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Officials discuss West End drought City watching wells carefully in Forks

McKinley to take applications soon

BY JESSE MAJOR

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FORKS — Officials on the West End are watching water levels closely after experiencing the second-driest spring on record and as West End rivers near or break record lows. Forks City Attorney Rod Fleck said city officials are watching the city’s wells closely before issuing mandatory water use restrictions. “We’re watching it very carefully,” Fleck said. “We’ve had one of the driest springs in our historic record and we put in voluntary conservation measures a couple weeks ago.” Fleck said that today that officials are expected to check the wells, which have been losing about a foot of water per week, and that he expects a decision on mandatory conservation measures to be made within the coming weeks. “It’s a decision that’s made by the mayor in consultation with the public works director and his staff,” Fleck said. Forks residents already have been asked to avoid watering lawns, limit washing vehicles and to be conscious of water use during daily tasks. The state Department of Ecology released a map Thursday showing that Tuesday the West End — which includes both Clallam and Jefferson counties — was facing a “severe drought” while East Clallam and East Jefferson counties were facing a “moderate drought.” There are two levels of drought beyond “severe drought.” On Tuesday, the Hoh River hit a record low of 770 cubic feet per second (cfs), breaking the 2015 record of 792 cfs. That river usually flows at about 1,900 cfs this time of year. On Thursday, flows in the Calawah

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The Sol Duc River is shown where it crosses U.S. Highway 101 near Sappho, east of Forks. Officials in Forks are concerned about water supply as the North Olympic Peninsula deals with drought conditions this summer. River were as low as 93.6 cfs, well under the median flow of 229 cfs. The lowest flow the river has seen on June 27 was in 2015, when flows on that day were as low as 83 cfs. On Tuesday, flows dropped below 80 cfs. Rivers in central Clallam County were still about double the record low flows set in 2015. “The little rain that we’re getting knocks down the dust and provides some water for grass to grow a little, but it’s not addressing the reduction in

our groundwater system,” Fleck said. Fleck and other West End officials met with state Department of Ecology officials Tuesday to discuss the drought and how the state might help. During his presentation, Mike Gallagher of Ecology’s Water Resources Program frequently compared this year’s drought to 2015, when the state experienced record low snowpack that was caused by higher-than normal temperatures during the winter. TURN

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PORT ANGELES — McKinley Paper Co. is seeking in-person job applicants July 11 in anticipation of reopening its shuttered Ediz Hook paper mill by December and expanding its reach through the recent acquisition of a U.S. packaging company. The New Mexico-based American subsidiary of Mexican-owned Bio-Pappel wants to fill 33 positions, an organizer of what’s billed as a “hiring event” said Thursday. Patrice Varela-Daylo, a business services specialist with WorkSource of Clallam and Jefferson counties, said Thursday the company wants to immediately fill 15 of the positions. Applicants will not be hired at the event, she said. Applicants will go through a training period, General Manager Edward Bortz said Thursday in an interview. Applications must be filled out and submitted in person between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. Thursday, July 11 at the Armory Square Professional Center, 228 W. First St., in Port Angeles. TURN

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JESSE MAJOR/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

A vehicle passes through the McKinley Paper Co. mill in Port Angeles. The company will seek job applicants July 11.

Consumer fireworks going on sale today Banned in Sequim, Port Angeles BY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Consumer fireworks go on sale in Clallam County today, but you’ll need to be outside of Port Angeles and Sequim to set them off legally this Fourth of July. Under state law, consumer fireworks can be lit in areas that

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haven’t established local regulations between noon and 11 p.m. today, 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday through Wednesday, 9 a.m. to midnight on Independence Day on Thursday and from 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. next Friday. Legal fireworks include sparklers, fountains, spinners, parachutes and roman candles. They can be set off during the

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appropriate times in unincorporated Clallam County and the city of Forks. Port Angeles and Sequim have banned consumer fireworks. Officers have discretion to issue citations.

‘Voluntary compliance’ “Really what we’re seeking is voluntary compliance,” Port Angeles Deputy Chief of Police Jason Viada said Thursday. Exploding fireworks like bot-

tle rockets, firecrackers, missile rockets, cherry bombs and M-80s are illegal. “I urge everyone to exercise extreme caution using legal fireworks and completely forgo the use of illegal pyrotechnic fireworks,” Clallam County Sheriff Bill Benedict said in a Tuesday announcement. “In general, anything that explodes is illegal.” The Port Angeles City Council voted to ban consumer fireworks

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with strong public support in 2015. The Sequim City Council followed suit in 2016 after an advisory vote found that 65.6 percent of respondents said they favored a fireworks ban. Forks municipal code allows for the discharge of legal consumer fireworks beginning today. Clallam County also follows state law. TURN

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INSIDE TODAY’S Peninsula Daily News 103rd year, 154th issue — 4 sections, 32 pages

BUSINESS A7 CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS B5 COMMENTARY A9, A10 DEAR ABBY B5 DEATHS A8 HOROSCOPE B5 LETTERS A9 NATION/WORLD A4

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A2 D2 B1 B6


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Friday, June 28, 2019

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

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The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2019, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

Publisher:Terry Ward, 360-417-3500, tward@ peninsuladailynews.com General Manager:Steve Perry, 360-417-3540, sperry@ peninsuladailynews.com Executive Editor: Leah Leach, 360-417-3530, lleach@ peninsuladailynews.com www.peninsuladailynews.com Follow us on Facebook (Peninsula Daily News) Twitter (@PenDailyNews) and Instagram (@peninsuladailynews)

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Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Group Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Contents copyright © 2019, Peninsula Daily News MEMBER

Audit Bureau The of Circulations Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Lawsuit takes on blog for #FreeBritney THE CONSERVATORSHIP THAT oversees Britney Spears’ personal life and career sued the creator of a blog devoted to the pop superstar Wednesday in an increasingly aggressive effort to push back against the so-called “Free Britney” movement, which alleges the singer is being controlled against her will. The lawsuit filed in Los Angeles alleges that Anthony Elia, who runs the website Absolute Spears Britney, has falsely claimed the courtordered conservatorship has manipulated Spears’ Instagram account to make her

appear more troubled and in need of help than she actually is. “It is time for the conspiracy theories about Britney Spears’ well-being and the mob #FreeBritney movement to stop,” the lawsuit states in its opening line. Elia’s blog and its social media accounts have played a key role in the “Free Britney” phenomenon, a group of fans who said on social media and in public protests that the singer is being controlled against her will by her father Jaime Spears, who serves as her conservator, and that she is surreptitiously seeking help to free herself. The suit alleges that Elia “has made it his mission to spread false and malicious lies on the internet about Britney, her conservatorship and her team, including that those around Britney are harming her and not acting in

her best interests.”

Spacey lawsuit A young man who accused Kevin Spacey of groping him at a resort island bar in 2016 filed a lawsuit against the actor, who is also fighting a criminal charge stemming from the alleged assault. The lawsuit filed Wednesday seeks unspecified damages for “severe and permanent mental distress and emotional injuries.” The accusation was first brought in 2017 by former Boston TV anchor Heather Unruh, who said Spacey got her then 18-year-old son drunk and sexually assaulted him at the Club Car, a restaurant and bar on Nantucket where the teen worked as a busboy. Spacey, who has denied groping the teen, pleaded not guilty to indecent assault and battery in January.

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL WEDNESDAY’S QUESTION: Do you know anyone who has struggled with addiction?

Passings By The New York Times

ROBERT J. FRIEND, 99, one of the last surviving Tuskegee Airmen, who defied racism at home and enemy fire over Europe and who later oversaw the federal government’s investigation into UFOs, died last Friday in Long Beach, Calif. The cause was sepsis, his daughter Karen Friend Crumlich said. Refused enlistment in the Army Air Forces because he was AfricanAmerican, he was among the 355 pilots who served in the all-black unit known as the Tuskegee Airmen, flying single-engine planes into combat in the Mediterranean theater during World War II. His death leaves 11 surviving pilots from the unit. Remaining in the military in what became the Air Force and rising to lieutenant colonel, he directed Project Blue Book, the government’s secret study of unidentified flying objects, assessing whether they posed a threat to national security or might advance scientific research. He held the post from 1958 to 1963. When, after 20 years, the project ended in 1969, about 700 of more than 12,000 sightings had been classified as unidentified. But the study concluded that the objects posed no danger and displayed no perplexing technological attributes. Speaking at the National Atomic Testing Museum in 2017, Lt. Col.

Friend, by then retired, expressed skepticism, for practical reasons, that aliens from outer space had ever Friend landed on Earth. “Do I believe that we have been visited? No, I don’t believe that,” he said. “And the reason I don’t believe it is because I can’t conceive of any of the ways in which we could overcome some of these things: How much food would you have to take with you on a trip for 22 years through space? How much fuel would you need? How much oxygen or other things to sustain life do you have to have?” But unlike many of his colleagues, he favored further research. “I, for one, also believe that the probability of there being life elsewhere in this big cosmos is just absolutely out of this world — I think the probability is there,” he said. Long after Project Blue Book had ended, it commanded scrutiny again after The New York Times disclosed in 2017 that the government’s research into unidentified objects had continued under a secret effort called the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program. The disclosure inspired the “Project Blue Book” series on the History channel last year. Robert Jones Friend was

born Feb. 29, 1920, in Columbia, S.C., the oldest of four children. His father, William A. Friend, was an immigrant from Ecuador who had served in the American Army in World War I and who married Nella Mae Jones Liner, Robert’s mother. An airplane enthusiast even as a child, Friend joined the Civilian Pilot Training program as a sophomore at the historically black Lincoln University in Oxford, Pa.

Yes  No 

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Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Leah Leach at 360-4173530 or email h ­ er at lleach@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News and Port Angeles Evening News

1944 (75 years ago) Preceding the monthly potluck dinner and business meeting of the Klahhane Club, six members spent the night at Heart o’ the Hills and climbed first and second peaks of Mount

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

MAN USING HIS leaf blower to dry his truck after using the self car wash at 8th and Lincoln Streets in Port Angeles. Clever ... WANTED! “Seen Around” items recalling things seen on the North Olympic Peninsula. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360417-3521; or email news@ peninsuladailynews.com. Be sure you mention where you saw your “Seen Around.”

Angeles on Sunday. This was the first climb of this mountain since New Year’s Day, when a pocket lunch was eaten standing around in a snowstorm on the island in Lake Angeles. Starting out under a low-hanging blanket of clouds which acted as a sunshade, the walk up through the timber was cool and exhilarating.

1969 (50 years ago) DelGuzzi Construction, Inc., was the apparent low bidder when bids on the proposed dormitory at Peninsula College were opened in Olympia on Thursday afternoon. President E. John Maier of the college said today the DelGuzzi basic bid was $498,000. The decision on accep-

tance of the low bid is now up to the Peninsula College board of trustees.

1994 (25 years ago) A pair of strikeout kings also did damage at the plate to lead their teams — Local 155 and Swain’s — into today’s Olympic Junior Babe Ruth championship game. Keaton Gaines struck out 13 batters and Local 155 scored three runs in the final inning to notch a 5-4 come-from-behind victory over defending champion Daishowa. In the other semifinal, Tony Burke amasses 12 K’s in a two-hitter and batted 3-for-4 in Swain’s 8-2 triumph over Fryer’s. Local 155 and Swain’s collide for the league title today, 7 p.m., at Civic Field.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS FRIDAY, June 28, the 179th day of 2019. There are 186 days left in the year. Today’s Highlights in History: On June 28, 1978, the Supreme Court ordered the University of California-Davis Medical School to admit Allan Bakke, a white man who argued he’d been a victim of reverse racial discrimination. On this date: In 1778, the Revolutionary War Battle of Monmouth took place in New Jersey; from this battle arose the legend of “Molly Pitcher,” a woman who was said to have carried water to colonial soldiers, then took over firing her husband’s cannon after he was disabled. In 1838, Britain’s Queen Victoria was crowned in Westminster Abbey. In 1863, during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln appointed Maj. Gen. George G. Meade the new commander of the Army of the Potomac, following the resignation of Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker.

In 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife, Sophie, were shot to death in Sarajevo by Serb nationalist Gavrilo Princip — an act which sparked World War I. In 1919, the Treaty of Versailles was signed in France, ending World War I. In Independence, Mo., future president Harry S. Truman married Elizabeth Virginia Wallace. In 1939, Pan American Airways began regular trans-Atlantic air service with a flight that departed New York for Marseilles, France. In 1940, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Alien Registration Act, also known as the Smith Act, which required adult foreigners residing in the U.S. to be registered and fingerprinted. In 1968, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Uniform Monday Holiday Bill, which moved commemorations for Washington’s Birthday, Memorial Day and Veterans Day to Monday, creating three-day holiday weekends beginning in 1971.

In 1994, President Bill Clinton became the first chief executive in U.S. history to set up a personal legal defense fund and ask Americans to contribute to it. In 1997, in a wild rematch, Evander Holyfield retained the WBA heavyweight boxing championship after his opponent, Mike Tyson, was disqualified for biting Holyfield’s ear during the third round of their fight in Las Vegas. In 2013, tens of thousands of supporters and opponents of President Mohammed Morsi rallied in Cairo, and both sides fought each other in Egypt’s second-largest city of Alexandria, where two people — including an American — were killed and scores injured. In 2017, ABC and a South Dakota meat producer announced a settlement in a $1.9 billion lawsuit against the network over its reports on a beef product that critics dubbed “pink slime.” Ten years ago: Soldiers ousted Manuel Zelaya, the democratically elected president of Honduras;

congressional leader Roberto Micheletti was sworn in to serve until Zelaya’s term ended in January 2010. Death claimed TV pitchman Billy Mays, 50, at his Florida home and Las Vegas impressionist Fred Travalena, 66. Five years ago: Ahmed Abu Khattala, the Libyan militant accused of masterminding the deadly Benghazi attacks in 2012, pleaded not guilty to conspiracy in Washington nearly two weeks after being captured by U.S. special forces. One year ago: A man armed with a shotgun attacked a newspaper in Annapolis, Md., killing four journalists and a staffer before police stormed the building and arrested him; authorities said Jarrod Ramos had a long-running grudge against the newspaper for its reporting of a harassment case against him. Lawyers for Ramos, who is charged with first-degree murder, have argued that he was not criminally responsible by reason of insanity; a November 2019 trial is scheduled.


Peninsula Daily News

Olympia man sentenced for burglaries

PeninsulaNorthwest

Friday, June 28, 2019

A3

Get home delivery. Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

962384222

Collin J.R. Kennedy Olympia Lost Mountain Road last Nov. 28 and stole a $3,000 digital camera and lens, a $2,000 laptop computer, a $300 camera with no lens and other items, Deputy Matthew Murphy said in court documents. The owner of the home interrupted the burglary and chased Kennedy into the driveway, Murphy said. The victim grabbed hold of Kennedy and kneed him, but Kennedy was able to escape by pulling himself out of his coat, Murphy said in the affidavit for probable cause. About three hours later, a resident on the 600 block of Lost Mountain Road told deputies that he had captured video surveillance of a man approaching his door. The person in the footage was later identified as Kennedy, Murphy said. The Sheriff’s Office also used footprints to connect Kennedy to the burglary, King said. Kennedy was being held Thursday at the Washington Corrections Center near Shelton.

________

RENTALS BY THOMAS 962368524

PORT ANGELES — An Olympia man has been sentenced to four years in prison for a pair of burglaries that occurred in the Sequim area last year, the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office said. Collin J. R. Kennedy, 28, was sentenced Wednesday to 48 months confinement plus one year of community custody after he pleaded guilty to two counts of residential burglary and single counts of forgery and heroin possession, court papers said. The Clallam County Sheriff’s Office said Kennedy stole about $2,880 worth of items from an East Sequim Bay Road residence in June 2018 and more than $5,300 worth of items from a Lost Mountain Road residence last November. Superior Court Judge Lauren Erickson sentenced Kennedy to the term recommended by deputy prosecuting attorney Matthew Roberson and defense attorney Charlie Commeree. Kennedy was charged in two other cases with second-degree theft and possession of methamphetamine. Those cases were dismissed pursuant to a plea agreement, court papers said. Clallam County Sheriff’s Deputy James Dixon said Kennedy broke into a residence on the 1700 block of East Sequim Bay Road and stole a $2,000 computer, necklaces and other items June 6, 2018, according to the affidavit for probable cause. The Sheriff’s Office used fingerprints and surveillance footage to identify Kennedy in the East Sequim Bay Road burglary, Chief Criminal Deputy Brian King said. Kennedy broke into a home on the 3800 block of

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Briefly . . . Space exhibit set for three locations The Pacific Science Center on Wheels will present “A Space Odyssey” at several area venues in July. The Seattle-based exhibit will be at Sequim Middle School, 301 W. Hendrickson Road at 10:30 a.m. July 9. That same day, the exhibit also will be presented at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St. at 2 p.m. Tuesday. The traveling exhibit will be at the Forks Library, 171 S. Forks Ave. at 4 p.m. July 10. This free, public presentation is part of the summer reading program sponsored by the North Olympic Library System. For more information, call the library at 360-4178500, email discover@nols. org or visit www.nols.org.

each session. To reserve a seat, call 206-221-6893 or email coasst@uw.edu. For more information on COASST, visit www.coasst. org. Peninsula Daily News

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NEAH BAY — The University of Washington Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team will conduct beached bird training from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 13. The training will be held in the Makah Tribal Community Center, 81 Third Ave. No prior experience is needed but volunteers should be interested in surveying a specific beach at least once a month. The training will provide volunteers with the skills to collect survey data on beach cast marine bird carcasses. The data collected will help track patterns of marine bird mortality on North Pacific beaches. There will be a break for lunch in the middle of

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Briefly: Nation Health care, immigration at Dems’ debate

building to journalists, offering an inside glimpse of the station in Clint for the first time since lawyers who met with young migrants there told The Associated Press they saw 250 infants, children and teens locked up for MIAMI — Ten Democrats up to 27 days in what was railed against a national economy and a Republican adminis- designed to be a short-term holding facility. tration they argued exist only The tour came hours before for the rich as presidential canimmigrant advocates asked a didates debated onstage for the federal judge to issue an emerfirst time in the young 2020 seagency order requiring immedison, embracing inequality as a ate inspections and access for defining theme in their fight to deny President Donald Trump a doctors at border detention facilities like the one in Clint. second term in office. The attorneys also are asking Health care and immigration, for the prompt release of chilmore than any other issues, led the first of two debates Wednes- dren to parents and close relatives and for the government to day, with another to follow Thursday night. And Massachu- be found in contempt of court. The lawyers who visited the setts Sen. Elizabeth Warren Clint facility described hearing stood out in calling for “fundaabout and seeing children takmental change” across the ing care of children, and at nation’s economy and government to address a widening gap least one sick 2-year-old boy between the rich and the middle without a diaper who had wet his pants, his shirt smeared in class. mucus. Those interviews conThe debate marked a major tributed to the legal action step forward in the 2020 presidential campaign as Democrats brought late Wednesday in federal court. fight to break out from a crowded field that has been consumed by one question above Census query on hold all: Who’s best positioned to WASHINGTON — The defeat Trump? The candidates Supreme Court is forbidding will spend the next eight President Donald Trump’s months before primary voting administration from adding a scrapping over that question citizenship question to the 2020 and the broader fight for the census for now. The court said direction of their political party. the Trump administration’s explanation for wanting to add Border facility opened the question was “more of a distraction” than an explanation. CLINT, Texas — Migrant It’s unclear whether the children being housed at a Boradministration would have time der Patrol facility near El Paso appeared mostly clean and were to provide a fuller account. Cenbeing watched by hallway moni- sus forms are supposed to be printed next week. tors Wednesday, less than a The court ruled 5-4 on Thursweek since they reported living there in squalid conditions with day, with Chief Justice John Roberts joining the four liberals little care and inadequate food, in the the outcome. water and sanitation. U.S. officials opened the The Associated Press

House sends Senate border bill to Trump BY ANDREW TAYLOR AND ALAN FRAM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The Democratic-controlled House voted Thursday to send President Donald Trump a bipartisan, Senatedrafted, $4.6 billion measure to care for migrant refugees detained at the southern border, capping a Washington skirmish in which die-hard liberals came out on the losing end in a battle with the White House, the GOP-held Senate and Democratic moderates. The emergency legislation, required to ease overcrowded, often harsh conditions at U.S. holding facilities for migrants seeking asylum, mostly from Central American nations like Honduras and El Salvador, passed by a bipartisan 305-102 vote. Trump has indicated he’ll sign it into law. Ninety-five Democrats opposed the bill, reluctantly brought to a vote by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., after her plan to further strengthen rules for treat-

ment of migrant refugees ran into intractable opposition from Republican lawmakers and Vice President Mike Pence. Many moderate Democrats split with Pelosi as well, undercutting her efforts, which faded shortly after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said he would swiftly reject them. The legislation contains more than $1 billion to shelter and feed migrants detained by the border patrol and almost $3 billion to care for unaccompanied migrant children who are turned over the Department of Health and Human Services. It rejects an administration request for additional Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention beds, however, and contains provisions designed to prevent federal immigration agents from going after immigrants living in the country illegally who seek to care for unaccompanied children. The funding is urgently needed to prevent the humanitarian

emergency on the U.S.-Mexico border from worsening. The government had warned that money would run out in a matter of days. The Senate bill passed Wednesday by an 84-8 vote, with Democrats there pleased with the deal they cut with Republicans controlling the chamber. The measure was initially only reluctantly accepted by the White House — which complained about elimination of the request for detention bed for immigrants facing removal from the U.S. — but GOP support grew after the measure presented an opportunity to outmaneuver Pelosi. Just seven Republicans opposed the bill. “We could have done so much better,” Pelosi said in a floor speech. Earlier, Pelosi pushed a plan to ping-pong the Senatepassed bill right back across the Capitol with provisions requiring more stringent care requirements for detained migrant families and other steps.

Briefly: World Trade, politics, climate on G-20 summit agenda

to contain a wildfire in northeastern Spain that has spread over 13,590 acres and forced the evacuation of 53 residents. A Spanish military unit with 120 specialists joined local fireOSAKA, Japan — Trade, geo- fighters who had worked overnight to control the blaze that political tensions and the looming threat of climate change are sent thick plumes of smoke over on the agenda as the presidents difficult, hilly terrain near the Ebro River. of the United States and China Miquel Buch, the regional and other world leaders gather interior minister, said 20,000 in Osaka, Japan, for a summit hectares were under threat in of the Group of 20 major econowhat is the worst fire in the mies. Catalonia region in two “This will decades. be a difficult G-20, there North Korea: Butt out are global challenges to SEOUL, South Korea — be met, we North Korea said Thursday that need to step South Korea must stop trying to up to avoid mediate between Pyongyang the climate and Washington. threats … The North Korean statement Tusk reform the was an apparent continuation of World Trade Organization and its displeasure with Seoul and prepare for the digital revoluWashington over the stalled tion,” Donald Tusk, president of diplomacy. the European Union Council, But there are no signs that said. North Korea would formally President Donald Trump abandon talks anytime soon as arrived Thursday and was due an inter-Korean liaison office in to meet with Chinese President North Korean remains operatXi Jinping on Saturday. ing and the North still talks about good relations between its Wildfire rages in Spain leader, Kim Jong Un, and President Donald Trump. MADRID — Hundreds of The Associated Press firefighters struggled Thursday

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

GOODBYE

HUGS

Justice Cash, center left, hugs his brother, incoming plebe Nathanael Cash, as they say goodbye on Induction Day at the U.S. Naval Academy on Thursday in Annapolis, Md. The class of 2023 reported to the Academy and received medical examinations, uniforms, haircuts and instructions on how to salute.

Justices deal blow to limits on drawing partisan districts BY MARK SHERMAN AND JESSICA GRESKO THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court dealt a huge blow to efforts to combat the drawing of electoral districts for partisan gain Thursday in a ruling that could embolden political linedrawing after the 2020 census. On the court’s final day of decisions before a summer break, the conservative justices ruled that federal courts have no role to play

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in the dispute over the practice known as gerrymandering. The decision has no effect on racial gerrymandering challenges. Courts have barred redistricting aimed at reducing the political representation of racial minorities for a half-century. The next round of redistricting will take place in 2021, once census results are available. In the redistricting case, voters and elected officials should be the arbiters of what is a political dispute, Chief Justice John Roberts

said in his opinion for the court. The court rejected challenges to Republican-drawn congressional districts in North Carolina and a Democratic district in Maryland. “Our conclusion does not condone excessive partisan gerrymandering,” Roberts wrote, acknowledging that the North Carolina and Maryland maps are “highly partisan.” But he said courts are the wrong place to settle these disputes.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Fire officials report on breaks against blazes

Nation: Federal officials eye Okla. opioid settlement

Nation: Seven injured in Atlanta drive-by shooting

World: Merkel has shakes again at event in Berlin

FEDERAL OFFICIALS HAVE released their review on removing or changing vegetation over a huge swath of the U.S. West to stop wildfires on land used for cattle ranching, recreation and habitat for imperiled sage grouse. The work would occur on strips of land up to 165 yards wide and up to 11,000 miles long in Idaho, Washington, Oregon, California, Nevada and Utah, according to an environmental analysis. It didn’t give specific details on what the impact to the land could be. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management announced in 2017 it planned the review into creating so-called fuel breaks that starve fires of vegetation.

THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT is seeking a portion of Oklahoma’s $270 million settlement with Purdue Pharma that stemmed from the state’s ongoing lawsuit against opioid drug makers. The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said in a letter to the head of Oklahoma’s Medicaid agency it has determined the federal government is entitled to a portion of Oklahoma’s proceeds. The June 12 letter from CMS’ regional director Bill Brooks seeks information from Oklahoma and warns that failure to return a portion of the settlement money could result in the withholding of federal funds.

ATLANTA POLICE SAID seven people were injured in a drive-by shooting in the city. Atlanta Police Deputy Chief Jeffrey Glazier said the victims were standing on a sidewalk in the Old Fourth Ward neighborhood Thursday morning when a dark-colored sedan and another car fired multiple rounds. News outlets quoted authorities as saying the victims were targeted, but police haven’t identified a motive. Police said the victims included five men and a woman, all in their early-tomid-30s, two of whom were taken into surgery in critical condition. A seventh victim was later located at a hospital.

GERMAN CHANCELLOR ANGELA Merkel appeared unsteady and was seen shaking for the second time in just over a week at a ceremony in Berlin on Thursday. Merkel, 64, folded her arms while her body trembled for around two minutes as she stood alongside President Frank-Walter Steinmeier at an indoor event where Germany’s new justice minister was being formally appointed. Last week, Merkel’s whole body shook as she stood outside in hot weather alongside Ukraine’s president. Merkel said afterward that she was fine after drinking three glasses of water, which she “apparently needed.”


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2019

Robby Streett honor slated Water: Drought BY MATTHEW NASH

OLYMPIC PENINSULA NEWS GROUP

SEQUIM — For Robby Streett, a library was a sanctuary filled with imagination and knowledge. His mom Josslyn said he could usually be found one of two places — in the Sequim High School’s Library or the Sequim Library across the street. Now, thanks to his Sequim High classmates, the 16-year-old who died July 20, 2017, will have a permanent spot in the school library. With the support of 2018 SHS graduate Annabelle Armstrong, SHS senior-to-be Lesae Pfeffer, and the Class of 2019, students installed three new living room sets including three new couches, three coffee tables and six chairs in the library. Armstrong and Pfeffer worked as the volunteers behind the Robby Streett Legacy Fund for the last year-and-a-half, raising funds for the project completed June 4. “They helped turn this horrible tragedy into something that’s positive,” Josslyn Streett said. Robby, 16, and his father

Robert, 52, died after being struck in a head-on collision in Colorado; Josslyn and Robby’s brother Sawyer survived the crash. Robby would have graduated with the Sequim class on June 7. Organizers held a moment of silence for him and teacher Dana Minard, who died this school year. Armstrong began researching the idea of doing something for Robby in early 2018. “I had a friend-of-afriend die my freshman year and not a lot was said about it, so I wanted to do something that matters,” Armstrong said. “I talked to Lesae [one of Robby’s first friends in Sequim] and she knew Josslyn.” Josslyn Streett said when the girls approached her, their hope was for fellow students to find healing through grief, too. “It’s tough to lose a classmate,” she said. “I really identified with that reasoning.” The girls said they initially looked at doing some work in a science classroom but the needs were too costly. So Pfeffer suggested a couch in the library.

“I thought Robby would like that,” Josslyn Streett said. “And we started thinking we could get one couch, maybe more but with a lot of help we got three living room sets for the library.” Armstrong and Pfeffer organized several events including a showing of “Ready Player One” — a movie adaptation of Robby’s favorite book — and a block party, a Night at the Museum, car washes, book sale and blood drive. They also set up a GoFundMe account. The students raised about $6,000 between the events. Sequim High School librarian Linsay Rapelje said the new living room sets are the library’s first new furnishings, aside from donated and worn pieces from teachers and staff. She said the plaque, donated by the Class of 2019, will be a good conversation starter and remind students that they matter and are valued. Joe Marvelle, owner of Port Angeles’ The Warehouse and a Sequim High grad, worked with the SHS students on their vision by recommending the most

durable furniture, Pfeffer said. Marvelle even attempted to look for purple and gold couches to match the school colors, she said. Pfeffer said it’s been an honor to work on the project. “I think it’s such a big thing,” she said. “I know it’s impacted so many lives.” Armstrong said she hopes the library project is an example to fellow teens that they shouldn’t bottle in emotions — particularly after a tragedy — but rather to “have an outlet when you’re feeling down.” Through the past yearand-a-half, Josslyn Streett said feels the project has helped her to heal, too. “I got to meet some of the people who knew Robby, and I think getting together and getting to know each other and tell stories about him was healing,” she said. For more information on Sequim High School, 601 N. Sequim Ave., call 360-5823600.

________ Matthew Nash is a reporter with the Olympic Peninsula News Group, which is composed of Sound Publishing newspapers Peninsula Daily News, Sequim Gazette and Forks Forum. Reach him at mnash@sequimgazette. com.

Fire: OK to use in the county CONTINUED FROM A1 before this July 4. Local fireworks regulaCounty commissioners tions take effect one year have been discussing a pos- after they are adopted, sible fireworks ordinance meaning a county ordithat would strike a balance nance, if adopted, would between those who believe take effect in 2021. The state Fire Marshal’s fireworks are a part of the Office reported 209 fireIndependence Day tradition works-related injuries and and those who feel that fire- 92 fires caused by fireworks works pose too much of a last year. wildfire risk. Bottle rockets have been Commissioners have responsible for most firesaid they would not rush to work-related grass and pass a fireworks ordinance structure fires in Clallam

County, Benedict said. Even sparklers can ignite fires in dry grass or brush that can rapidly get out of control, Benedict said. “I urge those who still choose to discharge consumer fireworks in spite of the danger they present to use the utmost caution,” Benedict said. “Remember that you are responsible [civilly and possibly criminally] for the damage or fires caused by

your fireworks — even if they are legal.” Benedict suggested professional fireworks displays as an alternative to consumer fireworks. Public displays are scheduled this Thursday in Port Angeles, Forks and Neah Bay.

________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 56450, or at rollikainen@ peninsuladailynews.com.

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________ Reporter Jesse Major can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 56250, or at jmajor@peninsula dailynews.com.

Piano teacher gets to keep $40K in feud with noisy neighbor THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SELAH — An appeals court said a piano teacher in Washington state deserved the $40,000 she was awarded in a dispute with a neighbor who revved his pickup truck engine for months to drown out the sound of her lessons. The Yakima Herald-

Republic reported the appeals court ruled Tuesday that Junghee Kim Spicer’s Yakima Arts Academy was entitled to the payment from her neighbor. The inharmonious relationship started in 2012, court records said, when Spicer increased the number of piano lessons she gave.

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2015 drought the city purchased property for the project, but hasn’t gone through the process yet. He estimated that reports and permitting would cost around $30,000, but Fleck said he was unsure of the cost to complete the project. Fleck said there have been concerns that the drought would impact smaller Class A water systems that are outside city limits, leading to discussions about trucking water. The details on how that would work is still being worked out, he said. “We have an ordinance on bulk water sale that leaves it up to the mayor,” Fleck said. “If we’re going to start working through that, there’s costs. Is Ecology helping to offset those costs?”

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Gov. Jay Inslee issued an emergency drought declaration in April and on May 20 he expanded that declaration to include 27 watersheds, including the entire Olympic Peninsula. Gallagher said May was the ninth warmest in Washington since 1895, that 71 percent of rivers are flowing below normal levels and that the Olympic Coast experienced the second driest spring since 1895. “We had an abnormally warm May,” Gallagher said. He said that although snowpack isn’t nearly as low as it was in 2015, when it was less than 20 percent of average, it is still lower than it was in 2016, 2017 and 2018. He said Ecology is responsible for leading the drought response, including aiding state agriculture, protecting public water supplies, safeguarding fish and boosting stream flows, maintaining critical energy supplies and preparing to fight wildfires. This month, Ecology began accepting grant applications for projects that benefit areas impacted by drought. The state has $2 million available and grants are capped at $350,000 and require a 50 percent match. Fleck said the city is working on a grant application in hopes of getting help to fund drilling another well for the city, which would be deeper than the existing wells. He said following the

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press release on the purchase Monday with a Mexico City dateline (tinyurl. com/PDN-McKinley Corrugated). In U.S. Corrugated’s undated announcement (tinyurl.com/PDN-McKinley Packaging), the company said the purchase created “a fully integrated paper and packaging company with a vertically aligned network of paper mills, box plants, sheet plants and an efficient distribution network in the United State and the maquiladora region in Mexico.” Bio-Pappel said the acquisition will allow BioPappel to double its operations in the U.S., according to the pulp and paper industry news website www.nipimpressions.com.

