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Swan Lake Fire grows to more than 60,000 acres

In the news Authorities: Fairbanks residents should prepare to evacuate FAIRBANKS — Fairbanks emergency officials are warning some residents to be prepared to flee as a wildfire burns nearby. The Daily NewsMiner reports that the Fairbanks North Star Borough Department of Emergency Service says residents of a neighborhood in northwest Fairbanks have been advised that they need to be ready to evacuate, but no evacuation notices have been issued as of Saturday night. Emergency officials say residents should assemble a kit of important items to take in the event of an evacuation. Wildfire smoke is degrading air quality throughout the region.

Troopers: 3 dead, 1 critically injured in plane crash MOOSE PASS — Three people died and a fourth was severely injured in a plane crash in Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula, authorities said. The small plane crashed Friday into a mountain on the north side of Tern Lake near Moose Pass, Alaska State Troopers spokesman Tim DeSpain told the Anchorage Daily News. Three people were killed in the crash, but one person was airlifted to Providence hospital in critical condition. The Daily News reported that family members said the survivor, 28-year-old Joy Cooper of Paris, Texas, was on vacation in Alaska with friends when the plane crashed. Cooper suffered multiple broken bones and a partially collapsed lung, but was responsive in the hospital Saturday, her family told the newspaper. A team was expected to be airlifted to the crash scene Saturday to recover the bodies. The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating. — Associated Press

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By Brian Mazurek Peninsula Clarion

Tucker Challans, left, and Logan Amaya, right, advertise their lemonade business along the Kenai Spur Highway during Lemonade Day in Soldotna on Saturday. (Photo by Brian Mazurek/Peninsula Clarion)

Sidewalk entrepreneurs set up shop By Brian Mazurek Peninsula Clarion

In the heat of the summer, even Alaskans need a way to cool off. On Saturday, as temperatures reached nearly 80 degrees, dozens of resourceful kids from around

the peninsula parked their roadside stands all over Soldotna for Lemonade Day and offered fresh-squeezed lemonade and homemade snacks to thirsty residents and tourists. Organized annually by the Kenai and Soldotna Cham-

bers of Commerce. Lemonade Day is aims to give young entrepreneurs the opportunity to learn the ins and outs of running a small business — from idea to execution, Sara Hondel, tourism and education director for the Soldotna Chamber of Com-

merce, said. To get involved, parents register their kids online either at the chamber websites or on the Lemonade Day Alaska website and receive a yellow backpack from the chamber full of information See LEMON, page A3

The Swan Lake Fire grew to more than 60,000 acres over the weekend, with the blaze at 62,840 acres as of a Saturday morning update by the Alaska Incident Management Team. Firefighters spent Friday reinforcing fire lines along the Sterling Highway and East Fork Moose River, according to the update. There are currently 489 personnel managing the fire from various local, state, and federal agencies. On Friday, a hotshot crew was repositioned to protect infrastructure to the northeast of the fire, including a public use cabin, the Moose Research Center and a portion of the ENSTAR gas pipeline. The fire continues to spread primarily to the northeast through thick strands of black spruce. Two-way traffic along the Sterling Highway has resumed, but motorists should expect a reduced speed limit as firefighters are working along the road. Smoke conditions on the peninsula are expected to remain the same as a highpressure weather system moves over the area. See FIRE, page A3

Reaching new heights Seward’s Moore celebrates 50 years of running Mt. Marathon By JOEY KLECKA Peninsula Clarion

Seward stalwart Fred Moore may not reside in the public eye of the Alaska mountain running scene as those that have blazed to new records up and down the famed Mount Marathon trail, and he’s never been as fast as those names either. But one thing he holds over them — over everyone, in fact — is how many times he’s returned to conquer the famous peak standing guard over the fishing town at the head of Resurrection Bay. The 79-year-old Moore will attempt to complete his 50th Mount Marathon race Thursday in Seward, extending the all-time race record that he owns for consecutive races, which stretches back to his rookie year in 1970. “I never did run as racing, until Mount Marathon,” Moore said of his early days. “And then it was even a couple of years before I started running. I

Seward’s Fred Moore stands at the base of Mount Marathon in Seward on Monday. Moore will run in his 50th consecutive Mount Marathon race on July 4. (Photo by Joey Klecka/Peninsula Clarion)

just ran as much as I had to to get to the mountain and back.”

The Mount Marathon race is celebrating its 92nd year, dating back to the

Dunleavy vetoes more than $400M By Ben Hohenstatt Juneau Empire

Gov. Mike Dunleavy unveiled more than $400 million in cuts to the Legislature-approved budget in the form of line-item vetoes, and said more are on the way. Dunleavy and Office of Management and Budget Director Donna Arduin discussed the 182 items vetoed by the governor during a press conference Friday

at the Capitol that doubled as an announcement of the budget’s signing. Dunleavy said reductions in spending on the University of Alaska, Medicaid, senior benefits, school bond debt reimbursement, public broadcasting, village public safety office program, the Ocean Ranger program and more are the first half of an envisioned two-year process. “This is a difficult situa-

tion, but I believe everyone realizes something has to be done,” Dunleavy said. The $409 million in vetoes coupled with about $270 million in cuts previously approved in the Legislature’s budget adds up to almost $680 million less in spending than last year, according to the Office of Management and Budget. The biggest chunk of the $409 million came from the University of Alaska at See VETO, page A2

first competitive race up the mountain in 1915. The

legend goes that the competition sprouted up as a bar bet between two old sourdoughs, who wagered that the 3,022-foot peak could not be climbed and descended in less than one hour, with the loser buying the house a round of drinks. Ultimately, it was James Walters who made it to the finish line first, albeit two minutes over an hour, but the seeds were planted for what has become a globally sought-after event. In his 50 years running, Moore has always finished the race to the applause of locals and visitors alike. Fellow Seward runner Erik Johnson, who at age 42 has a pedestrian eight Mount Marathon’s under his belt but a high finish of second place in 2017, said the the culture and the people who understand the history of the event know what Moore is doing belongs up there among the iconic records of the race. “People here want to celebrate the people that See 50TH, page A2

Feds allocate $10M to combat violence in rural communities By MICHAEL BALSAMO Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Attorney General William Barr declared a law enforcement emergency in Alaska on Friday, clearing the way for the Justice Department to award more than $10 million to combat crime in rural communities. The announcement comes a month after Barr visited the state and met

with Alaska Natives, who described disproportionately high rates of violence and sexual assault in Native communities and other problems, including not having any law enforcement presence in some villages. It is the first time that Barr has personally declared a law enforcement emergency since he assumed the top post at the Justice Department in February. The See FEDS, page A3


A2 | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

. . . Veto Continued from page A1

$130.3 million. “This budget is going to impact all Alaskans,” Dunleavy said. “The University of Alaska, I have a lot of faith in. I know their leadership. I know a lot of their regents. I believe they’ll be able to work through this. … I don’t think they can be all things to all people, and I think that’s generally speaking for the state of Alaska. We can’t be all things to all people, we don’t have money for that.” University of Alaska President Jim Johnsen said during a press conference the university does not try to be all things to all people. “There are many degree plans that we don’t provide,” Johnsen said. “There

. . . 50th Continued from page A1

inspire them,” Johnson said in a recent interview. “They don’t want it to be just about (men’s record holder) David Norris and (Seward’s) Denali Strabel. They want it to be about people that show they’re special by either organizing events or doing events, or doing races 50 times.” Longtime Seward resident Patti Foldager, a twotime women’s champion who trained often with Moore back in their heyday, said Moore’s longevity is setting the standard for the crowd that’s been competing for many years. According to the Mount Marathon website, only nine men and three women have complete 30 or more runnings of the race, and of that group only two have 40 more on their belt — Moore and Palmer runner Braun Kopsack. Foldager has 36 races under her belt, going back to her rookie attempt in 1980,

are programs that are only available at one of our universities.” University of Alaska Southeast and other community campuses were not directly included in the governor’s veto, but Jim Johnsen said a “devastating” 41% cut to state funding would have serious negative effects on the entirety of the university system. Johnsen said the governor’s veto would likely translate to 1,300 fewer university employees. “Everything is on the table,” he said. “Forty-one percent of our state funding was vetoed today, campuses, academic programs. It must be on the table.” A hiring freeze, traveling freeze and 60-day notice of furlough would be effective immediately, Johnsen said. Legislative override? He said the university

would be working with state lawmakers to push for an override of the veto. An override would need support from three-fourths of the Legislature in a joint session to revert the budget back to the Legislature-approved budget. Senate Minority Leader Sen. Tom Begich, D-Anchorage, said he “would certainly hope” there’s mass support for overriding the governor’s vetoes in light of the support the Legislatureapproved budget received. “Only 15 members of the Legislature opposed this budget,” Begich said. He said he would advise an override of all the vetoes rather than picking and choosing issues to override, but he wasn’t sure what if any tactic might be used. If the veto is upheld, Johnsen said University of Alaska may need to declare

financial exigency at the July 15 Board of Regents meeting. He said that would allow the university to make quick financial decisions. “It’s very rarely used by public universities, but given a number this big and a need to capture those savings as quickly as we need to there probably isn’t other options,” Johnsen said. Other big changes While University of Alaska saw the biggest cut, it wasn’t alone. Other vetoes included a 50% reduction to school bond debt reimbursement totalling $48.9 million, the elimination of the senior benefits program for a $20.8 million reduction, a $50 million cut to Medicaid and repealing the Ocean Ranger program for a reduction of $3.4 million among others. Multiple questions

during the press asked Dunleavy about cutting all funding to the Ocean Ranger program in light of Princess Cruises, a subsidiary of Carnival Corporation, agreeing to pay $20 million for illegal dumping and environmental regulations. The governor’s response alluded to other ways to actively protect the environment but did not pinpoint a specific replacement for the oversight the program provided. Dunleavy acknowledged cutting school bond debt reimbursement in half is going to pose a challenge to cities, but said he wasn’t sure if municipalities will need to raise local taxes to make up the difference. “That depends upon the community,” Dunleavy said. “That depends on their reserves or how

they handle their finances. There’s no easy way out of this.” City and Borough of Juneau City Manager Rorie Watt said there’s no doubt what the veto means for the CBJ, which this year would have to spend about $3.7 million on school bond debt. “If the governor’s vetoes stand, CBJ will sooner or later be forced to raise taxes and/or reduce our local services,” Watt said in a release. “We are additionally disappointed that the timing of the state’s process forced municipalities to deliberate and set local tax rates for this fiscal year before the state finalizes its budgetary decisions. CBJ will await the legislature’s deliberations and learn whether or not there will be overrides prior to making a local plan to respond to the state budget.”

and husband Flip Foldager has 39 races. “I think there’s going to be a group of guys that reach that point,” Foldager said. “There’s not many too far behind.” In discussing his longevity that has kept him coming back year after year, Moore pulled a line from legendary New York Yankees Hall of Famer Yogi Berra, who was full of memorable quotes. “If you don’t know where you’re going, you might end up somewhere else.” Moore said Berra’s quote perfectly represents his journey to Seward as a young man and the lifetime he’s spent in the small town tucked away in the mountains. “If you stop and think about it, who really does know where they’re going?” Moore asked. “You know where you’d like to go, but you do not know where you going, and there’s a pretty good chance you will end up somewhere else.” Now retired, Moore spends much of his time writing — the story of his

journey to Alaska can be found in “Seward Unleashed: Vol I and II” at the Seward Senior Center — and hunting. Working as a carpenter much of his life, Moore’s work skills helped lead him to the 49th state. Moore joined a group of acquaintances heading up the Alcan Highway in June 1959 from his hometown of Jamestown, Pennsylvania. The quartet agreed to split gas and driving duties as they sought adventure and the potential for work in sawmills. When no employment was found, the four turned back and headed home, but Moore abandoned the group in Edmonton, Alberta, after quarreling with the lead driver. The 19-yearold Moore hitchhiked with various rides to get back to Seward, where he picked up a position at the Bayview Sawmill. The Bayview eventually burned to the ground and Moore bounced between jobs in Seward, Whittier and Wasilla for several years, mostly working summers with the Alaska Forest Service and winters at the Hardwood Mill in Wasilla. Eventually, Moore’s passion for seafaring and fishing led him to construct several boats and skiffs, including a 30-foot trimaran that he finished in 1970, leading him to quit the sawmill and set eyes on Mount Marathon. “I had time on my hands, and I always liked getting out into the mountains,” he said. “I started climbing the mountain, thinking about the race, not sure if I was going to do it. “On the fourth of July, it was good weather, I was feeling good, so I paid my dollar deposit on a bib to run the race, and I did it.” Unlike the $65 entry fee required of all runners today, Moore said racers then got their dollar back when they turned in their cloth bib. Some runners in modern times will pay thousands of dollars to run the race. Every year, the night before the race, aspiring racers who have not gained entry into the event through the lottery have shown up in the Seward High gym to try their luck in the bib auction, which hocks 10 race bibs to those willing to lay down the cash. Some years have seen

men’s race bibs go for as much as $4,500. Moore isn’t shocked to see the high price some are willing to pay. Instead, he says it’s just the natural progression of an event that has skyrocketed in popularity over the years, from an event only attempted by “crazy people,” to now a bucket-list item for passionate runners. Moore’s finished his first handful of races in over an hour, but eventually began training more seriously and lowered his time to 53:23 in 1976, which stands as his all-time personal best. Throughout his time, Moore has held age group records in four separate divisions — the 40-49, the 5059, the 60-69 and the 70-79 age groups, the last of which he currently holds. The first three age divisions have since been topped by others. Moore, however, isn’t the oldest racer in history. That honor belongs to Anchorage’s Chad Resari, who will be 83 on race day this year. Resari’s first year running the event was 1964, but he has skipped years in between, helping to give Moore the longevity award. Currently 83, Resari should this year break the age record, which was formerly held by Anchorage’s Corky Corthell, and should continue giving Moore a carrot to chase after. Moore said he recalls the feat of consecutive races gaining attention in the 1990s, when he approached what many believed then to be 26 in a row by Ed Schuster, who began his streak in 1969. Moore’s credits his best career finish of ninth, the only top-10 of his career, in 1987 to who was not racing that year. “There was a lot of people in an ordinary year would’ve beat me,” he said. “But they weren’t in the race that year … I know (former champions) Sam Young and Bill Spencer were up on the top officiating, so there’s two.” Another factor that helped Moore grab a top-10 spot was his local knowledge of the mountain, which has taken a particularly brutal beating from a nasty storm in fall of 1986, leading to flooding on the trail that reshaped the landscape. “We knew the mountain, and others expected it to be

different,” Moore said. To add further legend to the story, Moore said he ran that year with a hernia, which he got taken care of later that fall. Back in his faster days, Moore said he trained most often with two women who know the mountain well — Patti Foldager and Carmen Young. Foldager is a twotime women’s champion and Young is a four-time champ who ran the fifthfastest time (currently) in women’s history in 1986 with a sizzling time of 50:54 — a time that still stands as the 30-39 age group record. Moore said sharing information and tips with the two ladies never dominated the conversation, but pushing each other on during training runs made for a lifelong friendship. “We all had our own way of doing things,” Moore said. “We’d just do the whole course together.” Foldager said with the trio of training partners all finishing in about the same times, it provided good opportunity to test out the various routes on the mountain to see which one was fastest. “He was a good teacher,” Foldager said. “I’m pretty bullheaded, I like to do things my way, and I think Fred was challenged by that. He would always tell me, ‘You’re never going to win the race on your toes’. “When I’d start getting weak, he’d move ahead and I would think, ‘Oh, I gotta stay with Fred’.” Foldager won the women’s race in 1985 — the first year the women ran separate from the men — and 1993, while Young racked women’s victories in 1982 and 1986 through ’88. Foldager couldn’t remember her first meeting with Moore, but said he has simply been a part of Seward’s culture seemingly forever. “He’s just always been there,” Foldager said. “Living in Seward, almost everyone associated Fred with the mountain because he always did it.” With 50 years of running the mountain, Moore has also seen a lot, including some of the race’s biggest moments. Moore said while the iconic marks that have stuck in everyone’s memory (like Bill Spencer’s 1981 record that stood for 32 years) are impressive, some of the most stirring performances

have come in the junior division, which races halfway up the mountain and back. Bill Spencer’s 1973 junior race record of 24:30 has never been seriously threatened in 46 years since he set it. In the junior girls history, 2014 stands out as the most shocking performance, when Kenai runner Allie Ostrander’s defeated the entire field, including the boys. Another tradition that Moore has carried throughout the years is running with hot pink shorts. Moore said the use of his iconic pink shorts began with his wife’s suggestion when Moore ran the 1983 Equinox Marathon in Fairbanks. Phyllis Shoemaker wanted to be able to pick out her husband among the crowd of thousands running the race, and when she stopped her car along the race route, it would be obviously clear whether Fred was coming or going. “I was talking to her just a couple days ago and she said that I picked out the shorts,” he said. “I don’t remember it that way.” Moore said he adopted the bright pink shorts look for Mount Marathon in either 1984 or 1985. Since then, he’s gone through at least a dozen pairs of pink shorts. “I try to stay clean,” he said. “I don’t want my pink shorts getting muddy.” Shoemaker has run Mount Marathon 20 times herself, most recently in 2006, and has six top-10 finishes to her credit. Moore said his wife hasn’t raced in recent years after getting knee replacements. While he often won’t be seen approaching the finish line muddied or bloodied, Moore said the final half mile or so to the end is a time to enjoy the atmosphere. “I kind of go down the street like a baseball player that’s just hit an out-of-thepark home run,” he said. “Relish the crowd and don’t be looking tired at the end. “I don’t want to get muddy, bloody or let anybody see me looking tired.” At the end of the day, Moore said as long as Alaska embraces him, he’ll embrace it back. “I’ve never cared much about competition,” he said. “But what I do care about is, when I do something, I like to do it well.”

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Peninsula Clarion | Sunday, June 30, 2019 |

Elaine White

Around the Peninsula

August 5, 1948 - June 18, 2019

Kenai/Nikiski Class of ‘89 reunion

Elaine White, 70, long time Anchorage resident, passed away peacefully at home June 18, 2019 surrounded by loving family and friends. Born to William R. & Georgia J. (VanWy) Struble August 5, 1948 in Bakersfield, CA. She spent her childhood and some of her teenage years growing up in Bakersfield and Oxnard with her sister, Christine and her brother, Mark. Her family moved to Kenai, Alaska in 1960. She graduated from Kenai Central High School in 1966 and married in 1967 and had a daughter, Victoria in 1972. She worked at Alaska Title Guarantee in Kenai 1974-1981 as an Escrow Officer and Assistant Vice President while taking courses in Alaska real estate law at Kenai Peninsula College in 1979. She was also a charter member, elected director and program chairperson of the Kenai Peninsula Association of Professional Mortgage Women. She was also a Deputy Treasurer on a reelection campaign for a local Kenai resident. She and her daughter lived in Juneau while she worked for the Legislative Affairs Agency in 1981 before moving to Anchorage and working as a Title Operations Officer and Senior Escrow Officer at Alaska Title Guarantee Agency until 1987. She started working for the State of Alaska Court System in 1988 until her retirement in 2011. She loved spending time with her family and snuggling with her cats. She enjoyed working and laughing with her coworkers and driving her Datsun 280Z sportscar. She is survived by her daughter, Victoria White and son-in-law, Mathew Suboski; her brother, Mark Struble of Lake Stevens, WA; and nieces and nephew. She is preceded in death by her mother, Georgia J. Struble; her father, W illiam R. Struble; and sister, Christine Malone. It was always me and you Mama, I love you, forever in my heart. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that you make donations to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

. . . Fire Continued from page A1

The Skilak Wildlife Recreation Area remains closed to public use, including campgrounds,

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department has previously declared similar emergencies after mass shootings and to combat spikes in violent crime. The funding is meant to hire additional village and tribal officers and to pay for equipment and training. Additional money is also being awarded for federal prosecutors to target violent crime in rural Alaska and for tribes to pay for victims’ advocacy services. Federal officials face unique challenges in Alaska because most of the crime plaguing the state would be prosecuted by local officials instead of the federal government, Bryan Schroder, the

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on financial literacy, how to seek investors, how to build a business plan and everything else they need to start a successful venture. Hondel said that the kids also participate in two workshops at the end of the school year. One workshop focuses on teaching them about running a business, marketing and food safety. The second workshop is hosted by Home Depot and teaches kids how to actually build their lemonade stand. Children are encouraged to donate a portion of their profits to a charity of their choice. In addition, the kids are responsible for reaching out to local businesses to host their stands. On the day of the event, Lemonhead — the Lemonade Day mascot — goes all around town to visit each of the booths registered with the

trails and cabins. Skilak Lake Road, along with Jim’s Upper and Lower Skilak landings remain open. For the latest on the Swan Lake Fire and to view an interactive fire map, visit kpboem.com.

Kenai/Nikiski Class of ‘89 reunion will be held Friday, Aug. 9 at Kenai River Brewing company from 5:308 p.m. an dat Bridge Lounge at 8 p.m. same night. A potluck at Hilcorp Rec Site will be held Saturday, Aug. 10 at 11 a.m. Info: FB Kenai Peninsula Class of ‘89 or call 360-893-2750.

Annual Summer Book Sale

The Annual Summer Book Sale at the Kenai Community Library will be held from Thursday, July 18 through Saturday, July 20. The usual advance sale for members will be held Wednesday, July 17, from 4 to 6:30 pm. As always, memberships may be purchased and used that evening.

‘Ferrous and Fiber’ at Kenai Fine Art

The opening reception of Ferrous and Fiber will be held Thursday, July 4 from 5-7 p.m. at the Kenai Fine Art Center. During our 1st Thursday opening see the artwork, meet the artists and hear what they have to say about working with silk and metal. Work by artists Chelline Larsen & Adam Hoyt will showcase hand-dyed silk with free motion quilting and embellishments along side plasma cut, powder coated metal pieces/furniture. 1st Thursday will include refreshments, music, free and open to the public. The Kenai Fine Art Center is located across from the Oiler’s Bingo Hall and next to the Historic Cabins. 283-7040, www.kenaifineart.com. “Ferrous and Fiber” will hang until July 27.

PROPS Committee meeting

The Cook Inlet Regional Citizens Advisory Council’s PROPS (Prevention, Response, Operations and Safety) Committee meeting will be held in Nikiski on Friday, July 12 at 10 a.m. at the Nikiski Senior Center, 50025 Lake Marie Avenue. The public is welcome to attend. For an agenda, directions or more information call 907-2837222 or 800-652-7222.

Services announcement Former Kenai resident, Ms. Khelby Kennedy, 28, died Tuesday, June 11, 2019 at her home in Falon, Nevada. Memorial Services will be held 2 p.m. Sunday, June 30 at College Heights Baptist Church in Soldotna. A reception will follow services at the Church.

U.S. attorney in Alaska said. But the federal government hopes the funding can help retain law enforcement officers in some rural communities, where it can take a long time before state troopers can arrive to investigate crimes, and to build and strengthen tribal courts. Often, it can take troopers hours to reach a village given the sheer vastness of the nation’s largest state, with few roads. That can stretch into days if the weather is bad. State authorities handle criminal investigations in more than 200 Alaska Native villages. A 2013 federal report found that at least 75 Alaska Native communities had no law enforcement presence. Tribal leaders have spoken candidly about barriers that victims face in seeking justice, saying some sexual as-

sault victims must take boats or planes to urban areas to get a medical forensic exam. The move drew praise from the Alaska Federation of Natives, which applauded the Justice Department for demonstrating a commitment to strengthening federal, state and tribal partnerships. “We appreciate that U.S. Attorney General William Barr clearly understands the urgency of the public safety situation in rural Alaska,” the organization’s president, Julie Kitka, said in a statement. U.S. Rep. Don Young, an Alaska Republican who lives in the tiny community of Fort Yukon, above the Arctic Circle, said he was glad Barr released the money. “I’m cautioning people, though, because money just doesn’t solve the problem,” the 86-year-old Young said

Friday afternoon while filing paperwork in Anchorage to seek a 25th term in the House. “There should be recognition that this problem can only be solved by support by the communities themselves.” While the money will help, Young said, “You can’t expect it to be done just by outside influences.” In May, Barr toured rural Alaska communities after taking part in a round-table discussion in Anchorage with Alaska Native leaders. Vivian Korthius, with the Association of Village Council Presidents, told Barr there were only six village public safety officers in her 48-village region. Barr said his declaration allows the Justice Department to direct resources “where they are needed most and needed immediately.”

chamber. This year the Lemonhead mask was donned by Hondel’s mom, Terri Burdick, who put her experience with the Kenai Performers to good use while entertaining the kids. Due to the competitive nature of the lemonade business these days, the young entrepreneurs of Lemonade Day have come up with creative and unique offerings for their customers over the years, going way beyond just lemonade. Paxton McKnight had a stand set up inside the Fred Meyer in Soldotna and took a sweet-and-salty approach to his venture, offering red licorice and popcorn alongside his homemade lemonade. McKnight has set up lemonade stands at other locations in the past, and he said that although business was good this year, his best year was when he was able to set his stand up in the KeyBank parking lot on the day of the Soldotna River Festival.

“It was pretty easy to catch people on their way across the street to the park,” McKnight said. “So we made a lot of money that year.” McKnight said he plans to donate 30% of the profits from Saturday to Samaritan’s Purse, an evangelical humanitarian aid organization. On the other side of Fred Meyer was another lemonade stand, this one run by a few kids from the Midnight Sun Chapter of the Future Farmers of America. In addition to offering lemonade made with “TLC” and organic lemons, the FFA kids also had homemade Rice Krispie treats and snickerdoodles for sale. Sam Festervand, JaLeen Gattenby, Michael Boatright and Nathaniel Boatright are using the profits from their lemonade stand to help fund future FFA trips and projects. Outside of First American Title, the Lervig Brothers Gunnar and Ryder were trying their hands at the business for the second year in a row. The Lervig Brothers gave their mom credit for actually making the lemonade — which they offered in the traditional and strawberry varieties — but the two boys had the salesmanship down

to a science. Ryder’s calls of “Come get your lemonade!” could be heard from across the parking lot and didn’t fail to draw a crowd. The Lervigs had popsicles, chips and water bottles, as well as an assortment of fresh fruit to add a touch of class to each glass of lemonade. Gunnar said that most of their profits from Saturday would be going toward equipment for their football team. “And some toys!” Ryder quickly added. From their stand — dubbed Lemony Spigots — at the entrance to Sportsman’s Warehouse, Bri Havrilla and her daughters Addison, Isabella and Emma sold blueberry and strawberry lemonade, Arnold Palmer iced tea and lemonade, and homemade lemon cupcakes with buttercream frosting. Addison said that business had been good so far, so good in fact that a few people had come back for seconds. For Addison, the biggest challenge of starting a lemonade business from scratch was actually making the lemonade. It took a few trial batches to create the perfect recipe, she said. The Havrilla’s planned to donate 10% of their profits to St. Ju-

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Kenai Central Swimming Pool

Swim lesson dates: Session III July 8-19; Session IV July 22- August 2; Swim lesson times: 11 a.m.-11:40 a.m. (M-F); 11:45 a.m.-12:25 p.m. (M-F); 12:30 p.m.-1:10 p.m. (M-F); 1:15 p.m.-1:55 p.m. (M-F); 1:15 p.m.– 1:45 p.m. (3 and 4 year olds) (M-F); Private Lessons 3-3:30 p.m., 3:30-4 p.m. (M-F, 10 days of private) or 10:15-10:45 a.m. (Tuesday and Thursday). Need to sign-up for lessons in advance at the Kenai Pool. Private Swim lessons times or pool rentals are available. Register for swim lessons in advance at the Kenai Pool. Pool rentals are available. 283-7476

Soldotna Historical Society & Homestead Museum board meeting

Soldotna Historical Society & Homestead Museum will hold a board meeting, Monday, July 1 at 4:30 p.m., main building, 461 Centennial Park Road. Open to the public. Come be a part of our second annual Homesteaders Meet & Greet during Progress days! Questions? Call 262-3832.

North Peninsula Rec Area events

— Log Rolling is being offered at the Nikiski Pool on Tuesdays from 7:45-8:45 p.m. throughout the summer. This is free family fun class. Registration is not required. Pool admission rates apply. For more information, contact Nigel at 776-8800. — Pre-School Aquatic Play Classes will be offered in July and August. This class is for little ones 3-6 years of age. Parent are not required to be in the water. Students will have fun exploring the water through games with Mr. Nigel. For more information, call 776-8800. — Inner Tube Water Polo will be offered on Monday July 15, 6-9 p.m. at the Nikiski Pool. For those 15 years and older. Pickup games and tournament. Come out for a night of fun and competition. For more information, please contact Nigel at 776-8800.

de’s Children’s Hospital. Over at the Liquid Sunshine booth on Binkley Street, 6-year-old Ava McCaughey was serving up her lemonade in style, sporting a pair of sunglasses and a pink tutu while asking her customers “strawberry or regular?” McCaughey offered fresh fruit with the lemonade as well as banana creme cookies and muffins. McCaughey said they hadn’t decided yet on how to spend or save their profits from the day, but her business partner Zoey Stone had suggested putting some of it toward a trip to Disney Land. Outside of Kenai Kids Therapy on the Kenai Spur Highway, Avery and Nathan Powell had their 907 Sibling Rivalry stand stocked with homemade Rice Krispies treats, Red Vines and two kinds of lemonade. They said the name came from the fact that they offered two types of lemonade and wanted to see which one sold better. Nathan said that the pink was winning at that point in the day, but added that last year the traditional yellow had sold out fast. This year the Powells will be giving half of their

profits to the local Soldotna Whalers Wrestling Club. Local Girl Scout Troop 210 also had their Hello Sunshine! stand on the Kenai Spur Highway just down the road, outside of Sweeney’s. Soon-to-be first graders Brooklynne Timm and Kinley Clack were running the stand for the lunch rush. As well as homemade snacks, they offered frozen pineapple lemonade blended while you wait. Continuing south on the highway, Autumn Bass, Aries Lyons, Logan Amaya, Tucker Challans and Alexa Menzel sold strawberry and traditional lemonade while Yo! Tacos owner Nila Sanchez set up her taco shop just a few feet away. Sanchez has sponsored kids and their lemonade stands through her Next Generation program for the past two years in order to encourage and develop youth entrepreneurial and leadership skills for the future. The kids were in charge of running the lemonade stand, but Sanchez was always close by to give them a quick pep talk or break into dance while holding signs on the side of the road.

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Opinion

A4 | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

CLARION P

E N I N S U L A

Serving the Kenai Peninsula since 1970 Jeff Hayden Publisher ERIN THOMPSON......................................................... Editor RANDI KEATON....................................... Circulation Director FRANK GOLDTHWAITE......................... Production Manager

What others say

Democracy depends on free access to public records No one owns the law, because the law

belongs to everyone. It’s a principle that seems so obvious that most people wouldn’t give it a second thought. But that’s what is at issue in Georgia v. Public.Resource.Org, a case about whether the State of Georgia can assert copyright in its annotated state code. This week, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the case in its next term. Americans deserve free and easy access to public records of all kinds, including court documents. But access to the law is the most important of all: Democracy depends on it. Keeping the law free of copyright is the first step. Yet the law is in disarray on the topic. The last time the Supreme Court ruled on the issue was in 1888, and it only addressed opinions written by judges. In the last century, a number of lower courts issued lofty proclamations on how the law belongs to the people and the people alone. Meanwhile, copyright laws passed in 1909 and 1976 explicitly excluded any “work of the United States government.” But that exclusion applies only to the federal government. So when the nonprofit organization Public.Resource.Org purchased, scanned and uploaded all 186 volumes of the annotated Georgia state code to its website, the state sued to take it down. The code was already available free online through the state’s partnership with LexisNexis. As part of the deal, Georgia gave LexisNexis exclusive rights to official “annotations” that elaborate on the law but aren’t legally binding. LexisNexis allowed users to read the law free and it sold the annotated code for $404 per copy. Public.Resource.Org is no stranger to litigation. For years, it has been embroiled in lawsuits over its publication of fire and electrical safety standards, air duct leakage standards, nonprofit tax returns and European Union baby pacifier regulations. The founder of Public.Resource.Org was once labeled a “rogue archivist.” But if publishing building safety standards online is an act of roguery, it is time for the courts to take a hard look at what copyright is for. Much of the litigation against Public.Resource. Org falls into an ever-expanding gray zone of the law, created by government outsourcing bits and pieces of its regulatory function to the private sector. Regulations for everything from student loan eligibility to food additives can use standards written by trade groups. Courts have issued conflicting opinions on this premium tier of the law. In the Georgia case, an appeals court ruled that the annotations were “sufficiently law-like,” partly because LexisNexis had created the annotations at the direction of the state. As a consequence, “the people are the ultimate authors of the annotations.” If the law is confused, it is in part thanks to the Supreme Court, which handed down two rulings on the subject in 1888. One stated that the law is in the public domain, and the other said that compiling the law with a table of contents, summaries and an index could be copyrightable. It’s this latter case that the State of Georgia relies on. The modern-day outsourcing of regulations to the private sector makes this issue all the more important to take up anew. If the law belongs to anyone, it belongs to the people. After a hundred or so years of confusion, the Supreme Court now has the chance to affirm this principle of selfgovernance. — The New York Times, June 25

Letters to the Editor:

E-mail: news@peninsulaclarion.com Write: Fax: Peninsula Clarion 907-283-3299 P.O. Box 3009 Questions? Call: Kenai, AK 99611 907-283-7551

Stand up for equality and support HB 82 A laska V oices E van A nderson Fifty years ago, bricks thrown at Stonewall Inn in Manhattan sparked a riot that ignited a global liberation movement. We have trans women of color at Stonewall like Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera to thank for responding to police violence with direct action, and making it possible to stand up for equal rights without fear of discrimination for every American, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer people. We have Stonewall to thank for the annual celebration of Pride that continues today. Celebrating Pride is just as important today as it was in 1969. Indeed, the LGBTQ community has made major progress in the last halfcentury. However, despite an increase in visibility, LGBTQ people do not yet have equal protection under federal or state law in Alaska. A recent survey suggests 45% of Americans incorrectly believe that the LGBTQ have the same rights as every other American — yet this couldn’t be further from the truth in Alaska or the majority of states. This year, there were setbacks: a non-discrimination ordinance in Fairbanks vetoed by the mayor; a rise in hate crimes among trans people of color; a ban on trans troops in the military; a rollback of federal healthcare protections allowing denial of coverage on the basis

of “religious freedom;” and a decision that shocked me personally when the international United Methodist Church — my own spiritual home — decided to take a hardline stance against the LGBTQ community. The Alaska LGBTQ community is no stranger to resistance, and we know the formula for change. Juneau, Sitka and Anchorage led the way in passing non-discrimination protections. In Fairbanks, residents attended early morning work sessions and testified well into the night. By making their voices heard, Fairbanks demonstrated democracy in action — only to lose fair protections at the stroke of a mayor’s pen. Just last year, voters in Anchorage faced a “bathroom bill” on the ballot, threatening to strip equal rights from trans friends and neighbors. In response, the community swelled in an outpouring of support, having tough conversations with voters and mobilizing enough people to make history by being the first in the nation to affirm equal rights for trans people at the ballot box, by a wide margin. Watching fellow humans allow personal ignorance to obscure and denigrate the beauty of our community is painful. However, if we continue to lean into strong action at the local, state and national level, we will ensure these moments are mere blips on the march towards valuing the innate humanity in all Alaskans. We need statewide non-discrimination protections to protect Alaskans’ access to employment, housing, public accommodations, education, healthcare and the electoral system. In Alaska, we have the chance to change history.

House Bill 82 by Rep. Andy Josephson, D-Anchorage, would provide equal protections for all, regardless of gender identity, gender expression, or sexual orientation. Alaskans deserve a life free from violence, fear and hatred. We deserve a government that reflects and protects communities it serves. It’s time to protect all Alaskans, regardless of identity. Reach out to your legislator today, and encourage them to become a co-sponsor of HB or SB 82. Ultimately, decision-makers are responsible for our communities’ mental health; however I encourage all of us to check in with the queer and trans Alaskans in our own lives. Without state or federal protections, social support systems carry all the more weight — the very forms of social capital to which people of color, immigrants, those who are HIV+, and working class people have access at more limited rates. Summer in Alaska means long days. Whether you’re fishing, harvesting or putting away food for the winter, consider taking a break from the summer grind and giving your legislator a call before Pride Month is over. We will achieve equal rights for all Alaskans, but only after we work together to elevate it as a top priority. By the time the Legislature is back in session and you’re taking another can of this summer’s salmon out of the pantry, it will be time for us to push this bill out of committee and out on the floor. We’re all counting on your support. Stand up, vote equality, be heard. Evan Anderson is the Civic Engagement Manager for The Alaska Center Education Fund. He resides in Anchorage.

