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Spring sports See lineups of peninsula high school teams D Section

Sunday

Champs Redemption MMA is great at state Sports/B1

CLARION P E N I N S U L A

Sunday, April 21, 2019 Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

Vol. 49, Issue 172

$1 newsstands daily/$1.50 Sunday

O’Brien approved as interim school district head

In the news Alaska museum to have new name, look when it reopens in May KODIAK — Officials say the Baranov Museum in Kodiak will have a new name once an extensive renovation of its permanent exhibit space is complete. The Kodiak Daily Mirror reported on Friday that the Kodiak Historical Society’s board of directors voted to change the name to Kodiak History Museum to better convey the broad Kodiak history that is encapsulated at the museum. The Historical Society says the Baranov Museum name misrepresents the museum’s mission and place in the community as it doesn’t focus on Russian history alone. The museum’s $750,000 permanent exhibit renovation began in September. As part of the reopening, the Historical Society will unveil a new bronze outdoor sculpture by Alutiiq artist Perry Eaton and feature a performance by the Alutiiq Dancers. The museum is scheduled to reopen at 1 p.m. on May 4.

Anchorage police lieutenant picked for Fairbanks chief job FAIRBANKS — A lieutenant with the Anchorage Police Department has been picked to be police chief in Fairbanks. Fairbank Mayor Jim Matherly recommended Lt. Nancy Reeder for the job. The Fairbanks Daily News-Miner reports she accepted an employment offer but that she must pass a background check and be confirmed by the Fairbanks City Council. Reeder was a sergeant in the Air Force for four years and a member of the Alaska Air National Guard for two years. Reeder has been with the Anchorage Police Department since 1984. She was an officer, traffic sergeant and detective before being named a lieutenant. — Associated Press

Index Local................A3 Opinion........... A4 Nation..............A5 Police.............. A6 Weather.......... A8 Sports..............B1 Homes............ C1 Community..... C3 Crossword....... C4 Classified........ C5 TV Guide........ C7 Spring Sports Guide.............. D1 Check us out online at www.peninsulaclarion.com To subscribe, call 283-3584.

By VICTORIA PETERSEN Peninsula Clarion

From left, the Caring for the Kenai finalists Akilena Veach and Lindy Guernsey (second place), Austin Cline (first place) and Anna DeVolld (third place) pose for a photo at Kenai Central High School in Alaska on Thursday. (Photo by Brian Mazurek/Peninsula Clarion)

Eco inspiration Winners announced in annual Caring for the Kenai contest By Brian Mazurek Peninsula Clarion

What do butterflies, video games and a parody of “Ice, Ice, Baby” by Vanilla

Ice have in common? They were all part of the presentations and ideas at this year’s Caring for the Kenai contest. Celebrating its 29th year, Caring for

the Kenai challenges high schoolers to come up with original ideas for environmental and natural disaster preparedness and present their ideas to a panel of

judges. Thanks to support from the community, Caring for the Kenai was able to award $8,000 directly to the students who particiSee ECO, page A2

On Thursday, John O’Brien was approved to be interim superintendent by the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District Board of Education. In a unanimous vote, the board amended and approved O’Brien’s contract to act as interim superintendent from July 1, 2019, t0 June 30, 2020. “I humbly accept this appointment as Interim Superintendent and am 100 percent committed to work on behalf of the entire Kenai Peninsula community to achieve positive educational outcomes for our students,” Mr. O’Brien said in a press release. “The Board of Education asked me to step up to help our school district through this challenging transition period in our See HEAD, page A2

Trump sours on Mueller report after initial upbeat view By JILL COLVIN Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump is lashing out at current and former aides who cooperated with special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation, insisting the deeply unflattering picture they painted of him and the White House was “total bulls---.” In a series of angry tweets from Palm Beach, Florida, Trump laced into those who, under oath, had shared with Mueller their accounts of how Trump tried numerous times to squash or influence the investigation and portrayed the White House as infected by a culture of lies, deceit and deception. “Statements are made

Attorney General William Barr speaks about the release of a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report during a news conference, Thursday, at the Department of Justice in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

about me by certain people in the Crazy Mueller Report, in itself written by 18 Angry Democrat Trump

Haters, which are fabricat- & only given to make the ed & totally untrue,” Trump other person look good (or wrote Friday, adding that me to look bad).” some were “total bulls--The attacks were a dra-

matic departure from the upbeat public face the White House had put on it just 24 hours earlier, when Trump celebrated the report’s findings as full exoneration and his counselor Kellyanne Conway called it “the best day” for Trump’s team since his election. While the president, according to people close to him, did feel vindicated by the report, he also felt betrayed by those who had painted him in an unflattering light — even though they were speaking under oath and had been directed by the White House to cooperate fully with Mueller’s team. The reaction was not entirely surprising and had been something staffers feared in the days ahead See SOUR, page A6

Marine pilots concerned about Royal Princess megaship JUNEAU (AP) — Southeast Alaska marine pilots are concerned about the maneuverability of one of the four megaships cruise lines are expected to bring to the state this sea-

son. The Norwegian Bliss and its sister ship are expected to visit the state, along with Royal Caribbean International’s Ovation of the Seas and Princess

Cruises’ flagship, Royal Princess, CoastAlaska reported Friday. The Southeast Alaska Pilots Association tested the limits of each of the four megaships in virtual

Music in the Park lineup released By VICTORIA PETERSEN Peninsula Clarion

The Soldotna Chamber of Commerce has released its Music in the Park summer lineup. The free, family-friendly concert series was recently awarded the Levitt AMP Grant Award — a $25,000 matching grant from the Mortimer and Mimi Levitt Foundation. The foundation is “a national funder of creative placemaking that empowers communities to inject new life into underused public spaces,” according to a chamber press release. The grant is a dollar-for-

Musician Mika Day performs for market attendees at this year’s final Wednesday Market, on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018, in Soldotna, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)

dollar match from the foundation, with a minimum contribution from

the Soldotna Chamber of $25,000. See MUSIC, page A2

reality. At 68,666 tons, Ovation of the Seas is the largest ship ever to visit Alaska. But it’s Royal Princess that’s concerning marine pilots.

“Overall the simulations (for the Royal Princess) produced serious challenges in wind and current conditions common to Southeast Alaska,” the pilots See MEGA, page A3

Sentencing set for ex-Alaska bank employee who stole $4.3M ANCHORAGE (AP) — A former Alaska bank employee who stole $4.3 million in cash and fled to Mexico is set to be sentenced. Gerardo Cazarez Valenzuela, 33, pleaded guilty to theft of bank funds after he was extradited to the U.S. last year, Alaska Public Media reported Thursday. The former cash vault services manager loaded boxes of cash onto a cart and wheeled them out of a KeyBank in Anchorage in 2011, according to court documents. He had organized an

ice cream social for that day, giving him the opportunity to stay late to access the vault under the guise of cleaning up from the event, according to the documents. He also set measures in place to allow himself to open the vault without another employee present. Valenzuela drove to the Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport and boarded a private jet to Seattle. He then bought an AK-47 rifle and a handgun and drove to Mexico. After crossing into See BANK, page A2


A2 | Sunday, April 21, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

Plan would bring snowcat, helicopter skiing to Hatcher Pass By ALEX DeMARBAN Anchorage Daily News

ANCHORAGE — A company that wants to shuttle skiers by snowcat and helicopter to distant peaks in the increasingly popular Hatcher Pass area has sparked objections from some outdoor enthusiasts worried about increased avalanche danger, pollution and noise. "They'll say they won't interfere with us, but sure enough on a blue powder day, they'll be right there poaching that line right above you," said Toby Schwoerer, a longtime backcountry skier in the area who opposes the plan. "And it's a safety issue," he said. "They drop atop me

. . . Eco Continued from page A1

pated as well as $20,000 for their classrooms. The top 12 students, representing schools from all over the peninsula, presented their ideas at Kenai Central High School on Thursday night. Taking first place and receiving a $1,600 cash award this year was Homer’s Austin Cline. Cline’s proposal, “Plastics Reimagined” involves taking No. 5 plastics — which are not currently recycled on the peninsula — and converting them into filament for 3D printers. Cline said that No. 5 plastics are items like yogurt containers and the lids of water bottles, and the filament used by 3D printers can be expensive and hard to acquire. “The best solution to this problem is not to send our plastic elsewhere, which has been done in the past, but to reuse that plastic here.” Cline plans to put bins at

and they may trigger an avalanche that buries me." But the founders of Hatcher Pass Mountain Guides say their goal is getting away from people, in part to avoid competition for pristine slopes in the Talkeetna Mountains northwest of Palmer. They say the area is not as busy as people think, and they plan to focus on safety. "I don't want to compete with the guys that can walk over from the road and ski," said Bryce Dean, an owner of the Willow Creek Resort, where the company will be based. "It doesn't make sense and it's not good for business." "We really want to be operating far away from the public," said Adam Cuthri-

ell, a mountain guide for the company who lives in Girdwood and Willow. Along with a third business owner — Farley Dean, Bryce's father — the men have applied for a five-year land-use permit from the Alaska Department of Natural Resources. They hope to start operating next winter. If their application is successful, they'd run the first snowcat-skiing operation in Hatcher Pass in more than a decade, and the first heliskiing operation in more than 30 years, say people familiar with the area. The proposal has sparked opposition, and some support, on social media sites. The state announced Wednesday that it would extend a planned two-week

comment period. Originally set to end Tuesday, the comment period will now last until May 2 at 5 p.m. A map of the proposed area of operations released by the state has led to misconceptions about where the company will take clients for skiing, Cuthriell said. The snowcat will pick up skiers and snowboarders along Fishhook Willow Road, such as near Hatcher Pass Lodge, he said. Because of that road pickup, the permit boundaries on the map encompass some of the busiest areas at Hatcher Pass, including Independence Mine, Hatch Peak and Skyscraper Mountain, across the road from the lodge. But the clients won't ski

in those areas, or in any areas designated as "non-motorized" in the Hatcher Pass Management Plan, he said. They will ski on state land, but not state park or private land. The snowcat will ferry the clients, in groups of up to eight with two guides, to harder-to-reach areas west of Skyscraper Mountain, Cuthriell said. The helicopter, flying out of Talkeetna and operated by Talkeetna Air Taxi, would pick up snowcat customers, two at a time, who pay extra to reach more remote terrain. "The helicopter will never operate on the Palmer side of (Hatcher) pass" where it's busiest, "or near the parking lot areas," the

application says. "People are really blowing the heli operation out of proportion," Cuthriell said. "This is primarily a cat-ski operation with an opportunity for heli-bumps if someone wants to." Helicopter pickup sites could include the bottom of Bullion ridge — west of Skyscraper Mountain — or the base of the bowl in the Dogsled Pass area, north of Skyscraper, the application says. Cuthriell expects that most helicopter operations will occur on the west side of Bullion Ridge, farther away from people. But depending on conditions, there's a chance the helicopter could pick up people on the eastern flank, he said.

local waste transfer facilities that people can put their No. 5 plastics into. He has two easily assembled machines that shred this plastic and convert it into 3D printing filament. Cline said that this will not only provide filament to classrooms that have 3D printers, but will also provide income to those classrooms that can sell their surplus filament to other businesses and individuals that use it. Cline said that the machines that convert the plastic into filament can be assembled by instructors for under $400, and the schematics for these machines are available for free thanks to a UK-based program called Precious Plastics. Taking second place and receiving $1,100 was a dynamic duo from Seward High, Lindy Guernsey and Akilena Veach. Guernsey and Veach built a full-scale drone using 3D printers and have used the drone to survey Seward’s floodplains. By taking a series of half-

second photographs and using computer software to convert those images into a 3D model of the landscape, Guernsey and Beach have been able to provide crucial data to the Seward Flood Board so that they can accurately identify areas that need flooding mitigation. Guernsey and Veach have been doing this work for three years now and, as juniors in high school, they have been encouraging their younger peers to continue the program after they graduate. Coming in third place was Connections homeschool student Anna DeVolld. DeVolld’s project is all about saving the peninsula’s pollinators. DeVolld studied a variety of plants that support pollinators like bees, bats and butterflies and developed a “pollinator pack,” which contains seeds from a number of native Alaskan plants. DeVolld plans to distribute her “pollinator packs” to businesses, schools and individuals in the community, as well as give presentations to classrooms to teach the next generation about the importance of pollinators in the ecosystem. DeVolld received $900 for her project and plans to use the money to fund her pollinator packets so that she can start distributing them as soon as possible. Fourth place went to

Homer’s Vianne Sarber, who is writing and illustrating a children’s book about environmental activism. Sarber’s book, “Sophie Saves the Sea,” is about a young Alaskan girl named Sophie who takes a trip to the beach one day only to find that it is littered with trash. Sophie then teams up with her sea animal friends to clean up the beach and save the sea. Sarber plans to continue Sophie’s journey to save other parts of the natural world and create a relatable, environmentally conscious role model for the next generation. Her fourth-place prize of $750 will help get her book published on Kindle so that it can be distributed all over the world. Fifth place honors went to Jacob Topp from Cook Inlet Academy. After hearing about two deaths that occurred last winter due to people falling through the ice on Big Lake, Topp decided to try and increase awareness about ice safety for people on the peninsula. Topp is encouraging people to join a Facebook page where residents can post regularly and receive updates about ice conditions. “When we are sharing ice conditions with everyone on the Kenai; we are caring for the Kenai,” Topp said. “If this project could just save one life, that would mean the world to

me.” He also created an original rap to the tune of “Ice, Ice, Baby” by Vanilla Ice with lyrics about ice safety that he hopes to start broadcasting on local radio stations. At the end his presentation, Topp treated the audience to a live performance of his soon-to-be hit song, “Nice Ice Safety.” Sixth place and $550 went to a pair of students also from Cook Inlet Academy, Landon Vyhmeister and Josiah Nunn. Vyhmeister and Nunn have coded and designed a video game about disaster preparedness to be used as a fun educational tool for students of all ages. Their game “R.I.S.E. U.P.” presents the player with a series of natural disasters and requires them to collect supplies necessary to survive. Their game will feature multiple difficulty levels and the option to change the type of disasters that occur based on where the game is played, such as tornadoes and flooding in the Midwest or earthquakes in Alaska. The other six finalists each were awarded $400 for their projects and for earning a spot in the top 12 out of around 400 entries. Riley Graves from Kenai Central gave an update on his magnetic beach rake that he introduced at last year’s Caring for the Kenai event, which has since been

used by the city of Kenai to collect thousands of pounds of metal from the beaches. Melita Efta from Kenai Central collaborated with local artists to create a coloring book that teaches kids about wildlife native to the peninsula, which she plans to distribute to schools, as well as to local restaurants in the form of placemats. Justin Hansen from Soldotna Prep presented his Trails Initiative, which proposes to update the digital maps of local hiking trails to make them more precise and available offline. A team of girls from Ninilchik School, Olivia Ferguson, Rebecca Okonek and Autumn Calabrese, convinced the audience that worms are sexy by introducing worm composting as an effective and efficient way to deal with food waste on the peninsula. Shawna Hudson from Kenai Central created a Monopoly-style board game called Solution for Pollution, where players compete to collect the most points by recycling. Dylan Duniphin from Kenai Central presented his idea to create an educational video on the dangers of nutrient runoff and its impact on the environment. The 12 finalists as well as their families and teachers will attend a V.I.P. Awards banquet on April 27 hosted at the Challenger Learning Center of Alaska.

. . . Head

ful that by persistently working together we will emerge from this storm stronger, more resilient, and more cohesive.” O’Brien has been been an educator since 1983 when he began his career as a special education teacher in Maine. He has served as an athletic director, assistant principal, principal and Maine’s Distinguished Educator for Teacher Quality at the Maine Department of Education, according to the release. In 2005, he moved his family to Nikiski to join the school dis-

trict as the education and instructional leader of Nikiski Middle-High School. In 2011, he left the role of a school principal to serve as the director of secondary education for the district. In 2015, he stepped into his current position of assistant superintendent of instruction. He holds a bachelor’s of science degree in secondary education and a master’s in education in educational leadership. “I have every confidence that Interim Superintendent John O’Brien is committed to move our District for-

ward through these challenging and demanding times,” school board president Penny Vadla said in a press release. “Superintendent O’Brien will work diligently to ensure our five-year strategic plan and our vision are kept intact; and with the collaborative efforts of the District Leadership team and the Board of Education, the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District will continue our commitment to provide a quality educational experience for all KPBSD students.”

grant award. From June 5 to August 21, the series will feature 12 concerts ranging from genres like rock, hip-hop, blues, bluegrass and country. The concert headliners include Seward’s Blackwater Railroad Company, The Resonant Rouges,

Meghan Linsey, The Forest That Never Sleeps, Pamyua, Barcelona Boys Choir, Milo Matthews, The Wigh Pets, The Burrouhs, Kuff Knots and Christine Elise Rose’s Pawn Shop and The Rebel Blues Band. The series will kick off

June 5 with Blackwater Railroad Company, with an opener from local artists The Cowskinners. Concerts will be from 6-9 p.m. on Wednesdays in Soldotna Creek Park. The full schedule can be found on the Soldotna Chamber’s Facebook page.

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Continued from page A1

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state. I am committed to the students, parents, and staff of this District and will work with everyone to provide a high-quality educational experience for our students through the continued implementation of our five-year strategic plan. We clearly have many difficult choices ahead of us as a District due to the fiscal uncertainty in our state. I am hope-

. . . Music Continued from page A1

The grant was awarded in December. Seventeen other small to midsize towns and cities across the country also received the

. . . Bank

Freedom from Pain · Freedom to Live Life Fully

Continued from page A1

Mexico, Valenzuela boarded a bus. Mexican authorities happened to conduct a random search of the bus, finding Valenzuela with the cash and guns, federal prosecutors said. They arrested him on smuggling charges, and Valenzuela was jailed for seven years until his extradition. Prosecutors plan to seek a nine year prison sentence and restitution of $500,000 — the amount the bank spent on trying to get the money back. The financial harm caused by the theft, resulted in the bank laying off some employees, prosecutors said.

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Peninsula Clarion | Sunday, April 21, 2019 | A3

LIO Schedule

Around the Peninsula

Monday, April 22

Sterling Moose River Hustle

3:30 p.m.: The Senate Resources Committee will hold a public hearing to discuss SB 90 Cook Inlet: New Administrative Area; Permit Buyback and SB 91 Nuyakuk River: Hydroelectric Site. 6 p.m.: The Senate Judiciary Committee will hold a public hearing to discuss SB 52 Alcoholic Beverage Control; Alcohol Regulation. Testimony will be taken.

The 8th annual Sterling Moose River Hustle will be held May 11 at the Sterling Senior Center. Registration is from 8:30-9:45 a.m. Event starts at 10 a.m. Courses available are 1 mile and 3 miles. Entry fees are $10 youth, $20 adult, $50 family. Awards and door prizes. All proceeds benefit the Senior Center’s “Meals on Wheels” program. Online registration is available at www.sterlingseniors.org. until noon May 10. Entry forms are available at the Sterling Senior Center. For more information, call 262-1721 or 252-2959.

Tuesday, April 23

9 a.m.: The Senate Finance Committee will hold a public hearing for a presentation by David Teal, Legislative Finance Director. Listen only. 10 a.m.: The House Special Committee on Fisheries will hold a public hearing to discuss HB 116 Aquatic Farm / Hatchery Site Leases and HR 8 2019: International Year of the Salmon. Testimony will be taken. 1:30 p.m.: The House Finance Committee will hold a public hearing to discuss HB 14 Assault; Sex Offenses; Sentencing Aggravator, HB 16 Local Food Procurement; Labeling and SB 25 Extend Board of Dental Examiners. Testimony will be taken. 3 p.m.: The House State Affairs Committee will hold a public hearing to discuss An Act relating to voting by mail, voter access, and election modernization; and providing for an effective date. <Pending Introduction & Referral>, HB 110 Vehicles / Boats: Transfer on Death Title, HB 31 Appropriation: Earnings Reserve to Permanent Fund and HB 82 Discrimination: Gender ID; Sexual Orientation. Testimony will be taken. 6 p.m.: The Senate Judiciary Committee will hold a public hearing to discuss HB 12 Protective Orders, SJR 9 Constitutional Amendment: Appropriation Bill for Public Education and SB 80 Initiative Severability. Testimony will be taken.

Wednesday, April 24

9 a.m.: The Senate Finance Committee will hold a public hearing to discuss SB 10 Extend Suicide Prevention Council and SB 74 Internet for Schools. Testimony will be taken. 1:30 p.m.: The House Finance Committee will hold a public hearing to discuss HB 30 Workers’ Compensation: Death; Permanent Partial Impairment and SB 61 Commercial Fishermen’s Fund: Vessel Owner Claims. Testimony will be taken.

Thursday, April 25

9 a.m.: The Senate Finance Committee will hold a public hearing for a presentation by David Teal, Legislative Finance Director. Listen only. 10 a.m.: The House Special Committee on Fisheries will hold a public hearing to discuss HB 116 Aquatic Farm / Hatchery Site Leases and HB 65 Fish Tax: Repeal Municipal Refunds / Revenue Share. Testimony will be taken. 1:30 p.m.: The House Finance Committee will hold a public hearing to discuss HB 131 Appropriation Limit. Testimony will be taken. All teleconferences are held at the Kenai LIO 145 Main St Lp #217, Kenai, AK 99611 unless otherwise noted. To confirm call 283-2030 or email Kenai. LIO@akleg.gov. To listen / watch online go to http:// alaskalegislature.tv/.

. . . Mega Continued from page A1

wrote in a report released publicly this month. The simulations also found that the Royal Princess model didn’t handle well at low speeds. None of the pilots CoastAlaska contacted were willing to talk about their findings. Princess Cruises questioned the report’s results but said it will work closely with the marine pilots to ensure safe handling of the vessels in southeast Alaska. “While we appreciate SEAPA’s (Southeast Alaska Pilots Association) efforts to date, we believe the model they used to assess this ship requires further refinement,” Princess Cruises’ Keith Taylor, executive vice president of fleet operations, said in a statement. “There are three Royal Class ships operating safely around the globe, in many challenging navigational areas.” Royal Princess uses standard propulsion: propellers and rudders. The other three ships have Azipod propulsion.

