodge 49 Dud resumes (43) AMC 131 254 Earthlings vs. evil aliens in 15-mile-wide ships. (43) A find a missing groom after a wild bash. rey, Courteney Cox, Sean Young. apprenticeship. ‘14’ Bob’s Burg- Bob’s Burg- Bob’s Burg- Bob’s Burg- Bob’s Burg- Bob’s Burg- (:05) Bob’s Bob’s Burg- The Brak The Brak Bob’s Burg- Bob’s Burg- Bob’s Burg- (:35) Bob’s Bob’s Burg- Bob’s Burg (46) TOON 176 296 ers ‘PG’ (46) T ers ‘14’ ers ‘14’ ers ‘14’ ers ‘PG’ ers ‘PG’ Burgers ers ‘PG’ Show ‘PG’ Show ‘PG’ ers ‘PG’ ers ‘14’ ers ‘14’ Burgers ‘14’ ers ‘PG’ ers ‘PG’ Tanked ‘PG’ Tanked Tracy Morgan’s huge Tanked “Bellagio Makeover” Tanked “Going for the Tanked Wayde and Brett both Tanked Theater-themed tank Tanked NBA star Hassan Tanked Wayde and Brett both (47) ANPL 184 282 (47) A shark aquarium. ‘PG’ ‘PG’ Gold(fish)” ‘PG’ want a pond. ‘PG’ for Jeff Dunham. ‘PG’ Whiteside. ‘PG’ want a pond. ‘PG’ (49) DISN

173 291

(50) NICK

171 300

(51) FREE 180 311 (55) TLC

183 280

(56) DISC

182 278

(57) TRAV 196 277 (58) HIST

120 269

(59) A&E

118 265

(60) HGTV 112 229 (61) FOOD 110 231 (65) CNBC 208 355 (67) FNC

205 360

(81) COM

107 249

(82) SYFY

122 244

Bunk’d ‘G’