News Analysis

Trump’s diplomacy puts relationships over results By ZEKE MILLER and JONATHAN LEMIRE Associated Press

SEOUL, South Korea — For President Donald Trump, a four-day visit to Asia is shaping up to be more about relationships than results. In Japan for the Group of 20 summit, Trump notched few identifiable accomplishments on a range of pressing challenges as he savored the show of diplomatic backslapping. He went into his meetings with friends and foes alike against the backdrop of global crises, from Iranian aggression to Russian election meddling. Eager to avoid a repeat of his past tumultuous international summit visits, Trump traded hard-nosed negotiations for compliments and sidestepped thorny issues in public with even the most troublesome of global figures. After meeting with Russia’s Vladimir Putin, Saudi Arabia’s Mohammed bin Salman, Turkey’s Recep Tayyep Erdogan and China’s Xi Jinping, all of whom have authoritarian tendencies, the president invoked the imperative of strong relationships nine times in a closing news conference at the G-20. “I really have a good relationship with everybody,” he said. Then he moved on to South Korea, holding out hope for another chance to show off what may be his “Art of the Handshake.” He invited North Korea’s Kim Jong Un to join him for a quick exchange of greetings at the heavily fortified Demilitarized Zone. The prioritization of personal ties over concrete achievements revealed the unexpected flip side to Trump’s transactional view of foreign policy. Despite his reputation as a dogged negotiator, he often frames developing connections with world leaders as an end unto itself. “We have a great relationship and that’s very important, whether you have a place

like Saudi Arabia, in all fairness, or China, or North Korea, or any country,” Trump said. “Otherwise you end up in a lot of very bad wars and lots of problems.” At the same time, though, Trump hasn’t hesitated to insult and undercut some of America’s closest allies, straining ties with partners such as France’s Emmanuel Macron, Canada’s Justin Trudeau and Germany’s Angela Merkel. He publicly aired grievances against Japan, Germany and India in the days leading up to his trip to Asia. During his travels, he directed valuable attention to weighing in on domestic issues and U.S. politics — a focus that otherwise could have been devoted to diplomacy. In Osaka, Trump’s cultivation of world figures played out in ways big and small. In a meeting with Merkel, he set aside concerns about Germany’s defense spending. He was cavalier with Putin about the issue of Russian interference in American elections, which U.S. intelligence agencies fear will occur again in 2020. “I honestly don’t know what Trump’s goals are,” said Michael McFaul, ambassador to Russia under President Barack Obama. “He defines a good meeting and a positive relationship with Putin as the goal. That should be the means to achieving the real goals.” Trump praised the summit host, Japan’s Shinzo Abe, for his hospitality. Trump fondly recounted to Xi the red carpet welcome granted to the American nearly two years ago when he visited Beijing. As he and Xi declared a cease-fire in their countries’ trade war, Trump enthused that “Chinese culture is an incredible culture,” and repeatedly called Xi his friend. Trump aides contend that he is taking the long view on personal diplomacy, believing that while it may seem at odds with his oft-invoked “America First” worldview, it did create images of statesmanship that contrast with the political infighting among

the Democrats back home looking to replace him. Critics deride it as a “Trump First” policy, in which a few flattering words can buy an adversary Trump’s silence. Either way, the affirmations of friendship haven’t yet correlated with results. That reality was at the fore as Trump expressed hope for a meeting with Kim at the Demilitarized Zone on Sunday. U.S.-North Korean talks on nuclear issues and even the repatriation of Korean war remains have broken down in recent months after the failure of their second summit in Hanoi in February. But Trump is eager for the historic image at the DMZ — he said Saturday that he would welcome becoming the first U.S. president to step over the border into North Korea — and hopes it can help jump-start negotiations he once believed could deliver him a Nobel Peace Prize. The mere invitation from Trump marks a significant propaganda victory for Kim, who has long sought and been denied recognition on the international stage. Trump has made clear he considers Kim a friend, even as the North has resumed some ballistic missile testing in recent months that Trump’s national security adviser, John Bolton, contends violated U.N. sanctions. Trump has often placed a priority on close ties over matters of principle, arguing it pays off in the long term. After his meeting with the Saudi crown prince, the president falsely claimed that “nobody so far has pointed directly a finger at the future king of Saudi Arabia” in the murder of journalist and U.S. resident Jamal Khashoggi. U.S. intelligence agencies have assessed that the prince must have at least been aware of the plot. Trump’s willingness to embrace the royal helped clear the transformation of the Saudi leader from international pariah to member of the club in Osaka.


Nation

Peninsula Clarion | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | A5

Far-right, anti-fascist groups clash

Judge bars Trump from using $2.5B to build border wall

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Competing demonstrations spilled into the streets of downtown Portland on Saturday, with fights breaking out in places as marchers clashed. At least three groups had planned rallies or demonstrations at different sites in the city, including members of the so-called Proud Boys and anti-fascist groups that include “antifa,” and the fights occurred when participants of the opposing groups met, according to The Oregonian/OregonLive. In a statement on Twitter, the Portland Police Bureau says injuries had occurred in the crowd as a result of the fights, but it did not specify how many, or whether arrests had been made. The bureau did not respond to phone calls or emails seeking clarification. Andy Ngo, who describes himself as an editor at the conservative website Quillette and says he is “hated by antifa,” said on his Twitter feed that he was

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — A federal judge on Friday prohibited President Donald Trump from tapping $2.5 billion in military funding to build high-priority segments of his prized border wall in California, Arizona and New Mexico. Judge Haywood S. Gilliam, Jr. in Oakland acted in two lawsuits filed by California and by activists who contended that the money transfer was unlawful and that building the wall would pose environmental threats. “All President Trump has succeeded in building is a constitutional crisis, threatening immediate harm to our state,” said California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, who led a 20-state coalition of attorneys general in one lawsuit. The American Civil Liberties Union, which sued on behalf of Sierra Club and Southern Border Communities Coalition, praised the decision. “This decision upholds the basic principle that the president has no power to spend taxpayer money without Congress’ approval,” said ACLU staff attorney Dror Ladin. “We will continue to defend this core principle of our democracy.” Speaking Saturday at a press conference marking the end of the Group of 20 summit in Osaka, Japan, Trump called the decision

After a confrontation between authorities and protestors, police use pepper spray as multiple groups, including Rose City Antifa, the Proud Boys and others protest in downtown Portland, Ore., on Saturday. (Dave Killen/The Oregonian via AP)

attacked by anti-fascist protesters and had to be taken to the hospital to treat injuries to his face and head. Ngo also said the attackers took his camera equipment. Protesters also clashed with police, throwing water

bottles and eggs at officers. In separate social media posts later in the day, police declared the situation to be a civil disturbance and warned participants faced arrest. The Portland Police Bu-

reau on Twitter asked for the public’s help in investigating violent assaults. The bureau also said that it has received reports that some of the milkshakes thrown by protesters contained quickdrying cement.

NC redistricting fight turns to state courts By GARY D. ROBERTSON Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. — Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled federal courts aren’t the place to settle partisan gerrymandering disputes, opponents of North Carolina’s district maps are putting their hopes in state courts. An election reform group, the state Democratic Party and voters will go to court in two weeks to try to persuade state judges that Republican-drawn General Assembly districts discriminate against Democrats based on their political beliefs and voting history. What’s different in this case is that the plaintiffs — some of whom sued in federal court over the state’s congressional map, which ended with Thursday’s 5-4 Supreme Court decision against them — argue the House and Senate boundaries violate the state constitution, not the U.S. Constitution. “We are confident that justice will prevail in the North Carolina courts,” said Bob Phillips with the North Carolina office of Common Cause, which is a plaintiff in both matters. “And we

will continue to work with state lawmakers to reform our broken redistricting system that has left far too many without a voice in Raleigh.”? Voting-rights advocates across the country have vowed to turn to state litigation after Chief Justice John Roberts wrote in the opinion addressing North Carolina and Maryland cases that federal courts have no authority to determine whether partisan gerrymandering is unconstitutional. Addressing complaints of partisan gerrymandering in state courts has already succeeded in Pennsylvania, where last year the state Supreme Court struck down congressional districts based on language in the Pennsylvania constitution that is similar to North Carolina’s. That ruling led to the court redrawing congressional lines. Democrats picked up four additional seats in 2018. The pending partisan gerrymandering case filed in Wake County court marks at least the eighth lawsuit challenging North Carolina maps on the basis of racial and partisan bias since the current round of redistricting began in 2011. The law-

suits resulted in redrawing congressional lines in 2016 and legislative districts in 2017 — both to address racial bias. The state has spent millions of taxpayer dollars defending the maps. Unlike the conservative majority on the U.S. Supreme Court, the state Supreme Court that would hear the appeal of the trial court’s decision has six registered Democrats and one Republican. “My guess is that the North Carolina court — given its composition — will think differently than the U.S. Supreme Court,” said Guy-Uriel Charles, a Duke University redistricting expert and co-director of the Duke Law Center on Law, Race and Politics. In previous decades, the state’s Democrats drew maps favoring their candidates that also ended up in court. U.S. Supreme Court rulings in the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s plowed new ground on the limits of shaping boundaries to achieve more representation by candidates supported by black voters. But litigation by political rivals and civil rights groups went into high gear against Republicans who controlled

the mapmaking after winning legislative majorities in 2010. There was a national effort by the GOP to win statehouses and set the course for district lines. North Carolina maps drawn in 2011 helped legislators create veto-proof majorities at the General Assembly, allowing them to advance their agenda on taxes, abortion and the environment. Republicans ultimately held 10 of North Carolina’s 13 seats in Congress. The North Carolina House’s chief mapmaker this decade has called on the plaintiffs in state court to withdraw their case because of Thursday’s ruling. Those suing have no plans to withdraw. “The U.S. Supreme Court just reaffirmed that redistricting is an issue that should be worked on here by elected legislators, not decided in court,” state Rep. David Lewis said. Roberts’ opinion, however, doesn’t say state judges are prevented from adjudicating these matters. “Provisions in state statutes and state constitutions can provide standards and guidance for state courts to apply,” he wrote.

Oregon Republican senators end walkout By ANDREW SELSKY and SARAH ZIMMERMAN Associated Press

SALEM, Ore. — Republican lawmakers returned to the Oregon Senate on Saturday, ending an acrimonious nine-day walkout over a carbon emissions bill that would have been the second such legislation in the nation. The boycott had escalated when the Democratic governor ordered the state police to find and return the rogue Republicans to the Senate so the chamber could convene, and a counterthreat by one GOP senator to violently resist any such attempt. Senate Republicans fled the state to avoid being forcibly returned by the Oregon State Police, whose jurisdiction ends at the state line. Democrats have an 18 to 12 majority in the Senate but need at least 20 members — and therefore at least two Republicans — present to vote on legislation. Nine minority Republicans returned to the Senate on Saturday after Senate President Peter Courtney said the majority Democrats lacked the necessary 16 votes to pass the legislation, a statewide cap on car-

“a disgrace.” “So we’re immediately appealing it and we think we’ll win the appeal,” he went on to say. “There was no reason that that should have happened. And a lot of wall is being built.” The decisions are in line with Gilliam’s ruling last month that blocked work from beginning on two of the highest-priority projects — one spanning 46 miles (74 kilometers) in New Mexico and another covering 5 miles (8 kilometers) in Yuma, Arizona. But the fight is far from over. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals is expected to take up the same issue of using military money next week. At issue is President Donald Trump’s February declaration of a national emergency so that he could divert $6.7 billion from military and other sources to begin construction of the wall, which could have begun as early as Monday. Trump declared the emergency after losing a fight with the Democraticled House that led to a 35day government shutdown. The president identified $3.6 billion from military construction funds, $2.5 billion from Defense Department counterdrug activities and $600 million from the Treasury Department’s asset forfeiture fund.

43-year-old El Salvador migrant dies in US custody By COLLEEN LONG Associated Press

WASHINGTON — A 43-year-old El Salvadoran man who crossed into the U.S. with his daughter collapsed at a border station and later died at a hospital, officials said Saturday. The man had been held about a week at the Rio Grande Valley central processing center in McAllen, Texas, according to a law enforcement official. The official said the man, who had health issues, had been medically checked. The daughter was still in U.S. Border Patrol custody, but officials had requested an expedited transfer to a shelter run by the agency that manages children who cross the border alone, the official said. The official did not know the daughter’s age. The child will be in a shelter until she is released to a sponsor, but that process could take weeks. The official was not authorized to divulge details of an ongoing investigation and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. According to a statement from U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the man’s cause of death is not yet known. The facility, like most other Border Patrol stations along the U.S.-Mexico border, is overcrowded. A review of the death was underway,

and Congress and the inspector general for the Department of Homeland Security, the watchdog that oversees the border agencies, has been notified, according to the statement. So was the El Salvadoran government. Border stations are generally at capacity with about 4,000 people, and more than 15,000 are in custody. Advocates and attorneys have decried fetid, filthy conditions inside the stations that were not meant as more than a temporary holding station. Even with expedited processing, it’s not clear how long the daughter would remain at the McAllen facility. Teens and children are only supposed to be held for 72 hours, but because of massive delays in the system, they are held for several days or weeks. At least two other adults and five children have died in custody since December, including a teenage boy who died from the flu and had been at the central processing center in McAllen last month. More than two dozen others were sick with flu in an outbreak there in May, and the facility was briefly shut down and sanitized. To help with the care of migrants in custody, Congress has sent President Donald Trump a $4.6 billion aid package. Administration officials say they are expecting a 25% drop in crossings in the month of June.

Around the Nation Oregon State Police officers guard the entrance to the Oregon State Capitol in Salem, Ore., Saturday. Nine of the 12 minority Republicans returned after Senate President Peter Courtney said the majority Democrats lacked the votes to pass the legislation aimed at countering climate change. ( AP Photo/Andrew Selsky)

bon that allows companies to trade pollution credits. Shortly after convening, senators quickly voted 1710 to send the climate proposal back to committee, essentially killing it for the session. Sen. Sara Gelser, a Democrat from the college town of Corvallis, said the demise of the cap-and-trade bill has deeply upset many constituents. “That’s a bill that’s been many, many years in the making,” Gelser told report-

ers Saturday. “I think there’s a lot of heartbreak, but today is one day and we’ll come back and address it. We have to. Our planet demands it.” The House had previously passed the bill, one of the centerpieces of Oregon’s 2019 legislative session, which is scheduled to end late Sunday. Republicans, who make up the minority in both chambers, uniformly opposed the proposal saying it would increase the cost

of fuel and wreak financial havoc on the trucking and the logging industries. One of the Republicans absent Saturday was Sen. Brian Boquist, who had told state police to come heavily armed and to send bachelor officers if they were going to forcibly return him to the Senate during the walkout. Senate Republican leader Herman Baertschiger, Jr., on Friday refused to condemn Boquist’s words, only saying the comments were unhelpful.

Body parts found in gator after Florida man discovered dead FORT MEADE, Fla. — Officials are investigating the death of a man discovered floating in a Florida canal with some of his remains found inside an alligator. The Ledger reports that a person found the body floating west of Fort Meade and saw an alligator had parts of it in its mouth. The victim was identified as 45-year-old Michael Ford II. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission trapped and killed the alligator to perform a necropsy, which revealed that one of Ford’s hands and one of his feet were in the gator’s stomach. An autopsy revealed Ford had other injuries caused by the gator and apparently drowned, though an official cause of death has yet to be determined. — Associated Press


A6 | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

Peninsula Clarion | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | A7

Kenai July 4th Parade & Festivities July 4th, 2019

Parade starts at 11am. Parade route starts down Fidalgo Ave to Willow Street, left on Willow Street to Kenai Spur Hwy, right on Kenai Spur Hwy to Main Street Loop Road. The Midway (Kenai Park Strip) is open from 12pm-3pm. UNDER THE BIG TOP

GAMES

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ENTERTAINMENT SCHEDULE Parade Line Up 8am-10am Parade Begins at 11am Midway (Kenai Park Strip) Opens at 12pm

During the parade, Kenai police will close Main Street Loop from the Kenai Spur Highway to 1st Avenue from 10am until 5pm, Officers will direct traffic around the parade route during that time. Police also encourage people to arrive early for the best viewing spots along the parade route. Residents with questions about the parade should call the Kenai Chamber at 283-1991.

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A8 | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

World

Tens of thousands join gay pride parades By AMY GUTHRIE Associated Press

MEXICO CITY — Tens of thousands of people turned out for gay pride celebrations around the world on Saturday, including a boisterous party in Mexico and the first pride march in North Macedonia’s capital. Rainbow flags and umbrellas swayed and music pounded as the march along Mexico City’s Paseo de la Reforma avenue got underway, with couples, families and activists seeking to raise visibility for sexual diversity in the country. Same-sex civil unions have been legal in Mexico City since 2007, and gay marriage since 2009. A handful of Mexican states have also legalized samesex unions, which are supposed to be recognized nationwide. But pride participants said Mexico has a long way to go in becoming a more tolerant and accepting place for LGBTQ individuals. “There’s a lot of machismo, a lot of ignorance still,” said Monica Nochebuena, who identifies as bisexual. Nochebuena, 28, attended the Mexico City march for the first time with her mother and sister on Saturday, wearing a shirt that said: “My mama already knows.” Her mother’s shirt read: “My daughter already told me.” Human rights activist

US, Taliban open Doha talks in fresh bid to end war By KATHY GANNON Associated Press

A performer flies a rainbow flag during the gay pride parade, in Mexico City, Saturday. (AP Photo/Christian Palma)

Jose Luis Gutierrez, 43, said the march is about visibility, and rights, especially for Mexico’s vulnerable transgender population. The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights says that poverty, exclusion and violence reduce life expectancy for trans women in the Americas to 35 years. In New York City, Friday marked the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, when a police raid on a gay bar in Manhattan led to a riot and days of demonstrations that morphed into a sustained LGBTQ liberation movement. The city’s huge Pride parade on Sunday also swings past the bar.

Other LGBTQ celebrations took place from India to Europe, with more events planned for Sunday. In the North Macedonian capital of Skopje, U.S. Charge d’Affaires Micaela Schweitzer-Bluhm attended the first pride march there in a festive and incidentfree atmosphere despite a countermarch organized by religious and “pro-family” organizations. People from across Macedonia took part, along with marchers from neighboring Bulgaria, Greece and Serbia and other countries. “This year Skopje joined more than 70 Pride (march-

es) and the USA are very proud to be part of this,” Schweitzer-Bluhm told reporters. “There is a lot of progress here in North Macedonia but still a lot has to be done.” In Paraguay, about 2,000 people marched through the capital some carrying signs saying “Universities Free of Homophobia” and “Equal Rights.” The gay pride march came on the same day that conservative Paraguayan President Mario Abdo Benítez tweeted: “We will defend the family as the basis of society and the protection of life from conception.”

ISLAMABAD — A fresh round of talks between the U.S. and the Taliban began in Qatar on Saturday, just days after U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Washington is hoping for an Afghan peace agreement before Sept. 1. Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid confirmed to The Associated Press that negotiations had begun. Originally scheduled to begin in the morning, the two sides sat down mid-afternoon for the seventh time in a series of direct talks that began last year following the appointment of U.S. peace envoy Zalmay Khalilzad. As in previous talks between Khalilzad and the Taliban, the focus is on the withdrawal of U.S. troops and Taliban guarantees to prevent Afghanistan from again hosting militants who can stage global attacks. Both sides say they have come to an understanding on the withdrawal and the guarantees but details have yet to be worked out. The protracted war in Afghanistan began in 2001 to unseat the Taliban and hunt down al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden and his followers, who carried out the 9-11 attacks in the United States while operating in Afghan territory. After nearly 18 years and billions of dollars spent,

the Taliban control or contest roughly half of Afghan territory. In the Afghan capital of Kabul last week, Pompeo said “real progress” had been made on a draft agreement with the Taliban to ensure “that Afghan soil never again becomes a safe haven for terrorists.” Both Khalilzad and Pompeo have said that agreements with the Taliban will come hand in hand with understandings on an intra-Afghan dialogue and a permanent cease-fire. It was expected that a timetable would be among the discussion points in the Doha talks. The Taliban’s negotiating team has been led by Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, who cofounded the Taliban movement with its leader Mullah Mohammad Omar, who ruled with an iron fist, imposing a strict brand of Islam. Omar died several years ago, while Baradar has been held in a Pakistani jail since 2010 until his release earlier this year. The Taliban have refused to meet directly with President Ashraf Ghani’s government but have held several rounds of talks with a collection of Afghan personalities from Kabul, including former president Hamid Karzai, several prominent opposition leaders and government peace council members. Both those meetings were held in Moscow earlier this year.

Trump reaches out to Kim for border rendezvous By ZEKE MILLER and JONATHAN LEMIRE Associated Press

SEOUL, South Korea — President Donald Trump issued a Twitter invitation Saturday to North Korea’s Kim Jong Un to meet for a handshake at the Demilitarized Zone that separates the North and South, and expressed a willingness to cross the border for what would be a history-making photo opportunity. The invitation, while long rumored in diplomatic circles, still came across as an impulsive display of showmanship by a president bent on obtaining a legacydefining nuclear deal. North Korea responded by calling the offer a “very interesting

suggestion.” Presidential visits to the DMZ are traditionally carefully guarded secrets for security reasons. White House officials couldn’t immediately say whether Kim had agreed to meet with Trump. The president himself claimed before flying from Japan to South Korea that he wasn’t even sure Kim was in North Korea to accept the invitation. “All I did is put out a feeler, if you’d like to meet,” Trump said later of the message to Kim. He added, somewhat implausibly: “I just thought of it this morning.” Later, after arriving in Seoul from a summit in Osaka of world leaders, Trump offered no further in-

sight into his planned trip to the heavily fortified border. “It will be very interesting,” he said. While in Japan, Trump said at a news conference that he was “literally visiting the DMZ,” but wasn’t sure whether Kim would meet him. Trump said he’d “feel very comfortable” crossing the border into North Korea if Kim showed up, saying he’d “have no problem” becoming the first U.S. president to step into North Korea. His comments followed hours after Trump asked for Kim to meet him there. “If Chairman Kim of North Korea sees this, I would meet him at the Border/DMZ just to shake his hand and say

Hello(?)!” he wrote. It was not immediately clear what the agenda, if any, would be for the potential third Trump-Kim meeting. “If he’s there we’ll see each other for two minutes,” Trump predicted. Such a spectacle would present a valuable propaganda victory for Kim, who, with his family, has long been denied the recognition they sought on the international stage. Despite Trump’s comments Saturday, he had told The Hill newspaper in Washington in an interview this past week that he would be visiting the DMZ and “might” meet with Kim. The paper reported it had withheld Trump’s comments,

Putin says liberalism ‘eating itself’

had dinner that they agreed a possible Trump-Kim meeting would be a “good thing.” Moon talked about Kim’s commitment to denuclearization, while Trump expressed his “amicable” views on Kim, according to the official, Yoon Do-han, who added that a meeting would help pave the way for the resumption of nuclear diplomacy. Trump’s summit with Kim in Vietnam earlier this year collapsed without an agreement for denuclearizing the Korean Peninsula. He became the first sitting U.S. president to meet with the leader of the isolated nation last year, when they signed an agreement in Singapore to bring the North toward denuclearization.

Around the World Sudan’s army warns protest leaders of violence at rallies

By VLADIMIR ISACHENKOV Associated Press

OSAKA, Japan — Russian President Vladimir Putin fired a new broadside against Western liberalism at the Group of 20 summit in Japan, saying that policies such as welcoming migrants have hurt people’s interests. Speaking after the summit in Osaka concluded on Saturday, Putin charged that Donald Trump’s victory in the 2016 U.S. presidential election and a drop of popularity of traditional parties in Europe have been rooted in growing public dismay with mainstream liberal policies. He said Trump’s election victory was driven by growing disenchantment with liberal policies. “The liberal idea has started eating itself,” Putin said at a news conference. “Millions of people live their lives, and those who propagate those ideas are separate from them.” He also charged that the influx of migrants to Europe has infringed on people’s rights. “People live in their own country, according to their own traditions, why should it happen to them?” Putin said. The Russian leader added that while “liberal ideas remain attractive as a whole,” election results show that people want change. Putin hailed his meeting

citing security concerns by the White House. North Korea’s first vice foreign minister, Choe Son Hui, said the meeting, if realized, would serve as “another meaningful occasion in further deepening the personal relations between the two leaders and advancing the bilateral relations.” South Korea’s presidential Blue House said in a tweet that Trump asked South Korean President Moon Jae-in at the Group of 20 meetings whether he’d seen Trump’s Twitter message to Kim. When Moon replied he had, Trump said “(Let’s) try doing it” and raised his thumb, the Blue House said. A Moon aide told reporter after the presidents

Russia’s President Vladimir Putin attends a press conference with Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe after the G-20 summit in Osaka, western Japan Saturday. (Yuri Kadobnov/Pool Photo via AP)

with Trump on Friday on the sidelines of the G-20 summit as “business-like and pragmatic.” “We addressed almost the entire list of issues of mutual concern,” he said. “Of course, we talked about the situation in various parts of the world. Overall, these consultations were useful.” He said the claims of Russian meddling in the U.S. election were part of the agenda of his talk with Trump. At the start of Friday’s meeting, the Russian leader

laughed when a reporter shouted about Trump warning Putin “not to meddle” in the 2020 presidential election. Asked Saturday whether the issue was discussed during the meeting, Putin said that “we talked about it,” but didn’t elaborate. He said he believes it’s necessary to “turn the page” in relations with the U.S., which have plunged to the lowest level since the Cold War era. In November, Trump abruptly canceled a scheduled round of talks with Putin on

the sidelines of the G-20 summit in Argentina over Russia’s seizure of Ukrainian navy ships and their crews. Russia has kept the seamen in custody pending trial. Putin said that Trump raised the issue during Friday’s meeting and made it a priority. The Russian leader said the naval incident was a provocation staged by the former Ukrainian president, and signaled that the Ukrainian seamen could be released after their trial is over.

KHARTOUM, Sudan — Sudan’s ruling military council warned protest leaders Saturday that they would be held responsible for any destruction or damage by “vandals” and people “with an agenda” ahead of planned mass rallies demanding civilian rule more than two months after the military ousted autocratic President Omar al-Bashir. The country’s pro-democracy movement called for demonstrations across the country Sunday, despite efforts by the African Union and Ethiopia to bring the generals and the protest leaders back to the negotiating table. The AU and Ethiopia have mediated between the two sides and floated a joint proposal for a transition of power. But protest leaders said they believe the military’s comments were meant as a threat to allow them to quash Sunday’s demonstrations. The Sudanese Professionals’ Association, a leading protest organization, said security forces stormed its headquarters late Saturday and banned its planned news conference ahead of the rallies. The protests are planned to mark the 30th anniversary of the Islamist-backed coup that brought Omar alBashir to power in 1989, toppling Sudan’s last elected government. The protest groups said the demonstrations would not be canceled unless the military council hands power over to civilians. The military council warned against “any destruction or damage” to people and state institutions because of “traffic disruption or road closure” during Sunday’s rallies. Gen. Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, deputy head of the military council, insisted the council does not oppose the planned demonstrations. “We are not against peaceful rallies. But there are (vandals), people who have an agenda. We do not want troubles; we do not need strife,” he told a gathering of army supporters in the capital of Khartoum. — Associated Press


Peninsula Clarion | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | A9

Public Safety Court reports The following judgments were recently handed down in Kenai District Court: n Isaiah Jose Trevino, 19, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to fourth-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance, committed June 2. He was fined $250 and a $100 court surcharge. n Robert Backstrom, 36, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to fourth-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance, committed Apr. 30. He was fined a $100 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete a substance/alcohol abuse assessment and follow all recommendations, and placed on probation for 12 months. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Lisa M. Bevin, 38, of Nikiski, pleaded guilty to violating condition of release, committed May 18. She was sentenced to time served and fined a $100 court surcharge and a $50 jail surcharge. n Joseph Chikoyak, Jr., 44, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to second-degree criminal trespass (upon premises), committed June 9. He was sentenced to 10 days in jail and fined a

Police reports Information for this report was taken from publicly available law enforcement records and includes arrest and citation information. Anyone listed in this report is presumed innocent. n On June 10 at 6:01 p.m., Alaska State Troopers was contacted by Alisa Fauble, 25, of Seward, and her hiking companion, requesting assistance on Mount Marathon for Fauble, who had injured her ankle. Fauble stated she could not hike out and requested Lifemed. After Lifemed helicopter launched with a 35-minute estimated time of arrival, Fauble contacted Dispatch, stating that she wouldn’t wait 35 minutes for Lifemed and was hiking out. Fauble hiked out and was contacted by troopers at the Jeep Trail. Fauble declined emergency medical services or transportation to the emergency room and said she was going to walk. Fauble was issued a citation for making a false report of an emergency. n On June 15 at 4:02 p.m., Alaska State Troopers was advised of an injured hiker on Flattop Mountain. William Thon, 24, of Anchorage, stated that his hiking companion, Maylyn Cleveland, 30, of Anchorage, was injured in a fall near Flattop Peak. Lifemed and park rangers responded but were unable to extricate Cleveland due to steep treacherous terrain. RCC AKANG responded and hoisted the victim out for transport to Providence in Anchorage. n On June 1 at about 12:00 p.m., Alaska State

$100 court surcharge and a $50 jail surcharge. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Katheryn J. Heazlett, 29, of Nikiski, pleaded guilty to an amended charge of unlawful contact, committed Apr. 22. She was sentenced to 30 days in jail with all but time served suspended, fined a $100 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete an anger management class and follow all recommendations, and was placed on probation for 12 months. n Anthony Charles Larocca, 51, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to an amended charge of fourthdegree theft, committed Mar. 27. He was fined a $100 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to pay restitution, forfeited items seized, ordered to admit three prior theft convictions, and was placed on probation for six months. n Anthony Charles Larocca, 51, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to two counts of second-degree criminal trespass (upon premises), committed Apr. 9. He was fined a $100 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge, forfeited items seized, ordered to have no contact with victims, and placed on pro-

bation for 12 months. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Tyler Craig Lewis, 33, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to no motor liability insurance, committed May 3. He was fined $500, a $100 court surcharge, and a $50 jail surcharge. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Denver James McClain, 44, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct, committed May 17. He was fined $10 and a $100 court surcharge. n Peter Dale Nagle, 61, of Homer, pleaded guilty to an amended charge of reckless driving, committed Jan. 18. He was fined a $100 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered not to consume or buy alcohol for 12 months, had his license revoked for 30 days, ordered to attend 12 Alcoholic Anonymous meetings, and was placed on probation for 12 months. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Alyssa N. Smith, 22, of Nikiski, pleaded guilty to driving under the influence, committed May 17. She was sentenced to 30 days in jail or on electronic monitoring with 27 days suspended, fined $2,000 with $500 suspended, a $150 court surcharge, a $150 jail surcharge with

$100 suspended and $66 for the first three days plus $14 for each additional day of monitoring ordered, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, had her license revoked for 90 days, forfeited items seized, ordered not to possess, consume or buy controlled substances for one year unless with a valid prescription, taken as prescribed, and kept in original container, and was placed on probation for one year. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Robert Eugene Sparks III, 25, of Sterling, pleaded guilty to first-degree criminal trespass (in a dwelling), a domestic violence offense committed May 18. He was sentenced to 90 days in jail with all but time served suspended, fined a $100 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete a substance/alcohol abuse assessment and follow all recommendations, forfeited all items seized, and placed on probation for 12 months. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Robert Eugene Sparks III, 25, of Sterling, pleaded guilty to fourthdegree theft, committed May 24. He was sentenced to five days in jail, fined a $100 court surcharge and a

$50 jail surcharge, ordered to pay restitution, ordered to have no contact with Soldotna Safeway, and forfeited all items seized. n Dimitri Christopher Targonsky, Jr., 28, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to leaving the scene of an accident (vehicle damage), committed Apr. 20. He was fined $200 and a $100 court surcharge, ordered to have no contact with victim, and placed on probation for 12 months. n Jacob Robert Trawinski, 23, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to driving under the influence, committed June 2, 2018. He was sentenced to 30 days in jail or on electronic monitoring with 27 days suspended, fined $2,000 with $500 suspended, a $75 court surcharge, a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended and $66 for the first three days plus $14 for each additional day of monitoring ordered, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, had his license revoked for 90 days, beginning Sept. 1, forfeited items seized, forfeited interest in the firearm seized, and was placed on probation for one year. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Shannon Dee Walker, 58, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to second-degree criminal trespass, commit-

ted May 10. She was fined $150 and a $100 court surcharge, ordered to have no contact with Kenai Walmart, and placed on probation for 12 months. n George D. Ivie, 38, of Sterling, pleaded guilty to driving under the influence, committed July 1, 2018. He was sentenced to 120 days in jail on electronic monitoring with 100 days suspended (time has been completed on electronic monitoring), fined $4,000 with $1,000 suspended, a $75 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment (completed), had his license revoked for one year, ordered ignition interlock for 12 months, ordered not to consume alcohol to excess, and placed on probation for 24 months. The following dismissals were recently handed down in Kenai District Court: n A charge of violating condition of release against Joseph Chikoyak, Jr., 44, of Kenai, was dismissed. Date of the charge was June 6. n A charge of fifthdegree criminal mischief against Nicholas Donald Owen Demont, 25, of Nikiski, was dismissed. Date of the charge was May 30.

Troopers responded to a report from the International Emergency Response Coordination Center of a GPS device SOS activation. Investigation revealed that the device owner, Peter Smith, 63, of Anchorage was making a multi-day hike in the Eagle River Valley alone and was not responding to communication from the IERCC. AST Helo 3 and Alaska Mountain Rescue Group responded to the area. The SOS message was subsequently found to be accidental, and Smith was not in distress. n On June 21 at about 6:00 p.m., Alaska State Troopers was advised of an aircraft crash near Little Johnstone Bay, southeast of Seward. RCC AKANG was alerted and prepared to respond. Prior to the arrival of AKANG rescue personnel, a commercial helicopter from Seward landed at the scene and confirmed no signs of life. The pilot of the Helio Courier was identified as Kem Sibbitt, 63, of Fairbanks. Two adult passengers were believed to be aboard but have not been positively identified. As of June 22 at about 12:00 p.m., Alaska State Troopers Helo 3, along with the National Transportation Board, are currently at scene, conducting investigation and recovery of the victims. The passengers found deceased in the crash have been tentatively identified as Michael John Timmer, 42, and Traci Pauline Timmer, 43, both of Hopkins, Michigan. n On June 23 at 1:28 a.m., Alaska State Troopers received a report of a vehicle in a ditch near Mile 52 of the Sterling Highway in

Cooper Landing. Troopers arrived on scene and identified the sole occupant of the vehicle as Kevin Tanner, 25, of Fairbanks. Investigation revealed that Tanner had been driving under the influence of alcohol. During the investigation, a rifle was discovered in Tanner’s vehicle. Tanner later refused to submit to chemical testing in lieu of his charge of driving under the influence. He was taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility on the charges of driving under the influence, refusal to submit to chemical test, and fourth-degree misconduct involving weapons and was to be released on his own recognizance. n On June 22 at 7:49 p.m., Alaska State Troopers received report of a male slumped-over in the driver’s seat near Gold Dust Drive in Soldotna. Investigation revealed that Michael Foree, 44, of Soldotna, had operated a motor vehicle while under the influence of controlled substances and that he was in possession of three different controlled substances. Foree was arrested for driving under the influence and three counts of fourth-degree misconduct involving controlled substances and was taken to Wildwood Pretrial on $500 bail. n On June 22 at 10:05 p.m., Alaska State Troopers responded to several REDDI (Report Every Dangerous Driver Immediately) complaints regarding a 2000 gray Chevrolet Suburban driving aggressively on Kalifornsky Beach Road. Troopers contacted the vehicle and identified the driver as Travaun Sanders, 33, of Anchorage, who was

found to be driving under the influence. Sanders was arrested and taken to Wildwood Pretrial where he refused to provide a sufficient breath sample. Sanders was remanded on the charges of driving under the influence and refusal to submit to a chemical test. n On June 21, Alaska State Troopers were follow-

ing-up on a welfare check. After investigation, James Fidler, 26, of Nikiski, was arrested for: violating a domestic violence protection order, violating conditions of release, illegal contact, and resisting arrest and was taken to Wildwood Pretrial. n On June 23 at about 11:00 a.m., Alaska State Troopers responded to a

residence off Lake Street in Soldotna for a report of a male threatening a family member with a machete. Investigation led to the arrest of Zachariah Glen Kasukonis, 39, of Soldotna, who was taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility on domestic violence charges of thirddegree assault and fifthSee POLICE, page A10