“With an Azipod-style propulsion, the propeller is actually on a pod below the ship, and what you can do is rotate that pod,” explained Keir Moorhead, an engineer who teaches at California State University Maritime Academy in Vallejo. He said Azipod propulsion performs better at low speeds when big ships need to maneuver in tight spots. “At any given moment, you can rotate a propeller 360 degrees to give you thrust in any direction,” Moorhead said. Getting into the Ketchikan port requires passing through the 220-meter-wide Tongass Narrows. There’s not a lot of room to maneuver. And, there’s a 7-knot speed limit. The pilots recommend against the Royal Princess attempting this in more than 15 knots of wind. “Fifteen knots of wind in Ketchikan? I was stationed on a ship there. It blows 15 knots quite often,” said Capt. Stephen White, commander of the Coast Guard’s Sector Juneau. The Royal Princess is scheduled to make its first visit to southeast Alaska on May 13.

Family Caregiver Support open house

Tuesday, April 23 from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Kenai Peninsula Family Caregiver Support Program Open House in the Blazy Mall, Suite # 209. Drop by our office to see how we may best serve you via the workshop, access to our lending library, durable medical equipment closet, gain information and assistance, or stop by for a cup of coffee and to visit. WORKSHOP PRESENTATION 1-2 p.m.: “Manny’s Driving School” business owner, Daryl Mannausau, is an American Automobile Association lead instructor and has been teaching drivers on the Kenai Peninsula to be safer, more knowledgeable, and aware drivers since 1983. For more information, call Sharon or Judy at 907-262-1280.

partment of Commerce, Community & Economic Development, the National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health, and AMSEA members. The cost is $175 for all others. Interested mariners may register online at www.amsea. org or call (907) 747-3287.

Take-A-Break Ladies Night Out

“Hats on Parade, Tuesday, April 30 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Show your style with your own hat. Inspirational speaker Ronna Martin, “There Is Hope.” Dinner $12. At the Solid Rock Conference Center, Mile 90.5 Sterling Highway. For reservations call Susan at 335-6789 or 440-1319.

Game Warden Camp

Game Warden Camp will take place Saturday, May 11 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. for current 5th, 6th, 7th graders. More information: Kelly_Modla@fws.gov or 907-260-2851. Registration packets can be picked up /returned at the the Visitor Center — space is limited & preregistration is required by April 20 (for T-shirt order). Cost is $20 and includes lunch and a T-shirt. Investigate a wildlife forensics crime scene and learn how to work a case, learn about wildlife management and enforcement, explore antlers, skulls and waterfowl ID. Practice outdoor survival and boating safety. Explore GPS/map and compass, archery, and learn how drones are used as a wildlife management tool.

Kenai Senior Center activities, April

LeeShore Center monthly board meeting

—Ring-a-Lings - Lunchtime entertainment, Monday, April 22 at 11:30 a.m. The LeeShore Center will be holding its monthly Board —Riverside Band – Lunchtime entertainment, Monday, meeting at The LeeShore Center on Wednesday, April 24. April 29 at 11:30 a.m. The meeting is open to the public and begins at 6 p.m. For further information call 283-9479. Soldotna Public Library activities

Midnight Sun fundraiser

For more information, contact the library at Soldotna Public Library at 262-4227. —Lunch and Learn on Earth Day, Monday, April 22 at 12 p.m.: What do penguins and polar bears have in common? Doctor Kristin Mitchell can tell you! She’ll be here to talk science and tell stories about her recent trip to Antarctica. —Soldotna Library Friends Book and Art Sale, Thursday, April 25 from 2-6 p.m.: Join us for great deals on books and art! All proceeds benefit the Soldotna Library Friends. —Drawdown: Book to Action Climate Series, ThursNational Day of Prayer day, April 25 at 5:30 p.m.: Climate change is affecting “Do you believe in the power of prayer? Do you have a Alaska faster than any other state in the nation. Join us for love for your community and nation? Please join in a time a solution-oriented discussion focused on climate action of unified public prayer imploring God through the power and local solutions. The topic this month is energy. and authority of Jesus Christ for the life and salvation of our Kenai Community Library: April region, state and nation on Thursday, May 2, 12-1 p.m. out—Seed Jars, Tuesday, April 23 at 4 p.m.: Want to learn side KPB Administration Building on Binkley Street. how plants grow from seed? Want to see the whole process 2019 Women On Target Clinic schedule from your counter? Come learn about the growth process Go to our events and sign up on Eventbrite “get tickets” for seeds and maybe even be able to plant these seeds in and review the instructions on Facebook-Kenai Peninsula your garden later this spring. Class size is limited so register Women on Target. You must be 18 years of age. May 16: at the front desk! —Reader’s & Leader’s Pre-School Story Time, WednesIntro to Shotgun; June 8: Intro to pistol; June 29: Intro to pistol; August 2: Intro to Rifle.Sponsored by Friends of the day, April 24 at 10:30 a.m.: A special Pre-school Story time Event with special guests, Fireweed Fiber Guild. During NRA, Kenai Peninsula SCI and Snowshoe Gun Club. this special story time we will be singing songs, playing Kenai River Festival Salvage Art Exhibit games, and making an arts and craft project! We will also Creative entries for the Salvage Art Exhibit are encour- witness a demonstration of spinning and weaving! —The Bigfoot After School Escape Room!, Wednesday, aged to be displayed at the Kenai River Festival June 7-9 April 24 at 4 p.m.: Are you clever enough to solve the ultiThis event is cosponsored by ReGroup and The Kenai Fine Art Center. Recycling at other summer events will be dis- mate mystery – Does Bigfoot exist? Put your detective work cussed at the monthly meeting of ReGroup Monday, April to the test in this after-school ESCAPE ROOM designed 15 at 6:30 p.m. in the Hope Community Center on Princ- for teens and tweens. Snacks and drinks will be provided. eton Ave. just off K-Beach. Details of the upcoming Elec- Space is limited for this FREE program, so sign up today. tronics Recycling Event May 4 will be finalized. For more For more information, contact James at 283-8210. —Fabric Baskets, Thursday, April 25 at 5:30 p.m.: Sign up information or to volunteer to help at any of these happenfor our 30 minute Fabric Basket Workshop and learn how to ings call 252-2773. make a simple and sturdy storage basket! This class is free but International Fly Fishing Film Festival limited to 8 participants. No sewing experience needed! Sign up Worldwide fly fishing adventures from Alaska’s barren at the front desk or call Ryanna at 283-8208. —Three-bead Necklace, Friday, April 26 at 4 p.m.: Learn Kuskokwim River drainage to lush South American jungles the basics of jewelry making with this simple three-bead neckwill be premiered at the 2019 annual International Fly Fishing Film Festival, April 27 at the Kenai Visitors Center, lace. A great introduction to the 11471 Kenai Spur Highway, Kenai. Doors to the theater art and tools of necklace making. open at 5:30 p.m. with the film screening at 6:30 p.m. The This simple design will make a Film Festival is hosted by the conservation organization great gift or add to your collecPlaya-Azul Mexican Restaurant Kenai Peninsula Trout Unlimited. International Fly Fish- tion of beautiful baubles. Class Salsa Bar ing Film Festival tickets are priced at $12 general admis- size is limited to 10 people. Sign up early at the registration desk. sion and are available at the theater the day of the event. For —DIY Deodorant Workmore information, contact pic41@comcast.net. Great Food! shop, Thursday, May 2 at 5:30 Great Ingredints! Women in the Law p.m.: Learn how to make your On Tap (or Bottles) Women in the Law, Saturday, April 27 from 1-4 p.m. The own all-natural, deodorant! Kenai Community Library and the Kenai Peninsula Bar As- Made with Coconut Oil, BakFree sociation are partnering to show the 2018 film on the early ing Soda, Essential Oils and Salsa efforts of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and litigants to advance more! Class size is limited to Bar! 10 people. Must pre-register at gender equality through the 14th amendment. Following the movie, local female attorneys will share their experi- the front desk. —Raspberry Pi Club, Friday, ences with law in our unique State and facilitate a discussion about the movie. Movie snacks will be provided by the May 3 at 4 p.m.: Come join us at Purchase Two Lunches the library to create games and inKenai Peninsula Bar Association. or Dinners, receive ventions, learn how to program, Fishing Vessel Drill Conductor Training make music with Sonic Pi, meet The Alaska Marine Safety Education Association (AM- new friends, and more! Whether Coupon Expires 4/30/19 Must present coupon. SEA) will offer a Fishing Vessel Drill Conductor class you want to hone your skills or Not valid with any other offer. in Seward, Alaska on April 29, from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. at are learning about Pi for the first 283-2010 AVTEC, 809 Second Avenue. The class is free to com- time, the Raspberry Pi club is Open 7 Days a Week mercial fishermen, thanks to support from the Alaska De- the perfect place for you! 12498 Kenai Spur Hwy Tickets for the Safari Club’s annual Midnight Sun fundraiser and banquet on Saturday, May 4 at Soldotna Sports Center are now available online at http://www.safarikenai. auctionreg.org or by calling Spencie at 260-7758. Board members also have tickets to sell. There will be chances to win guns, hunts and trips, furs and jewelry. All funds raised are dedicated to wildlife conservation, youth education, and protecting your hunting heritage. Seating is limited, so get your tickets early.

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Opinion

A4 | Sunday, April 21, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

CLARION P

E N I N S U L A

Serving the Kenai Peninsula since 1970 Jeff Hayden Publisher ERIN THOMPSON......................................................... Editor DOUG MUNN........................................... Circulation Director FRANK GOLDTHWAITE......................... Production Manager

What Others Say To restore public confidence, more transparency is needed One by one, Democratic

presidential hopefuls are releasing their tax returns. Years of them. Longtime holdout Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) revealed 10 years of returns at the tail end of Tax Day, which arrived on Monday this year. Later that evening, former Texas representative Beto O’Rourke unveiled a decade of his personal tax information. Both followed Sen. Kamala D. Harris (D-Calif.), who released 15 years of tax returns on Sunday, enabling her campaign to boast that Ms. Harris is “the most transparent candidate in the field when it comes to information about her personal finances.” It is nice to see a race to the top, rather than the bottom, for a change. This is the kind of political one-upmanship Americans should welcome. Clearly, part of the point is to draw a contrast with President Trump, who routinely promised during the 2016 presidential race to offer his tax information for public scrutiny. He has instead revealed nothing. His excuse is that his returns are under audit, but that would not prevent him from releasing tax documents he signed and swore to be true — and certainly does not explain why he refuses to reveal returns from years ago, as his challengers have done. The president’s staff has offered nothing more persuasive. Acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney said earlier this month the public would “never” see the president’s tax returns, arguing that the 2016 election had settled the question over whether Americans cared. In fact, Mr. Trump’s persistent promises to disclose more personal financial data remain unfulfilled campaign pledges. White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said Sunday that Democrats were not smart enough to understand Mr. Trump’s tax returns, a new defense of Mr. Trump’s indefensible refusal to come clean that hardly rises above the level of a schoolyard insult. Ever since President Richard M. Nixon set the example, presidents and major candidates have revealed their tax return information to offer voters a view of how these national leaders conduct their private affairs. The returns sometimes expose nothing surprising. Sometimes they result in a headline or two, as when the socialist Mr. Sanders was revealed to be a millionaire. The Post’s James Hohmann pointed out Tuesday that the most interesting nugget from the Democrats’ recent tax revelations is that many of the candidates have not given much to charity. Each of these women and men has years, if not decades, of public service that voters can judge. Mr. Trump entered office with a privately held business of unknown value and a Twitter feed. It was all the more important for voters to see how reality matched up to his claims of private business success. Tax returns should have been only the baseline for transparency; a thorough accounting of his business arrangements and possible conflicts of interest was also needed. It is needed still. Americans remain in the dark about Mr. Trump’s potential conflicts. As Democratic candidates do the right thing, Mr. Trump continues to insult the voters who entrusted him to lead the nation. — The Washington Post, April 16

Letters to the Editor:

E-mail: news@peninsulaclarion.com Write: Fax: Peninsula Clarion 907-283-3299 P.O. Box 3009 Questions? Call: Kenai, AK 99611 907-283-7551

Sexual assault survivors deserve real change

Forget awareness, sexual assault survivors deserve real change Alaska state legislators recently declared April sexual assault awareness month. While this gesture is meant to show support for victims and their families, awareness is not enough. According to the UAA Justice Center, over half of Alaskan women suffer sexual assault or domestic violence in their lifetime. With numbers that high, it’s clear that we need concrete policy solutions — not symbolic gestures. When Justin Schneider brutally strangled and maturbated on a young woman and received no jail time, the failings of our laws were brought into stark focus. We at No More Free Passes, along with so many of the Alaskan public, demanded change. We led the campaign to not retain Judge Corey who approved the plea deal. However, just replacing the judge was clearly not enough, the laws needed to be changed as well. Senate Bill 12, introduced by Senator Peter Micciche with our support, closes the Schneider loopholes by addressing three aspects of our laws. First, the legislation makes non-consensual contact with semen a sex offense. Second, it elevates strangulation to the point of unconsciousness to first-degree assault. It also elevates sentencing for any sexual assault that includes strangulation or a firearm. Finally, the bill eliminates sentence credit for time spent on electronic

A laska V oices E lizabeth W illiams monitoring in cases of crimes against persons and requires prosecutors to confer with victims prior to a sexual assault plea. Together, these provisions mean that Justin Schneider would have faced a sentence in the range of 10-20 years and registration as a sex offender rather than the zero jail time and no consequences he actually received. This is the kind of real action that will end the crisis of sexual violence in Alaska. Rather than giving offenders a free pass and allowing them to victimize other innocent Alaskans, they will face real consequences for their actions. We understand that all of the problems in our criminal justice system cannot be fixed in one bill or one legislative session, however Senate Bill 12 acts as a down payment on fixing our system. This legislation does not seek to rewrite our criminal justice statues or dramatically change our system in ways we do not fully understand. Instead, it approaches failings in our sexual assault laws and restores the public’s confidence in the Legislature to address urgent criminal

justice issues. However, despite the public’s overwhelming support for the legislation, SB 12 is now in limbo. While the bill was written, introduced, and moved through judiciary committee efficiently, it has now been stalled in the Senate Finance committee for over a month. Senate leadership has failed to schedule a vote on this legislation or even hold a second finance committee hearing for the public to weigh in. There is an unfortunate irony to spending sexaul assault awareness month watcing the most significant bill on sexual violence remain trapped in committee. Survivors are left wondering why their protection does not seem to be a priority to leadership. At No More Free Passes we have christened April “sexaul assault action month” because awareness alone will never be enough. Now it is time for the Alaska Senate to follow suit and show action on this urgent issue. We ask that a second finance committee hearing be held on SB 12 before time runs out in the legislative session. We also ask that all Alaskans who wish to participate in sexual assault action month take this opportunity to contact Senate Finance co-chairs Bert Stedman and Natasha von-Imhof and Senate President Cathy Giessel and ask that the Schneider loophole bill be allowed to move forward. No More Free Passes is a nonpartisan advocacy group seeking to end the crisis of sexual violence in Alaska.

An opportunity for nuclear energy in Alaska The United States has long been a leader in the peaceful use of nuclear energy, and within a few years Alaska could be on the leading edge of this clean, reliable and affordable technology. The next generation of nuclear systems — known as advanced reactors — could help relieve crippling energy prices in isolated villages and provide baseload power for an array of other applications. What’s more, the technology is safer than ever before. Advanced reactors are not your grandparents’ nuclear plants. These systems use new materials, fuels, and methods to convert heat to electricity. Creative designs mean massive improvements in performance. Many are inherently safe and will never melt down. Refueling will occur even less frequently — once every couple of decades. Better systems to extract heat and generate electricity equate to higher efficiency and cheaper power. Together, these improvements are enabling the emergence of so-called “microreactors” that could be a perfect fit throughout our state. As the name suggests, these smaller reactors can be right-sized for dozens of Alaska communities and will have off-grid capability that could solve the challenge of providing clean, affordable energy in our remote areas. Over the past several years, I have worked with my Senate colleagues to develop a pathway for the development of these systems. We successfully passed two measures in the last Congress to bring the public and private sectors together to facilitate reactor development and streamline the approval process at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The next steps to making them a reality are contained in the Nuclear Energy Leadership Act, which I recently introduced along with a bipartisan group of 16 other senators. NELA will accelerate the path to market for

A laska V oices S en . L isa M urkowski advanced reactors by directing the Department of Energy to demonstrate innovative concepts and allowing the federal government to be an early adopter, when and where it makes sense. This is a sensible path toward cleaner energy as national and global energy demand continues to grow. Outside of hydropower, nuclear energy remains the only source, renewable or otherwise, that can feed the world’s appetite for energy with no emissions, and be a reliable and dispatchable bedrock of a lower-carbon future. The emergence of advanced reactors is a bright spot in an industry that has struggled in recent years. Existing nuclear plants in the Lower 48 are aging and facing challenges that render them less competitive. Plans for new conventional reactors in the U.S. have mostly been scrapped, with only two currently under construction. Meanwhile, our geostrategic competitors — China, Russia and others — have recognized nuclear energy’s immense potential and are blazing new paths to seize it. Operating from a position of strength, they are seizing the mantle of advanced reactor leadership for the coming decades. The decline in U.S. nuclear leadership has had a range of economic consequences for our nation. It has also diminished our ability to influence nuclear security and non-proliferation decisions. Allowing other nations to take our place could put world security interests at risk. Fortunately, it is not too late to turn

the tide and restore our influence, particularly if we pursue the development of advanced reactors that can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions without increasing the cost of electricity. My colleagues and I believe that it is time to restore U.S. leadership. And as we do, Alaska stands to benefit as much as any other state. Many of our small villages are making progress on hybrid microgrid systems that integrate renewable resources. Microreactors would be a new option to reduce diesel consumption, with a system the size of a Conex box providing constant power at considerably lower cost. As an added bonus, we can forget about the perils of twice-annual barge shipments — these reactors will only need to be refueled once every 25 to 40 years. Innovative nuclear technologies are scalable, providing new options for more densely populated areas like Anchorage and Fairbanks. From a military perspective, they could ensure that our Arctic installations have the reliable power they need to be at the appropriate readiness level with no question of when their next fuel shipment will arrive. Advanced reactors also have great potential for our state’s remote resource operations, where power costs are often one of the highest operating expenses. Microreactors could provide the energy necessary to run a mine, an oilfield, or any number of projects — again at far lower cost and no emissions, with less land usage and a simpler permitting process. Many Alaskans I have spoken to have never fully considered the possibility of nuclear power in our state. It’s easy to understand why, but advanced reactors have now made that prospect increasingly real. In the near future, Alaska could become a proving ground for these new technologies — with a whole host of benefits to show for the effort.


Peninsula Clarion | Sunday, April 21, 2019 | A5

Nation/World

Columbine honors 13 lost By KATHLEEN FOODY Associated Press

LITTLETON, Colo. — Community members in suburban Denver marked the 20th anniversary of the Columbine High School shooting Saturday with a remembrance ceremony that celebrated the school’s survival and by volunteering at shelters, doing neighborhood cleanup projects and laying flowers and cards at a memorial to the 13 people killed. “We’re changed,” Dawn Anna, whose daughter Lauren Townsend was among the students killed in the school’s library, said before a crowd of more than 2,000 gathered in a park near the high school. “We’re weaker in some places, but hopefully we’re stronger in most of them. Our hearts have giant holes in them. But our hearts are bigger than they were 20 years ago.” The events ended a threeday slate of somber gatherings honoring the victims and lending support to their families, survivors of the April 20, 1999, attack and the school’s students and staff. The decades since have brought similar violence at schools in America, and some survivors and victims’ families have found themselves acting as a support system for those affected by other tragedies. Speakers on Saturday portrayed healing and recovery as the result of daily

By JONATHAN LEMIRE and ERIC TUCKER Associated Press

Cassandra Sandusky, right, a graduate of Columbine High School, pauses with her friend, Jennifer Dunmore, at a row of crosses bearing the names of the victims of the attack at the school 20 years ago before a program for the victims Saturday, in Littleton, Colo. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

work — not a destination to be arrived at in a set amount of days, weeks or years. Forgiveness, though, is achievable, said Patrick Ireland, a student who became known as “the boy in the window” when cameras captured him dangling from a second-story window before falling during the 1999 school shooting. He re-learned to walk and talk with months of physical and cognitive therapy. “Our innocence was stolen,” Ireland said. “How can that ever be repaid? But forgiveness is a process. It takes time. It takes practice, repetition, translating that rhythm into moving.” The afternoon ceremony at times had the feel of a re-

union. Former students introduced classmates to their husbands or wives and the crowd jumped to their feet when a retired teacher led a call-and-response cheer of the school’s mantra. “We are” Ivory Moore yelled, his voice straining. “Columbine!” the crowd replied, some pumping their fists in the air. There were tears too, particularly as photos of the victims at various ages flashed across a projector screen during a video that featured current Columbine students pledging to honor them with community service each year on April 20. At the ceremony’s end,

Frank DeAngelis, the school’s principal at the time of the shooting, read the 13 names aloud in a wavering voice. A bell rang 13 times, and white doves soared into the cloudy sky for each individual. Starting in the morning, a steady stream of visitors stopped at a memorial that sits on a hill overlooking the school. The site includes an oval outer wall of stone with plaques featuring quotes from officials and Columbine students and teachers, and an inner ring with plaques for each person killed. People walked silently through, occasionally stopping to hug a friend or wipe away tears.