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grade brown paper, using 100 percent recycled cardboard. The city of Port Angeles issued McKinley a shoreline permit in April to install $600,000 in new equipment. McKinley will hire about 120 workers when fully operational, according to the permit application. Bio-Pappel, through McKinley, purchased Pennsylvania-based US Corrugated Inc., a corrugated packaging manufacturer, the companies recently announced. Bio-Pappel announced it had purchased 55 percent of the company, according Fastmarkets RISI, a forestproducts market-analysis company that printed a

CONTINUED FROM A1

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CONTINUED FROM A1 similar backgrounds and experience are encouraged,” Applicants should bring a press release said. “We are looking to hire a resume and “be dressed appropriately,” Varela- ‘A’ employees who are up to the challenge, in the unique Daylo said. Applicants with Work- opportunity of a startup, to Source accounts available participate [in] and create a by going to www.work positive and secure environsourcewa.com will be inter- ment,” Bortz said in the viewed faster than other release. Hourly employees will applicants, she said. Anyone who cannot get be paid under a new union off work and who wants to contract McKinley signed apply should call Varela- this month with the Association of Western Pulp and Daylo at 360-457-2128. “This is a big event, and Paper Workers Local 155, I know everyone is really Bortz said in the interview. Union President Greg excited about it,” VarelaPallesen did not return calls Daylo said. “We’ve had a number of for comment Thursday inquiries about it already.” afternoon on wage ranges. McKinley plans to WorkSource and the Port Angeles Regional reopen the plant, purchased Chamber of Commerce are from Nippon Paper Industries USA in April 2017, by sponsoring the event. Openings are available the end of this year, Bortz for 10 multi-craft mechanics, reconfirmed Thursday. “That’s not a committhree electrical instrumentation mechanics, a store ment, that’s the plan,” Bortz said. room clerk and a buyer. The company has been “Many other positions will be advertised in the retooling the plant with coming weeks and months, plans to run two paper so applications from people machines to manufacture with paper manufacturing, containerboard, which also general manufacturing, is produced by Port construction, farming, fish- Townsend Paper Co., and to ing, logging, machinery and manufacture packaging-

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Friday, June 28, 2019

Peninsula Daily News

Chetzemoka Trail to be dedicated Saturday

Two-boat service to resume on Port Townsend route

By Jeannie McMacken

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — The Chetzemoka Trail, an interpretative trail winding through Port Townsend to celebrate the life of Chief Chetzemoka, the important places in his life and the S’Klallam people, will be dedicated Saturday. The ceremony will be at 1 p.m. at Memorial Field, 550 Washington St.

Dedication Also on Saturday will be the dedication of a newly installed totem pole outside the Northwest Maritime Center at the corner of Water and Monroe streets. The Chetzemoka Trail project is a partnership between the Native Connections Action Group of the Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship and the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe, with additional assistance from the community. The trail features 18 sites throughout the city that can be divided into 3-, 6- and 12-miles loops. The 3-mile loop concentrates on the downtown historical sites. A 6-mile loop extends west to Kah Tai Lagoon and Chetzemoka’s grave site at the Laurel Grove Cemetery. The 12-mile loop extends to North Beach and Fort Worden. The trail is intended to educate visitors about the relationship between the S’Klallam people who lived for hundreds of years in qatáy and the European settlers who arrived in the area in mid-19th century, according to the Jamestown S’Klallam website at jamestowntribe.org. Chief Chetzemoka lived from 1808 to 1888 in the area now occupied by Port Townsend. “The people of qatáy [Port Townsend] have been very open to learning the history of the area, and the area’s original inhabitants,” said Loni Grinnell-Greninger, a descendent of Chief

Jeannie McMacken/Peninsula Daily News

A 40-foot Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe totem pole was placed in front of the Northwest Maritime Center on Thursday. Chetzemoka and the deputy director of Social and Community Services of the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe. “As the community walks along the new trail, they will be taken back in time as they see each destination and read each sign,” she added. “We have found the qatáy community to be positively invested in our culture and our involvement; for this we are grateful.” A 26-foot, 1,600-pound carved totem pole was erected Thursday morning at the maritime center. The pole was carved from a cedar log by master carver Dale Faulstich and tribal member Timothy O’Connell, and painted by them, as well as by Tyler Faulstich and Andy Pitts. “Port Townsend is a town of craftsmen,” Faulstich said. “In the old days, the supernatural carpenters were sent to earth to teach the craftsmen all their skills — the carpenters to build, the drummers to sing, weaving, all the arts. “The top figure on the pole is the supernatural carpenter holding traditional tools in his hands. The middle figure is the spirit of the cedar tree because the tribes depended on the cedar tree for their

livelihood. The bottom figure is Cicmehan, the S’Klallam chief who welcomed the early settlers to the Kah Tai, the traditional village. “He thought the people would get further along by cooperating with one another rather than fighting with one another. He is there today to welcome new visitors to Port Townsend.” Also at the maritime center is a replica of a dugout Salish Coast canoe named “Two Eagles,” which was installed in the Wooden Boat Chandlery. The boat was carved and decorated by Falustich and Andy Pitts. It is named after two young eaglets that had fallen from their nest near Pitts’ studio and survived. They were returned to the nest and are continuing to mature. The artists both felt the eaglets were a meant to be represented on the canoe. Grinnell-Greninger said the tribe has chosen to employ non-native allies to help implement its vision. “While some of our carvers are non-native, we are very thankful to them for helping us express our culture in the style of art that we have chosen to adopt over the years,” she said. “Moreover, we are proud that many tribal citizens

have come through our carving shed to apprentice, and one of our tribal citizens was involved in the making of the Northwest Maritime Center totem pole from start to finish. “Our tools have changed, but we still make our art and regalia,” she said. “Some songs have faded away, but new songs are coming back to our people; we record them so we do not lose them. Our language almost died, but it has been rekindled and revitalized through the help of nonnatives, through the publishing of books, and the use of computer programs. In sum, we use the contemporary tools to carry on our traditions. “These partnerships with non-native individuals and organizations have led to many exciting successes.” Jale Beattie, maritime center executive director, said the art is a gift from the Jamestown S’Kallam tribe to the center. “We’ve had a working relationship with the tribe before the building was here. During the 10 years we were raising money and coming up with the idea of the maritime center, the Jamestown were part of that conversation,” he said. “We’ve had periodic conversations and explorations around how to better tell the whole story of the maritime traditions and past and present of our place that, for thousands of years, were the traditions of the native tribes.” “It was kind of hard to know where the front door of the Northwest Maritime Center is,” Beattie said. “Now we know where the front door is and it’s a pass into the future. “It’s a current expression of a full scope of a tradition that doesn’t end now. It goes on.”

________ Jefferson County Reporter Jeannie McMacken can be reached at 360-385-2335 or at jmcmacken@peninsuladailynews. com.

PORT TOWNSEND — The Port Townsend-Coupeville ferry route is expected to return to two-boat service Monday, a day after the first of the state’s four Super class ferries, the Hyak, is decommissioned. “Monday is the plan,” said Ian Sterling, public information officer for the ferry system, in an email Thursday. “Thank goodness in time for the holiday rush.” The 52-year-old Hyak will be retired late Sunday after its 9:05 p.m. sailing from Seattle to Bremerton. It then will go to Washington State Ferries’ Eagle Harbor Maintenance Facility on Bainbridge Island where crews will remove all usable equipment and prepare the ferry for sale through the state surplus process. The Port TownsendCoupeville ferry route was cut to one ferry on Sunday as the state ferries system prepared for the decommissioning of the Hyak, which leaves it with 22 vessels statewide. The state needs 19 boats to operate its summer sailing season, and four are undergoing maintenance in the coming weeks, according to Sterling, and so ferries had to be juggled to cover all routes. The Salish is now in the San Juan Islands, leaving the Kennewick as the only ferry on the Port TownsendCoupeville route. The Kennewick continued its regular schedule, but all Salish sailings were suspended, Sterling said. John Vezina, the government relations director for the state ferry system, had told state legislators in an email earlier this month that the decision was based on ridership and revenue. “The Port Townsend/ Coupeville route has both the lowest estimated ridership and the lowest net revenue loss during this time of year,”

Vezina wrote. “And while the San Juan Islands are incredibly busy in the summer, they have already had a capacity reduction this spring. With four boats out of service, we don’t have another vessel available for the interisland route.”

Boat overhauls The Kitsap, a 39-yearold vessel, needed an overhaul of a ship service generator, Vezina told legislators. The 60-year-old Tillikum needed an overhaul of both main diesel engines. The overhauls previously had been scheduled but deferred by the state, he said. The Cathlamet and Sealth also are being repaired. Vezina said the ferry system has reduced the scope from deferred preservation work on the Cathlamet in an attempt to move it out of the shipyard by Wednesday. The state ferries system has said that it lacked sufficient funding in the 2019-21 state transportation budget to operate the vintage Hyak, which entered state service on the Seattle-Bremerton route in July 1967. Throughout the past half-century, Hyak has sailed on almost every state ferries route but primarily served the SeattleBremerton route in recent years. “With 12 more boats due for retirement in the next 20 years, there is an increased risk of service disruptions due to routine maintenance requirements and unexpected repairs that become more common with old vessels,” the state ferries system said in a press release. The state ferries system 2019 Alternate Service Plan can be found at tinyurl. com/PDN-alternate ferriesplan.

State senator complains of inherent bias at caucus The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — The Secretary of the Senate has asked the chamber’s human resources officer to conduct an inquiry into public comments made by a senator who said she experienced “hate, sexism, racism and misogyny” during closed-door Democratic meetings.

Secretary Brad Henderson said once he was made aware of a story earlier this week by The Kent Reporter detailing the remarks by Democratic Sen. Mona Das, he requested the inquiry, which was approved at a Thursday meeting of the Senate Facilities and Operations Committee. Henderson said the inquiry will begin Monday.

Sen. Mona Das, whose family moved to the U.S. from India when she was an infant, said Wednesday she was talking specifically about the use of terms such as “those people” and other language that seeks to distance people in diverse groups. “No one has said anything overtly racist or sexist, but it’s what I hear

underneath it all, the coded language,” Das told The Associated Press. Her initial comments, reported by The Kent Reporter, came last week during a legislative forum before a Kent Chamber of Commerce audience. “After they close that door, that’s when it gets real,” Das said at the forum. “That’s when my 28 col-

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“The hate, sexism, racism and misogyny I experienced when that caucus room door closed would shock only the white folks in the room because the brown folks know it’s there,” she told the group. Das, who is serving her first term after ousting incumbent Republican Sen. Joe Fain last November, said Wednesday her goal was to shine a light on the reality that even people who align with women or communities of color may use language that unintentionally “others” people. “I don’t regret the conversation because now it has opened the conversation and is shining a light on inherent bias and making people think about their language,” she said.

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leagues got real. And that’s when I heard hate, that’s when I heard misogyny and racism and sexism from people you would not expect.” In a Facebook post responding to the article, Das accused the newspaper of mischaracterizing her words and wrote she was not singling out the Senate when discussing her concerns about implied bias. “I was merely stating that every institution faces those issues,” she wrote. But video of her comments posted on the chamber’s Facebook page shows she was not misquoted while talking about her experience as one of eight people of color in the Senate Democratic Caucus.

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Peninsula Daily News for Friday/Saturday, June 28-29, 2019

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New software glitch in Boeing’s 737 Max jet BY DAVID KOENIG

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A new software problem has been found in the troubled Boeing 737 Max that could push the plane’s nose down automatically, and fixing the flaw is almost certain to further delay the plane’s return to flying after two deadly crashes. Boeing said Wednesday that the FAA “identified an additional requirement” for software changes that the aircraft manufacturer has been working on for eight months, since shortly after the first crash. “Boeing agrees with the FAA’s decision and request, and is working on the required software to address the FAA’s request,” Boeing said in a statement. Government test pilots trying out Boeing’s updated Max software in a flight simulator last week found a flaw that could result in the plane’s nose pitching down, according to two people familiar with the matter.

G

overnment test pilots trying out Boeing’s updated Max software in a flight simulator last week found a flaw that could result in the plane’s nose pitching down, according to two people familiar with the matter. In both Max crashes, the plane’s flight-control software pushed the nose down based on faulty readings from one sensor. The people said fixing the issue might be accomplished through software changes or by replacing a microprocessor in the plane’s flight-control system. One said the latest setback is likely to delay the plane’s return to service by an extra one to three months. Both spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss aspects of the review process that are not public. In a statement, the Federal Aviation Administration said it will lift its

grounding of the plane only when it deems the jet safe — there is no set timeline. “On the most recent issue, the FAA’s process is designed to discover and highlight potential risks. The FAA recently found a potential risk that Boeing must mitigate,” the agency said. The Max began passenger flights in 2017 and is Boeing’s best-selling plane, although fewer than 400 have been delivered to airlines. A Max flown by Indonesia’s Lion Air crashed in October, and an Ethiopian Airlines Max crashed in March. In all, 346 people died. Days after the second crash, regulators around

the world grounded the plane. Boeing is scaling back the power of flight-control software called MCAS to push the nose down. It is also linking the software’s nose-down command to two sensors on each plane instead of relying on just one in the original design. It is still uncertain what kind of training pilots will get for flying the plane with the new software — either computer-based or in-flight simulators. Meanwhile, some airlines that own Max jets have had to cancel large numbers of flights while the planes remain grounded. On Wednesday, United Airlines pushed back the scheduled return of its 14 Max jets until September. Southwest Airlines and American Airlines had already made similar announcements — an acknowledgement that the plane won’t return to flying as soon as the airlines had hoped.

Amazon adds new option: Buy on Amazon, pick up at Rite Aid BY JOSEPH PISANI AND MICHELLE CHAPMAN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Amazon is adding a new way to get your packages: head over to another store’s sales counter to pick it up. Starting Thursday, Amazon shoppers are able to fetch their orders at more than 100 Rite Aid stores across the United States. It will expand to 1,500 Rite Aid locations by year-end. And Amazon said it’s looking to bring the service to other stores, both big and small. At this time, Rite Aid stores in Port Angeles and Sequim are not included in the program. It’s the first time Amazon is bringing the service to the U.S., after it began offering it at stores in Italy and the United Kingdom last month. Amazon has installed lockers in supermarkets and banks where packages can be picked up, but said this

option is for shops that don’t have space for lockers. Amazon said it hopes the service will fill one of its weaknesses: physical locations where customers can buy online and pickup in stores if they want. The option has been popular with shoppers at Walmart, Target and other big retailers. For Rite Aid, the service could bring in Amazon shoppers who might buy something off the pharmacy chain’s store shelves. Investors seemed to like the partnership: Rite Aid Corp.’s stock soared 22 percent Thursday. A similar partnership has worked for Kohl’s, which accepts Amazon returns inside its department stores. Kohl’s has said the deal has helped boost sales. It might seem like an unusual tie-up, but more physical retailers are working with Amazon in the hopes that they can reach its millions of shoppers. Sears, for example, sells its

Kenmore-branded appliances on Amazon.com. And some clothing and shoe brands, such as Chico’s, J. Crew and Nike, are selling some of their fashions on the site. Kohl’s and Amazon have been working together since 2017, when Kohl’s started selling Amazon Kindles,

Echos and other gadgets at some of its stores. With Amazon’s pickup service, called “Counter,” stores will receive Amazon packages daily. The packages will be scanned by store workers and an email will be sent to shoppers letting them know their order is ready.

Register now for July 10 tax webinar

OLYMPIA — The state Department of Revenue will conduct a free webinar on business taxes from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Wednesday, July 10. Participants will learn about Washington excise taxes, reporting classifications, deductions, sales tax collection and record-keeping requirements. The facilitator will answer specific questions related to your business during the presentation. Interested business owners must pre-register by emailing dorwebinar@ dor.wa.gov by Tuesday, July 9. The registration email should include your name, company name, phone number and email address. For more information, call Rick Stedman at 360705-6624 or email rickst@ dor.wa.gov.

Market watch June 27, 2019

-10.24

Dow Jones industrials

26,526.58

Nasdaq composite

57.79 7,967.76

Standard & Poor’s 500

11.14 2,924.92

Russell 2000

28.77 1,546.55

NYSE diary

Advanced: Declined:

1,943 798

Unchanged:

84

Volume:

3b

Nasdaq diary

Advanced:

2,210

Declined:

731

Unchanged:

146

Volume:

2b

The DOE earlier this month announced changes the way it interprets the No waste changes in MARKET 062719: C BRIEF legal definition of highRICHLAND — A U.S. shows daily market figures level radioactive waste at fo Department of Energy offi- Hanford S&P, Russell 2000 and Nasd and two cleanup cial said there is no change sites in South Carolina and with NYSE and Nasdaq diary proposed for waste desigIdaho. alone; 1c x 4 inches; ETA 5:1 nated as high level at the State officials said the Hanford nuclear complex. update could change the The News Tribune Editor’s Note: standards It is mandatory to includeand all sou for treating reported Wednesday that that accompany this graphic whenwaste repurposin disposing of some at DOE undersecretary forit for publication editing the Hanford site 184 miles science Paul Dabbar said east of Tacoma. the department currently does not “have any plans to propose anything in Wash- Gold, silver futures August gold fell $3.40, ington state.” or 0.2 percent, to settle at Gov. Jay Inslee and Attorney General Bob Fer- $1,412 an ounce Thursday. guson, both Democrats, Silver for September have expressed concerns shed 8.1 cents, or 0.5 perthat DOE policy changes cent, to $15.294 an ounce. are potentially “reckless Peninsula Daily News and dangerous action.” and The Associated Press

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Friday, June 28, 2019

Peninsula Daily News

New system for Sequim offers outdoor voter registration is now corrected concert on Tuesday Peninsula Daily News The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Washington state intends to move ahead with a new voter-registration system ahead of the Aug. 6 primary despite concerns from election officials in a handful of counties about problems they’ve encountered. A steering committee of state and county election officials — which included Secretary of State Kim Wyman — made the decision. Concerns stem from the transition from the previous system to the new $9.5 million project, called VoteWA, The Seattle Times reported. In addition to shutting down the state’s online voterregistration system for roughly a month — about two weeks longer than planned — some counties said they encountered issues when they made the switch. Those issues included apartment numbers for voter addresses not appearing, address formatting and problems with translating materials in various languages. Ballots for overseas and military voters started going out in the mail last week. Because of the new system’s problems with those, workers in King and Thurston counties had to manually correct many overseas addresses before they went out. Spokane County has also created workarounds to handle problems related to ballot bar codes and to email electronic ballots that go to some overseas voters, according to Auditor Vicky Dalton. “Unit and apartment numbers were missing when doing data validation but we were able to have the state do a mass update to address this issue” before any military and overseas ballots went out, said Shoona Riggs, Clallam County auditor on Thursday. Jefferson County has not experienced any problems with the new system said Betty Johnson, election coordinator. “Our military and overseas ballots went out without any modifications or workarounds from us,” she said. She said the new software application is a new way of doing things, but that she

doesn’t foresee a problem on election night for the small county. What could impact ballot counts, however, is a new state law that allows sameday voter registration, she said. “That’s going to impact how many ballots are counted on election night,” although it might not be an issue until the November general election. The Secretary of State’s Office has said problems in the counties that experienced them have been fixed and the system is ready to go. And county officials acknowledge that such problems are the sort of bugs that any ambitious software overhaul could reveal in a testing phase. But elections officials say they’re also concerned because they didn’t get to test every component of the new system ahead of the primary. “We’re using the primary election as a test environment, which is not how it’s usually done,” said Thurston County Auditor Mary Hall. Dalton said voters in her county should expect to see fewer ballots counted than usual on election night. If people must register to vote or change their address, they should do so earlier rather than later, she added. For years, elections officials have discussed the idea of centralizing some of the work currently undertaken by each of Washington’s 39 counties and Hall and others say they’re excited about VoteWA. It ultimately will allow counties to better work together and help the state implement the new sameday voter registration law, which takes effect with this primary. Assistant Secretary of State Mark Neary, one of the project’s leaders, said he understands that some counties might be nervous, but “I’m also confident in the VoteWA system and being able to conduct our primary.” The general consensus has been to test the new system this year, said Neary, which is an off-year election cycle with fewer races.

Ranger and the Rearrangers will perform swing and gypsy jazz in Sequim during a free outdoor concert Tuesday. The city of Sequim’s Concerts in the Park performance will begin at 6 p.m. at the James Center for the Performing Arts at Carrie Blake Park, 202 N. Blake Ave. The Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce will take a break from its Wednesday summer outdoor concerts, instead offering a Fourth of July celebration next week. Port Townsend Main Street Program’s Concerts on Dock will begin July 11 with a performance by Jim Nyby and the F Street Band.

Sequim The city of Sequim’s Concerts in the Park will take place at 6 p.m. Tuesdays through Aug. 27. Admission is free and open to the public. Attendees are urged to bring portable lawn chairs and blankets for seating. Here is the schedule for the rest of the season: •  July 9 — John Hoover and the Mighty Quinns; music of John Denver. • July 16 — Stardust Big Band; 18-piece Big Band music. • July 23 — Bread & Gravy; blues, classic rock

December 30, 1963 June 18, 2019 LaPush resident, Darlene Rose Oya-Flores passed away on June 18, 2019, in Forks. Born to Alvin Oya and Thelma Fulton, on December 20, 1963, in Canada, she moved to the Olympic Peninsula in 1986. On February 21, 1990, Darlene married the love of her life, Michael Flores, Sr. They were married for 29 years. During her life, Darlene was a college student, a secretary, housekeeper and full-time mother and homemaker. Darlene loved being the best “gramma” to her grandchildren. She was

Darlene Rose Oya-Flores happiest taking care of her family! Her other interests included yard work, playing games on her phone and slot machines. Darlene was preceded

By Conor Dowley Olympic Peninsula News Group

SEQUIM — Interim Superintendent Rob Clark plans to focus first on passage of a levy for the Sequim School District and on personnel problems when he begins work July 8. “The two big things we need to get done early,” Clark said, “are to get ready for the (Educational Programs & Operations) levy coming up and make sure

in death by her parents, Thelma and Alvin Oya, of Little Boston; sister, Mary McCarty, of Neah Bay; sister, Terri Lee Jack, of Puyallup; brother, Carl Allen, of Skokomish. She is survived by her husband, Michael Flores, Sr.; sons, Nathan, Austin and Michael Flores, and Byron “Joey” Fryberg; grandchildren, Angel, Cheyanne, Chaz Lynn and Kalob Fryberg; brothers, Clifford Blevins and Richard Blevins; her cat, Precious; and her dogs, Riley and Chewy. Darlene’s funeral service will be held this Saturday, June 29, 2019, at 1 PM, at the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribal Gym, in Port Gamble. Burial will be at Little Boston Cemetery in Port Gamble.

May 12, 1989 — June 24, 2019

after coming on board. He’ll also get to know the Sequim community with targeted outreach to local stakeholders, leaders, and organizations.” When asked if he was considering applying to be the permanent superintendent when that process begins later this year, Clark laughed. “I’ll have to ask my wife,” he said. “She’s been incredible following me all over the state for more than three decades. I’m going to have to get her permission for that one.”

________ Conor Dowley is a reporter with the Olympic Peninsula News Group, which is composed of Sound Publishing newspapers Peninsula Daily News, Sequim Gazette and Forks Forum. Reach him at cdowley@sequimgazette. com.

Angeles residence. She was 87. Services: No services have been announced. Harper-Ridgeview Funeral Chapel, Port Angeles, is in charge of arrangements. www.harper-ridgeview funeralchapel.com

Medical Center. He was 65. Services: No services have been announced. Linde-Price Funeral Service, Sequim, is in charge of arrangements. www.lindefuneral service.com

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Clark said he is familiar with the region because of serving as the Quilcene schools superintendent from 1995 to 1997. “My wife and I like the area a lot, and we have a condo in Port Ludlow because of it,” he said. “Two of our three children also live in the greater Seattle area, so being closer to our family would be a huge benefit to us. “But more than that,” Clark said, “I think I have the skills to really help this district. There’s things that need doing that my history shows I can do, and I want to do that for this community.” School Board president Brian Kuh said that improving district-wide communication will be a key focus for Clark. “He’s indicated his desire to reach out to all of our buildings and staff soon

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Downtown Port Townsend will rock with all-ages free Concerts on the Dock from July 11 through Aug. 29 at Pope Marine Park Plaza, on Water Street between Madison and Monroe streets. Seating will open at 4:30 p.m. and music will

Forks resident Donald Eugene Fraker died from April 1, 1932 — June 24, 2019 Sequim resident Randy age-related causes at OlymAlice Barton died from Martin Johnson died from pic Medical Center. natural causes at her Port lung disease at Olympic He was 80. Services: No public services are planned. Drennan and Ford Funeral Home, Port Angeles, is in charge of arrangements. www.drennanford.com

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that passes. “There’s also several personnel issues I’m aware of that need to be addressed soon,” he added. Clark is tying up loose ends at the Milton-Freewater (Oregon) School District, where he has served as superintendent since 2013. He said he would be in Sequim for a few days before then on what he called a “time share” between the districts. Clark said he wants to spend some time building relationships with district staff and various community stakeholders who are involved in the education process. “Those relationships help us get things done,” Clark said, “and they bring a lot of people to the table productively when there’s something to accomplish.”

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The Port Angeles summer concert series is the longest on the North Olympic Peninsula with a performance every Wednesday evening at 6 p.m. — except this coming Wednesday — to Sept. 11 during the Concerts on the Pier. Admission is free and open to the public. A standard of Port Angeles summers for more than 20 years, these community concerts — sponsored by Key Bank, Elwha River Casino, Red Lion Hotel and the Peninsula Daily News — are presented against the backdrop of the Port Angeles Harbor in one direction and the Olympic Mountains in the other. Audience members are encouraged to bring blankets or chairs to these infor-

run from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Attendees should bring chairs or blankets and settle in to listen, dance, see friends, enjoy a drink and have a bite. In the event of rain, concerts will be moved to the Cotton Building, 607 Water St. Local vendors and beer garden serving Port Townsend Brewing Co., Port Townsend Vineyards and local ciders (Eaglemount, Alpenfire or Finnriver) will contribute to the festival atmosphere. Reusable pottery wine and cider cups created by LaughinGnome Pottery and stainless steel pint cups and will be available for rent for $5 at the shows. When guests return the cup, they get their $5 back. Here is the schedule for the rest of the season: •  July 18 — Uncle Funk and Dope Six; dance music. •  July 25 — Micaela Kingslight Band; bluesrock. •  Aug. 1 — Joy in Mudville; Americana/roots rock. •  Aug. 15 — Daring Greatly; classic rock and soul. •  Aug. 22 — The Whole Bolivian Army; indie rock. •  Aug. 29 — Kevin Mason and the PT AllStars; rock, soul, Motown, rhythm and blues. For the schedule, see ptmainstreet.org/concertson-the-dock.

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mal, family-friendly performances. If heavy wind or bad weather is expected, the performances might be moved to The Gateway pavilion at the corner of Lincoln and Front streets. Here is the schedule for the rest of the season: • July 10 — Crushwater; indie, rock. • July 17 — Three Too Many; progressive rock. • July 24 — Kayohti, swamp funk. •  July 31 — Backwoods Hucksters; acoustic Americana roots. •  Aug. 7 — Fat Chance; classic rock. • Aug. 14 — The Weavils; bluegrass. •  Aug. 21 — Sweet T & Justice; American rock. • Aug. 28 — The Talbott Bros.; rock and blues storytelling. • Sept. 4 — Black Diamond Junction; classic hits. • Sept. 11 — Champagne Sunday; rock. For the schedule, see www.portangeles.org/pages/ ConcertsonthePier.

Interim school chief in Sequim set to focus on levy, personnel

Death and Memorial Notice DARLENE ROSE OYA-FLORES

and contemporary. • July 30 — Max Hatt & Edda Glass; contemporary, jazz, bossa nova and Brazilian. • Aug. 6 — Black Diamond Junction; classic rock, pop and country. • Aug. 13 — Blue Rhinos; blues and rock. • Aug. 20 — Farmstrong; folk, country and bluegrass. • Aug. 27 — Joy in Mudville; Americana/roots rock. For the schedule, see www.visitsunnysequim. com/202/Concerts.

Dollie Sparks

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Peninsula Daily News for Friday/Saturday, June 28-29, 2019

Commentary

PAGE

A9

The anti-college is on the rise BY MOLLY WORTHEN

source of contention. “Some students feel strongly that Plato has a great deal to offer their intelA SMALL BAND of students lectual situations, and some can’t will travel to Sitka, Alaska, this believe they’re being asked to month to help reinvent higher read a dead white man,” she told education. me. They won’t be taking online Moreover, romanticizing the courses, or abandoning the pursuit of the pure “life of the humanities in favor of classes in mind” risks alienating workingbusiness or STEM, or paying class students. high tuition to fund the salaries “For organizations that want of more Assistant Vice Provosts to be accessible to students in all for Student Life. walks of life, as we do, that They represent a growing means having some kind of value movement of students, teachers proposition that translates into and reformers who are trying to other parts of their life.” compensate for mainstream The point of bringing students higher education’s failure to help to live, work and read together is young people find a calling: to nothing short of “the cultivation figure out what life is really for. of wisdom, the living of a good These students will read life in thought and action, and works by authors ranging from selfless devotion to world and Plato and Herbert Marcuse to humanity,” according to the Arete Tlingit writers. Project’s website. The point is to “develop and But what philosophical founflex a more rigorous political dations underlie those ambiimagination,” according to one tions? course syllabus. “I do wonder whether or not They will take on 15 to 20 CHAD BROWN/FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES it’s mission-critical for an educahours a week of manual labor in tional institution to have a fully Michelle Jones, founder and president of Wayfinding Sitka, and set their group’s rules Academy. articulated metaphysics and ethon everything from curfews to ics and politics that underpin it cellphones. replicable model for these micro- — or to what extent that is tize canonical texts or universal Last summer’s cohort discourinhibitive to the broader project institutions,” Sweeney-Taylor questions — have sapped our aged the use of phones during of liberal education,” Marcus told said. confidence. class and service hours and me. Laura Marcus, 30, is one such “The question of the value and ordered everyone to turn off the “There is a deep-seated kindred spirit. purpose of living, of the sources internet at 10 p.m. human desire to feel you’re a She was an overachieving This is Outer Coast, one of an of fulfillment available to us as part of something bigger than high school student in Indiana mortal creatures with ambitions expanding number of educational yourself, and one of the problems when she read about Deep of the most varied kinds, has experiments born out of a deepof liberal modernity is that it Springs and became enthralled. been pushed to the margins of ening sense that mainstream doesn’t give you a whole lot “So much of the effort I was American colleges are too expen- respectability even in the beyond the self to subsume yourputting forth was only to polish humanities,” wrote Anthony Krosive, too bureaucratic, too self in. That gives secular institumy own GPA and résumé. I was nman, a professor at Yale Law careerist and too intellectually tions like ours a little bit of a staring down the barrel of a colSchool, in his 2007 book “Educafragmented to help students figquestion mark about what that lege education that seemed to be tion’s End.” ure out their place in the unigrounding vision is going to be.” a continuation of that same Outer Coast, founded in 2015, verse and their moral obligations Outer Coast and the Arete mode,” she told me. “I felt jaded.” offers one partial solution. to fellow humans. Project represent one strain of She was devastated to learn Bryden Sweeney-Taylor, 38, There are alternative colleges that Deep Springs admitted only higher education reform: call helped found the program in that replace traditional courses them the communitarian pragmen (the college welcomed its order to give young people a with personalized study; gapmatists, with liberal arts for the first female students last fall). taste of the education he received year programs that combine mind, labor for the body and an After graduating from Yale in at an older countercultural quasi-monastic retreats with ethos of secular monasticism for 2010, Marcus founded a Deep experiment, Deep Springs Colworld travel; summer seminars the spirit. Springs-style program for lege, which was founded in 1917. devoted to clearing trails and They are the descendants of women: the Arete Project, in the Deep Springs — a tuition-free, reading philosophy. philosophers such as John Dewey Blue Ridge Mountains in North highly selective two-year liberal They aim to prove that it is and educational entrepreneurs Carolina. arts college and working ranch possible to cultivate moral and She has recently opened a sec- such as Deep Springs College’s near Death Valley in California existential self-confidence, withfounder, L.L. Nunn. ond, coed program in rural out the Christian foundation that — combines intense study, manThere is a long history here. Alaska. ual labor and intimate commugrounded Western universities A second set of new programs The Arete Project — the nity to give students “a sense of until the mid-20th century. — the humanist individualists — Greek word means “excellence” the purpose of education not just in the broadest sense — calls They seek to push back owe more to the experiments of being for oneself but for someagainst the materialism and the counterculture era: schools itself “education for citizenship, thing larger than one’s self,” individualism that have satulike Evergreen State College, stewardship and leadership.” Sweeney-Taylor told me. rated the secular left and right, It operates on a “pay what you founded in Olympia in 1967; Outer Coast — which was co- can” model and bans alcohol, all at an affordable price. Kresge College at the University founded by Jonathan KreissIt’s a tall order. of California, Santa Cruz, tobacco, marijuana and recreTheir work is inspiring, but it Tomkins, an Alaskan who founded soon after; or the Jack ational drugs. The project began dropped out of Yale to serve in is also a sobering indictment — as a summer seminar with plans Kerouac School of Disembodied the Alaska Legislature — plans particularly for those of us who Poetics, founded in Boulder, Colo., to grow into a yearlong underto eventually expand into a twoteach in the humanities, whose graduate program (participants in 1974 by the poets Allen Ginsyear undergraduate program. job it once was to lead students can earn college credit). berg and Anne Waldman. The aim is to recruit Alaska in a survey of how civilization’s Like Outer Coast, it immerses These schools combined an Natives and other students from a small group of students in the greatest minds wrestled with interest in Eastern spirituality underrepresented backgrounds, philosophical problems. demands of self-governance, with the principles of humanistic but also to develop a program In recent decades, a stultifystudy and manual labor. Stupsychology and the human that reformers elsewhere might ing mix of hyperspecialized dents read a mix of “classical potential movement, which research and pressure to empha- copy — which means “being as texts and contemporary texts,” emphasized the goodness in all size “practical skills” — as well financially lean and economically Marcus said. humans and their gift for selfas a political reluctance to priori- efficient as possible, creating a The curriculum has been a actualization. THE NEW YORK TIMES

Peninsula Voices Protect the nation U.S. Rep. Derek Kilmer needs a wake-up call. We have elected our representatives to protect our interests. First among those interests is protecting us from bad leaders. We currently have a president who has broken the law. People should read the Mueller Report. The president continues to break the the law by obstructing justice. The only reason House Speaker Nancy Pelosi will not support hearings for impeachment is it doesn’t currently poll well, but that is not a reason to not do their job. When the Watergate

hearings started, impeachment wasn’t popular then, either. As people learned through the hearings what had taken place and then Nixon further tried to obstruct justice — see Saturday Night Massacre — people saw how necessary it was. Congress’s job, in part, is to ensure a check on the power of the president and hold him accountable. If they don’t, no one else can, and that is a very scary thought indeed. Start the hearings now. Richard Stewart, Port Townsend

Pernicious Regarding the letter “Pro-

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In the 1960s, psychologists such as Abraham Maslow and Carl Rogers challenged the dark, animalistic portrait of human beings advanced by behavioral psychologists and disciples of Freud — not to mention the grim vision of original sin in traditional Christian theology. Their ideas caught on among educators at a time when students were already in revolt against traditional curriculums. The result was the further collapse of eroding general education requirements in favor of radical student choice, which may have felt empowering in the short term, but added more confusion and doubt to universities’ sense of mission. Some reformers abolished traditional course grades and envisioned the professor as a “facilitator” and “flexible resource” who “relies upon the desire of each student to implement those purposes which have meaning for him,” as Carl Rogers wrote in “Freedom to Learn” in 1969. At Kresge College, students and faculty joined “encounter groups” and “sensitivity training” sessions to break down hierarchy and humanize a university that was heavily bureaucratized. Most of these new academies and seminars struck me as moral and philosophical “summer bridge programs,” boot camps meant to do what mainstream universities can’t — or won’t — take on in a comprehensive way. Other educators have created summer schools in basic skills, like writing, as a quick-fix attempt to help the rising number of incoming students who are unprepared for college-level work. It makes perfect sense that programs like Outer Coast and Wayfinding have sprung up to address another major deficit that afflicts students across the socio-economic spectrum, and which will leave them floundering at university and beyond: the inability to ask, and answer, serious questions about life’s ultimate purpose. Perhaps the proliferation of programs like these will push mainstream universities to recover the moral component of their mission, and to recognize that what students need — far more than gourmet dining hall food or fancier classroom technology — is a period of discipleship, a time of discernment. They crave a means to figure out how to do what we all desperately want: to submit to a community and an ideal larger than ourselves, without losing ourselves entirely.