A10 | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

. . . Police Continued from page A9

degree criminal mischief and violating conditions of release. n On June 22, Alaska Wildlife Soldotna Post Troopers contacted three people for dipnetting out of season on the Kasilof River and issued citations to Natalie Angapak, 61, Nelson Angapak, 75, and Grant Kashatok, 55, for personal use fishing in closed waters. Troopers also seized multiple salmon and released them to a local charity. n On June 22 at 7:25 p.m., Kenai police made a routine traffic stop near the Bridge Access Road and Tern Avenue. Investigation led to a summons being issued to Kaylene A. Miller, 28, of Anchor Point, on a charge of fourth-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance. n On June 21 at 6:41 p.m., a Kenai police officer contacted a male who was seen pushing a local grocery store’s shopping cart. After the officer spoke with the male, Anthony C. Larocca, 51, of Soldotna, was issued a summons for third-degree theft. n On June 21 at 11:13 p.m., Kenai police responded to a welfare check report on a female near a local grocery store. Officers contacted and interviewed the female, who reported that a male had assaulted her. Another officer contacted the male suspect, and as a result, Robert W. Westover, 48, of Kenai, was arrested for fourth-degree assault (domestic violence) and taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility. n On June 24 at 9:25 a.m., Alaska State Troopers contacted Sarah Kirk, 30, of Anchor Point, after receiving a report that she was refusing to leave a property in Anchor Point. A records check showed that Kirk had an outstanding warrant for her arrest for violating her conditions of release in a separate criminal case. Kirk was arrested and taken to the Homer Jail without bail. n On June 23 at about 8:50 p.m., Alaska Wildlife Troopers, Soldotna Post, arrested Christopher Eugene Brower, 51, of Soldotna, on the Kasilof River near Crooked Creek for fifthdegree misconduct involving a weapon and violating conditions of release. Brower was also issued a $320 citation for making a false statement on a sportfish license application after troopers contacted Brower sportfishing on the Kasilof River and conducted a routine license check. The investigation revealed that Brower had applied for and obtained a 2019 Resident Low-Income license for which he did not qualify. During the investigation, it was revealed Brower had a concealed handgun on his person, but he failed to notify troopers of that. It was also revealed that Brower was on conditions of release for a prior burglary charge. Brower was taken to Wild-

wood Correctional Facility, pending arraignment. n On June 24 at 12:22 p.m., Alaska State Troopers were dispatched to the area of Twin Road in Sterling for a report of a male sleeping in a suspicious vehicle. Investigation revealed that Garrett J. Mahan, 47, of Sterling, had an active arrest warrant for failure to appear for an arraignment on the original charge of unlawful abandonment. Mahan was arrested on the warrant and taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility on $500 bail. n On June 24 at 4:36 p.m., Alaska State Troopers received a report of a theft from a commercial property near Mile 16 of the Kenai Spur Highway. The suspect(s) entered the property and stole a Warn wench from a trailer, valued at $800. The investigation is continuing. n On June 24 at 4:59 p.m., Alaska State Troopers responded to a two-vehicle collision on Kalifornsky Beach Road at Poppy Lane. Investigation revealed that Dana Payne, 67, of Soldotna, was driving her Dodge Dakota pickup when she stopped for a light. Mikaela Reilly-Nelson, 25, of Kenai, was behind her, driving her Saturn sedan. Reilly-Nelson was distracted on her phone when she started to go and rear-ended the pickup, causing minor damage. Both drivers reported wearing seat belts, and no injuries were suffered. Reilly-Nelson was issued a citation for negligent driving on scene. Both vehicles were drivable from the scene. n On June 23, Alaska Wildlife Troopers issued Christian Monroe, 20, of Fishkill, New York, a $120 bailable citation for failing to log a king salmon on his non-resident sport fishing license. Monroe was contacted sport fishing in the Nick Dudiak Lagoon. n On June 22, Alaska Wildlife Troopers issued Barry Silook, 60, of Homer, a $220 bailable citation for sport fishing King Salmon without having a king salmon stamp in possession. Silook was contacted fishing for king salmon in the Nick Dudiak Lagoon. n On June 24 at about 5:00 p.m., Alaska State Troopers responded to a residence off Macholz Avenue in Sterling, where contact was made with Jack Allan Brewster, 35, of Sterling, and Travis Gene Herrick, 35, of Soldotna. Investigation revealed that Brewster had an outstanding warrant for fourth-degree assault (domestic violence), and Herrick had an outstanding warrant for second-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance and thirddegree misconduct involving a controlled substance. Both were arrested and taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility, Brewster on $500 bail and Herrick on $2,500 bail. On June 24 at 9:52 p.m., Alaska State Troopers received a report of a disturbance in the Soldotna area. Investigation revealed that John Sommer, 43, of Sterling, had followed an old neighbor to a local gas

station and started a confrontation with the victim. The confrontation resulted in Sommer threatening to shoot the victim in the head multiple times. Sommer insulted, taunted and challenged the victim to a fight. Sommer was issued a misdemeanor citation for fourth-degree assault and second-degree harassment. n On June 23 at 7:31 p.m., Alaska State Troopers responded to a report of male lying on the side of the road at about Mile 92 of the Sterling Highway. The male was identified as Curtis Zackar, 46, of Anchorage. Zackar left the area, and as he was walking away, he purposely fell to the ground near the fog line. A vehicle traveling northbound took evasive action to avoid hitting Zackar. Due to Zackar’s actions, he was arrested for disorderly conduct and taken to Wildwood Pretrial. Alcohol played a factor. n On June 26 at 4:19 a.m., Alaska State Troopers responded to a disturbance off North Cohoe Street in Kasilof. Investigation revealed that Laura Hamrick, 53, of Soldotna, had assaulted two people at a residence and damaged multiple items at the residence. Hamrick was arrested and taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility for domestic violence fourth-degree assault, domestic violence fourth-degree criminal mischief, and fourth-degree assault. n On June 25 at about 9:00 p.m., Alaska State Troopers stopped a Toyota sedan for speeding (77 miles per hour in a 55 miles per hour area) near Mile 67 of the Sterling Highway. Investigation revealed that driver Ferdinand Mingoy, 37, of Anchorage, was in possession of methamphetamine. Mingoy was arrested and taken to Wildwood Pretrial. The vehicle was impounded on scene. n On June 24, Alaska Wildlife Troopers were conducting a patrol of Kasilof South Beach when Timothy Mycroft, 61, of Kasilof, was contacted at his personal use set net site. Mycroft was asked for his fishing license and permit, which he provided. The trooper observed Mycroft’s net to be longer then the nets surrounding it. When asked how long the net was, Mycroft said he did not know. The trooper helped Mycroft remove the net from the water, so it could be measured. The length of his net was measured at 107 feet, 47 feet longer than the 60 feet permit conditions allowed. Mycroft was issued a citation for fishing with illegal gear. A court date was set for July 11. n On June 26 at 8:44 p.m., Alaska State Troopers and Nikiski Fire Department responded to Wildwood Pretrial Facility upon the report of an inmate who was not conscious and not breathing. Life-saving efforts were administered, but 23-yearold Noah Price, of Soldotna, was pronounced deceased on scene. At this time, no foul play is suspected, and the incident is being investigated as a suicide. The re-

mains have been sent to the State Medical Examiner’s Office in Anchorage pending autopsy. Next of kin has been notified. n On June 26, Alaska Wildlife Troopers were conducted a patrol of Kasilof south beach and contacted Theodore Vandervelde, 54, of Delta Junction, fishing, using a dip net. When contacted, he was unable to provide a valid 2019 Alaska Sport Fishing License. He was issued a correctable citation, with bail set at $220. n On June 26 at 5:18 p.m., Kenai police were advised of a person trespassing at a business near Mile 10 of the Kenai Spur Highway. Officer response resulted in a summons to court for Francis X. Moesh V, 28, of Ninilchik, on a charge of second-degree criminal trespass. n On June 25 at 10:43 p.m., Kenai police were called to a business near Mile 10.5 of the Kenai Spur Highway on the report of a trespasser. Officer response resulted in the arrest of Travis D. George, 32, of Fort Yukon, on a charge of second-degree criminal trespass. George was taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility. n On June 24 at 7:55 p.m., Kenai police received a report of a male being extremely disruptive at the local airport. Officers responded and contacted the male suspect, Curtis S. Zackar, 46, of Anchorage, who continued to cause a disturbance. Zackar was arrested for disorderly conduct and violating conditions of release and was taken to Wildwood Pretrial. Jacqueline Mouser, 48, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to failure to give immediate notice of an accident, committed June 28, 2018. She was fined a $50 court surcharge and placed on probation for 12 months. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Roger Alford Mouser, 51, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to violating condition of release, committed June 27, 2018. He was fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended and placed on probation for 12 months. On June 28 at 2:18 a.m., Alaska State Troopers responded to a Kasilof residence on the report of a disturbance. William Eastham, 28, was contacted during the investigation and was determined to have assaulted a household member. After investigation, Eastham was arrested and taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility on the charge of fourth-degree assault (domestic violence). n On June 27 at 8:28 p.m., Alaska State Troopers received a report of a male burglarizing a greenhouse at a residence on Funny River Road in Soldotna. Troopers responded to the residence and apprehended the male, identifying the suspect as Johnny Riddle, 69, of Soldotna. Investigation revealed that Riddle had burglarized the greenhouse and damaged property in excess of $750. In addition, Riddle had threatened the caller with a dangerous instrument

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when he was confronted. Prior to leaving the scene, Riddle also spit on a trooper. Riddle was arrested and taken to Wildwood Pretrial without bail on the charges of third-degree assault, second-degree burglary, thirddegree criminal mischief, and first-degree harassment. n On June 29 at 12:23 a.m., Alaska State Troopers responded to motor vehicle collision with a moose. The driver of the tan Dodge Dakota was identified as Linda McLane, 68, of Kasilof. Investigation revealed her vehicle was unable to avoid a collision with a moose that had run out in front of it. McLane was transported by Central Emergency Services for minor injuries. The moose was given to a charity. No foul play is suspected. McLane was wearing a seat belt. n On June 28 at 8:04 p.m., Alaska State Troopers received a report of longterm protective order violation. Investigation revealed that Robert Burns, 27, violated the protective order by texting a person he was not allow to contact, per the protective order. Burns was arrested and taken to Wildwood Pretrial. n On June 28 at 11:21 p.m., Alaska State Troopers received a report of a domestic disturbance at a residence in Sterling. Troopers arrived on scene and identified the suspect as Gregory McMullen, 51, of Sterling. Investigation revealed that McMullen had placed two household members in fear of imminent physical injury. McMullen was arrested and taken to Wildwood Pretrial without bail on two counts of fourth-degree assault, (domestic violence). n On June 27 at about 1:40 a.m., Alaska State Troopers received a REDDI (Report Every Dangerous Driver Immediately) report about a vehicle driving with no headlights on and swerving all over the road. The vehicle was traveling toward Soldotna near Mile 72 of the Sterling Highway. Troopers located and stopped the vehicle near Mile 86 of the Sterling Highway. The

driver identified herself as Shannon Walker, 58, of Nikiski. After investigation, Walker was arrested for second-degree misconduct involving controlled substances, two counts of thirddegree misconduct involving controlled substances, four counts of fourth-degree misconduct involving controlled substances, and driving under the influence of drugs. She was taken to Wildwood Pretrial without bail. n On June 23, 2019 at 11:59 a.m., Jessica Ellingson, 28, of Anchorage, contacted the Alaska State Troopers and reported that she and Bryan Andrew, 28, of Anchorage, were stranded on a beach just south of Caine’s Head in the Seward area. Jessica reported that their 20-foot skiff began taking on water when another boat created a wake big enough for the water to make it inside their boat. Bryan was able to operate the boat to a nearby beach without incident. Alaska State Troopers and Alaska Wildlife Troopers responded with a boat and provided transportation back to the Seward Harbor. Neither party reported any injuries, and both declined Emergency Medical Services. n On June 28 at about 4:00 p.m., Seward Alaska State Troopers was notified of an aircraft emergency locator transmitter (ELT) activation in mountainous terrain near Mile 37 of the Seward Highway. Investigation confirmed the crash of a small plane with four souls onboard. Alaska Air National Guard (AKANG) Pararescuers responded to the crash site and located one survivor, who was airlifted to the Providence Emergency Room in critical condition. On June 20, AST Helo 3 will be flying to the scene to attempt recovery of victims and will be transporting National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) to the area. Recovery efforts are hampered by poor visibility due to wildfire smoke and mountainous terrain. Victim names are withheld pending next-of-kin notifications.

Today in History Today is Sunday, June 30, the 181st day of 2019. There are 184 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On June 30, 1936, the Civil War novel “Gone with the Wind” by Margaret Mitchell was first published by The Macmillan Co. in New York. On this date: In 1865, eight people, including Mary Surratt and Dr. Samuel Mudd, were convicted by a military commission of conspiring with John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln. (Four defendants, including Surratt, were executed; Mudd was sentenced to life in prison, but was pardoned by President Andrew Johnson in 1869.) In 1918, labor activist and socialist Eugene V. Debs was arrested in Cleveland, charged under the Espionage Act of 1917 for a speech he’d made two weeks earlier denouncing U.S. involvement in World War I. (Debs was sentenced to prison and disenfranchised for life.) In 1934, Adolf Hitler launched his “blood purge” of political and military rivals in Germany in what came to be known as “The Night of the Long Knives.” In 1953, the first Chevrolet Corvette, with its innovative fiberglass body, was built at a General Motors assembly facility in Flint, Michigan. In 1963, Pope Paul VI was crowned the 262nd head of the Roman Catholic Church. In 1966, the National Organization for Women (NOW) was founded in Washington, D.C. In 1971, the Supreme Court ruled, 6-3, that the government could not prevent The New York Times or The Washington Post from publishing the Pentagon Papers. A Soviet space mission ended in tragedy when three cosmonauts aboard Soyuz 11 were found dead of asphyxiation inside their capsule after it had returned to Earth. In 1977, President Jimmy Carter announced he had decided against production of the Rockwell B-1 bomber, saying it was too costly. (However, the B-1 was later revived by President Ronald Reagan.) In 1982, the proposed Equal Rights Amendment to the U.S. Constitution expired, having failed to receive the required number of ratifications for its adoption, despite having its seven-year deadline extended by three years. In 1985, 39 American hostages from a hijacked TWA jetliner were freed in Beirut after being held 17 days. In 1997, the Union Jack was lowered for the last time over Government House in Hong Kong as Britain prepared to hand the colony back to China at midnight after ruling it for 156 years. In 2013, 19 elite firefighters known as members of the Granite Mountain Hotshots were killed battling a wildfire northwest of Phoenix after a change in wind direction pushed the flames back toward their position. Ten years ago: Democrat Al Franken was declared the winner of Minnesota’s eight-month U.S. Senate vote recount, defeating Republican incumbent Norm Coleman. A Yemeni jet with 153 people on board crashed into the Indian Ocean as it tried to land on the island nation of Comoros; a 12-year-old girl was the sole survivor. American soldier Pfc. Bowe R. Bergdahl went missing from his base in eastern Afghanistan, and was later confirmed to have been captured by insurgents. (Bergdahl was released on May 31, 2014 in exchange for five Taliban detainees.) Five years ago: A sharply divided Supreme Court ruled that some companies with religious objections could avoid the contraceptives requirement in President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul, the first time the high court declared that businesses can hold religious views under federal law. President Obama tapped former Procter & Gamble CEO Robert McDonald to take over the troubled Veterans Affairs Department. The Israeli military found the bodies of three missing teenagers just over two weeks after they were abducted in the occupied West Bank, allegedly by Hamas militants. Writer, actor, producer and director Paul Mazursky, 84, died in Los Angeles. Actor Bob Hastings, 89, died in Burbank, California. One year ago: Hundreds of thousands of people gathered for rallies and marches in hundreds of locations around the country, demanding an end to the separation of immigrant families who cross into the United States. Today’s Birthdays: Actress Lea Massari is 86. Actress Nancy Dussault is 83. Songwriter Tony Hatch is 80. Singer Glenn Shorrock is 75. Actor Leonard Whiting is 69. Jazz musician Stanley Clarke is 68. Actor David Garrison is 67. Rock musician Hal Lindes (Dire Straits) is 66. Actor-comedian David Alan Grier is 63. Actor Vincent D’Onofrio is 60. Actress Deirdre Lovejoy is 57. Actor Rupert Graves is 56. Former boxer Mike Tyson is 53. Actor Peter Outerbridge is 53. Rock musician Tom Drummond (Better Than Ezra) is 50. Actor-comedian Tony Rock (TV: “Living Biblically”) is 50. Actor Brian Bloom is 49. Actor Brian Vincent is 49. Actress Monica Potter is 48. Actress Molly Parker is 47. Actor Rick Gonzalez is 40. Actor Tom Burke is 38. Actress Lizzy Caplan is 37. Actress Susannah Flood is 37. Rock musician James Adam Shelley (American Authors) is 36. Country singer Cole Swindell is 36. Rhythm and blues singer Fantasia is 35. Olympic gold medal swimmer Michael Phelps is 34. Actor Sean Marquette (TV: “The Goldbergs”) is 31. Thought for Today: “In order to go on living one must try to escape the death involved in perfectionism.” -- Hannah Arendt, German-born American philosopher and historian (1906-1975).


Peninsula Clarion | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | A11

Take Pride In Old Glory

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m o d e e r F


A12 | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

AccuWeather® 5-day forecast for Kenai-Soldotna Today

Monday

Partly sunny; breezy this afternoon Hi: 69

Tuesday Wednesday Thursday

Partly sunny and smoky

Lo: 54

Hi: 72

Mild with partial sunshine

Lo: 54

Hi: 72

RealFeel

Lo: 55

The patented AccuWeather.com RealFeel Temperature® is an exclusive index of the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

Hi: 74

Lo: 56

63 65 67 69

Today 4:39 a.m. 11:37 p.m.

Sunrise Sunset

New July 2

First July 9

Daylight Day Length - 18 hrs., 57 min., 35 sec. Daylight lost - 1 min., 35 sec.

Alaska Cities City Adak* Anchorage Barrow Bethel Cold Bay Cordova Delta Junction Denali N. P. Dillingham Dutch Harbor Fairbanks Fort Yukon Glennallen* Gulkana Haines Homer Juneau Ketchikan Kiana King Salmon Klawock Kodiak

Sunny to partly cloudy

Moonrise Moonset

Hi: 78

Tomorrow 4:40 a.m. 11:36 p.m.

Kotzebue 62/54

Lo: 59

Unalakleet 58/51 McGrath 67/47

Tomorrow 4:06 a.m. 10:41 p.m.

* Indicates estimated temperatures for yesterday

Yesterday Hi/Lo/W 52/47/r 79/61/pc 48/36/r 65/61/c 55/48/pc 79/50/s 87/60/pc 87/52/pc 67/55/pc 52/47/r 89/59/pc 87/59/pc 91/54/pc 91/50/pc 81/60/pc 71/52/s 81/58/pc 65/56/c 71/57/c 67/50/pc 64/53/c 74/57/s

Today Hi/Lo/W 53/49/r 72/59/pc 51/44/sh 60/47/c 56/47/c 70/53/pc 83/57/t 77/51/sh 66/50/s 56/49/c 76/55/t 81/58/s 72/53/pc 87/58/c 80/59/pc 67/53/pc 79/54/pc 69/55/pc 59/50/sh 63/47/pc 68/52/pc 64/52/pc

City Kotzebue McGrath Metlakatla Nome North Pole Northway Palmer Petersburg Prudhoe Bay* Saint Paul Seward Sitka Skagway Talkeetna Tanana Tok* Unalakleet Valdez Wasilla Whittier Willow* Yakutat

Yesterday Hi/Lo/W 68/57/c 84/64/c 63/55/c 53/49/c 88/60/pc 88/53/s 85/55/s 72/55/pc 43/36/sh 52/45/r 72/60/pc 60/53/pc 77/57/s 89/58/s 85/53/pc 86/51/pc 63/56/c 78/54/pc 84/59/pc 76/52/c 88/60/pc 78/49/s

Talkeetna 82/59

Bethel 60/47

Today Hi/Lo/W 62/54/c 67/47/pc 67/57/pc 52/45/sh 77/54/pc 88/58/pc 82/56/t 73/56/pc 52/43/c 53/47/c 71/56/pc 64/55/pc 82/58/pc 82/59/pc 75/49/pc 85/56/t 58/51/sh 75/53/pc 80/56/pc 76/62/pc 82/58/pc 66/53/s

Anchorage 72/59

Albany, NY Albuquerque Amarillo Asheville Atlanta Atlantic City Austin Baltimore Billings Birmingham Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo, NY Casper Charleston, SC Charleston, WV Charlotte, NC Chicago Cheyenne Cincinnati

87/70/sh 94/69/pc 98/63/s 87/63/s 87/72/sh 93/75/pc 94/70/pc 97/73/t 84/63/pc 88/71/pc 86/73/c 88/52/s 87/70/t 81/69/r 93/52/s 89/70/t 91/67/pc 92/70/pc 87/69/pc 90/60/t 91/68/pc

75/58/t 93/67/c 94/62/s 87/69/s 88/73/s 90/62/pc 87/72/t 91/62/pc 84/60/c 88/71/t 85/61/c 89/59/pc 75/62/t 73/55/pc 79/55/c 92/75/t 89/60/pc 95/71/s 86/71/t 81/58/t 89/69/pc

Cleveland Columbia, SC Columbus, OH Concord, NH Dallas Dayton Denver Des Moines Detroit Duluth El Paso Fargo Flagstaff Grand Rapids Great Falls Hartford Helena Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Jackson, MS

89/71/pc 91/66/pc 92/68/pc 83/66/sh 98/75/r 92/71/pc 96/66/pc 94/70/s 89/72/pc 87/58/s 99/76/pc 85/64/t 86/48/pc 89/70/pc 79/50/s 89/71/t 81/51/s 88/77/pc 90/72/t 90/70/pc 91/65/pc

78/59/s 96/73/pc 87/65/pc 71/55/t 87/71/t 89/70/pc 90/59/t 94/71/s 84/63/s 81/63/t 100/72/s 86/63/pc 82/50/c 85/67/pc 79/50/pc 79/59/t 81/53/c 87/76/pc 84/70/t 90/73/t 88/68/t

City

First Second

12:53 a.m. (17.5) 2:03 p.m. (15.6)

7:36 a.m. (-0.6) 7:37 p.m. (3.8)

First Second

12:53 p.m. (8.0) --- (---)

6:30 a.m. (-0.6) 6:09 p.m. (2.9)

First Second

5:52 a.m. (28.7) 6:59 p.m. (27.5)

12:19 a.m. (6.6) 12:59 p.m. (-0.2)

Anchorage

Almanac Readings ending 4 p.m. yesterday

Temperature

From Kenai Municipal Airport

High .............................................. 72 Low ............................................... 52 Normal high ................................. 63 Normal low ................................... 46 Record high ....................... 79 (1968) Record low ........................ 36 (1994)

Precipitation

From the Peninsula Clarion in Kenai

24 hours ending 4 p.m. yest. . 0.00" Month to date ........................... 0.11" Normal month to date ............. 1.03" Year to date ............................. 3.50" Normal year to date ................. 5.01" Record today ................ 0.61" (1995) Record for June ........... 2.93" (1955) Record for year ........... 27.09" (1963)

Valdez 75/53

Juneau 79/54

(For the 48 contiguous states)

Kodiak 64/52

115 at Glendale, Ariz. 22 at Bodie State Park, Calif.

High yesterday Low yesterday

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Jacksonville 89/74/pc 88/74/t Kansas City 93/76/s 91/71/pc Key West 93/83/pc 89/83/t Las Vegas 103/80/pc 99/78/pc Little Rock 87/67/pc 89/72/t Los Angeles 85/60/s 84/62/s Louisville 94/75/pc 92/74/pc Memphis 90/73/pc 90/73/t Miami 85/79/t 90/76/t Midland, TX 97/69/s 97/70/s Milwaukee 83/65/pc 77/71/t Minneapolis 89/69/pc 91/71/t Nashville 92/72/pc 92/72/s New Orleans 91/72/pc 90/73/t New York 91/75/t 81/66/pc Norfolk 96/73/s 95/72/t Oklahoma City 95/69/pc 88/68/s Omaha 98/77/s 95/75/s Orlando 88/75/t 89/75/t Philadelphia 94/72/t 86/63/pc Phoenix 111/86/pc 110/87/pc

City

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

City

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Pittsburgh Portland, ME Portland, OR Rapid City Reno Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Santa Fe Seattle Sioux Falls, SD Spokane Syracuse Tampa Topeka Tucson Tulsa Wash., DC Wichita

88/70/t 84/66/t 81/54/pc 84/63/pc 83/48/pc 87/57/s 92/60/s 92/72/pc 75/63/c 70/52/pc 89/56/s 77/56/pc 96/72/pc 77/49/pc 84/68/pc 90/75/pc 96/77/s 109/79/pc 94/76/pc 96/72/t 97/73/s

Acapulco Athens Auckland Baghdad Berlin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Magadan Mexico City Montreal Moscow Paris Rome Seoul Singapore Sydney Tokyo Vancouver

95/78/t 91/81/s 56/45/s 114/82/s 88/54/s 92/84/t 84/69/s 71/47/s 91/58/s 104/68/s 54/47/r 73/53/pc 82/68/pc 54/47/r 93/68/s 90/72/s 82/70/c 85/82/t 69/51/pc 75/68/r 70/57/pc

81/55/pc 69/59/t 83/59/pc 75/60/t 87/56/s 88/55/s 87/67/c 85/73/t 76/64/pc 69/56/pc 90/58/c 79/57/pc 92/71/t 83/57/s 72/57/sh 88/79/t 93/70/s 105/76/s 91/73/s 92/66/pc 92/70/s

88/78/t 85/72/s 60/49/s 111/81/s 98/62/pc 90/82/sh 85/67/s 70/44/s 75/57/pc 100/69/s 53/44/c 71/53/t 75/59/sh 65/51/pc 84/60/pc 88/66/s 82/66/pc 88/80/t 65/45/s 80/71/t 73/57/pc

Strong storms with large hail and damaging wind threats will hit the northern Plains today. Showers and thunderstorms with small hail threats are expected in New England.

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation

Cold -10s

Warm -0s

Locally Owned & Operated

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Showers T-storms 30s

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Rain

60s

70s

Flurries 80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

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Stationary

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Ketchikan 69/55

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Sitka 64/55

State Extremes

Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Fresh GROUND BEEF

8:40 a.m. (-0.6) 8:41 p.m. (3.8)

Seward

High yesterday Low yesterday

World Cities

City

1:34 a.m. (18.7) 2:44 p.m. (16.8)

National Extremes

National Cities City

First Second

Glennallen 72/53

Cold Bay 56/47

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

10:31 a.m. (-0.7) 10:32 p.m. (3.8)

Seward Homer 71/56 67/53

Kenai/ Soldotna Homer

Dillingham 66/50

Unalaska 56/49 Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

2:47 a.m. (19.4) 3:57 p.m. (17.5)

Kenai/ Soldotna 69/54

Fairbanks 76/55

Low(ft.)

First Second

Deep Creek

Anaktuvuk Pass 67/45

Nome 52/45

High(ft.)

Kenai City Dock

Prudhoe Bay 52/43

Seldovia

Full Last July 16 July 24

Today 3:37 a.m. 9:22 p.m.

Tides Today

Sunny

Sun and Moon

10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m.

Utqiagvik 51/44

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SECTION

Sports

B Sunday, June 30, 2019

n Racing Saturday’s dirt track racing at Twin Cities will be at peninsulaclarion. com and in Tuesday’s paper

Twins run unbeaten string to 10 Staff report Peninsula Clarion

The American Legion Post 20 Twins pushed their unbeaten streak to 10 on Friday in Kodiak. The Twins won the league contest 9-6 before playing to a 4-all draw in the nonleague contest. The Twins are now 6-2 in the league and 10-4-1 overall. The Twins have shot up into third place in the American Division, while Kodiak is sixth in

that division at 2-6. In Friday’s league game, the Twins, who were the home team on the scoreboard, fired up their bats in the second and third innings to secure the victory. Post 20 entered the bottom of the second trailing 3-0, but tied the game in the bottom of the second. Six runs in the third would be all the club needed. Mose Hayes pitched one inning for the Twins, yielding two runs on a hit while walking four and

sitting down two. Harrison Metz pitched the last six, giving up four runs — three earned — on four hits while walking three and striking out four. At the plate, the Twins were able to squeeze their nine runs out of eight hits. Tanner Ussing was 2 for 3, while Metz was 2 for 3 with a run and two RBIs. Jeremy Kupferschmid, David Michael, Mose Hayes and Seth Adkins also had hits. Kupferschmid and Hayes each had a pair of RBIs, while

Jacob Belger and Harold Ochea scored two runs. The nonleague tie saw the Twins use four pitchers. Kupferschmid worked two innings and gave up two runs and two hits, Adkins worked two innings and gave up one run and two hits, Ussing worked 1 2-3 innings and gave up a run and a hit, and Davey Belger worked 1 1-3 innings and gave up no runs and no hits. At the plate, Hayes was 2 for 4 with two runs, Michael was 2 for

4 with a run and an RBI, Adkins had a run, Ochea was 1 for 2 with two RBIs, Ussing had a hit and an RBI, and Davey Belger had a hit. The Twins are back in action Tuesday with a full slate of games at Coral Seymour Memorial Park on the opening day of the Bill Miller Wood Bat Invitational. Rhode Island plays Ohio at 10 a.m., Eagle River plays Post 20 at 1 p.m., Eagle River plays Ohio at 4 p.m. and Rhode Island plays Post 20 at 7 p.m.

Oilers drop 2 to Glacier Pilots By JOEY KLECKA Peninsula Clarion

In a one-run game with the tying man 90 feet away, the Peninsula Oilers couldn’t find a way to bring him home in what was a microcosm of the their night. The Oilers left the bases loaded in the ninth inning to fall 5-4 Friday night to the Anchorage Glacier Pilots at Coral Seymour Memorial Park. The Oilers lost 9-5 Saturday to the Pilots, sending the Oilers to their fifth straight loss. The Oilers (7-15) have now lost nine of the last 11 Alaska Baseball League contests to drop eight games behind the league-leading Anchorage Bucs (15-7). Saturday, the Oilers had 11 hits to the 13 of the Pilots, but Peninsula pitchers issued eight costly walks. Overall, the Oilers stranded 11 total men on base Friday, including every inning but one. Oilers head coach Kyle Brown pinned it on lack of offensive execution in the clutch. “We left multiple guys on base, multiple guys in scoring position,” Brown said. “We just can’t seem to get that knock. We can get on base, we can hit the ball, but pushing them across home plate and getting a run, it’s not happening right now.” The Pilots (11-9) won even with five errors on the night, leaving head coach Jeff Pritchard surprised after thrashing the Oilers 15-6 the previous night.

“I have a checklist as a coach in my mind, you have to come back and win a game like we did last night,” Pritchard said. “And sometimes you have to win a game when you don’t play well. “I tell these guys, wins are like your children — you have to love them even if they’re ugly.” Hunter Rigsby, who hasn’t allowed a single earned run in over 16 innings of relief this summer, came on to get the last four outs for the Pilots and escaped the bottom of the ninth after giving up a hit and two walks, one intentional. “Those are free runs that we are not manufacturing right now,” Brown said. “Pitching staff did their part tonight, kept us in the ballgame and gave us a chance to win, but the offense didn’t execute.” The Oilers loaded the bases in the bottom of the ninth, with the tying run 90 feet away and the winning run in scoring position, but a fly ball to center field by pinch-hitter Giancarlo Servin ended it and gave the Pilots a huge sigh of relief. Prior to the last out, Calvin Farris was intentionally walked to load the bases after working a 3-1 count against Rigsby, but on the last throw home to send Farris to first, the Oilers dugout called for a balk on Rigsby, who they believe didn’t reach his set on the See OILERS, page B4

Oilers outfielders Calvin Farris, Camden Vasquez and Paul Steffensen receive congratulations after the Oilers defeated the Chugiak-Eagle River Chinooks on June 16 at Coral Seymour Memorial Park in Kenai. (Photo by Jeff Helminiak/Peninsula Clarion)

Vasquez lets bat do talking By JOEY KLECKA Peninsula Clarion

Don’t expect to hear much out of Camden Vasquez. His bat does all the talking for him. Vasquez, a 19-year-old Arizona native who is playing his first summer with the Peninsula Oilers, is one of the hottest hitters this year in the Alaska Baseball League. The slugger currently leads the Alaska Baseball League in

hitting with a .417 average and gets on base more than half the time at .522. Oilers head coach Kyle Brown said the team added Vasquez on the advice of San Diego head coach Rich Hill, with whom Brown enjoys a good relationship. “He said you’ll love him,” Brown said, listing off his outfielder’s attributes like a checklist. Great two-out hitter, great contact hitter, has a great two-strike approach

and a short and simple swing. Pitch recognition is “off the charts,” and he has good bat control. “Oh and by the way, he’s got incredible speed,” Brown said last. Vasquez’s speed was on full display Thursday when he grounded a ball to Anchorage Glacier Pilots’ shortstop Zach Sehgal, who bobbled the ball attempting to throw to first and ended up throwing it into the bullpen. See TALK, page B3

Soldotna Cycle Series sets participants record Staff report Peninsula Clarion

The bike boom continued on the central Kenai Peninsula on Thursday, with the Soldotna Cycle Series breaking its record with 91 combined participants in the 6- and 12-kilometer races at Tsalteshi Trails. Tyle Owens won the 12-kilometer race in 25 minutes, 21 seconds, while Mike Crawford was second at 25:53 and Brian Beeson was third at 28:00. Morgan Aldridge took the win for the women, coming in at 29:59, which also was seventh overall. Jen Showalter was second at 32:04, while Melissa Smith came in third. The

youth race went to Miles Moloney in 29:59, while Landen Showalter was second at 33:38 and Sean Raften was third was 35:41. In the 6-kilometer event, Matt Brown was first at 15:51, Forrest Vest was second at 16:50 and Jackson Klein was third at 17:03. Megan Anderson was the top woman, and fourth overall, at 17:19, while Brianna Baeten was second at 18:34 and Laura Gerber was third at 21:20. The top youth racer was David Abel at 18:27, while Garrett Ussing was second at 18:28 and Cody Tunks was third at 18:54. There will be no race Thursday, because that’s the Fourth of July. The series resumes July 11 at the

trailhead on Kalifornsky Beach. Registration and the kids ramble starts at 5:45 p.m., while racing begins at 6:15 p.m. The cost is $5 for Tsalteshi Trails Association members and $10 for nonmembers. Participants under 18 get to race one week for free. Soldotna Cycle Series Race 1 12 kilometers 1. Tyle Owens - 25:21; 2. Mike Crawford - 25:53; 3. Brian Beeson - 28:00; 4. Jordan Chilson 28:47; 5. Dave Edwards-Smith - 29:36; 6. Nathan Kincaid - 29:56; 7. Morgan Aldridge - 29:59 1st Place Women; 8. Miles Moloney - 29:59 1st Place Youth; 9. John Pothast - 30:18; 10. Tom Kobylarz - 30:31; 11. Jon Iannoccone - 30:47; 12. Rob Carson - 31:29; 13. Jamie Nelson 31:52; 14. Joel Todd - 31:57; 15. Anthony Murray - 32:03; 16. Jen Showalter - 32:04 2nd Place Women; 17. Dustin Henkin - 32:29; 18. Landen Showalter - 33:38 2nd Place Youth; 19. Mark Forbes - 35:34; 20. Will Morrow - 35:59; 21.

Sean Raften - 35:41 3rd Place Youth; 22. John Tabor - 36:30; 23. James Showalter - 37:10; 24. Ben Boersma - 37:50; 25. Ryan Nelson - 38:19. 26. Ethan Hogue - 39:58 Youth; 27. Melissa Smith - 3rd Place Women; 28. Alicia Driscoll DNF. 6 kilometers 1. Matt Brown - 15:51; 2. Forrest Vest - 16:50; 3. Jackson Klein - 17:03; 4. Megan Anderson - 17:19 1st Place Women; 5. Ryan Christman - 17:38; 6. Joe Newby - 18:21; 7. David Abel 18:27 1st Place Youth; 8. Garrett Ussing - 18:28 2nd Place Youth; 9. Brianna Baeten - 18:34 2nd Place Women; 10. Darren Sanger - 18:42; 11. Cody Tunks - 18:54 3rd Place Youth; 12. Eli Boettcher - 19:01 Youth; 13. Brady Baeton - 19:57 Youth; 14. Keenan Young - 19:59 Youth; 15. Titas Boettcher - 20:10 Youth; 16. Nikita Monyahan - 20:13 Youth; 17. Avery Powell - 20:23 Youth; 18. Cooper Tallent - 21:01 Youth; 19. Michael Nutter - 21:03 Youth; 20. Josiah Abel - 21:05 Youth; 21. Paxton McKnight - 21:20 Youth; 22. Laura Gerber - 21:20 3rd Place Women; 23. Justice Adcox - 21:52 Youth; 24. Sailor Tallent - 21:57 Youth; 25. Beka Baeten - 21:58 Youth. 26. William Smith - 22:07 Youth; 27. Whitney

Owens - 22:17 Youth; 28. Kristin Morrow - 23:42 Women; 29. Lauri Lingafelt - 23:46 Women; 30. Carrie Wawrzyk - 23:47 Women; 31. Kaya Cox - 23:48 Youth; 32. Alexis Collins - 24:09 Youth; 33. Kim McMilin - 24:14 Women; 34. Rylan Broyles - 24:15 Youth; 35. Erick McKinley - 24:57 Youth; 36. Caden McKinley 24:58 Youth; 37. Sheilah-Margaret Pothast - 24:59 Women; 38. Breckin Sulley - 25:45 Youth; 39. Angie Sulley 25:46 Women; 40. Colbie Broyles - 25:47 Youth; 41. Makayla McKinley - 25:50 Youth; 42. Caleb Abel - 25:53 Youth Youth; 43. Kyaran Matturo 26:31 Youth; 44. Grace Morrow - 26:22 Women; 45. Quinn Cothran - 26:51; 46. Corbyn Crisp 26:56 Youth; 47. Carl Kincaid - 26:57; 48. Alana McKinley - 27:09 Youth; 49. Aiden Collins 28:36 Youth; 50. Cassie Collins - 28:36 Women. 51. Gus Cothran - 29:27 Youth; 52. Steve Cothran - 29:30; 53. Lucia Carson - 29:36 Youth; 54. Ruby Davis - 29:41 Youth; 55. Harper Wight - 30:13 Youth; 56. Gus Reimer - 30:47 Youth; 57. Adam Reimer - 30:47; 58. Jonathon White 32:33 Youth; 59. Moriah McKinley - 39:10 Youth; 60. Alissa Boettcher - 39:34 Youth; 61. Mattie Johnston - 39:47 Youth; 62. Caroline Kapik 46:18 Youth; 63. Ike Davis - DNF.

Smoke can’t stop Spit Run By MEGAN PACER Homer News

Soldotna’s Kent Peterson crosses the finish line of the Spit Run 10K to the Bay on Saturday, June 29, 2019 in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Megan Pacer/Homer News)

Smoke drifting over from the Swan Lake Fire near Sterling obscured the normally picturesque view of Kachemak Bay that local runners have come to expect, but that didn’t stop a horde of athletes from enjoying this year’s Spit Run on Saturday. The 10K to the Bay and Cosmic Half Marathon saw a total of 152 participants. New this year, there were also 14 people who signed up for the untimed 10K walk, which they could start at any time.