Raven’s Just Roll With Jessie ‘G’ Jessie ‘G’ Coop & Cami Sydney to the Raven’s Just Roll With Bunk’d ‘G’ Bunk’d ‘G’ Home ‘G’ It ‘Y7’ Max ‘G’ Home ‘G’ It ‘Y7’ The Loud The Loud The Loud The Loud Henry Dan- SpongeBob “Ice Age” (2002, Children’s) Voices of Ray All That ‘G’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ House ‘Y7’ House ‘Y7’ House ‘Y7’ House ‘Y7’ ger ‘G’ Romano, John Leguizamo. (2:00) “Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s “Finding Nemo” (2003) Voices of Albert Brooks, Ellen DeGeneres. Ani“Finding Dory” (2016, Children’s) Voices of Ellen DeGeThe 700 Club “Hancock” (2008) Will Smith, End” (2007) Johnny Depp. mated. A clown fish searches for his missing son. neres, Albert Brooks, Ed O’Neill. Charlize Theron. Say Yes to the Dress ‘PG’ 90 Day Fiancé: Before the 90 Days The results of the back- Unexpected Rosa and ReBirth Moms ‘14’ Obese and Pregnant ‘PG’ Obese and Expecting ‘PG’ Unexpected Rosa and Reground check. ‘PG’ becca finally meet. ‘14’ becca finally meet. ‘14’ Naked and Afraid “The Dan- Naked and Afraid “Category Naked and Afraid “From the Naked and Afraid “Trouble in Naked and Afraid “River, Rain and Jealousy” Rains and pumas threaten a duo. (N) ‘14’ Naked and Afraid A deadly ger Within” ‘14’ 5 Survival” ‘14’ Ashes” ‘14’ Paradise” ‘14’ spider bite. ‘14’ The Dead Files ‘PG’ The Dead Files ‘PG’ The Dead Files “Evil Comes The Dead Files Terrifying The Dead Files (N) ‘PG’ The Dead Files “Absorbed” The Dead Files A woman The Dead Files ‘PG’ Home” ‘PG’ paranormal activity. ‘PG’ (N) ‘PG’ loses control. ‘PG’ American Pickers An ultra- American Pickers “Picked a American Pickers “Hydro American Pickers: Bonus Buys “Pickin’ Hollywood” Mike and Danielle join a salvage crew. (N) ‘PG’ (:03) American Pickers: Borare VW beetle. ‘PG’ Peck of Pepper” ‘PG’ Homestead” ‘PG’ nus Buys ‘PG’ (2:00) Live PD “Live PD Live PD Live PD Live PD Live PD Live PD Live PD Live PD Live PD (:01) Live PD (:32) Live PD (:04) Live PD (:34) Live PD (:03) Live PD (:33) Live PD -- 07.13.18” Riding along with Presents: PD Presents: PD Presents: PD Presents: PD Presents: PD Presents: PD Presents: PD Presents: PD Presents: PD Presents: PD Presents: PD Presents: PD Presents: PD Presents: PD law enforcement. ‘14’ Cam ‘14’ Cam ‘14’ Cam ‘14’ Cam ‘14’ Cam ‘14’ Cam ‘14’ Cam ‘14’ Cam ‘14’ Cam ‘14’ Cam ‘14’ Cam ‘14’ Cam ‘14’ Cam ‘14’ Cam ‘14’ Flip or Flop Flip or Flop Flip or Flop Flip or Flop Flip or Flop Flip or Flop Flip or Flop Flip or Flop Flip or Flop Flip or Flop House Hunt- Hunters Int’l Selling the House Hunt- Flip or Flop Flip or Flop ‘G’ ‘G’ ‘G’ ‘G’ ‘G’ ‘G’ ‘G’ ‘G’ (N) ‘G’ ‘G’ ers (N) ‘G’ Big Easy ‘G’ ers ‘G’ ‘G’ ‘G’ Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Halloween Baking Champi- Kids Halloween Baking Kids Baking Championship Beat Bobby The Flay List Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Kids Baking ChampionFlay ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ onship ‘G’ Championship ‘G’ (N) ‘G’ Flay (N) ‘G’ (N) ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ ship ‘G’ Shark Tank A juice and Shark Tank ‘PG’ Shark Tank A pricing tool; a Shark Tank Dual-use breath Shark Tank A juice and Shark Tank ‘PG’ Dateline NBC “The Carroll- Dateline NBC “The Carrollsmoothie cart. ‘PG’ cleaning tool. ‘PG’ freshener. ‘PG’ smoothie cart. ‘PG’ ton Plot” ton Plot” Tucker Carlson Tonight (N) Hannity (N) The Ingraham Angle (N) Fox News at Night With Tucker Carlson Tonight Hannity The Ingraham Angle Fox News at Night With Shannon Bream (N) Shannon Bream (3:55) The Of- The Office The Office (:35) The Of- (:10) The Of- (:45) The Office Darryl negoti- (:20) The Of- (7:55) The Comedy Central Roast “Alec Baldwin” The roast The Daily Lights Out-D. (:05) South (:36) South fice ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ fice ‘14’ fice ‘14’ ates with Michael. ‘14’ fice ‘14’ of one of Hollywood’s stars. ‘MA’ Show Spade Park ‘MA’ Park ‘MA’ (2:00) “The Hunger Games” “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” (2013, Science Fiction) Jennifer Lawrence, Josh “Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters” (2013, Fantasy) Jeremy (9:58) “Jack the Giant Slayer” (2013, Fantasy) Nicholas (2012) Hutcherson. The 75th Annual Hunger Games may change Panem forever. Renner. Siblings hunt witches for a living. Hoult, Eleanor Tomlinson, Ewan McGregor.