________

Molly Worthen is a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times.

OUR READERS’ LETTERS, FAXES AND EMAIL

gressive lies” (PDN, June 19). That “power corrupts” is best illustrated by President Donald Trump’s abuses of his office and his indefensible blockage of Congress’ constitutional oversight responsibilities. As for “lies about global warming,” the denial of clear scientific evidence is truly delusional and pernicious. Why do media reports and opinion pieces, educators, bureaucrats and qualified subject matter experts so often support progressive ideas? Paul Krugman’s witty, but in my opinion valid, answer is that “the facts have a wellknown liberal bias.” Lawrence Jensen, Port Ludlow

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A10

Friday, June 28, 2019

CommentaryViewpoints

Big nights for Dems? It’s debatable INADEQUATE EXCUSES FOR missing the Democratic presidential debates this week: A) Ticked off that they didn’t Gail include Montana Gov. Steve Collins Baldwin — no, Bradford. Or Bullock. Anyhow, that guy. B) Busy watching U.S. vs Panama in CONCACAF Gold Cup Soccer. C) Not thinking about the presidential election until a year before the presidential election. Last one just doesn’t work, I’m sorry. Thanks to Donald Trump, Americans have been obsessing about the next election since 2016. Remember? You were stalking around the house yelling, “He’s lying about the popular vote!” The debates were held in Miami, possibly because the Democrats were worried Florida resented losing the national nominating convention to Wisconsin. At minimum, it might have made up for the party’s refusal to hold a separate debate on global warming, because it gives everyone lots of time to contemplate what happens when a state sinks into the ocean. Twenty candidates over two days was quite a crowd. But a few still had to be culled from the herd due to their pathetic lack of support. This is not something I want you to fret about. When a party puts John Delaney, Eric Swalwell and Marianne Williamson in a presidential event, you cannot possibly complain it’s being too picky. Those who made the cut will, of course, go down in history. The nation is not going to forget any-

one who qualified for a presidential debate. Today you’re a regular politician, tomorrow the new George Pataki. Democrats can take pride in the diversity of the field — six women were on stage over the two nights, which is a heck of a lot more than the old record of, um, one. Feel free to note still somewhat less than 10. The candidates come from 14 different states — not counting the ones who just moved into new residences in Iowa. Canny debate watchers wanted to make sure Julián Castro of Texas was onstage, and not his identical twin. I once interviewed Rep. Joaquin Castro, back when Julián was still mayor of San Antonio, and he admitted at least one instance in which the two of them had switched places to accommodate a tight schedule. Or at least I think it was the congressman. You never really know. With the debates now over, try to decide whom you liked best and send him or her a small contribution. Help get rid of big money and show Donald Trump what real swamp-draining looks like. That message is not necessarily going to come from the Democratic National Committee, which celebrated the debates in Miami with a fundraising lunch for big donors at the home of the founder of Lumber Liquidators. People, help prove it’s possible to run for president without the help of a wood-floor baron or hedge fund owners. Candidates have to file their quarterly report on donations soon. “By mid-July we’ll see if anyone has a massive increase,” said Brendan Quinn of the Center for Responsive Politics. If none of the candidates

knocked you off your feet this week, there will be another round of debates at the end of July. Meanwhile, you can practice just memorizing who’s in the race. There are lots of advantages to being able to list all the Democratic candidates, only one of them being able to impress your friends. Or, if you turn this into a habit, send them fleeing from the room. When I have trouble sleeping, I mentally recite the list of all the vice presidents. But I’ll bet the Democratic candidates would work even better. Although really, none of them are going to match Franklin Pierce’s running mate, William King, who died of tuberculosis after six weeks in office. Before that, King was a longtime senator who many believed was the lover of future President James Buchanan. I am just telling you this to encourage you to memorize lists. About the debates: A lot of Democrats just want to figure out who’d be the most attractive candidate in a race against Trump and will settle for anybody who seems reasonably adorable. Still, you want to know who stands where on matters such as health care. Only Elizabeth Warren and Bill de Blasio raised their hands for “Medicare for All” on Night 1, but almost everybody else managed to make their own policies sound pretty close. But the last thing we need is negative thinking. Presidential nominations can be as crucial as presidential elections. I’ll bet there were a billion times this year when you looked back on the last Republican primaries and told yourself, “God, if only we’d gotten Ted Cruz.” OK, maybe not so much. But even Ted Cruz would have held press conferences.

Anti-Trump crafters FUN FACT: I’VE been crocheting since I was 10, when my Tita Lisa taught me the magic of granny squares. Fellow yarn Michelle nerds will understand the Malkin heavenly bliss of spending hours at Hobby Lobby or Walmart immersed in a sea of alpaca, mohair, angora, super bulky and super saver skeins for blankets, baby clothes, hats, headbands, scarves, bookmarks and potholders. (Yes, I’ve made them all!) I passed on the tradition to my artsy teenage daughter; teaming up on a Christmas afghan for my dad last year was one of my favorite projects ever. Are you surprised? You shouldn’t be. Creativity and crafting transcend political ideology — or so you might think. This week, Ravelry.com, one of the internet’s most popular gathering sites for crocheters and knitters with a reported 8.5 million users, publicly smeared and ejected conservative members who support President Donald Trump — all in the name of protecting their preciously “inclusive” safe space. Excluding to include. Welcome to opposite world. On Sunday (there’s no rest for vengeful social justice warriors), Ravelry’s founders announced: “We are banning support of Donald Trump and his administration on Ravelry. This includes support in the form of forum posts, projects, patterns, profiles, and all other content.” The progressive operators at Ravelry declared that every right-winger on the fiber arts forum who supports our commander in chief is really just a KKK domestic terrorist wielding sharp needles instead of flaming crosses and nooses. It doesn’t matter whether you support the White House because you are pro-borders, pro-life, proentrepreneur, pro-limited government, anti-collectivist or antisocialist. “We cannot provide a space

that is inclusive of all and also allow support for open white supremacy,” Ravelry management declared. In case you weren’t clear on Ravelry equating all Trump support with virulent racism, the defamers decried: “Support of the Trump administration is undeniably support for white supremacy.” So watch out, America. Knitted MAGA beanies are the new MAGA baseball caps of hate. “TRUMP 2020” tea cosies are the new white hoods. Red, white and blue twisted cable ear warmers are subversive tools of racist oppression. But here’s the thing I know from being in contact with conservative knitters and crocheters over the past decade: Ravelry’s ideological bigotry is not just about Trump. They simply cannot countenance anyone in their community who disagrees with them on any political matter. During the 2008 presidential election season and into 2009, I heard from Republican hobbyists whose lively discussion boards were shutdown on Ravelry. Janna S. wrote to warn that “while this may not be making waves in the headlines, there is an upswing in conservative censorship that has hit cyberspace.” A group on Ravelry called “The Bunker,” which had more than 200 members who discussed GOP politics and knitting patterns, was singled out and shut down after liberal, pro-Obama members complained about its presence. Ravelry accused the conservative crafters of a “culture of anger and “us versus them” stance. One of the Bunker’s active members, Melissa, reported to me that Ravelry co-founder Casey Forbes had replied to right-leaning users asking how peacefully expressing their opinions violated their terms of service by “making excuses for the fact that he just doesn’t like conservative people on his website. … Many of our members are mothers or grandmothers and are completely harmless. We’ve all been discriminated against because we think and believe differently.” Meanwhile, rabid leftists who promoted misogynist sweaters

slamming Sarah Palin as “c—y” went unpunished. A forum titled “What Would You Do To Sarah Palin” inviting liberal members to post physical threats was allowed to thrive. “The problem here is not that the site owners decided that they didn’t want an active, vocal conservative group on their site. That is certainly their right as site owners,” Melissa noted. “The issue is the double standard and the denigration of the reputations of all members of The Bunker and the injury and/ or destruction of some members’ businesses. The far-left is not only tolerated on Ravelry, they are nurtured and encouraged. Their bad behavior goes unchallenged.” This was more than 10 years ago, mind you, long before the latest wave of suppression, shadow-banning, algorithm-rigging, de-platformings, and defamation of right-minded people by Twitter, Facebook and Google/ YouTube. The speech-squelching imperative of the far left is a thread that traces back to the 1960s, when radical philosopher Herbert Marcuse popularized the “repressive tolerance” theory of modern progressives. “Liberating tolerance would mean intolerance against movements from the right and toleration of movements from the left,” Marcuse taught. “Certain things cannot be said, certain ideas cannot be expressed, certain policies cannot be proposed.” In advance of the 2020 election, no space in the internet square is safe from “inclusive” exclusion. Silicon Valley’s overlords, such as Ravelry’s petty tyrants, have no interest in promoting diversity, discussion and community. They are bent on decimating debate and dissent while wrapped in thick, woolly blankets of hypocrisy and sanctimony.

_________ Michelle Malkin is host of “Michelle Malkin Investigates” on CRTV.com. Her column appears in the PDN every Friday. Email writemalkin@gmail. com.

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Peninsula Daily News for Friday/Saturday, June 28-29, 2019

Sports

SECTION

B

Outdoors

Summer rainfall brings in the kings THE KING BITE picked up in a big way over the last two days off of Neah Bay, with some impressive results Thursday for charter anglers fishing Swiftsure Bank with Tom Burlingame of Excel Fishing Charters (360-374-2225 or excelfishingcharters.com). I could sense the smile on Michael Burlingame’s Carman face when he started to discuss the day’s fishing during a Thursday afternoon phone call. “I almost hate to give you a report because it was so good out there that I hate to disappoint people when they come out if they don’t have a similar experience,” Burlingame said. “The chinook fishing was just unbelievable.” Despite the ocean salmon season kicking off last Saturday, Burlingame hadn’t fished for salmon this week. “It had been really slow and I hadn’t fished salmon at all because of that,” Burlingame said. “But today it was an epic bite.”

Rainfall helpful I check the weather radar a couple of times a day out of habit and I was concerned for anyone out Thursday due to the rainbow color scheme running east to west across the western portion of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and in the Pacific Ocean west of Neah Bay. But those worries were for naught. It was plenty wet and raingear was a necessity, but Burlingame and another charter operator fishing for halibut said conditions were otherwise optimal. “Just rain,” Burlingame said. “The ocean was flat as can be.” I’ll credit those recent rains for the pickup in king catches. “It’s a long-held axiom that it’s the first rain of summer that gets the chinook moving,” said Quilcene’s Ward Norden, a former fisheries biologist and owner of Snapper Tackle Co., Burlingame’s boat was fishing with larger, Luhr Jensen Superior Commercial spoons — not the type of recreational spoon you’re going to find at Swain’s, Jerry’s Bait or Brian’s Sporting Goods, but the color scheme was the same. The largest king of the day, a chinook a little larger than 28 pounds, hit a cookies and cream colored spoon. “I fish a little different than most and I was fishing big spoons,” Burlingame said. “The big one hit the cookies and cream and we had a gold one out there that was performing just as well.” That large king was hungry, Burlingame said. “It was a dandy and it had a 1½-pound hake in it. “I’ve never seen that before, such a big fish inside another fish.” Burlingame said the hake was a relatively recent meal for the king, so my thought was it already had a bit of breakfast. “It wanted a little dessert,” Burlingame said.

Halibut bite strong Ben Maxson of Windsong Charters (360-640-8728 or fishneahbay. com) had his customers fishing offshore for halibut Thursday. “Plenty of halibut and ling cod caught at 72-Square,” Maxson said as he brought the boat back to Neah Bay Thursday afternoon. “The ocean was flat clam but you’d better be wearing your rain gear.” Halibut’s popularity has Maxson and crew fishing for flatfish on open days (today and Saturday are the last scheduled halibut dates of the season for Marine areas 1-10). TURN

TO

OUTDOORS/B3

RELIGION, COMICS, WEATHER In this section

PA sweeps doubleheader Scalzo tosses three-hitter BY MICHAEL CARMAN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — After seeing their series opener with the Yakima Valley Pippins postponed due to rain, the Port Angeles Lefties had double the fun on Wednesday. The Lefties rode outstanding pitching, two Matt Christian home runs and a timely error to a doubleheader sweep of Yakima Valley, winning by final scores of 4–1 and 5–4. Port Angeles only had two hits in the opening game, but they were both clutch. Following a walk and hit batter in the home half of the first inning, Christian deposited a Mark Finkelnburg offering over the left-field wall to give the Lefties a 3–1 lead. Christian, a returner from the 2018 Lefties, then doubled in the sixth inning, stole third and scored on a throwing error. Christian’s heroics were more than enough for Frankie Scalzo, who was in control from the get-go. Scalzo threw a complete game three-hitter in the seven-inning contest, facing

DAVE LOGAN/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Port Angeles’ Frankie Scalzo tossed a complete-game, three-hitter, striking out six and walking none in the first game of the Lefties’ doubleheader sweep of the Yakima Valley Pippins on Wednesday. just two batters over the minimum. He did not walk a batter and struck out six. Only two balls left the infield against Scalzo, who improved his ERA to a team-leading 1.80. The Pippins plated three runs (one earned) against Kyle Hamrick in the first inning of the nightcap, but Christian once again had an answer. He hit another three-run shot in the bottom of the first, also to left

field, to tie the game at 3. The teams traded single tallies in the fourth with Trevor Rosenberg plating Nick DiPonzio via a base hit for the Lefties. With the score still tied in the final scheduled inning of the doubleheader, Gavin Rork led off with an infield single and advanced on a throwing error. Evan Hurn walked and both runners advanced on a passed

ball. Nick Brown then struck out Charlie Nasuti before intentionally walking Christian. After C.J. Schauwecker struck out, Ethan Groff hit a bouncer to short that went off the glove of Tanner Parker for a game-ending error and a walk-off win. The Lefties went for the series sweep late Thursday and will be back at it tonight in the opener of a three-game set with the Bend Elks at 6:35 p.m.

France no underdog Brew

Crew beats Seattle

BY ANNE PETERSON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PARIS — The United States has its ranking and its trophies, and that’s all the motivation France needs. The Americans face the French on Friday night at the Women’s World Cup, a match that’s been described as a final in the quarterfinals. It really has it all: The defending champions against the upstart hosts. The City of Lights. A sellout crowd. “They’ve got a great trophy cabinet and we still have everything to prove,” French captain Amandine Henry said. The only downside? The country is in the midst of a heat wave and temperatures are expected to soar into the 90s, although a 9 p.m. local time start should bring some cooling. Les Bleues, ranked No. 4 in the world, finished atop its group before overcoming a determined challenge from Brazil on Sunday night to reach the quarterfinals. France also reached the quarterfinals at the 2015 World Cup in Canada but fell to Germany on penalties after a 1-1 draw. The team’s best finish at the tournament was fourth in 2011 after losing 2-1 in the third-place match to Sweden. France had lost 3-1 in the semi-

BY ANDREW WAGNER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. fans wait for the start of Monday’s World Cup match against Spain. Team USA faces host France today at noon on Fox (Channel 13). finals to the Americans. But France has seen its profile rise considerably in recent years, coinciding with the growth of its domestic professional league. Seven players on France’s roster play for Lyon, which routed Barcelona 4-1 to win the women’s Champions League for the fourth straight year and sixth time overall. “From where we were four years ago, and where France was four years ago, I think both of us are much stronger teams. I think just the women’s game in general has grown tremendously,” U.S. star Megan Rapinoe said. “I guess the task for each team is to be the team that is growing as fast as the game is, keeping up on that and even

being the one that is pushing the game forward.” France is seeking to become the first nation to simultaneously hold the men’s and women’s World Cup trophies. The men won last year in Russia.

Seeking fourth Cup The United States already has three World Cup trophies, most of any nation. The Americans emphatically beat Japan 5-2 to win in Canada, highlighted by Carli Lloyd’s hat trick. Vying for a fourth title in France, the United States faced a physical knockout-round opener against Spain. TURN

TO

CUP/B2

MILWAUKEE — Facing the prospect of a three-game sweep by the last-place Seattle Mariners, the Milwaukee Brewers rediscovered their winning formula. Orlando Arcia hit a threerun homer and the Brewers snapped a two-game skid with a 4-2 victory over the Mariners on Thursday. “We needed it,” outfielder Christian Yelich said. “That’s the kind of game we’re accustomed to playing. That’s us, as a team, that kind of game but it just hasn’t worked out for us over the last few weeks. It’s been a tough stretch, for sure, but we showed signs of getting back on track and doing what we’re capable of.” Yelich narrowly missed his MLB-leading 30th home run of the season in the first inning. TURN

TO

M’S/B3

Briefly . . . PC Pirates host Fourth of July Cornhole event PORT ANGELES — The Peninsula College Alumni Pirates in the Park Cornhole Tournament will be held along the waterfront at Pebble Beach park, corner of W. Railroad Ave. and N. Oak St., as part of a community Fourth of July celebration Thursday. Cornhole is a lawn game in which players throw bean bags at a raised platform or board with a hole in the end. Points are scored by tossing the bags inside the hole or throwing the bags on the board. Two-person teams with players ages 18 years or older can compete in the event. Registration will be held from 11 a.m. to noon, with the tournament beginning at noon and finishing up by 5 p.m. The cost is $35 per team for the public, $25 for Peninsula College alumni. Cash prizes are available — the winning team earns $200,

Forks FC won the championship of the City of Port Angeles Parks & Recreation Department/Peninsula College Spring Adult Coed Soccer League. while the runner-ups bag $50. To register, or for more information email Tim Tucker at ttucker@pencol.edu. Other activities planned at the park on the holiday include a Balls in the Boat fundraiser for Habitat for Humanity, in which golfers can attempt to chip biodegradeable golf balls into a boat off shore; a putt for wine contest; a Cedars at

Dungeness food tent catered by the course’s Stymies Bar & Grill; and a beer garden hosted by the Port Angeles Lefties.

Home run derby PORT ANGELES — What’s more American than baseball, apple pie and hot dogs? Port Angeles Lefties players will compete in a home run derby

event just off City Pier in Port Angeles from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. on the Fourth of July. Lefties owner Matt Acker said the event will be very similar to the 2018 West Coast League All-Star Game Home Run Derby held last July at City Pier. Players will swing for the fences from a barge just offshore. A containment-boom normally used for oil spills will be set up to serve as a “fence” and keep the balls in one area for easier pickup. Lefties players and coaches also will march in the grand parade at 6 p.m.

Pickleball tourney PORT ANGELES — A pickleball tournament will be held on the upper parking deck of the Landing Mall, 115 E. Railroad Ave., from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the Fourth of July. The event is open to all and prizes will be awarded to winners. To register, email sbenit55@ hotmail.com. TURN

TO

BRIEFS/B2


B2

SportsRecreation

Friday, June 28, 2019

Today’s

SPORTS ON TV

Scoreboard Calendar

Detroit

Today Baseball: Wilder Senior vs. Lakeside BR at Bannerwood, 5 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Bend Elks at Port Angeles, 6:35 p.m. BMX Racing: USABMX Washington State Championship Series: Single point racing, 6 p.m.

Saturday Baseball: Wilder Junior vs. Lakeside Recovery at Newport High School, 9 a.m.; Bend Elks at Port Angeles, 6:35 p.m. BMX Racing: USABMX Washington State Championship Series: double-point racing, 1 p.m.

West Coast League Overall Standings North Division W L Bellingham 12 6 Victoria 13 7 Port Angeles 9 11 Wenatchee 7 10 Yakima Valley 8 12 Kelowna 6 11 South Division W L Walla Walla 12 5 Corvallis 11 6 Ridgefield 10 7 Bend 8 9 Portland 8 12 Cowlitz 5 13

Pct. GB .667 — .650 — .450 4 .412 4½ .400 5 .353 5½ Pct. GB .706 — .647 1 .588 2 .471 4 .400 5½ .278 7½

Baseball

National League

American League Houston Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle Minnesota Cleveland Chicago Kansas City

26 50 .342 24 East Division W L Pct GB New York 52 28 .650 — Tampa Bay 46 35 .568 6½ Boston 44 38 .537 9 Toronto 29 52 .358 23½ Baltimore 22 58 .275 30 Wednesday’s Games Chicago White Sox 8, Boston 7 N.Y. Yankees 8, Toronto 7 Cleveland 5, Kansas City 3 San Diego 10, Baltimore 5 Texas 4, Detroit 1 Oakland 2, St. Louis 0 L.A. Angels 5, Cincinnati 1 Pittsburgh 14, Houston 2 Minnesota 6, Tampa Bay 4 Seattle 4, Milwaukee 2 Thursday’s Games Tampa Bay 5, Minnesota 2, 18 innings Texas 3, Detroit 1 Milwaukee 4, Seattle 2 Pittsburgh 10, Houston 0 Oakland at L.A. Angels, late. Friday’s Games Cleveland (Clevinger 1-1) at Baltimore (Means 6-4), 4:05 p.m. Kansas City (Duffy 3-3) at Toronto (TBD), 4:07 p.m. Texas (Lynn 9-4) at Tampa Bay (Chirinos 7-3), 4:10 p.m. Washington (Sanchez 3-6) at Detroit (Norris 2-6), 4:10 p.m. Minnesota (Berrios 8-3) at Chicago White Sox (TBD), 5:10 p.m. Seattle (TBD) at Houston (Miley 6-4), 5:10 p.m. Oakland (Fiers 7-3) at L.A. Angels (Pena 5-2), 7:07 p.m.

West Division W L Pct GB 50 32 .610 — 45 36 .556 4½ 43 38 .531 6½ 41 40 .506 8½ 37 48 .435 14½ Central Division W L Pct GB 52 28 .650 — 44 36 .550 8 37 41 .474 14 28 53 .346 24½

West Division W L Pct GB 55 27 .671 — 42 38 .525 12 41 41 .500 14 40 40 .500 14 34 45 .430 19½ East Division W L Pct GB Atlanta 48 33 .593 — Philadelphia 42 38 .525 5½ Washington 39 40 .494 8 New York 37 44 .457 11 Miami 30 48 .385 16½ Los Angeles Colorado Arizona San Diego San Francisco

Peninsula Daily News

Today

Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 44 37 .543 — Milwaukee 43 38 .531 1 St. Louis 40 39 .506 3 Pittsburgh 38 41 .481 5 Cincinnati 36 42 .462 6½ Wednesday’s Games San Diego 10, Baltimore 5 Arizona 8, L.A. Dodgers 2 Colorado 6, San Francisco 3 Philadelphia 5, N.Y. Mets 4, 10 innings Washington 7, Miami 5 Oakland 2, St. Louis 0 Atlanta 5, Chicago Cubs 3 L.A. Angels 5, Cincinnati 1 Pittsburgh 14, Houston 2 Seattle 4, Milwaukee 2 Thursday’s Games Philadelphia 6, N.Y. Mets 3 Milwaukee 4, Seattle 2 Pittsburgh 10, Houston 0 Chicago Cubs 9, Atlanta 7 All other games, late. Friday’s Games Atlanta (Soroka 8-1) at N.Y. Mets (deGrom 4-6), 4:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Hamels 6-2) at Cincinnati (Gray 3-5), 4:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Velasquez 2-4) at Miami (Hernandez 0-2), 4:10 p.m. Washington (Sanchez 3-6) at Detroit (Norris 2-6), 4:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Archer 3-6) at Milwaukee (Chacin 3-8), 5:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 9-1) at Colorado (Senzatela 6-5), 5:40 p.m. St. Louis (Wacha 5-3) at San Diego (Lauer 5-7), 7:10 p.m. Arizona (Kelly 7-7) at San Francisco (Anderson 2-2), 7:15 p.m.

Women’s Soccer World Cup QUARTERFINALS Thursday’s Games At Le Havre, France England 3, Norway 0 Today’s Games At Paris France vs. United States, noon (Fox) Saturday’s Games Italy vs. Netherlands, 6 a.m. (FS1) Germany vs. Sweden, 9:30 a.m. (FS1)

9 a.m. (47) GOLF LPGA, NW Arkansas Championship (Live) 9 a.m. (304) NBCSN Beach Volleyball FIVB, World Championship Day 1 (Live) Noon (13) KCPQ Soccer FIFA, France vs. United States, World Cup Women’s Quarterfinal (Live) Noon (47) GOLF PGA, Rocket Mortgage Classic (Live) Noon (306) FS1 Golf USGA, U.S. Senior Open (Live) 4:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Football CFL, Montreal Alouettes at Hamilton Tiger-Cats (Live) 5 p.m. (25) ROOT Baseball MLB, Seattle Mariners at Houston Astros (Live) 6 p.m. (306) FS1 Truck Racing NASCAR, Camping World 225 Gander Outdoors Series (Live) 7 p.m. (313) CBSSD Basketball WNBA, Indiana Fever at Phoenix Mercury (Live) 7 p.m. (26) ESPN Boxing Top Rank, Richard Commey vs. Raymundo Beltran (Live)

Saturday 5 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Andalucia Masters (Live) 9 a.m. (7) KIRO Basketball BIG3 (Live) 9:30 a.m. (306) FS1 Soccer FIFA, Germany vs. Sweden, World Cup Women’s Quarterfinal (Live) 10 a.m. (13) KCPQ Baseball MLB, New York Yankees vs. Boston Red Sox (Live) 10 a.m. (47) GOLF PGA, Rocket Mortgage Classic (Live) 11 a.m. (313) CBSSD Basketball BIG3, 3’s Company vs. Killer 3’s (Live) 11 a.m. (26) ESPN Basket-

ball WNBA, Connecticut Sun at Washington Mystics (Live) Noon (47) GOLF Golf LPGA, NW Arkansas Championship Round 2 Site: Pinnacle Country Club - Rogers, Arkansas (Live) Noon (306) FS1 Golf USGA, U.S. Senior Open (Live) 12:30 p.m. (304) NBCSN Auto Racing NASCAR, Camping World 300 Xfinity Series (Live) 1 p.m. (2) CBUT Volleyball FIVB, Italy vs. Canada Nations League (Live) 1 p.m. (13) KCPQ Golf USGA, U.S. Senior Open (Live) 1 p.m. (26) ESPN Soccer MLS, FC Cincinnati at Minnesota United FC (Live) 1 p.m. (306) FS1 Baseball MLB, Washington Nationals at Detroit Tigers (Live) 3 p.m. (26) ESPN UFC UFC Preliminaries (Live) 3 p.m. (47) GOLF Golf Korn Ferry Utah Championship (Live) 4 p.m. (306) FS1 Soccer CONCACAF, Haiti vs. Canada, Gold Cup Quarterfinal (Live) 5 p.m. (13) KCPQ Baseball MLB, Seattle Mariners at Houston Astros (Live) 5 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Baseball College Home Run Derby (Live) 6 p.m. (26) ESPN UFC, Francis Ngannou vs. Junior dos Santos (Live) 7 p.m. (22) KZJO Soccer MLS, Vancouver Whitecaps at Seattle Sounders (Live) 7 p.m. (25) ROOT Baseball MILB, Eugene Emeralds at Hillsboro Hops (Live) 7 p.m. (306) FS1 Soccer CONCACAF, Mexico vs. Costa Rica, Gold Cup Quarterfinal (Live) 7:30 p.m. (313) CBSSD Basketball WNBA, Indiana Fever at Las Vegas Aces (Live)

Briefly: Forks events planned Continued from B1 tration and more information, call West End Motors at 360-640-1687. Forks demo derby FORKS — The Forks Old Fashioned 4th of July Demolition Derby will be held at the Tillicum Park Arena on Thursday. Gates open at 2 p.m. with derby action beginning at 3 p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance at the West End Youth League fireworks stand on Forks Ave., next to Tillicum Park. The booth is open from noon to 8 p.m. today; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday and 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. July 1-3 and beginning at 10 a.m. on the Fourth of July. Tickets also are $10 at the gate. For demo derby regis-

Dodgeball tourney FORKS — A dodgeball tournament fundraiser in support of Forks Wrestling will be held at the Tillicum Park tennis courts from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. on the Fourth of July. The tournament is open to ages 12 and older. The cost is $40 per team. Registration is available at 360-640-4085 or at the event.

3 on 3 tournament FORKS — A three-onthree basketball tournament will be held in the

Briefly . . . Seattle NHL team now has AHL affiliate

Springs, Calif. This arena will serve as the home for the AHL affiliate to the unnamed NHL Seattle franchise. NHL Seattle and OVG SEATTLE — The NHL’s have submitted a joint bid Seattle franchise doesn’t to bring an AHL franchise have a team logo, colors or into the league, currently even and general manager the AHL has 31 teams in but it does have a location the league. for its AHL affiliate. The team will operate The Agua Caliente Band as the Seattle’s top minorof Cahuilla Indians and league affiate and plans to Oak View Group announced plans this week begin play in 2021, the to build a privately-funded same season as Seattle’s 10,000 seat arena on tribal NHL franchise is schedland in downtown Palm uled to start.

BURIAL PLOT: Half cost, premium location.

Forks High School gymnasium on Friday, July 5. Registration will begin at 9 a.m. with games starting at 10 a.m. The event is a fundraiser for the Forks High School boys and girls basketball programs. There will be boys and girls brackets for ages 8 to 10, 11-13 and a high school division. The champions of each division will receive t-shirts. Games will be played to 21, with all shots made from beyond the 3-point line worth two points and all other baskets worth one point. The cost is $10 per player. For more information,

call Rick Gooding at 360780-0310 or David Hurn at 360-640-2301.

Forks Fun Run FORKS — The Forks Old Fashioned Fourth of July Fun Run will be held Saturday, July 6. The 5-or 1-kil0meter event will begin in the gravel parking lot across from the In Place restaurant, 320 S. Forks Ave., at 9 a.m. The race fee is $10 and t-shirts are also $10. The event supports the Forks High School boys basketball program. For more information, call Rick Gooding at 360-780-0310. Peninsula Daily News

The Associated Press

France’s Valerie Gauvin, left, celebrates with Viviane Asseyi, center, and Amel Majri after scoring a goal in a World Cup win over Brazil last Sunday.

Cup: Pressure

Continued from B1 Kadidiatou Diani — who wasn’t named to France’s Rapinoe scored on a pair World Cup roster — scored of penalty kicks for the 2-1 twice in a 3-1 victory. “It’s impossible to have victory in Reims on Monday night, although the game- any pressure. Quite the winner in the 75th minute opposite, in fact. It’s addiwas the result of what tional motivation for us. many thought was at best We’re coming up against Lakers make room Bonga and Jemerrio Jones minimal contact between the best team in the world. So the only pressure we The Los Angeles Lakers’ as well as a future second- Spain’s Virginia Torrecilla have is to have a good perand Rose Lavelle. The foul round draft pick from the price tag for Anthony Davis was confirmed after video formance,” Diacre said. Lakers, while the Pelicans got a little steeper on The game Friday night review. will get cash from WashThursday, with the tradeoff ington. “Yes, they do have some doesn’t come without conbeing that the team now shortcomings, but so does troversy for the U.S. team, The deal cannot be has the flexibility to bring every team in this tourna- which often finds itself the finalized until July 6. another max-contract star ment,” French coach center of attention. ESPN and The Washto play alongside him and Rapinoe was caught on Corinne Diacre said. “Spain ington Post first reported LeBron James next season. elements of the deals. played very well indeed. video earlier this year using Los Angeles have agreed But we know the United an expletive in explaining The agreement means to trade three players to States will be difficult oppo- that she would not visit the six players and four picks the Washington Wizards as were the price the Lakers White House if the team sition.” part of the deal that will Until Jennifer Hermoso wins the World Cup. It got paid for Davis. It is not a land them Anthony Davis 10-for-1 move, because the scored for Spain, the United the attention of President from the New Orleans Peli- newfound cap space will States had not conceded a Donald Trump, who called cans. goal in eight straight com- her out on social media. bring at least one other On Thursday, the day petitive matches dating to The Wizards will get player to Los Angeles. The Associated Press the 2016 Olympics, outscor- before the match, she said Moritz Wagner, Issac ing opponents 44-0. It was she stood by her comments, the first goal the United except the coarse language. “I stand by the comStates had allowed this year since a 5-3 win over ments that I made about Australia in an April not wanting to go to the White House, with the friendly. The Americans have exception of the expletive,” played the French 23 times, she said. “My mom will be with France winning just very upset about that.” She even suggested the three. But the last three matches have tilted toward uproar might help her France, with two wins and a team. “I think, if anything, it draw. The last meeting was a friendly in January, when just fires everybody up.”