New attack on Ebola center in Congo By AL-HADJI KUDRA MALIRO Associated Press

BUTEMBO, Congo — Militia members attacked an Ebola treatment center hours after another attack killed a staffer with the World Health Organization, a Congolese official said Saturday. Butembo city’s deputy mayor, Patrick Kambale Tsiko, told The Associated Press that the attackers armed with machetes tried to burn down the center in Katwa district overnight. Military and police guarding the center killed one militia member and detained five others, he said. Such violence has deeply complicated efforts to contain what has become the seconddeadliest Ebola virus outbreak in history, with the number of new cases jumping each time

Trump’s legal team breathes a sigh of relief

treatment and prevention work is disrupted. An attack on Friday on a hospital in Butembo killed an epidemiologist from Cameroon who had been deployed to the outbreak in eastern Congo. Tsiko cited witnesses as saying the attackers wrongly blamed foreigners for bringing the deadly virus to the region. This outbreak now has more than 1,300 confirmed and probable cases, including 855 deaths, since being declared last August. The number of new cases has risen alarmingly in recent weeks after other attacks, leading the WHO to convene an expert committee that decided the outbreak, while of “deep concern,” is not yet a global health emergency . Attacks by rebel groups and community resistance have posed serious challenges

to containing Ebola, which can spread quickly and can be fatal in up to 90% of cases. Congo’s North Kivu region had never faced an outbreak of the hemorrhagic fever before, and health workers have battled misinformation. Some residents did not believe Ebola was real . In the hospital attack on Friday, gunmen burst into a conference room and forced people onto the floor, taking their belongings and “accusing them of perpetuating false rumors about Ebola,” according to a statement by IMA World Health, a Washingtonbased aid group that supports the hospital. The gunmen then shot the Cameroonian doctor in the abdomen and left, firing into the air and sending staff and patients fleeing. Friday’s attack was at least

Today in History Today is Sunday, April 21, the 111th day of 2019. There are 254 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On April 21, 1789, John Adams was sworn in as the first vice president of the United States. On this date: In 1509, England’s King Henry VII died; he was succeeded by his 17-year-old son, Henry VIII. In 1836, an army of Texans led by Sam Houston defeated the Mexicans at San Jacinto, assuring Texas independence. In 1910, author Samuel Langhorne Clemens, better known as Mark Twain, died in Redding, Connecticut, at age 74. In 1918, Manfred von Richthofen, 25, the German ace known as the “Red Baron” who was believed to have downed 80 enemy aircraft during World War I, was himself shot down and killed while in action over France. In 1926, Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II was born in Mayfair, London; she was the first child of The Duke and Duchess of York, who later became King George VI and the Queen Mother. In 1930, fire broke out inside the overcrowded Ohio Penitentiary in Columbus, killing 332 inmates. In 1942, the first edition of “The Stranger” (L’Etranger), Albert Camus’ (al-BEHR’ kah-MOOZ’) highly influential absurdist novel, was published in Nazi-occupied Paris by Gallimard. In 1975, with Communist forces closing in, South Vietnamese President Nguyen Van Thieu resigned after nearly 10 years in office and fled the country. In 1976, clinical trials of the swine flu vaccine began in Washington, D.C. In 1977, the musical play “Annie,” based on the “Little Orphan Annie” comic strip, opened on Broadway, beginning a run of 2,377 performances. In 1998, astronomers announced in Washington that they had discovered possible signs of a new family of planets orbiting a star 220 light-years away, the clearest evidence to date of worlds forming beyond our solar system. In 2016, Prince, one of the most inventive and influential musicians of modern times, was found dead at his home in suburban Minneapolis; he was 57. Ten years ago: Calling on Americans to volunteer, President Barack Obama signed a $5.7 billion national service bill tripling the size of the AmeriCorps service program. The sole survivor of a pirate attack on an American cargo ship off the Somali coast was charged as an adult with piracy in federal court in New York. (A prosecutor said Abdiwali Abdiqadir Muse (AHB’-dih-wah-lee AHB’-dih-kah-dir moo-SAY’) had given wildly varying ages for himself before finally admitting he was 18. Muse later pleaded guilty to hijacking, kidnapping and hostagetaking and was sentenced to more than 33 years in prison.) Five years ago: More than 30,000 people defiantly ran the Boston Marathon a year after the deadly terrorist bombings; American Meb Keflezighi (keh-FLEZ’-gee) won the men’s race in 2:08:37 while Kenya’s Rita Jeptoo successfully defended her title, finishing in a course-record 2:18:57. Win Tin, 85, a prominent journalist who became Myanmar’s longest-serving political prisoner after challenging military rule, died in Yangon. One year ago: North Korea announced that it would suspend nuclear tests and intercontinental ballistic missile launches ahead of its summits with South Korea and the United States. Barbara Bush was remembered as the “first lady of the Greatest Generation” during a funeral in Houston attended by four former U.S. presidents and hundreds of others. Actor Verne Troyer, best known for his role as “Mini-Me” in the “Austin Powers” movies, died in Los Angeles at the age of 49; a coroner later ruled that the death was suicide by alcohol intoxication. Today’s Birthdays: Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II is 93. Actress-comedian-writer Elaine May is 87. Actor Charles Grodin is 84. Actor Reni Santoni (REH’-nee san-TOH’-nee) is 81. Anti-death penalty activist Sister Helen Prejean is 80. Singer-musician Iggy Pop is 72. Actress Patti LuPone is 70. Actor Tony Danza is 68. Actor James Morrison is 65. Actress Andie MacDowell is 61. Rock singer Robert Smith (The Cure) is 60. Rock musician Michael Timmins (Cowboy Junkies) is 60. Actor-director John Cameron Mitchell is 56. Rapper Michael Franti (Spearhead) is 53. Actress Leslie Silva is 51. Actor Toby Stephens is 50. Rock singer-musician Glen Hansard (The Frames) is 49. Actor Rob Riggle is 49. Comedian Nicole Sullivan is 49. Football player-turned-actor Brian White is 46. Olympic gold medal pairs figure skater Jamie Sale (sah-LAY’) is 42. Rock musician David Brenner (Theory of a Deadman) is 41. Actor James McAvoy is 40. Former NFL quarterback Tony Romo is 39. Actor Terrence J is 37. Actress Gugu Mbatha-Raw is 36. Actor Christoph (cq) Sanders is 31. Actor Frank Dillane is 28. Rock singer Sydney Sierota (Echosmith) is 22. Thought for Today: “I am a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work the more I have of it.” -- Stephen Leacock, Canadian economist and humorist (1869-1944).

the fourth on an IMA World Health-supported facility involved in Ebola response efforts, the statement said. Four days earlier, attackers looted a nearby clinic and briefly kidnapped a nurse. The clinic remains closed.

WASHINGTON — First they cooperated. Then they stonewalled. Their television interviews were scattershot and ridiculed, their client mercurial and unreliable. But President Donald Trump’s legal team, through a combination of bluster, legal precedent and shifting tactics, managed to protect their client from a potentially perilous in-person interview during special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation . His lawyers are taking a victory lap after a redacted version of Mueller’s findings revealed politically damaging conduct by the president but drew no conclusions of criminal behavior. “Our strategy came to be that when we weren’t talking, we were losing,” Rudy Giuliani, one of Trump’s lawyers, told The Associated Press in a recent interview. Given that Mueller could not indict a sitting president, Giuliani said, the team kept its focus on Mueller’s “capacity to report, so we had to play in the media as well as legally.” The aftershocks from the Mueller report released Thursday will help shape the next two years of Trump’s administration. But while the report may cause some Democrats to take a renewed look at impeachment despite long odds of success in Congress, the legal threat to Trump that seemed so dangerous upon Mueller’s appointment in May 2017 has waned. At the outset, that appointment led Trump to predict “the end of my presidency.” The White House struggled to recruit

top Washington attorneys, many of whom were reluctant to work for a temperamental, scandal-prone president who repeatedly claimed he would be his own best legal mind. The initial strategy of the Trump legal team, including White House attorney Ty Cobb and personal defense lawyer John Dowd, was to be as cooperative as possible with Mueller’s prosecutors and ensure that investigators got access to the documents they requested and the witnesses they wanted to interview. The Trump lawyers hoped to bring about a quick conclusion to the investigation. Believing he could exonerate himself, Trump initially expressed a willingness to sit for an interview with Mueller’s team. A date was set for that to take place at Camp David. But then the president’s lawyers moved away from the plan, in part by arguing that the special counsel already had gotten answers to his questions. “It became the most transparent investigation in history,” Jay Sekulow, one of the president’s personal lawyers, said in an interview. Still, there was internal tumult along the way, including the March 2018 departure of Dowd, a veteran and experienced criminal defense attorney, and the additions of Giuliani and the husband-wife team of Martin and Jane Raskin. Even as the legal team professed cooperation with Mueller’s prosecutors, the lawyers expressed impatience, frustration and skepticism in a series of private letters that challenged the credibility of the government’s witnesses and the demands to interview the president.

Patrick C. Heath Patrick C. Heath was born the last day of December 1945 in Palo Alto California, but he was never a Californian. His mother, Betty Driscoll-Kjera, was born 1914 in Fairbanks to a Montana school teacher and an Irish miner. As it was for Betty, Fairbanks was Pat’s first home, just as it was for his siblings: Ed Heath, Kathy Lewis, John Heath and “the boys” Andrew and Tom Kjera. Their lives were full of stories: stories of the Fairbanks floods, camping at Harding Lake, berry picking adventures, broken cars/motorcycles/snowmachines and the tomfoolery that inevitably ensued. All stories told, retold and argued during spirited card games, where fighting over the rules seemed to be the actual game. Patrick left Fairbanks as a young man and eventually found himself, like so many men at the time, in the jungles of Vietnam. He served with the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marines at Khe Sanh, in what became known as “The Hill Fights,” where he took a bullet to the wrist, April 27th 1967. For this, he was bestowed the prestigious military honor, the Purple Heart Medal. After returning to the US, he began working in the growing Alaskan Oil and Gas industry where he would eventually spend over forty years and become the first, and last person to water ski north of the Arctic Circle, behind a spill response boat. For a short time, he attended the University of Alaska Fairbanks and studied Journalism with Glen Boyer, a man that would become a lifelong friend. The story goes that journalism seemed an easy major and provided a good cover story to meet girls. The following spring, he spent time backpacking through Europe, from Spain to Ireland, where he was able to meet Irish family members. He was shown first hand by his Irish uncles where they had fought for independence, in and around Snave Bantry, during the early 1920’s against the British. After returning to Alaska, he met Sherry Lynn Best though Glen. Sherry was also from California, but spent her teens in Alaska with her family living the Alaskan dream of freedom and hard work on the Kenai Peninsula. They dated off and on until Patrick saw Sherry out on a date at the Katmai Lounge. He literally sat down and chased the guy off. Patrick and Sherry were married soon after on September 1st, 1973. Patrick had no idea he had joined a family just as large and quite possibly louder than his own. They lived in Nikiski, Alaska for over 30 years on Cabin Lake where they raised three children: Brian, Brandi and Chera, along with dozens of foster children, many of whom became like their own children. The years on Cabin Lake were spent forging friendships and creating memories that will last many lifetimes. Pat and Sherry eventually moved to Soldotna where they built a wonderful home with a beautiful yard and garden where their seven grandchildren and countless friends and relatives could spend time building even more memories. Patrick spent the last few years in retirement playing with his grandkids and continuing to take care of everyone around him. He became a member of the local VFW and the Purple Hearts, the Pioneers of Alaska and was very involved with the Soldotna Senior Center. At home he spent time organizing his collection of Alaskan Native art, his books and his photography.

The first week of March, Patrick began noticing some weakness and doctors found that he needed surgery to increase blood flow to his brain. The surgery in Anchorage went well and he was surrounded by his children before, during and after. He spoke to and laughed with many friends and family in the days prior. But alas, while preparing to leave the hospital, he suffered an event that led to his peaceful passing on March 15th a sunny, cool spring morning. He is survived by his loving wife of 45 years, Sherry, along with his children: Brian Heath, Brandi Heath and Chera Wackler. His Grandchildren: Driskoll, Fionna and Devynn Heath, Aanson and Brie Clark and Van and Isla Wackler. He is preceded in death by his parents, Edwin and Betty Kjera and his brother, John Heath. Patrick loved making and sharing memories, family history and telling silly “dad jokes” surrounded by loved ones. A Celebration of Life will take place at Soldotna Creek Park, 3pm July 5th with food, music, dancing and plenty of opportunity to tell the good’ol stories and yet-to-be told stories of our father, Patrick Heath. All family and friends are welcome.


A6 | Sunday, April 21, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

Public Safety

Police reports Information for this report was taken from publicly available law enforcement records and includes arrest and citation information. Anyone listed in this report is presumed innocent. n On Apr. 10 at 9:54 a.m., Soldotna Alaska State Troopers received a 911 hang-up from a female reporting a disturbance in the neighborhood of Ciechanski Road in Kenai. Investigation revealed that Rebecca Curren had an argument with a man, then slapped him in the ear. She was arrested and taken to Wildwood Pretrial on the charge of fourthdegree assault (domestic violence). n On Apr. 14 at 9:02 p.m. Alaska State Troopers received a 911 hang-up call. Investigation revealed that the phone number was associated with a Jacob Parrish, of Kenai, and that he had an outstanding warrant. He was contacted and arrested. n On Apr. 16 at about 2:20 p.m., Alaska State Troopers responded to the area of Mile 4.5 Kalifornsky Beach Road for report of a single-vehicle rollover. Investigation revealed that the driver of a 2004 GMC Envoy had fallen asleep while driving and gone off the road, causing her vehicle to roll multiple times. The driver was wearing her seat belt and was uninjured. She was cited for negligent driving and released from the

Court reports The following judgments were recently handed down in Kenai District Court: n Robbie Cave Zimmerman, 31, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to one count of fourth-degree misconduct involving weapons (firing gun by highway) and one count of violating condition of release, committed Sept. 21. On the count of fourthdegree misconduct involving weapons, he was fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to pay restitution, forfeited all items seized, ordered to have no contact with three specifically named people or with Soldotna Fred Meyer store, and was placed on probation for 12 months. On the count of violating condition of release, he was sentenced to five days in jail. n Jonathan Avery, 34, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to violating condition of release, committed Oct. 29. He was fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended and placed on probation for 12 months. n Jonathan Avery, 34, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to violating condition of release, committed

. . . Sour Continued from page A1

of the report’s release as they wondered how Mueller might portray their testimony and whether the report might damage their relationships with Trump. While Mueller found no criminal evidence that Trump or his campaign aides colluded in Russian election meddling and did not recommend obstruction charges against the president, the 448-page report released Thursday nonetheless paints a damaging picture of the president, describing numerous cases where he discouraged witnesses from cooperating with prosecutors and prodded aides to mislead the public on his behalf to hamper the Russia probe he feared would cripple his

scene. n On Apr. 14 at about 10:50 p.m., Alaska State Troopers responded to a rollover vehicle accident at Mile 117 of the Sterling Highway. The only occupant in the vehicle, a female, was taken to Central Peninsula Hospital, where she was treated for injuries received from the accident and released. Alcohol or drugs were not a factor. n On Apr. 16 at 8:39 a.m., Kenai police were advised that Michelle E. Davidson, 46, of Kenai, had been violating a stalking protective order by texting the protected person. Investigation led to the arrest of Davidson, who was booked into Wildwood Pretrial Facility. n On Apr. 15 at about 10:50 p.m., Alaska State Troopers responded to a rollover vehicle accident at Mile 117 of the Sterling Highway. The only occupant in the vehicle, a female, was taken to Central Peninsula Hospital, where she was treated for her injuries received from the accident and released. Alcohol or drugs were not a factor. n On Apr. 13 at 10:39 p.m., Alaska State Troopers in Seward received a report of a motor vehicle collision at about Mile 39 of the Seward Highway. The driver, identified as Ryan Williams, 19, of Kenai, fled the scene prior to troopers’ arrival. Charges have been forwarded to the District Attorney’s Office for reck-

less driving and leaving the scene of an accident. n On Apr. 13 at 10:36 a.m., Alaska State Troopers in Seward received a report that a local business had been broken into. It did not appear as though anything was taken from the business. However, there was evidence that fuel had been siphoned from an RV behind the building. Investigation is ongoing. n On Apr. 13 at 5:15 a.m., Kenai police received a call from a local store about a male eating merchandise and leaving the store in a vehicle. Officers responded and contacted the vehicle that contained the suspect and multiple other individuals. After investigation, Grant J. Bear, 29, of Chugiak, was arrested for fourth-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance and first-degree promoting contraband. Bear was taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility. Kathleen R. Owens, 36, of Anchorage, was issued a summons for fourth-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance. n On Apr. 12 at 11:07 p.m. a Kenai police officer conducted a routine traffic stop on Bridge Access Road. After making contact with the driver and performing tests, Cynthia L. Herr, 54, of Soldotna, was arrested for driving under the influence and taken to Wildwood Pretrial. n On Apr. 12 at 11:55 p.m., the Kenai Police De-

partment was notified of a wanted person at a local business near Mile 11 of the Kenai Spur Highway. After officers made contact with the wanted person, Corey J. Gulley, 27, of Kenai, was arrested on a $2,000 felony Soldotna Alaska State Troopers warrant for failure to comply with conditions of probation and was also charged with false information and fourth-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance. He was taken to Wildwood Pretrial. n On Apr. 15 at 3:07 p.m., Alaska State Troopers responded to a report of a disturbance. Investigation revealed that Katheryn J. Heazlett, 28, of Nikiski, had committed an assault. Heazlett was arrested for fourth-degree assault (domestic violence) and taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility without bail. n On Apr. 15 at 6:06 p.m., the Soldotna Public Safety Communications Center received a report of a shooting that had occurred in the Seward area. Investigation found that Joseph Chandler, 30, of Seward, had shot and killed Dustin Marx, 28, of Seward, and Michael White, 40, of Seward, after a confrontation had occurred. Chandler was arrested for two counts of first-degree murder and taken to the Seward Jail without bail. n On Apr. 15 at 6:41 p.m., Alaska State Troopers responded to a reported burglary at a business near Mile 25 of the Kenai Spur High-

way. Forced entry had been made through a window and multiple items were stolen, including an Axiom marine chart plotter and a Vizio 70inch television. This case is under investigation. n On Apr. 15 at 7:36 p.m., Soldotna Alaska State Troopers received a report of a vehicle that had been stolen from a residence in Nikiski. Investigation resulted in the recovery of the vehicle and the arrest of McGerra Beck, 35, of Nikiski, for first-degree vehicle theft. Beck was taken to Wildwood Pretrial, where she was held without bail. n On Apr. 15 at 9:49 p.m., Alaska State Troopers received a report of an assault that had occurred on Grumman Avenue in Anchor Point. Investigation showed that Natalie Cooper, 18, of Anchor Point, had assaulted a family member. Cooper was arrested and taken to the Homer Jail, pending arraignment. n On Apr. 9 at 4:52, Alaska State Troopers stopped a black 2003 Mercury Mountaineer for a moving violation near Mile 73.0 of the Seward Highway. The driver identified as Ralph Oliver, 24, of Anchorage. Investigation revealed that Oliver was in violation of conditions of release from a prior incident, for which he had been arrested for fourthdegree assault (domestic violence). Oliver was arrested and taken to the Anchorage Jail without bail. n On Apr. 4 at 9:19 a.m.,

Alaska State Troopers received a report of a protective order violation from a male resident of Ninilchik. Investigation showed that Bruce Larson, 59, of Anchor Point, had contacted the male in violation of protective order. Further investigation showed that Larson was on conditions of release in a prior criminal case and that he had violated those conditions. Larson could not be located during the investigation. An arrest warrant has been requested. n On Apr. 15 at 3:55 p.m., Apple Bus Company reported that a vehicle had driven by a school bus that was stopped with the red lights flashing and stop arm extended at the intersection of the Sterling highway and Evergreen Drive in Sterling. Investigation revealed that Debbie Joyce Lamb, 60, of Sterling, was operating the vehicle. Lamb was issued a misdemeanor mandatory court citation for failure to stop for a school bus. n On Apr. 10 at 2:58 p.m., Soldotna Alaska State Troopers received a call from a man who reported a theft. He said that his Glock 21 (45cal) gen 4 was stolen from his residence. He last had the pistol on Apr. 3. Anyone with information regarding the theft is asked to contact the Alaska State Troopers 907-262-4453 or Peninsula Crime Stoppers 907-283-8477. Tipsters can also report anonymously at www.peninsulacrimestoppers.com.

Feb. 28. He was sentenced to time served and fined a $100 court surcharge and a $50 jail surcharge. n Aaron Jay Bullard, 55, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to second-degree unlawful contact, a domestic violence offense committed Feb. 10. He was fined a $100 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to have no contact with victim, and placed on probation for 12 months. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n A jury found Valerie L. Henderson, 48, of Nikiski, guilty of an amended charge of third-degree theft, committed Jan. 20. Imposition of sentence was suspended and she was placed on probation for nine months, fined a $100 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, and ordered to complete 50 hours of community work service. She was acquitted of a second charge in this case. n Michael Lavern Hughes, 59, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to driving while license cancelled, revoked or suspended, committed Nov. 24, 2017. He was fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended and placed on probation for 12 months. All other charges in this case

were dismissed. n Heidi Lynzie Lyle, 49, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to driving under the influence, committed Jan. 28, 2018. She was sentenced to 120 days in jail or on electronic monitoring with 100 days suspended, fined $4,000 with $1,000 suspended, a $75 court surcharge, a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended and $1,467 cost of imprisonment, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, had her license revoked for one year, and placed on probation for one year. n Rhea Winter Plaskowski, 24, address unknown, pleaded guilty to fourth-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance, committed May 11, 2018. She was fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete a substance/ alcohol abuse assessment and follow all recommendations, forfeited all items seized, ordered to possess no controlled substances unless prescribed and in original containers, and was placed on probation for 12 months. n Jonathan Avery, 35, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to violating condition of release, committed Nov. 8. He was fined a $50

court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended and placed on probation for 12 months. n Nadia Brittany Showalter, 22, of Sterling, pleaded guilty to driving under the influence, committed Feb. 2. She was sentenced to 30 days on electronic monitoring with 27 days suspended, fined $2,000 with $500 suspended, a $150 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, had her license revoked for 90 days, ordered ignition interlock for six months, and placed on probation for one year. n David Paul Willis, 34, address unknown, pleaded guilty to an amended charge of third-degree theft, committed Mar. 22. He was fined a $100 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, forfeited item seized, ordered to have no contact with victim, and placed on probation for 12 months. The following judgment was recently handed down in Kenai Superior Court: n Kevin William Brower, 52, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to one felony count of second-degree burglary and one misdemeanor count of third-degree theft, committed Jan. 22, 2018.