Christopher Walker of Anchorage cruised to first place in the half marathon in 1 hour, 34 minutes and 50 seconds. He was followed by the first woman to cross the finish line in the half marathon, Homer’s Stacey Buckelew, with a time of 1:40:45. Christopher Gardeline of Anchorage and Homer’s Mike Illg rounded out second and third place for the men in the half marathon, with times of 1:50:48 and 1:54:16, respectively. For the women, Homer runners dominated the half marathon, with Elizabeth Roedl taking second place in

1:45:26 and Kristen Buckwalter in third with a time of 1:47:02. In the 10K that ran from Homer High School down to the end of the Spit, Kristyn Turney and her husband, Taylor, both of Anchorage, were the first man and woman across the finish line. Taylor Turney completed the 10K course in 38:43 while towing their 1 1/2-year-old son Levi behind him, while Kristyn Turney nabbed first place for the women with a time of 44:12, just three seconds ahead of the second place woman finisher, MelaSee SPIT, page B2


B2 | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

. . . Spit

Continued from page B1

nie Weatherly of Anchor Point. Homer’s Annie Ridgely took third place in the 10k for the women with a time of 46:58. For the men, John-Mark Pothast of Soldotna was second at 41:49 and Benjamin McGarry of Soldotna was third at 43:09. Homer Spit Run

10K to the Bay results WOMEN 1. Kristyn Turney, Anchorage, 44 minutes, 12 seconds; 2. Melanie Weatherly, Anchor Point, 44:15; 3. Annie Ridgely, Homer, 46:58; 4. Katie Johnson, Homer, 48:31; 5. Anna Williams, Homer, 49:58; 6. Bronsyn Rulison, Garden Grove, 50:39; 7. Amber Riggs, Anchorage, 51:44; 8. Sidney Barbier, Steamboat Springs, 51:51; 9. Janelle Spurkland, Homer, 52:24; 10. Charity Williams, Portland, 53:07; 11. Eryn

Field, Homer, 54:36; 12. Katie Gatica, Homer, 55:21; 13. Terri Mach, Homer, 55:22; 14. Alecia Stengel, Homer, 55:59; 15. Brennan Berry, Homer, 56:35; 16. Rebecca Ravin, Homer, 57:04; 17. Isabelle Hickman, Nikolaevsk, 57:22; 18. Sarah Miller, Homer, 57:40; 19. Sachi Kwon, Anchorage, 57:42; 20. Sara Bundy, Soldotna, 57:56; 21. Sarah Hobart, Soldotna, 58:11; 22. Mallory Karp, Anchorage, 58:36; 23. Joy Hobart, Soldotna, 59:16; 24. Amanda Miotke, Homer, 59:28; 25. Tara Schmidt, Homer, 59:50. 26. Kathy Sarns, Homer, 59:58; 27. Karalyn Veihdeffer, Kasilof, 1:00:31; 28. Linda Suthard, Homer, 1:00:40; 29. Erin Westfall, Denver, 1:00:53; 30. Kimberly Conkling, Eagle River, 1:00:53; 31. Donna Aderhold, Homer, 1:01:54; 32. Gabbie Tews, Kenai, 1:02:40; 33. Jodi Andrews, Homer, 1:02:49; 34. Lou Rock, Naples, 1:03:51; 35. Kelly Hostetler, West Glacier, 1:04:11; 36. Pamela O’Brien, Anchorage, 1:04:12; 37. Brandy McGee, Homer, 1:05:31; 38. Julie Deboard, Seward, 1:05:31; 39. Molly Hart, Anchorage, 1:06:47; 40. Cristy Millington, Kenai, 1:07:32; 41. Karen Carney, Wasilla, 1:08:42; 42. Sheilah-Margaret Pothast, Soldotna, 1:09:19; 43. Amanda Cherok, Homer, 1:09:48; 44. Dalena Mckay, Homer, 1:10:09; 45. Victoria Gutschow, Homer, 1:10:09; 46. Danna Keifer, Soldotna, 1:10:21; 47. Melinda Erickson, Homer, 1:11:30; 48. Kate Swaby, Soldotna, 1:11:43; 49. Veronica Lebresh, Anchorage, 1:12:09; 50. Kate Crowley, Homer, 1:12:46.

51. Emily Moss, Homer, 1:12:52; 52. Amanda Barth, Homer, 1:13:01; 53. Jamie Beever, Soldotna, 1:13:29; 54. Camelle Bickish, Eagle River, 1:14:22; 55. Pamela Finch, Chugiak, 1:14:29; 56. Betsy McKitrick, Anchorage, 1:17:32; 57. Brenda Beesley, Anchorage, 1:17:33; 58. Amy Warfle, Kenai, 1:18:06; 59. Allison Rulison, Garden Grove, 1:18:12; 60. Nancy Black, Palmer, 1:18:24; 61. Laurie Fievet, Kansas City, 1:18:43; 62. Nicole Rednose, Anchorage, 1:19:17; 63. Nichole Haynes, Homer, 1:19:34; 64. Abby Shealy, Homer, 1:19:36; 65. Uran Christensen, Homer, 1:19:39; 66. Alexis Trombley, Chugiak, 1:21:39; 67. Rory Molacek, Bozeman, 1:22:27; 68. Mindy Rulison, Garden Grove, 1:24:59; 69. Julie Aldrich, Montesano, 1:26:17; 70. Merri McPherson, Olympia, 1:26:18; 71. Bessie Lincoln Narcross, Seward, 1:26:20; 72. Elsa Milne, Homer, 1:26:27; 73. Minadora Reutov, Homer, 1:26:28; 74. Leah Dunn, Homer, 1:26:39; 75. Kathy Hobart, Soldotna, 1:27:12. 76. Denise Demetree Trombley, Chugiak, 1:28:43; 77. Robin McPherson, Tumwater, 1:30:11; 78. Karen Weston, Homer, 1:30:11; 79. Cassie Ostrander, Anchorage, 1:32:11; 80. Kelly J. Lincoln, Bethel, 1:32:17; 81. Penny Furnish, Kenai, 1:32:20; 82. Brooke Shafer, Anchor Point, 1:38:24; 83. Tabitha Piek, Homer, 1:41:47; 84. Mary Liston, Homer, 1:59:33; 85. Johanna Alvarez, Anchorage, 2:12:23. MEN

1. Taylor Turney, Anchorage, 38:43; 2. JohnMark Pothast, Soldotna, 41:49; 3. Benjamin McGarry, Soldotna, 43:09; 4. Evan Markelz, Mountain View, 43:30; 5. Jan Spurkland, Homer, 44:03; 6. Silas Firth, Anchor Point, 44:06; 7. Lance Seneff, Homer, 44:18; 8. Lance Williamson, Fritz Creek, 44:27; 9. Lukyna Day, Homer, 45:50; 10. Jonathan Rulison, Garden Grove, 46:05; 11. Thomas McDonough, Homer, 46:30; 12. Tannen Berry, Homer, 46:42; 13. Andrei Tsyganenko, Homer, 48:11; 14. Kent Peterson, Soldotna, 48:36; 15. Larry Deboard, Seward, 49:29; 16. Dean Ravin, Homer, 51:05; 17. Greg Lincoln, Bethel, 51:10; 18. Eric Brunelle, Anchorage, 51:24; 19. Edgar Montero, Rome, 51:59; 20. Mark Hemstreet, Homer, 52:08; 21. Bill Taylor, Kenai, 52:29; 22. Thomas Wang, Anchorage, 52:34; 23. Trevor Tew, Anchorage, 53:48; 24. Zachary Knott, Homer, 54:36; 25. Larry Tews, Kenai, 54:58. 26. Tanner Stengel, Homer, 55:59; 27. Bryan Kirby, Willow, 58:43; 28. Thaddeus Lingenfelter, Kenai, 59:48; 29. Ralph Broshes, Homer, 59:57; 30. Matthew Willison, Homer, 1:02:53; 31. Alan Goins, Ninilchik, 1:03:05; 32. Rio Saunders, Homer, 1:05:31; 33. Joel Moss, Homer, 1:06:03; 34. John Pothast, Soldotna, 1:09:20; 35. John Erickson, Homer, 1:11:30; 36. Parker Finch, Chugiak, 1:12:02; 37. Mike Fievet, Kansas City, 1:18:43; 38. Niko Sulczynski, Homer, 1:38:22; 39. Dennis Mackulin, Homer, 1:42:01; 40. Kevin Keifer, Soldotna, 1:50:58.

Spit Run Cosmic Half Marathon results WOMEN 1. Stacey Buckelew, Homer, 1:40:45; 2. Elizabeth Roedl, Homer, 1:45:26; 3. Kristen Buckwalter, Homer, 1:47:02; 4. Becky Hauser, Anchorage, 1:50:28; 5. Maryam Norton, Seward, 1:58:34; 6. Lindsay Wolter, Homer, 2:04:17; 7. Emilie Otis, Homer, 2:06:01; 8. Ashlynne Bachman, 30-34 Homer, 2:07:00; 9. Tiffany Lawrence, Brooklyn, New York, 2:07:16; 10. Shawna Arend, Chugiak, 2:09:56; 11. Angela Head, Homer, 2:10:38; 12. Casey Marsh, Anchor Point, 2:19:40; 13. Amy Baxter, Soldotna, 2:31:32; 14. Ashley Beach, Anchorage, 2:32:34; 15. Juliette Veerman, Anchorage, 2:35:45; 16. Calmille Thomas, Tacoma, Washington, 2:58:04; 17. Kirsten Rasmussen, Homer, 2:59:27; 18. Alice Rademacher, Homer, 3:05:38. MEN 1. Christopher Walker, Anchorage. 1:34:50; 2. Christopher Gardeline, Anchorage, 1:50:48; 3. Mike Illg, Homer, 1:54:16; 4. Willi Moody, Anchorage, 2:04:39; 5. Carl Kincaid, Sterling, 2:04:46; 6. Jon Marsh, Anchor Point, 2:11:49; 7. Richard Rulison, Garden Grove ,2:12:47; 8. Joseph Horazdovsky, Anchorage, 3:04:51; 9. Fred Lau, Homer, 3:11:36.

Rapinoe makes her mark on World Cup By ANNE M. PETERSON AP Sports Writer

PARIS — With a colorful vocabulary and manner to match her pinkish-purple hair, Megan Rapinoe stands out simply by being Megan Rapinoe. She celebrated her two goals in the quarterfinal match against France at the Women’s World Cup by raising both arms in victory, reminiscent of Russell Crowe in “Gladiator.” Are you not entertained? She spawned many memes in the process. “She’s just a big personality both on and off the pitch,” coach Jill Ellis said. “And I think she honestly thrives in these moments.” In securing the 2-1 victory that knocked the hosts out of the tournament, the United States now moves on to a semifinal match against England on Tuesday in Lyon.

If they can get past the Lionesses, the Americans will get a shot at their second straight World Cup title and fourth overall in a July 7 final. From a high-profile battle with U.S. Soccer over equal pay back home, to the exuberant celebration of every goal in the 13-0 tournament opener against Thailand, the U.S. team is unapologetically brash and confident. If anyone embodies the U.S. ethos, it’s Rapinoe. She has five goals in this World Cup, tying her with teammate Alex Morgan, England’s Ellen White and Australia’s Sam Kerr for the tournament lead. She is the first player to score two goals in back-to-back games since Brazil’s Marta in 2007: Rapinoe also scored twice in a 2-1 victory over Spain to open the round of 16. And sometimes she gets just as much attention for

Swedes, Dutch move on By The Associated Press

RENNES, France — With Germany out of the way, Sweden believes it could win it all. Stina Blackstenius scored the go-ahead goal just minutes into the second half and Sweden surprised Germany with a 2-1 quarterfinal victory Saturday night at the Women’s World Cup. It was Sweden’s first victory over Germany in a major tournament in 24 years, and it sent the ninth-ranked Swedes into the semifinals against the Netherlands. “We’re going to go for it,” Sweden coach Peter Gerhardsson said. The second-ranked Germans, who won back-to-back World Cup titles in 2003 and 2007, were the presumptive favorites on their side of the bracket. Instead, they’ll head home. Germany coach Martina Voss-Tecklenburg said her team seemed to lose focus. “We knew it was going to be difficult,” she said. “We shall not let this bring us down. We have to make sure this process goes on despite the defeat, to keep on growing, to gain strength and channel this negative experience into something positive and to learn our lessons from it.” The eighth-ranked Dutch defeated Italy 2-0 earlier Saturday, setting up the semifinal Wednesday in Lyon. The United States plays England in the other semifinal on Tuesday. The final is July 7. Netherlands 2, Italy 0 VALENCIENNES, France — The Oranje procession will roll into a Women’s World Cup semifinal for the first time. The parade of fans, covered head to toe in orange, the brass band — and, of course, the free kick specialists on the field. In the sweltering afternoon heat of northeast France, the Netherlands relied on a pair of headers off free kicks by Sherida Spitse to beat Italy 2-0 in a quarterfinal game Saturday. Vivianne Miedema scored off Spitse’s delivery from the left side in the 70th minute to claim her 61st goal in 80 appearances for the Netherlands. “In the end, people expect me to score goals,” Miedema said. “That header, I had a good feeling.” So did Stefanie van der Gragt 10 minutes later, powering in a towering header when Spitse swung in a free kick from the right. “I had the strength to get the ball in the right place,” Spitse said. “Our football, we could also play a little bit more and could score goals but it’s nice to score from set pieces as well.” Six of the last eight goals have come from set pieces at this World Cup, only the second time the Dutch women have appeared in the tournament. Four years ago, they only made it to the round of 16 but laid the foundations to win the European Championship in 2017. “I didn’t expect to be in the semifinals of this World Cup,” Miedema said. “We’ve been complaining that we’re not playing the best football but in the end we’re in the semis. We’ve done amazing and we can be really proud.”

what she does away from the game. Rapinoe was at the center of a controversy in the days leading up to what was called Le Grand Match when video surfaced of her saying she wouldn’t visit the White House if the team won the World Cup — and dropping in an expletive for emphasis. While the interview was from January, it attracted President Donald Trump’s attention and he tweeted: “Megan should never disrespect our Country, the White House, or our Flag, especially since so much has been done for her & the team.” Trump added that he would invite the team to Washington, win or lose. Rapinoe said she stood by the statement, with the exception of her coarse language. Then she went out and scored five minutes into the game against France.

“You can hear it in her comments and how she presents herself. She’s a very experienced, eloquent person. I would just kind of point to the performance tonight and I’d say if anything this stuff just bounces off her, I think it even pushes her forward,” Ellis said afterward. Rapinoe has always been unafraid to speak her mind. She came out as gay in 2012 and is currently in a relationship with WNBA star Sue Bird. Rapinoe even joked about it following Friday night’s victory, when asked if it had more meaning because this is Pride Month. “You can’t win a championship without gays on your team, it’s pretty much never been done before, ever,” she said. “Science right there.” Rapinoe has been particularly vocal about equitable pay and the treatment of female athletes, while also criti-

cal of FIFA for not investing more in the women’s game. She has pointed to the disparity in the prize money for the men’s and women’s World Cups. France, the men’s winner in Russia, was awarded $38 million, while the winner of the women’s tournament will take home just $4 million. Two years ago, Rapinoe was in the news for kneeling during the national anthem. She said it was an act of solidarity with Colin Kaepernick, the former San Francisco 49ers quarterback who knelt during the anthem to call attention to racial inequality. U.S. Soccer responded by adopting a rule that says players must stand for anthems. She said she’d abide by it, but in France she has not sung the anthem or put her hand on her heart while it plays before each game.

Oh, and she can play, too. Rapinoe won an NCAA title with the University of Portland in 2005 and made her senior national team debut the next year. She played in all six U.S. games at the 2011 World Cup in Germany, memorably picking up a microphone after a goal and singing Bruce Springsteen’s “Born in the U.S.A.” One of her biggest moments as a player came in that tournament, when her perfect cross to Abby Wambach led to the tying goal in the quarterfinals against Brazil. The Americans advanced on penalties. She also has an Olympic gold medal from the 2012 London Games, where she scored directly from a corner kick in the semifinals against Canada. She is the only player — male or female — to have such a goal in Olympic competition.

Scoreboard Baseball AL Standings

East Division W L Pct GB New York 53 28 .654 — Tampa Bay 47 36 .566 7 Boston 44 39 .530 10 Toronto 31 52 .373 23 Baltimore 24 58 .293 29½ Central Division Minnesota 53 29 .646 — Cleveland 44 38 .537 9 Chicago 38 42 .475 14 Detroit 27 51 .346 24 Kansas City 28 55 .337 25½ West Division Houston 52 32 .619 — Texas 46 37 .554 5½ Oakland 45 39 .536 7 Los Angeles 42 42 .500 10 Seattle 37 50 .425 16½ Friday’s Games Baltimore 13, Cleveland 0 Toronto 6, Kansas City 2 Texas 5, Tampa Bay 0 Washington 3, Detroit 1 Chicago White Sox 6, Minnesota 4 Houston 2, Seattle 1, 10 innings Oakland 7, L.A. Angels 2 Saturday’s Games N.Y. Yankees 17, Boston 13 Baltimore 13, Cleveland 0 Toronto 7, Kansas City 5 Detroit 7, Washington 5 Tampa Bay 5, Texas 2 Minnesota 10, Chicago White Sox 3 Houston 6, Seattle 5, 10 innings Oakland at L.A. Angels, late Sunday’s Games N.Y. Yankees (Tarpley 0-0) vs. Boston (Rodriguez 8-4) at London, 6:10 a.m. Cleveland (Bieber 6-3) at Baltimore (Ynoa 0-5), 9:05 a.m. Kansas City (Keller 3-9) at Toronto (Sanchez 3-10), 9:07 a.m. Texas (Chavez 3-2) at Tampa Bay (Snell 4-7), 9:10 a.m. Washington (Scherzer 7-5) at Detroit (Zimmermann 0-5), 9:10 a.m. Minnesota (Thorpe 0-0) at Chicago White Sox (Giolito 10-2), 10:10 a.m. Seattle (Gonzales 9-6) at Houston (Cole 7-5),10:10 a.m. Oakland (Bassitt 4-3) at L.A. Angels (Heaney 1-1), 12:07 p.m. Monday’s Games Kansas City at Toronto, 9:07 a.m. Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 3:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Texas, 4:05 p.m. All Times ADT

NL Standings

East Division W L Pct GB Atlanta 50 34 .595 — Philadelphia 43 40 .518 6½ Washington 41 41 .500 8 New York 37 47 .440 13 Miami 32 49 .395 16½ Central Division Chicago 45 38 .542 — Milwaukee 44 39 .530 1 St. Louis 40 41 .494 4 Pittsburgh 39 42 .481 5 Cincinnati 37 43 .463 6½ West Division Los Angeles 56 29 .659 — Colorado 44 39 .530 11 San Diego 42 40 .512 12½ Arizona 43 42 .506 13 San Francisco 35 47 .427 19½ Friday’s Games Atlanta 6, N.Y. Mets 2 Cincinnati 6, Chicago Cubs 3 Miami 6, Philadelphia 2 Washington 3, Detroit 1 Pittsburgh 3, Milwaukee 2 Colorado 13, L.A. Dodgers 9 San Diego 3, St. Louis 1 San Francisco 6, Arizona 3 Saturday’s Games Atlanta 5, N.Y. Mets 4 Chicago Cubs 6, Cincinnati 0 Detroit 7, Washington 5 Miami 9, Philadelphia 6

Colorado 5, L.A. Dodgers 3 Milwaukee 3, Pittsburgh 1 Arizona 4, San Francisco 3 San Diego 12, St. Louis 2 Sunday’s Games Chicago Cubs (Lester 7-5) at Cincinnati (DeSclafani 4-4), 9:10 a.m. Philadelphia (Arrieta 7-6) at Miami (Richards 3-8), 9:10 a.m. Washington (Scherzer 7-5) at Detroit (Zimmermann 0-5), 9:10 a.m. Pittsburgh (Brault 3-1) at Milwaukee (Davies 7-2), 10:10 a.m. L.A. Dodgers (Maeda 7-4) at Colorado (Gonzalez 0-1), 11:10 a.m. Arizona (Ray 5-5) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 4-7), 12:05 p.m. St. Louis (Mikolas 5-8) at San Diego (Lucchesi 6-4), 12:10 p.m. Atlanta (Fried 9-3) at N.Y. Mets (Syndergaard 5-4), 3:05 p.m. Monday’s Games Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 3:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 3:10 p.m. San Francisco at San Diego, 6:10 p.m. All Times ADT

Yankees 17, Red Sox 13 NY 602 630 000—17 19 Bos. 600 001 600—13 18

0 0

Tanaka, Green (1), Hale (3), Cortes Jr. (4), Kahnle (7), Ottavino (7), Britton (8), A.Chapman (9) and G.Sanchez, Romine; Porcello, Brewer (1), Wright (2), Shawaryn (4), J.Taylor (5), Brasier (6), Velazquez (7), Walden (9) and Vazquez, Leon. W_Green 2-2. L_Wright 0-1. HRs_New York, Gardner (12), Hicks (6), Judge (7). Boston, Chavis 2 (14), Bradley Jr. (9).

Orioles 13, Indians 0 Cle. 000 000 000—0 5 Bal. 010 622 20x—13 13

0 0

Plesac, Clippard (4), Cole (5), Cimber (6), M.Freeman (7) and Plawecki; Cashner, Scott (8) and Sisco. W_Cashner 8-3. L_Plesac 3-3. HRs_Baltimore, Nunez 2 (18), Sisco (4), Santander (4).

Rays 5, Rangers 2 Tex. 000 000 011—2 TB 030 000 20x—5

5 7

Twins 10, White Sox 3 1 1

Pineda, May (7), Duffey (8), Parker (9) and J.Castro; Nova, Osich (7), Fulmer (7), J.Ruiz (9) and J.McCann. W_Pineda 5-4. L_ Nova 3-7. HRs_Minnesota, Cruz 2 (15), Kepler 2 (21), Sano (12). Chicago, Jimenez (14).

Blue Jays 7, Royals 5 KC 200 110 001—5 Tor. 001 040 002—7

7 6

Astros 6, Mariners 5, 10 inn. 7 8

Athletics 4, Angels 0

Greinke, Y.Lopez (8), Chafin (8), Hirano (9), G.Holland (9) and Avila; Pomeranz, Moronta (6), Dyson (7), Melancon (8), D.Holland (9) and Vogt. W_Greinke 9-3. L_Dyson 2-1. Sv_G.Holland (12). HRs_San Francisco, Vogt (2).

Oak. 000 030 100—4 LA 000 000 000—0

8 3

0 2

B.Anderson, Hendriks (8) and Phegley; Skaggs, Cahill (5), L.Garcia (8), H.Robles (9) and Garneau, Lucroy. W_B.Anderson 8-5. L_Skaggs 7-7. HRs_Oakland, Chapman (20).

Tigers 7, Natioals 5 Was. 000 300 200—5 9 Det. 000 120 31x—7 12

0 1

Voth, Guerra (5), Venters (5), Rainey (7), Sipp (7), Suero (8) and Gomes; G.Soto, Hardy (4), A.Adams (6), Alcantara (7), J.Jimenez (8), Greene (9) and J.Hicks. W_Alcantara 3-1. L_Rainey 1-3. Sv_Greene (22). HRs_ Washington, Rendon (18).

Cubs 6, Reds 0 Chi. 010 000 041—6 Cin. 000 000 000—0

8 7

0 2

Quintana, Cishek (7), Strop (8), Maples (9) and Contreras; Castillo, Hernandez (8), Duke (8), Hughes (8), Stephenson (9) and Casali. W_Quintana 5-7. L_Castillo 7-3. HRs_Chicago, Baez (20), Heyward (13).

1 1

Eflin, Nicasio (7), Morgan (7), R.Suarez (7) and Realmuto; Yamamoto, Conley (5), J.Garcia (7), N.Anderson (8), Romo (9) and Holaday. W_J.Garcia 2-0. L_Morgan 2-3. Sv_Romo (15). HRs_Philadelphia, Hoskins (19). Miami, Walker (5).

Atl. 201 000 020—5 13 NY 001 102 000—4 8

1 0

Teheran, Blevins (4), Toussaint (5), Newcomb (6), Webb (8), Jackson (9) and Flowers, B.McCann; Matz, Mazza (3), Lugo (7), Pounders (8) and Ramos. W_Newcomb 2-0. L_Lugo 3-2. Sv_Jackson (13). HRs_Atlanta, Riley (14), Markakis (8). New York, Smith (8).

Rockies 5, Dodgers 3 LA 100 110 000—3 Col. 002 003 00x—5

8 7

1 1

Kershaw, P.Baez (8) and Barnes; Gray, Diaz (7), Shaw (8), W.Davis (9) and Wolters. W_Gray 9-5. L_Kershaw 7-2. Sv_W.Davis (12). HRs_Colorado, Blackmon (19).

1 0

Kikuchi, Altavilla (6), Bass (7),

Pit. 100 000 000—1 Mil. 200 100 00x—3

6 5

1 0

Lyles, Feliz (7), Holmes (8) and E.Diaz; Woodruff, Albers (8), Hader (9) and Grandal. W_Woodruff 10-2. L_Lyles 5-4. Sv_Hader (20). HRs_Milwaukee, Thames (11).

1 2

Soccer QUARTERFINALS Thursday, June 27 At Le Havre, France England 3, Norway 0 Friday, June 28 At Paris United States 2, France 1 Saturday, June 29 At Valenciennes, France Netherlands 2, Italy 0 At Rennes, France Sweden 2, Germany 1 SEMIFINALS Tuesday, July 2 At Lyon, France England vs. United States, 11 a.m. Wednesday, July 3 At Lyon, France Netherlands vs. Sweden, 11 a.m. All Times ADT

MLS Standings W L T Pts GF GA Philadelphia 9 5 5 32 34 25 D.C. United 8 4 7 31 25 19 Montreal 9 8 3 30 24 31 Atlanta 9 6 2 29 23 15 New York 8 6 3 27 30 20 NY City FC 6 1 8 26 27 19 Toronto FC 6 7 5 23 30 31 Orlando City 6 8 3 21 24 22 New England 5 8 5 20 20 35 Chicago 4 7 7 19 26 27 Columbus 5 11 2 17 16 27 Cincinnati 3 13 2 11 15 42

WESTERN CONFERENCE Los Angeles FC 11 2 4 37 39 14 LA Galaxy 10 7 1 31 24 22 Seattle 8 4 5 29 27 21 FC Dallas 7 6 5 26 27 24 San Jose 7 6 4 25 28 27 Minnesota U. 7 7 3 24 30 26 Houston 7 6 3 24 22 22 Real Salt Lake 7 8 2 23 24 28 Vancouver 4 7 8 20 21 25 Colorado 5 9 4 19 28 36 S. Kansas City 4 6 7 19 27 29 Portland 5 8 2 17 24 28 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Friday, June 28 New York 3, Chicago 1 Colorado 1, Los Angeles FC 0 Saturday, June 29 Minnesota United 7, Cincinnati 1 Atlanta 2, Montreal 1 New York City FC 4, Philadelphia 2 New England 2, Houston 1 Orlando City 2, Columbus 0 Toronto FC 1, D.C. United 1, tie Real Salt Lake 2, Sporting Kansas City 0 San Jose 3, LA Galaxy 0 Seattle 1, Vancouver 0 Sunday, June 30 FC Dallas at Portland, 7 p.m. ADT

Basketball

Padres 12, Cardinals 2 SL 100 000 010—2 5 SD 070 201 11x—12 12

Ari. 000 000 130—4 11 SF 000 000 003—3 7

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Marlins 9, Phillies 6 Phi. 200 220 000—6 8 Mia. 100 002 60x—9 15

Diamondbacks 4, Giants 3

Women’s World Cup

Brewers 3, Pirates 1 0 1

Bailey, J.Lopez (6), Diekman (8), Barlow (9) and Maldonado; Stroman, Mayza (6), Phelps (7), Law (8), Dan.Hudson (9) and Jansen. W_Dan.Hudson 5-2. L_Barlow 2-3. HRs_Kansas City, Maldonado (5). Toronto, Jansen (4), Biggio (6), Guerrero Jr. (8).

Sea. 021 010100 0—5 Ho. 050 000 000 1—6

Louis, Edman (2). San Diego, Machado 2 (19), Reyes 2 (24), Tatis Jr. (11).

Braves 5, Mets 4 0 0

Sampson, Fairbanks (7), St. John (8) and Federowicz; McKay, Poche (7), Drake (8), Alvarado (9) and d’Arnaud. W_McKay 1-0. L_Sampson 6-5. HRs_Tampa Bay, d’Arnaud (5), Adames (10), Garcia (12).

Min. 210 010 222—10 13 Chi. 100 000 101—3 7

Elias (9) and Narvaez; Verlander, Rondon (6), Harris (6), Pressly (7), McHugh (8), R.Osuna (9), Devenski (10) and Chirinos. W_ Devenski 2-0. L_Elias 2-1. HRs_ Seattle, Beckham (12), Santana (18), Vogelbach (20).

1 2

Dak.Hudson, Ponce de Leon (2), Leone (8) and Molina, Wieters; Paddack, Wieck (7), Stock (8) and Mejia, Hedges. W_Paddack 5-4. L_Dak.Hudson 6-4. HRs_St.

WNBA Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Washington Connecticut Chicago New York

W 9 9 6 4

L Pct GB 3 .750 — 4 .692 ½ 5 .545 2½ 7 .364 4½

Indiana Atlanta

5 9 .357 5 2 7 .222 5½

WESTERN CONFERENCE Seattle Las Vegas Minnesota Los Angeles Phoenix Dallas

8 7 6 5 4 3

5 .615 — 5 .583 ½ 5 .545 1 6 .455 2 5 .444 2 7 .300 3½

Saturday’s Games Washington 102, Connecticut 59 Las Vegas 102, Indiana 97, OT Sunday’s Games New York at Atlanta, 11 a.m. Minnesota at Dallas, noon Chicago at Los Angeles, 1 p.m. Phoenix at Seattle, 3 p.m. All Times ADT

Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Placed LHP Brian Johnson on the 10day IL. Activated RHP Hector Velázquez from the 10-day IL. Added 1B-OF Sam Travis (26th man). DETROIT TIGERS — Signed RHP Trevor Rosenthal to a minor league contract. MINNESOTA TWINS — Reinstated OF Byron Buxton and INF-OF Marwin Gonzalez from the 10-day IL. Optioned OFs Jake Cave and LaMonte Wade Jr. to Rochester (IL). NEW YORK YANKEES — Added INF Thairo Estrada (26th man). Optioned LHP Nestor Cortes Jr. to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). National League CHICAGO CUBS — Placed LHP Cole Hamels on the 10-day IL. Designated OF Carlos González for assignment. Recalled RHPs Dillon Maples and Rowan Wick from Iowa (PCL). PIITSBURGH PIRATES — Reinstated RHP Jordan Lyles from the 10-day IL. Optioned RHP Geoff Hartlieb to Indianapolis (IL). ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Placed OF Marcell Ozuna on the 10-day IL. Placed RHP John Brebbia on the paternity list. Recalled OFs Tyler O’Neill and Lane Thomas from Memphis (PCL). SAN DIEGO PADRES — Recalled RHP Robert Stock from El Paso (PCL). Designated RHP Matt Wisler for assignment. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Signed OF Hunter Bishop. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association INDIANA PACERS — G Darren Collison announced his retirement. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS — Signed C Sam Carrick to a one-year contract extension through the 201920 NHL season. TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS — Named Dave Hakstol assistant coach. Signed G Michael Hutchinson and Dan Martin Marincin to one-year contract extensions. VANCOUVER CANUCKS — Placed C Ryan Spooner on waivers. WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Signed C Mike Sgarbossa to a two-year, two-way contract. TENNIS Tennis Integrity Unit TIU — Suspended Nigerian tennis player Henry Atseye three years and fined him $5,000 after admitting to match-fixing and nonreporting offenses. One year of the ban and $2,500 of the fine will be suspended on condition that no further breaches of the Tennis Anti-Corruption Program (TACP) are committed.


Peninsula Clarion | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | B3

. . . Talk Continued from page B1

“That is his speed getting into the internal clock mechanism of the defense, where they recognize his speed and they try to speed up themselves,” Brown said. “You have a kid hitting .400 and you add in he runs a sub-four (seconds) down the line? It’s going to put some pressure on the defense.” The 2018 graduate of Campo Verde High School in Gilbert, Arizona, said his wheels are something he relies on, but can’t pinpoint where it started. “I don’t know where my speed came from,” Vasquez said, adding that his main goal each time he comes up to bat is to be a tough out. “Whether that’s beating a chopper out or getting walked or hitting a line drive, or even reaching on an error,” he said.

Vasquez began the summer with the Oilers on an 11-game hitting streak, which pushed him to an early stat line of .487 batting and 1.144 OPS. He said his plate approach is simple. “I don’t like to think of it like a chunk of games, I just try to take it one at-bat at a time,” Vasquez said. “Just stick to the approach I was taught at school.” Fellow Oilers teammate and California native Jonathan Carlos said Vasquez’s attitude makes it easy to get along with him, but dangerous to face him on the mound. “He’s a good guy, very humble,” Carlos said. “He’s funny, he’s very loose, doesn’t think too much when he plays baseball, he goes out there, has fun.” The son of Tim and Julie Camden is living this summer with host family Jessica and Robbie Small of Kenai, and tracked his easygoing demeanor to his childhood growing up near Phoenix, where he often spent summers

swimming at the local pool, taking day trips to hiking spots north of Phoenix and taking in baseball and football games at Arizona State and watching Arizona Diamondbacks baseball. His days as a wide receiver in high school were numbered after injuries cost him time in both his sophomore and junior seasons. Vasquez said baseball provided more opportunity for him in college, even though football was where his passion lay, so it was off to play summer ball in 2018, getting time with the Gresham (Oregon) GreyWolves in the West Coast League, which the club has since left to become an independent team. Vasquez just wrapped up his first year at the University of San Diego, but never saw a pitch due to a foot injury that kept him out. Vasquez ended up redshirting his first year, but was healed up and ready for the summer season with the Oilers. Vasquez said he does not know

how the injury occurred — he was diagnosed with two broken toes — just days before the college season was set to begin, but said the time off didn’t mean he was getting a free vacation. “For me, it was more about learning as much as I could,” he said. Vasquez said he spent innings at SDU taking notes and soaking in as much knowledge watching his team play. “It was good for me to learn pitchers’ sequences and learn from the guys around me that are great players,” he said. “I just took it as an opportunity to just soak it up.” Carlos played against Vasquez’s USD team as a member of Long Beach State, although the two never squared off individually due to Vasquez’s injury. As a pitcher, Carlos said he asks Vasquez about what hitters look for in certain counts, and Vasquez’s advice has helped Carlos in his own game.

Plus, he provides a stellar support system. “When I’m pitching, he always comes in and smacks me on the (butt), tells me whenever I’m (messing) up,” Carlos said. “He’s a great teammate. He plays hard, that’s what I like about him.” Brown said after hearing good things about Vasquez from Hill, the decision to bring in a player that was motivated to return to the field was a no-brainer. “I think he showed up here with a drive to play, with a statement to make,” Brown said. “He got an opportunity up here and he’s made the most of it in every facet to this point.” Even as his position in the batting lineup has had to change due to a hand injury to leadoff hitter Damon Keith, Vasquez hasn’t flinched under the circumstances. The move pushed Vasquez to Keith’s spot as leadoff man. “He hasn’t missed a beat,” Brown said.

Yankees top Red Sox in London slugfest By The Associated Press

LONDON — Brett Gardner hit a tiebreaking, two-run homer in the third inning, Aaron Judge went deep to cap a six-run fourth and the New York Yankees outslugged the Boston Red Sox 17-13 on Saturday night in the first Major League Baseball game played in Europe. Each team scored six runs in a first inning that stretched nearly an hour. Aaron Hicks hit the first European homer, DJ LeMahieu had four hits and five RBIs as New York opened a 17-6 lead and Luke Voit had four hits, including three doubles, before leaving with an injury in the fifth inning. Rookie Michael Chavis hit a pair of three-run homers for Boston and Jackie Bradley Jr. had four hits, also going deep. Boston starter Rick Porcello and New York’s Masahiro Tanaka both failed to finish the first inning. Chad Green (2-2) allowed four hits in two scoreless innings. Steven Wright (0-1) lost in his first decision and second appearance since an 80-game suspension for a positive drug test. ROCKIES 5, DODGERS 3 DENVER — Jon Gray pitched effectively into the seventh inning and Charlie Blackmon homered to lead Colorado past Los Angeles. Gray (9-5) allowed three runs, two earned, and struck out eight over 6 2/3 innings. He outdueled Los Angeles lefty Clayton Kershaw (7-2), who gave up five runs, four earned, struck out seven and didn’t walk a batter. Alex Verdugo had two hits and Edwin Rios got his first major league hit and drove in a run for the Dodgers. Scuffling closer Wade Davis got three outs for his 12th save in 14 chances.

BRAVES 5, METS 4 NEW YORK — Nick Markakis and Austin Riley hit consecutive solo homers to give Atlanta the lead in the eighth inning, and the Braves spoiled the New York’s celebration of the 1969 World Series champion Mets.

Braves closer Luke Jackson stranded runners at second and third in the ninth for his 13th save, handing New York its seventh straight loss. Sean Newcomb (2-0) tossed 1 1/3 scoreless innings. Jackson worked around an error by first baseman Freddie Freeman and a walk, ending it by striking out Dominic Smith on three pitches. Ronald Acuña Jr. and Dansby Swanson each had three hits for NL East-leading Atlanta. Struggling reliever Seth Lugo (3-2) worked 1 2/3 innings and allowed four hits and two earned runs with three strikeouts.

ORIOLES 13, INDIANS 0 BALTIMORE — Andrew Cashner threw seven innings of three-hit ball, Renato Núñez had two of Baltimore’s four home runs and the Orioles clinched their first series win since April. Anthony Santander hit the 100th home run, and 45th by an Oriole, to land on Eutaw Street since the stadium opened on April 6, 1992. Chance Sisco also homered for Baltimore, which has outscored Cleveland 26-0 over the first two games. The Orioles will go for their first threegame sweep of the season Sunday. Cashner (8-3) was scratched moments before the first pitch as thunderstorms passed through the area. When the start of the game was announced for 5:10 p.m. -- an hour and six minutes delay -- Cashner was renamed the starter. He finished with six strikeouts and one walk. The Orioles earned backto-back shutouts for the first time since June 28, 2015, also against Cleveland in a doubleheader. Trey Mancini had three hits and drove in three runs for the Orioles. Núñez tied a careerhigh with four RBIs.

BLUE JAYS 7, ROYALS 5 TORONTO — Danny Jansen hit a game-winning home run in the bottom of the ninth inning, Cavan Biggio hit his first career grand slam and Toronto beat Kansas City. Vladimir Guerrero Jr. added a solo home run for the Blue Jays, who recovered after blowing a one-run lead in the top of the ninth. Toronto gave right-hander

Daniel Hudson (5-2) his third save opportunity of the season. Marcus Stroman exited in the fifth with a cramp in his non-pitching shoulder. He allowed three runs and four hits in four-plus innings. Scott Barlow (2-3) took the loss.