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SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, June 28, 2019

B3

M’s: Can’t pick up the sweep Outdoors: Continued from B1 The Brewers wouldn’t threaten again until the fourth when Mike Leake loaded the bases with one out to bring up starting pitcher Chase Anderson. Anderson put down a near-perfect suicide squeeze to score Ryan Braun. And one pitch later, Arcia sent a three-run blast to right. Chase Anderson (4-2) bounced back after he allowed six runs in his previous start. Anderson allowed two runs, one earned, and struck out six in 5 1/3 innings. “Chase was really good today. I thought just the command of his pitches is what stood out,” Brewers manager Craig Counsell said. (Catcher Yasmani Grandal) did a really nice job of sequences. It wasn’t necessarily the strikeouts that stood out, it was the popups and the lazy fly balls.” Leake (7-7) allowed four runs, eight hits and a walk while striking out five over six innings. “I could have placed (the pitch to Arcia) a little better,” Leake said. “I could have gone off the plate and tested where he was at first instead of going right at him. “That one inning was the blemish.”

“It was nice to come back here,” Santana said. “The fans really appreciate me and showed it to me. The team -- I have a good chemistry with them. I really enjoyed being a Brewer so it was really fun to come back.”

First pitch

The Associated Press

Seattle’s Tim Beckham hits an RBI double Thursday against the Milwaukee Brewers.

Pro Football Hall of Famer Jerry Kramer threw out the first pitch. Kramer won five NFL championships, including the first two Super Bowls, with the Green Bay Packers.

Seager sits

Anderson said he hadn’t executed a suicide squeeze since he was 13 years old, cashing in on a couple of errors and scoring the winning run to lead a group of seventh graders against a team of eighth graders. “It’s kind of crazy to be able to do that in that moment, sparking a rally,”

Seattle outfielder Domingo Santana went 0-for-4 with a pair of strikeouts, ending his nine-game hitting streak. He batted .353 (12-for-34) during that run with four doubles, four home runs and 11 RBIs. He had two hits, including a double and two RBIs in the first two games against Milwaukee, which dealt him to the Mariners in an offseason trade.

Mariners 3B Kyle Seager got the day off again Thursday, still feeling sore after injuring his right hand during an at-bat in the series opener. “For me, there’s no reason to rush him back for a day game after a night game.” Mariners manager Scott Servais said. “We’ll give him another day today. We’ll see how he is over in Houston. He felt it in the swing. I don’t feel it will be a big issue.” Seattle continues its road trip tonight in Houston where LHP Tommy Milone (1-2, 3.35 ERA) — following an opener — will face off against Astros LHP Wade Miley (6-4, 3.51 ERA).

have traveled outside Michigan without his permission and missed a routine alcohol test. McDowell, a former Michigan State standout and a 2017 Seattle Seahawks second-round draft pick, was in court for a pretrial hearing on a February traffic stop that resulted in charges that he was driving while intoxicated, assaulted and resisted a

Lathrup Village police officer and was driving on a suspended license. His next court date is July 28. In the February incident, McDowell allegedly refused to hand over his license to a police officer and during a confrontation inside a gas station, grabbed the officer’s wrist and put his hand on the officer’s gun. The 6-foot-6, 300 pound McDowell eventually was

shot with a taser. Additionally, McDowell was arraigned in an April incident in which he is charged with receiving and concealing a stolen $74,000 pickup truck he said he bought on the street for $3,000. McDowell has not played a down in the league after suffering a head injury in an ATV crash in July 2017. The Associated Press

Josh Hader struck out three batters over the final two innings to earn his 19th save of the season. Tim Beckham and Daniel Vogelbach hit back-toback RBI doubles in the sixth for Seattle.

Flashback

Anderson said. “Getting it started and being an impact with the bat is a huge advantage for a starting pitcher.”

Santana streak ends

Briefly . . . Former pick McDowell back in court PONTIAC, Mich. — During troubled NFL hopeful Malik McDowell’s brief appearance Thursday in Oakland County Circuit Court, the judge took exception with a report he may

plesimple simple p step step

Continued from B1 “What we have been doing on those days is salmon/halibut combos,” Maxson said. “You are able to get out early, catch your salmon limit and then drop for halibut. We haven’t focused in as much for ling cod on those days, but that’s been okay. The chances of getting salmon and halibut is a good one.” Maxson said the chinook really seemed to show up Wednesday for sport anglers. “They are out there and they are all over the water column,” Maxson said. “We’ve been fishing almost exclusively for chinook at deeper depths, but we dropped our downrigger only to 60 feet and still encountered chinook. We ended up with chinook on the top as much as chinook on the bottom. “The size of the chinook that we are catching has been very nice as well, ranging from the low teens [pounds] to mid 20s.” Maxson thinks most of the recent coho catches have been inside of Tatoosh Island and in Area 4B inside the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Early catch totals from the state showed more coho catches than kings in the first two days of the fishery last weekend. “For coho specifically, those guys are catching them in the near shore near Neah Bay,” Maxson said.

Salmon, crabbing

He was out fishing recently and said the water levels resemble late summer already. Menkal also made the excellent point that salmon fishing will begin Monday off Marine Area 5 (Sekiu) and Marine Area 6 (Eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca) and crabbing opens for areas 5, 6 9 (Admiralty Inlet) and 12 (Hood Canal North of Ayock Point) on the Fourth of July. Menkal listed the tried and true techniques for salmon fishing: jigging, mooching herring or trolling your favorite cohokiller spoon from a downrigger. “Early on, it’s small bait fish. The candlefish or small herring, that’s what they are looking for. As for spoon color, Menkal suggests “anything with a shade of green is a good way to go.” Cookies and cream or cop car colors also work well. Menkal said blue and green spoons also work for squid. It’s a little early for squid to show up in big numbers, typically it takes some warm summer weather to bring them in the bay.

Salmon/steelheading Menkal will offer his two-part Introduction to Salmon and Steelhead Fishing course at his store, 609 W. Washington St., No. 21 in Sequim, from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday with part two following at the same time Tuesday, July 9. Menkal knows a ton of tips, tricks and locations to fish around the North Olympic Peninsula and offers the course for $50 per person plus tax. Menkal asks attendees to RSVP to 360-683-1950.

Brian Menkal of Brian’s Sporting Goods and More (360-683-1950) in Sequim was glad to see the summer rains. “Hopefully, that’s a little shot in the arm this week________ end for people going to fish Sports reporter/columnist for summer steelhead or Michael Carman can be contacted salmon on the West End,” at 360-417-3525 or mcarman@ Menkal said. peninsuladailynews.com.

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B4

FaithReligion

Friday, June 28, 2019

Remember to bring God with you this summer MEMORIAL DAY 2019 has come and gone. It is a day we don’t recognize quite enough. I think a whole lot of us see it as a three-day weekend coming into summer. If we have kids at home then we are usually wrapping up so many things school-wise that we just appreciate maybe a little respite before the final days of school and the onset of summer. I go through periods where I read a few books on a particular subject (gifts from family, usually) and this spring it was military history. First-person stories, not academic books. In my experience, history is one of those subjects that either one really likes, or one doesn’t care for at all. I have two sisters that really don’t care at all, so I’m not sure where I got the bug, but I definitely have it. If you’re looking for riveting reading, human stories, a summer book where you will learn and feel the struggles of the average guy as he tries to stay alive, try “With the Old Breed”by E.B. Sledge, “Guadalcanal Diary”by Richard Tregaskis, “All the Gallant Men,” by Donald Stratton and “Goodbye Darkness” by William Manchester. My favorite historical fiction of the past decade has been “All the Light

T

you.

ake God with you; say a prayer after you buckle up in the car; pray for safety, pray that you allow the Holy Spirit to guide

We Cannot See” by Anthony Doerr. I watched the Memorial Day special on PBS from the nation’s capital and I have to say we take for granted so many of the freedoms we have in our country. I served in the Marine Corps because I felt it was a duty, but really it was an honor. Semper Fi.

ISSUES OF FAITH Mike

Acheson

Summer plans What are you going to do this summer? I don’t want to sound corny, but I remember like it was last week shoveling all the snow off our walkways and deck. Epic snow. Will we have that again in our lifetime? God only knows, truly. I see the church as a bit more sparse as the days get longer and the sun comes out. God, if I need to point out, is not a Septemberthrough-May God. He doesn’t go on vacation. He created Yellowstone and the Oregon Coast and Chesapeake Bay and the Grand Canyon because God understands beauty — which is supposed to remind us of God.

It should at least. If you are Catholic, one of the joys of traveling is that there is always a Catholic Church

in the vicinity. Downtown Las Vegas, check. Disneyland, check. Rockaway Beach, Ore., check. Take God with you; say a prayer after you buckle up in the car; pray for safety, pray that you allow the Holy Spirit to guide you. I hold a small rosary in my hand much of the day to just remind me that God is everywhere. Believe me, this does not detract from the trip, it makes it more beautiful.

The first martyr Who was the first biblical martyr? If you said Stephen, you are correct.

Why was he killed? The people “could not withstand the wisdom and the Spirit with which he spoke” Acts 6:10. I love the verse a bit later, which states, “All those who sat in the Sanhedrin looked intently at him and saw that his face was like the face of an angel.” We know that Stephen was filled with “grace and power,” and this is a gift open to all of us. Stephen spoke the truth of Christ and was martyred; he must have known he would die for the words he spoke in that place and time, and yet, he had the face of an angel. Think about that.

Peninsula Daily News

Briefly . . . Unity speaker set for this weekend PORT ANGELES — George Lindamood will present “The Third Half of Life” at 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Lindamood will be the

guest speaker at Unity in the Olympics, 2917 E. Myrtle Ave. Sunday service begins at 10 a.m. Child care is available. For more information, call 360-457-3981 or visit www.UnityintheOlympics. org. Peninsula Daily News

Thoughts on politics The political season is heating up, and who welcomes this? Personally, I have a very hard time with the flipfloppers and love this quote from Abraham Lincoln: “Be sure you put your feet in the right place. Then stand firm.” Be a Stephen, not a Judas. This applies to each and every one of us. Moms, Dads, everyone.

_________ Issues of Faith is a rotating column by five religious leaders on the North Olympic Peninsula. Mike Acheson is director of religious education at Queen of Angels Roman Catholic Church in Port Angeles and St. Joseph Parish in Sequim. His email is mikea@ olypen.com.

Julius Motal/The Associated Press

New

archbishop

Archbishop Elpidophoros, left, and Metropolitan Augoustinos of Germany, right, walk toward the Archdiocesan Cathedral of the Holy Trinity for Elpidophoros’ enthronement ceremony as the new archbishop for America as young girls throw flower petals Saturday in New York. 962357566 6-28

Join us in

WORSHIP FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 337 West Spruce, Sequim

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE READING ROOM 121 N. Sequim Ave. For times and details:

ChristianScienceSequim.org

360-683-9174

UNITY IN THE OLYMPICS

www.unityintheolympics.org 2917 E Myrtle, Port Angeles 457-3981 Sunday Services 10:30 a.m. Reverend Donna Little, Minister

SEQUIM BIBLE CHURCH 847 N. Sequim Ave. 360-683-4135 www.sequimbible.org

Dungeness Valley Lutheran Church (ELCA)

Reaching out, sharing God’s love.

925 N. Sequim Ave. Sunday Worship

TWO SERVICES 8:30 a.m. & 11:00 a.m.

Pastor Russ Britton www.dvelca.org 360-681-0946

CHURCH OF CHRIST 1233 E. Front St., Port Angeles (360) 457-3839 pacofc.org Mike Soto, Minister SUNDAY: 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Worship Service WEDNESDAY: 7:00 p.m. Bible Study

SUNDAY Worship Service - 10:00 a.m. Nursery & Children’s Ministry

Fellowship Hour - 11:00 a.m. Nursery & Children’s Ministry & Adult Fellowship

WEDNESDAY 6:00 p.m. Youth Groups Middle School/High School

THURSDAY Awana-6:00 p.m. Shane McCrossen, Senior Pastor Pat Lynn, Student Ministries Pastor Bible Centered • Family Friendly

Reach over 40,000 readers with your message! Contact Jeanette at Peninsula Daily News to place an ad on this page. Call 360-417-7685 or email jelledge@peninsuladailynews.com FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH SEQUIM (SBC) 1323 Sequim-Dungeness Way Wes Funkhouser, Pastor

SUNDAY 10:45 a.m. Worship

office@fbcsequim.com 360-683-2114 www.fbcsequim.com

OLYMPIC UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP 1033 N. Barr Road, Agnew Adult & Children’s Services at 10:30 Sunday This week: Rev.Tom Bozeman

Olympicuuf.com

360 - 417- 2665 A welcoming Congregation

www.firstchristianchurchportangeles.org

ST. MATTHEW LUTHERAN CHURCH (LCMS) Sundays at 10 a.m. & 7 p.m. 132 E. 13th St. Port Ang. (360) 457-4122 www.stmatthewportangeles.org

508 S. Francis St. SUNDAY:

9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Worship Service WED. & SAT.:

7 p.m. Evening Service

FIRST UNITED METHODIST Tom Steffen, Pastor SUNDAY 10:00 a.m. Worship office@pafumc.org ❘ www.pafumc.org

PORT ANGELES CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Corner of 2nd & Race P.O. Box 2086 • 457-4839 Pastor Neil Castle 360-670-2393 9 a.m. Sunday School 10 a.m. Worship Service 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study

360.681.4367 : www.ehcchurch.org 81 Savannah Lane in Carlsborg PO Box 1355, Port Angeles, WA 98362

SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICES 9:00 a.m. & 11:00 a.m. Nursery & Kid Zone during services ADULT BIBLE STUDIES Meet throughout the week YOUTH (7TH-12TH GRADE): Tuesdays 6:30-8:00 P.M. AWANA (4YRS-6TH GRADE): Tuesdays 6:15-8:00 P.M. Mark Weatherford :: Senior Pastor Larry Loucks :: Youth Pastor Scott Adams :: Worship Pastor

HILLCREST BAPTIST CHURCH (SBC)

254 N. Bagley Creek Rd. Port Angeles, WA 98362 www.CSLPA.org cslportangeles@gmail.com Facebook: CSL Port Angeles 360-457-4801 Check out our webpage for times and details

CHURCH OF CHRIST IN SEQUIM 107 E. Prairie St., Sequim

SUNDAY 10 a.m. Bible Study 11 a.m. Worship

360-683-7333 45 Eberle Lane, Sequim Worship Services 9:00 a.m. & 10:45 a.m. Pastor Tim Richards

QUEEN OF ANGELS CATHOLIC PARISH

7th & Laurel, Port Angeles 360-452-8971

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH (Disciples of Christ) 2606 S. Race St., Port Angeles 360-457-7062 David Moffitt, Pastor Sunday School 9:00 a.m. Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.

BETHANY PENTECOSTAL CHURCH

DUNGENESS COMMUNITY CHURCH

205 Black Diamond Road, P.A.

360-457-7409 • Dr. William Gullick

SUNDAY 9:45 a.m. Bible Study, all ages 11 a.m. Worship Nursery provided WEDNESDAY 6:00 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer Call for more info regarding other church activities.

209 West 11th St., Port Angeles (360) 452-2351

www.clallamcatholic.com Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil: 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. Tuesday evening 6:00 p.m. Wednesday 12:00 p.m. Thursday - Friday 8:30 a.m. Confession: 30 minutes prior to daily Masses

(Wednesday & Friday) Weekend Confessions: Saturday 3:30 - 4:30pm

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC PARISH 101 E. Maple St., Sequim (360) 683-6076 www.clallamcatholic.com Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil: 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Mon., Thurs. & Fri. 8:30 a.m. Wed. 12:00 p.m. Spanish Mass Every 2nd Sunday 2:00 p.m. Confession: 30 min. prior to daily Masses (Wednesday & Friday) Weekend Confessions: Saturday 3:30 - 4:30pm.


Fun ’n’ Advice

Peninsula Daily News

Dilbert

Garfield

DEAR ABBY: My newly retired husband and I lead a nice life and are in good health. Our two girls are grown and established. Our battle is over my husband “taking back” some of the duties I have performed for years, like paying and mailing out our monthly bills, some of which I pay in person. This task is easy for me and never a hardship. We have excellent credit. He now wants all the bills to come to him online, and he’ll pay them online, leaving me out of the process. He knows I enjoyed doing it and considered it my purview. I want to continue to handle bill paying as I always have, occasionally taking a statement to a department store or whatever. Paying for checks is not a problem for us. I use a debit card for regular shopping and a credit card in certain stores. I am not a spend-a-holic. My husband paying bills online cuts me out of the process, and I don’t like it. I prefer the method I have used for decades. Is this more of a control issue than anything else? Any ideas? Stifled in Washington

by G.B. Trudeau

by Bob and Tom Thaves

by Jim Davis

Red and Rover

Abigail

________

Dear Abby: I met my husband 22 years ago and decided to move in with him. I was 21. My mother has never approved of him. He is a blue-collar, hardworking, huge-hearted man. We fell hard for each other, and I didn’t

by Brian Basset

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, the late Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology ❘ ARIES (March 21April 19): Situations can change rapidly. Bide your time, listen to what others have to say and keep your thoughts to yourself until you feel you have something concrete to back your opinions as well as the decisions you make. 3 stars

Rose is Rose

DEAR ABBY

care that he wasn’t rich. I know Mom Van Buren was disappointed that I didn’t marry a doctor or a lawyer. Instead, I married the man I fell in love with. The past 22 years haven’t been easy. She acts like she accepts him, but then she says horrible things about him. We both have helped my parents during some difficult times, but she still says things that hurt like, “I’m glad you two never had kids.” Well, lo and behold, I ended up getting pregnant at 40, and we have an amazing son together. I keep trying to start over with Mom, especially since my son was born, but she has continued her evil ways. I’m finally done with her, and my husband and I have decided to move to another state where my husband’s family lives so our son can grow up surrounded by loving people. I feel sad, but my mother is not willing to Dear Stifled: Yes, it is a control issue. It is also an indication that your accept us. Am I doing the right thing by moving? My father passed away, husband doesn’t have enough to do. Because the bill paying is partly a and we hung in through her verbal abuse just to make sure Dad was well social outlet for you, you should not taken care of. allow the task to be taken over. Anxious in Arizona Tell your husband he needs to find something else to do — mow the lawn, Dear Anxious: I’m sorry for what paint the garage, volunteer his time you and your husband have been put — but not the bill paying because it through. makes you uncomfortable. You have clearly tried to make the A compromise might be for him to relationship with your mother work. pay some of the bills online and you Because you are a mother now, focus pay the rest. However, if something unexpected on creating a happy life for your son, happens to your husband (illness, your husband and yourself. death, murder?), you absolutely must You are doing the right thing for know how the online system works so the right reasons. Your mother is you can assume the task seamlessly. toxic. Bon voyage.

by Lynn Johnston

Classic Doonesbury (1993)  ❘

Frank & Ernest

TAURUS (April 20May 20): You’ll have trouble making up your mind. Don’t jump to conclusions or get into a feud over something that may not be valid. Discipline and patience will be required if you want to avoid making an emotional mistake. 3 stars

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

GEMINI (May 21June 20): Trust issues will arise if communication breaks down. Ask direct questions, and be open to suggestions or advice from someone who has never steered you wrong in the past. Romance is in the stars, but so is deception. 3 stars

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

CANCER (June 21July 22): Actions speak louder than words. If something needs doing, do it yourself. Waiting around for things to happen or for someone else to step up will set you back. Now is not the time to ask for help; just do it. 4 stars

by Hank Ketcham

Pickles  ❘

by Brian Crane

by Eugenia Last

change or sign up for something because someone else does. A change at work or being pushed in a different vocational direction shouldn’t be looked at as a loss. Personal improvement is favored. 2 stars

bly isn’t. Look for warning signs when dealing with friends or relatives who may be hiding a secret or information that is detrimental to your relationship. Live life moderately, and offer others understanding and support. 3 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23Sept. 22): Sign up for something new and exciting. Apply your skills to trends that can lead to more significant opportunities. Attend a reunion or get together with people you have collaborated with successfully in the past, and see where it leads. 5 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): No need to flex your muscles. Offer others the same freedom you want, and go about your business. The changes you bring about at home will entice the ones you love to spend more time enjoying the comforts of your place. 5 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): An unexpected change will leave you feeling insecure. Before you let negativity interfere, look at the possibilities that exist. Relax, and let things unfold naturally. In the end, what transpires will turn out to be a blessing in disguise. 3 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Sit tight and concentrate on personal improvement. If you don’t count on anyone else, you won’t be disappointed. Look for a creative outlet that will encourage you to get involved in something that will expand your circle of friends. 2 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23Nov. 21): It’s to your advantage to know what others plan to do if you are going to consider a joint venture. Attend a trade show or meeting that will give you the facts you need to make a wise decision. 3 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Dec. 21): If something Don’t feel you have to make a doesn’t seem right, it proba-

Dennis the Menace

B5

Couple does battle over who handles household bills

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

Friday, June 28, 2019

The Family Circus

PISCES (Feb. 19March 20): An exciting way to use your attributes will arise, giving way to an unexpected opportunity, a chance meeting and a new way to bring in extra cash. Explore the possibilities, and take action. Don’t let someone’s excessive behavior ruin your fun. 4 stars

by Bil and Jeff Keane


B6

WeatherWatch

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2019

Yesterday

Neah Bay 58/49

Bellingham 66/52 Port Townsend 63/51

Port Angeles 59/49

Sequim Olympics Snow level: 6,500 feet 62/49 Port Ludlow 65/51

Forks 65/50

New

Forecast for Friday, June 28, 2019 Bands separate high temperature zones for the day. Seattle S e eat ttl tt 69/54 6 69 9/ 9/ /54 4

First

Full

L

Billings ngs ng gs 81/60 81/ 81 1/ /60 60 0

Minneapolis M nneapo po 90/72 90/7 90/ 72 7 2

L San Sa S an Francisco Francisco cisco 70/54 70/ 0/5 0/ 54 4

L

H

Last

Low 49 Look at the world

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

61/51 Sun keeps returning

MONDAY

65/53 While my clouds gently weep

Marine Conditions Strait of Juan de Fuca: E morning wind to 10 kt becoming N in the afternoon. Wind waves 1 ft or less. A chance of showers. W evening wind to 10 kt. Wind waves 1 ft or less.

63/51 Look at rain fall

TUESDAY

Tuesday July 9

July 16

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow 63/52 Moonrise tomorrow Still the clouds Moonset today gently seep

CANADA

9:18 p.m. 5:16 a.m. 3:08 a.m. 4:53 p.m.

Tacoma 67/49 Yakima 74/49

ORE.

Warm

Stationary

Pressure

H

L

High

Low

<-10

-0s

Showers

0s

10s

20s

Rain

30s

T-storms

40s

50s

Flurries

60s

70s

Snow

80s

90s

Ice

100s 110+

NATIONAL SUMMARY: Much of the nation will bask in typical summer Heavy, gusty and locally severe storms will pesTODAYwarmth and humidity today. TOMORROW SUNDAY ter the Great Lakes region. Severe storms are likely later on from Montana Ht Low Tide Ht High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht to South Dakota. Spotty, but heavy storms will dot the South, including the 5.5’ Florida 4:06 a.m.Peninsula. 0.9’ 11:10 a.m. 5.8’ areas 4:56can a.m.expect 0.0’ rain-free 12:05 p.m.conditions. 6.2’ 5:43 a.m. -0.8’ Most other

10:36 p.m. 8.3’

4:31 p.m. 2.7’

11:19 p.m. 8.6’

Port Angeles

2:16 p.m. 4.9’ 11:31 p.m. 6.6’

6:39 a.m. 0.6’ 5:58 p.m. 4.8’

3:05 p.m. 5.7’

7:11 a.m. -0.3’ 6:55 p.m. 5.3’

©2019 12:03 a.m. AccuWeather, 6.6’ 7:45 a.m. Inc. -1.2’ 3:46 p.m. 6.2’ 7:48 p.m. 5.8’

Port Townsend

12:37 a.m. 8.2’ 3:53 p.m. 6.1’

7:52 a.m. 0.7’ 7:11 p.m. 5.3’

1:08 a.m. 8.2’ 4:42 p.m. 7.0’

8:24 a.m. -0.3’ 8:08 p.m. 5.9’

1:40 a.m. 8.2’ 5:23 p.m. 7.7’

8:58 a.m. 9:01 p.m.

-1.3’ 6.4’

2:59 p.m. 5.5’

7:14 a.m. 0.6’ 6:33 p.m. 4.8’

12:14 a.m. 7.4’ 3:48 p.m. 6.3’

7:46 a.m. -0.3’ 7:30 p.m. 5.3’

12:46 a.m. 7.4’ 4:29 p.m. 6.9’

8:20 a.m. 8:23 p.m.

-1.2’ 5.9’

Dungeness Bay*

Astoria 63/54

Fronts Cold

3:37 p.m. 2.5’

Spokane 70/49

Seattle 69/53

Miami M 90/78 90/ 90 /78 /

High Tide 10:09 a.m. 9:54 p.m. 7.9’

La Push

Victoria 65/54

Subaru KOENIG 3501 HWY 101, E. PORT ANGELES

H

Atlanta At anta 89/72 89/72

July 24

Tides

Forecast for Friday, June 28, 2019

Olympia 66/55

New New w York Y Yor ork 91/74 91/74 91/ 91 /74 Washington W h ngton gto g o 94/76 9 /76 94 /76 /7 76

Houston Housto H oust ston 95/71

Tomorrow’s weather Washington TODAY

Ocean: E morning wind to 10 kt becoming N in the afternoon. Wind waves 1 ft or less. A chance of showers. W evening wind to 10 kt. Wind waves 1 ft or less.

Detroit D troit De t 91/71 91/ 91 /71 1

Kansas K n s City C City 93/73 93/73 93 /7 /73 7

El Paso 99/75 99/7

TONIGHT

L Chicago Chic C Ch cago g 92/72 9 /72 92/ 2

Denver Denver ver 96/63 96/ 96 6/ /6 63 6 3

Los Angeles L os A An Ang ng g es ge 80/61 80 0/6 0/61 61

Almanac

Brinnon 64/52

Aberdeen 62/52

National weather

Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 62 52 0.07 11.93 Forks 71 54 0.35 30.75 Seattle 71 57 0.02 12.81 Sequim 61 53 0.14 4.70 Hoquiam 66 52 0.06 17.35 Victoria 72 52 0.00 12.83 Port Townsend 64 53 **0.07 5.73

Olympic Peninsula TODAY

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

5:22 p.m.

2.8’

*To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

©2019 AccuWeather, Inc.

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SECTION

C

Arts & Entertainment

The week of June 28-July 4, 2019

Life on display

Rehearsals start for immigration play in Sequim

— Page 2

Last weekend for PT cabaret begins tonight

— Page 4

This image by Lockwood Dennis will be included in an exhibit at the Jefferson Museum of Art and History.

Voice Works finishes tonight in PT with show

— Page 5

Woodcut print exhibit by longtime PT artist slated PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — The Jefferson County Historical Soci-

ety will host a member’s preview party for the opening of an exhibit of Lockwood Dennis from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday.

The show will be at the Jefferson Museum of Art and History, 540 Water St. Individual memberships to the historical society are available at jchsmuseum.org/Support/ MembershipBenefits.html for $50. Admission also is available for $6 for adults, $5 for seniors and $1 for children during operating hours, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

daily except Tuesdays.

Know as ‘Woody’ Dennis (1937-2012), known primarily as “Woody,” painted and made prints throughout his life, creating 400 prints with 385 of those in editions of 20 or more, and hundreds of paintings. TURN

TO

DISPLAY/C3


C2

Arts&Entertainment

Friday, June 28, 2019

Peninsula Daily News

Strawberry fundraiser, crabs, philosophy set for Peninsula Peninsula Daily News

Olympic Theatre Arts

Kait Saffold, left, and Sharon DelaBarre read through the letters they transcribed by hand from the script on a set under construction.

OTA casts, rehearses ‘Immigrant Letters’ Olympic Peninsula News Group

SEQUIM — Olympic Theatre Arts’ production of “The Immigrant Garden ~ Letters” — set to coincide with Sequim’s Lavender Weekend in July — is cast and in rehearsal. “The Immigrant Garden ~ Letters” will run from July 12 to 21. Performance times will be 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sunday. Pay-What-You-Will night will be July 18, with the curtain rising at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $15 for the general public, $13 for OTA members and $10 for students with school identification card. Tickets are available at the theater box office between 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays or online at www.Olympic TheatreArts.org. Cast in the two leading roles are veteran actress Sharon DelaBarre as Louise Beauchamp, an elderly and somewhat eccentric English gardener, and newcomer Kait Saffold as Cecily Barnes, a young and dreamy Washingtonian gardener. Set in 1910, Caroline Wood’s play sees Barnes passionate about having a

flower garden. She finds a catalogue from “Mrs. Beauchamp’s Mystical Flower Seed and Herb Emporium” and sends off to England for seeds. The contact blooms into an exchange of letters between young Cecily and Beauchamp that grows into a friendship transcending time and oceans. “I love Louise; she starts off saying basically that she’s older so she’ll just do what she wants to,” DelaBarre said. “She embeds character into her flowers, the butterflies in her garden, the toads in the grass, whatever. She’s even given the brook in her garden a personality.” Saffold said: “Every time we rehearse I feel like it’s a really special project. There’s just a lot of good gems and lessons in there. Even though it’s a period play I feel like it’s really timeless.” Also cast is Della LaCour, who was born in the same city of Yorkshire, England, from which the character of Louise writes her letters. LaCour plays Helen Curtis, a friend of Louise. “I have not been on the stage since I was a child,” LaCour said, “but, wow, something told me I needed to go do this. The underlying

messages with flowers and life and roots and things — it’s really touching.” Director Cathy Marshal said the play touches her heart. “It conveys a heightened sense of relationships, especially inter-generational,” Marshal said. “You’ve got a young woman of seventeen and an older woman who is in her seventies communicating across continents. It’s a lovely idea just being able to be friends and get to know one another even with that kind of distance in 1910. “The play is lighthearted in a lot of places, but it’s also real sweet and tender throughout.” Additional cast members include Joe Schulz as John Burrows, a Washington arborist, Carl Honore as Professor Barnes, Cecily’s father and Nolan Gordash as Quentin, young Cecily’s love interest. “There are some real basic human lessons in this show,” DelaBarre said. “It’s about flowers and gardens on the surface, but the play is really about human growth and blossoming, and growing into your potential.” For more information, call the theater at 360-6837326.

Two birdhouse building sessions set at libraries Olympic Peninsula News Group

This activity is for the birds. The North Olympic Library System will offer Build a Birdhouse events at local libraries this summer. Sessions are slated at 2 p.m. today at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., and at 2 p.m. Tuesday, July 16, at the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave. In the case of inclement weather, the Sequim event will be moved to Sequim Middle School, 301 W. Hendrickson Road.

CENTRUM

Library staff and volunteers lead this hands-on building workshop, and participants will walk away with a completed birdhouse. An adult must accompany children younger than 8. Participants are encouraged to bring their own hammers (if they have them), but the library will have some hammers available for use. Lumber for the program was provided by Angeles Millwork and Hartnagel Building Supply, and the Country Woodwright cut lumber to create more than 300 kits.

The event is part of the North Olympic Library System’s 2019 Summer Reading Program, “A Universe of Stories.” This summertime program encourages children to keep reading during the summer break from school, features a reading challenge with fabulous prizes and several events for all ages. The program runs through Aug. 17. For more information about this and other events, visit www.nols.org/srp, call 360-417-8500 or email to discover@nols.org.

FIDDLE TUNES

Joel Savoy, Artistic Director

Fiddles on the Fourth Thursday, July 4, 1:30 p.m.

Fireworks and Fiddles Thursday, July 4, 7:30 p.m.

Fiddle Tunes Finale Saturday, July 6, 1:30 p.m.

Washington—Vivian Williams and Barbara Lamb New Mexico— Lone Piñon North Carolina and West Virginia—David Bass and Ben Townsend Ireland—Frankie Gavin with Theo Paige

Iowa and Georgia—Alan Murphy,

North Carolina—Joseph Decosimo and Travis Stuart Denmark, Norway, Sweden—Fru Skagerrak Virginia—Earl White & friends Quebec—Genticorum

Art Rosenbaum, and Marc Janssen Western Canada—Daniel Lapp & friends New England—Donna Hebert and Max Cohen Louisiana Cajuns—Mitch Reed, Jimmy Breaux, and Randy Vidrine

McCurdy Pavilion, Fort Worden State Park Tickets $32, $26, $16

Friday, July 12. Tickets are three for $5 or 20 for $20 and can be purchased at Lefties games or at the United Way’s offices located at 1601 E. Front St. Building 2 Suite A.