He was sentenced to five years in prison with three years suspended on the count of second-degree burglary and to 30 days in jail on the count of thirddegree theft, fined a $100 court surcharge and a $200 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to pay $500 cost of appointed counsel, ordered to pay restitution, forfeited items seized, ordered, among other conditions of probation, not to use, possess or consume alcoholic beverages or illegal controlled substances, including marijuana or synthetic drugs, ordered to complete a substance abuse evaluation and comply with treatment recommendations, ordered to submit to search directed by a probation officer, with or without probable cause, for the presence of stolen property, controlled substances, drug paraphernalia and evidence of controlled substance transaction, ordered to have no contact with victims in this case, and was placed on probation for four years after serving any term of incarceration imposed. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Kevin William Brower, 52, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to two counts of second-degree theft, committed Dec. 28, 2017. He was sentenced to five years in

prison with three years suspended and to three years with one year suspended, unsuspended time to be served concurrently, fined a $100 court surcharge and a $200 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to pay restitution, forfeited items seized, ordered, among other conditions of probation, not to use, possess or consume any alcoholic beverages or illegal controlled substances, including marijuana or synthetic drugs, ordered to complete a substance abuse evaluation and comply with treatment recommendations, ordered to submit to search directed by a probation officer, with or without probable cause, for the presence of stolen property, controlled substances, drug paraphernalia, and evidence of controlled substance transactions, ordered to have no contact with victims in this case, and was placed on probation for four years after serving any term of incarceration imposed. All other charges in this case were dismissed. The following dismissal was recently handed down in Kenai District Court: n A charge of fourthdegree misconduct involving a controlled substance, against Jonathan P. Avery, 35, of Sterling, was dismissed. Date of the charge was July 30.

presidency. The accounts prompted Republican Sen. Mitt Romney, who has sometimes clashed with Trump, to release a statement saying he was “sickened at the extent and pervasiveness of dishonesty and misdirection by individuals in the highest office of the land, including the President.” “Reading the report is a sobering revelation of how far we have strayed from the aspirations and principles of the founders,” he said. The report concluded that one reason Trump managed to stay out of trouble was that his “efforts to influence the investigation were mostly unsuccessful … largely because the persons who surrounded the President declined to carry out orders or accede to his requests.” That didn’t spare those

who defied Trump’s wishes from his wrath. Trump appeared to be especially angry with former White House counsel Don McGahn, who sat with Mueller for about 30 hours of interviews, and is referenced numerous times in the report. In one particularly vivid passage, Mueller recounts how Trump called McGahn twice at home and directed him to set in motion Mueller’s firing. McGahn recoiled, packed up his office and threatened to resign, fearing the move would trigger a potential crisis akin to the Saturday Night Massacre of firings during the Watergate era. In another section, Mueller details how Trump questioned McGahn’s note-taking, telling the White House counsel that, “Lawyers don ‘t take notes” and that he’d “never had a lawyer who

took notes.” “Watch out for people that take so-called “notes,” when the notes never existed until needed,” Trump said in one of his tweets Friday. Others whose contemporaneous notes were referenced in the report include former staff secretary Rob Porter and Reince Priebus, Trump’s first chief of staff. Trump ended his tweet with the word, “a…” suggesting more was coming. More than eight hours later, he finally completed his thought, calling the probe a “big, fat, waste of time, energy and money” and threatening investigators by saying, “It is now finally time to turn the tables and bring justice to some very sick and dangerous people who have committed very serious crimes, perhaps even Spying or Treason.” There is

no evidence of either. Trump, who is in Florida for the Easter weekend, headed to his West Palm Beach golf club Friday after some early morning rain had cleared. There he played golf with conservative talk radio host Rush Limbaugh “and a couple friends,” according to the White House. He’ll spend the rest of the weekend with family, friends and paying members of his private Mar-aLago club in Palm Beach. As Trump hopped off the steps from Air Force One on Thursday evening, he was greeted by a throng of supporters, who clamored for autographs and selfies. He repeatedly told the crowd “thank you everybody” as they yelled encouragement. Ari Fleischer, who served as White House press secretary to former

President George W. Bush, said in an appearance on Fox News that he didn’t understand why Trump decided to send his tweets lashing out at former aides. “I think it’s over,” he said. “If I were the president, I would have basically declared victory with the Mueller report and everything that came out and move beyond it.” Still, he said he hoped the White House had learned some lessons. “The president and his entire team needs to realize how close they came to being charged with obstruction,” Fleischer said. “Asking your staff to lie and engaging in some of the activities that the Mueller report stated the president engaged in is too close to obstruction. And that’s a lesson I hope everybody at the White House takes with them going forward.”


Peninsula Clarion | Sunday, April 21, 2019 | A7

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A8 | Sunday, April 21, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

AccuWeather® 5-day forecast for Kenai-Soldotna Today

Monday

Tuesday Wednesday Thursday

Breezy with rain and snow showers

A rain or snow shower in spots

Partly sunny, a rain or snow shower

Times of clouds and sun

Hi: 44

Hi: 41

Hi: 40

Hi: 45

Lo: 27

Lo: 25

RealFeel

Lo: 25

The patented AccuWeather.com RealFeel Temperature® is an exclusive index of the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

21 25 28 31

Today 6:29 a.m. 9:39 p.m.

Sunrise Sunset

Last Apr 26

New May 4

Daylight Day Length - 15 hrs., 9 min., 33 sec. Daylight gained - 5 min., 31 sec.

Alaska Cities City Adak* Anchorage Barrow Bethel Cold Bay Cordova Delta Junction Denali N. P. Dillingham Dutch Harbor Fairbanks Fort Yukon Glennallen* Gulkana Haines Homer Juneau Ketchikan Kiana King Salmon Klawock Kodiak

Lo: 29

Hi: 47

Moonrise Moonset

Tomorrow 6:26 a.m. 9:41 p.m.

Kotzebue 24/19

Lo: 29

Today Hi/Lo/W 42/31/c 46/29/sn 14/8/c 31/13/c 35/25/r 45/33/r 49/33/c 44/27/pc 37/20/pc 36/28/pc 55/35/c 48/32/pc 40/29/r 52/31/c 48/40/r 39/29/r 47/42/r 47/43/r 26/19/pc 39/21/pc 50/41/r 41/30/c

Unalakleet 28/21 McGrath 38/25

Tomorrow 1:07 a.m. 8:19 a.m.

City Kotzebue McGrath Metlakatla Nome North Pole Northway Palmer Petersburg Prudhoe Bay* Saint Paul Seward Sitka Skagway Talkeetna Tanana Tok* Unalakleet Valdez Wasilla Whittier Willow* Yakutat

Yesterday Hi/Lo/W 20/13/c 37/12/sf 48/37/pc 15/4/c 45/25/pc 49/20/c 41/28/sn 47/33/sh 13/2/sn 30/27/sn 39/30/sn 46/37/c 46/40/sh 40/29/sf 36/6/sf 47/23/pc 25/18/sf 41/32/sn 43/28/sn 39/32/c 43/29/r 44/35/sh

Talkeetna 48/28

Bethel 31/13

Today Hi/Lo/W 24/19/pc 38/25/c 47/44/r 17/10/pc 55/36/pc 53/29/c 48/31/sn 46/43/r 17/15/c 31/21/sn 42/28/r 47/41/r 49/40/r 48/28/c 43/33/pc 48/27/c 28/21/pc 43/35/r 48/27/sn 41/26/r 49/28/c 45/38/r

Anchorage 46/29

City

Albany, NY Albuquerque Amarillo Asheville Atlanta Atlantic City Austin Baltimore Billings Birmingham Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo, NY Casper Charleston, SC Charleston, WV Charlotte, NC Chicago Cheyenne Cincinnati

71/65/r 82/51/pc 88/40/s 53/40/sh 51/43/sh 67/61/r 82/46/s 74/63/pc 66/54/c 64/44/pc 77/44/pc 67/53/t 74/65/r 47/40/r 77/44/sh 66/51/pc 56/51/sh 56/48/sh 64/36/s 75/40/c 46/39/r

71/50/pc 75/48/s 86/47/s 61/42/s 71/50/s 68/50/pc 85/62/s 65/50/c 51/42/r 76/50/s 62/38/c 66/43/c 64/50/sh 53/40/c 48/34/sh 69/49/s 60/42/c 65/47/s 74/54/s 55/31/sh 66/44/s

City

Cleveland Columbia, SC Columbus, OH Concord, NH Dallas Dayton Denver Des Moines Detroit Duluth El Paso Fargo Flagstaff Grand Rapids Great Falls Hartford Helena Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Jackson, MS

54/42/c 59/49/sh 56/43/c 72/64/r 80/47/s 45/41/r 80/48/pc 75/41/s 45/39/r 74/45/sh 93/59/s 68/47/pc 66/30/s 66/38/pc 46/43/r 69/63/r 51/49/r 86/70/pc 79/48/s 46/41/r 70/46/s

59/43/c 68/47/s 61/42/c 69/46/pc 83/64/pc 65/45/pc 65/36/sh 82/58/pc 67/44/pc 47/39/sh 87/60/s 60/42/pc 62/29/s 71/48/pc 54/35/r 69/47/pc 50/36/c 86/72/s 82/64/pc 70/45/s 78/51/s

City

Jacksonville Kansas City Key West Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Midland, TX Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Norfolk Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix

4:57 a.m. (22.5) 5:41 p.m. (20.6)

11:40 a.m. (-4.1) 11:50 p.m. (0.2)

First Second

4:16 a.m. (21.3) 5:00 p.m. (19.4)

10:36 a.m. (-4.1) 10:46 p.m. (0.2)

First Second

2:56 a.m. (12.0) 3:47 p.m. (9.9)

9:30 a.m. (-2.2) 9:28 p.m. (1.1)

First Second

9:05 a.m. (32.1) 9:46 p.m. (30.7)

3:42 a.m. (0.4) 4:16 p.m. (-3.3)

Anchorage

Almanac Readings ending 4 p.m. yesterday

Temperature

From Kenai Municipal Airport

High .............................................. 41 Low ............................................... 27 Normal high ................................. 47 Normal low ................................... 29 Record high ....................... 56 (2014) Record low .......................... 2 (1975)

Precipitation

From the Peninsula Clarion in Kenai

24 hours ending 4 p.m. yest. . 0.03" Month to date .......................... 0.28" Normal month to date ............ 0.37" Year to date .............................. 1.78" Normal year to date ................ 2.85" Record today ................ 0.71" (1963) Record for April ........... 2.21" (1955) Record for year ........... 27.09" (1963)

Valdez 43/35

Juneau 47/42

National Extremes (For the 48 contiguous states) High yesterday Low yesterday

Kodiak 41/30

101 at Death Valley, Calif. 16 at Stonington, Mich.

High yesterday Low yesterday

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

71/50/r 74/37/s 82/73/pc 89/69/pc 74/44/s 66/57/c 47/41/r 69/46/s 83/69/pc 88/49/s 60/40/s 78/44/s 50/39/sh 74/53/s 65/60/r 73/64/s 77/41/s 84/44/s 75/54/pc 72/65/r 94/70/s

76/50/s 82/62/pc 79/69/s 79/60/pc 80/55/s 67/52/pc 71/49/s 77/56/s 80/64/s 91/58/s 66/52/pc 73/45/t 74/47/s 79/58/s 66/52/pc 66/54/c 81/62/s 84/58/pc 77/54/s 68/51/pc 87/61/s

Sitka 47/41

State Extremes

City

Pittsburgh Portland, ME Portland, OR Rapid City Reno Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Santa Fe Seattle Sioux Falls, SD Spokane Syracuse Tampa Topeka Tucson Tulsa Wash., DC Wichita

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

66/49/c 58/53/sh 66/51/pc 79/42/pc 66/56/pc 69/54/pc 76/56/t 81/47/s 66/60/c 60/52/pc 79/37/pc 60/47/pc 84/47/s 61/48/sh 75/46/t 73/65/pc 79/37/s 90/62/s 79/38/s 74/66/pc 79/40/s

57/45/c 59/47/sh 63/44/pc 49/38/sh 64/42/pc 77/53/s 56/45/sh 84/63/s 65/56/pc 65/49/s 72/37/s 62/45/pc 76/45/t 65/41/pc 66/46/c 76/58/s 85/62/pc 88/55/s 83/64/pc 66/52/c 83/61/s

City

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Acapulco Athens Auckland Baghdad Berlin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Magadan Mexico City Montreal Moscow Paris Rome Seoul Singapore Sydney Tokyo Vancouver

90/72/s 60/48/pc 66/52/s 76/53/s 70/39/pc 85/78/t 59/46/pc 75/53/pc 75/48/s 68/50/pc 37/28/sn 78/52/s 47/39/r 54/34/pc 77/55/s 71/46/s 65/48/pc 87/81/t 78/62/pc 64/52/pc 55/46/pc

86/75/pc 64/48/pc 71/57/s 82/52/s 68/43/s 84/77/t 52/42/t 73/54/t 73/48/s 59/49/sh 35/29/sf 83/57/s 67/43/pc 61/38/c 77/52/pc 71/54/pc 67/47/pc 88/79/t 78/66/pc 70/61/pc 58/44/c

While the entire day will not be a washout, showers will dampen parts of the Northeast on this Easter Sunday. Showers and thunderstorms will rumble over the northern Plains as rain wets the Rockies.

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation

Cold -10s

Warm -0s

0s

Stationary 10s

20s

Showers T-storms 30s

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40s

50s

Rain

60s

70s

Flurries 80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2019

Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

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Ketchikan 47/43

50 at Klawock -9 at Point Thomson

Today’s Forecast World Cities

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

First Second

Deep Creek

Glennallen 40/29

Kenai/ Soldotna Homer

Dillingham 37/20

National Cities Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

1:01 a.m. (-1.1) 1:31 p.m. (-4.2)

Seward Homer 42/28 39/29

Cold Bay 35/25

Unalaska 35/28

6:10 a.m. (23.2) 6:54 p.m. (21.3)

Kenai/ Soldotna 44/27

Fairbanks 55/35

Low(ft.)

First Second

Seward

Anaktuvuk Pass 22/4

Nome 17/10

* Indicates estimated temperatures for yesterday

Yesterday Hi/Lo/W 41/33/c 40/31/c 14/3/sn 30/22/sn 39/28/c 40/33/sn 46/28/pc 35/20/sn 36/25/sn 38/31/sf 45/21/pc 45/20/pc 46/31/c 43/29/pc 45/36/sh 39/28/sn 47/37/c 48/31/pc 20/8/c 40/23/c 50/34/c 38/27/sf

Prudhoe Bay 17/15

High(ft.)

Kenai City Dock

Seldovia

First Full May 11 May 18

Today none 7:56 a.m.

Tides Today

Partly sunny

Sun and Moon

10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m.

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April 21 - April 27, 2019


SECTION

Sports

B Sunday, April 21, 2019

Parity reigns Southcentral Conference is up for grabs again By JOEY KLECKA Peninsula Clarion

Kenai’s Caleb Smith offers up a pitch to a Kodiak batter May 4, 2018, at the Kenai Little League fields. Smith is one of Kenai Central’s returning arms in 2019. (Photo by Joey Klecka/Peninsula Clarion)

Last year’s Southcentral Conference baseball tournament may have well been named “May Madness,” what with all the twists and turns more typical of the March Madness hoops craziness. In the nine-team field that sends only two to state, the top two seeds failed to make it to the third and final day of the tournament, and it was ultimately the four- and seven-seeded

teams that advanced to the state tournament. Palmer was that seven seed, and the Moose ended up winning it all. Kenai Central baseball coach Luke Oliver is hoping to have a team that plays the Cinderella spoiler, and explained that if a team can bring a hot pitcher and defense into a tournament, wild things can happen. “You have to be good that one day,” Oliver said. “If you can knock off the top seed, it’s all easier.”

This year’s region tournament will be hosted May 23 to 25 by Redington High School with games at Houston High. In 2018, the Homer Mariners became the second seed in the Southcentral Conference after a three-way tie was settled with Wasilla and Kodiak, but like top-seeded Wasilla, lost on day one and eventually dropped out before they could make it to the final day. Mariners head coach See BAT, page B4

Fast time Ostrander 9th in 1,500 Staff report Peninsula Clarion

Boise State distance ace Allie Ostrander posted a personal best in the women’s 1,500-meter race Friday night at the Bryan Clay Invitational and Multis in Azusa, California. Ostrander finished ninth overall in the loaded field of 143 runners with a time of 4 minutes, 14.76 seconds, which helped put her in contention for receiving a bid to the West Preliminary Round in the event. The redshirt junior finished over five seconds behind winner Hanna Green, a professional runner with Nike Elite, who won with a time of 4:09.33. Ostrander was fifth among collegiate racers. The kids and their coaches at Redemption MMA in Soldotna. (Photo provided by Redemption MMA)

Sixers Redemption MMA excels at state topple Owner Kolesar credits Anchorage Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu for mentoring area fighters Nets By JEFF HELMINIAK Peninsula Clarion

By The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Joel Embiid had 31 points and 16 rebounds, and passed to Mike Scott for the go-ahead 3-pointer with 18 seconds left as the Philadelphia 76ers beat the Brooklyn Nets 112-108 on Saturday to take a 3-1 series lead. Embiid also had a flagrant foul that led to a scuffle and two ejections during an eventful return to the lineup after missing Game 3 with a sore left knee. Tobias Harris had 24 points, eight rebounds and

Part of being an incredible mentor is comfort with the fact that doing a great job means the student may one day pass the teacher. Anchorage Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu has been an incredible mentor to Redemption MMA in Soldotna, a fact that has been evident at the last two state tournaments of the Alaskan Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Federation. Up until last year, Anchorage Brazilian JiuJitsu had won every kids and adults team trophy since the tourney began in 2010. Last year, Redemption MMA was able to wrest away the kids team trophy. April 13 in Anchorage, Redemption won the kids and adults trophy. “It was bittersweet beating them,” said Isaac Kolesar, owner of Redemption. “I’m happy for us, but they made us who we are. “They love that we won. They’re super awesome about it.” Kolesar started training in Brazilian Jiu-

‘It was bittersweet beating (Anchorage Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu). I’m happy for us, but they made us who we are. They love that we won. They’re super awesome about it.’ Isaac Kolesar, owner of Redemption MMA in Soldotna

Jitsu in 2006. When he moved to the Kenai Peninsula in 2010 and started Redemption, he was a blue belt, just one belt up from the white belt that beginners wear. Shortly after Kolesar started Redemption, Anchorage Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu affiliated the newcomers. “We didn’t have anyone to belt us and guide us on our jiu-jitsu journey,” Kolesar said. “Anchorage Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu said we want to help. They didn’t charge us anything. “They helped out with everything, from the

business side to setting up. They sent us light years ahead.” Even today, with 100 members, Redemption does not have any members with black belts, which take 10 years of consistent practice to earn. The closest are Kolesar and George Grossman, both freshly promoted to brown belts. Brown is one level below black. Whenever Redemption moves a student up a belt, that promotion is authorized by Ryder Spadafore, a black belt with Anchorage BraSee STATE, page B4

See NBA, page B3

Area soccer teams get in some games despite snowfall Staff report Peninsula Clarion

the Bulldogs to 2-2 overall this year. Gavin White netted two second-half goals to break a tie and secure the win for Nikiski. In the first half, Isaiah Gray and Michael Mysing scored for Nikiski, but Houston answered each time to forge a 2-2 tie at halftime. Houston tallied one goal on a penalty kick. “I think we underestimated (Houston), but I yelled at them at halftime,” said Nikiski head coach Harrison Deveer. “The first half was really competitive, but the second half the guys really stepped up.”

Spring snowfall threw the high school soccer weekend into chaos in the Anchorage and Valley regions as teams scrambled to find suitable fields to compete on. Both Kenai Central teams had games against Grace Christian canceled, while both Seward teams had games with Redington and Houston scrapped entirely. The Soldotna boys and girls got in games with Grace Christian, but moved locations to the indoor confines of The Dome in Anchorage. Nikiski girls 1, Houston 1 Nikiski had to scrap a pair of varsity games The Bulldogs beat the Hawks to move to Friday with Houston and Saturday with Redington, but the Bulldogs managed to get 0-3-1 this year. Tawnisha Freeman scored something out of the weekend with resched- for Nikiski with an assist from America Jefuled games Saturday afternoon with Houston. freys. Jeffreys tallied two goals in a 3-3 tie Thursday against Palmer. Nikiski boys 4, Houston 2 The Nikiski boys won a rescheduled game Saturday against Houston, pushing

nonconference game Saturday in Juneau, Juneau boys 2, Homer 1 but it wasn’t enough to beat the Falcons. Clayton Beachy made six saves on eight The Crimson Bears secured a nonconshots in goal for the Mariners, who dropped ference win Friday night over the Mariners to 3-3-2 overall in 2019. between two Div. II opponents. Homer girls 0, Thunder Mountain 0

Soldotna girls 4, Grace 0 Ali McCarron helped carry the Homer The Stars crafted a shutout over the Grizgirls to a scoreless draw Saturday in Juneau. zlies Friday afternoon at The Dome in AnThe team’s fourth tie result of the year left chorage after the game was moved due to a the Mariners at 3-1-4 overall. spring snowfall. Ryann Cannava, Meijan Leaf, Rhys FRIDAY Cannava and Jordan Strausbaugh all tallied goals for SoHi (4-1-1 overall). Rhys Cannava scored hers on a penalty kick, and the Juneau girls 11, Homer 0 Stars also got assists from Haley Buckbee, The Mariners fell in a lopsided score Fri- Sierra Kuntz and each of the Cannavas. day evening to the Crimson Bears in a nonKatie Delker and Margarida Mendoca conference game in Juneau. The loss was shared the clean sheet in goal. Homer’s first of the season. Soldotna boys 3, Grace 0 Juneau’s Michaela Bentley led the Crimson Bears with four goals and an assist, Josh Heiber tallied two goals for SoHi in Thunder Mountain boys 2, Homer 1 while Malia Miller added three goals with Friday’s nonconference win over the GrizEthan Pitzman scored for Homer in a an assist and Eva Goering scored twice. See KICK, page B2


B2 | Sunday, April 21, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

To bat flip or not to bat flip Some say ‘Let the kids play,’ others retaliate with beanings By JAKE SEINER AP Sports Writer

NEW YORK — When Tim Anderson spiked his bat and yelled toward his White Sox teammates, Major League Baseball’s selfdescribed “spicy” Twitter account was among the first to weigh in. “LET THE KIDS PLAY,” proclaimed @Cut4 , the offbeat arm of MLB’s social media portfolio with nearly 1 million followers. The tweet Wednesday included video of Anderson’s bat toss, and it sparked hundreds of comments — some cheering the fiery display, some condemning it. Baseball is stuck in an ongoing debate regarding onfield decorum, and MLB’s marketing department is leaving no doubt where it stands. Since the group was restructured just over a year ago, MLB’s promotional efforts have taken up arms against the old school. While traditionalists want to punish unabashed revelry with fastballs to the backside, MLB senior vice president of marketing Barbara McHugh wants her team feting those bat flips. “That’s certainly what we’re trying to celebrate,” McHugh told The Associated Press on Wednesday, hours before Anderson’s emphatic display. As Brad Keller’s fastball to Anderson’s backside showed, not everyone is buying MLB’s pitch. MLB’s promoters have made their stance clear on social media. Cut4 and the league’s other accounts, including its main @MLB handle, routinely highlight players showing the kind of raw emotion Anderson displayed. When Keller, a right-hander with the Royals, plunked Anderson two innings after his homer, Cut4 doubled down. “Imagine hating someone having fun this much,” @ Cut4 tweeted with an image of the ensuing benches-clearing fracas. Anderson’s antics and MLB’s response on social media highlighted the new

marketing strategy, but it also underscored that the game’s rules haven’t caught up. Both Keller and Anderson were ejected from the game, and both were suspended by the league Friday. Keller was banned five games — one turn in the rotation for the starting pitcher — and Anderson was also banned a game “for his conduct after the benches cleared.” ESPN, citing unidentified sources, said Anderson, who is black, called Keller, who is white, the N-word during the fray. Anderson didn’t go into detail Friday when asked what he said during the fracas. MLB’s disciplinary system for such incidents is based on precedent, though the league is exploring potential changes to better discourage retaliatory plunkings. The league has been criticized in recent years for failing to promote its top talents — two-time AL MVP Mike Trout, in particular — and McHugh’s group has made player marketing a top priority since she took charge in a department restructuring last year. Those marketing efforts are clearest in its “Let The Kids Play” campaign. It debuted with an advertisement last October that featured emotional displays from players like Giancarlo Stanton, Javier Baez, Yasiel Puig and Mookie Betts. The ad used stern commentary from major league broadcasters as a foil to fun-loving bat flips, ending it with a message from a most notable baseball kid, Hall of Famer Ken Griffey Jr. “No more talk,” Griffey says. “Let the kids play.” “I think we see ‘Let The Kids Play’ not just as a name or a hashtag or not just the name of a campaign,” McHugh said, “but really an overarching umbrella theme or rallying cry, if you will, to the work that we are dedicated to, which is to help promote our collection of diverse players and their personalities.”