TIGERS 7, NATIONALS 5 DETROIT — Miguel Cabrera had three hits and three RBIs as Detroit rallied twice and snapped an eight-game losing streak with a win over Washington. The Tigers rebounded from a three-run deficit in the fourth inning and erased a two-run deficit in the seventh when Niko Goodrum singled to cap a three-run rally. Shane Greene worked the ninth and earned his 22nd save in 23 chances. The Tigers won for just the third time in 24 games at Comerica Park. Anthony Rendon included a homer among his three hits for the Nationals, who had a fourgame winning streak halted.

RAYS 5, RANGERS 2 ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Brendan McKay took a perfect game into the sixth inning of his major league debut and Tampa Bay beat Texas. McKay (1-0) didn’t allow a baserunner until Danny Santana flared an opposite-field single to right with one out in the sixth. The lefty allowed one hit, a walk and struck out three in six innings. Three relievers completed a five-hitter. Avisail Garcia homered for the Rays, who won for the fourth time in 12 games. Willy Adames and Travis d’Arnaud hit consecutive homers in the seventh.

CUBS 6, REDS 0 CINCINNATI — Javier Baez hit his first grand slam of the season, and Jose Quintana went six innings for his first victory since May 5, leading Chicago over Cincinnati.

Britain’s Prince Harry, left, and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, walk off the field before a baseball game between the Boston Red Sox and the New York Yankees, Saturday, in London. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland) when Walker snapped an 0-for15 skid with a two-run homer in the sixth inning. He contributed an RBI single in Miami’s six-run seventh, and JT Riddle delivered a tiebreaking two-run double off Adam Morgan (23). Jarlin Garcia (2-0) worked a scoreless seventh, and Sergio Romo pitched a perfect ninth for his 15th save. Rookie Harold Ramirez had three of the Marlins’ 15 hits. Garrett Cooper added two hits and two RBIs.

TWINS 10, WHITE SOX 3 CHICAGO — Nelson Cruz and Max Kepler each hit two home runs, Miguel Sano went deep, and Michael Pineda threw six solid innings to lead Minnesota past Chicago. Cruz hit a pair of two-run homers, connecting against Ivan Nova (3-7) in the first and launching a 469-foot shot off Jose Ruiz in the ninth. That gave him three multihomer games this season and 30 in his career. He also doubled and singled.

MARLINS 9, PHILLIES 6

BREWERS 3, PIRATES 1

MIAMI — Neil Walker homered and drove in three runs as Miami rallied from a five-run deficit and beat Philadelphia for the fifth consecutive time. The Marlins fell behind 6-1 before starting their comeback

MILWAUKEE — Brandon Woodruff cruised to his 10th win of the season, Eric Thames homered and tripled, and Milwaukee beat Pittsburgh. Woodruff (10-2), the NL leader in wins and strikeouts, allowed one earned run and six

hits with six strikeouts in 7 2/3 over St. Louis. innings. San Diego rookie Fernando Tatis Jr. also homered and finished a triple shy of the cycle. ASTROS 6, The Padres have 16 homers MARINERS 5 during their four-game winHOUSTON — Yuli Gurriel ning streak. The Cardinals lost doubled in the 10th inning for their fifth straight and were his second straight last at-bat held to five hits by Paddack game winner, lifting Houston and two relievers. over Seattle. Michael Brantley singled to DIAMONDBACKS 4, GIstart Houston’s 10th, ending a ANTS 3 streak of nine hitless innings SAN FRANCISCO — over eight appearances for Seattle closer Roenis Elias (2- Zack Greinke pitched seven 1). Gurriel then hit a ball just shutout innings, Eduardo Escoout of reach of diving center bar hit an RBI single to break a fielder Mallex Smith to score scoreless tie in the seventh as Arizona beat San Francisco. Brantley. Greinke (9-3) struck out six and didn’t walk a batter. He ATHLETICS 4, allowed only one runner past ANGELS 0 first base and got the Giants to ANAHEIM, Calif. — Brett hit into a pair of double plays Anderson pitched 7 2/3 domi- while extending his scoreless nant innings of two-hit ball, streak on the road to 22 1/3 inand Matt Chapman hit a two- nings. He gave up five hits. Escobar had three hits. run homer in Oakland’s victory Adam Jones added two and over Los Angeles. Anderson (8-5) didn’t allow walked twice for the Diamondan Angels runner to reach sec- backs. Stephen Vogt hit a threeond base until Luis Rengifo’s eighth-inning double chased run homer off Arizona closer Greg Holland in the ninth. Holhim on his 100th pitch. land, the third reliever used by manager Torey Lovullo in the inning, retired the next three PADRES 12, CARDIbatters for his 12th save. NALS 2 Arizona stranded seven runSAN DIEGO — Manny ners in the first five innings Machado homered twice and against Drew Pomeranz and drove in five runs, and Franmil had a runner tagged out trying Reyes also connected twice to to score in the seventh before back dominant rookie Chris breaking through against rePaddack in San Diego’s win liever Sam Dyson (2-1).

NASCAR returns to site of dramatic finish By JAY COHEN AP Sports Writer

JOLIET, Ill. — When Kyle Busch looks back on last year’s dramatic finish at Chicagoland Speedway, nothing in particular stands out to him. He remembers every little detail. Moving into the lead. Getting slowed by lapped cars at the back of the field. Winning a last-lap duel with Kyle Larson. “It was an iconic finish, a very, I’d say, dynamic finish, that just will be known and recognized for a long time,” Busch said. NASCAR would love to see a similar show when the Cup Series returns to the bumpy 1.5-mile oval on Sunday. But the frantic final seconds of last year’s race have been more of the exception than the norm for its top series,

so much so that NASCAR overhauled its competition package in an effort to create more drama this season. With the new rules in place and more warm weather in the forecast at a track that has room for drivers to move around, the potential is there for another memorable finish at the suburban raceway. “I think it definitely sets up as a good track for a finish like that,” said Martin Truex Jr., a two-time winner at Chicagoland. “There is multiple grooves and the package this year has done what they wanted and expected. It has brought us all closer together. It is going to be hot and slick tomorrow. That will help us put on a good race. We will just have to see how it plays out with this package.” Busch was in front with about 40 laps to go last year when a hardcharging Larson started making

his way through the field. Larson brushed up against the wall with seven laps remaining, but he kept going and Busch had some trouble with a couple of lapped cars. Busch and Larson then raced each other hard on the final lap. Larson bumped into the back of Busch’s car and moved into the lead. Busch then raced into the back of Larson’s car and sped ahead for the victory. “He got into my quarter panel and put me in the wall and then after that, it was gloves off,” Busch said. “We were on after that.” Larson gave Busch a thumb’s up as he celebrated the win. A year later, Larson felt the same way about the final lap. “I made the initial contact, so I mean I can’t be upset with what happens at the other end of the race track,” he said. “I always feel like I can race Kyle hard. I’m sure

it will be the same for the rest of our careers together.” Busch’s victory after qualifying 16th last year continued a familiar pattern. Chicagoland has the highest average start for race winners among active Cup Series tracks at 14.94, easily clearing New Hampshire in second with a 12.23 average start, according to Racing Insights. “Sometimes the cars that don’t qualify very well have better race setups,” said Joey Logano, who qualified 19th. “They have something that’s going to make the tires last longer, and that could be the reason why you see that, is this track wears tires out a lot.” Logano’s lead in the series standings was trimmed to one over Busch after the Penske driver finished 23rd last weekend in California. Truex won on the hilly road

course at Sonoma, and Joe Gibbs Racing teammate Busch was the runner-up. Team Penske and JGR have dominated so far this season, and there is no reason to believe that trend will slow down this weekend. Busch, Truex and Denny Hamlin have combined to take the last four races at Chicagoland in Toyotas, and Penske’s Brad Keselowski won at the track in 2012 and 2014. If it comes down to the very end again, well, that’s just fine with Busch. “It’s a shame that we don’t have finishes like that each and every week,” he said. “We’d have people waiting in line for grandstand tickets if we did, but it only comes along once every so often. Hopefully we can continue to put on good races like that on though.”


B4 | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

Oilers batter Travis Bohall swings at a pitch from the Anchorage Glacier Pilots Friday, June 28, 2019, at Coral Seymour Memorial Park in Kenai. (Photo by Joey Klecka/ Peninsula Clarion)

. . . Oilers Continued from page B1

fourth ball. That led to Oilers bench coach Larry McCann getting ejected by the first-base umpire for arguing the noncall. Brown said from his third-base post, he didn’t discern Rigsby coming to a stop or not, and was more interested in keeping the two-out rally going from the plate. “It’s got to be pretty blatant for an umpire to

call that,” he said. Pritchard said after getting their road trip off to a great start Thursday, the Pilots got lucky with Friday’s game. “This game does not allow you to be careless about any details,” he said. “Now you can get away with being lucky, but you can’t get away with being careless, so you can pick which category that falls under.” Alameda, California, native Bryan Woo started strong for the Oilers, mowing down Pilots batters

with seven strikeouts in four innings of work, but gave up three runs on five hits and three walks. Drew Thorpe whiffed five in four innings of relief, giving up two runs on four hits and two walks, while Farris pitched a pristine top of the ninth with one strikeout. Anchorage’s Logan Freeman gave up just two earned runs in five innings, scattering five hits and two walks with two strikeouts. Connor McCord helped the Oilers’ offensive woes early with a first-inning

Anchorage Glacier Pilots second baseman Zach Sehgal (left) looks to turn a double play in front of Peninsula Oilers runner John Mackay, Friday, June 28, 2019, at Coral Seymour Memorial Park in Kenai. (Photo by Joey Klecka/Peninsula Clarion)

homer that barely cleared the left field fence and the foul pole. Anchorage’s Matt Ottino continued haunting the Oilers with a two-run single lined to right field in the second inning to tie the game at 2-2. Later, Mackay helped Peninsula’s cause with a slick strike-out, throw-out

double play on a throw to first. Alex Baeza put the Pilots ahead 3-2 in the fourth on an RBI single lofted to left field, but Jonathan Villa retorted in the bottom of the fifth with a sacrifice fly to knot it up again at 3-all. Four consecutive base hits off Thorpe to lead off the sixth inning led to two

Anchorage runs, with RBI singles by Mendazano and Zach Sehgal providing the scoring punches for a 5-3 Pilots lead. Mackay got a run back on a sac fly in the bottom of the frame. The Oilers finish off their five-game series with the Pilots today at 2 p.m. and Monday at 6 p.m.

Serena says she’s ready for Wimbledon WIMBLEDON, England (AP) — It’s hard to know exactly what Serena Williams will be able to do over the next two weeks at the All England Club. On the one hand, due at least in part to an injured left knee, Williams is short on matches and

training time this season, factors she cited after her third-round exit June 1 at the French Open, her most recent tournament. She has only 12 tour-level matches so far in 2019. Just four of the other 127 women in the Wimbledon field have fewer; 105 have

at least twice as many. Even Saturday — when she declared she’s “feeling better” and her coach, Patrick Mouratoglou, said the 37-year-old American “doesn’t have pain anymore” — Williams let out a chuckle when she proclaimed, “I’ve had a good

SERVING THE KENAI PENINSULA SINCE 1979

week and a half.” Hardly the ideal amount of practice to try to get ready for Grand Slam competition. And yet, on the other hand, as Williams put it with a wry smile, “I know how to play tennis.” Yes. Yes, she does. This is, after all, a seventime champion and threetime runner-up, including

last year, on the grass at Wimbledon, where play begins Monday. She also is the owner of 23 Grand Slam singles trophies in all, more than anyone else in the professional era and one shy of equaling Margaret Court’s record for the most in tennis history. “She didn’t do anything, really, like what she usually does, in terms of results

this year. Even in Australia, she lost quite early for her, the quarters. So she hasn’t played her best,” Mouratoglou said, before uttering a single sentence that speaks volumes: “But she’s Serena.” “And,” he added in an interview, “the weapons she has are probably even more efficient on grass than on any other surface.”

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C

Home&Health

Sunday, June 30, 2019

G ardening

n Also inside Community C3 Classified C4 TV Guide C6 Mini Page C7 Puzzles C8

Lobby crush: Online shopping leads to mountains of boxes

D ean F osdick

All-green woodland gardens can provide serenity All-green gardens are becoming popular again as the centerpieces of monochromatic landscaping. The designs are appealing and restive, driven as they are by massed ferns, moss, leaves, bark, berries, rock and foliage combinations. They serve some practical purposes, too. “Cool, mossy and damp, small space woodland gardens bring a welcome sense of organic Zen and a respite from digital overload, especially in dense urban areas where they can help to mitigate the effects of pollution,” said Elka Karl, a spokeswoman for Monrovia Nursery Co., based in Azuza, California. “It’s like bringing ‘forest bathing’ to the city with mixes of ferns, mosses, coral bells, hostas and anemones in high-contrast, almost unnatural places for a garden style that’s gaining ground,” Karl said. She said the company has seen a marked increase in consumer demand for all types of woodland plants over the last three years. One of the best attributes of plants with green foliage is that they’re the chameleons of the garden, said Kate Karam, Monrovia’s editorial director. “A holly, for example, can be left to grow into its natural form for a more woodland look or can be sheared into a tight shape suitable for a formal garden,” Karam said. Green gardens don’t have to be exclusively green, although foliage dominates. “Even the greenest of green gardens will likely have something that flowers, such as plants that bloom but are chosen for the foliage,” Karam said. “Grasses, spurges and hostas are good examples. Yes, they flower, but most of us don’t really grow them for that benefit.” There aren’t many “green flowers” in nature, but varieties like Nicotiana langsdorffii, euphorbia and Green Envy zinnia, among others, can be layered into the foliage, said Karen Chapman, a garden designer and co-author, with Christina Salwitz, of “Gardening With Foliage First” (Timber Press, 2017). Chapman said the monochromatic palette “can be adapted to create a richly textured, shaded woodland border with a framework of Japanese maples, feathery ferns and bold hosta, or a more traditional design of clipped boxwood hedges and architectural conifers.” People today are often pinched for time and less able to tend flower gardens, Monrovia’s Karam said. “They turn to hardworking evergreen or seasonally green plants, especially hedges and shrubs, to give the biggest bang and the longest show,” she said. “Plants like conifers, boxwoods, grasses, laurels, hollies, ferns, rhododendrons, drimys, aralia, green-leafed Japanese maples are some of our bestsellers.” When designing all-green gardens, consider a blend of texture, form and coloration. Foliage varies in texture from rough to smooth, glossy to lustreless. Shapes and sizes range from plants with huge round leaves to grasses with long feathery blades. Seek complementary colours. Japanese painted ferns, for example, display attractive blue-green fronds with contrasting deep red ribs and silver edging. “I would say the benefit for many homeowners would be the opportunity to create an urban oasis a meditative space where the distractions of life are minimized and one can quietly re-focus,” Chapman said. “An all-green-garden would be an excellent environment in which to practice yoga or mindfulness.”

This 2011 photo of Variegated Liriope taken near New Market, Va., shows how green gardens don’t have to be exclusively green . (Dean Fosdick via AP)

This photo provided by Luxer One shows a woman removing a package from one of Luxer’s access lockers in San Francisco, Calif. (Luxer One via AP)

This photo provided by Luxer One shows one of their outdoor access lockers for packages. (Luxer One via AP) By KATHERINE ROTH Associated Press

As online shopping becomes ubiquitous, so do the boxes delivered to homes across the country. For apartment dwellers — and the managers of the buildings they live in — it’s tough to manage the boxes that pile up, sometimes clogging precious space for days. (If not watched, packages also can be stolen or left out in the rain.) The problem’s only getting worse, says Rick Haughey, vice president of the non-profit National Multifamily Housing Council, which represents many owners, developers and managers of apartment housing. People are ordering more heavy, oversize and perishable items than ever before, he notes, and building managers are “tasked with finding new and creative ways to meet the demand for package storage, sorting and security.” The problem is especially acute around the holidays, but continues all year. “Now, you’ve got a lot of perishables coming in.

And things like tires can be ordered online at discount prices. That means four tires are sitting in the leasing office, along with items like flat-pack furniture and even bed mattresses,” Haughey says. “They might be there for days or potentially weeks if you’re away on vacation. There doesn’t seem to be perfect solution, but locker systems and delivery hubs come close.” There are a growing number of technologies and services aimed at alleviating the delivery problem in apartment foyers. UPS, FedEx and Amazon all have begun offering services to help manage the flow of delivery boxes. The Amazon Hub program, for example, includes Amazon Locker, based at third-party locations like Whole Foods; Locker+, with staffed locations for pickups and dropoffs; and Apartment Locker, which accepts Amazon and nonAmazon packages in apartment buildings, among other services. Luxer One, a company based in Sacramento, California, provides secure lockers in buildings in the

United States and Canada that can be accessed by both delivery companies and residents — including compartments for very large boxes and refrigerated lockers for perishables. The lockers can be placed inside or outside apartment buildings, and are accessible using codes. “It’s a huge issue for a lot of apartment buildings. There’s a security factor, but also a convenience factor. Building management offices aren’t open as late as some residents need them to be in order to retrieve packages, and in some cases, just accepting a building’s packages can easily become a fulltime job,” says Melody Akhtari, spokeswoman for Luxer One, which started out in 2005 with lockers in apartment buildings for dry cleaning. “A couple years in, a few buildings asked us if we could do something to help with all the boxes that were being delivered. In 2013, we launched across the United States and Canada, and our lockers are now in over 3,500 locations,” she says. Along with smart lockers, there are services that arrange deliveries for a specific time when residents know they’ll be home; or let recipients have packages delivered to secure hubs or other locations that are conveniently located and open late. “The challenge is that in an apartment building with, say, 400 units, you have FedEx, UPS and USPS all stopping by at multiple times of the day to make deliveries. And these are not just small standard packages. One person might be receiving a Casper mattress and another might be receiving a box of flowers

that needs refrigeration,” says Akhtari. But such locker systems can be pricey, and in buildings without them, residents can use services offered either by the shipper or by some retailers. Jet. com, for example, which is owned by Walmart, has installed lockers in hundreds of New York apartment buildings. There’s also a service called Fetch (www.fetchpackage.com), which collects packages, stores them offsite and delivers them when the recipient is home, taking the burden off building managers. In some cases, buildings have converted space into package storage rooms and hired additional staff to deal with deliveries. In other cases, they have decided not to accept packages at all, so residents must rely on one of the outside services. “Managing deliveries can be especially challenging in high package volume markets like New York, Washington, D.C., and Chicago,” says John Falco, principal at Kingsley Associates which, with the National Multifamily Housing Council, published a report on the issue. “In higherdensity, urban areas, space is often at a premium, so package storage solutions are important.” And the challenge doesn’t end at delivery and storage. Once the boxes are opened, some are shipped back as returns, while others create a trash or recycling headache. According to the report, issued in November 2018, over 40 percent of respondents said the large volumes of cardboard and packaging materials being disposed of have created a waste management challenge.

Making the most of your limited living space Downsizing with regard to living space is a trend that has long been associated with empty nesters and senior citizens. As children move out and start families of their own, many homeowners decide to downsize to less expensive, more manageable properties. But downsizing is not just for seniors anymore. According to a 2017 survey from the popular real estate website Trulia, among homeowners currently living in homes larger than 2,000 square feet, more would choose a smaller home than a larger one if they decided to move this year (60.6 percent to 39.4 percent). Homeowners who decided to downsize or those who purchased a small property to begin with may need a few pointers to make the most of their limited space.

• Reconsider your furniture. Furniture can make rooms feel cozy, cramped or spacious. For homeowners with limited space in their homes, furniture that also can be used as storage can save space without sacrificing comfort. For the bedroom, choose a storage bed if the quarters are cramped and it’s difficult to find space for two dressers. Such beds also can be used to store bed linens if closet space is limited. Purchase storage ottomans and/or end tables with storage beneath to make living areas feel less cramped. • Discard some items. Homeowners who are downsizing from large homes may need to part with some of their furniture to make their transition to smaller homes go more smoothly. For example, homeowners may

need to get by with just one bedroom nightstand and may even need to replace their existing nightstands with something more compact. Discarding living room end tables and downsizing to a smaller coffee table also can help homeowners make smaller common areas more welcoming and less cluttered. • Put paint to work. Paint is another way to make the most of a limited space. Painting certain pieces of furniture the same color as the wall can make the furniture blend in and feel less imposing. The result is a room that feels calm and open, even if there is less space to move around than homeowners might have grown accustomed to in their larger homes. • Keep surfaces free of

clutter. Surfaces such as dining tables, coffee tables and kitchen counters tend to accumulate clutter. While such clutter might not feel overwhelming in a large home, in small spaces crowded

surfaces can make it feel as though the walls are closing in. Make an effort to keep surfaces free of clutter, resolving to discard or put items away each night before going to bed.

Many people wish they could live in homes without as much square footage as their existing homes. For those who have downsized, there are many ways to make the most of less living space.


C2 | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

5 dishes every new graduate should learn how to make By Katie Workman The Associated Press

So your kid is going out into the world. Flying the coop. Time for them to learn how to cook. Maybe, just maybe, you didn’t do as good a job as you’d planned teaching them their way around the kitchen (cough — me too, despite what one might think). And just maybe you’d like to give them a little help before they are standing in front of an empty fridge with a frying pan in their hand and a blank expression on their face. Here are 5 basic dishes that should give anyone a head start in the kitchen, including options for breakfast, lunch and dinner. These are talked-through recipes, without specific quantities, just to get the ball rolling. If you are working to help your kid get more comfortable in the kitchen, you may want to use these as guidelines, and print out or copy some family favourite versions or other simple recipes.

1. MIGAS Many cooks feel that knowing how to make an omelet is a baseline kitchen skill, but that might feel a bit fussy to a young person just starting out. Scrambled eggs are good to know too, but let’s go one step more interesting. Migas is a flexible, madcap egg scramble, with roots in Spanish, Mexican and Tex-Mex cooking (depending on who you ask), and it’s easy and satisfying. You essentially saute up some vegetables, like peppers and onions, and maybe add some crumbled chorizo or other sausage. Then add beaten eggs and crushed tortilla chips, and stir the whole thing up in a skillet until the eggs are cooked and the tortilla chips have softened slightly into the mixture. Finish with some cheese and maybe salsa, sour cream or other toppings, and you have the kind of breakfast (or lunch or dinner) that will make a whole lot of people a whole lot of happy.

2. ROAST CHICKEN BREASTS OR THIGHS A roast chicken is also something many people consider a classic, but what’s

even easier — and requires no carving at the end — is roasted chicken pieces. For the most basic, roasted, bone-in and skin-on chicken breasts and thighs, start by preheating the oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit. Rub the chicken pieces with a bit of olive or other oil, place them, without touching, on a rimmed baking sheet or baking dish that has been sprayed with nonstick spray. Sprinkle them with salt and pepper and roast for 30 to 45 minutes, depending on the size of the pieces, until cooked through — to an internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit if you have an internal thermometer, or until the juices aren’t pink when you cut into the pieces with a sharp knife. Play around with different spices and herbs along with the salt and pepper, such as an Italian blend or a mixture of chili powder, paprika, and cumin, and rub those into the skin after you oil the chicken pieces.

3. RICE Knowing how to cook simple rice on the stove means that whatever leftovers you have (either homemade or from takeout) can be stretched into a full bowl meal. And then you can top the bowl with condiments and add-ins like Sriracha sauce, soy sauce, sliced avocado, chopped tomatoes or shredded cheese. To make white rice, bring 2 cups water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Add 1/2 teaspoon salt and an optional tablespoon of butter or cooking oil. When the water has returned to a boil, stir in 1 cup white rice. Let the water return to a simmer, stir, cover the pot, and turn the heat down to low. Simmer covered until the rice is tender and all of the liquid is absorbed, which will take from 17 to 20 minutes. Turn off the heat and let it sit, covered, for three minutes. Remove the lid, fluff the rice with a fork and serve warm.

4. ENGLISH MUFFIN PIZZAS

Sounds kind of specific, don’t it? Well, it’s safe to say that if you know how to make an English muffin pizza, you could have breakfast, lunch and dinner

This August 2016 photo shows Migas, a madcap scrambled egg dish in New York. (Laura Agra/Katie Workman via AP)

covered. Also a hearty midday snack. This is a recipe for plain pizzas, but you can add anything on top that you would add to regular pizza: slivered cooked onions or peppers, sliced olives, chopped cooked broccoli, pepperoni and so on. Toast a split English muffin in a toaster or in a preheated, 350-degree Fahrenheit oven until very lightly brown, three to four minutes. Spoon a few tablespoons of jarred tomato paste evenly over each half. Lay a slice of mozzarella, about the size of the muffin,

over each half. Put them on a baking sheet or some foil, and bake or toast until the cheese is melted. Give a final sprinkle of salt and pepper, and, if available, dried oregano.

5. SOUP If you have the basics of soup down, then you can almost always make a meal out of the odds and ends in your fridge, and from random produce that might be on sale. Also, soup is always a good vegetarian option. Start by heating a bit of oil in a large pot, then add-

ing some longer-cooking ingredients and aromatics, like chopped onion, shallots, carrots, winter squashes, potatoes, broccoli and cauliflower. Make sure all the ingredients are chopped into pieces small enough to fit in a soup spoon. Stir and cook for about 5 minutes. Then add several cups of broth — chicken, beef or vegetable — and bring to a simmer. Simmer until the vegetables are close to tender, anywhere from 10 to 20 minutes. Then add shortercooking ingredients like chopped or crushed to-

matoes (canned or fresh), drained and rinsed canned beans, zucchini or summer squash, shredded or cubed cooked beef, pork, turkey or chicken, cooked rice, orzo or grains, peas or corn. Stir in some dried or fresh herbs (such as thyme, basil, oregano, rosemary), and salt and pepper to taste. Simmer for another 15 minutes or so until it smells like soup. You can top the bowls with grated or crumbled cheese. If new graduates have these five dishes under their belt, that is a very good start.

Edmunds: Best cars for today’s youth sports families practicality. The SportWagen’s 30 cubic feet of cargo space offers plenty of room for gear, and its rear-seat pass-through allows you to carry long objects — think hockey or lacrosse sticks — lengthwise while still keeping the rear seats upright for two passengers. The SportWagen won’t dazzle you with power from its fourcylinder engine, but it does sip gas to the tune of 31 mpg combined. Golf SportWagen SE starting MSRP: $30,980

2019 RAM 1500

This undated photo provided by Honda shows the Odyssey, one of the most practical choices for families shuttling young players to sports activities. (American Honda Motor Co. via AP) By DAN FRIO Edmunds

Young athletes today compete year-round in a variety of clubs and travel to tournaments, usually with staggering amounts of equipment. Vehicle support is often key, and to that end, Edmunds has collected its picks for the best cars, trucks and SUVs for families with active young athletes. Space for passengers and cargo is paramount in this decision, especially if you’ll also be shuttling some of your child’s teammates. We’ve also considered comfort, fuel economy and safety features into our recommendations. Whether it’s hockey, travel baseball or amateur motocross, one

of our five vehicles should be suited to your needs. Note that we’ve listed a recommended trim level for each vehicle as well as its listed manufacturer suggested retail pricing (MSRP), which includes destination fees. Other current discounts or incentives might also be available in your area. All of the vehicles here would work well as a 2- or 3-year-old used vehicle.

2019 HONDA ODYSSEY Forget that minivans may project some notion of automotive uncoolness. For active youth sports families, few vehicles are more practical than the Odyssey. Eight-passenger seating means you can ferry your

whole crew to weekend tournaments and still have 38 cubic feet of luggage space for gear — more than double the trunk space of most sedans. A low floor and sliding doors make it easy for even your smallest goal-scorers to hop in and out. And with its strong V6 engine that returns an EPAestimated 22 mpg in combined city/highway driving, the Odyssey is built for long hauls. It’s also Edmunds’ top-ranked minivan. Odyssey EX starting MSRP: $35,205

2019 CHEVROLET TRAVERSE Can’t bring yourself to pilot a minivan? We get it. The next best thing is a three-row crossover SUV. The Chevrolet Traverse of-

fers a roomy cabin and the largest cargo space in its class. Three kids or teens can sit in the spacious second row. And by folding down the third row, you’ve got 58 cubic feet of space for gear and equipment bags. The Traverse is a big SUV and feels like it behind the wheel, but its V6 engine is up to the task of getting you and your crew up to speed. It also gets 21 mpg in combined driving. Traverse FWD LT Cloth starting MSRP: $36,595

If your kids race bikes or karts, ride bulls or horses, or surf waves at the crack of dawn, you’ll want a Ram 1500. It rides almost as serenely as a sedan thanks to a unique suspension design, and its quiet cabin offers plenty of space for passengers and multiple storage nooks (under the seat, for example). The Ram, one of the most capable towing rigs around, is available with a variety of engine, cab and bed length configurations. It’s no surprise that the Ram 1500 is Edmunds’ top-ranked light-duty pickup. Ram 1500 Big Horn Crew Cab 4x2 (with 5-foot7-inch box) starting MSRP: $40,435

2019 VOLKSWAGEN 2019 FORD GOLF SPORTWAGEN TRANSIT There are smaller alternatives if you don’t want a minivan or an SUV. The VW Golf SportWagen strikes a good balance between bigcar utility and small-car

What happens when your requirements exceed what all of the above vehicles are capable of supporting? You go big. The

Ford Transit can carry up to 15 passengers, making it easy to scoop up the whole softball team. Alternately, you can take out a couple of rows of seating and have a huge cargo area at your disposal. Other advantages include an optional high roof, which allows even lanky teens to stand up inside, and Ford’s sophisticated Sync 3 infotainment system that can make long treks to distant tournaments more enjoyable. Transit XL starting MSRP: $37,335 EDMUNDS SAYS: With today’s youth sports requiring ever more space for gear and distances to travel for competition, families have several good options for driving their young athletes.


C2 | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

5 dishes every new graduate should learn how to make By Katie Workman The Associated Press

So your kid is going out into the world. Flying the coop. Time for them to learn how to cook. Maybe, just maybe, you didn’t do as good a job as you’d planned teaching them their way around the kitchen (cough — me too, despite what one might think). And just maybe you’d like to give them a little help before they are standing in front of an empty fridge with a frying pan in their hand and a blank expression on their face. Here are 5 basic dishes that should give anyone a head start in the kitchen, including options for breakfast, lunch and dinner. These are talked-through recipes, without specific quantities, just to get the ball rolling. If you are working to help your kid get more comfortable in the kitchen, you may want to use these as guidelines, and print out or copy some family favourite versions or other simple recipes.

1. MIGAS Many cooks feel that knowing how to make an omelet is a baseline kitchen skill, but that might feel a bit fussy to a young person just starting out. Scrambled eggs are good to know too, but let’s go one step more interesting. Migas is a flexible, madcap egg scramble, with roots in Spanish, Mexican and Tex-Mex cooking (depending on who you ask), and it’s easy and satisfying. You essentially saute up some vegetables, like peppers and onions, and maybe add some crumbled chorizo or other sausage. Then add beaten eggs and crushed tortilla chips, and stir the whole thing up in a skillet until the eggs are cooked and the tortilla chips have softened slightly into the mixture. Finish with some cheese and maybe salsa, sour cream or other toppings, and you have the kind of breakfast (or lunch or dinner) that will make a whole lot of people a whole lot of happy.

2. ROAST CHICKEN BREASTS OR THIGHS A roast chicken is also something many people consider a classic, but what’s

even easier — and requires no carving at the end — is roasted chicken pieces. For the most basic, roasted, bone-in and skin-on chicken breasts and thighs, start by preheating the oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit. Rub the chicken pieces with a bit of olive or other oil, place them, without touching, on a rimmed baking sheet or baking dish that has been sprayed with nonstick spray. Sprinkle them with salt and pepper and roast for 30 to 45 minutes, depending on the size of the pieces, until cooked through — to an internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit if you have an internal thermometer, or until the juices aren’t pink when you cut into the pieces with a sharp knife. Play around with different spices and herbs along with the salt and pepper, such as an Italian blend or a mixture of chili powder, paprika, and cumin, and rub those into the skin after you oil the chicken pieces.

3. RICE Knowing how to cook simple rice on the stove means that whatever leftovers you have (either homemade or from takeout) can be stretched into a full bowl meal. And then you can top the bowl with condiments and add-ins like Sriracha sauce, soy sauce, sliced avocado, chopped tomatoes or shredded cheese. To make white rice, bring 2 cups water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Add 1/2 teaspoon salt and an optional tablespoon of butter or cooking oil. When the water has returned to a boil, stir in 1 cup white rice. Let the water return to a simmer, stir, cover the pot, and turn the heat down to low. Simmer covered until the rice is tender and all of the liquid is absorbed, which will take from 17 to 20 minutes. Turn off the heat and let it sit, covered, for three minutes. Remove the lid, fluff the rice with a fork and serve warm.

4. ENGLISH MUFFIN PIZZAS

Sounds kind of specific, don’t it? Well, it’s safe to say that if you know how to make an English muffin pizza, you could have breakfast, lunch and dinner

This August 2016 photo shows Migas, a madcap scrambled egg dish in New York. (Laura Agra/Katie Workman via AP)

covered. Also a hearty midday snack. This is a recipe for plain pizzas, but you can add anything on top that you would add to regular pizza: slivered cooked onions or peppers, sliced olives, chopped cooked broccoli, pepperoni and so on. Toast a split English muffin in a toaster or in a preheated, 350-degree Fahrenheit oven until very lightly brown, three to four minutes. Spoon a few tablespoons of jarred tomato paste evenly over each half. Lay a slice of mozzarella, about the size of the muffin,

over each half. Put them on a baking sheet or some foil, and bake or toast until the cheese is melted. Give a final sprinkle of salt and pepper, and, if available, dried oregano.

5. SOUP If you have the basics of soup down, then you can almost always make a meal out of the odds and ends in your fridge, and from random produce that might be on sale. Also, soup is always a good vegetarian option. Start by heating a bit of oil in a large pot, then add-

ing some longer-cooking ingredients and aromatics, like chopped onion, shallots, carrots, winter squashes, potatoes, broccoli and cauliflower. Make sure all the ingredients are chopped into pieces small enough to fit in a soup spoon. Stir and cook for about 5 minutes. Then add several cups of broth — chicken, beef or vegetable — and bring to a simmer. Simmer until the vegetables are close to tender, anywhere from 10 to 20 minutes. Then add shortercooking ingredients like chopped or crushed to-

matoes (canned or fresh), drained and rinsed canned beans, zucchini or summer squash, shredded or cubed cooked beef, pork, turkey or chicken, cooked rice, orzo or grains, peas or corn. Stir in some dried or fresh herbs (such as thyme, basil, oregano, rosemary), and salt and pepper to taste. Simmer for another 15 minutes or so until it smells like soup. You can top the bowls with grated or crumbled cheese. If new graduates have these five dishes under their belt, that is a very good start.

Edmunds: Best cars for today’s youth sports families practicality. The SportWagen’s 30 cubic feet of cargo space offers plenty of room for gear, and its rear-seat pass-through allows you to carry long objects — think hockey or lacrosse sticks — lengthwise while still keeping the rear seats upright for two passengers. The SportWagen won’t dazzle you with power from its fourcylinder engine, but it does sip gas to the tune of 31 mpg combined. Golf SportWagen SE starting MSRP: $30,980

2019 RAM 1500

This undated photo provided by Honda shows the Odyssey, one of the most practical choices for families shuttling young players to sports activities. (American Honda Motor Co. via AP) By DAN FRIO Edmunds

Young athletes today compete year-round in a variety of clubs and travel to tournaments, usually with staggering amounts of equipment. Vehicle support is often key, and to that end, Edmunds has collected its picks for the best cars, trucks and SUVs for families with active young athletes. Space for passengers and cargo is paramount in this decision, especially if you’ll also be shuttling some of your child’s teammates. We’ve also considered comfort, fuel economy and safety features into our recommendations. Whether it’s hockey, travel baseball or amateur motocross, one

of our five vehicles should be suited to your needs. Note that we’ve listed a recommended trim level for each vehicle as well as its listed manufacturer suggested retail pricing (MSRP), which includes destination fees. Other current discounts or incentives might also be available in your area. All of the vehicles here would work well as a 2- or 3-year-old used vehicle.

2019 HONDA ODYSSEY Forget that minivans may project some notion of automotive uncoolness. For active youth sports families, few vehicles are more practical than the Odyssey. Eight-passenger seating means you can ferry your

whole crew to weekend tournaments and still have 38 cubic feet of luggage space for gear — more than double the trunk space of most sedans. A low floor and sliding doors make it easy for even your smallest goal-scorers to hop in and out. And with its strong V6 engine that returns an EPAestimated 22 mpg in combined city/highway driving, the Odyssey is built for long hauls. It’s also Edmunds’ top-ranked minivan. Odyssey EX starting MSRP: $35,205

2019 CHEVROLET TRAVERSE Can’t bring yourself to pilot a minivan? We get it. The next best thing is a three-row crossover SUV. The Chevrolet Traverse of-

fers a roomy cabin and the largest cargo space in its class. Three kids or teens can sit in the spacious second row. And by folding down the third row, you’ve got 58 cubic feet of space for gear and equipment bags. The Traverse is a big SUV and feels like it behind the wheel, but its V6 engine is up to the task of getting you and your crew up to speed. It also gets 21 mpg in combined driving. Traverse FWD LT Cloth starting MSRP: $36,595

If your kids race bikes or karts, ride bulls or horses, or surf waves at the crack of dawn, you’ll want a Ram 1500. It rides almost as serenely as a sedan thanks to a unique suspension design, and its quiet cabin offers plenty of space for passengers and multiple storage nooks (under the seat, for example). The Ram, one of the most capable towing rigs around, is available with a variety of engine, cab and bed length configurations. It’s no surprise that the Ram 1500 is Edmunds’ top-ranked light-duty pickup. Ram 1500 Big Horn Crew Cab 4x2 (with 5-foot7-inch box) starting MSRP: $40,435

2019 VOLKSWAGEN 2019 FORD GOLF SPORTWAGEN TRANSIT There are smaller alternatives if you don’t want a minivan or an SUV. The VW Golf SportWagen strikes a good balance between bigcar utility and small-car

What happens when your requirements exceed what all of the above vehicles are capable of supporting? You go big. The

Ford Transit can carry up to 15 passengers, making it easy to scoop up the whole softball team. Alternately, you can take out a couple of rows of seating and have a huge cargo area at your disposal. Other advantages include an optional high roof, which allows even lanky teens to stand up inside, and Ford’s sophisticated Sync 3 infotainment system that can make long treks to distant tournaments more enjoyable. Transit XL starting MSRP: $37,335 EDMUNDS SAYS: With today’s youth sports requiring ever more space for gear and distances to travel for competition, families have several good options for driving their young athletes.