Nature Experience will host its sixth Picnic AucA strawberry shortcake tion from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. fundraiser, a crab feed and Saturday. a lecture on the history of The annual fundraiser philosophy are among the will be at Jardin Du Soleil, upcoming activities on the 3932 Sequim-Dungeness North Olympic Peninsula. Way. Information also is Senior dance The event features a available on the interactive live auction for handPORT ANGELES — calendar at www.peninsula crafted picnics prepared by Cat’s Meow will perform dailynews.com. Sequim restaurants and for a swing dance from food artisans. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday. PORT ANGELES Family activities will The dance will be in the include nature crafts, a Port Angeles Senior and native plant walk and stoVeterans memorial Community Center, 328 E. rytelling. Seventh St. PORT ANGELES — A Food and drink will be Refreshments will be veterans memorial service available from local purserved from 8 p.m. to is planned at 1 p.m. today. veyors Finnriver Farm 8:30 p.m. The service is held on and Cidery, the Peninsula Admission is $5 per per- Taproom and Pacific Panthe last Friday of each son; first-time attendees month at Veterans Memotry. rial Park, 217 S. Lincoln St. are admitted free. Admission is $5 per perDuring the ceremony, son or $15 per family; chilthe names of local veterans Art of gathering dren 5 and younger will be are read aloud, the bell is admitted for free. PORT ANGELES — rung after each name, a For more information, Play=Peace will sponsor rifle salute is fired and a visit www.olympicnature Art-Making and Connecbugler plays taps. experience.org. tion from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. The ceremony is preWednesday. ceded by a bagpiper who The free session of play Elks bingo also closes the ceremony by and creation will be in the SEQUIM — Sequim playing “Amazing Grace.” classroom at 1 of a Kind Elks will host bingo games Gallery in The Landing from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. SunStrawberry shortcake mall, 115 Railroad Ave. day and Thursday. For more information, PORT ANGELES — A Games will be at the strawberry shortcake fund- call 206-200-4542 or Sequim Elks lodge, 143 raiser for the Port Angeles email maryalice@ Port Williams Road. Farmers Market is set from playequalspeace.com. Admission is free with a 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. minimum buy-in of $10. Brain injury group The Strawberry ShortPlayers must be 18 cake Festival will be at the years or older. PORT ANGELES — A farmer’s market in The Proceeds will go to Elks brain injury support group Gateway Transit Center at will meet from 6 p.m. to scholarship programs, Lincoln and Front streets. other charities and lodge 8 p.m. Wednesday. Locally grown strawberThe monthly meeting is operating expenses. ries will be paired with For more information, held in the Wendel Room of shortcake biscuits from call Crystal Parker at 360Olympic Medical Center, 683-3034. Pane D’Amore and topped 939 Caroline St. with whipped cream. ProThe free support group ceeds will support the mar- is open to the public. PORT TOWNSEND ket. Live music and a family SEQUIM Conversation Cafe fund day also are planned. The festival will conPORT TOWNSEND — Market storytime tinue July 6. Conversation Cafe will meet from 11:45 a.m. to SEQUIM — The North Masonic bingo 1:30 p.m. today. Olympic Library System The group meets at will host Storytime at the PORT ANGELES — Alchemy Restaurant, 842 Sequim Farmers Market at Mason’s Lodge 69 will Washington St. 10:30 a.m. Saturday. host bingo from 6:30 to This week’s topic is The free early literacy 9 tonight and Wednesday program will be held on the “Admitting Mistakes.” night. plaza in front of the The lodge is located at Family movie Sequim Civic Center, 152 622 S. Lincoln St. W. Cedar St. Proceeds benefit Lodge PORT TOWNSEND — Storytime is geared programs. A free screening of the toward toddlers, preschool- 1982 film “E.T.: The ExtraFor more information, ers and their caregivers. visit www.pamasonic.org. terrestrial” is planned at Saturday is Kids’ Day at 7 tonight. the market. Paint and Sip The film will be shown For more information, at the Port Townsend Pubcall the library at 360-417PORT ANGELES — lic Library, 1220 Lawrence 8500, email discover@nols. St. Todd Fischer will host a org or visit www.nols.org. Paint and Sip event at The PG-rated film is 12:30 p.m. Sunday. recommended for children Crab feed The fundraiser will be aged 7 and older by Comat Civic Field, 307 S. Race mon Sense Media. SEQUIM — The St. during the Lefties game For more information, Sequim Vally Lions Club against the Bend Elks. call the library at 360-385will host a crab feed from Participants will receive 3181 or visit www.ptpublic 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday. a ticket to the game, a free The meal will be in Pio- library.org. drink and the supplies to neer Park, 387 E. Washingpaint with. Chetzemoka walk ton St. The event costs $50 per It will cost $30 per perPORT TOWNSEND — person and proceeds will son for a full meal and $20 The Olympic Peninsula benefit the United Way of per person for a half porExplorers Volkssport Club Clallam County. tion. will host 5-kilometer and Register for one of the For more information, 10-kilometer walks and a limited number of spaces call Steve Sahnow at 360by email Fischer at sawlty 683-9566 or email sahnows 20-kilometer bike ride on the Chetzemoka Interprebum@gmail.com. @olypen.com. tive Trail at 11 a.m. SaturFischer also has donated day. his original painting “Sum- Picnic auction Registration for the mer Ridge Nights” to the free event is from 8:30 a.m. United Way to raffle off on SEQUIM — Olympic to 11 a.m. at Memorial Field, 550 Washington St. The trail is composed of back roads, sidewalks and well-groomed trails but, according to a press release, is not suitable for strollers or wheelchairs. Walkers will be provided with maps, walking directions and start cards; water and restrooms will be available at the start and finish point. The Native Connections Action Group will host an opening ceremony for the trail at 1 p.m. on Memorial Field. Turn

Fru Skagerrak

TICKETS ONLINE AT CENTRUM.ORG OR CALL (800) 746-1982

to

Events/C4


Arts&Entertainment

Peninsula Daily News

Display: He captured

scenes of daily life Continued from C1 Although he lived in Port Townsend and captured many of the local scenes in paint, when he started exhibiting and finding a market for his work in Seattle, the work shifted to urban imagery from his visits to the city and other locales around the world. Dennis was born in Portland, Ore. After receiving his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in philosophy, he traveled east and was awarded a master’s degree from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston in 1968. He and his wife, Hiroko, moved to Port Townsend in 1975 and raised their son, Tasshi, in the town. They were an integral part of the arts community for more than 30 years. In the late 1970s and early ’80s, after settling in Port Townsend, Dennis created a series of black and white lithographs in which he explored the area’s imagery. Some of these are included in the Jefferson Museum of Art and History show. The exhibit also features nearly 50 of his color woodcuts. These prints, with their bold, quirky, simplified imagery, unique vantages and unusual coloring, became his most recognized and celebrated work, organizers said. The nature of the woodcut medium led to the development of a simplified graphic style which became his artistic signature. In these pieces his clever use of up to seven overlapping blocks, each with a different color, allowed him to create a single image with a wealth of rich tones. His inspirations for his

Friday, June 28, 2019

C3

Blown glass exhibit opening set for PT Peninsula Daily News

An exhibit of Lockwood Dennis’ work — titled “Lockwood Dennis: The Woodcuts,” — will also be on display at Davidson Galleries in Pioneer Square in Seattle from July 5-27. woodcuts came from many other artists, including George Herriman’s comic strips, Phillip Guston’s paintings from 1969 to 1973, George Walker’s industrial design of the 1930s and Cezanne. Most of these prints have never been seen locally even though they were exhibited for his entire career through Davidson Galleries in Seattle, where he is still exclusively represented. This exhibition is curated by Stephen Yates and presented in partnership with Davidson Galleries and the Lockwood Den-

nis Estate. Sam Davidson, Tasshi Dennis and Hiroko Dennis will attend the member’s preview Wednesday and provide remarks on the artist and his work. Davidson Galleries in Pioneer Square, Seattle, will published a catalogue raisonné of Dennis’s work in celebration of these retrospectives and will exhibit a simultaneous presentation of Dennis prints, titled “Lockwood Dennis: The Woodcuts,” July 5-27. The catalogue will be available in the Jefferson Museum Shop for the member’s preview.

PORT TOWNSEND — An exhibit of 1845 — 1,845 glass potatoes — is coming to the Museum of Art & History with a preview for Jefferson County Historical Society members Wednesday. The exhibit, “1845: Memento Mori,” is a memorial dedicated to the Irish Potato Famine. Showing for the first time at the Jefferson Museum of Art & History at 540 Water St., the work from Seattle artist Paula Stokes will be installed in the Women’s Jail at the historic City Hall museum and consists of 1,845 handblown glass potatoes piled into the form of a cairn. The exhibit will be shown from Wednesday through Aug. 26 and Stokes will provide a public presentation at the Museum of Art & History at 7:30 p.m. July 25. The Member’s Preview for 1845 will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday and the museum will be free and open to the public July 6 for Port Townsend ArtWalk. For historical society membership, go to jchsmuseum.org/Support/ MembershipBenefits.html. Stokes on the installation: “As Alexander Betts stated in a recent article in The Guardian about human migration, ‘Whether they are fleeing armed conflict or economic deprivation — or both — people will continue trying to cross borders in search of a decent life, and the global community needs to address this.’ ” “I have created an installation made of 1845 handblown glass potatoes that are piled into the form of a cairn. A cairn is a pile of

Rozarii Lynch/paulastokes.com

An exhibit of 1,845 glass potatoes will open Wednesday at the Jefferson County Museum of Art & History. stones that serves as a land marker, but in this case, it suggests a burial monument, and instead of stones, I am piling potatoes,” said Stokes. “The number of the glass potatoes, 1845, also the title of the project, references the year that the potato blight came to Ireland, marking the beginning of a period of mass starvation, disease and emigration. Over 1.5 million people died, and a further 1 million emigrated to Australia [or] Canada but mostly to America.” “About two-thirds of all Irish emigrants in the last six decades of the 19th century came to the United States. Most of those who today identify as Irish Americans are likely to be descended from post-Famine immigrants,” said Dan Mulhall, Irish ambassador to the U.S. Stokes is a native of Ireland who moved to Seattle in 1993. “Despite my full integration into a new world, I have never managed to shake the intense longing of living so far away from “home,” she said. “In creating this work, I honor my Irish heritage and culture, and all immigrants who have come before me.

“I also want to throw light on historical events that have shaped the present and open a dialogue on how we can learn from the past. I hope to create a bridge between the old and new, the past and the present. And in doing so I hope to elicit compassionate reflection that transcends the polarizing politics of our current time.” In addition to the installation of glass potatoes, the exhibition will feature a video with Stokes discussing her work and further resources curated by Stokes to give the public additional context to the installation. The exhibit will be shown at METHOD Gallery in Seattle from Oct. 18 to Nov. 30 and will include an artist’s catalogue. The installation will travel to multiple venues in Ireland in 2020. Stokes co-founded METHOD in 2013, and simultaneously began her work as manager of glass artist Dale Chihuly’s hot shop and special projects. Her educational background has been specific to studio glass and printmaking at the University of Washington, National College of Art and Design in Dublin, Ireland, and the International Glass Centre in Brierley Hill, England.

Discover the S'Klallam Historical Sites

Grand Opening Saturday, June 29, 1 p.m. Memorial Field, 550 Washington Street, PT

Dedication of NW Maritime Center Totem Corner of Water and Monroe streets, 2:30 p.m.

Schedule of Events: 8 - 11 am: Olympic Peninsula Explorers Volkssport Club walk or bike starting at Memorial Field. 10 am: Jefferson County Historical Society docent-led walking tours. 10 am - 1 pm: ReCyclery. Family Fun Ride starting at 1925 Blaine Street. Bring your own bike or borrow one from the

ReCyclery. Coffee, juice, bagels, cheese, fruit provided. 1 pm: Grand Opening of trail and Dedication at Memorial Field. Traditional Native dedication ceremony by the Jamestown S’Klallam, Port Gamble S’Klallam and Lower Elwha Klallam tribes. 2:30 pm: Northwest Maritime Center. Dedication of totem

pole donated by Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe. 11 am - 5 pm: Jefferson Museum of Art and History. Native artifacts exhibit. 11:30 am - 5:30 pm: Northwind Arts Center - Chetzemoka: Then and Now - combination of traditional arts and modern Native Creations.


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Arts&Entertainment

Friday, June 28, 2019

Peninsula Daily News

Events: PT story swap Continued from C2 with watercolors. For more information, call the library at 360-385For more information, 3181 or visit www.ptpublic call Todd Oberlander at library.org. 360-620-081 or visit www. opevolkssport.org.

Book Lovers’ Cafe

Story swap

Diane Urbani

de la

Paz/for Peninsula Daily News

Selena Tibert and Michael Covert star in the Cole Porter cabaret at the Key City Playhouse. The Port Townsend production is in its final week.

Final performances of Cole Porter cabaret at hand Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — The last week — and the final four performances — are arriving for the Cole Porter cabaret at Key City Public Theatre, 419 Washington St. The show, whose official title is “The Decline and Fall of the Entire World as Seen through the Eyes of

Cole Porter,” is at the theater at 419 Washington St. It has a live band playing onstage for a quartet of singers and dancers. They are Christa Holbrook of Port Townsend, New York City-based Selena Tibert and fellow guest artists Michael Covert and Matthew Alexander. Show times are 7:30 p.m. Thursday through Satur-

day and at 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Sunday; tickets range from $24 to $29. To purchase, visit key citypublictheatre.org or call 360-385-5278. The playhouse box office also is open for walk-up sales from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesdays through Fridays; then the theater lobby and bar open one hour before show time.

Open mic night in Sequim Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Fourth Friday will feature a free evening of Open Mic Readings at 6:15 tonight. The readings will be at The Lodge, 660 Evergreen Farm Way. Organizers invite attendees to arrive early for a beverage and snack at The Bistro and take a seat

in the Media Room. The Five-Minute OpenMic Readings showcase diverse writing talent — poetry, short-short stories and memoir excerpts. Both new writers and seasoned professionals are welcome to sign in. Five-minute readings are timed, so participants are asked to rehearse in advance.

Published writers are urged to bring their books to sell before and after the event. The Media Room is accessible to everyone, with an elevator to the second floor. Free parking is available. Guidelines for Open Mic are available from myerslindab@gmail.com.

PORT TOWNSEND — The Book Lovers’ Cafe will PORT TOWNSEND — discuss “Educated: A MemThe Quimper Storytelling oir” by Tara Westover from Guild will host a story 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Monday. swap at 2 p.m. Sunday. The free group meets The free storytelling monthly in the Charles session will be in the Port Pink House, 1256 LawTownsend Public Library, rence St. 1220 Lawrence St. In August, the group This month’s theme is will discuss “Exit West” by “Fractured Fairy Tales for Mohsin Hamid. Adults” in preparation for For more information, the guild’s ensemble perforcall Melody Eisler at 360mance in October. 344-3054 or email meisler For more information, call 360-316-9600 or email @cityofpt.us. quimperstoryguild@gmail. Yoga benefit com.

Summer band PORT TOWNSEND — The Port Townsend Summer Band will perform a free concert from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. The band will play in the Gazebo at Chetzemoka Park, 1000 Jackson St. For more information, call Miles Vokurka at 360-379-5710 or email ptsummerband@yahoo. com.

Landscape painting PORT TOWNSEND — The Summer Reading Program will host a session of landscape painting from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday. Participants should meet by the swings at Chetzemoka Park, 1000 Jackson St. Youths aged 6-12 years old will be able to look at famous landscape paintings then create their own

PORT TOWNSEND — Renee Klein will teach an all-levels benefit yoga class at 5:30 p.m. Monday. The benefit — part of the Feel Good, Do Good program — will be at the Madrona MindBody Institute, in Building 310 in Fort Worden. Admission is by donation and this month, all proceeds will benefit the Jumping Mouse Children’s Center. For more information, visit www.feelgooddogood. org.

Loss support group PORT TOWNSEND — Survivors of Suicide will meet from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday. The group for people who have lost someone to suicide meets monthly at Dove House, 1045 10th St. Meetings are free and open to the public.

For more information, call the Jill or John Hamilton at 360-302-0569 or email sos.jeffco@gmail.com.

Ukulele open mic PORT TOWNSEND — Ukuleles Unite will host a happy hour open mic event at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. The free open microphone event will be at the Highway 20 Roadhouse, 2152 W. Sims Ave. The public is welcome to come to play or to just listen. For more information, call 360-385-2233.

Beach walk PORT TOWNSEND — The Port Townsend Marine Science Center will guide a low-tide beach walk from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday. Participants will meet at the center’s aquarium and museum. The walk, which includes admission to the aquarium and museum, costs $5 per person, $3 for youths aged 5-17 years. Children younger than 5 and marine science center members are free. For more information or to reserve a space, call Carolyn at 360-385-5582, ext. 109 or email cwoods@ ptmsc.org.

CHIMACUM Climate on Tap CHIMACUM — The Climate Action Committee of Local 20/20 will host “Shopping for Change” from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Monday. Turn

to

Events/C5

AE    At the Movies Port Angeles “Toy Story 4” (PG-13) — When a new toy called Forky joins Woody and the gang, a road trip alongside old and new friends reveals how big the world can be for a toy. At Deer Park Cinema. 3-D Showtimes: 7 p.m. Friday; 12:15 p.m., 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; 7 p.m. Monday. 2-D Showtimes: 4:45 p.m., 9:10 p.m. Friday; 2:30 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 9:10 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; 4:45 p.m., 9:10 p.m. Monday; 4:50 p.m., 7:35 p.m., 9:45 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday; 12:05 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:35 p.m. 9:45 p.m. Thursday. “Aladdin” (PG) — A kindhearted street urchin and a power-hungry grand vizier vie for a magic lamp that has the power to make their deepest wishes come true. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes: 4 p.m., 6:40 p.m., 9:20 p.m. Friday; 1:05 p.m., 4 p.m., 6:40 p.m., 9:20 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; 4 p.m., 6:40 p.m., 9:20 p.m. Monday.

“Yesterday” (PG-13) — A struggling musician realizes he’s the only person on Earth who can remember The Beatles after waking up in an alternate timeline where they never existed. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes: 4:15 p.m., 6:45 p.m., 9:15 p.m. Friday; 1:45 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 6:45 p.m., 9:15 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; 4:15 p.m., 6:45 p.m., 9:15 p.m. Monday; 4:30 p.m. 6:55 p.m., 9:20 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday; 12:20 p.m., 2:45 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 6:55 p.m., 9:20 p.m. Thursday. “Men in Black: International” (PG-13) — The Men in Black have always protected the Earth from the scum of the universe. In this new adventure, they tackle their biggest threat to date: a mole in the Men in Black organization. At Deer Park Cinema. 3-D Showtimes: 7:30 p.m. Friday through Monday. 2-D Showtimes: 5:05 p.m., 9:55 p.m. Friday; 12:15 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 5:05 p.m., 9:55 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; 5:05 p.m.,

up to take on new threats in a world that has changed forever. At Deer Park Cinema. “Annabelle” (R) — Determined to keep Annabelle from 3-D Showtimes: 7:05 p.m. wreaking more havoc, demon- Tuesday and Wednesday; noon, 7:05 p.m. Thursday. 2-D ologists Ed and Lorraine Warren bring the possessed doll to Showtimes: 4:55 p.m., 9:45 p.m. Tuesday and the locked artifacts room in their home, placing her “safely” Wednesday; 2:15 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 9:45 p.m. behind sacred glass and Thursday. enlisting a priest’s holy blessing. But an unholy night of horror awaits as Annabelle awakPort Townsend ens the evil spirits in the room, who all set their sights on a “Men in Black: Internanew target, the Warrens’ tional” (PG-13) — See Port 10-year-old daughter, Judy, Angeles listing. At Uptown and her friends. At Deer Theatre. Showtimes: 4 p.m., Park Cinema. Showtimes: 7:30 p.m. Friday through Sun5:05 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 9:45 p.m. day; 7:30 p.m. Monday through Friday; 12:25 p.m., 2:45 p.m., Thursday. 5:05 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 9:45 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; “Yesterday” (PG-13) — 5:05 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 9:45 p.m. See Port Angeles listing. At Monday; 5:15 p.m., 7:35 p.m., Rose Theatre. Showtimes: 9:55 p.m. Tuesday and 4:15 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Friday; Wednesday; noon, 2:15 p.m., 12:45 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 5:15 p.m., 7:35 p.m., 9:55 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Saturday; 1:15 p.m. Thursday. Sunday; 4:15 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday. “Spiderman: Far From “Pavarotti” (PG-13) — Ron Home” (PG-13) — Following Howard directs a look at the the events of “Avengers: Endlife and work of opera legend game,” Spider-Man must step

9:55 p.m. Monday.

Please join us to celebrate our 2nd Anniversary! Friday, July 12th

Where to find the cinemas •  Deer Park Cinema: East Highway 101 at Deer Park Road, Port Angeles; 360-452-7176. •  The Rose Theatre: 235 Taylor St., Port Townsend; 360-385-1089. •  Starlight Room: above Silverwater Cafe, 237 Taylor St., Port Townsend; 360-385-1089. Partnership between Rose Theatre and Silverwater Cafe. A venue for patrons 21 and older. •  Uptown Theatre: Lawrence and Polk streets, Port Townsend; 360-385-3883. •  Wheel-In Motor Movie: 210 Theatre Road, Discovery Bay; 360-385-0859. Lucianao Pavarotti. At Rose Theatre. Showtimes: 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Friday; 3:15 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Saturday; 1 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Sunday; 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Monday and Tuesday; 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Wednesday; 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Thursday. “Small Island” (NR) — National Theatre Live performance of Helen Edmundsen’s adaptation of Andrea Levy’s novel about a journey from Jamaica to Britain, through the Second World War to 1948. At Rose Theatre. Showtimes: 11 a.m. Saturday. Due to strong, racially offensive language, the play has a British Board of Film Classification rating of 15 — suitable for ages 15 and older. “Toy Story 4” (G) — See Port Angeles listing. At Rose Theatre. Showtimes: 4 p.m., 7 p.m. Friday; 1:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; 4 p.m., 7 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, 1:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m. Wednesday; 4 p.m., 7 p.m. Thursday.

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“Rocketman” (R) — A musical about the fantastical human story of Elton John’s

breakthrough years. At WheelIn Motor Movie. Showtimes: dusk Friday through Sunday. “Booksmart” (R) — On the eve of their high school graduation, two academic superstars and best friends realize they should have worked less and played more. Determined not to fall short of their peers, the girls try to cram four years of fun into one night. At Wheel-In Motor Movie. Showtimes: second showing Friday through Sunday. “The Secret Life of Pets 2” (PG) — Continuing the story of Max and his pet friends, following their secret lives after their owners leave them for work or school each day. At Wheel-In Motor Movie. Showtimes: dusk Wednesday and Thursday. “Dark Phoenix” (PG-13) — Jean Grey begins to develop incredible powers that corrupt and turn her into a Dark Phoenix. Now the X-Men will have to decide if the life of a team member is worth more than all of humanity. At Wheel-In Motor Movie. Showtimes: second showing Wednesday and Thursday.

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Arts&Entertainment

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, June 28, 2019

C5

Voice Works concert tonight at Fort Worden Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — Voice Works, Centrum’s five-day camp for singers, finishes up tonight with the “Essential Traditions” concert in the Wheeler Theater at Fort Worden State Park. The 7:30 p.m. performance spreads out a showcase of early jazz, blues, reggae, bluegrass, indie folk and Irish music with Clinton Fearon, Mara Kaye, Ernie Vega, Kathy Kallick,

Emily Millard and Brian Ó hAirt. Tickets are $30 via Centrum.org and 800-7461982. Voice Works starts a summer full of art and cultural events at Fort Worden. The Festival of American Fiddle Tunes comes next week, with its barbecue, concerts and fireworks on the Fourth of July on Thursday and the Fiddle Tunes Finale on July 6.

The Port Townsend Writers’ Conference presents free readings by nationally known authors July 14-21; those are followed by Jazz Port Townsend’s concerts and club gigs July 26 and 27. The Acoustic Blues workshop brings a Blues Dance on July 31, the Port Townsend Gospel Choir concert and Acoustic Diane Urbani de la Paz Blues Showcase Aug. 3 and Reggae master Clinton Fearon is part of the “Essential Traditions” lineup Blues in the Clubs Aug. 2 tonight in Port Townsend. and 3.

Events: Philosophy history set to be discussed Continued from C4 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday. The lecture is part of the 16-week Philosophy in the Barn The community discussion is part of the Climate On Tap series series presented in the Hay Barn at Finnriver Farm and Cidery, held at Finnriver Farm and 124 Center Road. Cidery, 124 Center Road. The suggested donation is $5. This meeting will provide The barn is unheated so parideas and actions to support with ticipants are encouraged to dress dollars. for the weather. For more information, visit www.finnriver.com.

PORT HADLOCK

Philosophy history CHIMACUM — Wesley Cecil will discuss the history of philosophy from

Lunar touchdown PORT HADLOCK — The Summer Reading Program will

host a science workshop from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. today. The free program will be at the Jefferson County Library, 620 Cedar Ave. Participants will explore the concepts of gravity, motion, and force using paper, straws, and mini-marshmallows to design and build a shock-absorbing system to protect two “astronauts” when they land on the moon. This program also will be offered from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday at the Quilcene Community Center, 294952 U.S. Highway 101, Quilcene.

For more information, call 360-385-6544 or visit www. jclibrary.info.

Tech Tuesday PORT HADLOCK — Library staff will present “Free eBooks and Audiobooks” from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday. The class is part of the Tech Tuesday series at the Jefferson County Library, 620 Cedar Ave. The presentation will cover how to access the thousands of eBooks and audiobooks that are available for free through

the library. Tech staff will be available from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. after the class for drop-in tech assistance with phones, tablets or other devices. For more information, call 360-385-6544 or visit www. jclibrary.info.

________ Items for this listing of community events must be submitted by 5 p.m. Mondays. To submit, call 360-417-3527, fax 360-417-3521, email news@peninsula dailynews.com or visit the newsroom at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA, 98362.

AE    Nightlife Clallam County Forks BBG Blakeslee’s Bar & Grill (1222 S. Forks Ave.) — Tonight, 9 p.m.: Boothill Express (rock ’n’ roll, country, blues).

Port Angeles Bar N9NE (229 W. First St.) — Sunday and Wednesdays 9 p.m.: Karaoke. Monday, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.: Open mic with Matty Thompson. Thursday, 9 p.m.: Lady’s Night with DJ Robotix (house). This is a 21+ venue. Castaways Restaurant Lounge (1213 Marine Drive) — Wednesday, 6 p.m.: Open blues jam hosted by Big Al Owen. The Dam Bar (U.S. Highway 101 and state Highway 112) — Saturday, 8 p.m. to midnight: The C.D. Woodbury Trio (blues, rock, Americana) no cover charge. Thursday: closed for the Fourth of July, no blues jam this week. Dupuis Restaurant (256861 U.S. Highway 101) — Thursday, Friday and Saturday: Bob Daniels Sound Machine (rock, country, blues, oldies). Fairmount Restaurant (1127 W. U.S. Highway 101) — Friday, 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.: Open mic with Victor Reventlow. Sunday, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.: Open mic music jam hosted by Jerry and Ken. Fraternal Order of Eagles (2843 E. Myrtle St.) — Wednesday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m: Dee Coburn and Echo (country, southern rock and a touch of Elvis). The pubic is invited. New Day Eatery (102 W. Front St.): Today, Saturday, Sunday and Monday, 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.: Larry Smith (variety). New Moon Craft Tavern (130 S. Lincoln St.): Tuesday, 8 p.m.: Jason Mogi (variety).

Sequim, Blyn, Gardiner

James Center for the Performing Arts (500 N. Blake Ave.) — Tuesday, 6 p.m.: Ranger and the Rearrangers (swing and gypsy jazz). Admission is free and open to the public. Attendees are urged to bring portable lawn chairs and blankets for seating.

Sequim Elks (143 Port Williams Road) — Tonight, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.: The Weavils play a concert and dance with bluegrass, folk, country, Cajun and Hawaiian selections, $10 cover charge and $8 cover charge for Elks members. Sunday, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.: Black Diamond Junction plays a dance and concert rocking with 1960s through ’90s favorites, $10 cover charge and $8 cover charge for Elks members. Sequim VFW (169 E. Washington St.) — Saturday, 6 p.m. to 8:15 p.m.: Jerry’s Classic Country (country). Wind Rose Cellars (143 W. Washington St.) — Tonight, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.: Kalan Wolfe (folk, rock), no cover charge. Saturday, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.: Sarah Shea and Chez Jazz (songs from the American song book), no cover charge.

Jefferson County Coyle Laurel B. Johnson Community Center (923 Hazel Point Road) — Sunday, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.: Square Dance on the Grass with Coyley Coyotes. By donation. All ages are welcome.

to 10 p.m.: The Open Mic Show with Jack Reid. Tuesday, 6 p.m.: Pies and Mash Night, with Douglas Francisco and the Shaky Barbers (acoustic variety), no cover charge. Wednesday, 9 p.m.: Karaoke. This is a 21+ venue.

Louie’s World. Uptown Pub & Grill (1016 Lawrence St.) — Tonight, 9 p.m.: Songwriters’ Showcase with Flynn Kenneth Cusick, Dave Sheehan, and Mike Marston. Satursday, 9 p.m.: Auld

Lang Syne (intricate acoustic with rich harmonies). Tuesday, 9 p.m.: Open mic with Sam. Wednesday, 7 p.m. Trivia with Corey. Thursday, 9 p.m. Music Trivia. This listing, which appears each Friday, announces live enter-

tainment at nightspots in Clallam and Jefferson counties. Email live music information, with location, time and cover charge (if any) by noon Tuesday to news@peninsula dailynews.com, submit to the PDN online calendar at peninsuladaily news.com, call 360-417-3527, or fax to 360-417-3521.

Disco Bay Detour (282332 Hwy 101) — Saturday, 8 p.m. to 10 p.m.: Baylin and MaeDea Lady LaRose (blues, variety), no cover charge. Tuesday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.: Music trivia, no cover charge, $2 buy-in. Discovery Bay Brewing (948 N. Park Ave.) — Tonight, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.: Bruce Hooke (classic rock), no cover charge. Saturday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.: Estrella Roja (blues, rock, funk), no cover charge. Port Townsend Brewing (330 10th St.), — Tonight, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.: Blue Rhinos Blues Band (rock, blues), $5 cover charge. Pourhouse (2231 Washington St.) — Tonight, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.: Reach for the Sky (variety), no cover charge. Saturday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.: Kayohti (variety), no cover charge. This is a 21+ venue. Sirens (823 Water St.) — Tonight, 9 p.m.: Never Come Down (bluegrass), $5 cover charge. Saturday, 9 p.m.: Samara Jade and Band (folk, jazz, blues), $5 cover charge. Tuesday, 7 p.m.: Fiddler jam session. Wednesday, 9 p.m.: Open mic. Thursday, 9 p.m.: Karaoke with

Port Hadlock Ajax Cafe (21 N. Water St.) — Tonight, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.: Daniel Macke (Celtic-inspired originals). Saturday, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.: Gerry Sherman (bluesy originals). Tuesday, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.: Key City Jazz Trio (old-time jazz standards). The Keg and I (1291 Chimacum Road) — Monday, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.: Jack Dwyer with guest (variety), no cover charge. This is a 21+ venue. Spirits Bar and Grill at the Old Alcohol Plant (310 Hadlock Bay Road) — Saturday, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.: The Hounds of Townsend (blues), no cover charge. Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.: CD Woodbury (blues), no cover charge. Thursday, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.: 4th of July and Stringology (jazz, old standards, variety), no cover charge.

Port Townsend Alchemy (842 Washington St.) — Monday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.: Trevor Hanson (multigenre solo guitar).

The Cellar Door (940 Water St.) — Tonight, 9 p.m.: Nathaniel Talbot (roots, Americana), $5 cover charge. SaturNourish (1345 S. Sequim day, 9 p.m.: Throwback DJ Ave.) — Wednesday, 6:30 p.m. Party (soul, variety), $3 cover to 9:30 p.m.: Open mic with charge. Sunday, 8 p.m.: Never Victor Reventlow. Signups at Come Down (bluegrass), no cover charge. Monday, 6 p.m. 6 p.m.

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Club Seven at 7 Cedars Casino (270756 U.S. Highway 101) — Saturday, 9 p.m.: The Works (rock classics), no cover charge. Wednesday, 8 p.m.: Comedy Night with Chase Mayer and Patrick O’Sullivan. Thursday, 6 p.m.: Buck Ellard Band (country), no cover charge. This is a 21+ venue.

Rainforest Bar at 7 Cedars Casino (270756 U.S. Highway 101) — Tonight, 7 p.m.: Jim Hoffman (country), no cover charge. This is an 18+ venue.


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Peninsula Daily News

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Lynn Moreno, Broker

360.477.5582 cell 360.565.5412 office

INVESTOR ALERT

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IN

D EN

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This home has picturesque panoramic views from nearly every room in the house. It is located within 3.5 miles of city limits and sits in a very private location. The design incorporates floor to ceiling windows in the living room to take advantage of the ever changing nautical views. Cedar ceilings and maple floors give this home a feeling of warmth with an added touch of class. The entertaining kitchen is complete with a propane stove, granite counter tops, ample counter space, center island, sizable dining area, and a delightful sunroom. The impeccable landscaping is quite the conversation piece. This home is a featured model home for Lindahl homes. Call for a complete list of amenites. MLS#to come $685,000.00

Investment to purchase a light industrial manufacturing complex. Custom designed for engineering & manufacturing welded aluminum vessels + many industry specific upgrades! Current long-term NNN lease to a single tenant who is well established. Ideal location on Hwy 101 between Sequim & Port Angeles, 2.44 acres zoned RLC, with 3 structures for a total of 23,350 square feet of space. MLS#330993/1473013 $2,575,000

Very nice location & neighborhood! 1971 one-level duplex with spacious units -1,016 sq ft, 2 bedrooms 1 bath each, fireplaces, carports in back with extra parking spots around. All city utilities with separate meters for both. Great financials & rental history! JUST LISTED! MLS#331057 $275,000

Beautiful remarkable building opportunity in the City. S side may have mountain views. Some timber value. City water & sewer at street. 2.4 Acres MLS#321394 $289,000

MaryAnn Miller

Lynn Moreno, Broker

360.477.5582 cell 360.565.5412 office

TOWN & COUNTRY

360-774-6900 maryanncbfa@hotmail.com www.sequimrealestate.com Open the Door to Success

Ania Pendergrass

360-461-3973 cell ania@olypen.com www.aniap.remaxagent.com

LINDA LAPE FRENCH,

CNE,CRB,GRI Designated Broker/Owner Cell: 360-461-0803

RESIDENTIAL

180 DEGREE VIEW OF STRAIT

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1.45 ACRES

BEAUTIFUL 1.66 ACRE LOT!

Terrific mini farm on 3.9 acres. Enjoy spacious 2500+- sq. ft. 4 bedroom 3.5 bathroom home, small barn, dog kennel, garden shed, and end of Ross Lane privacy. All this 7-8 minutes from downtown Port Angeles. Property fenced for livestock and fenced garden area. MLS#331071 $349,000

Gorgeous 180 degree view of the beautiful Strait and Vancouver Island with Mountain Views too! All utilities are in including Power, phone, private well, and septic system. Lot is ready to build on with house pad completed. Property is very private And secluded yet close to Joyce. Geotechnical study completed and fully surveyed. MLS#321009 $349,900

4 Separate Commercial Zoned Lots with building pad and maximum traffic exposure on North side of Highway 101 just east of Del Guzzi Drive traffic light. 2 Driveway aprons approved by WSDOT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1 already in. Property is surveyed, has approved Drainage plan, and Geotechnical Site Review. Utilities are at or near the property line. Owner may finance with substantial down. MLS#320431 A steal at $119,900

Beautiful lot (Little Fir) ready to build on near Joyce, Salt Creek, and Olympic Mountains. Minutes from hiking, fishing, and kayaking, yet close to Port Angeles. Power, Phone, and Crescent Water installed. Building site is prepared and soils test done. Electronic gate. Seller says â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sell Nowâ&#x20AC;? so bring all offers! Owner may finance with substantial down. MLS#310449 $83,900

PROFESSIONAL

REALT Y SERVICES

Port Angeles

Paul Beck

Real Estate Broker Cell: 360.461.0644 paulbeck.professionalrealtyservices.com

PRIVATE, SECLUDED 22.17 ACRE LOT

Patti Morris 360.461.9008 pmorris@wavecable.com 319 S. Peabody St., #A, Port Angeles

LOCATION & VIEWS!