St. Louis Blues’ Jaden Schwartz, second from left, is congratulated by teammates Vince Dunn, left, Tyler Bozak (21), Tyler Bozak and Pat Maroon (7) after scoring during the second period in Game 6 of an NHL first-round hockey playoff series against the Winnipeg Jets, Saturday in St. Louis. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Blues end Jets’ season By The Associated Press

ST. LOUIS — Jaden Schwartz scored three times and Jordan Binnington stopped 18 shots to help the St. Louis Blues beat the Winnipeg Jets 3-2 in Game 6 of their playoff series Saturday night to advance to the second round. The Blues will next face the winner of the Dallas-Nashville series, which the Stars lead 3-2. Bryan Little and Dustin Byfuglien scored for Winnipeg, which tried to rally after falling behind 3-0 early in the third period. Connor Hellebuyck finished with 33 saves. The Blues became the first home team to win in the series, and advanced to the second round for the third time in four years. Schwartz, who had only 11 goals in the regular season, has four in the playoffs — the Blues’ last four, starting the tiebreaking tally with 15 seconds left in the 3-2 win in Game 5. STARS 5, PREDATORS 3 NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Alexander Radulov and Jason Dickinson each scored twice to help Dallas to push Nashville to the brink of elimination. The Stars came into the postseason as the West’s first wild card and are up 3-2 in the best-of-seven series over the two-time defending Central Divi-

sion champs. Dallas will have a chance Monday night at home in Game 6 to join Colorado and Columbus as the latest lower seed coming through in the opening round. Tyler Seguin had a goal and an assist, and Jamie Benn had three assists as the Stars scored at least five goals in back-to-back playoff games for the ninth time in franchise history, and the first since Games 3 and 4 of the 1991 conference finals when this team was still in Minnesota. Ben Bishop, named a finalist for the Vezina Trophy during the game, made 30 saves for the win. Rocco Grimaldi, Ryan Johansen and Kyle Turris scored for Nashville, and Pekka Rinne finished with 21 saves. The Predators lost back-to-back playoff games for the first time since Games 5 and 6 of the 2017 Stanley Cup Final.

CAPITALS 6, HURRICANES 0 WASHINGTON — Nicklas Backstrom needed five games to match his goal output from the entire 2018 playoffs, and he and Alex Ovechkin have the defending Stanley Cup champion Capitals one victory away from the second round. Backstrom had two goals and two assists, Ovechkin had a goal and two assists and Braden Holtby stopped all 30 shots he faced to lead Washington to a 6-0 win over the Carolina Hurricanes in Game 5 on Saturday night. Washington has a 3-2 series lead and

can advance with a win at Carolina in Game 6 on Monday night. After scoring five goals in 20 games during the Capitals’ Cup run a year ago that included missing four games with two fractures in his right pointer finger, Backstrom has that many already in these playoffs. Ovechkin assisted on Backstrom’s second goal and Tom Wilson’s on the power play and added the exclamation point in the rout with a power-play goal in the third. Lighting up Carolina’s Petr Mrazek fired up the crowd and gave Washington the lead in the series back after laying an egg in losses in Game 3 and Game 4 on the road. Much of the credit belongs to the penalty kill that made easy work of all five Carolina power plays, including three in quick succession in the second period. Holtby made six saves on the penalty kill and drew chants of his name from the crowd that was in a chanting mood all night. “D-S-P! D-S-P!” roared throughout the arena to salute 2018 playoff hero Devante Smith-Pelly, who was playing his first game with the Capitals since Feb. 17 after spending the past two months in the minors in a salary-cap move. Smith-Pelly filled the spot vacated by T.J. Oshie, who suffered an upperbody injury late in Game 4 and is expected to be out long-term. When the game was out of hand, fans chanted “T.J. Oshie!” to honor a popular player who was a significant part of the franchise’s first title.

Yankees win, but Judge injures oblique By The Associated Press

NEW YORK — All-Star slugger Aaron Judge hurt his left oblique while taking a swing and was expected to head to the injured list as the already banged-up New York Yankees beat the Kansas City Royals 9-2 Saturday. Judge homered early, but hurt himself in the sixth inning while hitting a single. He was taken to a hospital for an MRI and further tests. Judge winced after taking a swing in the sixth and gingerly made his way to first base. He left the game after being checked by a trainer. The Yankees, who began the game with 12 players on the injured list, hit four home runs. Judge connected in the first, Clint Frazier had a solo drive in the second and Mike Tauchman and DJ LeMahieu homered on consecutive pitches in the fourth.

ber working seven solid innings and Carlos Santana celebrated his U.S. citizenship with three hits, as Cleveland topped Atlanta in the opener of a doubleheader. Kluber (2-2) shook off a rough first inning and allowed four runs and five hits. He didn’t get out of the third inning in his previous start. Max Moroff homered and had two RBIs for Cleveland. Greg Allen hit a run-scoring double off starter Julio Teheran (2-2) and the Indians scored six runs in the fifth — all with two outs. Brian McCann and Matt Joyce hit back-to-back homers off Kluber in the seventh. The Braves, who have lost four in a row, had just six hits. In the second game, Ronald Acuña Jr.’s two-run double highlighted Atlanta’s five-run rally in the ninth inning as the Braves stormed back to gain a split. The Braves trailed 7-0 after two innings but chipped away late and stopped a four-game losing streak.

DIAMONDBACKS 6, CUBS 0 BREWERS 5, DODGERS 0 MILWAUKEE — Christian Yelich hit two home runs, pushing his major league-leading total to 13, and Chase Anderson pitched five strong innings in a spot start in Milwaukee’s win over Los Angeles. Ryan Braun added a three-run homer for the Brewers, who snapped a three-game losing streak. The Brewers, who ended the Dodgers’ six-game winning streak, got on the board in the third when Yelich hit a solo homer with two out off HyunJin Ryu (2-1). With that homer, Yelich broke the franchise record for home runs in March and April, set by Eric Thames in 2017. His second came in the sixth inning, and his 13 homers in the first month of the season matched the franchise record for homers in a month, set by Prince Fielder in May 2007.

CHICAGO — Zack Greinke pitched three-hit ball over six innings and was backed by three home runs as Arizona won for the fifth time in six games. Greinke (3-1) won for the third time in four starts. Taylor Clarke worked the final three innings for a save in his major league debut, allowing one hit and preserving Arizona’s first shutout since last Sept. 19.

RED SOX 6, RAYS 5

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Andrew Benintendi hit a grand slam and a tiebreaking ninth-inning sacrifice fly and catcher Christian Vázquez picked off Tommy Pham for the final out as Boston won a series for the first time this season. Boston had lost four of its first six series and split the other two during a 6-13 start, its worst since 1996. Rick Porcello gave up two runs and INDIANS 8, BRAVES 4; six hits in 5 2/3 innings, Matt Barnes BRAVES 8, INDIANS 7 (2-0) won after allowing Yandy Diaz’s CLEVELAND — Corey Klu- tying home run leading off the eighth,

and Ryan Brasier got his fifth save in poned by rain on Friday. six Minnesota took a 6-3 lead with a three-run sixth against Jimmy Yacabonis (1-1). MARLINS 9, NATIONALS 3 Taylor Rogers struck out the side MIAMI — Curtis Granderson in the ninth for his second save. José Berríos (3-1) gave up all homered and Miami busted out at the plate after changing hitting coaches, three Baltimore home runs but made roughing up ace Max Scherzer in it through six innings, allowing four beating Washington to win a series for runs, eight hits and three walks. In the second game, the Twins the first time this season. Brian Anderson doubled twice routed Baltimore with eight homers, and the Marlins finished with 11 hits matching their single-game mark set in their first game under new batting on Aug. 29, 1963, against Washington. coach Jeff Livesey. Former Oriole Jonathan Schoop, Nationals slugger Anthony Rendon had his 17-game hitting streak halted Nelson Cruz and Mitch Garver each when he left after being hit by a pitch had two homers. on the left elbow in the third inning. Miguel Rojas and Starlin Castro BLUE JAYS 10, ATHLETICS 1 each had two hits for the Marlins. OAKLAND, Calif. — Rowdy Tellez and Brandon Drury hit back-toCARDINALS 10, METS 2 back homers in a five-run fourth inST. LOUIS — Miles Mikolas ning and Justin Smoak also homered tossed eight stellar innings and drove as Toronto won for the fifth time in six in two runs, leading St. Louis over games on its road trip. Toronto pitcher Matt Shoemaker New York. Jose Martinez had three hits and injured his left knee in a rundown three RBIs and Paul Goldschmidt hit chase in the third inning. Toronto’s training staff was sumhis eighth home run for St. Louis. Mikolas (2-1) became the first St. moned again after just seven pitches Louis pitcher to record an out in the by Shoemaker’s replacement, Sam seventh inning this season. He al- Gaviglio. Gaviglio (2-0) was checked out and remained in the game, throwlowed two runs and four hits. Chris Flexen (0-1) surrendered six ing four scoreless innings to win. Tellez homered off A’s starter runs and on seven hits in 4 1/3 innings. Goldschmidt hit a 464 foot solo Mike Fiers (2-2) after Smoak and home run off Paul Sewald in the Teoscar Hernandez opened the fourth with consecutive singles. Two pitches eighth inning. later, Drury connected.

TWINS 6, ORIOLES 5; TWINS 16, ORIOLES 7

PIRATES 3, GIANTS 1

BALTIMORE — Eddie Rosario homered twice for a second straight game, Byron Buxton hit a tiebreaking two-run double in the sixth inning and Minnesota beat Baltimore in the opener of a doubleheader. Rosario also doubled and made a leaping catch at the wall to take away an extra-base hit from Chris Davis. Willians Astudillo went deep for the Twins. Dwight Smith Jr., Renato Núñez and Pedro Severino homered for the Orioles in the makeup of a game post-

PITTSBURGH — Cole Tucker hit a two-run homer in his major league debut and Pittsburgh beat San Francisco in a game shortened to five innings because of rain. Tucker, a first-round pick in the 2014 draft, sent a pitch from Derek Holland (1-3) a projected 431 feet into the bushes beyond the center field wall with two outs in the fifth inning to put the Pirates in front. Jung Ho Kang hit his third home run for Pittsburgh, which has won a season-high five straight. Bryan

Reynolds, called up from Triple-A Indianapolis, added a single in his first big league game. Jameson Taillon (12) allowed one run and four hits with a walk and three strikeouts to earn his first victory in five starts this season.

RANGERS 9, ASTROS 4 ARLINGTON, Texas — Joey Gallo hit another long home run, Asdrúbal Cabrera accounted for five runs and Texas beat Houston. Gerrit Cole (1-3) needed 43 pitches to get through a five-run first inning and didn’t get the first out until a called third strike against Gallo with the bases loaded on his 32nd pitch. The right-hander struck out eight, but allowed nine runs over 4 1/3 innings.

PHILLIES 8, ROCKIES 5 DENVER — Bryce Harper hit a three-run homer, Andrew McCutchen also connected as Philadelphia beat Colorado. Phil Gosselin drove in three big runs to back scuffling Phillies ace Aaron Nola (2-0). Hector Neris got five outs for his third save. Gosselin started at shortstop after Jean Segura (left hamstring strain) and Scott Kingery (right hamstring strain) were placed on the 10-day injured list earlier in the day. The backup came through for the banged-up Phillies, delivering a three-run double off Antonio Senzatela (1-1) in the fourth inning to give them a 4-3 lead.

REDS 4, PADRES 2 SAN DIEGO — Luis Castillo matched a season high with nine strikeouts and Jesse Winker added a pinch-hit homer as Cincinnati extended San Diego’s losing streak to six games. The Reds won their third straight after arriving in San Diego mired in a four-game losing streak. Castillo (2-1) pitched six innings and was charged with one run, four hits and a walk. After Eric Hosmer (three hits, two RBIs) homered in the second inning, only one other Padres player reached scoring position.


. . . NBA Continued from page B1

six assists for the 76ers. They can advance to the Eastern Conference semifinals for the second straight season with a victory at home Tuesday night. They got a big boost from the return of Embiid, who scored eight straight points in the fourth quarter after the Nets led by seven. He helped the 76ers overcome the loss of Jimmy Butler, who was ejected in the third quarter after Embiid’s hard foul on Jarrett Allen. Caris LeVert scored 25 points after being inserted into the Nets’ starting lineup. D’Angelo Russell and Allen each added 21. Jared Dudley also was inserted into the starting lineup for the Nets and had been agitating the 76ers with his defense and his talking, but was gone midway through the third quarter as one of the central figures in the scuffle that spilled into the stands. Embiid swung his arm forcefully while fouling Allen, and Dudley quickly moved in and bumped Embiid. Butler then ran in and pushed Dudley to start the shoving. Dudley, Simmons and referee Ed Malloy all got knocked into the seats,

Peninsula Clarion | Sunday, April 21, 2019 | B3 and after a lengthy video review, Butler and Dudley were given technical fouls and ejected, and Embiid’s foul was ruled a flagrant 1. Embiid would later make the biggest mark with his offense. The 76ers were trying to get the ball to him trailing by one after Joe Harris’ layup, but Embiid couldn’t control the pass under the rim. But he regained the ball and found Scott in the corner for a 3 and a 110-108 lead. Allen then turned the ball over after three Sixers surrounded him and Harris closed out the scoring with two free throws. NUGGETS 107, SPURS 103 SAN ANTONIO — Nikola Jokic had 29 points and 12 rebounds, Jamal Murray added 24 points and Denver beat San Antonio, rebounding from a flat performance tie the series at two games apiece. LaMarcus Aldridge had 24 points and nine rebounds for San Antonio. DeMar DeRozan added 19 points before he was ejected with five minutes remaining after arguing with an official over an offensive foul. Game 5 is Tuesday night in Denver.

BUCKS 119, PISTONS 103 DETROIT — Khris Middleton had 20 points and nine

. . . Kick Continued from page B1

zlies. Alex Montague also scored for the Stars (5-2 overall), and Heiber and Montague each also notched an assist, along with Kaleb Swank. Hunter Woodward earned the shutout in goal.

Peninsula runners shine at Heart Run Staff report Peninsula Clarion

Runners with peninsula connections shone Saturday morning at the 2019 Alaska Heart Run in Anchorage. Denali Strabel, a 2008 Seward High School graduate, won the women’s 5-kilometer race in a dominating time of 17 minutes, 39 seconds, more than a minute ahead of women’s runner-up Julianne Dickerson. Dickerson grew up in Kenai but now lives in Anchorage, and finished second in 18:49.

Fognini tops Nadal MONACO (AP) — Fabio Fognini ended Rafael Nadal’s winning streak at the Monte Carlo Masters, stunning the defending champion 6-4, 6-2 Saturday to reach the final for the first time and hand Nadal his first defeat here since a loss to Novak Djokovic in the 2015 semifinals. Fognini had beaten Nadal twice before on clay, and also once at the U.S. Open in five sets, but this was arguably the most impressive. “I have the game to play against him,” the 13th-seeded Fognini said. “I had nothing to lose.” He wasn’t concerned if Nadal was out of form. “That’s not the question that I have to answer,” Fognini said. “I just say that I played an incredible match.” Still, the second-ranked Nadal called it “one of my worst matches in 14 years” and the 32-year-old Spaniard said it was “difficult to find an explanation” for capitulating on his favored clay-court surface. Yet the defeat could have been even more humiliating for Nadal, who had not lost a set here by 6-0 since the 2005 final — which he went on to win for the first of his record 11 titles. Fognini came so close to drubbing him in the second set. He served for the match at 5-0 and 40-0, but Nadal saved three match points, broke back and held. “I was lucky to win the two games,” said Nadal, who had not even lost a set here since conceding one in the second round against Britain’s Kyle Edmund in 2017. Serving again for the match at 5-2, Fognini hit a superb forehand down the line on his fourth match point. He next plays unseeded Serb Dusan Lajovic in their first-ever meeting, and one few would have predicted. Least of all Fognini. He trailed by a set and 4-1 down during his first-round match against Andrey Rublev. “If you told me at the beginning of the week ‘See you on Sunday (for the final),’ I would laugh in your face,” Fognini said.

Philadelphia 76ers center Joel Embiid dunks during the second half of Game 4 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series against the Brooklyn Nets on Saturday in New York. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) rebounds and Milwaukee beat Detroit to take a 3-0 series lead. The Bucks can finish off the Eastern Conference series Monday night in Detroit. The Bucks overcame 27 points, seven rebounds and six assists from Blake Griffin in his return from a right knee injury. He missed the first two games of the series after sitting out four of the final six in the

regular season.

manding 3-0 lead in their firstround playoff series. Harden made a 3-pointer and added two free throws with 42.4 seconds left to give the Rockets a 101-97 lead. After Donovan Mitchell made two free throws, Harden missed another 3-point attempt, but P.J. Tucker, who finished with 12 points and 10 rebounds, grabbed the rebound, was

ROCKETS 104, JAZZ 101 SALT LAKE CITY — James Harden overcome a horrible shooting performance and scored 14 of his 22 points in the fourth quarter, leading the Houston past Utah for a com-

fouled and made one of two free throws. Mitchell had a wide-open look at a 3-pointer on the ensuing possession, but like so many of his shots in the hardfought contest, it was off the mark. Harden misfired on his first 15 shots and was 3-for-20 shooting with 10 assists. He was 14 for 16 from the line.

Scoreboard Hockey NHL Playoffs FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Tuesday, April 16 Columbus 7, Tampa Bay 3, Columbus wins series 4-0 N.Y. Islanders 3, Pittsburgh 1, N.Y. Islanders wins series 4-0 Winnipeg 2, St. Louis 1, OT Vegas 5, San Jose 0 Wednesday, April 17 Boston 6, Toronto 4 Dallas 5, Nashville 1 Colorado 3, Calgary 2, OT Thursday, April 18 Carolina 2, Washington 1 St. Louis 3, Winnipeg 2 San Jose 5, Vegas 2, Vegas leads series 3-2 Friday, April 19 Toronto 2, Boston 1, Toronto leads series 3-2 Colorado 5, Calgary 1, Colorado wins series 4-1 Saturday, April 20 Dallas 5, Nashville 3, Dallas leads series 3-2 St. Louis 3, Winnipeg 2, St. Louis wins series 4-2 Washington 6, Carolina 0, Washington leads series 3-2 Sunday, April 21 Boston at Toronto, 11 a.m. San Jose at Vegas, 3 p.m. Monday, April 22 Washington at Carolina, TBA Nashville at Dallas, TBA All Times ADT

Baseball AL Standings

East Division W L Pct Tampa Bay 14 7 .667 New York 10 10 .500 Toronto 10 12 .455 Boston 8 13 .381 Baltimore 8 14 .364 Central Division Minnesota 11 7 .611 Cleveland 12 8 .600 Detroit 9 10 .474 Chicago 8 11 .421 Kansas City 7 14 .333 West Division Seattle 16 8 .667 Houston 13 7 .650 Texas 11 8 .579 Oakland 11 12 .478 Los Angeles 8 13 .381

GB — 3½ 4½ 6 6½ — — 2½ 3½ 5½ — 1 2½ 4½ 6½

Friday’s Games Minnesota at Baltimore, ppd. Atlanta at Cleveland, ppd. N.Y. Yankees 6, Kansas City 2 Boston 6, Tampa Bay 4 Chicago White Sox 7, Detroit 3 Houston 7, Texas 2 Seattle 5, L.A. Angels 3 Toronto 5, Oakland 1 Saturday’s Games Chicago White Sox at Detroit, ppd. N.Y. Yankees 9, Kansas City 2 Minnesota 6, Baltimore 5, 1st game Toronto 10, Oakland 1 Cleveland 8, Atlanta 4, 1st game Boston 6, Tampa Bay 5 Atlanta 8, Cleveland 7, 2nd game Minnesota 16, Baltimore 7, 2nd game Texas 9, Houston 4 Seattle 6, L.A. Angels 5 Sunday’s Games Kansas City (Lopez 0-2) at N.Y. Yankees (Paxton 2-2), 9:05 a.m. Minnesota (Gibson 0-0) at Baltimore (Bundy 0-2), 9:05 a.m. Chicago White Sox (Lopez 1-2) at Detroit (Norris 0-0), 9:10 a.m. Boston (Price 1-1) at Tampa Bay (Glasnow 4-0), 10:10 a.m. Houston (McHugh 3-1) at Texas (Miller 0-1), 11:05 a.m. Seattle (Leake 2-1) at L.A. Angels (Barria 1-1), 12:07 p.m. Toronto (Sanchez 2-1) at Oakland (Anderson 3-0), 12:07 p.m. Atlanta (Fried 2-0) at Cleveland (Bieber 2-0), 3:05 p.m. All Times ADT

NL Standings

East Division W L Pct Philadelphia 12 8 .600 New York 11 9 .550 Atlanta 10 10 .500 Washington 9 10 .474 Miami 6 15 .286 Central Division Pittsburgh 12 6 .667 Milwaukee 13 9 .591 St. Louis 11 9 .550 Chicago 9 10 .474

GB — 1 2 2½ 6½ — 1 2 3½

Cincinnati 8 West Division Los Angeles 14 Arizona 11 San Diego 11 Colorado 8 San Francisco 8

12 .400

5

9 .609 — 10 .524 2 11 .500 2½ 13 .381 5 14 .364 5½

Friday’s Games Atlanta at Cleveland, ppd. Chicago Cubs 5, Arizona 1 Pittsburgh 4, San Francisco 1 Miami 3, Washington 2 L.A. Dodgers 5, Milwaukee 3 N.Y. Mets 5, St. Louis 4 Colorado 4, Philadelphia 3, 12 innings Cincinnati 3, San Diego 2, 11 innings Saturday’s Games St. Louis 10, N.Y. Mets 2 Arizona 6, Chicago Cubs 0 Pittsburgh 3, San Francisco 1, 5 innings Cleveland 8, Atlanta 4, 1st game Miami 9, Washington 3 Milwaukee 5, L.A. Dodgers 0 Atlanta 8, Cleveland 7, 2nd game Philadelphia 8, Colorado 5 Cincinnati 4, San Diego 2 Sunday’s Games Washington (Strasburg 1-1) at Miami (Richards 0-2), 9:10 a.m. San Francisco (Rodriguez 2-2) at Pittsburgh (Archer 1-0), 9:35 a.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 0-0) at Milwaukee (Woodruff 2-1), 10:10 a.m. N.Y. Mets (Syndergaard 1-1) at St. Louis (Hudson 0-1), 10:15 a.m. Arizona (Ray 0-1) at Chicago Cubs (Chatwood 0-0), 10:20 a.m. Philadelphia (Eickhoff 0-0) at Colorado (Gray 1-3), 11:10 a.m. Cincinnati (Mahle 0-1) at San Diego (Lucchesi 2-2), 12:10 p.m. Atlanta (Fried 2-0) at Cleveland (Bieber 2-0), 3:05 p.m. All Times ADT

Yankees 9, Royals 2 KC 000 001 001—2 6 0 NY 110 402 10x—9 14 0 Fillmyer, Sparkman (5), Newberry (8) and Gallagher; Tanaka, Holder (8) and Romine. W_Tanaka 2-1. L_Fillmyer 0-1. HRs_Kansas City, Owings (2), Merrifield (3). New York, Frazier (5), Tauchman (3), Judge (5), LeMahieu (1).