Peninsula Clarion | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | C3

Community

Summer fun on the peninsula

Heritage Place residents participate in the third Walk ‘n’ Roll event to show support for the Alzheimer’s Association. (Photo courtesy Aud Walaszek)

Meet the Clarion Pressman Jeremy Walker By KAT SORENSEN Peninsula Clarion

Jeremy Walker is a new addition to the Peninsula Clarion press team, but plays a vital role in making sure the paper gets printed. “I’m press operator number three,” Jeremy said. “So, I make sure that the inks are full and the plates are ready for press. I also help maintain the equipment and I jog and stack paper quickly and efficiently so that my teammates can load the inserter properly.” Jeremy was born in Tooele, Utah, and moved to Kenai when he was about 5 years old, to be closer to family. Growing up in the state, he always enjoyed hunting and fishing with his grandfather, dad and uncle. Now, his family has grown quite a bit. This June, Jeremy became a grandfather to a “beautiful baby boy.” He also has five of his own children, a Yorkshire terrier named Snickers and about 10 fish. “Making sure my kids and wife are taken care of and happy is my passion,” Jeremy said. “They are my everything.”

Jeremy Walker is a new addition to the Peninsula Clarion press team. (Photo courtesy Jeremy Walker)

Don McNamara and Donna Rae Faulkner of Oceanside Farms use their commercial-grade hydraulic fruit grinder to press stalks of rhubarb into fresh juice, at the Farmers Fresh Market on Tuesday at the Kenai Peninsula Food Bank near Soldotna. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)

Thanks for another successful luau The Soldotna Senior Center would like to thank all the individuals and area businesses that made donations for our Hawaiian Luau fundraiser, held on Saturday, June 15. The Hawaiian Luau fundraiser is one of our largest annual events and we had another great crowd again this year. Donations for our Luau were used for our silent auction, our outcry auction, and as door prizes for our guests. The Center raised nearly $6,000 during this event, our largest amount ever, and we couldn’t have done it without these generous donors. You rock! Donors for our fundraiser included: Alaska Best Transit Mix, Alaska Railroad, Alaska Wildgear, Arby’s, Aspen Hotel, AutoZone, Barbara Trombley, Beemun’s, Buckets Sports Grill, Bunny Chong, Caribou Family Restaurant, Alaska Hooked on Fishing, Donna Swaby, Dorothy Diamond, Dragonfly Gallery, Everything Bagels, First National Bank Alaska, Frames & Things, Fred Meyer, Gamas Designs, Gladys Routh, Holiday Gas Stations, Janelle Clinton, Jarod & Mariah Brown, Jersey Subs, Kaladi Brothers, Kenai River Brewing, Kendall Chrysler Jeep Dodge, Key Bank, Margo Dias, Midas, Muscles in Motion, Napa, Nita Douthit, O’Reilly Auto Parts, Peachie Koblyk, Poppy Lane Flowers, River City Books, Ron Walden, Siam Noodles & Thai Food, Sinshearly Shan-

non, Spenard Builders Supply, Sweeney’s, Trinity Greenhouse, Trustworthy Hardware, and Walgreens. We want to thank all the volunteers who helped us carry off this major event. Big Kudos go out to Jan Fena and Al Chong for cooking a wonderful Hawaiian Feast for our guests. Thanks to the members of the Apostolic Assembly of Jesus Christ who volunteered as servers for our meal. Lastly, in the kitchen, a shout out to Nathan Brown for all his efforts washing dishes, and there were a ton of them! Our newest decorating committee spent many hours decking out the Senior Center, bringing a taste of the tropics to Soldotna. Many thanks to Marie Billings, Janet Stacy, Donna Swaby, Cheryl Thames, Margaret Phelps, Gladys Routh, and Dorothy Diamond for working up to the last minute to ready our center for this event. More thanks to Estelle Parks, Dorothy Diamond, Gladys Routh, and Vickie Graham for going out to solicit donations for our auction items and door prizes. The Senior Center would also like to extend a hearty thank you to Sen. Peter Micciche for once again taking on the role of auctioneer for our outcry auction. His generous time donation and easy banter with the crowd helped increase our fundraising efforts — John Walker, executive director Soldotna Area Senior Citizens, Inc

Welcome warm weather in fiery July M onthly M usings B onnie M arie P layle July is the seventh month, and is called “Dog Days” because it’s the warmest month in the Northern Hemisphere. FACTS: Astrological signs: Cancer and Leo; Birthstone: ruby; Colors: green, russet and red; Flowers: delphinium, commonly called larkspur and water lily; Birds: raven and bald eagle; Animals: crab and lion; Trees: apple, fir, elm and cypress; Day observed: Independence Day and approximately 64 Special/ Wacky Days. Cancer is the fourth sign in the zodiac — its symbol is the crab and the element is water. Cancer people are “roots” kind of people who take great pleasure in the comforts of home and family. These people are nurturers, and being a water sign are sensitive, emotional and their feelings run deep. Leo is the fifth sign in the zodiac — its symbol is the lion and the element is fire. The ruler of this sign is the sun. Being a fire sign is an indicator of creativity — these people are self-sufficient, spontaneous and possess a tremendous zest for life. July has the birthstone of ruby. The ruby represents love, health and wisdom. This gemstone is the most valuable and its value increases based on color and quality. It’s said that rubies bestow good fortune on their owners. The colors are green, russet and red. Green is associated with money, the environment and revitalization, as well as rebirth. Russet means sorrow or grave seriousness. Red is passion and is associated with energy, war, danger, strength, power and determination. July’s flowers are larkspur and water lily. Larkspur symbolizes an open heart and ardent attachment and give a feeling of lightness and levity. The water lily is associated with rebirth and optimism, fertility, sexuality and creation, as well as, beauty, purity of heart and enlightenment. The scientific name is nymphaea, which means nymph, which is a feminine spirit that inhabited water bodies like

wells, waterways and springs. The birds for July are raven, which stands for embodiment of grief caused by loneliness and separation. This bird represents evil and death. The other bird is the bald eagle, which is fierce beauty and proud independence, as well as strength and freedom, which is why it was selected as the national ensign for America. The animals for July are the crab and the lion. The crab signifies prosperity, success and high status in Chinese symbolism. The crab means self-protection, boundaries and teaching others how to treat you. The second animal is the lion, meaning strength, courage and leadership. July 1-4 is the apple tree — the symbol of knowledge, immortality, temptation and the fall of man and sin. July 5-14 is the fir tree, which means honesty, truth and forthrightness because it grows on the straight and narrow. July 15-25 is the elm tree, the main aspect is strength and is associated with Mother and Earth Goddesses. July 26-31 is the cypress tree, which is associated with death and mourning. The main day observed in July is Independence Day. This is the most significant American holiday commemorating the signing of the Declaration of Independence, which was approved on July 4, 1776. There was a committee of five men: Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, Robert Livingston and Thomas Jefferson. Thomas Jefferson was appointed true author; 56 men from the 13 colonies actually signed the Declaration of Independence on August 2, 1776. On July 4, 1776, we separated from Great Britain and became a sovereign nation. Truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal and are endowed by their Creator, certain inalienable Rights, among them Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness. These became known as some of our ideals of our country. The result has been this shining light on a hill, the United States of America, the freest, most creative, productive and richest nation in the history of mankind. So, what’s happening in Alaska on the Kenai Peninsula in July? On July 2 is the Flying High with Civil Air Patrol — this event is held at the Soldotna Library and explains the civil air patrol program. On July 4 in Kenai is the Independence

Day Parade — there will be a variety of vendors and artists. July 10 through Aug. 7 is the Salmon Run Series, hosted by the Kenai Watershed Forum every Wednesday at the Tsalteshi Trails. This is a five-race series. Proceeds go to the Watershed Forum. On July 12-13 is the 2019 Music Festival: Rock’n the Ranch at the Rusty Raven at Mile 12.5 K-Beach Road, Kenai. On July 16 at the Soldotna Public Library is Habitat Space presented by the Wildlife Refuge, explaining why animals need space and what they need to survive. On July 20 at the Soldotna Creek Park is the Kenai Peninsula Disability Pride Celebration. On July 22-26 at the Challenger Learning Center in Kenai will be the Summer STEM Academy. This includes Forsensic Science and Aerial Robotics for the fourth through eighth graders. This is geared to learn about facets of drones and future careers. Topics will include weather, drone safety and aeronautical chart reading. On July 26-28 is Soldotna Progress Days at the Soldotna Creek Park. This is one of the largest events of the year, which includes a parade, family activities, Dutch oven competition, Sawfest Chainsaw carving competition and a community picnic all provided by the City of Soldotna. Here’s several other events around the state of Alaska for July: July 3-4 in Petersburg is the start of the 4th of July celebration. There’s a community barbecue, running games and fireworks at the ball fields and games at the harbors. On July 4th in Seward is the Annual Mount Marathon Race. This is about 3.1 miles with an elevation of 3,022 feet. It is believed to be the toughest 5K marathon on the planet. On July 4th in Talkeetna the Moose on Parade. This is in the spirit of Wild Salmon on Parade in Anchorage and Cows on Parade in Chicago. On July 10-14 in Eagle River is the Bear Paw Festival. 2019 marks the 34th annual event. This is the perfect place to take your family. There will be a carnival and vendors of all kinds, with live entertainment. On July 14-28 in Fairbanks is the Fairbanks Summer Arts Festival (FSAF). En-

joy the various classes offered, such as music, dance and theater — along with visual, literary, culinary and healing arts. Guests come from around the globe to educate Alaskans in new artistic techniques and spread knowledge. This event has something for everyone interests. On July 17-21 in Fairbanks is the Golden Days celebration. This five-day festival began in 1952 in remembrance of Gold Rush days and the mining tradition. On July 25-28 in Haines is the 51st Annual Southeast Alaska State Fair. This will include all fair events — a rodeo, livestock and agricultural exhibits, arts and crafts with quilts, bands, fiddle contest, parade and a children’s carnival. What’s on the menu? Well, fresh king salmon, of course. Now here’s some July trivia: On July 2, 1913, from Weeks Field in Fairbanks, the first airplane flight occurred. July 4, 1892 — the nucleus of all Alaska reindeer herds arrived at Teller from Siberia. July 7, 1958 — President Eisenhower signed the Alaska Statehood Act. July 8, 1923 — Mount McKinley National Park was dedicated. July 9, 1927 — the Alaska flag was flown for the first time in Seward. July 15, 1923 — President Harding drove in the golden spike marking the completion of the Alaska Railroad in Nenana. July 16, 1741 — the explorer Vitus Bering reached Alaska. July 21, 1982 — Dr. Miri Ercolani was the first solo woman to ascend Denali. July 23, 1957 — in Kenai there was an oil strike. July 27, 1977 — Prudoe Bay oil reached Valdez via the Trans-Alaska Pipeline for the first time. July 29, 1900 — White Pass and Yukon Route had the last rail laid. July was named by the Roman Senate in honor of the Roman general, Julius Caesar, it being the month of his birth. Prior to that, it was called Quintilis. In Alaska, there’s always something to do, fishing, kayaking, bear watching, hiking, camping, taking fjord trips and the train out of Whittier. Come join the fun, but be safe. July is a celebration of the season. This month means sunshine and summer and all of its radiant glory. People born in July can be sensitive, emotional, self-sufficient and possess a tremendous zest for life.


C4 | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

Contact us; www.peninsulaclarion.com, classified@peninsulaclarion.com • To place an ad call 907-283-7551

DIRECT SERVICE ADVOCATE Part-Time Transitional Living Center Provide support, advocacy and assistance to homeless women and children residing in transitional housing who have experienced domestic violence and/or sexual assault. Excellent interpersonal and written communication skills, ability to work with diverse populations, work independently and on a team and promote non-violent behavior and empowerment philosophy. HS diploma or equivalent required; degree or experience working in related field preferred. Valid driver’s licensen required. Resume, cover letter and three references to: Executive Director, The LeeShore Center 325 S. Spruce St. Kennai, AK 99611 by April July 3, 2019 by 15, 2019 EOE

2364863

EMPLOYMENT

BEAUTY / SPA 2385475

DIRECT SERVICE ADVOCATE Part-Time Transitional Living Center

BEAUTY / SPA

Provide support, advocacy and assistance to homeless women and children residing in transitional housing who have experienced domestic violence and/or sexual assault. Excellent interpersonal and written communication skills, ability to work with diverse populations, work independently and on a team and promote nonviolent behavior and empowerment philosophy. HS diploma or equivalent required; degree or experience working in related field preferred. Valid driver’s license required. Resume, cover letter and three references to: Executive Director, The LeeShore Center, 325 S. Spruce St., Kenai, AK 99611 by July 3, 2019. EOE

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Merchandise For Sale Kenmore Upright Freezer Model 29313 Runs Good - $275.00 398-0317

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BEAUTY / SPA

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A SUMMER MASSAGE Thai oil massage Open every day Call Darika 907-252-3985

Alaska Trivia The wolverine has a reputation of being so ferocious that it can harass and run off a Grizzly Bear.

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HOME SERVICES DISH TV - $59.99/month for 190 channels. $100 Gift Card with Qualifying Service! Free premium channels (Showtime, Starz, & more) for 3 months. Voice remote included. Restrictions apply, call for details. Call 1-866681-7887 (PNDC)

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Apartments Furnished FURNISHED APARTMENT FOR RENT Vacation, Corporate or Longterm Rental Daily, weekly, monthly! 1 bedroom on Kasilof River, 20x32 ft deck, All utilities, Wifi and Satalite included! FISHERMEN WELCOME! 907-252-6497

Classifieds

Work 283-7551 www.peninsulaclarion.com


Peninsula Clarion | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | C5

Contact us; www.peninsulaclarion.com, classified@peninsulaclarion.com • To place an ad call 907-283-7551 APARTMENTS FOR RENT

Business Property

EVERY BUSINESS has a story to tell! Get your message out with California’s PRMedia Release - the only Press Release Service operated by the press to get press! For more info contact Cecelia @ 916-288-6011 or http://prmediarelease.com/california (PNDC)

Professional Office Space

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COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL PROPERTIES

Keep a Sharp Eye on the Classifieds

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COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL SPACE FOR RENT WAREHOUSE / STORAGE 2000 sq. ft., man door 14ft roll-up, bathroom, K-Beach area 3-Phase Power $1300.00/mo. 1st mo. rent + deposit, gas paid 907-252-3301

I buy old Porsche, Jaguar, Mercedes and other classic European and American automobiles. Any condition, top $ paid. 707-965-9546, 707-339-9803 Porscherestoration@yahoo.com (PNDC)

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT

Now Accepting Applications fo Remodeled Spacious 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Affordable Apartments.

OFFICE SPACE RENTAL AVAILABLE 609 Marine Street Kenai, Alaska 404 and 394sq,ft, shared entry $1/sq.ft 240sq.ft.Shared conference/Restrooms $0.50/sq.ft 283-4672

Adjacent to Playground/Park Onsite Laundry; Full Time Manager Rent is based on 30% of Gross Income & Subsidized by Rural Development For Eligible Households.

Multi-Use Facility w/ fenced 5.11 Acres FOR SALE or LEASE. Shop/Warehouse-Office-Equipment Vehicle Bldg & Yard. 5,679SF Shop/warehouse w 5bays, (3) bays have 12’x12’ OD doors, (1) bay has 16’x12’ OH drive-through bay, (1) drive though no OH, Offices, break rm, restrm, storage rm, 3-phase, generator. 2,660sf Office bldg, 1-story, 8-offices, lrg break rm, restrms, kitchenette, storage, jan closet, handicap ramp, generator. 6,630SF Equip bldg (11) 12’wide bays x 32’ deep w power & storage. 4,000 gal diesel tank, 3-phase, vehicle plugins. Lease $5,500.00/mo Tenant pays R/E taxes, bldg insurance, maint, utilities, all services, etc NNN. Sale $700,000. Mark Rowley, Brkr, 244-3000 or Melonie Chapman, Licensee 907-242-5309 Brkr & Licensee are members of Sellers LLC & have a financial interest in this property. mchapman@pacifictower.com

Each week, our Classified section features hundreds of new listings for everything from pre-owned merchandise to real estate and even employment opportunities. So chances are, no matter what you’re looking for, the Classifieds are the best place to start your search.

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Advertise in the Service Directory today! - Includes Dispatch. 283-7551

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283-7551

Auto Repair

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Interstate Batteries After Market Body Parts Propane and AMSOIL Tu-Fr 10-5, Sa 10-4 • Closed Su/Mo 262-5333 • 800-760-5333

Lawn • Preparation • Excavation • Driveways Land Clearing • Septic Systems

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Lawn Care

Landscaping

Also offering other services check out our prices!

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Roofing

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Notices

Notice to Consumers The State of Alaska requires construction companies to be licensed, bonded and insured before submitting bids, performing work, or advertising as a construction contractor in accordance with AS 08..18.011, 08.18.071, 08.18.101, and 08.15.051. All advertisements as a construction contractor require the current registration number as issued by the Division of Occupational Licensing to appear in the advertisement. CONSUMERS MAY VERIFY REGISTRATION OF A CONTRACTOR. Contact the AK Department of Labor and Workforce Development at 907-269-4925 or The AK Division of Occupational Licensing in Juneau at 907-4653035 or at www.dced.state.ak.us/acc/home.htm

Roofing

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Hydro Seeding & Landscaping Hydro Seeding on the peninsula since 1997

Insulation

Printing

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@

CHECK US OUT

Serving The PeninSula SinceSINCE 1979 1979 SERVING THEKenai KENAI PENINSULA

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• Automotive • RV Repair, • Outboard • Snow Machines

Moose River RV Parts and Propane RV Parts

Auto Repair

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Construction

Screened Top Soil Available!

Tree Service

Saturday Morning Delivery until 1:00 PM

Construction

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You C all We Ha ul Cleaning

Gravel

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Online

www.peninsulaclarion.com


C6 | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

SUNDAY MORNING/AFTERNOON A

B

(3) ABC-13 13 (6) MNT-5

8 AM

8:30

Jerry Prevo

5

(8) CBS-11 11 (9) FOX-4

4

4

(10) NBC-2

2

2

(12) PBS-7

7

7

Catholic Mass ‘PG’

(7:30) Face the Nation Xploration Nature Knows Best Paid Program ‘G’

Foot Pain Xploration DIY Sci ‘PG’

Raw Travel “Spread Out” ‘PG’ Samantha Weekends Brown Place With Yankee ‘G’

Cops ‘PG’

B = DirecTV

JUNE 30, 2019

9:30 10 AM 10:30 11 AM 11:30 12 PM 12:30 1 PM

1:30

137 317

(23) LIFE

Joel Osteen 108 252 ‘PG’

2:30

Manna-Fest Paid Program With Perry ‘G’ Stone ‘G’ The World’s Strongest Man Competition PBC Face to PBC Fight Face (N) Camp (N)

Soldotna Christian Worship Hour Paid Program Chicago P.D. “Erin’s Mom” Chicago P.D. “What Do You Church of ‘G’ Bunny becomes involved with Do” Burgess and Roman beGod a case. ‘14’ come trapped. ‘14’ Auto Racing (N) ‘PG’ PGA Tour Golf Rocket Mortgage Classic, Final Round. (N) (Live)

To Be Announced

Chicago P.D. Platt’s new de- Dew Tour Skateboard compe- Track and Field Prefontaine Classic. From Cobb Track & meanor is questioned. ‘14’ tition. From Long Beach, Calif. Angell Field in Stanford, Calif. (N) (Live) (N) ‘PG’ Pledge Programming TBA

Rick Steves’ Fishing Europe “Lis- Behind the bon” ‘G’ Lines ‘G’

3 PM

2019 U.S. Senior Open Championship Final Round. From Warren Golf Course in Notre Dame, Ind. (N) (Live)

Paid Program Raw Travel ‘G’ “Spread Out” ‘PG’ Texas Music Larry King Sp.

P. Allen Smith Garden Style Mantracker ‘PG’

Cops ‘PG’

Cops ‘PG’

Cops ‘PG’

Cops ‘PG’

Cops ‘PG’

Cops ‘PG’

Cops ‘14’

Cops ‘PG’

Cops ‘PG’

Cops ‘PG’

Mad Dog & Merrill Mid- (6) M west Grill’n Tails of Valor (8) C (N) ‘G’ Mom ‘14’ (9) F

(12) P Last Man Last Man Last Man Standing Standing Standing Christmas in July Sale (N) (Live) ‘G’

Last Man Standing

(36) ROOT 426 687 (38) PARMT 241 241 (43) AMC

131 254

(46) TOON 176 296 (47) ANPL 184 282 (49) DISN

173 291

(50) NICK

171 300

(51) FREE

180 311

(55) TLC

183 280

(56) DISC

182 278

(57) TRAV 196 277 (58) HIST

120 269

(59) A&E

118 265

(60) HGTV 112 229 (61) FOOD 110 231 (65) CNBC 208 355 (67) FNC

205 360

(81) COM

107 249

(82) SYFY

122 244

“Deep Impact” (1998, Drama) Robert Duvall, Tea Leoni, Elijah Wood. A “X-Men: First Class” (2011, Action) James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Rose Byrne. The “Doctor Strange” (2016, Action) Benedict large comet is on a collision course with Earth. early years of Charles Xavier and Erik Lehnsherr. Cumberbatch, Chiwetel Ejiofor. SportsCenter (N) (Live) 2019 ESPYS UFC Fight Night: Ngannou vs. Dos Santos Francis Ngannou vs. Junior Dos Santos, heavy- MLB Selec- Baseball Tonight: Sunday MLB Baseball Atlanta Braves Nomination weight bout. From Target Center in Minneapolis. tion Night Countdown (N) at New York Mets. E:60 Spartan 2019 UEFA U-21 EURO Championship Championship Final: Teams TBA. NBA: The Jump (N) (Live) Agoge (N) (Live) Paid Program Mariners Mariners All Mariners Pre- MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Houston Astros. From Minute Maid Park in Houston. (N) Mariners Mariners All Minor League Baseball Eugene Emeralds at Hillsboro Hops. ‘G’ Spotlight Access (N) game (N) (Live) Postgame Access Bar Rescue “Two Flew Over Bar Rescue “Raising Arizona” Bar Rescue “The Unlucky Bar Rescue A members-only Bar Rescue “To Protect and Bar Rescue “Pole Without a (:01) Bar Rescue “Twerking 9 (:02) Bar Rescue “Bromancthe Handlebars” ‘PG’ ‘PG’ Leprechaun” ‘PG’ bar in Kansas. ‘PG’ to (Over) Serve” ‘PG’ Purpose” ‘PG’ to 5” ‘PG’ ing the Stone” ‘PG’ (5:55) “Gangs of New York” (2002) Leon(:25) “Saving Private Ryan” (1998, War) Tom Hanks, Edward Burns, Tom Sizemore. U.S. troops look for a missing com(:25) “A Bronx Tale” (1993, Drama) Robert De Niro, Chazz Palminteri. A ardo DiCaprio, Daniel Day-Lewis. rade during World War II. youth favors a flashy mobster over his hard-working dad. Summer Summer Teen Titans Teen Titans World of World of World of World of DC Super OK K.O.!OK K.O.!World of World of World of Craig of the Victor and Camp Island Camp Island Go! ‘PG’ Go! ‘PG’ Gumball Gumball Gumball Gumball Hero Girls Heroes Heroes Gumball Gumball Gumball Creek ‘Y7’ Valentino Northwest Law “Dangerous North Woods Law “Running North Woods Law “Take the North Woods Law “TakeNorth Woods Law “Truth or The Zoo A new exhibit for the The Zoo Penguin chicks are The Aquarium Confrontations” ‘14’ Cold and Fast” ‘PG’ Plunge” ‘PG’ down” ‘PG’ Consequences” ‘PG’ Pallas’ cats. ‘PG’ introduced. ‘PG’ Big City Big City Amphibia ‘Y7’ Big City Raven’s Sydney to the Just Roll With Andi Mack ‘G’ Bunk’d ‘G’ Big City Raven’s “Toy Story” (1995, Children’s) Voices of Tom “Toy Story 2” (1999) Voices Greens ‘Y7’ Greens ‘Y7’ Greens ‘Y7’ Home ‘G’ Max ‘G’ It ‘Y7’ Greens ‘Y7’ Home ‘G’ Hanks, Tim Allen, Don Rickles. of Tom Hanks. Power Rang- LEGO City SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob LEGO City SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob (:01) The (:22) The ers Adventures Adventures Loud House Loud House (6:30) “Parental Guidance” “Mrs. Doubtfire” (1993, Children’s) Robin Williams, Sally Field, Pierce Brosnan. An es(:10) “Dr. Seuss’ the Lorax” (2012, Children’s) Voices of (:15) “Monsters, Inc.” (2001, Children’s) Voices of John (2012) Billy Crystal. tranged dad poses as a nanny to be with his children. Danny DeVito, Ed Helms, Zac Efron. Goodman, Billy Crystal, Mary Gibbs. Say Yes to Say Yes to Say Yes to the Dress ‘PG’ Say Yes to the Dress ‘PG’ Say Yes to the Dress ‘PG’ Say Yes to the Dress “A Say Yes to the Dress ‘PG’ sMothered “Equally ObsMothered Cher and Dawn the Dress the Dress Purple Unicorn” ‘PG’ sessed” ‘PG’ hide a secret. ‘14’ Building Off the Grid “Mas- Building Off the Grid “Glacier Building Off the Grid “Cliff Building Off the Grid “Desert Building Off the Grid “Mush- Building Off the Grid ‘G’ Building Off the Grid ‘G’ Naked and Afraid A jaguar sive Mud Home” ‘G’ River Cabin” ‘G’ House” ‘G’ Domes” ‘G’ room House” ‘G’ family circles. ‘14’ Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum Legendary Locations “What Paranormal Caught on Cam- Paranormal Caught on Cam- Paranormal Caught on Cam- Alien Highway “Escape From UFOs: The Lost Evidence ‘PG’ ‘PG’ Lurks Within” ‘G’ era ‘PG’ era ‘PG’ era ‘PG’ Area 51” ‘14’ “Past and Present” ‘PG’ Counting Cars “Baggers Can’t be Choosers” A rare 1970 Lincoln Mark III. ‘PG’ American Pickers “Substitute American Pickers ‘PG’ American Pickers ‘PG’ American Pickers “Sweet American Pickers “Good & Picker” ‘PG’ Homes Alabama” ‘PG’ Evel” ‘PG’ (7:30) “John Carter” (2012, Science Fiction) Taylor Kitsch, Lynn Collins, Wil- “The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers” (2002, Fantasy) Elijah Wood, Ian McKellen, Liv Tyler. Members of a fellowship “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of lem Dafoe. A human soldier becomes embroiled in a conflict on Mars. battle evil Sauron and his pawns. the King” (2003, Fantasy) Elijah Wood, Ian McKellen, Liv Tyler. Fixer Upper Houses in Wood- Fixer Upper A house with Fixer Upper “The Colossal Fixer Upper ‘G’ Love It or List It “Site UnLove It or List It A house’s Love It or List It “One Last Love It or List It A couple way, Texas. ‘G’ several acres of land. ‘G’ Crawford Reno” ‘G’ seen” ‘PG’ flaws. ‘G’ Renovation” ‘PG’ seeks more space. ‘PG’ The Pioneer The Pioneer The Pioneer The Pioneer Valerie Home Giada in Italy Barefoot Con- Barefoot Con- The Kitchen “Fireworks of Beach Bake Battle “SandThe Great Food Truck Guy’s Grocery Games Woman ‘G’ Woman ‘G’ Woman ‘G’ Woman ‘G’ (N) ‘G’ tessa tessa Flavor” ‘G’ castle Sweetness” ‘G’ Race ‘G’ “Cheesier” ‘G’ Smokeless HOOVER Inogen Porta- Paid Program LifeLock Pro- Power Air Paid Program Paid Program Shark Tank ‘PG’ Shark Tank Vincent Pastore Shark Tank Military members Shark Tank An innovative Grill CORDLESS ble Oxygen ‘G’ tection Fryer Oven ‘G’ ‘G’ makes a pitch. ‘PG’ and veterans. ‘PG’ shoe accessory. ‘PG’ America’s News Headquar- America’s News Headquar- FOX News Sunday With The Journal Editorial Report America’s News Headquar- The Greg Gutfeld Show (N) Fox Report with Jon Scott FOX News Sunday With ters (N) ters (N) Chris Wallace (N) ters (N) (N) Chris Wallace (N) (:10) The Of- (:45) The Office “Viewing (:20) The Of- (9:55) The Of- The Office (:05) The Of- (:40) The Of- (:15) The Office “PDA” ‘14’ (12:50) The (:25) The Of- The Office The Office The Office (:35) The Office ‘PG’ Party” ‘PG’ fice ‘PG’ fice ‘PG’ ‘PG’ fice ‘PG’ fice ‘PG’ Office ‘PG’ fice ‘14’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ fice ‘PG’ (7:00) “Annabelle” (2014, “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” (2004, Children’s) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert (:01) “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire” (2005, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson. “HarryHorror) Annabelle Wallis. Grint, Emma Watson. The young wizard confronts the fugitive Sirius Black. Voldemort lays a trap for Harry at the Triwizard Tournament. Phoenix”

PREMIUM STATIONS ! HBO

303 504

^ HBO2 304 505 + MAX

311 516

5 SHOW 319 546 8 TMC

329 554

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

4

B

(6) MNT-5

4 PM

4:30

To Be Announced

(3) ABC-13 13

Clarion TV

5 PM

A = DISH

5:30 ABC World News

Small Town Big Deal ‘G’

5

(8) CBS-11 11 (9) FOX-4

4

4

(10) NBC-2

2

2

(12) PBS-7

7

7

50PlusPrime Pawn Stars Pawn Stars ‘G’ “Out of Gas” “Bossy Pants” ‘PG’ ‘PG’ The Inspec- Modern Fam- Frontiers ‘G’ CBS Weektors ‘G’ ily ‘PG’ end News Funny You Funny You Entertainment Tonight (N) Should Ask Should Ask ‘PG’ ‘PG’ Leverage The team must run Channel 2 NBC Nightly a difficult con. ‘PG’ News: Late News With Edition Lester Holt Pledge Programming TBA

CABLE STATIONS

108 252

(28) USA

105 242

(30) TBS

139 247

(31) TNT

138 245

(34) ESPN 140 206 (35) ESPN2 144 209 (36) ROOT 426 687 (38) PARMT 241 241 (43) AMC

131 254

(46) TOON 176 296 (47) ANPL 184 282 (49) DISN

173 291

(50) NICK

171 300

(51) FREE

180 311

(55) TLC

183 280

(56) DISC

182 278

(57) TRAV 196 277 (58) HIST

120 269

(59) A&E

118 265

(60) HGTV 112 229 (61) FOOD 110 231 (65) CNBC 208 355 (67) FNC

205 360

(81) COM

107 249

(82) SYFY

122 244

303 504

^ HBO2 304 505 + MAX

311 516

5 SHOW 319 546 8 TMC

329 554

6:30

Rizzoli & Isles “Bloodlines” Frankie’s old girlfriend returns. ‘14’ 60 Minutes (N) To Be Announced

7 PM

Big Brother (N) ‘PG’

Last Man The SimpStanding ‘14’ sons ‘PG’

Hollywood Game Night Contestants lead a team of celebrities. ‘14’ Pledge Programming TBA

7:30

Celebrity Family Feud The Chainsmokers; 5 Seconds of Summer. (N) ‘PG’ Madam Secretary Elizabeth struggles with a decision. ‘14’

Bob’s Burgers ‘PG’

8 PM

JUNE 30, 2019

8:30

The $100,000 Pyramid Karamo Brown; Bobby Berk; Joel McHale. ‘14’ Chicago P.D. “Disco Bob” A double murder investigation. ‘14’ Instinct “Stay Gold” (N) ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’

9 PM

What Just TMZ (N) ‘PG’ Happened??!

America’s Got Talent “Auditions 4” Variety acts continue to audition. ‘PG’

9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30

To Tell the Truth Anna Camp; Joel McHale; Ron Funches. (N) ‘PG’ Murdoch Mysteries “The Local Option” A politician is poisoned. ‘PG’ The Good Fight (N) ‘MA’

Paid Program Access (N) ‘PG’

Entertainers: With Byron Allen Heartland Tim steps up Soldotna The Church Jade’s training regimen. ‘PG’ Church of of the AlGod mighty God KTVA Night- Castle Hayley becomes a Major Crimes cast suspect in a killing. ‘PG’ ‘14’ The Big Bang The Big Bang 2 Broke Girls 2 Broke Girls Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ ‘14’ ‘14’

New Amsterdam A case hits Channel 2 close to home for Sharpe. ‘14’ News: Late Edition Poldark on Masterpiece Endeavour on Masterpiece “Confection” Jamestown Maria’s plan Cornwall’s election approach- Gossip threatens to expose secrets. (N) ‘14’ could secure a new life. es. ‘PG’ (N) ‘14’

Graham Bensinger

NCIS: New Orleans A friend’s business partner is killed. ‘14’