Patti Morris 360.461.9008 pmorris@wavecable.com 319 S. Peabody St., #A, Port Angeles

SERENITY IN SUNLAND NG!

Patti Morris 360.461.9008 pmorris@wavecable.com 319 S. Peabody St., #A, Port Angeles

PRICE REDUCED!

ISTI

L NEW

Beautiful property with 2 acre parked out building site with balance in timber designation. Power, water, phone, and Crescent Water installed to Property line. You wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find a more beautiful lot to build on. Enjoy plenty of riding trails. Electronic gate. Seller says â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sell Nowâ&#x20AC;? so bring all offers! Owner may finance with substantial down. MLS#310453 $269,900

Great Opportunity! Great Location! Across the street from the Strait of Juan de Fuca sits this classic 3 bd 2 ba farmhouse with 1 bd cottage. This property has it all with water and mountain views, classic barns and 964 square foot guest cottage, perfect for a rental or visiting guests. Numerous fruit trees throughout the property. There is plenty of room for a mini farm - the perfect location to raise chickens, horses or plant veggies or lavender. The Sequim dream come true. MLS#330747 $425,000

Craig & Darel Tenhoff â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your Hometown Professionalsâ&#x20AC;?

Patti Morris 360.461.9008 pmorris@wavecable.com 319 S. Peabody St., #A, Port Angeles

206-853-5033 206-853-4743 tenhoff@olypen.com

www.blueskysequim.com 190 N. Priest Rd. â&#x20AC;˘ PO Box 1060 â&#x20AC;˘ Sequim, WA

SEQUIM PRIME COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

PARTIAL WATER VIEW LAND

â&#x20AC;˘ Sequimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Busiest Interchange â&#x20AC;˘ 0.93 Acres â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Hwy 101 and River Road â&#x20AC;˘ SE Corner of 101 and River Rd â&#x20AC;˘ Multiple Commercial Uses â&#x20AC;˘ Built in 1991 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1769 SF â&#x20AC;˘ Zoning is Highway Commercial â&#x20AC;˘ Unobstructed Mtn Views â&#x20AC;˘ 1.34 Adjacent Acres Also for Sale MLS#321485 $575,000

Quiet & private with trees and partial water views, 4.89 acres. Perc test done for pressurized system, well (18gpm), electricity and irrigation on the property. Site cleared for building area. Located between Sequim and Pt Angeles. MLS#330726/1451889 $114,900

UPTOWN REALTY

Marc & Pat Thomsen, Realtors

(360) 808-0979 mthomsen@olypen.com www.CallMarc1st.com

WRE/Sequim-East

Cathy Reed, RealtorÂŽ Direct: (360) 460-1800 Office: (360) 683-4844 creed@olypen.com

â&#x20AC;˘ Tastefully Updated Tri-Level â&#x20AC;˘ 2 BD, 2 BA, New Custom Kitchen â&#x20AC;˘ New Master Bath w/Walk-in Tiled Shower â&#x20AC;˘ Front Deck Overlooks Beautiful Landscaping â&#x20AC;˘ A Piece of Heaven w/ Sunland Amenities! MLS#1477577/331067 $359,000

Amazing custom built home 3Bd 2Ba 2831sqft. on a private 2.40 acres. Brazilian Cherry hard wood floors, custom cabinets, granite counter tops, 9 ft. ceilings, crown molding, formal dining room, den/ office, cozy propane fire place to heat up the living room. Master bedroom has a walk in closet, separate shower toilet, double sinks and a jetted tub. Large deck in the back that can be entered from the living room or master bed room. Over sized 3 car garage(1043sq. ft.) R.V. port with concrete pad. MLS#330732 $609,000

WRE/SunLand

Terry Peterson

lic#107780

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim (360) 683-6880 (360) 797-4802 tpeterson@olypen.com terrypeterson.withwre.com

Advertise Here Call Joylena Owen

360-452-2345 ext.35650

Mike Fuller

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your Hometown Professionalâ&#x20AC;?

360-477-9189 â&#x20AC;˘ 360-683-3900 www.blueskysequim.com

190 Priest Road â&#x20AC;˘ PO Box 1060 â&#x20AC;˘ Sequim, WA


Classified

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Friday, June 28, 2019 D2 Friday, June 28, 2019

ACROSS 1 Pickle 8 Important biblical river 14 Whale-watching excursion, say 15 It’s about 80 miles SW of Buffalo, N.Y. 16 Hot and spicy 17 Only Jet who was a Super Bowl MVP 18 Rundown 19 Impure 21 Photo lab abbr. 22 That, south of the border 24 Food additive 25 Something you can stand to lose 28 Lyric tributes 30 Med. school subject 32 Name on a banana sticker 33 Winery cask 35 Iconic San Francisco sight 38 Splitting with one’s group ... or a hint to the theme found in four puzzle rows 41 Landmark 1973 decision 42 Oxford, to Oxonians 43 Pay to play 44 Mideast seaport 46 Natural floor covering 50 __ green 51 __Kosh B’gosh 53 Louis XIV, par exemple 55 Something you might grab in a hammock 56 High wind 59 “M.O.” rapper 61 “Okay, that makes sense now” 63 Budget carrier headquartered near Kuala Lumpur 65 Scammer 66 Nordic Council member 67 Oregon city where Nike was founded 68 Comes back DOWN 1 Hinge (on)

Peninsula Daily News Peninsula daily news

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle — horizontally, vertically, diagonally and even backward. Find them, circle each letter of the word and strike it off the list. The leftover letters spell the WONDERWORD. EXCULPATORY EVIDENCE

F A I R N E T N A D N E F E D 6/28/19

By Michael Paleos

2 It’s pointy and cold 3 “Livin’ la Vida __” 4 Military day’s march 5 Many a fed. holiday 6 Chop meat 7 Calculation often using pi 8 Spinning __: weaving innovation 9 Provide an address 10 Frosty coating 11 Stalemate 12 Fitting 13 “You’re dreaming” 18 Speed Wagon make 20 Aid in reuniting a lost suitcase with its owner 23 Coffee brand with an orange cap 26 Word of regret 27 __ se 29 L.A. Clippers owner Ballmer 31 Blemished, in a way 32 Commonly blue fabric 34 Motor City org.

Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

R E G R E T O T O I L R N A E E ◯ S L ◯ A C ◯ C V ◯ A L V A M C T Y

C E A U S W A L C O O E A D N

O E G C S E L U R S T R A I O

Solution: 9 letters

R M I E E Y U D B B T R L T M

© 2019 Andrews McMeel Syndication

D E T S S O R A U N B E A N I

E N S O S Y E O O T G T E E T

T T E R O L D C T A Y D P M S

E N V P P T I O L A E Y P U E

www.wonderword.com

C O N F E S S C T G R H A C T

T D I S C L O S E S O O I O R

I H S I N U P L L T U V B D I

V H E A R G L P O L I C E A A

E A C T S A Y T I L I B A I L

6/28

Absolve, Acts, Agreement, Alleged, Appeal, Brady, Case, Civil, Claim, Clear, Confess, Contract, Court, Custody, Defendant, Detective, Disclose, Document, Doubt, Duty, Fair, Favor, Guilt, Hear, Investigate, Laboratory, Laws, Legal, Liability, Photo, Plea, Police, Possession, Prosecutor, Punish, Record, Rule, Scene, Team, Testimony, Trial Yesterday’s Answer: Paulsen THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME By David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

CANKK TIHDC

©2019 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

36 Musical Mars 37 Office PC nexus 38 Fillet’s lack 39 Recording over 40 Panhandle state 41 Cardi B genre 45 Beethoven’s Third 47 Browsing, nowadays 48 Tortilla shell fillers, perhaps 49 Special Stratego piece

PLUCEO

6/28/19

51 Broad expanse 52 A co-star might steal one 54 Taken together 57 “Woe __!” 58 Villain’s hideout 60 Morales of “NYPD Blue” 61 Great service? 62 Astros, on sports tickers 64 Shinto, for one: Abbr.

BOLTEG ©2019 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

Get the free JUST JUMBLE app • Follow us on Twitter @PlayJumble

D2

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

(Answers tomorrow)

Yesterday’s

Jumbles: FLUSH HONEY TIRADE SAFELY Answer: The bookcase wasn’t made very well and had a — SHORT SHELF LIFE


Classified

Peninsula Daily News Peninsula daily news

Friday, June 28, 2019 D3 Friday, June 28, 2019 D3

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE IN PRINT & ONLINE PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB: Visit | www.peninsuladailynews.com

Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

NOON E DLIN DEoA It! n’t Miss D

Place Your Ad Online 24/7

Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles • Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

EMERALD HIGHLANDS for WATER VIEW!

181 Amethyst Dr, Sequim Come see recent changes! At the high point in Emerald Highlands the views include mountains and ocean from this custom home that was just listed. It has just one level with 3 bedrooms & 2 baths, oversize garage, private fenced back yard, an inviting wrap around deck and easy care landscaping. Close to downtown Sequim. MLS#330639/1444499 Listed for $450,000

20 Topaz Way, Sequim Amazing View Home overlooking the Straits of Juan De Fuca, Sequim Bay, Mt Baker, Protection Is, City of Sequim & lights of Victoria BC! 2726sf of comfort. Main level living offers an attached 2 car garage, great room, kitchen, laundry, half bath, master suite, guest rm, office & guest bath, lower level offers large bonus room & full bath. Easy care yard, front patio & 2 view decks! MLS#1366272/321968 $472,000

OPEN H

Sat 11 amOUSE - 2 pm

41 Opal Lane, Sequim Beautifully updated 5 bed/3 bath home with stunning views of Mt. Baker, JF Strait & more! Many updates include. ALL NEW; GE Slate kitchen appliances, Carrara marble vanities, Central Vac system! Lower/entry level has two bdrms-one w/studio-kitchenette potential, a full bath, TWO bonus rooms for office/craft/play/storage. Fenced yard w/fire pit. MLS#1443028/330644 $475,000

Real Estate - Sequim

DIANN DICKEY

Deborah Norman

Managing Broker, ABR & CNE 1190 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 360.477.3907 ddickey@olypen.com

Chris Bonnelle

360.681.8778 ext 108 Cell 360.460.9961

360.808.6619 www.BrokersGroup.com

www.BrokersGroup.com

Directions: South on Sequim Ave, East on Miller Rd, South into EMERALD HIGHLANDS *** FOLLOW THE SIGNS TO THESE THREE WATER VIEW HOMES***

OPEN HOUSE

Sat & Sun, June 29 & 30, 1-4 New Appliances & Designer Styling

OPEN HOUSE

Sunday, June 30 1pm to 3pm

OPEN HOUSE

Saturday, June 29 10am - 12 pm Immaculate, bright & welcoming!

OPEN HOUSE

Saturday, June 29 11-2 ! AND

NEW PRICE!

L

SUN

430 North St, Sequim - Diamond Point Immerse yourself in incredible views of Protection Island, Puget Sound & beyond! This comfortable and peaceful ADA compliant home has everything you need to relax and feel on top of the world. 3+ bedrooms / 3.5 bathrooms 3,977 sf / 33,106 sf lot. MLS#1473004

540 W 8th St, Port Angeles

Great opportunity for investors looking to get into the lucrative vacation rental market in Port Angeles! Separate entry to the basement would allow you to run a business out of the basement while living full-time in the main house, or maybe it’s time to open that cafe you’ve always wanted... Plenty of off-street parking and storage make this an ideal property for use in many different commercial endeavors. Bring your dreams and make them a reality! MLS#330783 $215,000 Directions: West on 8th to 540 on the left.

30 Scenic View, Sequim

Rare! Single-Level 3 BD+2BA Home on 1-acre with garages plus huge 42’x30’ RV garage! 2 workshops w/bench! Mature fruit orchard! New roof (2019)! New front porch(2019)! MLS#330963 $469,000 Directions: Old Olympic Hwy to Grandview to R on Scenic Way

105 Ridgetop Place, Sequim • 2 BD, 2.5 BA. 2670 SF 1 Story w/Finished Basement • Guest BD/BA w/ Family Room, Fireplace on Both Levels • Situated on Cul-de-sac For Privacy • Sunland Amenities; Beach Access, Pool, Tennis & more!

MLS#1447723 $422,000 Directions: Sunland main entrance: Taylor Blvd., turn left on the 2nd Fairway Dr., Right on Clallam Bay St., Left on San Juan Dr., Left on Ridgetop Place

Kari Haas

WRE/SunLand

Real Estate Team Windermere Real Estate / Bellevue Commons, Inc.

Kari Haas

WRE/Port Angeles

Molly Herring

(206)719-2224 kari@windermere.com www.KariHaas.com

(360) 461-7090 mollyherring@olypen.com

OPEN HOUSE

Saturday, June 29 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm Single level open concept

Tyler Conkle lic# 112797

Lisa Roberts ABS, SRES, REALTOR 206.819.5472 homesweetsequim@gmail.com

OPEN HOUSE

Saturday | June 29 | 12 – 3

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 (360) 670-5978 tylerconkle.withwre.com

OPEN HOUSE

Sunday, June 30 12-2pm RELAX AND ENTERTAIN!

N

BEE HAS D E C I PR EDUCE R

1723 Lambert Lane, Port Angeles Enjoy the good life in this lovely 3 bedroom, 2 bath home in a friendly age 50+ community. Amazing water views from the open concept kitchen, living, dining area and from the master bedroom. There are no stairs to enter this home or any on the interior. MLS#330857/1462716 $325,000 Directions: Hwy 101, S on Golf Course Road, W on E Lauridsen Blvd, S on Currier Court west on E Lambert.

UPTOWN REALTY Lynn Bedford (360) 417-2806 lynnbedford@olypen.com

994 Woolsey Court, Sequim

NEW LISTING! Desirable Sherwood Village!  Completely updated in 2019!  3 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, ~1699 SF. MLS#331048 $379,000

TERI & DOUG PRICE 360.461.5321

PriceForHomes@gmail.com http://teriprice.professionalrealtyservices.com Licensees shown are licensed to Professional Realty Services Sequim, Inc.

160 Duke Drive, Sequim Beautiful custom home w/skylights and vaulted ceiling. 3BR, 2BA, living room w/propane FP, formal dining & kitchen eating area. Merillat kitchen cabinets w/pull out shelves. Private fenced backyard w/patio, southern exposure and MTN view. MLS#330252/1410001 $399,900 Directions: Sequim: Washington St, north on 5th, cross over Old Olympic to Evans Rd, R on Wayne Way (Mtn View Mdws) go right again & around the loop to property.

WRE/Sequim - East

Sheryl Payseno Burley lic# 41329

360-460-9363 • sheryl@olypen.com www.allaboutsequimwa.com

Advertise Here Call Joylena Owen 360-452-2345 ext.35650


D4 D4

Classified

Friday, June 28, 2019 Friday, June 28, 2019

4026 Employment 4026 Employment Momma General General

Sneak a peek Peninsula Daily news •

t o day ’ s

hottest

10’ LIVINGSTON: Fresh paint in/out, galv trailer, Minn Kota elec. motor, new oars/battery. $725. (360)457-8209 1122 Quantum Power Chair. Like new 1122 Quantum Power Chair new charger and battery with ROHO Air Seat was $1500 now just $750. 360-681-2127

new

classifieds!

2 012 S p ri n g d a l e 2 12 R B LS 2 5 ’ Tra i l e r with Slide-out Lounge/Dinette. Trailer in excellent condition used 6-8 times since 2012. Includes Reese We i g h t D i s t r i bu t i o n Hitch along with shank and ball for tow vehicle. Full queen bed, flat screen TV, many extras. $14,250. Call (360) 385-9524 B U R I A L P LOT : H a l f cost, premium location. $1,400/obo. (360)808-0611

GARAGE SALE: Sat., 8-4pm, 42 Roy St. Electric wheelchair, lift chair, survival suit, baby i te m s, c o ffe e ta bl e, bread maker, Christmas items, miscellaneous. Rain or shine. GARAGE SALE: Sequim Fri, July 5th 9-3 and Sat, July 6th 9-2. Sequim, Go west of Cays Road follow the arrows to 551 West Nelson Rd. This sale isn’t just in the garage it’s also in the drive way and house! Golf, garden, furniture and lots more

D O D G E : ‘ 0 0 , Da ko t a X LT, V 6 , 2 W D, G r ay, G L AS S P LY: 17 ’, s o ft with shell, $2,000. top, 280 Volvo Penta in360-461-6047 board/outboard drive on trailer, Evinrude 15hp Estate Sale: 1354 W troller, trim tabs, depth Laur idsen Blvd. Sat., finder, GPS, Boss maa n d S u n . , 8 - 3 . M a ck rine FM/CD player, crab truck rear end, tools, vin- pot, line and pot puller, tage chainsaw, bedroom down riggers, anchor, set, lift chair, tables, Tif- float coat and 2 vests. fany style lamp, desk, Other extras. Nice clean couch, love seat, lots of unit. $6500. misc. (360)461-7429

2008 HI-LO 17ft Towlite pop-up hard-sided trailer, bathroom, stove, wate r h e a te r, e l e c t r i c tongue lift, electric hook up(30 amp) water, sewer, newer tires, battery, fully loaded 3400 lbs, HITCH: Reese 5th easy towing! $8,500. Wheel, 16k, bed rails 360-681-0199 and hardware, can delivPeninsula Classified er. $350/obo. 360-417-8118 360-452-8435

3010 Announcements

3020 Found

Saturday, June 29th, 9-5. Combined two sets of household goods. Some man stuff. No early birds. 123 Kirk Road.

3023 Lost

16-24 yr olds; looking for work or need help getting started on a career path- attend a Pathways to Success orientation! Paid internships in local businesses, resume and job search assistance, vocational and technical exploration. Orientations are held Thurs. at 3:00 PM in the Clallam WorkSource office, 360-4572110 or 360-565-2001. 911 Dispatcher (Communications Officer) City of Port Angeles is looking to hire multiple 911 Dispatcher positions. $21.48/hour plus excellent benefits. Testing will take place Friday July 12th at the Vern Burton Community Center. To apply visit Public Safety Testing at www.public safetytesting.com to create a profile and register for the test. For more information please call 360-417-4510 or email afountai@ cityofpa.us. APPLY NOW! Join our Birth to Three team. Must be certified teacher OR Early Childhood Degree, special ed endorsement for both certs. 20 hours a week 47 / hr. + mileage, contracted position. Send resume to PO Box 1787, Forks WA 98331 or call Linda 360-374-9340

RUN A FREE AD FOR ITEMS PRICED $200 AND UNDER • 1 ad per household • No pets or livestock • No firewood, lumber, per week or construction • Private parties only materials • 4 lines, 2 days • Run as space permits • No garage sales Mondays & Tuesdays

Deadline: Friday at 3 p.m.

Ad

Name Address Phone Number

Email: classified@peninsuladailynews.com

912281831

Bring your ads to: Peninsula Daily News 305 West 1st St., Port Angeles Sequim Gazette/Peninsula Daily News 147 W. Washington, Sequim NO PHONE CALLS

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ACT NOW! Come into the office today! 305 W. First Street, Port Angeles or call 360-452-4507 Current valid Driver’s License and insurance required.

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by Mell Lazarus

PORT ANGELES CARRIER ROUTES AVAILABLE Peninsula Daily News Circulation Departments We are looking for individuals interested in routes. Must be reliable, 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License, proof of insurance and a reliable vehicle. Early morning delivery, deadline for delivery: 6:30 a.m. Call (360)452-4507 or email: Circulation@ peninsuladaily news.com

For Better or For Worse ❘

by Lynn Johnston

105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County 4080 Employment Wanted CAREGIVER (Private): HHA, Hospice, dementia, Parkinson’s training. PT/FT. 360-461-3065 Father & Sons’ Landscaping. Lawn maintenence, 1X cleanups, weeding, pruning, organic and chemical fertilization. In business since 1992. (360)681-2611 Residential and Commercial Remodels and Repairs, interior and exterior painting in Sequim and Port Angeles.General Contractor with over 30 years experience. 360-461-6175 bvmngmt@outlook.com Wa LIc Bigvavm822L2 We are licensed, bonded, and insured.

YARD CARE SERVICES : Clean ups/outs, hauling bark/gravel/debris, trimming, roof cleaning, power washing, fencing, City of Sequim; Admin- mowing. (360)801-9627 istrative Assistant II - Finance. FT + Bene, 2 yrs 105 Homes for Sale work exp in automated Clallam County systems, basic bookkeeping and customer 180 Degree ser vice required. See View of Strait www.sequimwa.gov for Gorgeous 180 degree job app and info, appliv i ew o f t h e b e a u t i f u l cation due 7/10/19. Strait and Vancouver Island with Mountain Views too. All utilities are i n i n c l u d i n g p o w e r, phone, private well, and s e p t i c sys te m . L o t i s ready to build on with house pad completed. Property is very private And secluded yet close to Joyce. Geotechnical study completed and fulClallam County ly surveyed. Employment MLS#321009 $349,900 Opportunities Patti Morris For complete job listings 360-461-9008 and to get an application JACE The Real Estate Visit: www.clallam.net Company DIETARY AIDE: 2.3 Acres With Old P/T, Apply in person, Barn Park View Villas, 8th & L o c a te d o n t h e We s t G Streets, PA. side of Port Angeles, this HAIR STYLIST needed, property is mostly woodfull service salon. Sat, ed with some clearing Mon, and Tues. Hadlock and fruit trees. The proparea. 360-385-3953 erty is currently lacking all utilities. City water, power, and sewer are HELP WANTED. available to the property Family Resource Cobut have not been inordinator, Port Angeles stalled. area. Join our Birth to MLS#330873 $139,000 Three team. On the Tom Blore job training. 30 to 40 360-808-6981 hours a week 18 / hr. + PETER BLACK mileage, Send resume REAL ESTATE to PO Box 1787, Forks WA 98331 or call LinATTENTION da 360-374-9340 INVESTORS Very nice location and Night Watchman. P-T n e i g h b o r h o o d , 1 9 7 1 graveyard shift opera- one-level duplex with tions night watchman, spacious units, 1,016 sf, Seeking a qualified in- 2 br 1 ba each, fireplacdividual for an off-shift es, carports in back with operations position at e x t r a p a r k i n g s p o t s Battelle ‘s Marine Sc around. All city utilities ience Lab (MSL). Posi- with separate meters for tion will monitor mainta both. Great financials in, communicate cond and rental history. Just itions on the research listed. campus. MSL is a MLS#331057 $275,000 component of the U.S. Ania Pendergrass DOE’s Pacific Nor th360-461-3973 west National Lab. Min Remax Evergreen Requirements: HS diploma. Ability to work C O M E S E E r e c e n t a l o n e ; n e g o t i a t e changes! At the high uneven terrain and ob point in Emerald Highstacles (e.g. climb, lands the views include m a n e u v e r o b s t r u c - mountains and ocean tions) at night/in all from this custom home we a t h e r c o n d i t i o n s ; that was just listed. It d r i ve ; p e r fo r m l i g h t has just one level with 3 duty preventive main- br and 2 ba, oversize tenance; communicate garage, private fenced clearly, input info using back yard, an inviting computer system. Ap- wrap around deck and ply at easy care landscaping. http://www.jobs.pnnl. Close to downtown Segov Job #309477 quim. MLS#330639/1444499 Listed for $450,000 OlyCAP Early ChildDeborah Norman hood Services is now 360.460.9961 accepting applications BrokersGroup RE for the following posiProfessionals tions: Teacher, Teacher Assistant, Classroom Comfortable County Aide, Child Development Living Sub. Application and job This wonderful Pacific descriptions at: www.olycap.org or call NW style home is warm and inviting. The interi(360) 452-4726. EOE. ors display a spacious The Quilcene School k i t c h e n w i t h g r a n i t e District is looking for a countertops and walk-in .6 FTE Special Educa- pantry, living room with a tion Director and a .4 free-standing stove, 3 br, FTE Special Services an office, and a generTOSA for 2019/2020. ous sized family room. These positions may There is an over-sized be combined up to 1.0 attached garage with a FTE. Applications are free-standing stove, a bunk house, a large available at commercial size shop, https://www.quilcene. and a covered RV carwednet.edu/Page/149 or 294715 Hwy 101, port. The landscape is c o m p l e te w i t h fl ow e r Quilcene, WA. beds, old growth trees, (360)765-3363 EOE and fruit trees. MLS#331058 $485,000 Tow Truck drivers needLynn Moreno ed, CDL preferred. 360.477.5582 360-457-4484 Olympic Real Estate Group Visit our website at www.peninsula LONG DISTANCE dailynews.com No Problem! Or email us at classified@ Peninsula Classified peninsula 1-800-826-7714 dailynews.com

Immaculate, bright & welcoming Rare, Single-Level 3 BD plus 2BA Home on 1-ac with garages plus huge 42’x30’ RV garage, 2 workshops with bench, m a t u re f r u i t o rc h a rd , new roof (2019), new front porch (2019). MLS#330963 $469,000 JACE The Real Estate Company

INVESTOR ALERT B e a u t i f u l re m a r ka bl e building oppor tunity in t h e C i t y. S s i d e m ay have mountain views. Some timber value. City water and sewer at street. 2.4 Acres MLS#321394 $289,000 Linda French 360-461-0803 John L. Scott Sequim

FSBO: Mountain view, 2 6 3 0 s f. h o m e , p l u s apar tment. Lg kitchen w/island, 3Br, 3Ba, detached 4 car garage, handicap ramps. 30 Mantle Rd. $415,000. (360)809-9351

GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

NEED EXTRA CASH! Sell your Treasures! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

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BARBER: Men’s barber or stylist with men’s hairFound: Brown, tabby ***1-724-Waddell*** LOST CAT: 1 yo Sia- cut experience. Booth Wanted: the Identity of m a l e c a t W. PA . Ca l l m e s e fe m a l e, c re a m , r e n t a l , 3 - 4 d a y s r e the PA burglars. Cash Pe n i n s u l a Fr i e n d s o f Monroe and E. Arnette quired, no nights/weekends. (360)457-8600. reward paid; no ques- Animals, 360-452-0414. Rds, PA. 360-775-5154 tions asked. This must end! Call David Waddell Visit our website at CAREGIVERS HELP www.peninsula at 1-724-Waddell 4026 Employment WANTED. Hiring for dailynews.com Personal Care caregivGeneral Or email us at GARAGE SALE ADS ers. Requirements: classified@ Call for details. Must be 18, HCA or peninsula GREEN CLEANING in CNA, CPR/First Aid, 360-452-8435 dailynews.com 1-800-826-7714 Sequim. 360-582-7855 T B te s t , M u s t p a s s background check, have reliable vehicle, c u r r e n t d r i v e r ’s l i cense, and auto insurance. Contact: www.concernedcitizen spnw.org Call Shannon S at: 360-374-9340

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BUILDING PERMITS for the week of June 9-15, 2019. Clallam County (Includes 21 permits from May 28 - June 3 and 18 permits from June 4-10 valued at $3,416,109.) Bryan and Jennifer Canepa, 52 Griffith Farm Road, install woodstove, $4,000. Ronald and Sharra Flanders, 541 Toad Road, install ductless heat pump, $6,726. William and Jennifer Henderson, 2300 Calawah Way, demolish single family residence, $7,000. Lynn Rutz, 491 Mill Road, demolish manufactured home, $2,000. Viewterra Homes, 153 Village Lane, place manufactured home, $65,000. Bobby and Shirley Braxton, 250 Mains Road, install heat pump, $8,246. James Covey, 226 Harmony Lane, install ductless heat pump, $3,883. Cynthia R. Marrett, 193 McDonald Drive, install ductless heat pump, $3,996. Timothy and Lynn Fraser, 153 Erving Jacobs Road,new detached garage, $31,041. Gary Smith, 373 Schmuck Road, new detached garage, $82,656. Hans and Beverly Bailey, 183 Twilight Beach Road, single family treehouse built without permit, $93,965. Randy and Phyllis Hatfield, 382 Fat Cat lane, 616 square foot addition to detached pole building, $28,287. Ivor L. and Nancy L. Garbush, 242 Brazil Road, install ductless heat pump, $4,720. Russll M. and Shannon V. Smith, 331 Maple Grove Road, install heat pump, $8,285. Frederick and M.J. Rodolf, 1290 Monroe Road, install ductless heat pump, $8,665. Alysia Rush, 48350 state Highway 112, replace woodstove insert, $7,300. Peloquin Properties LLC, 7639 state Highway 112, install 120-gallon propane tank, $7,000. Department of Natural Resources, 311 McCarver St., place manufactured office, $25,000. Department of Natural Resources, 311 McCarver St., place manufactured office, $25,000. Cathy and Martin Baker, 136 David Mansfield Road, place manufactured home, $109,000. Keller Sequim LLC, 23 Dorothea Way, new warehouse and office building, $2,070,431. Thomas and Virginia Meyer, 105 Durrwatcher Road, new single family residence, $226,102. Georgia and Thomas Peet, 134 Elk Run Trail, new single family residence, $257,305. Karl W. and Dana C. Allen, 2424 S. Third Ave., 1300 square foot covered patio, $37,000. Patrick and Doni J. Johnston, 2961 E. Myrtle St., replace front porch, $7,273. Jason and Lauren Dennis, 2410 Hennessy Lane, residential re-roof, $2,711. Leitz Properties, 259110 E. U.S. Highway 101, 1000-gallon propane dispensary, $10,000. William Schildhouse, 40 Sawmill Road, addition to attached garage, $37,471. Jara Lynn Reno, 1030 Kirner Road, install gate with keypad entry, $1,000. Holly E. Courtin Trustee, 1751 Cays Road, install ductless heat pump, $4,795. Karla T. Weaver, 52 Rickarla Circle, install heat pump, $8,770. Mary K. Pellitier Trustee, 97 Arcadia Place, install ductless heat pump, $18,730. Shwan P. and Stephanie L. Gould, 181 Livengood Lane, install heat pump, $8,260. Wal-Mart Stores Inc., 3411 E. Kolonels Way, revise backroom layout and add equipment, $30,000. Wal-Mart Stores Inc., 3411 E. Kolonels Way, add canopy in parking area, $61,165. Jemiah and Aubrie Jenkins, 150 Olympian Way, install woodstove, $3,326. Barbara Ann Nelson, 5953 Old Olympic Highway, demolish house and manufactured home, $10,000. Green Acres MH Park, 400 Gupster St., place manufactured home, $90,000. Ronald and Janice Wehner Trustees, 40 Columbine Way, replace heat pump, $9,499. Gary Prince, 158 San Juan Drive, replace heat pump, $14,032. Michael and Dora Whittaker, 345 W. Nelson Road, install gas stove and propane tank, $5,200. Mark and Holly Raemer, 380 Guy Kelly Road, install pellet stove, $1,500. Linda M. and Michael J. Turner, 770 Marine Drive, install ductless heat pump, $5,059. Astrid Spiegel Adams, 12 Serena Place, install ductless heat pump, $4,344. Ronald Sears, 194 Speedway Drive, place manufactured marijuana processing facility, $120,000. Russell and Yvette Stepp, 1702 Doe Run Road, replace elevated deck and extend roof to cover deck, $9,833. PJ’s Hideaway LLC, 97 Bugge Road, new detached garden house - not an ADU, $25,715. Nancy McMurray and John R. Smith, 501 Macleay Road, new detached garage, $78,163. Timothy R. and Kim W. Cleary, 144 Ioka Road, addition to single family residence, $130,191. Byron D. and Chelsey L. Boeckermann, 82 Draper Valley Road, repair storm-damaged single family residence, $408,188. Patrick K. McGillicuddy, 50 E. Nelson Road, new detached pole building, $43,995. Clallam County Fire District #3, 255 Carlsborg Road, interior remodel, $17,500. Krista and Mike Cox, 3911 W. Edgewood Drive, rebuild single family residence on existing basement, $223,081. Jimmy and Kelly Anderson, 185 Triopha Lane, place manufactured home, $127,000. State Department of Corrections, 1830 Eagle Crest Way, emergency repairs to storm-damaged structure, $250,000. Sharon L Kikuch, 381 American Blvd., replace heat pump, $8,226.

Sequim

OCP 51 LLC, 31 Lillian Ridge Drive, new single family residence, $300,629.10 Mike and April Madison, 681 Keeler Road, install heat pump and air handler, $9,247. Richard O. Porter, 250 Morgison Loop, new single family residence, $312,605.68. Asa Smith, 492 W. Cedar St., sign for PC Contracting, $250. Thomas Edward Cody, 305 N. Ninth Ave., residential re-roof, $12,610. Sequim Investors LLC, 680 W. Washington St. Suite B105, sign for Allstate, $10,000. Chandra and Curt Achberger, 649 Summer Breeze Lane, sign for Allstate, $10,000. Michael and April Jensen, 200 Torres Court, replace heat pump system, $0.

Port Angeles

Sam M. Watson and Marianne Cond, 1816 W. Fifth St., new single family residence, $79,320. Nikolai Popov, 1107 Caroline St., foundation and slab for new garage, $10,000. Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, 107 E. First St. and 110 E. Railroad Ave., demolish buildings, $175,000. Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, 217 N. Laurel St., demolish buildings, $35,000 Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, 111 E. Front St., demolish buildings, $65,000. Port of Port Angeles, 2602 W. 18th St. Building A, demolish two mobile units and a viewing platform, $10,000. Sabrina Hamm, 382 Lower Elwha Road, demolish manufactured home, $4,000. Sabrina Hamm, 382 Lower Elwha Road, new single family residence, $118,516. Steven and Karen Reed, 2021 W. Seventh St., residential re-roof, $16,000. C2J Enterprises LLC, 1213 W. 16th St., interior renovation, $9,000. Gregory B. Murray, 1542 W. U.S. Highway 101, residential re-roof, $12,336. Laverne A. Fisher, 2614 S. Laurel St., residential re-roof, $8,200. Blackbird Coffee Co., 336 E. Eighth St., install ductless heat pump, $6,482. Craig F. and Idah Smith, 1710 E. Third St., residential re-roof, $5,990. James and Jennifer Michalczik, 520 W. Third St., install ductless heat pump, $7,615. Jamie Linn Bolton, 3729 Canyon Circle, install ductless heat pump, $9,175. Cory A. McCown, 3503 Galaxy Place Place, install ductless heat pump system, $7,665.