Blue Jays 10, Athletics 1 Tor. 001 Oak.000 000

512 001—10 15 0 001— 1 6 0

Shoemaker, Gaviglio (4), Luciano (8) and Maile; Fiers, Hendriks (4), Buchter (6), Wendelken (7), Rodney (8), Morales (9) and Phegley. W_Gaviglio 2-0. L_Fiers 2-2. HRs_Toronto, Drury (2), Tellez (4), Smoak (4).

Twins 6, Orioles 5 Min. Bal.

020 003

013 000—6 9 0 001 010—5 13 0

Berrios, Hildenberger (7), Rogers (8) and J.Castro; Straily, Yacabonis (6), M.Castro (6), Scott (8) and Pedro Severino. W_Berrios 3-1. L_Yacabonis 1-1. Sv_Rogers (2). HRs_Minnesota, Astudillo (2), Rosario 2 (9). Baltimore, Smith Jr. (4), Nunez (5), Severino (2).

Guduan (7) and Stassi; Sampson, Kelley (5), Chavez (7), C.Martin (9) and Kiner-Falefa. W_Kelley 3-0. L_Cole 1-3. HRs_Houston, Springer (6), Stassi (1). Texas, Gallo (8).

Indians 8, Braves 4 Atl. Cle.

050 010

000 001—6 8 0 100 210—5 11 0

Porcello, Hembree (6), Poyner (7), Walden (7), M.Barnes (8), Brasier (9) and Leon, Vazquez; Morton, Faria (7), Alvarado (9) and Perez, Ciuffo. W_M.Barnes 2-0. L_Alvarado 0-1. Sv_Brasier (5). HRs_Boston, Benintendi (2). Tampa Bay, Garcia (4), Diaz (5).

Twins 16, Orioles 7 Min.316 300 021—16 Bal. 000 202 030—

19 0 7 11 0

M.Perez, Romero (7), Duffey (9) and Garver; Cobb, Wright (3), Kline (7), Chris Davis (9) and Jesus Sucre, Pedro Severino. W_M. Perez 2-0. L_Cobb 0-1. HRs_Minnesota, Cruz 2 (3), Cron (3), Rosario (9), Garver 2 (5), Schoop 2 (4). Baltimore, Alberto (1), Nunez 2 (5).

Rangers 9, Astros 4 Hou. Tex.

000 501

020 200—4 11 1 030 00x—9 10 0

Cole, Devenski (5), Rondon (6),

000 200—4 6 0 160 00x—8 10 0

Teheran, Parsons (5), Biddle (5), Webb (7), Tomlin (8) and McCann; Kluber, Wittgren (8), Hand (9) and Plawecki. W_Kluber 2-2. L_Teheran 2-2. HRs_Atlanta, Joyce (2), McCann (1). Cleveland, Moroff (1).

Braves 8, Indians 7 Atl. Cle.

000 250

010 205—8 9 000 000—7 9

0 0

Toussaint, Carle (2), Sobotka (6), Winkler (7), Jackson (8), Minter (9) and Flowers; Bauer, Otero (7), Ramirez (8), O.Perez (8), Cimber (9), Olson (9), C.Anderson (9) and R.Perez. W_Jackson 2-0. L_Cimber 1-1. Sv_Minter (2). HRs_Atlanta, Swanson (5).

Cardinals 10, Yankees 2 NY 000 000 200— 2 4 0 SL 032 013 01x—10 10 0 Flexen, Avilan (5), Rhame (6), Sewald (8) and Ramos, d’Arnaud; Mikolas, Gallegos (9) and Molina, Wieters. W_Mikolas 2-1. L_Flexen 0-1. HRs_St. Louis, Goldschmidt (8).

Diamondbacks 6, Cubs 0 Ari. Chi.

210 000

003 000—6 13 0 000 000—0 4 1

Greinke, Clarke (7) and Murphy; Darvish, Webster (6), Collins (7), R.Rosario (8) and Contreras, T.Davis. W_Greinke 3-1. L_Darvish 1-3. Sv_Clarke (1). HRs_Arizona, Peralta (3), Escobar (2), Murphy (3).

Pirates 3, Giants 1, 5 inn. SF Pit.

000 01—1 000 12—3

4 0 4 1

Holland and Posey; Taillon and Cervelli. W_Taillon 1-2. L_Holland 1-3. HRs_Pittsburgh, Tucker (1), Kang (3).

Marlins 9, Nationals 3 Was. Mia.

002 201

010 000—3 10 2 013 11x—9 11 0

Scherzer, Sipp (6), A.Adams (7), Grace (8) and Gomes; Urena, Conley (7), Kinley (8), Guerrero (9) and Alfaro. W_Urena 1-3. L_ Scherzer 1-3. HRs_Miami, Granderson (3).

Brewers 5, Dodgers 0 LA 000 000 000—0 Mil. 001 001 30x—5

2 0 8 0

Ryu, Floro (6), Ferguson (7), Y.Garcia (8) and Gale, A.Barnes; Ch.Anderson, Claudio (6), Guerra (8), Albers (9) and Pina. W_Ch.Anderson 2-0. L_Ryu 2-1. HRs_Milwaukee, Yelich 2 (13), Braun (4).

Red Sox 6, Rays 5 Bos. TB

101 100

Phillies 8, Rockies 5 Phi. Col.

001 111

300 301—8 14 1 000 020—5 14 0

Nola, Morgan (6), Dominguez (7), Neshek (8), Neris (8) and Realmuto; Senzatela, B.Shaw (7), Dunn (7), Estevez (7), Johnson (8), Oh (9) and Butera. W_Nola 2-0. L_Senzatela 1-1. Sv_Neris (3). HRs_Philadelphia, McCutchen (4), Harper (5). Colorado, Blackmon (2), Tapia (1).

Reds 4, Padres 2 Cin. SD

100 010

110 100—4 7 000 010—2 7

0 1

Castillo, Hernandez (7), Stephenson (8), Garrett (8), Hughes (8), R.Iglesias (9) and Barnhart; Lauer, Wisler (6), Wingenter (8), Warren (9) and Mejia. W_Castillo 2-1. L_Lauer 2-3. Sv_R.Iglesias (4). HRs_Cincinnati, Winker (6). San Diego, Hosmer (2).

Basketball NBA Playoffs FIRST ROUND

(Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Thursday, April 18 Philadelphia 131, Brooklyn 115 San Antonio 118, Denver 108 Golden State 132, L.A. Clippers 105, Golden State leads series 2-1 Friday, April 19 Toronto 98, Orlando 93, Toronto leads series 2-1 Boston 104, Indiana 96, Boston leads series 3-0 Oklahoma City 120, Portland 108, Portland leads series 2-1 Saturday, April 20 Philadelphia 112, Brooklyn 108, Philadelphia leads series 3-1 Denver 117, San Antonio 103, series tied 2-2 Milwaukee 119, Detroit 103, Milwaukee leads series 3-0 Houston 104, Utah 101, Houston leads series 3-0 Sunday, April 21 Boston at Indiana, 9 a.m. Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 11:30 a.m. Toronto at Orlando, 3 p.m. Portland at Oklahoma City, 5:30 p.m. Monday, April 22 Milwaukee at Detroit, 4 p.m. Houston at Utah, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 23 Orlando at Toronto, 3 p.m. Brooklyn at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. San Antonio at Denver, 5:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Portland, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 24 x-Indiana at Boston, TBA x-Utah at Houston, TBA x-Detroit at Milwaukee, TBA L.A. Clippers at Golden State, TBA All Times ADT

Soccer MLS Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE W D.C. United 4 Toronto FC 4 Philadelphia 4 Columbus 4 Orlando City 3 Montreal 3 Chicago 2 Cincinnati 2 New England 2 New York 1 Atlanta 1 NY City FC 0

L T Pts 1 2 14 1 1 13 3 1 13 3 1 13 3 2 11 3 2 11 2 3 9 4 2 8 5 1 7 4 2 5 3 2 5 1 5 5

GF GA 12 7 18 11 12 9 8 8 12 13 8 14 12 11 8 13 6 12 8 9 5 8 7 11

WESTERN CONFERENCE Los Angeles FC 6 1 1 19 LA Galaxy 6 1 0 18 Seattle 5 0 1 16 FC Dallas 5 2 1 16 Houston 4 1 1 13 Minnesota U. 3 3 1 10 Real Salt Lake 3 4 1 10 S. Kansas City 2 2 3 9 San Jose 2 5 0 6 Vancouver 1 5 2 5 Portland 1 5 1 4 Colorado 0 6 2 2 NOTE: Three points for victory, for tie.

21 6 13 7 14 5 14 9 13 8 17 15 10 14 15 11 10 17 6 11 9 18 12 23 one point

Friday, April 19 Real Salt Lake 3, Cincinnati 0 Toronto FC 4, Minnesota United 3 LA Galaxy 2, Houston 1 Saturday, April 20 Chicago 4, Colorado 1 Philadelphia 3, Montreal 0 Orlando City 1, Vancouver 0 FC Dallas 2, Atlanta 1 New England 1, New York 0 Portland 3, Columbus 1 San Jose 4, Sporting Kansas City 1 Sunday, April 21 New York City FC at D.C. United, Noon Seattle at Los Angeles FC, 3 p.m. All Times ADT

Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Placed RHP Nathan Eovaldi on the 10day IL, retroactive to Thursday. Recalled RHP Marcus Walden and LHP Bobby Poyner from Pawtucket (IL). Sent 2B Marco Hernandez to Salem (Carolina) for a rehab assignment. BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Reinstated RHP Alex Cobb from the 10-day IL. Optioned RHP Josh Lucas to Norfolk (IL). Recalled RHP Branden Kline from Norfolk. CLEVELAND INDIANS — Designated DH Hanley Ramirez for assignment. Reinstated INF Fran-

cisco Lindor from the 10-day IL. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Optioned LHP Dillon Peters to Salt Lake (PCL). Recalled RHP Luke Bard from Salt Lake. MINNESOTA TWINS — Sent LHP Gabriel Moya to Pensacola (FSL) for a rehab assignment. SEATTLE MARINERS — Purchased the contracts of RHP Tyler Cloyd from Somerset (Atlantic) and RHP Christian Bergman from Sugar Land (Atlantic). TAMPA BAY RAYS — Placed C Mike Zunino on paternity leave. Optioned RHPs Emilio Pagan and Casey Sadler to Durham (IL). Recalled C Nick Ciuffo and RHP Jake Faria from Durham. Transferred RHP Jose De Leon to the 60-day IL. TEXAS RANGERS — Optioned LHP Kyle Bird to Nashville (PCL). National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Optioned OF Tim Locastro to Reno (PCL). Recalled RHP Taylor Clarke from Reno. LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Optioned RHP Josh Sborz to Oklahoma City (PCL). Reinstated LHP Hyun-Jin Ryu from the 10day IL. MIAMI MARLINS — Optioned OF Austin Dean to New Orleans (PCL). Selected the contract of 3B Jon Berti from New Orleans. Fired hitting coach Mike Pagliarulo. Named Jeff Livesey interim hitting coach. Promoted minor league hitting coordinator Eric Duncan to assistant hitting coach. Transferred RHP Riley Ferrell to the 60-day IL. NEW YORK METS — Placed RHP Jacob deGrom on the 10day IL, retroactive to Tuesday. Recalled RHP Chris Flexen from Syracuse (IL). Sent 3B Todd Frazier to Syracuse for a rehab assignment. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Placed INFs Jean Segura and Scott Kingery and RHP Victor Arano on the 10-day IL, Segura retroactive to April 17. Recalled RHP Drew Anderson, LHP Austin Davis and INF Mitch Walding from Lehigh Valley (IL). PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Placed INF Eric Gonzalez on the 60-day IL and OF Starling Marte on the 10-day IL. Assigned RHP Dovydas Neverauskas to Indianapolis (IL). Recalled INF Cole Tucker from Indianapolis. Selected the contract of OF Bryan Reynolds from Indianapolis. Sent OF Lonnie Chisenhall to Indianapolis for a rehab assignment. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Sent RHP Luke Gregerson to Memphis (PCL) for a rehab assignment. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Placed OF Manuel Margot on the paternity leave. Recalled UT Jose Pirela from El Paso (PCL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA — Fined Portland F Maurice Harkless $15,000 for throwing his headband into the spectator stands in a game on Friday. HOCKEY National Hockey League CALGARY FLAMES — Signed F Martin Pospisil to a three-year, entry-level contract. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Assigned F Otto Somppi from Syracuse (AHL) to Orlando (ECHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Recalled G Ilya Samsonov from Hershey (AHL). American Hockey League AHL — Suspended Bridgeport F Travis St. Denis one game. SOCCER National Women’s Soccer League SKY BLUE — Signed M Kenie Wright. COLLEGE AUBURN — Sophomore F Chuma Okeke is entering the NBA draft. GEORGIA — Sophomore F Nicolas Claxton is entering the NBA draft. GONZAGA — Sophomore G Zach Norvell Jr. will enter the NBA draft. MISSISSIPPI VALLEY STATE — Named Lindsey Hunter men’s basketball coach.


B4 | Sunday, April 21, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

. . . State Continued from page B1

zilian Jiu-Jitsu. “Honestly, I had no expectations of beating them for the adults trophy,” Kolesar said. “We somehow ended up about doubling their points. Holy cow, how the heck did that happen?” Anchorage Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu had Redemption outnumbered by a 3-1 ratio. Kolesar said Redemption has thrived because it has adopted the high standards for performance and knowledge base from Anchorage Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. “I hope this shows how much care we put into our program,” Kolesar said. He said black belts take 10 years to attain because it doesn’t do any good to have a black belt if you can get beaten up by a purple belt, which is two notches below a black belt. Kolesar is particularly proud of the kids program. In addition to Kolesar and Grossman, Mae Britton, Cy Cox and Jimmy Jack Drath are coaches. Kolesar said all must be at least blue belts because that knowledge is necessary to keep things safe for the kids. When Kolesar got into Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu in 2006, he said he was in a job that put him in high-threat situa-

tions. He thought, with his boxing skills and kickboxing skills, he could hold his own. “I later learned that if you want real-world fighting, you’d better learn to fight on the ground,” Kolesar said. So that’s why he turned to Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. But that’s not what keeps him going these days. “Tribe is what keeps it going, because I do run out of gas,” Kolesar said. He said the tightknit group of members includes doctors, dentists, lawyers, oil field workers, law enforcement, missionaries, fishing guides and other professions. “They’re all helping each other out, not only in the gym but out of the gym,” Kolesar said. The gym also includes a weekly self-defense class for women that is completely free and scholarships for kids in need. “We drag them in and put them on a straight path, teach them to lead a better life through jiu-jitsu,” Kolesar said. The feeling of tribe is what made some moments at the tournament very special for Kolesar. Caitlin Peterson lost to a competitor in her weight class competition at white belt. There is also an absolute category in each belt

. . . Bat Continued from page B1

Rich Sonnen was left to wonder what happened, and chalked it up to falling victim to close competition. “We had a three-way tie for first so everybody was pretty close, which is pretty standard in our region,” Sonnen said. “There might be one or two (teams) at the top and one or two at the bottom, but the rest is pretty even. Somebody can upset one or two, then that opens the door for everybody.” More often than not, one team will dominate the conference for a spell while the others play catchup. In recent years, that dominant team was Wasilla, which held command over the rest of the field with a battery that was hard to beat in pitcher Nolan Monaghan and catcher Jeffrey Forster. But those two graduated three years ago and the Warriors have since come down to earth with the rest. The transition from a conference dominated by one team to one hotly contested by many is a positive, said Soldotna head coach Robb Quelland. “It’s good to have new players in the conference,” Quelland said. “It makes everyone play better, you’re not coasting in any games, there’s no gimmes.” Quelland echoed the thoughts of Sonnen and Oliver in guessing who would take the reigns this year. The consensus is that Palmer would emerge from the Valley as a top contender, having already beaten Kenai 10-0 earlier this week, while Kodiak is back and looking deep as ever with two wins over Palmer this weekend. “It’s cyclical,” Quelland said. “Kodiak used to have the best team, then Colony dominated, then Wasilla. It takes that time to

that is open to all weight Kolesar said. “You don’t classes, though, and Peter- coach when that happens.” son came back to beat that State tournament of the same competitor and take Alaskan Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu bronze in white belt absoFederation Redemption MMA placing competitors lute. KIDS Another special moment came when Enzo Drath and White belts — Joel Downum, gold, 45 54 pounds; Peter Scilzo, bronze, 45 Jacob Cox, sons of coaches to to 54; Eamon Traxler, gold, 64 to 74; Jimmy Jack and Cy, fought Zairhen Traxler, silver, 64 to 74; Shane it out on the mat. Cox would Penrod, bronze, 64 to 74; Phillip Jackbronze, 74 to 84; Matthew Innes, take gold at gray belt 64 to son, gold, 94 to 104; Cole Langham, gold, 104-114; William Bogart, gold, 144 and 74 pounds. In the same vein, brothers up. Gray belts — Jacob Cox, gold, 64 to Eamon and Zairhen Traxler 74; Anya Scilzo, bronze, 64 to 74; Namet for the championship at than Cox, gold, 74 to 84; Owen Payne, 74 to 84; Jack Bennett, bronze, white belt 64 to 74 pounds, silver, 74 to 84; Oliver Parshall, silver, 84 to with Eamon taking gold. 94; Anthony Payne, silver, 94 to 104; “Who do you root for?” Juliet Innes, silver, 104 to 114; Lauren

build.” Oliver said he has always known Kodiak to be a tough program to beat, even in his playing days for the Kardinals, but Sonnen cautioned not to overlook a fellow peninsula team, Soldotna, which won a short scrimmage with Homer last week on Homer’s turf. Until the conference tournament weekend, teams will be scrapping hard for a high seeding. The following is a look at what peninsula teams will look like: KENAI KARDINALS Oliver returns for his second year as Kardinals head coach, and is optimistic with 30 players in the program. Kenai has not made it to state since 2012, a seven-year drought that Oliver is hoping to break sooner than later. “We’re still rebuilding to a degree,” he said. “As long as we keep working, we hope to move up.” Oliver pointed to too many walks and errors in the field as key reasons that kept the Kardinals from winning more than they wanted to. As the eighth seed among the nine-team conference, Oliver said Kenai has a lot of room for improvement. “With last year, I had a little higher expectations than what happened,” he said. “I’ve been part of some awesome coaching staffs, and I like to win. … This year we’ve kind of revamped the approach, we’ve revamped how we do practice and what the focus is each day. The focus is more on defense and that’s what we continue to do.” The Kards return four seniors this season, two with experienced resumes — returning all-conference first-teamer Knox Amend and Andrew Carver, who played catcher last year but will shift to other positions this year. Oliver

Crawford tops Khan by TKO NEW YORK (AP) — Terence Crawford knocked Amir Khan down just a few punches into their fight. The punch that finally ended it was below the belt. Crawford retained his welterweight title by technical knockout Saturday night when Khan wasn’t able to continue after being hit with a low blow in the sixth round. Crawford threw a left hand that hit Khan on his right hip and Khan retreated toward his corner in pain. After taking a couple minutes trying to shake off the pain, his corner told the referee that Khan couldn’t continue. It was a strange, unsatisfying ending to Top Rank’s first ESPN pay-per-view card, drawing loud boos from the crowd of 14,091 at Madison

The adults at Redemption MMA in Soldotna. (Photo provided by Redemption MMA)

Square Garden. The finish left Crawford and promoter Bob Arum with plenty of time to lobby for the fight they want next. “The fight I want next is Errol Spence,” Crawford said. “Whenever he is ready, he can come and get it.” Crawford (35-0, 26 KOs) had knocked Khan down in the first round, but the final couple rounds had been competitive, with both fighters throwing hard shots from close range. Referee David Fields didn’t appear to see the final one that hit Khan (33-5) low. Khan could have taken five minutes trying to recover, but his trainer, Virgil Hunter, made the decision before then that Khan was finished.

said Amend delivers a lot of leadership for the younger and lessexperienced players. Kenai’s pitching staff will be headlined by sophomore Harold Ochea, junior Parker Mattox, sophomore Caleb Smith and junior Seth Segura. When not on the mound, Oliver said Ochea will be catching, Mattox will be a middle infielder or outfielder, Smith will be shortstop and Segura will be at second base. Oliver said Amend is a versatile utility hand who can play any position. When Ochea is pitching, Oliver said sophomore Nic Wehrstein will be catching, although he is currently out for injury but should return soon. First base will see returning junior Sam Berry, second will see Segura, and third base will see a collection of faces including Carver, senior J.T. Lott and freshman Ben Spinka. Lott got most of his time in right field in 2018. Junior newcomer Major Reis will likely take over left field this year. SOLDOTNA STARS Robb Quelland is back coaching for the ninth year overall and fifth in his current stint, and is joined by assistants Kenny Griffin, Bob Ledda, Logan Smith and Dr. Chris Mickelson. Quelland said he has about 25 players out for the team this year, including five that will play on the Legion Twins team come summer. “We’ll be competitive,” he said. “We won’t know until we get on a field with bigger teams … but we’re fortunate to have our returners.” SoHi lost a slew of talented seniors, including Southcentral MVP Cody Quelland and firstteamer Brandon Crowder, but coach Quelland said the Stars return three talented seniors this season in center fielder Jeremy

Chircop, bronze, 114 to 124. Yellow belts — Logan Duyck, silver, 104 to 114. Orange and green belts — Logan Duyck, silver, 104 to 114. WOMEN White belts — Alena Bennet, gold, 129 to 141.5; Chiara “River” Burkett, silver, 129 to 141.5; Amy Penrod, bronze, 129 to 141.5; Jennifer Chircop, bronze, 152.5 to 163.5; Bethany Bogart, gold, 163.5 and above; Kiana Lowery, bronze, 163.5 and above; Bethany Bogart, gold, absolute (or open); Caitlin Peterson, bronze, absolute. Blue belts — Elizabeth Kippling, gold, over 163.5; Callie Bennett, bronze, over 163.5; Elizabeth Kippling, gold, absolute. MEN White belts — Bradley Janorschke, gold, 127 to 141.5; Dexter Grayson, gold, 195 to 208; William Bogart, gold, over 222; Jesus Silves, silver, over

222. Blue belts — Orion Satori, bronze, 141.5 to 154.5; Jacob Montgomery, gold, 154.5 to 168; Sean Babitt, gold, 168 to 181.5; Christopher Roofe, gold, 195 to 208; Sean Babitt, gold, absolute; Jacob Montgomery, silver, absolute; Christopher Roofe, bronze, absolute. Purple to black belt — Jimmy Jack Drath, bronze, 195 to 208 pounds. Redemption MMA competitors that did not place Kids — Brylee Steinhage, Colt Steinhage, Zander Burkett, Eva Wonnacott, Corbin Grimm, Carson Grimm, Holden Kenner, Milo Bogart, Iann Scilzo, Sebastian Duyck, Enzo Drath, Adeline Sparks, Kate Bennett, Billy Jack Drath. Adults — Daniel Bennett, Ryan Traxler, Kyle Downum, Mario Reyna.