Pledge Programming TBA

Married ... Married ... Married ... Married ... Person of Interest Carter Bones A CIA informant is With With With With finally meets Reese. ‘14’ murdered. ‘14’ Plexaderm Skincare (N) Shoe Shopping Clearance Fashion Jewelry Clearance Courtney’s Closet Clearance (N) (Live) ‘G’ (Live) ‘G’ (N) (Live) ‘G’ (N) (Live) ‘G’ (3:00) “A Deadly Affair” “Psycho Ex-Girlfriend” (2018, Suspense) Elisabeth Harnois, “Hometown Killer” (2019, Suspense) Kaitlyn Black, Ashley American Princess “The (:03) “Hometown Killer” (2019, Suspense) Kaitlyn Black, (2017) Valerie Azlynn, Luke Morgan Kelly. A woman is pulled into a twisted game by her Gallegos. A woman reconnects with an old friend who is now Tempest” Maggie revels in Ashley Gallegos. A woman reconnects with an old friend who Edwards. ‘14’ fiance’s ex. ‘14’ a cop. Amanda’s failures. ‘MA’ is now a cop. (3:30) “San Andreas” (2015) Dwayne Johnson. A rescue “Captain America: Civil War” (2016, Action) Chris Evans, Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Jo- (8:49) “Captain America: Civil War” (2016, Action) Chris Evans, Robert Downey Jr., Scarpilot must save his family after an earthquake. hansson. Captain America clashes with Iron Man. lett Johansson. Captain America clashes with Iron Man. (3:30) “Kong: Skull Island” (2017, Adventure) Tom HidThe Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang Claws “Boy, Bye” Mac and (8:58) Claws “Boy, Bye” Mac (9:56) “Magic Mike XXL” (2015, Comedy-Drama) Channing dleston, Samuel L. Jackson. Explorers encounter a gigantic Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘14’ Theory ‘PG’ Melba commit a horrible act. and Melba commit a horrible Tatum, Matt Bomer, Joe Manganiello. Former stripper Mike ape and monstrous creatures. (N) ‘MA’ act. ‘MA’ Lane comes out of retirement. (2:30) “Doctor Strange” “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” (2017, Science Fiction) Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana. The Claws “Boy, Bye” (N) ‘MA’ (8:59) Claws “Boy, Bye” ‘MA’ (9:58) “Deep Impact” (1998) Robert Duvall, Tea Leoni. A (2016) Chiwetel Ejiofor team unravels the mystery of Peter Quill’s parentage. large comet is on a collision course with Earth. (3:00) MLB Baseball Atlanta Braves at New York Mets. From SportsCenter With Scott Van SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Citi Field in Flushing, N.Y. (N) (Live) Pelt (N) (Live) (1:00) NBA: The Jump (N) (Live) Formula 1 Racing Myworld Austrian Grand Prix. Unlocking E:60 MLB Baseball Atlanta Braves at New York Mets. From Citi Victory Field in Flushing, N.Y. (N Same-day Tape) Minor League Baseball: Em- Tennis Invesco Series: ADT Champions Classic. From MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Houston Astros. From Minute Maid Park in Houston. Mariners Mariners All World Poker Tour Bellagio eralds at Hops Tampa, Fla. Postgame Access High Roller - Part 3. (:03) Bar Rescue “Weird Sci- (:04) Bar Rescue “Spoiled (:05) Bar Rescue “I Smell a Bar Rescue “All Twerk & No Bar Rescue ‘PG’ Marriage Rescue “You Guys (:01) Bar Rescue “Tanked Bar Rescue “Paradise Lost” ence” ‘PG’ Brat Party” ‘PG’ Rat” ‘PG’ Pay” ‘PG’ Are Screwed” ‘14’ and Toasty” ‘PG’ ‘PG’ (3:55) “Cast Away” (2000, Drama) Tom Hanks, Helen Hunt, Nick Searcy. A courier company (6:55) Fear the Walking Dead Fear the Walking Dead (:08) NOS4A2 Vic is ques(:15) Fear the Walking Dead Althea endan- (:23) NOS4A2 executive is marooned on a remote island. “Skidmark” ‘MA’ (N) ‘MA’ tioned by the police. ‘14’ gers the mission. ‘MA’ ‘14’ Samurai Jack Final Space Bob’s Burg- Bob’s Burg- American Family Guy Family Guy Rick and Mike Tyson The Jellies Your Pretty American Family Guy Family Guy Rick and Mike Tyson ‘14’ ‘14’ ers ‘PG’ ers ‘PG’ Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Morty ‘14’ Mysteries ‘14’ Face... Hell Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Morty ‘14’ Mysteries The Aquarium Feisty baby The Aquarium The effects of The Aquarium: Unfiltered (:01) The Aquarium Coral (:02) Lone Star Law “Hunting (:03) Lone Star Law “Cross- (:03) Lone Star Law “When Lone Star Law “Hunting Huntalligators arrive. plastics in the oceans. “Penguins in Love” (N) restoration efforts. (N) Hunters” (N) ‘14’ ing the Line” ‘14’ Deer Attack” ‘14’ ers” ‘14’ (3:00) “Toy (:40) Just Roll (:05) Sydney Bunk’d ‘G’ Raven’s Raven’s Sydney to the Max ‘G’ Andi Mack ‘G’ Bunk’d ‘G’ Amphibia ‘Y7’ Big City Raven’s Andi Mack ‘G’ Bunk’d ‘Y7’ Bunk’d ‘G’ Story 2” With It to the Max Home ‘G’ Home ‘G’ Greens ‘Y7’ Home ‘G’ Smarter Than Smarter Than Smarter Than (:26) All That (5:57) All (:29) Henry “Marley & Me” (2008) Owen Wilson, Jennifer Aniston, Eric Dane. A couple’s Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ (:35) Friends (:10) Mom ‘14’ (:45) Mom ‘14’ ‘G’ That ‘G’ Danger ‘G’ new puppy grows up to become an incorrigible handful. ‘14’ (2:15) “Mon- (:20) “Beauty and the Beast” (1991, Children’s) Voices of (:25) “Zootopia” (2016, Children’s) Voices of Ginnifer Goodwin. Animated. (8:55) “WALL-E” (2008, Children’s) Voices of Ben Burtt, (:05) “Dr. Seuss’ the Lorax” sters, Inc.” Paige O’Hara, Robby Benson. Police rabbit Judy Hopps joins forces with a wily fox. Elissa Knight, Jeff Garlin. (2012) Ed Helms sMothered “Our Own Little 90 Day Fiancé: Happily Ever After? Ashley discovers the 90 Day Fiancé: Happily Ever After? “Sparks Will Fly” Nicole (:01) sMothered “Three’s (:02) 90 Day Fiancé: Happily 90 Day Fiancé: Happily Ever World” ‘14’ truth about Jay. (N) ‘PG’ pops the question to Azan. (N) ‘PG’ Company” (N) ‘14’ Ever After? (N) ‘PG’ After? ‘PG’ Naked and Afraid XL ‘14’ Naked and Afraid XL ‘14’ Naked and Afraid XL: UnNaked and Afraid XL “No (:01) Naked and Afraid (:02) Naked and Afraid A wil- (:02) Naked and Afraid ‘14’ Naked and Afraid ‘14’ censored All-Stars ‘14’ Hand-Outs” (N) ‘14’ (N) ‘14’ derness instructor. ‘14’ UFOs: The Lost Evidence UFOs: The Lost Evidence UFOs: The Lost Evidence UFOs: The Lost Evidence Ripley’s Believe It or Not! Legendary Locations “Flesh America Unearthed “The Rip- Ripley’s Believe It or Not! “Area 52” ‘PG’ “Nazi UFO Secrets” ‘PG’ “Police UFO Files” ‘PG’ “UFO Abduction” (N) ‘PG’ “Forces of Nature” (N) ‘G’ and Blood” (N) ‘G’ per Unmasked” ‘G’ “Forces of Nature” ‘G’ American Pickers “Tick Tock American Pickers “One of American Pickers “Picker’s American Pickers “Pickers (:02) American Pickers (:05) American Pickers “Van- (:05) American Pickers “Big (:03) American Pickers “PickPick” ‘PG’ Everything” ‘PG’ Dozen” ‘PG’ Like It Hot” ‘PG’ “Frank Meet Brank” ‘PG’ Tastic” ‘PG’ Boy Toys” ‘PG’ ers Like It Hot” ‘PG’ (2:30) “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King” (2003, Fantasy) Elijah Wood, Ian “The Shawshank Redemption” (1994, Drama) Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman, Bob Gun- (:04) Kids Behind Bars: Life (:03) “The Shawshank ReMcKellen, Liv Tyler. Humans and creatures unite to battle Sauron and his army. ton. An innocent man goes to a Maine penitentiary for life in 1947. or Parole “Curtis” ‘14’ demption” (1994, Drama) Tim Robbins, Bob Gunton. Love It or List It “Pool House Love It or List It ‘PG’ Love It or List It “PictureLakefront Lakefront Beach Hunt- Beach Hunt- Island Life Island Life Hawaii Life Hawaii Life Beach Hunt- Beach HuntProblems” ‘PG’ Perfect Kitchen” ‘PG’ Bargain Bargain ers (N) ‘G’ ers (N) ‘G’ (N) ‘G’ (N) ‘G’ ‘G’ ‘G’ ers ‘G’ ers ‘G’ Guy’s Grocery Games ‘G’ Guy’s Grocery Games Guy’s Grocery Games “Gro- Guy’s Grocery Games The Great Food Truck Race Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Beat Bobby The Great Food Truck Race “Cheesiest” ‘G’ cery Rush” ‘G’ “Home Cooks!” ‘G’ “Tampa 911” (N) ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ “Tampa 911” ‘G’ Shark Tank ‘PG’ Shark Tank ‘PG’ Shark Tank Guest shark Troy Shark Tank ‘PG’ Shark Tank ‘PG’ Shark Tank Vincent Pastore LifeLock Pro- Smokeless The Profit ‘PG’ Carter. ‘PG’ makes a pitch. ‘PG’ tection Grill Watters’ World The Next Revolution With Life, Liberty & Levin (N) Watters’ World The Next Revolution With Life, Liberty & Levin FOX News Sunday With MediaBuzz Steve Hilton (N) Steve Hilton Chris Wallace (N) (:10) The Of- (:45) The Of- (:15) “The Hangover Part II” (2011, Comedy) Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms. (:45) “The Hangover Part II” (2011, Comedy) Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms. Alternatino (:36) South (:12) South Park “Dances fice ‘PG’ fice ‘PG’ Phil, Stu, Alan and Doug head to Thailand for Stu’s wedding. Phil, Stu, Alan and Doug head to Thailand for Stu’s wedding. With Arturo Park ‘MA’ with Smurfs” ‘MA’ (3:30) “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix” (2007) Daniel Radcliffe. (:31) “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” (2009, Children’s) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Harry prepares a group of students to fight Voldemort. Watson. New dangers lurk for Harry, Dumbledore and their friends. ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’

PREMIUM STATIONS ! HBO

6 PM

America’s Funniest Home Videos ‘PG’

June 30 - July 6, 2019

B = DirecTV

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

Last Man Last Man Last Man Last Man (8) WGN-A 239 307 Standing Standing Standing Standing House to Home by Valerie - Holiday Edition (N) (Live) ‘G’ (20) QVC 137 317 (23) LIFE

(31)

(34) E

(35) E

(36) R

(38) P (43)

(46) T

(47) A

(49) D

(50) N

(51) F (55)

(56) D

(57) T (58) (59)

(60) H

(61) F

(65) C (67)

(81) C

(82) S

PRE

(7:55) “The Old Man & the Gun” (2018, “Ready Player One” (2018, Science Fiction) Tye Sheridan, Olivia Cooke, (11:50) “Rescue Dawn” (2006, War) Christian Bale, Steve Real Time With Bill Maher “Deadpool 2” (2018, AcComedy-Drama) Robert Redford, Casey Af- Ben Mendelsohn. A teen finds adventure in a virtual reality world in 2045. Zahn, Jeremy Davies. A U.S. fighter pilot is shot down over ‘MA’ tion) Ryan Reynolds, Josh ! fleck. ‘PG-13’ ‘PG-13’ Laos. ‘PG-13’ Brolin. ‘R’ (7:00) “Bad Times at the El Royale” (2018, (:25) Real Time With Bill (:25) REAL Sports With Bry- (:25) “Night School” (2018, Comedy) Kevin Hart, Tiffany (:20) “Ice on Fire” (2019) Narrated by Leon- “The Hate U Give” (2018) Suspense) Jeff Bridges, Cynthia Erivo, Jon Maher ‘MA’ ant Gumbel ‘PG’ Haddish, Rob Riggle. A student puts up with a feisty teacher ardo DiCaprio. Ongoing efforts to mitigate Amandla Stenberg. ‘PG-13’ ^ H Hamm. ‘R’ at night school. ‘PG-13’ climate change. ‘NR’ (7:40) “Vanilla Sky” (2001, Suspense) Tom Cruise, Pené“American Made” (2017, Comedy-Drama) Tom Cruise, Jett “Phoenix” Jett is ordered (12:55) “Justice League” (2017, Action) Ben Affleck, Henry “Red Eye” (2005, Suspense) lope Cruz, Cameron Diaz. A disfigured womanizer cannot Domhnall Gleeson, Sarah Wright Olsen. Pilot Barry Seal to track down Blair. ‘MA’ Cavill, Gal Gadot. Batman, Wonder Woman and other heroes Rachel McAdams, Brian Cox. + distinguish dreams from reality. ‘R’ transports contraband for the CIA. ‘R’ unite to battle evil. ‘PG-13’ ‘PG-13’ Boxing Jermall Charlo vs. Brandon Adams. Jermall Charlo (28-0, 21 KOs) defends his middleweight title City on a Hill Decourcy finds (:35) “The Dark Tower” (2017) Idris Elba. A (:15) “Fast Times at Ridgemont High” (:45) “Adrift” against Brandon Adams (21-2, 13 KOs). he has a new enemy. ‘MA’ Gunslinger defends the Dark Tower from the (1982) Sean Penn. California teenagers enjoy (2018) 5 S Man in Black. ‘PG-13’ malls, sex and rock ’n’ roll. “Baby Boom” (1987, Comedy) Diane Keaton, Harold Ramis, “Midnight Sun” (2018) Bella Thorne. A (:35) “Rent” (2005, Musical) Rosario Dawson, Taye Diggs, Jesse L. Martin. “The Cold Light of Day” (2012) Henry Cav- (:35) “The Sam Shepard. Manhattan exec suddenly inherits baby girl, teen who can’t be exposed to sunlight finds East Village artists cope with poverty and illness. ‘PG-13’ ill. A young business consultant must save his Spirit” (2008) 8 moves to Vermont. ‘PG’ romance. ‘PG-13’ kidnapped family.

SUNDAY AFTERNOON/EVENING A

CAB

(8) W

David’s Great Big Christmas House to Home by Valerie - Holiday Edition (N) (Live) ‘G’ (20) (N) (Live) ‘G’ Paid Program “The Bad Seed” (2018, Mystery) Mckenna Grace, Rob Lowe, “The Perfect Stalker” (2016, Suspense) Danielle Savre, Jef- “Family Pictures” (2019, Drama) Justina Machado, Elisabeth “A Deadly Affair” (2017, Sus‘G’ Patty McCormack. A man begins to suspect that his daughter ferson Brown, Krista Morin. A woman who is obsessed with Röhm, Matt Passmore. The lives of two women intersect pense) Valerie Azlynn, Luke (23) is a killer. ‘14’ her neighbor invents a stalker. ‘14’ when a shocking secret is revealed. Edwards. ‘14’ Queen of the South “La Mal- Law & Order: Special VicLaw & Order: Special VicLaw & Order: Special VicLaw & Order: Special VicLaw & Order: Special VicLaw & Order: Special Vic“San An (28) dición” ‘14’ tims Unit ‘14’ tims Unit ‘14’ tims Unit ‘14’ tims Unit ‘14’ tims Unit ‘14’ tims Unit ‘14’ dreas” The King of The King of The King of “Transformers” (2007, Action) Shia LaBeouf, Tyrese Gibson, Josh Duhamel. Two races of “Godzilla” (2014, Science Fiction) Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Ken Watanabe, “Kong: Skull Queens ‘PG’ Queens ‘PG’ Queens ‘PG’ robots wage war on Earth. Elizabeth Olsen. Godzilla and malevolent foes battle for supremacy. Island” (2017) (30)

Chrisley 105 242 Knows Best Everybody (30) TBS 139 247 Loves Raymond ‘PG’ NCIS: New Orleans “Out (31) TNT 138 245 laws” ‘14’ MLB Baseball: Yankees vs (34) ESPN 140 206 Red Sox SportsCenter (N) (Live) (35) ESPN2 144 209 (28) USA

(3) A

Try 3 Week Naturally, Chicago P.D. Platt’s new deYoga Retreat Danny Seo ‘G’ meanor is questioned. ‘14’ (10) N Now!

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS. Cops ‘PG’

SU

3:30

Family Feud To Be An‘PG’ nounced

In the Kitchen With David “Holiday Food Edition” (N) (Live) ‘G’

(20) QVC

2 PM

To Be Announced

In Search

CABLE STATIONS (8) WGN-A 239 307

9 AM

A = DISH

Last Man Last Man Married ... Standing Standing With The Joy of Christmas (N) (Live) ‘G’

Married ... With

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

(3:00) “Deadpool 2” (2018, Sermon on Bohemian “Robin Hood” (2018, Action) Taron Egerton, Jamie Foxx, Big Little Lies “She Knows” Euphoria “Made You Look” Last Week Euphoria “Made You Look” Big Little Lies Action) Ryan Reynolds, Josh the Mount (N) Rhapsody Ben Mendelsohn. Robin Hood leads a revolt against the Sher- (N) ‘MA’ Kat has her first camming ses- Tonight-John Kat has her first camming ses- ‘MA’ Brolin. ‘R’ ‘MA’ iff of Nottingham. ‘PG-13’ sion. (N) ‘MA’ sion. ‘MA’ (3:00) “The Hate U Give” (:15) Big Little Lies Abigail Big Little Lies “Tell-Tale (6:55) Big (:45) “The Jackal” (1997, Suspense) Bruce Willis, Richard Gere, Sidney (9:55) “Jupiter Ascending” (2015, Science Fiction) Chan(2018) Amandla Stenberg. doesn?t want to go to colHearts” Renata faces an un- Little Lies Poitier. An imprisoned Irishman accepts an offer to nab an assassin. ‘R’ ning Tatum, Mila Kunis. An ordinary woman learns of her ‘PG-13’ lege. ‘MA’ certain future. ‘MA’ ‘MA’ extraordinary destiny. ‘PG-13’ (3:00) “Red “Inception” (2010, Science Fiction) Leonardo DiCaprio, Joseph Gordon“Maze Runner: The Death Cure” (2018, Science Fiction) Dylan O’Brien, (:25) “It” (2017, Horror) Jaeden Lieberher, Jeremy Ray “Kingsman: Eye” (2005) Levitt, Ellen Page. A thief enters people’s dreams and steals their secrets. Thomas Brodie-Sangster, Kaya Scodelario. Thomas leads the Gladers into a Taylor, Sophia Lillis. Maine children unite to fight an ancient, The Golden ‘PG-13’ WCKD-controlled labyrinth. ‘PG-13’ evil clown. ‘R’ Circle” ‘R’ (3:45) “Adrift” (2018) Shailene Woodley. A Our Cartoon City on a Hill Decourcy finds Our Cartoon Desus & Mero City on a Hill Jackie searches The Loudest Voice The for- The Loudest Voice The City on a Hill Jackie searches couple fight for survival after sailing into a hur- President ‘14’ he has a new enemy. ‘MA’ President “Link in Bio” for an absent informant. mation of Fox News Channel. formation of Fox News Chan- for an absent informant. ‘MA’ ricane. ‘PG-13’ (N) ‘14’ ‘MA’ (N) ‘MA’ (N) ‘MA’ nel. ‘MA’ (3:35) “The Spirit” (2008, Action) Gabriel “Anaconda” (1997, Suspense) Jennifer “Rent” (2005, Musical) Rosario Dawson, Taye Diggs, Jesse (:15) “Marshall” (2017, Historical Drama) Chadwick Bose- (:15) “Assault on Precinct Macht. A rookie cop, believed to be dead, Lopez. A huge snake stalks a film crew in the L. Martin. East Village artists cope with poverty and illness. man, Josh Gad. Young lawyer Thurgood Marshall defends a 13” (1976, Action) Austin fights crime in Central City. Brazilian jungle. ‘PG-13’ ‘PG-13’ black man in court. ‘PG-13’ Stoker. ‘R’ © Tribune Media Services


Peninsula Clarion | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | C7

WEEKDAYS MORNING/AFTERNOON A (3) ABC-13 13 (6) MNT-5 5 (8) CBS-11 11 (9) FOX-4 4 (10) NBC-2 2 (12) PBS-7 7

8 AM

B

CABLE STATIONS

(20) QVC

137 317

(23) LIFE

108 252

(28) USA

105 242

(30) TBS

139 247

(31) TNT

138 245

(34) ESPN 140 206

(35) ESPN2 144 209

(36) ROOT 426 687 (38) PARMT 241 241

M T W Th F M T W Th F M T W Th F M T W Th F M T W Th F M T W Th F M T W Th F M T W Th F M T W Th F

M T (43) AMC 131 254 W Th F M T (46) TOON 176 296 W Th F

(47) ANPL 184 282 (49) DISN

(50) NICK (51) FREE (55) TLC

9 AM

M T 173 291 W Th F M T 171 300 W Th F

180 311

M T 183 280 W Th F

B

(6) MNT-5

5

(8) CBS-11 11 (9) FOX-4

4

4

(10) NBC-2

2

2

(12) PBS-7

7

7

Wendy Williams Show Hot Bench Court Court Millionaire Young & Restless Mod Fam Rachael Ray ‘G’ Live with Kelly and Ryan Steve ‘PG’ Dinosaur Cat in the Sesame St.

Hot Bench Millionaire Bold Paternity Super Why!

1:30

Strahan & Sara Divorce Divorce The Talk ‘14’ Paternity ES.TV ‘PG’ Days of our Lives ‘14’ Pinkalicious Go Luna

2 PM

2:30

General Hospital ‘14’ Judge Judy Judge Judy Face Truth Face Truth Dish Nation Dish Nation Pickler & Ben ‘PG’ Nature Cat Wild Kratts

3 PM

3:30

Jeopardy Inside Ed. Live PD Live PD Dr. Phil ‘14’ Wendy Williams Show The Dr. Oz Show ‘PG’ Varied Programs

In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night Blue Bloods ‘14’ Blue Bloods ‘14’ Blue Bloods ‘14’ “X-Men: First Class” In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night Blue Bloods ‘14’ Blue Bloods ‘14’ Blue Bloods ‘14’ Last Man Last Man In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night Cops ‘14’ Cops ‘14’ Cops ‘14’ Cops ‘14’ Cops ‘14’ Cops ‘14’ (7:00) “Happy Feet Two” “Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby” (2006) “Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby” (2006) Last Man Last Man Last Man Last Man In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night Blue Bloods ‘14’ Blue Bloods ‘14’ Blue Bloods ‘14’ M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Fashion & Accessories LOGO by Lori Goldstein Jayne & Pat’s Closet Cuddl Duds Vince Camuto Apparel G.I.L.I. With Jill Martin Plexaderm (N) (Live) ‘G’ PM Style with Amy Stran Kerstin’s Closet Clearance (N) (Live) ‘G’ Linea by Louis Dell’Olio Swim Style Clearance ‘G’ Fashion & Accessories Clearance (N) (Live) ‘G’ Denim & Co. Clearance Shoe Shopping with Jane Amazon Fire TV Stick ‘G’ Insect & Mosquito Control Fashion & Accessories Clearance (N) (Live) ‘G’ American West Jewelry (N) (Live) ‘G’ Mally: Color Cosmetics Amazon Fire TV Stick ‘G’ Home Made Easy With Mary (N) (Live) ‘G’ American West Jewelry (N) (Live) ‘G’ La-Z-Boy (N) (Live) ‘G’ Quacker Factory by Jeanne Bice Clearance (N) ‘G’ La-Z-Boy (N) (Live) ‘G’ Colors of Gemstone Jewelry (N) (Live) ‘G’ Honora Jewelry Collection Gemstone Jewelry Tanzanite Jewelry (N) ‘G’ Turquoise Jewelry (N) ‘G’ Colors of Gemstone Jewelry (N) (Live) ‘G’ The Closer ‘14’ The Closer ‘PG’ The Closer ‘14’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ The Closer ‘14’ The Closer ‘14’ The Closer ‘14’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ The Closer ‘14’ The Closer ‘PG’ The Closer ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Double “The Green Mile” (1999, Drama) Tom Hanks, David Morse. “Unforgettable” (2017) Rosario Dawson, Katherine Heigl. “Unfaithful” (2002) Richard Gere, Diane Lane. The Closer ‘14’ The Closer ‘14’ The Closer ‘14’ Wife Swap ‘14’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Wife Swap ‘PG’ Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Chicago P.D. ‘14’ (9:59) Chicago P.D. ‘14’ (10:59) Chicago P.D. ‘14’ (11:58) Chicago P.D. ‘14’ Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Twister “Volcano” (1997, Action) Tommy Lee Jones. (:43) “The Lost World: Jurassic Park” (1997, Adventure) Jeff Goldblum. (:41) “Jurassic Park III” (2001) Sam Neill. Jurassic Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Burgers Burgers Burgers Burgers Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Amer. Dad Amer. Dad (7:00) “Fist Fight” “Get Hard” (2015) Will Ferrell, Kevin Hart. “Wedding Crashers” (2005) Owen Wilson, Vince Vaughn. The Detour The Detour The Detour Claws “Just the Tip” ‘MA’ Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld ‘G’ Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld ‘G’ Charmed ‘PG’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ “Total Recall” (2012) Colin Farrell, Jessica Biel. Charmed ‘PG’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ “Pacific Rim” (2013) Charlie Hunnam. Charmed ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ Supernatural ‘14’ “Road to Perdition” (2002) Tom Hanks. (7:00) “Mad Max: Fury Road” (2015, Action) (9:50) “Star Wars: The Phantom Menace” (1999) Liam Neeson. (12:50) “Star Wars: Attack of the Clones” (2002) Ewan McGregor. “Total Recall” (2012) Colin Farrell, Kate Beckinsale. “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” (2015) Harrison Ford, Mark Hamill. (:28) “Star Wars: A New Hope” (1977) Mark Hamill. 2019 Wimbledon Championships First Round. From the All-England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in Wimbledon, England. Get Up (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) MLB Baseball 2019 Wimbledon Championships First Round. From the All-England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in Wimbledon, England. Get Up (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) NBA: The Jump (N) (Live) 2019 Wimbledon Championships Second Round. (N) (Live) Get Up (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) MLB Baseball 2019 Wimbledon Championships Second Round. (N) (Live) MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh Pirates. From PNC Park in Pittsburgh. MLB Baseball 2019 Wimbledon Championships Third Round. (N) (Live) Get Up (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) The Jump Basketball SportsCenter (N) (Live) Outside NFL Live (N) (Live) NBA: The Jump (N) (Live) NFL Live NBA: The Jump NFL Live SportsCenter (N) (Live) Outside NFL Live (N) (Live) NBA: The Jump (N) (Live) NFL Live NBA: The Jump NFL Live SportsCenter (N) (Live) Outside NFL Live (N) (Live) NBA: The Jump (N) (Live) NFL Live NBA: The Jump NFL Live NBA: The Jump (N) (Live) Hot Dog Eat American Cornhole League (N) (Live) Hot Dog Eat Hot Dog Eat Lacrosse USA Softball International Cup SportsCenter (N) (Live) First Take NBA: The Jump (N) (Live) NBA Summer League Basketball Teams TBA. (N) The Jump USA Softball International Cup USA Blue vs Japan. The Rich Eisen Show (N) (Live) ‘PG’ Paid Prog. Paid Prog. The Dan Patrick Show (N) Focused Bensinger The Rich Eisen Show (N) (Live) ‘PG’ Paid Prog. Paid Prog. The Dan Patrick Show (N) ‘PG’ Undeniable The Rich Eisen Show (N) (Live) ‘PG’ Paid Prog. Paid Prog. The Dan Patrick Show (N) ‘PG’ Bensinger Mariners The Rich Eisen Show ‘PG’ Mariners Mariners MLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals at Seattle Mariners. (N) (Live) Mariners Dan Patrick The Rich Eisen Show ‘PG’ Paid Prog. Paid Prog. The Dan Patrick Show (N) Minor League Baseball Spokane Indians at Hillsboro Hops. Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Varied Bar Rescue Varied Bar Rescue Two Men Two Men Two Men Two Men Varied Programs Stooges (:45) “Lara Croft: Tomb Raider” (2001) Angelina Jolie. “Focus” (2015, Comedy-Drama) Will Smith, Margot Robbie. “Cast Away” (2000, Drama) Tom Hanks, Helen Hunt. “Source Code” (2011) Jake Gyllenhaal. “Double Jeopardy” (1999) Tommy Lee Jones, Ashley Judd. “Escape Plan” (2013, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Jim Caviezel. “Enemy of the State” Stooges “Gangs of New York” (2002, Historical Drama) Leonardo DiCaprio, Daniel Day-Lewis. “The Bourne Ultimatum” (2007) Matt Damon, Julia Stiles. “Colombiana” (2011) Jordi Mollà The Walking Dead ‘MA’ (:08) The Walking Dead (:08) The Walking Dead (:08) The Walking Dead (:08) The Walking Dead ‘MA’ (:21) The Walking Dead (:25) The Walking Dead Walk:Dead The Walking Dead ‘MA’ (:25) The Walking Dead The Walking Dead ‘MA’ (:36) The Walking Dead (:40) The Walking Dead (:45) The Walking Dead ‘MA’ (:04) The Walking Dead Gumball Gumball Total Drama Teen Titans Teen Titans Teen Titans Ben 10 ‘Y7’ Craig Total Drama Total Drama Total Drama Victor Teen Titans Teen Titans Gumball Gumball Gumball Gumball Total Drama Teen Titans Teen Titans Teen Titans Ben 10 ‘Y7’ Craig Total Drama Total Drama Total Drama Victor Teen Titans Teen Titans Gumball Gumball Gumball Gumball Total Drama Teen Titans Teen Titans Teen Titans Ben 10 ‘Y7’ Craig Total Drama Total Drama Total Drama Victor Teen Titans Teen Titans Gumball Gumball Gumball Gumball Total Drama Teen Titans Teen Titans Teen Titans Ben 10 ‘Y7’ Craig Total Drama Total Drama Total Drama Victor Teen Titans Teen Titans Gumball Gumball Gumball Gumball Total Drama Teen Titans Teen Titans Teen Titans Ben 10 ‘Y7’ Craig Total Drama Total Drama Total Drama Victor Teen Titans Teen Titans Gumball Gumball My Cat From Hell Animal Cribs The Secret of The Zoo Pit Bulls and Parolees Pit Bulls and Parolees Jeremy Wade Varied Programs T.O.T.S. ‘G’ Vampirina Mickey Big City Big City Big City Amphibia Jessie ‘G’ Jessie ‘G’ Bunk’d ‘G’ Sydney-Max Raven Big City Big City Raven Raven T.O.T.S. ‘Y’ Vampirina Mickey Big City Big City Big City Amphibia Jessie ‘G’ Jessie ‘G’ Bunk’d ‘G’ Sydney-Max Raven Big City Big City Raven Raven T.O.T.S. ‘Y’ Vampirina Mickey Big City Big City Big City Amphibia Jessie ‘G’ Jessie ‘G’ Bunk’d ‘G’ Sydney-Max Raven Big City Big City Sydney-Max Sydney-Max T.O.T.S. ‘G’ T.O.T.S. ‘Y’ Mickey Big City Big City Big City Amphibia Amphibia Amphibia Bunk’d ‘G’ Bunk’d ‘G’ Bunk’d ‘G’ Big City Big City Roll With It Roll With It T.O.T.S. ‘Y’ PJ Masks Amphibia Big City Big City Big City Amphibia Jessie ‘G’ Jessie ‘G’ Bunk’d ‘G’ Sydney-Max Raven Big City Big City Bunk’d ‘G’ Bunk’d ‘G’ Blaze PAW Patrol 44 Cats Alvinnn!!! Loud House Loud House Smarter Henry Henry Loud House Loud House Alvinnn!!! SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob Blaze PAW Patrol 44 Cats Alvinnn!!! Loud House Loud House Smarter Henry Henry Loud House Loud House Alvinnn!!! SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob Blaze PAW Patrol 44 Cats Alvinnn!!! Loud House Loud House Smarter Henry Henry Loud House Loud House Alvinnn!!! SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob Blaze PAW Patrol 44 Cats Alvinnn!!! Loud House Loud House Smarter Henry Henry Loud House Loud House Alvinnn!!! SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob PAW Patrol PAW Patrol PAW Patrol PAW Patrol PAW Patrol PAW Patrol Smarter Ryan Loud House Loud House Movie SpongeBob SpongeBob Reba 700 Club The 700 Club Movie Varied Programs Movie Varied Programs Kate Plus Date ‘PG’ Kate Plus Date ‘PG’ Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes Four Weddings ‘PG’ Four Weddings ‘PG’ American Gypsy Wedding American Gypsy Wedding Sweet Home Sextuplets Sweet Home Sextuplets Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes Four Weddings ‘PG’ Four Weddings ‘PG’ American Gypsy Wedding American Gypsy Wedding 90 Day Fiancé: Happily Ever After? ‘PG’ Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes My 600-Lb. Life ‘PG’ My 600-Lb. Life Alicia fears her food addiction. ‘PG’ My 600-Lb. Life ‘PG’ Outdaughtered ‘PG’ Outdaughtered ‘PG’ Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. Dr. Pimple Popper: Red Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes to the Dress ‘G’ Say Yes Say Yes sMothered ‘14’ sMothered ‘14’ 90 Day Fiancé: Happily Ever After? ‘PG’ 90 Day Fiancé

4 PM

4:30

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TV A =Clarion DISH B = DirecTV 5:30

Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud ABC World ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ News

(3) ABC-13 13

WE

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

6 MONDAY AFTERNOON/EVENING A

B = DirecTV

9:30 10 AM 10:30 11 AM 11:30 12 PM 12:30 1 PM

Good Morning America The View ‘14’ The Doctors ‘14’ Channel 2 Morning Ed Dateline ‘PG’ Providence Providence (7:00) CBS This Morning Let’s Make a Deal ‘PG’ The Price Is Right ‘G’ Hatchett The People’s Court ‘PG’ Judge Mathis ‘PG’ The Real ‘PG’ (7:00) Today ‘G’ Today 3rd Hour Today-Hoda Go Luna Daniel Tiger Daniel Tiger Pinkalicious Sesame St. Splash

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(8) WGN-A 239 307

8:30

A = DISH

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(:01) Grand Hotel “Curveball” ABC News at (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live ‘14’ (:37) Nightline (N) ‘G’ Danny finds new information 10 (N) about Sky. ‘PG’ Chicago P.D. “Captive” Atwa- How I Met How I Met Last Man Last Man Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent Dateline ‘PG’ DailyMailTV DailyMailTV Impractical Pawn Stars ter disappears. ‘14’ Your Mother Your Mother Standing ‘PG’ Standing ‘PG’ A judge’s mistress is murA loan shark kidnaps a fam(N) (N) Jokers ‘14’ ‘PG’ ‘14’ ‘14’ dered. ‘14’ ily. ‘14’ The Ellen DeGeneres KTVA 5 p.m. CBS Evening KTVA 6 p.m. Evening News The NeighThe NeighThe Code “Smoke-Pit” (N) Bull Bull works with his roKTVA Night- (:35) The Late Show With James CorShow ‘G’ First Take News borhood borhood ‘PG’ mantic rival. ‘14’ cast Stephen Colbert ‘PG’ den Two and a Entertainment Funny You Funny You The Big Bang The Big Bang Beat Shazam “Teachers Win So You Think You Can Fox 4 News at 9 (N) TMZ (N) ‘PG’ TMZ ‘PG’ Entertainment Two and a Half Men ‘14’ Tonight (N) Should Ask Should Ask Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ Big!” Teams of teachers com- Dance The first round of audiTonight Half Men ‘14’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ pete. ‘PG’ tions begins. ‘14’ Judge Judy Judge Judy Channel 2 NBC Nightly Channel 2 Newshour (N) American Ninja Warrior “Baltimore City Qualifiers” Najee Dateline NBC (N) Channel 2 (:34) The Tonight Show Star- (:37) Late (N) ‘PG’ ‘PG’ News 5:00 News With Richardson, Joe Moravsky and more. (N) ‘PG’ News: Late ring Jimmy Fallon ‘14’ Night With Report (N) Lester Holt Edition (N) Seth Meyers Travel Detec- Rick Steves’ BBC World Nightly Busi- PBS NewsHour (N) Antiques Roadshow W.S. Antiques Roadshow “Vintage Finding Your Roots With To Be Announced Amanpour and Company (N) tive With Europe “Lis- News ness Report Starring archive; Isotta FraDenver” Bakelite collection; Henry Louis Gates, Jr. ‘PG’ Peter bon” ‘G’ ‘G’ schini. (N) ‘G’ Tabor mining. ‘G’

CABLE STATIONS

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’

June 30 - July 6, 1, 2019 JULY 2019 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30

Wheel of For- The Bachelorette “1507” (N) ‘PG’ tune ‘G’