PREMIUM STATIONS ! HBO

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5 SHOW 319 546 8 TMC

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Jessie ‘G’

Jessie ‘G’

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SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

(3:55) Succession “Return” 303 504 ‘MA’

^ HBO2 304 505 + MAX

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(4:55) “Notting Hill” (1999, Romance-Comedy) Julia Rob“Rush Hour 2” (2001) Jackie Chan. Detec- The Righ(:05) Room “Night School” (2018, Comedy) Kevin Hart, Tiffany HadAlternate erts, Hugh Grant. A bookseller and a movie star have an tives battle a Hong Kong gangster and his teous Gem- 104 ‘MA’ dish, Rob Riggle. A student puts up with a feisty teacher at Endings: Six ! unlikely romance. ‘PG-13’ henchmen. ‘PG-13’ stones ‘MA’ night school. ‘PG-13’ New Ways (3:45) “Suspect Zero” (2004) Aaron Eckhart. (:25) “The Darkest Hour” (2011) Emile The Righ(:35) “Mary Queen of Scots” (2018, Biography) Saoirse (:45) “Buzz” (2019, Documentary) Author Buzz Bissinger (:20) “AquaFBI agents search for a murderer of serial Hirsch. An alien attack sweeps up American teous Gem- Ronan, Margot Robbie. Chronicles Mary Stuart’s attempt to reveals his own buried desires. ‘NR’ man” (2018) ^ H killers. ‘R’ tourists in Moscow. ‘PG-13’ stones ‘MA’ overthrow Elizabeth I. ‘R’ (3:25) “Reversal of Fortune” (1990) Glenn (:20) “The Getaway” (2018, Suspense) Aaron “The Prestige” (2006, Drama) Hugh Jackman, Christian (:15) “Replicas” (2018, Science Fiction) Keanu Reeves, (:05) “True Lies” (1994, Close. Based on the story of the Claus von Paul. A couple’s plans are interrupted by a Bale, Michael Caine. Two 19th-century magicians engage in a Thomas Middleditch, Alice Eve. A neuroscientist tries to clone Action) Arnold Schwarzeneg- + Bulow murder trial. ‘R’ homeowner’s evil plans. ‘R’ deadly rivalry. ‘PG-13’ his dead wife and children. ‘PG-13’ ger. ‘R’ (3:20) “Cruel Intentions” The Affair “505” Sierra’s “American Assassin” (2017, Action) Dylan O’Brien, Michael “Dead Presidents” (1995, Drama) Larenz Tate, Keith David, “Reservoir Dogs” (1992) Harvey Keitel, Tim On Becoming (1999, Drama) Sarah Michelle mother visits uninvited. ‘MA’ Keaton, Sanaa Lathan. Three agents join forces to battle a Chris Tucker. A jobless Vietnam vet and his buddies organize Roth. Violent thieves ponder the identity of a a God 5 S Gellar. ‘R’ mysterious operative. ‘R’ a heist. ‘R’ police informant. ‘R’ (3:05) “Charlie’s Angels: “Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life” (2003, Ad- “Midnight Sun” (2018) Bella Thorne. A (:35) “13 Going on 30” (2004) Jennifer (:15) “Falling for Grace” (2006, Romance-Comedy) Fay Ann Full Throttle” (2003) Camventure) Angelina Jolie. The globe-trotter battles a scientist for teen who can’t be exposed to sunlight finds Garner. An uncool girl magically becomes a Lee, Gale Harold. A Chinese-American gal is mistaken for a 8 eron Diaz. ‘PG-13’ Pandora’s box. ‘PG-13’ romance. ‘PG-13’ successful adult. ‘PG-13’ Hong Kong heiress. ‘PG-13’

Clarion TV

September 22 - 28, 2019


Clarion Features & Comics A14

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Peninsula Clarion

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peninsulaclarion.com

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thursday, september 26, 2019