‘We had a three-way tie for first so everybody was pretty close, which is pretty standard in our region. There might be one or two (teams) at the top and one or two at the bottom, but the rest is pretty even. Somebody can upset one or two, then that opens the door for everybody.’ — Rich Sonnen, Homer baseball head coach Kupferschmid, shortstop David Michael and utility man Trapper Thompson. All three are four-year starters for SoHi and also play for the Legion Twins. Quelland also said senior Brennan Werner is back with the team after dealing with an injury. The pitching rotation will consist chiefly of Kupferschmid, Thompson and juniors Davey Belger and Tanner Ussing. When not pitching, Belger will be at third base and Ussing will start at first. Junior Jacob Boze will start at catcher most often, while junior Trenton Steadman will be at first, junior Seth Payment will be at second, freshman Atticus Gibson will be in left field and junior Chris Jaime will be in right field. Sophomore Foster Boze will get time as a utility player. HOMER MARINERS Sonnen returns for another attempt in snapping Homer’s 10year state tournament drought, and said he has 17 players out this season that could do it. “We always talk about it,” Sonnen said. “It’s the ultimate goal of any team, it’s the top tier on our goal list. The first thing to get to state we’ve got to do is finish top two in our region.”

Grand Opening May 4th 12pm-4pm

Homer gets its season officially under way April 24 at home against Kenai for a nonconference contest. Like Soldotna, the Mariners lost several key seniors from the 2018 squad, namely shortstop Joe Ravin, pitcher Adam Brinster, infielder Douglas Dean and Spencer Warren. ‘We lost our whole starting infield,” Sonnen said. Sonnen said a large group of sophomores return to help give Homer a boost. He said the three main arms of the pitching rotation include junior Mose Hayes, sophomore Harrison Metz and senior Seth Adkins. When not pitching, Hayes and Metz will take up the middle infield at shortstop and second base, respectively, while Adkins will catch. Sophomore Austin Ceccarelli will join the infield with junior first baseman Johnny Rummery, who missed last season with a broken leg, and sophomore Coda Wood will also get time at third. Sonnen said junior Colby Marion will probably swing up to play at first. The Homer outfield will consist mainly of senior Hunter Warren in center, sophomore Karl Wickstrom in left and senior Austin Dash in right.

Gran inauguración el 4 de mayo de 12pm-4pm


SECTION

C

Home&Health

Sunday, April 21, 2019

G ardening D ean F osdick

Wildflowers: robust, lowmaintenance, pollinator-friendly Gardeners trying to lure pollinators to their landscape would be wise to mimic nature and plant wildflowers. The attractive perennials tolerate harsh climates, seldom need fertilizing and resist most diseases and insect pests. Wildflowers are durable, too, requiring little or no irrigation once established. “They bloom early and establish nicely to make a very natural colony,” said Barry Glick, owner of Sunshine Farm and Gardens in Renick, West Virginia. But beware: Some native plants are invasive. “Ragweed, for example, is a native plant but is considered undesirable because it gives us hay fever,” said Sharon Yiesla, a horticulturist with The Morton Arboretum in Lisle, Illinois. On the other hand, she said, “There are plants that people think of as wildflowers but they are not native.” Queen Anne’s lace, for instance, came from Europe and has been around so long that it has naturalized here. “Some people call it a wildflower some call it a weed,” she said. “Know something about each plant before you choose it.” Shop at a specialty nursery if you want to grow wildflowers, Yiesla said. “Wildflowers should be purchased rather than dug from the wild,” she said. “This is often regulated by law and even if it is not, a tremendous amount of damage can be done to wild populations through digging.” Wildflower varieties generally are divided into three major groups: meadow, woodland and wetland. Plants taken from nature generally don’t survive being transplanted because growing conditions can differ so greatly in residential backyards. “The first step in starting a wildflower area is choosing an appropriate site and matching plant species to environmental factors such as climate, rainfall, pH and soil type,” said Leonard Perry, horticulture professor emeritus with University of Vermont Extension, in a fact sheet. “Whenever possible, try to select native species as they often perform better than non-natives,” he said. “Native species generally are more attractive to pollinators and beneficial insects, too.” Simply spreading wildflower seed over unprepared ground is inefficient. Site preparation is important. Break up the soil and eliminate weeds before sowing any seed. That will speed germination and reduce confusion over what’s a weed and what’s a wildflower. It usually is better to choose bare root plants, plugs or seedlings if you want your wildflower gardening to be faster and easier to manage. Seeds are cheaper if you have large areas to cover. Study package labels closely when buying seed mixtures. Ideally, you want 100 per cent pure seed without any fill. It’s ideal to source natives or varieties that are proven in your area if you want lasting colours for years to come, said Mike Lizotte, a managing partner of American Meadows Inc. in Shelburne, Vermont. “Finding a reputable seed company or contacting your local Master Gardening Extension or native plant source would be great resources to get you started in the right direction,” he said. Landscapes may look disheveled once the flowers fade but don’t be quick to remove spent plants. “The leaves produce food that help the plant grow and become bigger and stronger the next year,” Yiesla said. “Also the plant may produce seeds or fruit that feed birds and wildlife.”

Community C3 Crossword C4 Classifieds C5 TV Guide C7 Mini Page C8

What to do to get your grill ready for summer By Katie Workman The Associated Press

There are die-hard grillers who don’t see why a little cold or sleet should stand between them and a juicy grilled steak. The rest of us in colder climes throw a cover over our grills for the winter and wheel them into a garage or storage spot, wheeling them out months later as the mercury climbs back up. None of us, however, can assume that last year’s grill is ready to roll as soon as we fire it up. What to do to get your grill ready for service again:

A THOROUGH ONCE OVER Look for signs of rust or cracks in the metal or grill lines. It’s also possible that little critters may have found their way into the grill, and need removing. Get the least squeamish person in the family to do that.

WIPE DOWN THE OUTSIDE Amanda Haas, a cookbook author who works with Traeger Grills, says: “Lots of grills are covered in grease, dust, and pollen when you lift that cover after a long winter of hibernation, so give the outside a thorough scrub down. Keeping it clean will extend the life of the grill and help prevent accidents due to sticky or greasy surfaces.” You probably can get away with warm soapy water, but there are also products for cleaning specific kinds of grills.

DON’T FORGET THE INSIDE OF THE LID Whether you use gas or another type of grill, the inside of the lid will likely have buildup from the previous year. Not only does it look gross, it also can be a fire hazard. Use a strong brush, possibly the same kind you use to clean the grill grates, or maybe a nylon brush, depending on the grill material. Personally, I don’t care about scratches inside the lid of my grill — I’m just happy when it’s clean. A paint scraper is also handy for cleaning out built-up gunk.

CLEAN THE INSIDE

This 2009 photo shows a pink ladyslipper orchid thriving in a forest near New Market, Va. (Dean Fosdick via AP)

n Also inside

Do all of the following with the gas off, if applicable. Clean the “flame tamers,” right over the gas burners underneath the metal grilling grates. A skewer, toothpick or paper clip are good for making

In this 2019 photo, a grill sits outside a home in New Milford, Conn., in need of some upkeep after sitting unused during the winter months. (Katie Workman via AP)

sure all the little holes in the burners are open and unclogged. There are also tiny wire brushes made for this purpose. Later, when you test the grill, peek to see if any holes are still clogged. Then, once the gas is off again, give those openings an extra go-over. Empty the grill of all ash and debris from the previous year (remove the grate to do this). Make sure that grease pan is empty! Ideally, you would have emptied it at the end of last season, but in case you forgot, this is a big one, as grease fires are a hazard. Check this about once a week if you grill regularly.

CHECK THE FUEL LINE One insider tip for making sure your gas line is uncompromised is to brush the outside of the gas tubes with soapy water and then run the gas. If you see any bubbles along the tubes, there are leaks and the tubes need to be replaced. If you see bubbles where the tubes connect into the grill or gas tank, these might just need tightening.

GET THE GRATES SPARKLING CLEAN Start the season with clean grates, both for sanitary reasons and because you want to kick off your grilling with a beautiful clean grill and beautiful clean grill marks on your food. For a gas grill, turn all the burners to high, shut the lid and let the grill heat for 15 minutes. Open the lid and hopefully everything stuck to the grill will have burned off. Then, just give it a good

scrub with a grill brush or grill scraper. Make sure no bristles get stuck on the grill rack. A waddedup piece of foil held with tongs also does a good job. You can give the clean grate a light brush with oil while it awaits your next grilling session. Haas advises, “If it’s been awhile since you’ve cleaned your grill grates, remove them and take a nylon sponge or hard bristle brush to them along with some tough cleanser. Make sure to rinse and dry them thoroughly before placing back on the grill.”

STOCK UP ON FUEL If you need a new tank of fuel, go grab it before you marinate those chops (and consider a backup tank so you never get caught short in the middle of a fleet of sausages.) If briquets, wood or pellets are your fuel of choice, lay in a supply of those. Jay Buzaid, owner of Powerhouse Appliances in New Milford, Connecticut, says that if you use hardwood charcoal or pellets, then take a close look at any unused fuel from the previous year. If there’s any mould, it all needs to be tossed. If it’s clean and dry, use it. “In the summer, extreme temperature fluctuations from hot to cold cause moisture to build up, and sometimes the hardwood pellets and charcoal get wet from condensation — especially if the grill is in the sun,” he says. He tells customers that wet hardwood charcoal can be dried out, but he recommends tossing wet pellets. Regular grill

use can help prevent this problem, and he also suggests storing pellets in the manufacturer’s bag, which is designed to help them stay dry.

FIND A SAFE PLACE If possible, your grill should be at least 10 feet from your house, and not near an open window. It should be situated on a fireproof and stable surface like concrete or brick, if possible. Make sure it’s somewhere you can monitor at all times when the grill is going. And make sure there isn’t an overhang, to prevent fire or carbon monoxide buildup.

CHECK YOUR TOOLS Did you leave those tools lying on the grill under that cover all winter? Mmmm, been there. Take a good look at your tools, and if you think they aren’t shipshape, consider investing in new ones. A worn-down grill brush doesn’t clean well, and a basting brush that wasn’t properly cleaned before the end of the season may need replacing. Get a good instant-read thermometer for measuring the internal temperature of meat it’s one of a good griller’s secrets to success. Haas loves having long, stainless steel tongs, an oversize spatula, a perforated pan for grilling veggies, and small kitchen towels to protect hands as she puts food on and off the grill. So now that you’re ready to grill, the only big decision left is … what’s for dinner?

Before you buy; Explaining the different carpet fibers and types When buying carpet for the first time, homeowners can be overwhelmed with unfamiliar terminology. Navigating such terminology, not to mention the vast array of options inside typical carpeting stores, can be difficult and make carpet buyers nervous about making the right decision. Homeowners looking for carpeting for their homes are bound to hear about particular fibers and types of carpets. But such talk is lost when buyers don’t understand carpet fibers and what makes each type of carpet unique. The following rundown of the various carpet fibers and types of carpet should help homeowners make more informed decisions.

Carpet fibers When a carpet salesman or store employee references “carpet fiber,” he or

she is referring to the type of material used to make a particular carpet. No two fibers are the same, as each feels different to the touch and reacts to routine wear and tear differently. Here are the five most popular carpet fibers: • Nylon: Nylon is the most durable carpet fiber, and that has contributed to its popularity. Nylon is available in a wide range of styles and is a flexible material. Many nylon carpets come with a stain-resistant treatment to protect the material from common stains and spills. • Polyester: Highly resistant to stains and fading, polyester is soft, and today’s polyester carpets are more resilient and durable than those of yesteryear. • Triexta: Triexta is a type of polyester fiber that is especially soft. A relatively recent addition to the market, triexta carpet fibers

rays and therefore don’t fade when exposed to sunlight. • Wool: Wool tends to be the most expensive carpet fiber, but that cost is offset by its considerable durability and soft feel. Wool carpets can last several decades, but they also are high maintenance and not especially resistant to stains.

Carpet types

are especially susceptible to stains and spills. • Olefin: Olefin carpet fibers are among the least

expensive, thanks in part to its lack of durability compared to other fibers. Olefin carpet fibers repel UV

The type, or style, of carpet refers to how the carpet is designed. The type of carpet homeowners choose may depend on where in their homes the carpet will be installed. • Frieze: Frieze carpet, sometimes referred to as twist carpet, is made of twisted strands of carpet, and many homeowners prefer frieze carpet because of its modern and stylish look. Frieze carpet can be somewhat

expensive, which is why some homeowners install it in bedrooms and sitting rooms where it won’t be susceptible to high traffic. • Saxony/Cut pile: Saxony or cut pile carpet is ideal for high traffic areas, such as the living room or hallways. That’s because it tends to be resistant to matting and crushing and still feels soft underfoot. • Berber: Berber carpets, often referred to as loop carpets, are especially durable, making them strong options for high-traffic areas of a home. Though there are variations in loop carpets, a traditional loop carpet is created when yarn is sewn or tufted into the backing and left uncut. Choosing a carpet for a home is no small task, but homeowners who educate themselves about the various carpet fibers and styles can find the right fit for their homes.


C2 | Sunday, April 21, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

To a tea: handcrafted gifts that celebrate a nice cuppa By Kim Cook The Associated Press

Lana Effron, a Denverbased graphic designer with an online shop and a collaboration with Terrain , the home and garden retailer, has a motto she brings to all her work. “Nice matters,” Effron says. “That little bit extra of something handmade, something original, makes even a small gesture significant and special. Every touch of ‘nice’ put out there makes a big difference in the world.” Her collection for Terrain is an array of cotton tea towels hand-painted with winsome baby woodland animals and posies. You could use them as cup dryers, but they’re pretty enough to serve as napkins at teatime, too. Tea drinking seems to be steeped in that feelgood vibe. A mug of coffee might be chugged on the way out to battle the day. But a cup of tea invites a moment of calm, a gentle conversation, an invitation to share, a gesture of consideration. So a tea-related item might be the perfect thing for Mother’s Day, or any time a gift of quiet kindness is in order. New York City designer Michael Michaud is known for his botanical-themed jewelry, but he also crafts home accessories (also at Terrain). Each piece includes delicate details of flowers

and leaves that Michaud is able to retain by casting moulds over the actual materials. Napkin rings moulded on gingko leaves, for example, are bathed in soft, gold metallic finish. Petite orange blossom teaspoons are cast on foraged leaves and flowers, clad in gold- and silver-plated bronze, then finished with tiny seed pearls. A set of bronzefinished pewter teaspoons has the distinctive print of a honeycomb on the bowl, with a little bee on the tip of the handle. Bronze condiment spoons are formed so the shape of a calla lily becomes the bowl. At Uncommon Goods you can find work by ceramic artists for tea time. Colleen Huth of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, was inspired by the idea of baby animals following their mother to the watering hole she celebrates mom’s guidance and care in a collection of clay mugs stamped with imagery of elephant, duck, deer and bear families. Potter and animal lover JoAnn Stratakos of Effort, Pennsylvania, carves endangered animals onto her stoneware mugs for each mug sold, $5 goes to Global Wildlife Conservation . Sales of her rhinoceros mugs help support PARCA , a rhino advocacy organization. And in East Hampstead, New Hampshire, artisan Donna Rollins infuses her ceramic clay

with minerals, then finishes each one by placing a crystal on the handle choose from tiger eye, amethyst, rose quartz and clear quartz. British artist Clare Twomey created a teacuporiented exhibition in 2013 at London’s Foundling Museum to celebrate the Foundling Hospital, a children’s charity dating to 1739. The exhibition, entitled Exchange , involved 1,550 cups and saucers, each carrying a printed exhortation to perform a good deed, or what Twomey calls “a positive action.” They range from the simple, like “recycle plastic bags,” “smile more” or “say thank you to a teacher,” to the more involved, like “make dinner for someone in need” or “give time not money to a good cause.” Twomey chose simple, unembellished cups and saucers from ceramics maker Dudson. “The requirement I applied to the design was that it had to be very everyday, not hierarchical or special,” she said. If visitors agreed to take on the good deed, they could take the cup home the saucer remained at the museum. People could then keep their deed fulfilment a secret or share on the museum’s Tumblr site you can read those at www.exchangegooddeeds-blog.tumblr. com . Years after the exhibition, some were still

This photo provided by uncommongoods.com shows mugs created by Colleen Huth, inspired by the idea of thirsty baby animals following their mother’s lead to the watering hole. (uncommongoods.com via AP)

working on their good deed. Colin Coleman, for instance, posted a photo of himself and his cup on the site in 2016, saying: “It gives me great pleasure to inform you that several years after your exhibition, I have finally managed to complete the mission cited on the base of the teacup I took.” Coleman was to return a hat to a person who’d had it blown off in the wind. He wrote that the recipient of the gesture loved the idea that they’d been part of a long-term artwork. As English playwright Sir Arthur Pinero wrote, “where there’s tea, there’s hope.”

This photo provided by Terrain shows Michael Michaud’s delicately crafted metal spoons made using molds and natural botanical material. (Terrain via AP)

US judge blocks part of Ohio ban on abortion procedure

In this file photo, Gov. Mike DeWine speaks before signing a bill imposing one of the nation’s toughest abortion restrictions in Columbus, Ohio. (Fred Squillante/The Columbus Dispatch via AP) By Julie Carr Smyth The Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio — A federal judge blocked part of an Ohio law late Thursday that bans the abortion method of dilation and evacuation in most cases, adding to a list of restrictions on the procedure that are or soon could be in legal limbo. Senior U.S. District Judge Michael Barrett in Cincinnati ordered the state

not to bring criminal charges against doctors who perform the D&E procedure under most circumstances until the case can be fully litigated. Other parts of the law were allowed to proceed. The ruling comes as the state’s ban of abortions in cases involving a Down Syndrome diagnosis also is before the courts, and the ACLU plans a court challenge to a heartbeat abortion ban signed last week.

The ban on D&Es , the most common second-trimester abortion procedure, was signed by then-Gov. John Kasich last year. In Thursday’s ruling, Barrett agreed with Planned Parenthood the law is likely to be declared unconstitutional because it places an undue burden on a “large fraction” of Ohio women. Dr. Leana Wen, president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, called the ruling a victory for patients’ rights. “This ban has no basis in medicine, which is why it has been opposed by the medical community,” she said in an emailed statement. “Women’s health care is health care. Reproductive health care is health care. And health care is a fundamental human right. Planned Parenthood will always safeguard the ability of our patients to access safe, legal abortion, no matter what.” Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost said he was pleased Barrett “largely

upheld the ban on dismembering unborn children while they are still alive.” “Though we will continue defend the constitutionality of every part of the law, we appreciate the judge’s recognition that Ohio may ban abortion methods that are more brutal than any form of slaughter we would permit to be used on livestock,” Yost said in an emailed statement. The Ohio law defines D&E as “dismemberment abortion” of a living fetus. Barrett agreed with the plaintiffs that such language creates an “implicit fetal demise” requirement in the law, essentially forcing doctors who perform the procedure to either end the life of a living fetus before conducting the abortion — which can be dangerous, ineffective or both — or not offering the D&E abortion at all. “D&E is the only previability second trimester abortion method available in the outpatient setting

in Ohio,” Barrett wrote. “Without the option of selecting a different method, or the ability to rely on a sufficiently broad medical exception, physicians who perform D&E are presented with a series of (fetal) demise options that layer risks on top of existing risks” — legally for doctors, and physically for their patients. He cited testimony that D&E abortions are safe and take about 15 to 20 minutes. The state argued those risks are mitigated by an exception written into the law for the life of the mother or “serious risk” to her health. Barrett rejected that argument, writing, “the medical exception is narrowly drafted at best, and unconstitutionally vague at worst.” He said graphic and unsettling descriptions of abortion procedures were necessary to include in his ruling, because preventing fetal pain is at the heart of efforts to restrict the pro-

cedure. Barrett said the general consensus of the medical community is that a fetus cannot feel pain before about 24 weeks’ gestation, when neural connections to the cortex develop. Still, he said the state of Ohio’s interest in the case is legitimate. “(T)he Court finds it unlikely that pre-viability fetuses feel pain,” he wrote. “The Court recognizes, however, the State’s interest in this area to prevent even the possibility.” Mike Gonidakis, president of Ohio Right to Life, said the state’s largest antiabortion group is disappointed “yet not surprised” at the decision. “However, even this judge recognized in his decision that states have greater leeway today to regulate abortion,” he said in an emailed statement. “This clearly demonstrates that it is time to revisit the Casey decision which is what the pro-life movement’s goal has always been.”