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

(3:00) “X-Men: First Class” (2011) James McAvoy. The early “X-Men: First Class” (2011, Action) James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Rose Byrne. The Married ... Married ... How I Met How I Met Elementary ‘14’ (8) WGN-A 239 307 years of Charles Xavier and Erik Lehnsherr. early years of Charles Xavier and Erik Lehnsherr. With With Your Mother Your Mother (3:00) PM Style with Amy Stran Clearance (N) (Live) ‘G’ LOGO by Lori Goldstein Clearance (N) (Live) ‘G’ Denim & Co. Clearance (N) Peace Love World - Fashion Susan Graver Style Clear- Denim & Co. Clearance (N) (20) QVC 137 317 (Live) ‘G’ (N) (Live) ‘G’ ance (N) (Live) ‘G’ (Live) ‘G’ Wife Swap “Flannagin/Logan” Wife Swap Goth mom and Wife Swap “Brown/Holland” “Unfaithful” (2002, Drama) Richard Gere, Diane Lane, Olivier Martinez. A (:33) “The Good Mistress” (2014) Annie (:01) “Unfaithful” (2002, housewife has an affair with a charming stranger. Heise. A woman has a one-night stand with Drama) Richard Gere, Diane (23) LIFE 108 252 A family lives a pioneer life- hockey mom swap lives. ‘PG’ Disparate mothers trade style. ‘PG’ lives. ‘PG’ her friend’s husband. ‘14’ Lane, Olivier Martinez. Chicago P.D. “A Night Owl” Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- WWE Monday Night RAW (N Same-day Tape) ‘PG’ Modern Fam- (:31) Modern (:01) Modern (:31) Modern (28) USA 105 242 ‘14’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘14’ ily ‘14’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ Family ‘PG’ Family ‘PG’ Family ‘PG’ Bob’s Burg- Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy “3 Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy American Final Space Conan Actor Brooklyn Brooklyn Conan Actor “Christmas “Peter Prob- “Grimm Job” ‘14’ “Mom’s the Acts of God” “Fresh Heir” ‘14’ ‘14’ Dad (N) ‘14’ “The Torra Dax Shepard. Nine-Nine ‘14’ Nine-Nine ‘14’ Dax Shepard. (30) TBS 139 247 ers ‘PG’ Guy” ‘14’ lems” ‘14’ ‘14’ Word” ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Regata” ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ (2:00) “Total “RoboCop” (2014, Science Fiction) Joel Kinnaman, Gary Oldman. A critically “Transformers” (2007, Action) Shia LaBeouf, Tyrese Gibson, Josh Duhamel. Two races of “Pacific Rim” (2013) Charlie Hunnam, Idris Elba. Humans (31) TNT 138 245 Recall” injured police officer is transformed into a cyborg. robots wage war on Earth. pilot giant robots to fight monstrous creatures. (3:00) MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh Pirates. SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter With Scott Van SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (34) ESPN 140 206 From PNC Park in Pittsburgh. (N) (Live) Pelt (N) (Live) NBA: The Jump (N) (Live) NBA Summer League Basketball Teams TBA. (N) (Live) Professional Fighters League From May 9, 2019. UFC Countdown (N) ‘14’ Now or Never MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh (35) ESPN2 144 209 (N) Pirates. (N Same-day Tape) Mariners Mariners Mariners All Mariners All West Coast Charlie Moore Rod. Crackerbox Graham Destination Fight Sports MMA (N) Fight Sports: World Champi- World Poker Tour Bellagio (36) ROOT 426 687 Spotlight Spotlight Access Access Sport Racing (N) Bensinger Polaris ‘PG’ onship Kickboxing High Roller - Part 3. Two and a Two and a Cops ‘14’ Cops ‘14’ Cops ‘14’ Cops “Bad Cops ‘14’ Cops ‘14’ Cops “Baby Cops ‘14’ Cops (N) ‘14’ Cops ‘14’ Cops ‘14’ Cops ‘14’ Cops ‘14’ Cops ‘14’ (38) PARMT 241 241 Half Men Half Men Eggs” ‘14’ Driver” ‘14’ (1:30) “Cast “Double Jeopardy” (1999, Suspense) Tommy Lee Jones, Ashley Judd. “Enemy of the State” (1998, Suspense) Will Smith, Gene Hackman, Jon Voight. Rogue “Escape Plan” (2013, Action) Sylvester Stallone. A security (43) AMC 131 254 Away” Jailed for her husband’s murder, a woman learns he lives. agents hunt a lawyer who has an incriminating tape. expert must break out of a formidable prison. American American Bob’s Burg- Bob’s Burg- Family Guy Family Guy Rick and Robot Chick- Tigtone ‘14’ Eric’s Awe- American American Bob’s Burg- Bob’s Burg- Family Guy Family Guy (46) TOON 176 296 Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ ers ‘14’ ers ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Morty ‘14’ en ‘14’ some Show Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ ers ‘14’ ers ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Alaskan Bush People: Alas- Alaskan Bush People: Alas- Alaskan Bush People: Alas- The Last Alaskans “No Man’s The Last Alaskans “The The Last Alaskans “Winter Is The Last Alaskans ‘14’ The Last Alaskans “The (47) ANPL 184 282 kan Grit ‘PG’ kan Grit kan Grit Land” ‘14’ Hunted” ‘PG’ Coming” ‘PG’ Hunted” ‘PG’ Raven’s (:35) Andi Sydney to the Just Roll With Bunk’d ‘G’ Raven’s Home “Lost at Chel-Sea” The kids Coop & Cami Sydney to the Amphibia ‘Y7’ Big City Raven’s Andi Mack ‘G’ Bunk’d ‘G’ Bunk’d ‘G’ (49) DISN 173 291 Home ‘G’ Mack ‘G’ Max ‘G’ It ‘Y7’ get stuck on a cruise ship. ‘G’ Max ‘G’ Greens ‘Y7’ Home ‘G’ The Loud The Loud The Loud The Loud Smarter Than Henry Dan- Movie Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ (:35) Friends (:10) Friends (:45) Mom ‘14’ (50) NICK 171 300 House ‘Y7’ House ‘Y7’ House ‘Y7’ House ‘Y7’ ger ‘G’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ The Middle The Middle The Middle “WALL-E” (2008) Voices of Ben Burtt. Animated. A robot “Moana” (2016) Voices of Dwayne Johnson, Auli’i Cravalho. Animated. A The 700 Club “Lilo & Stitch” (2002) Voices (51) FREE 180 311 ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ chases a mechanical scout across the galaxy. once-mighty demigod and a teen sail across the ocean. of Daveigh Chase. Say Yes to the Dress ‘PG’ Say Yes to the Dress ‘PG’ 90 Day Fiance: The Other 90 Day Fiance: The Other 90 Day Fiance: The Other Kate Plus Date “I Want to sMothered “Three’s Com90 Day Fiance: The Other (55) TLC 183 280 Way ‘14’ Way (N) Way (N) ‘PG’ Break Free” (N) ‘PG’ pany” ‘14’ Way Fast N’ Loud Ford ‘32 Cabrio- Fast N’ Loud “Stung by a ‘67 Fast N’ Loud “Camaro Ris- Fast N’ Loud “Mustang Ma- Fast N’ Loud “Busch vs. Logano” Richard builds Kurt Busch a ’72 Pantera. ‘14’ Fast N’ Loud “Busch vs. (56) DISC 182 278 let; ‘62 Corvette. ‘14’ Corvette Stingray” ‘14’ ing” ‘14’ nia” ‘14’ Logano” ‘14’ A Haunting A historian beA Haunting “Tunnel of Death” A Haunting “House of SorA Haunting “Battle for the Soul and House of Nightmares” A A Haunting “The Haunted A Haunting Linda returns A Haunting “The Haunted (57) TRAV 196 277 comes possessed. ‘PG’ ‘PG’ rows” ‘PG’ woman enlists a guardian angel. (N) ‘PG’ Cabinet” (N) ‘PG’ from overseas. ‘PG’ Cabinet” ‘PG’ American Pickers “Frank’s American Pickers “Tough American Pickers “Texas American Pickers “Corvette American Pickers “Alabama (:03) Pawn Stars “A Demon (:05) Pawn Stars “Pawning (:03) American Pickers “Ala (58) HIST 120 269 Birthday” ‘PG’ Nut to Crack” ‘PG’ Pick’em” ‘PG’ King” ‘PG’ Rolls” (N) ‘PG’ of a Deal” (N) ‘PG’ Picasso” ‘PG’ bama Rolls” ‘PG’ (3:00) Live Rescue “Live Res- Live PD: Live PD: Live PD: Live PD: Live PD: Live PD: Live Rescue: Rewind “Live (:01) Live Rescue: Rewind (:04) Live PD: (:34) Live PD: (:04) Live PD: (:33) Live PD: Police Patrol Police Patrol Police Patrol Police Patrol Police Patrol Police Patrol Rescue: Rewind 5” (N) ‘14’ “Live Rescue: Rewind 4” ‘14’ Police Patrol Police Patrol Police Patrol Police Patrol (59) A&E 118 265 cue -- 06.10.19” ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ (N) ‘14’ (N) ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Love It or List It A couple Love It or List It ‘G’ Love It or List It “A Hole-in- Love It or List It “An Artful Hidden Po- Hidden Po- House Hunt- Hunters Int’l House Hunt- Hunters Int’l Hidden Po- Hidden Po (60) HGTV 112 229 needs more space. ‘G’ One Location” ‘PG’ Promise” ‘PG’ tential ‘G’ tential ‘G’ ers (N) ‘G’ ers ‘G’ tential ‘G’ tential ‘G’ Chopped Junior A new group Chopped Junior “Champions: Chopped Junior “Champions: Chopped Junior “Champions: World Cake Championship Cupcake Championship Chopped “Sweets: Doughnut World Cake Champion (61) FOOD 110 231 competes. ‘G’ Part 3” ‘G’ Part 4” ‘G’ Grand Finale” ‘G’ (N) ‘G’ (N) ‘G’ Dash” ‘G’ ship ‘G’ American Greed “An Ungodly American Greed ‘PG’ American Greed “BabyAmerican Greed “Artistic American Greed “An Ungodly American Greed ‘PG’ Paid Program Retirement LifeLock Pro- Paid Program (65) CNBC 208 355 Scammer” ‘PG’ ‘G’ Faced Drug Lords” ‘PG’ License to Steal” ‘PG’ Scammer” ‘PG’ ‘G’ Income tection Tucker Carlson Tonight (N) Hannity (N) The Ingraham Angle (N) Fox News at Night With Tucker Carlson Tonight Hannity The Ingraham Angle Fox News at Night With (67) FNC 205 360 Shannon Bream (N) Shannon Bream (:10) The Of- (:45) The Of- (:15) The Office Jim helps (5:50) The Of- (:25) The Of- The Office The Office The Office The Office The Office The Office The Daily Alternatino (:06) South (:37) South (81) COM 107 249 fice ‘14’ fice ‘PG’ interview applicants. ‘PG’ fice ‘14’ fice ‘PG’ “Lotto” ‘PG’ ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ Show With Arturo Park ‘MA’ Park ‘MA’ (2:30) “Blade” (1998, Horror) “Blade 2: Bloodhunt” (2002, Horror) Wesley Snipes, Kris Kristofferson. A “Blade: Trinity” (2004, Horror) Wesley Snipes, Kris Kristofferson, Jessica (:01) Futura- (:31) Futura- (:01) Futura- (:31) Futura (82) SYFY 122 244 Wesley Snipes. vampire hunter unites with his prey against a new threat. Biel. Blade and a pair of vampire slayers battle Dracula. ma ‘PG’ ma ‘PG’ ma ‘PG’ ma ‘PG’

PREMIUM STATIONS ! HBO

303 504

^ HBO2 304 505 + MAX

311 516

5 SHOW 319 546 8 TMC

329 554

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

(3:20) “Ocean’s 8” (2018, Last Week (:45) “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom” (2018, Adventure) Chris Pratt, Years and Years (N) ‘MA’ Divorce Divorce Years and Years ‘MA’ Comedy) Sandra Bullock. Tonight-John Bryce Dallas Howard, Jeff Goldblum. Owen and Claire try to save the dino“Charred” (N) “Charred” ‘MA’ ‘PG-13’ saurs from a volcano. ‘PG-13’ ‘MA’ (:15) True Justice: Bryan Stevenson’s Fight for Equality Real Time With Bill Maher Ramy Youssef: Feelings “MacGruber” (2010, Comedy) Will Forte, (:35) “Mean Girls” (2004) Lindsay Lohan. A The public interest attorney’s career. ‘MA’ ‘MA’ The comic/actor shares his Kristen Wiig. A clueless soldier-of-fortune teen becomes friends with three cruel schoolthoughts. ‘MA’ must find a stolen nuke. ‘R’ mates. ‘PG-13’ (3:30) “Soldier” (1998, Sci- (:10) “My Soul to Take” (2010, Horror) Max Thieriot, John Jett “Phoenix” Jett is ordered (7:55) “The Perfect Score” (2004) Erika “College” (2008, Comedy) Drake Bell, Kevin ence Fiction) Kurt Russell. ‘R’ Magaro. A serial killer stalks seven children who were born on to track down Blair. ‘MA’ Christensen. Students try to steal the answers Covais. High-school seniors have a wild the same day. ‘R’ to their SATs. ‘PG-13’ weekend on campus. ‘NR’ “Escape (:25) “Air Force One” (1997, Suspense) Harrison Ford, Gary Our Cartoon City on a Hill Jackie searches The Loudest Voice The City on a Hill Jackie searches The Loudest Voice The From L.A.” Oldman, Glenn Close. A terrorist and his gang hijack the U.S. President ‘14’ for an absent informant. ‘MA’ formation of Fox News Chan- for an absent informant. ‘MA’ formation of Fox News Chanpresident’s plane. ‘R’ nel. ‘MA’ nel. ‘MA’ (3:30) “Anything” (2017, (:15) “Sorry for Your Loss” (2018, Comedy-Drama) Justin “Diary of a Mad Black Woman” (2005, Comedy-Drama) “Nine” (2009, Musical) Daniel Day-Lewis, Marion Cotillard, Drama) John Carroll Lynch, Bartha, Bruce Greenwood. A new dad tries to honor his es- Kimberly Elise, Steve Harris. A woman starts over after her Penélope Cruz. A famous director endures creative and perMatt Bomer. ‘R’ tranged father’s final wish. ‘NR’ husband leaves her. ‘PG-13’ sonal crises. ‘PG-13’

June 30 - July 6, 2019

Clarion TV

(:05) Divorce (:35) “Bad “Charred” ‘MA’ Times at the El Royale” (:15) “Crazy Rich Asians” (2018) Constance Wu. ‘PG-13’ (:10) “American Wedding” (2003, Comedy) Jason Biggs. ‘R’ Our Cartoon “Drive AnPresident ‘14’ gry” (2011) ‘R’ “The Other Woman” (2009, Comedy-Drama) Natalie Portman. ‘R’

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release dates: June 29-July 5, 2019

26 (19)

C8 | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

Next Week: Visit Mount Rushmore

Issue 26, 2019

Founded by Betty Debnam

Home to Liberty

Lettering on the bell reads: “Proclaim LIBERTY Throughout all the Land unto all the Inhabitants Thereof.”

Mini Fact: This photo shows the north side of Independence Hall.

The Liberty Bell

The Liberty Bell was originally made to hang in the steeple of the Pennsylvania State House. It was made in 1752 by a British foundry*. When the bell arrived in Philadelphia, officials mounted it on a stand to test the sound, but the rim of the bell cracked when it was first struck. Two local metal casters, John Pass and John Stow, melted the original bell down and made a new bell, which was ready in 1753. However, the sound of the new bell was not good. Pass and Stow again removed the bell and recast it, and three months later it was hung in the steeple. Almost a century later, in the 1840s, a narrow crack developed in the bell. Metal workers tried to repair it, but another crack appeared, and it has not been rung since. Today, the bell hangs in the Liberty Bell Center near Independence Hall.

photos courtesy NPS

Independence Hall in Philadelphia is often called the birthplace of our country. This famous building, which was built between 1732 and 1751 to be the Pennsylvania State House, is in very good shape after standing for more than 260 years. Many important events happened there, including: • The Declaration of Independence was adopted in 1776. • The Constitution, a plan for governing our country, was adopted in 1787. Today, this site is a National Historical Park managed by the National Park Service. In honor of Independence Day on July 4, let’s visit Independence Hall.

A historic building

Independence Hall is a two-story building with a tower and cellar. It has two wings. Visitors enter in the East Wing. An exhibit displays copies of the first printed Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. The Pennsylvania legislature loaned its Assembly Room to the Second Continental Congress and the Constitutional Convention. It is where the Declaration of The Assembly Room Independence and the Constitution were signed.

Delegates to the Constitutional Convention met in the Assembly Room at Independence Hall. image courtesy Architect of the Capitol

The Rising Sun chair

When George Washington served as president of the convention to write the Constitution, he sat in a chair at the front of the Assembly Room. A sun design was on the back of the chair. (You can see the chair behind George Washington in the painting above.) At the close of the convention, Ben Franklin made a remark about The Rising Sun chair that design, which he had often wondered about. “I have often looked at that design on the chair behind the president without being able to tell whether it was rising (going up) or setting (going down.) “But now, at length, I have the happiness to know that it is a rising and not a setting sun.” Ben Franklin meant that he expected that the Constitution written by the convention would last and last.

* A foundry is a building or factory where metals are produced.

Resources On the Web:

• www.nps.gov/inde/ index.htm • bit.ly/MPbellsound

At the library:

• “Exploring Independence Hall” by Emma Huddleston

The Mini Page® © 2019 Andrews McMeel Syndication

Try ’n’ Find

Mini Jokes

Words that remind us of Independence Hall are hidden in this puzzle. Some words are hidden backward, and some letters are used twice. See if you can find: ASSEMBLY, BELL, CAST, CHAIR, CONSTITUTION, CRACK, DELEGATES, FOUNDRY, FRANKLIN, HALL, INDEPENDENCE, LIBERTY, PENNSYLVANIA, PHILADELPHIA, ROOM, SIGN, STEEPLE, SUN, WASHINGTON.

D N L N P M I T Y B

R O P G E O N L R R

A I H I N O D N D I

S T I S N R E I N A

E U L W S Y P L U H

T T A A Y T E K O C

A I D S L R N N F C

G T E H V E D A S A

E S L I A B E R T S

L N P N N I N F E S

Ian: What happens when you illegally park your frog? Inga: It gets toad away!

E O H G I L C O E E

D C I T A L E T P M

M K A O N A L S L B

N U S N I H Y A E L

L L E B C R A C K Y

Eco Note

• 1 tablespoon canola oil • 2 tablespoons white cheddar cheese powder

What to do: 1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Coat large baking sheet with cooking spray. 2. In large bowl, combine pretzels, cereal squares and bread. Add canola oil and toss to coat. Add cheese powder and toss to coat everything. 3. Spread mixture out on baking sheet in single layer. Bake for 15 minutes, stirring halfway through cooking, until golden brown. Serves 4. Adapted from “The Robin Takes 5 Cookbook for Busy Families” with permission from Andrews McMeel Publishing (andrewsmcmeel.com).

7 Little Words for Kids Use the letters in the boxes to make a word with the same meaning as the clue. The numbers in parentheses represent the number of letters in the solution. Each letter combination can be used only once, but all letter combinations will be necessary to complete the puzzle.

1. shirt part around the neck (6) 2. pull apart like Silly Putty (7) 3. blue “Inside Out” character (7) 4. pilots fly them (6) 5. avoid (5) 6. Will and Jada’s acting son (5) 7. behind three people in line (6)

SS

PLA

EN

STR

JAD

COL

FOU DOD

ET

NE

SAD

CH

GE

RTH

NES

LAR

The Mini Page® © 2019 Andrews McMeel Syndication

You’ll need: • 1 cup unsalted mini pretzel twists • 1 cup rice cereal squares • 1 cup corn cereal squares • 4 slices pumpernickel bread, cut into 2-inch pieces

©2019 Blue Ox Technologies Ltd. Download the app on Apple and Amazon devices.

Cheddar Baked Snack Mix

* You’ll need an adult’s help with this recipe.

Cook’s Corner

Fish and shellfish are a major source of food worldwide. Smallscale fishing does little harm to fish populations, but commercial fishing fleets gather such large hauls that some seas have very few fish left. For example, the Grand Banks off Newfoundland, Canada, were once a rich fishing ground for cod. But fishing fleets came from far and wide to collect the fish, and cod stocks dropped sharply. In 1992, the cod fishery collapsed, affecting marine food chains and putting many local fishermen out of work. adapted with permission from “50 Things You Should Know

About the Environment” by Jen Green, © QEB Publishing Inc.

For later: Look for items in your newspaper about Fourth of July celebrations.

Teachers: For standards-based activities to accompany this feature, visit: bit.ly/MPstandards. And follow The Mini Page on Facebook!

Answers: collar, stretch, Sadness, planes, dodge, Jaden, fourth.


Dear Readers: How do you know if your DOG IS SICK? He can’t come up to you and tell you, right? So if you see any of the following general health changes, such as excessive thirst, constipation, weakness, runny nose and scratching, make an appointment for a checkup. If your dog is experiencing poor appetite, no energy, constipation, panting, whimpering, vomiting or diarrhea? Go to the veterinarian soon. If your dog has more acute, serious symptoms, such as bloated belly, seizures, loss of consciousness, a temperature of over 104 F or a significant, sudden change in personality, you’ll need to get to the emergency veterinarian. Lots of conditions can be helped if an animal gets medical attention as soon as possible. -- Heloise

WHO REMEMBERS GORP?

Dear Heloise: Who remembers GORP? During our Scouting days, it was “good old raisins and peanuts,” but now it’s more! Oat, rice or bran cereal, dried fruits, candy-coated peanuts and chocolates, sunflower and other seeds -- the possibilities are endless, but there was one rule in my family: No one was allowed to pull out all the WEEKEND WARRIOR candies and eat them and leave the healthier Dear Heloise: I graduated college in components -- ha! May, took a bit of time off, and now it’s time

Quick, cheap, healthy and delicious snacks for everyone! -- Jennifer J. in Houston Dear Heloise: As I was about to throw away the waxed paper liner that comes inside a box of breakfast cereal, I realized I was about to throw away something perfectly usable. When making hamburger patties, I always placed a square of waxed paper between the patties to separate them. Now I just cut the liner from a cereal box into 5-inch squares and use them. -- Dawn W., Brush Prairie, Wash.

ACROSS

1 It was first officially

11 19 20 22 23 25 26 28 29 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 39 41 42 45 47 49 51 56 57 59 60 61 63 66 67 69 70 72 73

designated in a 1966 Lyndon Johnson proclamation Holders of tiny mirrors Apple Store purchase What studies show that men do more than women, conversationally It might require a quick check Star treatment Male swan Static, as an exercise Access with a password “Lord, show me ____” World’s largest cosmetics company Post office? Oscar winner Jared Kitchen cabinet Major academic achievements “Yeah, whatever” Having locks Cocktail of tequila and grapefruit soda Load Specious arguer Risk taker One taking the bait Like Earth’s orbit 2019, zodiacally Mine entrance Calle ____, landmark street in Miami’s Little Havana Arcade game based on a film of the same name “You listening?” N.Y.U.’s ____ School of the Arts Got by Traces left by burning candles Complete fool Call of the wild Catch a break? Promote Deli machine

Last Sunday’s Crossword Answers

A B L U R

S E M I N A L

A V O C A D O

S T E D M A N

P A T E R N O

76 Auditorium section beneath the balcony 78 Word before web or chocolate 79 Bundle 81 Heather has two, in a children’s book title 82 Onetime U.S. soccer prodigy Freddy 85 Dates not found on the calendar 87 Hot sauce 89 Bank takeback 91 Great work 92 Without profit 93 Kid around 97 Owing 99 Greek goddess of the moon 100 Police, slangily 101 Negatively charged 102 Oppositely 104 Internet ____ 105 Weapon with a distinctive hum 107 Classic play with a Delphic oracle 109 It’s seen near Pennsylvania Avenue 110 Bright shade of red 111 Casino attraction 112 Buzzer beater?

C L Y D E M E T A R Z A N Y O U J A N E

H I S A T I M Y P S A S B E A O A N T E T W H N C O B I D C O V A C A M S E D E A A Z J E A S M

M O R T E M

O N E A R M

S I E S T A

S C R I M P S

R E P U T E

G A S S E R

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 i 13 14 15 16 17 18 21 24 27 30

O T T T Y O R E U N L K E A T R A P T A E L M E A R S O T T I T C Y

No. 0623

S M O S I O R N A D I E S F L N P E E P E C S P S C O T I H E A P S D W I T C S N O U O P A E A S T I N K I R M A T O I C N T F R I I O N A P E X A H E F A C U P N A M E E N

S O Y S

E A R L O F G R E Y S T O K E

D I M I T R I

S N A P S A T

B A T H T O Y

S W E E T I E

I M R T S M A S C E N T I T I

S P A C E

M I M E S

T I G H T K U R D

G R E C H O Y D I E E D S T A L I L R E D A Y D E

DOWN

Kind of conservative Put side by side Something to champ at It makes the earth turn Finish with Parts of a college app Thomas Aquinas and others, philosophically Inferior deities Put forward Number one on Rolling Stone’s “100 Greatest Pop Songs” list Polite What “accommodate” s often inaccurately spelled with ____ Dew (stylized brand name) Stripped Sinclair Lewis novel for which he received (but declined) the Pulitzer Prize Parts of bluffs Coaches Nascar mishap “My Neighbor ____,” acclaimed animated film from Hayao Miyazaki The “Tullius” of Marcus Tullius Cicero Sci-fi weapon Tied the knot

Jaqueline Bigar’s Stars HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Sunday, June 30, 2019: This year, you’ll gain an understanding of others and what drives them. You could find some of their motivations curious. If single, you’ll get into the dating process. Try to steer away from anyone who is emotionally unavailable. If you’re attached, you and your partner seem more connected than you have been in a while. You enjoy being together as a couple. GEMINI always has interesting perceptions and feedback for you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Although you could have the best intentions, what you say might be taken too literally, even if you mean to be humorous. Weigh the pros and cons of going to the movies, a concert or some other place where you don’t need to talk. You’ll get into less trouble. Tonight: Think about tomorrow. This week: A change on the homefront will become possible soon, if not immediately. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH You might want to rein in your spending. You love beautiful things. You appreciate quality. Those natural inclinations easily can get you into trouble. You could convince your sweetie to pitch in and pay for such purchases. Tonight: Enjoying the moment. This week: You love baubles and things in general. You might surprise yourself with a purchase. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH All eyes turn to you. Although you might not be doing anything differently, you seem wittier and more content than you usually do. A partner cannot get enough of you. If single, you have quite the entourage. Tonight: Let it all hang out. This week: You could opt to not make a purchase, as much as you might want to. If you do make the purchase, you will be thrilled at first...

CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Your emotions take over before you can restrain yourself. Perhaps sharing what’s in your heart is better. Don’t take someone’s first reaction personally. This person will probably change his or her mind. Tonight: Keep it calm. This week: Your intensity and moodiness translate into magnetism. Go for what you want. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Your friends could come up with a provocative set of plans that you don’t want to say no to. On the other hand, a child or loved one could feel left out. See whether blending the two different relationship types is possible. You’ll be happier. Tonight: You could see the sunrise. This week: If you can disappear midweek, do. The end of the week improves. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH An older relative would appreciate your company. This person adores you but might not be expressive. Make it your pleasure to go out to lunch or the movies together. If you understood how important this afternoon time could be to this person, you’d smile. Tonight: Out late. This week: Accept the limelight. Accept the responsibility. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH You might want to see a situation differently. Listen to the other parties involved and imagine being each one of them. You’ll gain a better sense of what’s going on. Keep it light. Tonight: Accept an invitation out and about. This week: Go for what you want. Success will be yours if you break though rigid thinking. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You express a willingness to share more with a specific person. One-on-one relating could be rewarding. You’ll enjoy yourself so much that you could forget your budget. Enjoy, but don’t make a big deal of doing so. Tonight: Out.

This week: A close loved one seems to become a major force yet controlling at the same time. Chill. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH No matter what you decide to do, you’ll tend to go to excess. A partner or loved one could come up with one tempting idea after the other. Go for the moment; you’re likely to have a blast while you’re out. Tonight: Dinner out. This week: Defer and you will be a lot happier. This theme holds all week long. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH You have a lot to do and complete. Focus on one item at a time; you’ll reach your goal fast enough. Don’t be tempted by a friend to toss your schedule into the air and join him or her. You might enjoy yourself now, but the consequences might not be amusing. Tonight: Complete rather than begin. This week: Follow another person’s lead. You will like what occurs. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Your inner child demands release. You’re likely to pursue some hobby that you’ve enjoyed for years. A friend or several friends would love to join in. You feel silly but have a great time. Tonight: Dance the night away. This week: Your playfulness cannot be subdued except maybe Tuesday or Wednesday. Enjoy the lightness. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH You might be more tense than you realize. Your source of stress might come from a judgment that you’re making around your personal life. If you can clear the air or have a helpful talk, do just that. Tonight: Forget problems; go out. This week: You might be slow to get going, yet you display unusual creativity from Tuesday on. For some, love knocks on the door. BORN TODAY Actress Lizzy Caplan (1982), Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps (1985), boxer Mike Tyson (1966)

2

3

4

5

6

1 8 3

SUDOKU Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. 7

8

9

10

11 20

22

23

25

26

43

38

49

50 57 62

67

84

89

90

97

2 8 1 5 7 9 6 4 3

14

15

16

17

18 21 24

36 40

65

75

87

76

94

95

96

72

81 88

92

93 100

102 106

55

77

99

109

54

66 71

80

86

53 60

70

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41 48

52

64

101

103 107

104 108

110 111

32 34 35 38 39 40 42 43 44 46 48 50 52 53 54 55 58 62 64 65 68

13

47

69

98

105

9 4 5 6 2 3 8 7 1

28

79 85

6 7 3 4 1 8 5 9 2

6/23

59

74

83

12

51

63

78 82

5 9 4 2 8 6 3 1 7

Last Sunday’s Answer Key

46

58

68

73

1 3 7 9 4 5 2 6 8

Difficulty Level

39 45

61

8 6 2 1 3 7 4 5 9

35

44

56

7 2 9 8 5 4 1 3 6

3 5 8 7 6 1 9 2 4

32

34 37

42

4 1 6 3 9 2 7 8 5

31

33

2 7 1

4 5 6

27

30

6 5 9

6/30

19

29

1 5 8

Difficulty Level

Dear Heloise: I appreciate when my veterinarian’s staff sends me an email birthday card for my pet, but when the animal passes away, I wish they could remove the pet from their list. It pangs my heart to see “Happy Birthday, Amber” when Amber is no longer with me. -- Glenda B., Pottstown, Pa.

NOT IN SO MANY WORDS By Joel Fagliano. Puzzles Edited by Will Shortz M A F I A

4 3 7

‘PASSED’ TENSE

New York Times Crossword

9 1 2

WAXED PATTY

1

7 2 4

2019 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Hints from Heloise

to get serious. I’m using my weekends to learn ordinary household things that admittedly I should have known by this time, but hey, better late than never! These things include laundry, organizing the kitchen, cleaning and decluttering the other rooms in the house, yardwork, organizing my personal finances and maintaining the car. My dad taught me to change a tire, to jump-start the car, and he even gave me a toolkit to keep in the glove box! These lessons are as important as my college work. -- Jeanette in Arizona

By Dave Green

2019 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Symptoms of sickness for dogs

Peninsula Clarion | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | C9

Org. for the Vegas Golden Knights Sauce traditionally prepared in a mortar Repeats mindlessly Embarrassing sound when bending over Fruits baked in wine Tapped, as a cigarette Delta Air Lines hub Getting up there Puckered fabric Many a local volunteer Ticker symbol? Meanspirited person Best A ____ (based on logic) Sinful Brave deeds celebrated in verse They’re found among the reeds Attacks vigorously Goldman ____ An Emmy is awarded for the best one Many action-movie villains

112

1 White coat 7 74 Face-to-face interaction? 75 Recite from memory 77 Cable inits. for cinephiles 80 Muslim niqab, e.g. 82 Standard Windows typeface 83 Co-owner of Paddy’s Pub on “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” 84 Not loose 86 Afrique du ____ 88 Desiccated 90 “Pick me! Pick me!” 92 Agcy. created after the Manhattan Project 94 No longer interested 95 Placid 96 Scam artist 98 Between: Fr. 99 Begets 100 The birds and the bees, e.g. 102 Clothes-dryer attachment 103 Gush 106 Part of a Twitter page 108 Private instructor: Abbr.

Destination wedding is aimed at shortening the guest list DEAR ABBY: My son and his fiancee, “Breanna,” have planned a destination wedding in another country. Breanna’s mother’s family vacations there every couple of years, so they decided to have the wedding there when her extended family will be vacationing. The reason Breanna gave me was that she is embarrassed by some of my family members and doesn’t want to introduce them to her family, so a destination wedding eliminates those people from attending. When I told Breanna’s stepfather what she said, Breanna denied ever making the statement!

D E A R ABBY: I am a father of four. My sons are 62 and 52. The older one calls me about every two months; the younger one hasn’t called me in nearly two Abigail Van Buren years. One of my daughters last spoke to me three years ago. My remaining child, a daughter, stays in regular contact with me about once a week. They all live far away out west. I have tried to contact each of my children lovingly, but have not been successful for the most part.

I told my son how hurt I am that she doesn’t want our side of the family to attend (including his father, brother and myself), since the cost for travel and accommodations will be approxiI now have end-stage cardiac dismately $3,500 per person. He said he doesn’t want to ruin her special day ease and will soon be joining hospice. When I do that, I’ll be faced with the and changed the subject. decision of how much to tell my kids I would love to see my son get mar- about my condition. In view of our disried (even though I have a bitter taste in tant relationships, I’m not inclined to my mouth), but we can’t afford to at- tell them very much, since they have tend unless we take out a second mort- been so unresponsive in the past. I gage or dip into our 401(k). Are we bad would welcome your suggestions. parents for not attending our own son’s -- PONDERING IN PENNSYLwedding? VANIA -- STRUGGLING MOTHER OF DEAR PONDERING: I am sorry THE GROOM about your diagnosis. I don’t know DEAR MOTHER: That your whether something caused the disson’s fiancee verbalized what she tance between you and your three did is shocking. It shows how little older children, or whether they are respect she has for your feelings and completely focused on themselves her lack of manners or class. A mar- and their own lives. I do think you riage is supposed to be a blending of should disclose to all of them what is TWO families, something this young going on so amends can be made if woman -- and her family -- appears possible. And, of course, the daughunwilling or unable to recognize. ter who is close to you should know That your son would accept this be- so she can be as supportive as she cause THEIR wedding is “her” day has always been and begin preparis disappointing. Under the circum- ing herself emotionally for what is stances, you and your family should coming. She may also be helpful in not go into debt to attend this wed- spreading the word among her sibding. lings.


C10 | Sunday, June 30, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

Man tired of dating game is ready to throw in the towel some advice. -- SOMEBODY’S BOYFRIEND IN MICHIGAN DEAR BOYFRIEND: Something is clearly wrong here. Where are you meeting these women who cheat and lie? You may need to go fishing in different waters. And has Abigail Van Buren it occurred to you that in your loneliness you may be trying too hard, which may scare them off? Having never met you, I can’t guess what you might be doing wrong, if anything. It’s time to start asking your married friends why they think this is happening repeatedly. Perhaps they can suggest some “tweaks” or introduce you to women who will appreciate the fine qualities you possess. DEAR ABBY: My husband’s first wife died 17 years ago. They were married for 20 years. We have been together 14 years, married for 12. He still insists that her family is his family because of their daughter, who is an amazing young woman. We have an ongoing disagreement about this. He can’t understand why I refuse to attend functions that include only his late wife’s fami-

Hints from Heloise

Rubes

By Leigh Rubin

early night. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH When it comes to a partner, you could be quite confused. This person’s actions do not conform to what you believe is happening. Drop the rosecolored shades and try to be more realistic. Tonight: Where the crowds are. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH You have an excellent perception of a situation and what is happening. Still, encourage others to talk. The more you know, the better off you will be. You might not hear a boss clearly, which could become evident later. Tonight: Burning the midnight oil. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Highlight relating to others no matter what you choose to do. Your sense of humor emerges when dealing with a child or loved one. Nevertheless, a serious talk might be in order. Tonight: Detach and take an overview. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH You could be too tired for your own good. You have been highly responsive to a driven, demanding associate or loved one. At the same time, you have had your share of work to cover. Tonight: Slow down, for your sake. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Plunge into work as if there is no stopping you at this point. You seem unusually nimble when handling problems. Wait until later in the day or tomorrow to have an important conversation with a loved one or associate. Tonight: Opt for togetherness. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH You could be in the mood to pursue a favorite hobby, or enjoy someone who is perhaps younger than you, but who makes you laugh. Postpone any serious conversation until tomorrow. Tonight: Why stop? Continue frolicking away. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH You could opt to stay close to home. You might be uncomfortable with your plans. Do not allow another person to sway your thinking. Listen but do not feel as if you need to change your decision. Tonight: Let go and relax with a loved one or friend. BORN TODAY Comedian Dan Aykroyd (1952), business founder Estee Lauder (1906), Chinese politician Li Keqiang (1955)

Ziggy

FAST FACTS Dear Readers: Here are some hints for labeling keys: * Use colored nail polish. * Get colored key covers. * Have keys made in different colors. * Use decorative tape. -- Heloise THE INVITATION Dear Heloise: My mother said I can’t tell people where I’m registered on the wedding invitations. She said it is rude. I say it’s not. Who’s right? -- Shelley in New Jersey Shelley, your mother is correct. Never put where you are registered on a wedding invitation. Why? The majority of people will bring a gift, but a gift is NOT mandatory. It’s better to spread the information by word-of-mouth, so tell your bridesmaids. Above all, don’t ask for money on your invitation. -- Heloise SWEET SMELL Dear Heloise: My vacuum has a removable filter, and each time I clean or change the filter, I spray it with a little of my perfume, and this makes the whole house smell wonderful. This is especially nice since I have two dogs. -- Vangie in Texas PILL BUG WAR Dear Heloise: Got a problem with pill bugs, also known as “roly-polies”? Here’s a solution: Fill a spray bottle with 1/3 dishwashing soap and 2/3 water, then shake well. Spray the leaves and soil around your plants where you’ve seen pill bugs. Check back in 24 hours to see if you need to reapply. -- Darlene D., Cambridge, Mass.

SUDOKU Solution

6 4 3 7 2 1 5 9 8

5 1 7 3 8 9 4 6 2

2 9 8 4 5 6 7 3 1

8 2 1 5 6 3 9 7 4

7 5 4 1 9 2 3 8 6

1 8 2 9 7 5 6 4 3

Difficulty Level

B.C.

9 3 6 2 1 4 8 5 7

4 7 5 6 3 8 2 1 9 6/28

By Dave Green

1 7 9 8

6 8 5

8 4 9 6 6 5 3 1 5

2

7

3

1

8 9 4 1 2 9 7 4 8 3 5 9 1

Difficulty Level

7/01

By Johnny Hart

By Tom Wilson

Tundra

Garfield

3 6 9 8 4 7 1 2 5

Friday’s Answer 6-28

2019 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Jacqueline Bigar’s Stars HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, July 1, 2019: This year, you open up to many new ideas. You might not be ready to live them out, but your parameters around life are changing. If single, the person you choose to date today might be quite different from the person you would choose a year from now. Do not make any commitments unless you are 100% sure. If attached, your sweetie needs to understand where you are coming from more often. Take the time to explain. Let your sweetie know he or she is valued, and include him or her in your outside life as well. GEMINI reads and understands you well. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Just when you believed all was copacetic, you find out about a wrinkle in your assessment. Talk through a lurking problem. You might not be ready to commit one way or another to settle the issue. Tonight: Stay close to home. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH You love beautiful baubles, and you demand quality in any object you choose. Things are simply important to you. Double-check your checking account before spending any further, even for a good cause. Tonight: Catch up with a friend. This person has news. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH You might be confused about what a boss might insist upon doing and why this person is proceeding as he or she is. Just go along with what this person is saying. The more docile you are, the better the end results. Tonight: Go for a brisk walk! CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH You have a lot to share but for some reason cannot get the appropriate words out of your mouth. Process your feelings. You will soon find you are able to clear the air. Tonight: Nap. Make an important call later. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH You might be doing more inner reflection than you normally do. You appear gabby and full of fun, but soon your irritation about something could emerge. Try to handle the issue before you hit that point. Tonight: Make it an

By Eugene Sheffer

ly. He doesn’t feel my family is his family, only his first wife’s family. When he attends these functions alone, he comes home very angry. He tells me I don’t understand and that I need to go where he goes. I am sorry, Abby, but after another intense disagreement, I’m ready to call it the end of the road. We are both in our 60s, and it’s kind of late in life for a divorce, so I would appreciate any advice you could give me. -- ARGUING A LOT IN MONTANA DEAR ARGUING: Unless your husband’s former in-laws have made you feel unwelcome, I think you should have made a greater effort to accompany him to some of those gatherings. Frankly, I am surprised you would seriously consider ending your marriage over the fact that he still considers them to be family. If ever I thought a couple should get marriage counseling, it is you two. Please consider it before consulting a lawyer. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. What teens need to know about sex, drugs, AIDS and getting along with peers and parents is

2019 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

DEAR ABBY: In the last few years I have had a string of failed relationships. Nothing bad happened, and there were no fights or arguments. The ladies tell me I’m great and an amazing person. Yet they don’t want to be in a relationship, or they cheat or lie to me. I’m a very open, understanding guy. I believe communication is key to success in any relationship, and that together, there isn’t much a couple can’t overcome. It seems many women come from abusive relationships or just plain toxic ones, and they are scared because I don’t exhibit any of those traits. I’m a kind, caring, supportive partner. If you had a bad day, I want to hear about it. You had a good day? Let’s talk about that. You want to go out with your friends? Go for it. Have fun and be safe! You want to go out with me? Don’t worry about bringing your pocketbook -- I got this. I’m looking for a partner, someone who eventually may become my queen. These women love that about me but then do everything to distance themselves. It appears nice guys finish last. I’m not bad looking -- I’m 34, go to the gym regularly, no kids, no marriages. I was engaged for four years previously. I’m ready to give up on relationships altogether; the pain just doesn’t seem worth it. After a while, though, it gets lonely. Please give me

Crossword

Shoe

By Jim Davis

Take it from the Tinkersons

By Bill Bettwy

By Chad Carpenter

By Chris Cassatt & Gary Brookins

Mother Goose and Grimm

By Michael Peters


SUNDAY COMICS

Sunday, June 23, 2019

DILBERT®/ by Scott Adams


DOONESBURY/ by Garry Trudeau


SALLY FORTH/ by Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM/ by Mike Peters

B.C./ by Mastroianni and Hart

ZIGGY/ by Tom Wilson

DENNIS THE MENACE/ by Hank Ketcham


MORT WALKER’S BEETLE BAILEY/ by Mort, Greg & Brian Walker

MARVIN/ by Tom Armstrong

THE BORN LOSER by Art & Chip Sansom

Profile for Sound Publishing

Peninsula Clarion, June 30, 2019  

June 30, 2019 edition of the Peninsula Clarion

Peninsula Clarion, June 30, 2019  

June 30, 2019 edition of the Peninsula Clarion