Friend’s new wife overshares about couple’s married life DEAR ABBY: My DEAR MATURE ONE: husband’s best friend When Jane’s behavior remarried a couple of presents itself, ask her to years ago, and the new tone it down because it wife, “Jane,” is a handful. makes you uncomfortWhen we get together, able. If that doesn’t work, she’s as free-spirited the only guaranteed way and open as you can for Jane’s antics to not get, sexually. She hangs bother you will be for on her husband like a you to encourage your magnet, grabbing at him husband to socialize Dear Abby provocatively and letting separately with his best Jeanne Phillips everyone know anything friend so you see Jane as and everything about her little as possible. sexual attraction and their sex life. At first it was funny, since they DEAR ABBY: I am a gay man. A were newlyweds and all, but it isn’t few weeks ago, a neighbor I became funny any longer. Frankly, it’s nauclose to confided to me that her husseating. I would like to get together band is homophobic. When she said more often, minus the X-rated show. he wasn’t comfortable around me, I’m concerned that if I say something I agreed with her that it was best to (and everyone knows I don’t usually give them both space and discontinbite my tongue), it will cause a major ue our friendship. Then her husband rift between all of us. I don’t want approached me and apologized. He to keep my husband from his best told me he is not homophobic, and friend. Any advice? he wants to be friends, so I decided — MATURE ONE IN INDIANA to forgive. Lately, he has been trying to

include me in his friend group within the neighborhood. I appreciate it, but part of me in all honesty is a bit afraid. Not knowing what he may have mentioned to his friends and how they may treat me has me worried. Should I try and be friends with them and try to repair the friendship? Or should I let it go? — OUT AND PROUD IN PENNSYLVANIA

has office mates, and she’s in kind of a “hub.” She lives alone with two dogs and an unknown (to me) number of cats. Her children are grown but don’t live nearby. How can I kindly address this with her? I don’t want to hurt her feelings, but something has got to give. I have let management know, but they are reluctant to address this. — NOSE KNOWS IN THE SOUTH

DEAR OUT AND PROUD: I’d hate to see you isolate yourself. Integrating the neighborhood would be beneficial to all. Give it a try, gauge the way these individuals treat you and make your final decision then.

DEAR NOSE: It is not your job to address this problem with your coworker. It is management’s responsibility. Because you have complained and nothing was done, it’s time for the others who are affected by the odor to address management about it COLLECTIVELY.

DEAR ABBY: I work with a wonderful older woman. She is smart, funny, and comes to work with a positive attitude. Unfortunately, she smells of cat urine. It’s really bad — to the point I have moved out of our shared office, and there are plans to move her into her own office. However, that may be months off. She still

Crossword | Eugene Sheffer

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Jacqueline Bigar’s Stars

ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH You can be unusually frugal and fussy. You want to complete a task and feel that you know the best way. A supervisor might be inclined to change your procedures. You will naturally dig in your heels. Tonight: Do not push yourself too hard.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Your creativity soars as you deal with a child or new friend. You might experience some initial tension, but that will diffuse quickly as long as you can understand where others come from. Tonight: Work on your listening skills.

HHH Having your personal life run smoothly could be more important to you than you realize. Be ready to change directions if you perceive a snafu. Above all, you have a strong likelihood of understanding another person’s upset. Tonight: Go with the flow.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH You say what you feel, but do not be surprised at another person’s reaction. You may feel fatigue, and your desire to change what already is could be blunted. A friend stuns you with his or her unexpected behavior. Tonight: At a favorite haunt.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH You might suddenly be concerned with your finances. An unexpected request or demand puts you on new turf. Recognize what will happen if you let go and do not exercise some self-discipline. You need to be moderate in your financial dealings. Tonight: As you like it.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Keep your head high. Many people are observing your choices and your behavior. Investigate new possibilities with more care. You might want to take a stab

Dear Heloise: I know my neighbors are out of town when they don’t put out their trash/recycle cans on trash day and their vehicles don’t move. When I go out of town, I have a neighbor put trash/recycle cans in front of my house and park a vehicle in front of my house occasionally. — Mary H., via email

READER SHAKEN BY SIFTED Dear Heloise: I get frustrated when reading a recipe that quotes ingredients for dry goods in “cup” measurements. One cup of flour sifted is significantly different from 1 cup of sifted flour. — Rosemary W., Ventura, Calif.