Jefferson County

Amanda C. Webby, 10 Timberline Road, install heat pump, $0. John Felix Mottola, 440 Pond Road, install heat pump, $0. Thomas M. Gazdik, 2907 Oak Bay Road, place manufactured home with shoreline exemption, $0. Carol A. Baker, 91 E. Maude St., add new bedroom and gravel parking area, $20,000. Karyn L Williams, 406 Center Road, new detached garage, $64,034. Timothy O’Neill, 873 Parkridge Drive, repair to porch and roof, $0.

Port Townsend

Washington State Parks, Alexander’s Loop, twenty glamping tents, $855,480. Washington State Parks, Fort Worden building 288, glamping shelter, $288,120. Ronald J. Moller Trustee, 839 Quincy St., replace two windows. $2,831.65. Belmont 1885 LLC, 925 Water St., add two balconies on south facade, $21,000. Jean M. Herrington Trustee, 905 Franklin St., replace a window, $2,500. Vincent and Janette Mestre, 1326 Jackson St., replace a window. $1,878.07. Lari Maczko, 340 Pierce St., replace a window, $1,000.

Department Reports

Area building departments report a total of 56 building permits issued from June 16-22 with a total valuation of $3,972,560.50: Clallam County, 18 at $1,481,526; Sequim, 8 at $655,341.78; Port Angeles, 17 at $579,299; Jefferson County, 6 at $84,034; Port Townsend, 7 at $1,172,359.72.

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GARAGE On t h e Pe n i n s u l a

Classified

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8120 Garage Sales 8142 Garage Sales 8180 Garage Sales 8183 Garage Sales Jefferson County Sequim PA - Central PA - East

Community Garage Sale at Beckett Point Fishermen’s Club Saturday, June 29. 9 AM to 2 PM. Several households. Come d ow n B e cke tt Po i n t Road off Cape George Ro a d i n Po r t Tow n send. Worth the drive.

8142 Garage Sales Sequim B I G H A N GA R SA L E : Fri-Sat, 9-4pm, 102 Airpark Rd. (0ff Greywolf in Sequim) Antiques, collectibles, restored antique piano, plus stool, old pedestalsink, plus t o i l e t , o l d B u tt e r n u t b r e a d s t o r e d i s p l a y, tools, furniture, fishing gear, compressor, table saw, small new appliances, clothing CLOSE OUT SUPER BIG SALE Sat. June 29th. 9-3pm. 33 Onager Ln. Ever ything must go! 1/2 price all day. Lots of beads jewelr y, fur niture, antiques, glassware, dolls, teddy bears, Christmas decor, and much much more! ESTATE SALE: Fri-Sat, 9 - 3 p m . 14 1 Sa i l o rs L a n e, ( o ff W S e q u i m Bay Rd.) Electronics, fur niture, photography items, framed and matted photos, tools, outdoor furniture, fine china, silver plate, books, holiday items, and more. Saturday is half-off day! E STAT E SA L E : Fr i . Sat. 9-3pm. 381 Vautier Rd. House and 2 garages full of treasures. Furniture, bedroom sets, refrigerator, washer/dryer, freezer, kitchenware, TV’s, lift recliner, tools. YARD Sale: Fr i.-Sat., 8-2 p.m., 861 E. Hamm o n d . S e q u i m . M a ny kitchen items, home decor, clothes, toys, auto parts, many collectibles.

PARKING LOT SALE: Saturday, 10-5pm, First and Chambers Sts. Fixtures, glassware, clothi n g, c a rd s a n d m o re cards. YARD SALE benefiting Genealogical Research Center June 29th, 8:30 - 3 PM 402 E. Laur idsen. Ar t work, antique dolls, small fur niture, kids items, household misc.

GA RAG E SA L E : Sa t , June 29, 8-3pm, 34 E. 8182 Garage Sales Pheasant Ln. Sequim. PA - West The usual, and perhaps the unusual? Come see. CLOSING THE HOUSE Sa l e : Fr i / Sa t , Ju n e GARAGE TOOL Sale: 28-29, 9-2pm, 1331 MaMains Farm Sequim. rie View Dr. (off 14th and F r i d a y, J u n e 2 8 , N) Golf, camping, fish8-3pm, 551 W. Nelson ing, tools boxes, cookRoad, (west of Cays w a r e / k i t c h e n w a r e , Road, look for the ar- chairs, canning, crafts, rows workshop is be- and lots more! No Earlies. hind house) Entire contents of Mains GARAGE SALE: MultiFarm home shop. No Family, Sat only, 8-4pm, pre-sales or holds. 20 Robinson Rd, (2.9 mi up O’Brien Rd.) Bistro M OV I N G S A L E : Fr i . dining set, 4 chairs, miSat. 9-3pm. 32 McLo Ln. crowave, Christmas tree, Lots of great stuff. Items N e s p r e s s o m a c h i n e , from garage, garden and dish set for 4, kitchenware, sleeper sofa (twin) house. Collectibles. o a k c o r n e r s h e lv i n g, Sat. Only, 9-3 PM, 123 dress, computer desk, S a n fo rd L a n e . L a rg e rocker, silk screen printmirror, split door, fire- er, sway bar, electronics, p l a c e m a n t l e , s m a l l bedding, linens, office kitchen appliances, gar- supplies, jewelry, toiletden items, clothing and ries, cosmetics, sm/med accessories, draperies, pet carrier, air mattress, ga m e s / toys, c l o t h i n g, hand sewn quilts, china. storage ottomans, media Saturday, June 29th, console. 9-5. Combined two sets Multi-family Downsizing! o f h o u s e h o l d g o o d s . Fri. and Sat., 8-3 PM, Some man stuff. No ear- 2100 W 18th St. Adult ly birds. 123 Kirk Road. and kids clothing, furniture, jeep soft top, tow VINTAGE BARN SALE bar, reloading equip., Fri-Sat, 6/28,29, 10-5pm Har ley Electr ic Glide, 300 Thornton (Sequim household goods; cash /Anderson). All Vintage, or cards accepted! antiques, collectibles, fun farmy, retro, industrial, shabby chic, chippy SALE: Sat-Sun, June p a i n t d o o r s , t h e a t e r 29/30th, 9-4pm, 1740 seats, school desks, gar- W. 8th, in alley. PA. den patio, linens, tables, To o l s, fi s h i n g, m i s c chairs, oak project piec- housewares, old/new es, parking behind barn and in between. off Anderson

8180 Garage Sales PA - Central Moving Sale: Sat. only, 8-1 PM, 145 W Cedar St. Furniture, crafts, holiday items, household items and collectibles.

UNDER $10 ,000

105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

YARD SALES

Estate Sale. Large Est a t e S a l e 110 M a y Road, Sequim. June 28, 29 and 30 until it is all gone. Artwork from many places around the world. Statues m a n y f ro m A f r i c a n . J e w e l r y, f u r n i t u r e , quilting material, clothing and soooooo much m o re. N o c h e ck s, sorry.

Friday, June 28, 2019 D5 Friday, June 28, 2019 D5

8183 Garage Sales PA - East V E N D O R S WA N T E D : Mt Pleasant Community Association Indoor/Outdoor Flea Market. 2432 Mt. Pleasant Rd. Saturday July 20, 9-2pm., call 360-775-4331

Community Sale in Mount Pleasant Estates. Sat. only, 8:30-2:30. Angels glass, model planes, quality fabrics, Steihl trimmer, furniture, large antique mirror, airline golf bag, firewood, b i ke s, p l a n t s, b o o k s, drapes, lg bins, + misc. GARAGE SALE: Sat., 8-4pm, 42 Roy St. Electric wheelchair, lift chair, survival suit, baby i te m s, c o ffe e ta bl e, bread maker, Christmas items, miscellaneous. Rain or shine. Garag e Sale: Swap Meet. Cars, Car Parts, Household, Coll e c t i bl e s, Fu r n i t u re, Tools, and too much to name! Fair view G ra n g e, 16 1 L a ke Farm Rd., PA. Saturday 9-3 PM Rain or Shine!

Commercial Property – 1.45 Acres 4 Separate Commercial Zoned Lots with building pad and maximum traffic exposure on North side of Highway 101 just east of Del Guzzi Drive traffic light. 2 Driveway aprons approved by WSDOT – 1 already in. Property is surveyed, has approved Drainage plan, and Geotechnical Site Review. Utilities are at or near the property line. Owner may finance with substantial down. MLS#320431 $119,900 Patti Morris 360-461-9008 JACE The Real Estate Company New Appliances & Designer Styling Immerse yourself in incredible views of Protection Island, Puget Sound and beyond! This comfor table and peaceful A DA c o m p l i a n t h o m e has everything you need to relax and feel on top of the world. 3 plus br, 3.5 ba 3,977 sf, 33,106 sf lot. MLS#1473004 Heidi Kaas WINDEREMERE (206)719-2224

Custom Home Expansive Views 9+ Private Acres The sweeping views of the valley, pasture land, the Straits of Juan de Fuca, and BC from this mountain top home are simply gorgeous. The home style is Colonial with a wrap around d e ck . B e a u t i f u l h a rd wood floors grace this wonderful home throughout the main living space. The design includes a gourmet kitchen with a 12.5 ft granite center island, butlers pantry, and large w a l k - i n p a n t r y. T h e home is ADU compliant. There are two attached garages and a heated/ insulated 900 sf shop with a bath attached. This space could be a separate living quarters. Call for further details. MLS#330499 $790,000 Lynn Moreno 360.477.5582 Olympic Real Estate Group

EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY Investment to purchase a light industrial manufacturing complex. Custom designed for engineering and manufacturing welded aluminum vessels + many industry specific upgrades! Current long-term NNN lease to a single tenant who is well established. Ideal location on Hwy 101 b e t we e n S e q u i m and Port Angeles, 2.44 acres zoned RLC, with 3 structures for a total of 23,350 square feet of s p a c e . E XC E L L E N T OPPORTUNITY MLS#330993/1473013 $2,575,000 MaryAnn Miller 360.774.6900 TOWN & COUNTRY

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STK# H7910A 1 only, subject to prior sale. Sale Price plus tax and license. A negotiable $150 documentation fee may be added. See Wilder Auto for details. Ad expires 1 week from date of publication.

WILDER AUTO 844-793-0274 www.wilderauto.com

101 and Deer Park Rd, Port Angeles • You Can Count On Us!

105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale Clallam County Clallam County Private, Secluded 22.17 Acre Lot Beautiful property with 2 ac parked out building site with balance in timber designation. Power, water, phone, and Crescent Water installed to property line. You won’t find a more beautiful lot to build on. Enjoy plenty of riding trails, electronic gate, Seller says “Sell Now” so bring all offers. Owner may finance with substantial down. MLS#310453 $269,900 Patti Morris 360-461-9008 JACE The Real Estate Company

RELAX AND ENTERTAIN! Beautiful custom home with skylights and vaulted ceiling. 3BR, 2BA, living room with propane FP, for mal dining and kitchen eating area. Merillat kitchen cabinets with pull out shelves. Private fenced back yard with patio, southern exposure and MTN view MLS#330252/1410001 $399,900 Sheryl Burley lic# 41329 360-460-9363 Windermere Sequim East

Eye Candy.

Garag e Sale: Swap M e e t . Ve n d o rs we l come for Garage Sale - Swap Meet Fairview G ra n g e, 16 1 L a ke Farm Rd., PA Saturday 9-3PM $10 Space! Bring anything to Sell! Call 360-461-9008 for more info. M OV I N G S A L E : S a t . 9-5pm. 135 Dun Rollin Ln. off Lewis Rd. Tools, antiques, toys, lots of great household goods, vintage Coke machine, furniture. Too much to list. M u s t e m p t y p a cke d house!. Besides furniture, every room has tables loaded with h o u s e h o l d d e c o r, kitchenware, linens, massive owl collection, lots of tools, plasma cutter, 110 amp welder, plastic welder, air c o m p re s s o r, A r i e n s tractor mower, Poulon Pro push mower, garden tools, Weber BBQ, lots more! Friday/Satu r d a y, J u n e 2 8 / 2 9 from 8-2 at 182 Holley Circle, Port Angeles.

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105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 505 Rental Houses Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

RESIDENTIAL Terrific mini farm on 3.9 acres. Enjoy spacious 2500+- sq. ft. 4 bedroom 3.5 bathroom home, small barn, dog kennel, garden shed, and end of Ross Lane privacy. All this 7-8 minutes from downtown Port Angeles. Property fenced for livestock and fenced garden area. MLS #331071 $349,000 Paul Beck 360.461.0644 Professional Realty Services

PARTIAL WATER VIEW LAND Quiet and private with trees and partial water views, 4.89 acres. Perc test done for pressurized system, well (18gpm), electricity and irrigation o n t h e p ro p e r t y. S i te cleared for building area. Located bet ween Sequim and Pt Angeles. MLS#330726/1451889 $114,900 Cathy Reed (360) 460-1800 Windermere Sequim East

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SERENITY IN SUNLAND Tastefully updated triLevel, 2 BD, 2 BA, new c u s to m k i t c h e n , n ew master bath with walk-in tiled shower, front deck overlooks beautiful landscaping. A piece of h e ave n w i t h S u n l a n d Amenities! MLS#1477577 / 331067 $359,000 Terry Peterson Lic#107780 360-797-4802 WINDERMERE SUNLAND SINGLE LEVEL OPEN CONCEPT Enjoy the good life in this lovely 3 br, 2 ba home in a friendly age 50+ community. Amazing water views from the open concept kitchen, living, dining area and from the master bedroom. There are no stairs to enter this home or any on the interior. MLS#330857/1462716 $325,000 Lynn Bedford 360-417-2806 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

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6050 Firearms & Ammunition

872159533

NEW PRICE! 2 BD, 2.5 BA. 2670 SF 1 story with finished basement, guest BD/BA with family room, fireplace on both levels, situated on cul-de-sac for privacy. Sunland amenities; beach access, pool, tennis and more! MLS#1447723 $422,000 Tyler Conkle lic# 112797 (360) 670-5978 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

Sequim Prime Commercial Property Sequim’s busiest interchange, 0.93 acres, Hwy 101 and River Road, SE corner of 101 and River Rd, multiple commercial u s e s, bu i l t i n 19 9 1 – 1769 sf, zoning is highway commercial, unobstructed mtn views, 1.34 adjacent acres also for sale MLS#321485 $575,000 Team Thomsen (360)808-0979 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

605 Apartments Clallam County 872159538

PRICE REDUCED! Amazing custom built home 3Br 2Ba 2831sf. on a pr ivate 2.40 ac. Brazilian Cherr y hard wood floors, custom cabinets, granite counter tops, 9 ft. ceilings, crown molding, formal dining room, den/office, cozy propane fire place to heat up the living room. Master bedroom has a walk in closet, separate s h owe r to i l e t , d o u bl e sinks and a jetted tub. Large deck in the back that can be entered from the living room or master bed room. Over sized 3 car garage(1043 sf) R.V. port with concrete pad. MLS#330732 $609,000 Mike Fuller 360-477-9189 Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim

872159540

Great Views, Great Location This home has picturesque panoramic views from nearly every room in the house. It is located within 3.5 miles of city limits and sits in a very private location. The design incorporates floor to ceiling windows in the living room to take advantage of the ever changing nautical views. Cedar ceilings and maple floors give this home a feeling of warmth with an added touch of class. The entertaining kitchen is complete with a propane stove, granite counter tops, ample counter space, center island, sizable dining area, and a delightful sunroom. The impeccable landscaping is quite the conversation piece. This home is a featured model home for Lindahl homes. Call for a complete list of amenites. MLS#to come $685,000. Lynn Moreno 360.477.5582 Olympic Real Estate Group

LOCATION & VIEWS! Great Opportunity, Great L o c a t i o n , Ac ro s s t h e street from the Strait of Juan de Fuca sits this classic 3 br 2 ba farmhouse with 1 br cottage. This property has it all with water and mountain views, classic barns and 964 sf guest cottage, perfect for a rental or visiting guests. Numerous fruit trees throughout the property. There is plenty of room for a mini farm; the perfect location to raise chickens, horses or plant veggies or lavender. The Sequim dream come true. MLS#330747 $425,000 Craig & Darel Tenhoff 206-853-4743 Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim

962379584

Great opportunity for investors looking to get into the lucrative vacation rental market in Port Angeles. Separate entry to the basement would allow you to run a business out of the basement while living fulltime in the main house, or maybe it’s time to open that cafe you’ve always wanted, plenty of off-street parking and storage make this an ideal property for use in many different commercial endeavors. Br ing your dreams and make them a reality. MLS#330783 $215,000 Molly Herring 360-461-7090 Windermere Port Angeles

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BUCKMASTER: .223, Mid-Century Modern s h o o t s f l a t , m i l i t a r y. Scandinavian Westnofa “Siesta” lounge chairs $800. (360)808-7852 (2) with headrests and ottomans. Brown leath6055 Firewood, er, bent wood frames. Fuel & Stoves Great condition! $2100 obo, Cash only. FIREWOOD: Dumptruck 360-457-9789 loads, seasoned, $390 + gas. 360-732-4328

6100 Misc. Merchandise

6065 Food & Farmer’s Market BELTED GALLOWAY BEEF R a i s e d o n p a s t u re, fresh air, and scenery. $ 3 . 7 0 l b. h a n g i n g weight. Spring harvest orders. Meat fit for royalty (360)582-1907

6005 Antiques & Collectibles

6075 Heavy Equipment

APPLE CIDER PRESS and carboys for brewing cider or beer. Good condition. $400. (360)452-6560

Front load tractor (Kioti). As is, not running, with a tt a c h m e n t s , $ 6 , 4 0 0 obo. (Sequim) 360-477-3542

6035 Cemetery Plots

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7030 Horses Horse Trailer (1), asking $600 Leave msg for details. 360-461-6999

FORD: 27’ Class C, runs good, everything works. $3500 obo or trade for 20’-24’ travel trailer. Les. (360)808-1904 F O R E ST R I V E R : ‘ 0 7, Sunseeker, 31’ 2 slides, 14,7k mi, 5000 miles on all new tires in Sept., $1,000 pillow queen mattress, drapes, well cared for, runs perfectly. $31,900/obo. 360-370-7770

MISC: Diamond Ring .85K, appraised excellent. $6,300. Leather Coat, green, new, tall med-large. $2,500. 360461-1917 or 360-797F O R E ST R I V E R : ‘ 17, 1328 F R 3 , C l a s s A , 3 2 ’, 2 slides, 18k miles, 6115 Sporting $72,500. Tow car also Goods available. 360-461-1912 or 208-661-0940 CAR BIKE RACK: for s a l e . S i m i l a r t o t h e ITASCA: ‘03, SuncrusiS w a g m a n C h i n o o k er, 38K miles, 35ft, 8.1 Rack. 1-1/4” or 2” hitch Chev with Allison trans, receiver. Tilt down fea- 2 slides, excellent cond. ture allows access to $25,000/firm. rear of vehicle. Locking (360)477-1895 pin secures rack to vehicle. $200. 360-775-6278 TRAVEL TRAILER: ‘06 Wildwood, 27’ 2-door suMISC: Cannon gun safe, p e rs l i d e, q u e e n b e d , A m e r i c a n E a g l e, key $12,000. (360)808-1904 and combination lock. $800. Alaskan Camper 9832 Tents & for truck bed, needs repairs. Best Offer. Travel Trailers (360)460-1539 ‘12 Dutchman Denali, excellent! Sleeps 10, $21K. 360-477-1966 6125 Tools

6140 Wanted & Trades WANTED: 16-18’ Hughes, Lund, etc. Qualit y fish boat with soft top. 360-963-2122 2008 HI-LO 17ft Towlite pop-up hard-sided trailer, bathroom, stove, wate r h e a te r, e l e c t r i c tongue lift, electric hook up(30 amp) water, sewer, newer tires, battery, W A N T E D : W a s h e r , fully loaded 3400 lbs, easy towing! $8,500. must work, not “as is”. 360-681-0199 (360)808-7852 WANTED: Freon R12. We p ay CA $ H . R 12 R500 R11. Convenient. Certified professionals. www.refrigerantfinders .com 312-291-9169

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COW/CALF: Hereford cow and 1 year old steer calf. $1200. You haul. CALL: Jerry Weiler. 360-452-3096

WRENCH SET: MAC, angle style, 11 pieces in soft case, new. $300. (360)461-7429

1 column x 1”...........................$100.08 (4 Weeks) 1 column x 3”...........................$160.08 (4 Weeks) 1 column x 2”...........................$130.08 (4 Weeks) 2 column x 2”...........................$190.08 (4 Weeks) 2 column x 3”...........................$250.08 (4 Weeks) 3 column x 3”...........................$340.08 (4 Weeks)

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7025 Farm Animals & Livestock

1122 Quantum Power Chair. Like new 1122 Quantum Power Chair new charger and battery 7035 General Pets with ROHO Air Seat was $1500 now just $750. AKC Standard Poodle 360-681-2127 Puppies. Black, 15 wks, champion pedigree, par‘64 Lincoln, $1500; ‘55 ents genetic health testChevy P/Up rolling ed, shots up to date, Vet f r a m e, $ 5 0 0 ; c e m e n t checked, dewor med, m i xe r, $ 4 9 0 ; G i b s o n smart, attentive, loving, tractor, $200; Cab-over confident, and ready to camper, $500; ‘53 Fergo to their new homes. guson tractor, $1200; $1,500. 360-457-3579 Aluminum Grumman canoe, $400; 1.5 ton steel AUSSIE PUPS: Puretruck flatbed, $1700. b r e d To y s i z e . 360-461-9164 Available 6/13. One DOLLS AND TRAINS: 2 male tri and one feHO gauge trains, track, male merle both with switches, trestle, used BB. Tails are docked, $75. Dolls; Alexander dew claws removed, S t o r y b o o k 8 i n , $ 10 wormed, health certifieach. Sequim 360-582- cate and first shots. 3033/360-461-0451 See www.rainshadow lilaussies.com HITCH: Reese 5th 206 999-4724 Wheel, 16k, bed rails and hardware, can deliver. $350/obo. 9820 Motorhomes 360-417-8118

Small Older Crawler (bulldozer) running or not, even garden size, B U R I A L P LOT : H a l f also small farm tractor cost, premium location. with loader, Skidsteer $1,400/obo. etc, any condition. Also (360)808-0611 backhoe unit for tractor, old tools, anvils, vises, 6045 Farm Fencing post vises, old advertising signs, old barn items, & Equipment private party. Cash. HONDA GENERATOR: 360-204-1017 Honda Harmony Tiller E U 10 0 0 , 10 0 0 w a t t , FG500, used once, like good condition, runs NEW $450 Call Bill 6080 Home great, $335. 360-683-2383 360-670-6055 Furnishings TRACTOR: ‘50, FerguKM Resorts Camp son, TO-20, rare, runs Chaise Lounge: down ground memebership: a n d d r i ve s x l n t , n ew seat and two pillows for sale. $4,000. Call for Good cond., 70x39x31, tires, PTO, $3,250/obo. details. 360-670-5333 $80. 503-853-5880 (360)452-2484

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ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser’s responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmless Black Press Ltd./ Sound Publishing, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., reserves the right to disclose a user’s identity where deemed necessary to protect Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.


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ALL 2019 RPODS IN STOCK $19,995 SAVE UP TO $4,700

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers 2 012 S p ri n g d a l e 2 12 R B LS 2 5 ’ Tra i l e r with Slide-out Lounge/Dinette. Trailer in excellent condition used 6-8 times since 2012. Includes Reese We i g h t D i s t r i bu t i o n Hitch along with shank and ball for tow vehicle. Full queen bed, flat screen TV, many extras. $14,250. Call (360) 385-9524 24’ Kit Campanion trailer, ‘96, double doors, AC, excel cond. $3,800. 360-775-7869 Classic 1992, 23’ Hi-Low “Fun Lite” Travel Trailer Improve your tow gas mileage significantly and camp in style with this easy-tow fully contained and collapsible trailer. It has a new electric tongue hoist, or iginal roll-out-awning (in good shape) , and an effective air conditioner. The trailer has been well maintained and is ready to travel. $5,500. Call Brent: 360-775-8969 for a viewing.

(360) 457-7715 (800) 927-9395

9050 Marine Miscellaneous G L AS S P LY: 17 ’, s o ft top, 280 Volvo Penta inboard/outboard drive on trailer, Evinrude 15hp troller, trim tabs, depth finder, GPS, Boss marine FM/CD player, crab pot, line and pot puller, down riggers, anchor, float coat and 2 vests. Other extras. Nice clean unit. $6500. (360)461-7429

HOTWOODS.com: Fish & Sport 15, 4 pontoon, 9.9 Johnson, 55 Minnkota, Honda 1000 generat o r , d e c k 5 ’ X 1 3 ’ 6 ”. $4500. Sequim. (509)885-0999

Travel Trailer: 2016, 24’ Forest River Max, loaded, LED lighting, elec. stabilzer jacks, power aw n i n g, A / C, 1 s l i d e room, excel. condition! $24,750. 360-797-3068 U t i l i t y Tra i l e r : 2000#GVWR, 4’ X 6.5’, 3/4” plywood box, $500. 360-461-3947

9802 5th Wheels

THUNDER JET: ‘05 Aluminum 20’ Envoy, 175hp Sportjet, 8hp elec., start Tohatsu, EZ loader trailer, stored in Sequim. $15,900. (425)941-9480

9817 Motorcycles

5th Wheel Trailer: Arctic Fox, 33’ quality trailer ‘01 Yamaha Vino Scootn e e d s w o r k . $ 2 , 7 0 0 . er, 360 original miles! Like new! $1200. 360-385-2311 360-452-3213 BIG HORN by Hear t‘ 0 7 H a r l e y Da v i d s o n land: ‘10, 34’, 3 slides, great shape. $21,000. Electa Glide, 43K miles, tr unk detaches, extra (360)460-6720 seat, for a strip down look, $9,000. 360-461-1526 9808 Campers &

Canopies

2 0 0 7 J AYC O S e l e c t 1 2 H W Te n t Tr a i l e r sleeps 6, Queen & King beds, furnace, stove, hot water heater, Shower & toilet, 2 propane tanks $4,500. Includes Champion Gas Generator CALL 360-681-5271 N AS H Tr ave l Tr a i l e r : ‘97, Very good condition. 22’. Full bed/sofa bed, kitchenette, nook, AC. $5,000. (541)233-3156, (541)416-0243

BMW: ‘95, 540i, Excellent condition, auto transmission, 203k miles, maintenance records. $3,500/OBO. (360)477-5629 BUICK: ‘00 Century ltd edition, V6, new tires, new brakes, 134K miles. $2500. 253-439-0436

FORD: ‘15, Ford Focus SE 5-Door Hatchback 61,051 Miles, 2.0L four cyc l i n d e r, 5 - s p e e d manual transmission, 16 ’’ fa c to r y 10 - s p o ke aluminum wheels, nice all-season tires, keyless entry, power door locks, power adjustable mirrors, power windows, tilt steering wheel, cruise control, air conditioning, AM/FM CD player stereo, Aux/USB Inputs, Bluetooth Phone/Satelite Radio Capable, Back Up Camera, Front Bucket S e a t s , R e a r Fo l d i n g Seats, Front/Side Impact Airbags, Full Side Curt a i n A i r b a g s , L AT C H child seat safety system Vin #FL386425 $9,995 Gray Motors 360-457-4901 graymotors.com H O N DA : ‘ 9 2 , A c c o r d wagon, clean, sunroof, spotless, 186K miles, $2,000. (360)457-5435 KIA: ‘11, Soul, 97,937 mi, white, 25mpg and 32 hwy, clean, $9,500. (360)681-4232

2 010 H a r l ey X R 12 0 0 s p o r t s te r, exc . c o n d . 1200 miles, $7,500. 360-452-0128 ‘96 Honda Shadow VT1100, 62K mi., newer re a r t i re a n d b a tte r y, $2,395. 360-460-6213 SUBARU: ‘17, Outback, 2.5i Limited wagon. very HARLEY: ‘03, FXDL, 92 c l e a n , 3 4 , 5 0 0 / m i l e s . cu in, one owner, 25k blue/gray with cloth inm i . , b e tte r t h a n n ew. terior. $22,500 $8,500. (360)808-0611 360-460-0131, or email houndhelper@ HARLEY: ‘10 FLSTSB, gmail.com (Crossbones), 11,151 m i l e s, l o t s o f ex t ra s, VW: ‘02, Golf, 2.0, 4 Dr, $15,000. 360-460-6971 5 spd, 36/mpg, 108k mi, great stereo, great cond. HARLEY DAVIDSON: $5,000. (360)452-9685 ‘06 Electric Glide, 13,300 miles. $7,000. 9434 Pickup Trucks (480)266-9304

Others

‘0 0 Chevy S10 4WD. Extra cab, nice truck! Needs motor work. $1,000. 360-460-2667

9050 Marine Miscellaneous 10’ LIVINGSTON: Fresh paint in/out, galv trailer, Minn Kota elec. motor, Harley Davidson, 2002 Dyna Low-Rider, great new oars/battery. $725. c o n d i t i o n , n ew t i re s , (360)457-8209 21,000 mi. and extras. ‘ 8 4 C h a m p i o n B a s s $5,800. 360-301-0213 Boat, 17,’ excellent con- M O T O R C YC L E : ‘ 9 9 dition. $7,250. 360-385- Honda Goldwing, 50th 2792 pls leave message A n n i ve r s a r y, m a r o o n

color, excellent cond., e x t r a s . $ 5 , 5 0 0 / O B O. 360-477-4003 MOTOR SCOOTER: ‘07, 250CC, low miles, always garaged. $1,200. (360)457-8729

BAYLINER: ‘88, CAPRI BOWRIDER. This Boat is ready to go! Fresh engine, fresh water cooling. Out-drive serviced. Ca m p e r c a nva s, n ew upholster y. Ever ything works. Have titles, tab’s for both. Full gas tank too. $6,000. 360-316-6246

9292 Automobiles Others

C H E V : ‘ 0 2 , Ca m e ro convertible, auto, V6, silver with burgundy leather upholstery, 85K miles, To y o t i r e s , i n g o o d shape, all power, always garaged. $4,700. ( 3 6 0 ) 4 6 1- 1 74 2 o r (360)460-2694

SAILBOAT: 25’ Coronad o, 15 H P O u t b o a rd , sleeps 5, moorage, $3,900. 360-385-2012

V E S PA : S w e e t r i d e , great mileage. 2008 Piaggio Vespa granturismo 200cc motorscooter. 5,387 miles, always garaged, regularly serviced, h e l m e t a n d b a tte r y charger included. $2,500. 713-449-7418.

CHEV: Silverado 1500 LS Extra Cab 4X4, 73,908K mi, 4.8L Vortec V8, automatic transmission, chrome grille, 17’’ fa c to r y c h ro m e a l l oy wheels, brand new Michelin Defender tires, factory chrome running boards, chrome rear bumper, trailer towing package, matching arrow fiberglas canopy, four opening doors, keyless door entry, power door locks, power adjustable windows, power mirrors, tilt steer ing wheel, cruise control, air conditioning, AM/FM CD player stereo with auxiliary input, Sirius satelite radio capable, rear folding seat, latch child seat safety system Vin #8Z303154 $17,995 Gray Motors 360-457-4901 graymotors.com

9180 Automobiles

FORD: ‘08 F-350 Lariat, extended cab, 6.4L diesel. 77,700 mi. Original owner, very good condition, many extras. $22,900. Call for details. 360-808-6430 GMC: ‘89, Sierra, 3/4 ton, Needs work. $500. (360)477-6516

FORD: ‘10 Escape XLT AWD, 99,910K mi, 3.0L V6, automatic transmission, chrome grille, fog l i g h t s , 17 ’’ fa c to r y 5-spoke chrome alloy wheels, like new Open Countr y tires, factor y running boards, trailer tow i n g p a cka g e, re a r glass or gate openings, roof rack with crossbars, body colored side mirrors/door handles, keycode door entry, keyless door entry, power door locks, power adjustable mirrors, power windows, tilt steering wheel, cruise control, air conditioning, automatic/dual zone clim a te c o n t ro l , fa c to r y touch screen navigation system, bluetooth AM/FM/CD player stereo with AUX/USB inputs, Sirius satelite capability sun roof, auto dimming rear view mirror, homelink, sunglasses holder, center console armrest w i t h s to ra g e, l e a t h e r seating surfaces, front leather heated bucket seats, power adjustable d r i ve r ’s s e a t , a u dio/cr uise/phone controls on steering wheel, b a ck u p c a m e ra w i t h parking assist, rear folding seats, rear latch child seat safety system. Vin #AKA03571 $10,995 Gray Motors 360-457-4901 graymotors.com JEEP: ‘95, Grand Cherokee Laredo 4x4. Runs good. New: carpet, floor mats, brakes front and back, rotors in front, oil change, alternator, more replacement parts, too many to list. Transmission serviced at Tranco Transmissions. $2,000. 360-460-6981 S U B UA R U : F o r e s t e r 2.5i Limited, ‘16, 13K miles, exc. cond., $25,000. 360-457-5937

9730 Vans & Minivans Others C H E V: ‘ 14 , C h r y s l e r Town & Country Tourning Van, 88,479 Miles, 3.6L V6, automatic transmission, fog lights, chrome grille, 17’’ factory 9-spoke aluminum wheels, like new tires, roof rack, body colored side mirrors/door handles, chrome door accents, roof rack, power sliding doors, power rear lift gate, keyless entry, power door locks, power windows, power adjustable mirrors, tilt steering wheel, leather wrapped steering wheel, cruise control, air conditioning, automatic/dual zo n e c l i m a te c o n t ro l , AM/FM CD player stereo with auxiliary/USB input, satelite radio capability, bluetooth phone/stereo controls on steer ing wheel, DVD enter tainment system, front leather bucket seats, ar mre s t s, p ow e r d r i ve r ’s seat, center console with storage, 2nd row capta i n’s c h a i rs, c h ro m e dash/inter ior accents, rear window wiper, rear folding seats, latch child seat safety system, front impact, side impact and full side curtain airbags. Vin #ER158321 13,995 Gray Motors 360-457-4901 graymotors.com

9931 Legal Notices Clallam County

TO: UNKNOWN HEIR, SPOUSE, LEGATEES, AND DEVISEES OF ANDREW MICHAELIS AND BETTY MICHAELIS, GARY MICHAELIS, STEVEN MICHAELIS, SHERYL BLANEY, SANDRA REAMER, STANLEY MICHAELIS AND OCCUPANTS OF THE SUBJECT REAL PROPERTY; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PERSONS OR PARTIES CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE REAL ESTATE DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT HEREIN

SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON in and for the County of Clallam SHERIFF’S NOTICE TO JUDGMENT DEBTOR FOR SALE OF REAL PROPERTY BY PUBLICATION Cause No. 18-2-00049-05 Sheriff’s No. 19000381 US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR STRUCTURED ASSET INVESTMENT LOAN TRUST, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-BNC1, Plaintiff VS THE UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OR EARL E. JOHNSTON; DOROTHY L. JOHNSTON; OCCUPANTS OF THE PROPERTY, Defendants TO : D O ROT H Y J O H N STO N a n d T H E U N KNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OR EARL E. JOHNSTON An order of sale has been issued in the above-captioned case, directed to the sheriff of Clallam County, commanding the sheriff as follows: “A Judgment of Foreclosure was entered and docketed in this case on 12/24/2018. The Judgment was entered in favor of the Judgment Creditor: U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR STRUCTURED ASSET INVESTMENT LOAN TRUST, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-BNC1, 3217 S. Decker Lake Dr., Salt Lake City, UT, 84119; against DOROTHY L. JOHNSTON AND THE UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF EARL E. JOHNSTON in rem, with a money award in the amount of $146,851.01, plus post judgment interest at the rate of 6.9000% per annum from 12/24/2018 to date of sale, with a per diem of $27.76, and whereas said judgment is a foreclosure with deficiency judgment, twelve month redemption period.