BETTER BANDAGE Dear Heloise: To remove an adhesive strip that’s

Rubes | Leigh Rubin

HHHHH A relationship could evolve to a new level of caring. You see a personal matter in a different light. A child or loved one could be most unpredictable. You might not be able to prevent a negative response. Be aware of the tension you are under. Tonight: What suits you best.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Create much more of what you desire. Observe what others are doing more carefully than you have in the recent past. Accept a fast change of pace, knowing full well where you are heading. Tonight: Listen to your inner voice. You will know what to do.

HHHH One-on-one relating flourishes despite a snafu of some sort. A disagreement around property or your home could provoke an odd reaction from someone else. Discussions could take away some of the tension. Tonight: Be a duo.

HHHH Create more of what you want and you will succeed. Friends will back you with a special project that you cannot say no to. Investigate new possibilities with an eye to expanding your horizons. Tonight: A partner does the unexpected.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Speak your mind and share more of your thoughts. You often keep people wondering about what is on your mind. Express your concerns in a diplomatic manner. Do not be surprised at another person’s reaction. Tonight: Say yes to a request.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH All eyes turn to a boss or higher-up. Do you really want this kind of role? Think twice. Think of all the flack you might need to absorb. Saying no has its benefits and allows you to be more independent. Tonight: A force to behold.

SEASONED CAST IRON Dear Heloise: I know you’ve had hints about cleaning cast-iron cookware. However, I just received a new cast-iron pan from my mother-in-law, and she said I need to “season” it first. What do I need to do? — Marie, via email Marie, let’s go step by step: 1. Wash with hot, soapy water, and dry thoroughly. 2. Rub the interior and exterior of the pan with a towel saturated with vegetable oil. 3. Heat in the oven, upside down, on a foil-covered baking sheet at 350 F for one hour. Cut the heat off and let the pan cool in place. That’s it! Never wash a seasoned pan with detergent — you want the patina (coating) to build up. Rub the pan with salt to clean it. — Heloise

cryptoquip

BORN TODAY Tennis player Serena Williams (1981), singer/actress Olivia Newton-John (1948), poet T.S. Eliot (1888)

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.

really stuck on, I rub a drop of baby oil on it. The strip comes right off. — Tina D. in Oklahoma

Wednesday’s answers, 9-25

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

hints from heloise I KNOW ...

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at making an agreement that suits you involving a new project. Tonight: Work with a sudden change in plans.

Conceptis Sudoku | DaveByGreen Dave Green

SUDOKU Solution

1 5 6 4 7 2 9 8 3

9 3 7 5 8 6 4 1 2

2 4 8 3 1 9 7 5 6

5 1 2 7 9 4 3 6 8

6 7 9 8 3 1 5 2 4

4 8 3 2 6 5 1 7 9

7 6 4 9 5 8 2 3 1

Difficulty Level

B.C. | Johnny Hart

3 9 1 6 2 7 8 4 5

8 2 5 1 4 3 6 9 7

1 5

7 8

8

Difficulty Level

Ziggy | Tom Wilson

Tundra | Chad Carpenter

Garfield | Jim Davis

Take it from the Tinkersons | Bill Bettwy

Shoe | Chris Cassatt & Gary Brookins

Mother Goose and Grimm | Michael Peters

5

3 9

2 3 6

2

9

6 2

9/25

7

6

7 9

4

6 1

7

9 4 9/26

2019 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

This year, you often feel as if you must keep certain information and feelings hush-hush. As a result, others find you secretive. If single, you meet people with ease, though you could experience some upset if you relate on a close level. Trust could be an issue. If attached, the two of you keep a lot under wraps. As a couple, you benefit from time away together. Infuse your bond with romance. VIRGO might irritate you with their fussing. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

GEMINI (May 21-June 20)

2019 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, Sept. 26, 2019:

Profile for Sound Publishing

Peninsula Clarion, September 26, 2019  

September 26, 2019 edition of the Peninsula Clarion

Peninsula Clarion, September 26, 2019  

September 26, 2019 edition of the Peninsula Clarion