N OW, T H E R E F O R E I N T H E N A M E O F T H E An order of sale has been issued in the above-cap- STATE OF WASHINGTON, you are hereby comtioned case, directed to the sheriff of Clallam manded to sell, in the manner prescribed by law for the sale of real property on execution (subject to reCounty, commanding the sheriff as follows: demption of 12 months), all of the interest that the “A Judgement of Foreclosure was entered and Defendant had on December 16, 2005, the date of docketed in this case on 5/3/2019. The Judgement the Deed of Trust, and also the interest that the Dewas entered in favor of the Judgement Creditor : fendant had thereafter acquired, in the real property U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUS- described as follows: TEE, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS SUC- LOT 11, IN BLOCK 37, OF NORMAN R. SMITH’S CESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK NA- SUBDIVISION OF THE TOWNSITE OF PORT ANTIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CIR- GELES, SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE T I F I D CAT E H O L D E R S O F B E A R S T E A R N S OF WASHINGTON. ASSET BACKED SECURITIES I LLC, ASSET- APN/Parcel No. 61630 / 06-30-00-513755 and BACKED CERTIFICATES SERIES 2007-HE1, commonly known as: 807 Georgiana St, Port An3217 S. Decker Lake Dr., Salt Lake City, UT, geles, WA 98362. 8 4 119 ; a ga i n s t U N K N OW N H E I R , S P O U S E , LEGATEES, AND DEVISEES OF ANDREW MI- Sale of the property is to satisfy the sum listed CHAELIS AKA ANDREW WILLIAM MICHAELIS, above, plus the costs incurred in performing this OrDECEASED; UNKNOWN HEIRS, SPOUSE, LEGA- der of Sale. You are to make the return within 60 TEES, AND DEVISEES OF BETTY MICHAELIS days after issuance by the court. For purposes of AKA BETTY LICILLE MICHAELIS in rem, with a sale, the Order may be automatically extended for money award in the amount of $324,290.75, plus 30 days. post judgment interest shall accrue at variable rates per annum from 5/3/2019 to date of sale, and WITNESS, the Honorable Brian Coughenour, whereas said judgement is a foreclosure without Judge of the Superior Court and seal of said court, deficiency judgment, eight month redemption peri- affixed this 5th day of June, 2019 at Port Angeles, Washington. od. NOW, THEREFORE, IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON, you are hereby com- The sale date has been set for 10:00 A.M. on Frimanded to sell, in the manner prescribed by law day, 08/02/2019 in the main lobby of the Clallam for the sale of real property on execution (sub- County courthouse, entrance located at 223 E. 4th ject to redemption of 8 months), all of the inter- Street, Por t Angeles, Washington. YOU MAY est that the Defendant had thereafter acquired, HAVE A RIGHT TO EXEMPT PROPERTY from the sale under statutes of this state, including sections in the real property described as follows: 6.13.010, 6.13.030, 6.13.040, 6.15.010, and LOTS 7, 8 AND 9 IN BLOCK 6 OF ENGLEWOOD 6.15.060 of the Revised Code of Washington, in the ADDITION TO PORT ANGELES, WASHINGTON, manner described in those statutes. AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 1 OF PLATS, PAGE 115 RECORDS OF DATED THIS Thursday, June 17, 2019 CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. W.L. Benedict, SHERIFF SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF Clallam County, Washington By _____________________ WASHINGTON. Nelson Morgan, Civil Deputy APN/Parcel No. 063012-620490-1000, 063012- 223 E. 4th Street, Suite 12, 620490-2001 and commonly known as: 2354 East Port Angeles, WA 98362 TEL: 360.417.2266 FAX: 360.417.2498 5th Avenue, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Pub: June 21, 28, July 5, 12, 19, 26, 2019 Sale of the property is to satisfy the sum listed Legal No. 862040 above, plus the costs incurred in performing this OrSUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF der of Sale. You are to make the return within 60 WASHINGTON days after issuance by the court. For purposes of in and for the County of Clallam sale, the Order may be automatically extended for SHERIFF’S PUBLIC NOTICE 30 days. OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY MAKE RETURN HEREOF within sixty (60) days of Cause No. 15-2-00765-6 the date indicated below, showing you have executSheriff’s No. 19000342 ed the same. U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSWITNESS, the Honorable Brian Coughenour Judge TEE, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO BANK OF of the Superior Court and the seal of said Court, af- AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS SUCfixed this 15th Day of May, 2019, at Port Angeles, CESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CIRWashington. T I F I D CAT E H O L D E R S O F B E A R S T E A R N S The sale date has been set for 10:00 A.M. on Fri- ASSET BACKED SECURITIES I LLC, ASSETday, 07/26/2019 in the main lobby of the Clallam BACKED CERTIFICATES SERIES 2007-HE1, County courthouse, entrance located at 223 E. 4th VS Street, Por t Angeles, Washington. YOU MAY UNKNOWN HEIR, SPOUSE, LEGATEES, AND HAVE A RIGHT TO EXEMPT PROPERTY from the DEVISEES OF ANDREW MICHAELIS AKA ANsale under statutes of this state, including sections DREW WILLIAM MICHAELIS, DECEASED; UN6.13.010, 6.13.030, 6.13.040, 6.15.010, and KNOWN HEIRS, SPOUSE, LEGATEES, AND DE6.15.060 of the Revised Code of Washington, in the VISEES OF BETTY MICHAELIS AK A BETTY LICILLE MICHAELIS, DECEASED; GARY MImanner described in those statutes. CHAELIS; STEVEN E. MICHAELIS; SHERYL BLANEY; SANDRA REAMER; STANLEY MICHAELIS; DATED THIS Thursday, June 13, 2019 OCCUPANTS OF THE SUBJECT REAL PROPERTY; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PERSONS OR PARLEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOTS 7, 8 AND 9 IN BLOCK 6 OF ENGLE- TIES CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIWOOD ADDITION TO PORT ANGELES, WASH- E N , O R I N T E R E ST I N T H E R E A L E STAT E INGTON, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT HEREIN IN VOLUME 1 OF PLATS, PAGE 115 RECORDS TO: UKNOWN HEIRS, SPOUSE, LEGATEE, AND DEVISEES OF ANDREW MICHAELIS AKA ANOF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. DREW WILLIAM MICHAELIS, DECEASED COMMONLY KNOWN AS: THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CLALLAM COUNTY 2354 EAST 5TH AVENUE HAS DIRECTED THE UNDERSIGNED SHERIFF PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 OF CLALLAM COUNTY TO SELL THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED BELOW TO SATISFY A JUDGW.L. Benedict, SHERIFF MENT IN THE ABOVE ENTITLED ACTION. IF Clallam County, Washington DEVELOPED, THE PROPERTY ADDRESS IS: By _____________________ 2354 East 5th Avenue Nelson Morgan, Civil Deputy Port Angeles, WA 98362 223 E. 4th Street, Suite 12, Port Angeles, WA 98362 THE SALE OF THE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS TEL: 360.417.2266 FAX: 360.417.2498 TO TAKE PLACE AT 10:00 A.M. ON FRIDAY, Pub: June 14, 21, 28, July 5, 12, 19, 2019 JULY 26, 2019 IN THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE Legal No. 861244 CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, ENTRANCE LOCATED AT 223 E. 4th STREET, PORT ANCompose your 9931 Legal Notices GELES, WASHINGTON.

Clallam County

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR CLALLAM COUNTY In re the Estate of Paul B, Reandeau, Deceased. NO. 19-4-00236-05 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representatives’ attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: June 28, 2019 Personal Representative: Kenneth P. Reandeau Attorney for Personal Representative: J. Graham Ralston, WSBA #42796 Address for mailing or service: LAW OFFICES OF MORIARTY & RALSTON 403 S. Peabody, Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 457-3327 Court of Probate Proceedings: C l a l l a m C o u n t y Superior Court Probate Cause Number: 19-4-00236-05 Pub: PDN June 28, July 5, 12, 2019 Legal: 862812

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THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR CAN AVOID THE SALE BY PAYING THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT OF $ 3 2 4 , 2 9 0 . 7 5 TO G E T H E R W IT H I N T E R E ST, COSTS AND FEES BEFORE THE SALE DATE. FOR THE EXACT AMOUNT, CONTACT THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE AT THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW. DATED June 25, 2019 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOTS 7, 8 AND 9 IN BLOCK 6 OF ENGLEWOOD ADDITION TO PORT ANGELES, WASHINGTON, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 1 OF PLATS, PAGE 115 RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2354 EAST 5TH AVENUE PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 W.L. Benedict, SHERIFF Clallam County, Washington By _____________________ Nelson Morgan, Civil Deputy 223 E. 4th Street, Suite 12, Port Angeles, WA 98362 TEL: 360.417.2266 FAX: 360.417.2498 Pub: June 28, July 5, 12, 19, 2019 Legal No. 863045

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SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON in and for the County of Clallam SHERIFF’S NOTICE TO JUDGMENT DEBTOR FOR SALE OF REAL PROPERTY BY PUBLICATION Cause No. 15-2-00765-6 Sheriff’s No. 19000342 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CIRT I F I D CAT E H O L D E R S O F B E A R S T E A R N S ASSET BACKED SECURITIES I LLC, ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES SERIES 2007-HE1, VS UNKNOWN HEIR, SPOUSE, LEGATEES, AND DEVISEES OF ANDREW MICHAELIS AKA ANDREW WILLIAM MICHAELIS, DECEASED; UNKNOWN HEIRS, SPOUSE, LEGATEES, AND DEVISEES OF BETTY MICHAELIS AK A BETTY LICILLE MICHAELIS, DECEASED; GARY MICHAELIS; STEVEN E. MICHAELIS; SHERYL BLANEY; SANDRA REAMER; STANLEY MICHAELIS; OCCUPANTS OF THE SUBJECT REAL PROPERTY; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PERSONS OR PARTIES CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIE N , O R I N T E R E ST I N T H E R E A L E STAT E DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT HEREIN

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9434 Pickup Trucks 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Others Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

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9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Trustee Sale # 070572-WA Title # 180226753-WA-MSO Notice of Trustee’s Sale Grantor(s): DOUGLAS B HAWES, A MARRIED MAN Grantee(s): OLYMPIC PENINSULA TITLE, as Trustee Current beneficiary of the deed of trust: WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR BEAR STEARNS ASSET BACKED SECURITIES I LLC, GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING TRUST 2006-AR1, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR1 Current trustee of the deed of trust: CLEAR RECON CORP Current mortgage servicer of the deed of trust: SELECT PORTFOLIO SERVICING Reference number of the deed of trust: 2005 1167874 Parcel number(s): 04-29-02-119020 LOT 2, RUBINO SHORT PLAT, VOL. 8, PG. 78 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, CLEAR RECON CORP, 9311 S.E. 36th Street, Suite 100, Mercer Island, WA 98040, Trustee will on 7/12/2019 at 10:00 AM OUTSIDE THE MAIN ENTRANCE OF THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 223 EAST 4TH ST, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 2 OF RUBINO SHORT PLAT RECORDED JULY 15, 1980 IN VOLUME 8 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 78, UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY AUDITOR’S FILE NO. 509589, BEING A PORTION OF PARCEL 3 OF SURVEY RECORDED IN VOLUME 2 OF SURVEYS, PAGE 8, UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY AUDITOR’S FILE NO. 449420, BEING A PORTION OF THE EAST HALF OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 29 NORTH, RANGE 4 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Commonly known as: 73 WAGGLER WAY SEQUIM, WA 98382 AKA 71 WAGGLER WAY SEQUIM, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/17/2005, recorded 10/21/2005, as Auditor’s File No. 2005 1167874, , records of Clallam County, Washington, from DOUGLAS B HAWES, A MARRIED MAN, as Grantor(s), to OLYMPIC PENINSULA TITLE, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. (“MERS”), AS DESIGNATED NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC., BENEFICIARY OF THE SECURITY INSTRUMENT, ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as Trustee for Bear Stearns Asset Backed Securities I LLC, GreenPoint Mortgage Funding Trust 2006-AR1, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-AR1, under an Assignment recorded under Auditor’s File No 20121286284. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust or the Beneficiary’s successor is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $235,339.04 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $425,386.75, together with interest as provided in the Note from 1/1/2018, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 7/12/2019. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 7/1/2019, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 7/1/2019 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 7/1/2019 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the or the Grantor’s successor interest or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT “1” by both first class and certified mail on 8/29/2018, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS – The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. If you are a servicemember or a dependent of a servicemember, you may be entitled to certain protections under the federal Servicemembers Civil Relief Act and any comparable state laws regarding the risk of foreclosure. If you believe you may be entitled to these protections, please contact our office immediately. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: 1-877-894-HOME(1-877-894-4663) . W e b s i t e : h tt p : / / w w w. d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e rship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: 1-800-569-4287 Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: 2/26/2019 CLEAR RECON CORP, as Successor Trustee For additional information or service you may contact: Clear Recon Corp 9311 S.E. 36th Street, Suite 100 Mercer Island, WA 98040 Phone: (206) 707-9599 EXHIBIT “1” NAME ADDRESS DOUGLAS B HAWES DOUGLAS B HAWES DOUGLAS B HAWES DOUGLAS B HAWES DOUGLAS HAWES DOUGLAS HAWES DOUGLAS HAWES DOUGLAS HAWES PUB: June 7, 28, 2019 Legal No. 848307

71 WAGGLER WAY SEQUIM, WA 98382 71 WAGGLER WY-73 SEQUIM, WA 98382 73 WAGGLER WAY SEQUIM, WA 98382 P O BOX 3069 PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 71 WAGGLER WY -73 SEQUIM, WA 98382 73 WAGGLER WAY SEQUIM, WA 98382 PO BOX 3069 PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 PO BOX 3069 PORT ANGELES, WA 98362

Trustee Sale # 076737-WA Title # 180541017 Notice of Trustee’s Sale Grantor(s): LLOYD GREGORY AND, BARBARA J GREGORY, HUSBAND AND WIFE Grantee(s): CLALLAM TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee Current beneficiary of the deed of trust: U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, NOT IN ITS INDIVIDUAL CAPACITY BUT SOLELY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE RMAC TRUST, SERIES 2016-CTT Current trustee of the deed of trust: CLEAR RECON CORP Current mortgage servicer of the deed of trust: Rushmore Loan Management Services, LLC Reference number of the deed of trust: 20071204764 Parcel number(s): 063012540200, 063012540260, 063012540145 121 port st I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, CLEAR RECON CORP, 9311 S.E. 36th Street, Suite 100, Mercer Island, WA 98040, Trustee will on 7/12/2019 at 10:00 AM OUTSIDE THE MAIN ENTRANCE OF THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 223 EAST 4TH ST, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to-wit: THE EASTERLY 50 FEET OF LOTS 1 TO 5, INCLUSIVE , BLOCK 2, OF NOB HILL ADDITION TO THE TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 1 OF PLATS, PAGE 35, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON; AND THE EAST HALF OF LOTS 6, 7, AND 8, BLOCK 2 OF NOB HILL ADDITION TO THE TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 1 OF PLATS, PAGE 35, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON; AND LOTS 8 THROUGH 13, INCLUSIVE, BLOCK 1, CARUSI’S ADDITION TO PORT ANGELES, AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN VOLUME 1 OF PLATS, PAGE 46, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON; EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE SOUTH 120 FEET OF SAID LOTS 11, 12 AND 13; TOGETHER WITH THOSE PORTIONS OF VACATED ALLEY ABUTTING SAID LOTS 8 THROUGH 13, BLOCK 1, ATTACHING THERETO BY OPERATION OF LAW. Commonly known as: 2222 E 7TH AVE PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 7/5/2007, recorded 7/6/2007, as Auditor’s File No. 2007-1204764, , records of Clallam County, Washington, from LLOYD GREGORY AND, BARBARA J GREGORY, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), to CLALLAM TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, not in its individual capacity but solely as trustee for the RMAC Trust, Series 2016-CTT, under an Assignment recorded under Auditor’s File No 2017 1357068. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust or the Beneficiary’s successor is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $12,802.54 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $91,836.32, together with interest as provided in the Note from 7/1/2018, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 7/12/2019. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 7/1/2019, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 7/1/2019 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 7/1/2019 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the or the Grantor’s successor interest or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT “1” by both first class and certified mail on 1/23/2019, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS – The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. If you are a servicemember or a dependent of a servicemember, you may be entitled to certain protections under the federal Servicemembers Civil Relief Act and any comparable state laws regarding the risk of foreclosure. If you believe you may be entitled to these protections, please contact our office immediately. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: 1-877-894-HOME(1-877-894-4663) . Web s i te : h tt p : / / w w w. d fi . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e rs / h o m e ow n e rship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: 1-800-569-4287 Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: 2/28/2019 CLEAR RECON CORP, as Successor Trustee For additional information or service you may contact: Clear Recon Corp 9311 S.E. 36th Street, Suite 100 Mercer Island, WA 98040 Phone: (206) 707-9599 EXHIBIT “1” NAME ADDRESS BARBARA J GREGORY 1078 TAMARACK LN PORT ANGELES, WA 98362-8927 BARBARA J GREGORY 2222 E 7TH AVE PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 LLOYD GREGORY 1078 TAMARACK LN PORT ANGELES, WA 98362-8927 LLOYD GREGORY 1078 TAMARACK LANE PORT ANGELES, WA 98362-8927 LLOYD GREGORY 2222 E 7TH AVE PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 PUB: June 7, 28, 2019 Legal No. 858XXX 43OCCASION

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Trustee Sale # 077547-WA Title # 180593082 Notice of Trustee’s Sale Grantor(s): WILLIAM J. LAMMIE, AS HIS SEPARATE ESTATE Grantee(s): OLYMPIC PENINSULA TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee Current beneficiary of the deed of trust: U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, NOT IN ITS INDIVIDUAL CAPACITY BUT SOLELY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE RMAC TRUST, SERIES 2016-CTT Current trustee of the deed of trust: CLEAR RECON CORP Current mortgage servicer of the deed of trust: Rushmore Loan Management Services, LLC Reference number of the deed of trust: 2007-1208502 Parcel number(s): 06-30-08-581350 LOT 12 BK 13 PENN PARK ADD I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, CLEAR RECON CORP, 9311 S.E. 36th Street, Suite 100, Mercer Island, WA 98040, Trustee will on 8/2/2019 at 10:00 AM OUTSIDE THE MAIN ENTRANCE OF THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 223 EAST 4TH ST, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 12 IN BLOCK 13 OF PENNSYLVANIA PARK ADDITION, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 2 OF PLATS, PAGE 66, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Commonly known as: 1033 GLENWOOD STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 AKA 1033 W GLENWOOD ST PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 8/23/2007, recorded 9/5/2007, as Auditor’s File No. 2007-1208502, , records of Clallam County, Washington, from WILLIAM J. LAMMIE, AS HIS SEPARATE ESTATE, as Grantor(s), to OLYMPIC PENINSULA TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. (“MERS”), AS DESIGNATED NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGEIT, INC., BENEFICIARY OF THE SECURITY INSTRUMENT, ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned to U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, NOT IN ITS INDIVIDUAL CAPACITY BUT SOLELY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE RMAC TRUST, SERIES 2016-CTT, under an Assignment recorded under Auditor’s File No 2018 1367533. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust or the Beneficiary’s successor is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $28,909.79 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $109,145.78, together with interest as provided in the Note from 2/1/2017, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 8/2/2019. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 7/22/2019, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 7/22/2019 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 7/22/2019 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the or the Grantor’s successor interest or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT “1” by both first class and certified mail on 2/20/2019, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS – The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. If you are a servicemember or a dependent of a servicemember, you may be entitled to certain protections under the federal Servicemembers Civil Relief Act and any comparable state laws regarding the risk of foreclosure. If you believe you may be entitled to these protections, please contact our office immediately. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: 1-877-894-HOME(1-877-894-4663) . Web s i te : h tt p : / / w w w. d fi . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e rs / h o m e ow n e rship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: 1-800-569-4287 Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: 3/19/2019 CLEAR RECON CORP, as Successor Trustee For additional information or service you may contact: Clear Recon Corp 9311 S.E. 36th Street, Suite 100 Mercer Island, WA 98040 Phone: (206) 707-9599 EXHIBIT “1” NAME ADDRESS CHERIE G. LAMMIE AKA CHERIE G. HUXTABLE Heir to WILLIAM J. LAMMIE 411 E 10TH ST PORT ANGELES WA 98362-7925 CHERYL LAMMIE 1033 GLENWOOD STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 CHERYL A LAMMIE 1033 GLENWOOD STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 CHERYL A LAMMIE 1033 W GLENWOOD ST PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 CHERYL A LAMMIE 411 E 10TH ST PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 CHERYL A LAMMIE 550 COUNTY ROAD 334 DE BERRY, TX 75639 JAMES R. LAMMIE Heir to WILLIAM J. LAMMIE 103 SOUTHVIEW DR PORT ANGELES WA 98363-6121 MARRESA LYNN LAMMIE heir to WILLIAM J. LAMMIE 1033 GLENWOOD ST PORT ANGELES WA 98363-2322 WILLIAM J LAMMIE 1033 GLENWOOD STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 WILLIAM J LAMMIE 1033 W GLENWOOD ST PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 WILLIAM J LAMMIE 411 E 10TH ST PORT ANGELES, WA 98362

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WILLIAM J. LAMMIE 1033 W GLENWOOD ST PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 WILLIAM J. LAMMIE ESTATE 1033 GLENWOOD ST PORT ANGELES, WA 98363-2322 PUB: June 28, July 19, 2019 Legal No. 860194

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Peninsula Daily News Peninsula daily news 9935 General Legals

9935 General Legals

9935 General Legals

9935 General Legals

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM MARK B. MURRAY, Plaintiff, vs.

NO. 19-2-00399-05

THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO THE ABOVE-SAID DEFENDANTS: TO UNKNOWN HEIRS and DEVISES OF AURELIUS TALBOT (Deceased), UNKNOWN HEIRS and DEVISEES OF ISEBEL VERNEY (Deceased); UNKNOWN HEIRS and DEVISEES of PHILLIP TALBOT (Deceased); UNKNOWN HEIRS and DEVISEES OF ALICE MCGUIRE (Deceased); and UNKNOWN HEIRS and DEVISEES of EDSON TALBOT; including also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint herein: You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty (60) days after the date of first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty days after the 24th day of May, 2019, and defend the above entitled action in the above-entitled court, and answer the complaint of the Plaintiff, MARK B. MURRAY, and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorney for Plaintiff, Curtis G. Johnson, P.S., at his office address below stated; and in case of your failure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The object of the complaint is quiet title and terminate all interest of said defendants, including all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, estate, lien or interest in certain real property identified as Clallam County Assessor’s Parcel No. 133214-330125-0000 and legally described as follows: Beginning at the SW corner of the said section 14, the North 417.42 feet along the West line of Section 14, the East 417.42 feet, the South 417.42 feet; the West 417.42 feet along the South line of Section 14 to the point of beginning and containing 4 acres. Records of Clallam County, Washington. DATED this 24 day of May, 2019. LAW OFFICE OF CURTIS G. JOHNSON, P.S. ________________________________________ Curtis G. Johnson, WSBA #8675 Attorney for Plaintiff FILE RESPONSE WITH: Clerk of the Court Clallam County Courthouse 223 East Fourth Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 SERVE A COPY OF YOUR RESPONSE on the attorney listed below: Curtis G. Johnson, P.S. 230 East Fifth Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 452-3895 Pub: PDN May 24, 31, June 7, 14, 21, 28, 2019 Legal: 857888

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR KING COUNTY In the Matter of the Estate of MARY K. KING, Deceased. NO. 19-4-12188-0 SEA NONPROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.42.030) Linda A. Barnfather, the undersigned Notice Agent, has elected to give notice to creditors of the decedent above named under RCW 11. 42.020. As of the date of the filing of a copy of this notice with the Clerk of this Court, the Notice Agent has no knowledge of the appointment and qualification of a Personal Representative in the decedent’s estate in the state of Washington or of any other person becoming a Notice Agent. According to the records of the Clerk of this Court as of 8:00 a.m. on the date of the filing of this notice with the Clerk, no Personal Representative of the decedent’s estate had been appointed and qualified and no cause number regarding the decedent had been issued to any other Notice Agent by the Clerk of this Court under RCW 11.42.010. Persons having claims against the decedent named above must, before the time the claims would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.42.070 by serving on or mailing to the notice agent or the notice agent’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the notice agent’s declaration and oath were filed. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the notice agent (or notice agent’s attorney) served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.42.020(2)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.42.050 and 11.42.060. This bar is effective as to all assets of the decedent that were subject to satisfaction of the decedent’s general liabilities immediately before the decedent’s death regardless of whether those assets are or would be assets of the decedent’s probate estate or nonprobate assets of the decedent. Date of filing copy of notice to creditors: June 18, 2019 Date of first publication: June 21, 2019 The Notice Agent declares under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Washington on June 17, 2019, that the foregoing is true and correct. _________________ _____ LINDA A. BARNFATHER, Notice Agent _______________________ _ ANNA M. CASHMAN, WSBA NO. 41782 Attorney for Notice Agent KHBB LAW PLLC, Hoge Building, Suite 800 705 Second Avenue Seattle, WA 98104 PUB: PDN June 21, 28, July 5, 2019 Legal No. 862007

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9935 General Legals

9935 General Legals

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq.108 1st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 Trustee Sale No.: WA-18-838318-SH Title Order No.: 180395911-WA-MSW Reference Number of Deed of Trust: Instrument No. 2008-1215067 Parcel Number(s): 0330 0550 01190 0 0 0 Grantor(s) for Recording Pur poses under RCW 65.04.015: TERRY V. JOHNSON AND SHERRY JOHNSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS WITH THE RIGHT OF SURVIVORSHIP Current Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust and Grantee (for Recording Purposes under RCW 65.04.015): U.S. Bank Trust National Association, not in its individual capacity but solely as owner trustee for Legacy Mortgage Asset Trust 2018-SL1 Current Trustee of the Deed of Trust: Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington Current Loan Mortgage Servicer of the Deed of Trust: Specialized Loan Servicing LLC I.NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 7/12/2019, at 10:00 AM At the main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, located at 223 E 4th St, Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: THAT PORTION OF TRACT A OF JAMESTOWN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME D OF DEEDS, PAGE 440, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE T-IRON STAKE SET IN CONCRETE IN 1960 MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID TRACT; THENCE NORTH 54°19’40” WEST (RELATIVE TO THE WASHINGTON COORDINATE SYSTEM GRID AND EQUALLING THE RECORD PLAT BEARING OF NORTH 56° WEST RELATIVE TO THE TRUE MERIDIAN) 213.16 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 24°16’13” WEST 2,323.91 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUING SOUTH 24°16’13” WEST 10 0 FEET; THENCE NORTH 65°43’47” WEST 148.04 FEET TO THE BOUNDARY ESTABLISHED BY AN EXCHANGE OF DEEDS DATED JULY 7, 1960 BETWEEN PETERSON AND PEDERSEN AND PRINCE; THENCE NORTH 23°57’51” EAST ALONG SAID BOUNDARY 100 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 65°43’47” EAST 148.04 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. More commonly known as: 241 WILCOX LANE, SEQUIM, WA 98382-8903 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 6/11/2007, recorded 1/22/2008, under Instrument No. 20081215067 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from TERRY V. JOHNSON AND SHERRY JOHNSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS WITH THE RIGHT OF SURVIVORSHIP, as grantor(s), to TRANS NATION TITLE COMPANY, as original trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC, as original beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was subsequently assigned to U.S. Bank Trust National Association, not in its individual capacity but solely as owner trustee for Legacy Mortgage Asset Trust 2018-SL1, the Beneficiary, under an assignment recorded under Auditors File Number 2018-1370273 II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust as referenced in RCW 61.21.030(4) is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $6,925.43. IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $8,533.21, together with interest as provided in the Note from 9/20/2017 on, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 7/12/2019. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 7/1/2019 (11 days before the sale date), or by other date as permitted in the Note or Deed of Trust, to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 7/1/2019 (11 days before the sale), or by other date as permitted in the Note or Deed of Trust, the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 7/1/2019 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower(s) and Grantor(s) by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. The list of recipients of the Notice of Default is listed within the Notice of Foreclosure provided to the Borrower(s) and Grantor(s). These requirements were completed as of 1/22/2019. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS – The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local c o u n s e l i n g a g e n c i e s i n W a s h i n g t o n : h t t p : / / w w w. h u d . g o v / o f f i c es/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear Additional information provided by the Trustee: If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the noteholders rights against the real property only. The Trustee’s Sale Number is WA-18-838318-SH. Dated: 3/8/2019 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Maria Montana, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1st Ave South, Suite 202, Seattle, WA 98104 For questions call toll-free: (866) 9250241 Trustee Sale Number: WA-18-838318-SH Sale Line: 916-939-0772 or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com IDSPub #0151148 6/7/2019 6/28/2019 Pub: June 7, 28, 2019 Legal: 858072

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq.108 1st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 Trustee Sale No.: WA-18-843614-BB Title Order No.: 180516118-WA-MSW Reference Number of Deed of Trust: Instrument No. 1999-1023651 Parcel Number(s): Grantor(s) for Recording Purposes under RCW 65.04.015: IAN ROGERS, UNMARRIED INDIVIDUAL(S) Current Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust and Grantee (for Recording Purposes under RCW 65.04.015): JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Current Trustee of the Deed of Trust: Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington Current Loan Mortgage Servicer of the Deed of Trust: JP Morgan Chase Bank, N.A. I.NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 7/12/2019, at 9:00 AM At the Main Entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, located at 223 East 4th Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real proper ty, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 1 OF SURVEY RECORDED MAY 5, 1994 IN VOLUME 30 OF SURVEYS, PAGE 21, UNDER CLALLAM RECORDING NO. 705526, BEING A SURVEY OF LOTS 1 AND 2 OF SHORT PLAT RECORDED AUGUST 2, 1992 IN VOLUME 24 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 5, UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY AUDITOR’S NO. 672842, TOGETHER WITH THAT PORTION OF BILLY SMITH ROAD A B U T T I N G W H I C H WAS VACAT E D BY C R RESOLUTION NO. 30, 1993 RECORDED UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY AUDITOR’S NO. 685197. ALL BEING A PORTION OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 6 WEST, W.M. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 312 BILLIE SMITH RD, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Tr ust dated 2/3/1999, recorded 2/5/1999, under Instrument No. 1999-1023651 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from IAN ROGERS, UNMARRIED INDIVIDUAL(S), as grantor(s), to CLALLAM TITLE COMPANY, as original trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, as original beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was subsequently assigned to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust as referenced in RCW 61.21.030(4) is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $9,162.56. IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $48,688.66, together with interest as provided in the Note from 6/1/2018 on, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 7/12/2019. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 7/1/2019 (11 days before the sale date), or by other date as permitted in the Note or Deed of Trust, to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 7/1/2019 (11 days before the sale), or by other date as permitted in the Note or Deed of Trust, the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 7/1/2019 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower(s) and Grantor(s) by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. The list of recipients of the Notice of Default is listed within the Notice of Foreclosure provided to the Borrower(s) and Grantor(s). These requirements were completed as of 12/27/2018. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS – The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://por tal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Wa s h i n g to n : h tt p : / / w w w. h u d . g o v / o ff i c es/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Te l e p h o n e : 1- 8 0 0 - 6 0 6 - 4 8 1 9 o r W e b s i t e : http://nwjustice.org/what-clear Additional information provided by the Trustee: If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the noteholders rights against the real property only. The Trustee’s Sale Number is WA-18-843614-BB. Dated: 2/28/2019 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Shawn Sta Ines, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1st Ave South, Suite 202, Seattle, WA 98104 For questions call toll-free: (866) 925-0241 Trustee Sale Number: WA-18-843614-BB Sale Line: 800-280-2832 or Log i n to : h tt p : / / wa . q u a l i t y l o a n . c o m I D S Pu b #0150856 6/7/2019 6/28/2019 Pub: June 7, 28, 2019 Legal: 856129

9935 General Legals

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UNKNOWN HEIRS and SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION DEVISES OF AURELIUS TALBOT (Deceased), UNKNOWN HEIRS and DEVISES OF ISEBEL VERNEY (Deceased); UNKNOWN HEIRS and DEVISES of PHILLIP TALBOT (Deceased); UNKNOWN HEIRS and DEVISEES OF ALICE MCGUIRE (Deceased) and UNKNOWN HEIRS and DEVISESS of EDSON TALBOT (Deceased); Also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint herein. Defendants

9935 General Legals

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Peninsula Daily News, Clallam County, June 28, 2019  

June 28, 2019 edition of the Peninsula Daily News, Clallam County

Peninsula Daily News, Clallam County, June 28, 2019  

June 28, 2019 edition of the Peninsula Daily News, Clallam County