Attackers kill doctor at hospital in Congo’s Ebola epicenter By AL-HADJI KUDRA MALIRO and CARA ANNA Associated Press

BENI, Congo — Attackers stormed a hospital at the epicenter of Congo’s Ebola outbreak and killed “a dear colleague,” the head of the World Health Organization said Friday as he condemned the latest violence against health workers trying to contain the virus. “We are outraged,” WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said after the attack Friday in Butembo, a city in eastern Congo. The world’s response to the second-deadliest Ebola outbreak in history has been hampered by a series of deadly attacks on health centers in Butembo and elsewhere that have disrupted medical care and vaccination efforts, leading to a rise in new Ebola cases in the sprawling African nation. The health worker killed was Dr. Richard Valery Mouzoko Kiboung, an epidemiologist, a WHO statement said. A Congo health ministry staffer and a driver were injured, a

separate statement by the U.N. secretary-general’s special representative in Congo said. Butembo’s deputy mayor, Patrick Kambale Tsiko, said Kiboung was from from Cameroon and blamed a militia group for the attack. He said the militiamen erroneously believed that foreigners had brought the disease with them to Congo. “According to witnesses at the scene, these militiamen wanted all the expatriates to go home because according to them, Ebola does not exist in Butembo,” Tsiko said. “They said they will continue if these expatriates do not return as soon as possible.” Police were pursuing the attackers, Tsiko said. Congo’s health ministry confirmed the assault on the Catholic University of Graben hospital. One aid group, the International Rescue Committee, said the hospital held only nonEbola patients and many of them fled during the attack. Dozens of rebel groups are active in eastern Congo. There also has been some community resis-

tance to Ebola containment efforts in a traumatized, wary region that had never faced an outbreak of the virus before. Ebola can spread quickly and can be fatal in up to 90% of cases. The hemorrhagic fever is most often spread by close contact with the bodily fluids of people exhibiting symptoms or with objects such as sheets that have been contaminated. Health Minister Dr. Oly Ilunga said in a tweet that local and international health workers are courageously combating the virus, “sometimes at the cost of their lives.” The attack came three days after President Felix Tshisekedi visited the Ebola outbreak zone, pledging more military and police protection for health workers and asking residents for their cooperation. The president hoped to see the outbreak contained in less than three months, although some health experts estimate it could take much longer. Robert Kitchen, senior vice president for emergencies with the International Rescue Com-

mittee, predicted it could take at least another year to contain the Ebola outbreak without a significant change in “community engagement and understanding.” He said such attacks on health workers are increasingly common. This month could see the highest rate of Ebola transmission yet, Kitchen said, adding “the trajec-

tory of this outbreak is alarming.” Since the Ebola outbreak in Congo was declared in August, there have been more than 1,300 confirmed and prob-

able cases, including 843 deaths, the health ministry said Thursday. More than 102,000 people have received an experimental but effective Ebola vaccine.


C2 | Sunday, April 21, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

To a tea: handcrafted gifts that celebrate a nice cuppa By Kim Cook The Associated Press

Lana Effron, a Denverbased graphic designer with an online shop and a collaboration with Terrain , the home and garden retailer, has a motto she brings to all her work. “Nice matters,” Effron says. “That little bit extra of something handmade, something original, makes even a small gesture significant and special. Every touch of ‘nice’ put out there makes a big difference in the world.” Her collection for Terrain is an array of cotton tea towels hand-painted with winsome baby woodland animals and posies. You could use them as cup dryers, but they’re pretty enough to serve as napkins at teatime, too. Tea drinking seems to be steeped in that feelgood vibe. A mug of coffee might be chugged on the way out to battle the day. But a cup of tea invites a moment of calm, a gentle conversation, an invitation to share, a gesture of consideration. So a tea-related item might be the perfect thing for Mother’s Day, or any time a gift of quiet kindness is in order. New York City designer Michael Michaud is known for his botanical-themed jewelry, but he also crafts home accessories (also at Terrain). Each piece includes delicate details of flowers

and leaves that Michaud is able to retain by casting moulds over the actual materials. Napkin rings moulded on gingko leaves, for example, are bathed in soft, gold metallic finish. Petite orange blossom teaspoons are cast on foraged leaves and flowers, clad in gold- and silver-plated bronze, then finished with tiny seed pearls. A set of bronzefinished pewter teaspoons has the distinctive print of a honeycomb on the bowl, with a little bee on the tip of the handle. Bronze condiment spoons are formed so the shape of a calla lily becomes the bowl. At Uncommon Goods you can find work by ceramic artists for tea time. Colleen Huth of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, was inspired by the idea of baby animals following their mother to the watering hole she celebrates mom’s guidance and care in a collection of clay mugs stamped with imagery of elephant, duck, deer and bear families. Potter and animal lover JoAnn Stratakos of Effort, Pennsylvania, carves endangered animals onto her stoneware mugs for each mug sold, $5 goes to Global Wildlife Conservation . Sales of her rhinoceros mugs help support PARCA , a rhino advocacy organization. And in East Hampstead, New Hampshire, artisan Donna Rollins infuses her ceramic clay

with minerals, then finishes each one by placing a crystal on the handle choose from tiger eye, amethyst, rose quartz and clear quartz. British artist Clare Twomey created a teacuporiented exhibition in 2013 at London’s Foundling Museum to celebrate the Foundling Hospital, a children’s charity dating to 1739. The exhibition, entitled Exchange , involved 1,550 cups and saucers, each carrying a printed exhortation to perform a good deed, or what Twomey calls “a positive action.” They range from the simple, like “recycle plastic bags,” “smile more” or “say thank you to a teacher,” to the more involved, like “make dinner for someone in need” or “give time not money to a good cause.” Twomey chose simple, unembellished cups and saucers from ceramics maker Dudson. “The requirement I applied to the design was that it had to be very everyday, not hierarchical or special,” she said. If visitors agreed to take on the good deed, they could take the cup home the saucer remained at the museum. People could then keep their deed fulfilment a secret or share on the museum’s Tumblr site you can read those at www.exchangegooddeeds-blog.tumblr. com . Years after the exhibition, some were still

This photo provided by uncommongoods.com shows mugs created by Colleen Huth, inspired by the idea of thirsty baby animals following their mother’s lead to the watering hole. (uncommongoods.com via AP)

working on their good deed. Colin Coleman, for instance, posted a photo of himself and his cup on the site in 2016, saying: “It gives me great pleasure to inform you that several years after your exhibition, I have finally managed to complete the mission cited on the base of the teacup I took.” Coleman was to return a hat to a person who’d had it blown off in the wind. He wrote that the recipient of the gesture loved the idea that they’d been part of a long-term artwork. As English playwright Sir Arthur Pinero wrote, “where there’s tea, there’s hope.”

This photo provided by Terrain shows Michael Michaud’s delicately crafted metal spoons made using molds and natural botanical material. (Terrain via AP)

US judge blocks part of Ohio ban on abortion procedure

In this file photo, Gov. Mike DeWine speaks before signing a bill imposing one of the nation’s toughest abortion restrictions in Columbus, Ohio. (Fred Squillante/The Columbus Dispatch via AP) By Julie Carr Smyth The Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio — A federal judge blocked part of an Ohio law late Thursday that bans the abortion method of dilation and evacuation in most cases, adding to a list of restrictions on the procedure that are or soon could be in legal limbo. Senior U.S. District Judge Michael Barrett in Cincinnati ordered the state

not to bring criminal charges against doctors who perform the D&E procedure under most circumstances until the case can be fully litigated. Other parts of the law were allowed to proceed. The ruling comes as the state’s ban of abortions in cases involving a Down Syndrome diagnosis also is before the courts, and the ACLU plans a court challenge to a heartbeat abortion ban signed last week.

The ban on D&Es , the most common second-trimester abortion procedure, was signed by then-Gov. John Kasich last year. In Thursday’s ruling, Barrett agreed with Planned Parenthood the law is likely to be declared unconstitutional because it places an undue burden on a “large fraction” of Ohio women. Dr. Leana Wen, president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, called the ruling a victory for patients’ rights. “This ban has no basis in medicine, which is why it has been opposed by the medical community,” she said in an emailed statement. “Women’s health care is health care. Reproductive health care is health care. And health care is a fundamental human right. Planned Parenthood will always safeguard the ability of our patients to access safe, legal abortion, no matter what.” Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost said he was pleased Barrett “largely

upheld the ban on dismembering unborn children while they are still alive.” “Though we will continue defend the constitutionality of every part of the law, we appreciate the judge’s recognition that Ohio may ban abortion methods that are more brutal than any form of slaughter we would permit to be used on livestock,” Yost said in an emailed statement. The Ohio law defines D&E as “dismemberment abortion” of a living fetus. Barrett agreed with the plaintiffs that such language creates an “implicit fetal demise” requirement in the law, essentially forcing doctors who perform the procedure to either end the life of a living fetus before conducting the abortion — which can be dangerous, ineffective or both — or not offering the D&E abortion at all. “D&E is the only previability second trimester abortion method available in the outpatient setting

in Ohio,” Barrett wrote. “Without the option of selecting a different method, or the ability to rely on a sufficiently broad medical exception, physicians who perform D&E are presented with a series of (fetal) demise options that layer risks on top of existing risks” — legally for doctors, and physically for their patients. He cited testimony that D&E abortions are safe and take about 15 to 20 minutes. The state argued those risks are mitigated by an exception written into the law for the life of the mother or “serious risk” to her health. Barrett rejected that argument, writing, “the medical exception is narrowly drafted at best, and unconstitutionally vague at worst.” He said graphic and unsettling descriptions of abortion procedures were necessary to include in his ruling, because preventing fetal pain is at the heart of efforts to restrict the pro-

cedure. Barrett said the general consensus of the medical community is that a fetus cannot feel pain before about 24 weeks’ gestation, when neural connections to the cortex develop. Still, he said the state of Ohio’s interest in the case is legitimate. “(T)he Court finds it unlikely that pre-viability fetuses feel pain,” he wrote. “The Court recognizes, however, the State’s interest in this area to prevent even the possibility.” Mike Gonidakis, president of Ohio Right to Life, said the state’s largest antiabortion group is disappointed “yet not surprised” at the decision. “However, even this judge recognized in his decision that states have greater leeway today to regulate abortion,” he said in an emailed statement. “This clearly demonstrates that it is time to revisit the Casey decision which is what the pro-life movement’s goal has always been.”

Attackers kill doctor at hospital in Congo’s Ebola epicenter By AL-HADJI KUDRA MALIRO and CARA ANNA Associated Press

BENI, Congo — Attackers stormed a hospital at the epicenter of Congo’s Ebola outbreak and killed “a dear colleague,” the head of the World Health Organization said Friday as he condemned the latest violence against health workers trying to contain the virus. “We are outraged,” WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said after the attack Friday in Butembo, a city in eastern Congo. The world’s response to the second-deadliest Ebola outbreak in history has been hampered by a series of deadly attacks on health centers in Butembo and elsewhere that have disrupted medical care and vaccination efforts, leading to a rise in new Ebola cases in the sprawling African nation. The health worker killed was Dr. Richard Valery Mouzoko Kiboung, an epidemiologist, a WHO statement said. A Congo health ministry staffer and a driver were injured, a

separate statement by the U.N. secretary-general’s special representative in Congo said. Butembo’s deputy mayor, Patrick Kambale Tsiko, said Kiboung was from from Cameroon and blamed a militia group for the attack. He said the militiamen erroneously believed that foreigners had brought the disease with them to Congo. “According to witnesses at the scene, these militiamen wanted all the expatriates to go home because according to them, Ebola does not exist in Butembo,” Tsiko said. “They said they will continue if these expatriates do not return as soon as possible.” Police were pursuing the attackers, Tsiko said. Congo’s health ministry confirmed the assault on the Catholic University of Graben hospital. One aid group, the International Rescue Committee, said the hospital held only nonEbola patients and many of them fled during the attack. Dozens of rebel groups are active in eastern Congo. There also has been some community resis-

tance to Ebola containment efforts in a traumatized, wary region that had never faced an outbreak of the virus before. Ebola can spread quickly and can be fatal in up to 90% of cases. The hemorrhagic fever is most often spread by close contact with the bodily fluids of people exhibiting symptoms or with objects such as sheets that have been contaminated. Health Minister Dr. Oly Ilunga said in a tweet that local and international health workers are courageously combating the virus, “sometimes at the cost of their lives.” The attack came three days after President Felix Tshisekedi visited the Ebola outbreak zone, pledging more military and police protection for health workers and asking residents for their cooperation. The president hoped to see the outbreak contained in less than three months, although some health experts estimate it could take much longer. Robert Kitchen, senior vice president for emergencies with the International Rescue Com-

mittee, predicted it could take at least another year to contain the Ebola outbreak without a significant change in “community engagement and understanding.” He said such attacks on health workers are increasingly common. This month could see the highest rate of Ebola transmission yet, Kitchen said, adding “the trajec-

tory of this outbreak is alarming.” Since the Ebola outbreak in Congo was declared in August, there have been more than 1,300 confirmed and prob-

able cases, including 843 deaths, the health ministry said Thursday. More than 102,000 people have received an experimental but effective Ebola vaccine.


Peninsula Clarion | Sunday, April 21, 2019 | C3

Community The annoyances of spring U nhinged A laska N ick V arney

There are several things about the arrival of spring that have always annoyed me. First, there is the meltfreeze cycle that turns our back forty into a noteworthy ice field which, if it rains significantly, quickly morphs into a millpond that could conceal a pod of deeply disturbed belugas. Then there’s the challenge of getting into the ville without turning my truck’s alignment into something resembling the aftermath of impacting a hefty beast with the same highway crossing skills as a week-old roadkill. How does that particular scenario work? Breakups spawn road surface pits that

are cunningly concealed beneath the surface of what seem to be innocuous pools of H2O. These monsters can be found almost everywhere and have been known to consume everything from little eco rigs to a rumored case of a missing asphalt truck and its crew. The positive side to this sad scenario is that the wee vehicles sometimes fill in the holes enough to smooth out the road a bit. Another irritation popping up during this seasonal swing are certain testosterone-infused feral critters strutting around our acreage like Wild Bill Hickok looking for a gunfight except that they’re only armed with a tiny, single shot, organic popgun. I’ve written about these narcissistic clowns before and nothing has changed much over the years other than I’ve added some pretty impressive recipes to my

stash. I’m talking about wild rooster pheasants that have the propensity to commence hurling despicable slurs at each other from behind every piece of puckerbush in the predawn hours of the morning. These idiots, with negative IQ ratings, have egos bigger than a politician and are known to fling insult shrieks that, if deciphered, would make a crab boat crew blanch. It’s a fascinating scenario to watch as they finally get riled enough to go full cage fighter and I’ve witnessed throw downs that deserved “pay-for-view” consideration. What I don’t appreciate is when they decide to have it out on our deck, especially behind the window where I do my writing. Needless to say, I have refereed some of those matches and quickly declared a winner much to dismay of both participants,

especially the loser dropped from the competition and into the freezer. Sometimes neither one makes the cut. I remember one dust up that went something like this: A, “Yo! You lookin’ at me you $#*^@+&%#?” bird-bellow exploded behind me just as I sat down to start a column and take a delicate sip of hot coffee. My unmanly reaction prompted a torrent of java lava to cascade onto a hypersensitive area that launched me high enough to change the trac-light bulbs in our upstairs loft. It wasn’t a pretty sight. Needless to say, I was not amused and there was no dispute arbitration. They made an outstanding main entrée for our Easter brunch. This spring has been less hectic because the hare population still hasn’t re-

covered from its low several years ago when their numbers imploded around the Kenai Peninsula. Hare jack rumbles were prolific in the surrounding fields which, in turn, attracted voracious raptors and coyotes looking for an easy nosh of horn-dog bucks engrossed in duking it out for the affections of a jill. Not cool, especially if one has small pets and/ or domestic egg layers to protect. What was even more tragic was the fact that, even when a jack won and survived aerial and ground attacks, he still had to deal with the object of his desire. If he had inadvertently targeted an unreceptive jill, he could be vigorously rebuffed to the point that the lady in question would attempt to turn him into stew meat until he got the hint. Even if he won, he was leveret loser.

As I write this, it is a beautiful day on the bay and I’m aggravation free. Two expectant moose have returned to their annual calving sanctuaries near our home and eagles are soaring overhead carrying renovation materials for their nests. Anytime now, I’m expecting the rattling bugle calls of our local sandhill cranes as they return from their winter migration. Close behind will be choirs of robins serenading us from their settling areas in the alders shadowed by flitting diminutive feathered creatures chanting in chirps and chimes announcing the commencement of a peacefilled spring. Hopefully, it will also be the cock roosters’ time to take the hint. If not, I have a new deep fryer that needs an inaugural launch. Nick can be reached at ncvarney@gmail.com.

Celebrate our students!: Joshua Wolf

At the Kenai River Campus of Kenai Peninsula College, we like to celebrate our students and share their successes with our community. Here is one of many: Attending Kenai Peninsula College can provide ambitious, motivated students with opportunities. Take Joshua Wolf, for example. Joshua moved into the Residence Hall on the Kenai River Campus in August 2014 to earn a degree in process technology. Only a couple days after he arrived, his roommate urged him to consider striving for an instrumentation degree as well. Joshua took the advice and — after a time that included a stint as a resident assistant and a place on a KRC troubleshooting team that finished second in the na-

tion — he graduated in December 2017 with both degrees. One month later, he was moving to Newton, Iowa, to take a job as a process operator at a BASF polyester plant. When production slowed at the BASF plant in mid-summer, Joshua, now 27, parleyed his education and experience into a successful application to Interstates Construction in Sioux Center, Iowa, where he is now employed as an instrumentation technician. “Both degrees helped me tremendously with getting a job and have been very useful while working,” Joshua said. “Since starting this job, I have been to many facilities, learning and applying all that I learned in class, as well as always learning new things.” His goal is to build on

what he knows, gain experience and increase his value as an employee. He is working toward earning a journeyman electrician license, and he hopes that, in time, he can return to Alaska and work in the oil fields on the North Slope. “KPC is an amazing place to attend and get a degree in either profession,” Joshua said. “I am currently building a biodiesel plant, worked at a polyester plant, and am heading to a grainextraction plant to help with construction there. There are so many areas you can go and work with these degrees, and if you are in Alaska or not, this is the best school for both degrees in the country.” Joshua, who grew up and was home-schooled in upstate New York, also reflected fondly on

Learning for Life

Repair. Redesign. Reuse.

Now is the time to plan your backyard poultry project, whether it be raising broiler chickens to eat or laying hens for a supply of your own fresh eggs. Cooperative Extension Service has a variety of free publications designed to help the home farmer. Information is available on what kind of chicks to buy, brooding methods, how to prepare a brooder house, feeding your flock and even how to grade and sell your eggs! This summer, why not try your hand at raising your very own poultry! Find “Selecting, Brooding, and Rearing Small Numbers of Chicks”, “Home Laying Flock” “Safe Egg Handling for Small Egg-Laying Flocks and Operations” and “Broiler Production” at http://www.uaf.edu/ces/districts/kenai/. Copies of these and other publications are available in our office located at 43961K-Beach Rd., Suite A, Soldotna, AK 99669. Stop in this spring and keep “Learning for Life!”

Veterans wheelchair ramp The public is welcome to join HAVE Alaska in the construction of a wheelchair ramp for disabled veterans. The ramp is being built at Fish Magnet Fishing Charters in Ridgeway. Barbecue lunch will be provided. Please plan on beginning at 9 a.m. For more information cal 252-9555.

Kenai Eagles Aerie 3525 Annual Easter Party Come hunt some eggs and get your picture with the Easter bunny! Saturday, April 20 from 12-1:30 p.m. Ages 10 and under.

Camp Mend-A-Heart Camp Mend-A-Heart is a free day camp for ages 6 to 16 who are experiencing a loss due to death. Camp is held at Solid Rock Camp, just outside of Soldotna and in a beautiful, wooded area. Many fun activities as well as age appropriate grief activities. All applications must be in by July. Please contact Hospice at 262-0453 for additional information and applications. Monday to Thursday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Kenai Performers presents ‘The Crucible’ Kenai Performers presents “The Crucible” by Arthur Miller. May 9, 10, 11 and May 16, 17, 18, at 7 p.m. Location: 44045 K-Beach Road (backside of Subway restaurant). Tickets are $15, available at the door and online at ww.kenaiperformers.org. For more information call Rebecca at 398-2951.

Joshua moved into the Residence Hall on the Kenai River Campus in August 2014 to earn a degree in process technology. (Courtesy photo)

The Recycling Bin

Alaskans can successfully raise backyard poultry

Learning for Life

his time with the Kenai Kings, the KRC troubleshooting team. “For the three years I was there, KPC or the University of Alaska was represented in every one of the national competitions. I just saw that they are headed (there) again.” KPC has finished in the top three nationally in all four of the national competitions held since 2012. “If that does not tell you how good this school is, then I don’t know what will,” Joshua added. “For anyone not in Alaska that is interested in these fields, go have an adventure and see Alaska.” We congratulate Joshua on a career path that opened many doors for him already and promises to open many more. We are proud of his success, and proud to call him our own.

Green Guru Gear of Boulder, Colorado, loves biking and wants you to love it too. Since 2005, Green Guru has upcycled more than 1 million pounds of bike tubes, climbing ropes, tents and wetsuits into new gear. As the amount of materials reclaimed, jobs created, and products manufactured increase, Green Guru is able to realize positive social, environmental and economic change by building an organization with a foundation needed to flourish into the future. Information provided by ReGroup, a nonprofit organization of volunteers formed in 1989 to develop public awareness and participation in the benefits of waste reduction, reuse and recycling on Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula.

Sterling Senior Center breakfast The Sterling Senior Center will be serving breakfast on Saturday, April 27, from 9 a.m. to noon. Menu includes pancakes, scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage, biscuits and gravy. Adults $10, children $5. All proceeds benefit the center. Everyone welcome!

Alzheimer’s Community Forum An Alzheimer’s Community Forum will be held Wednesday, May 1, 5-7 p.m. Hear a brief overview on Alzheimer’s, dementia and memory loss. Bring a friend who has been affected by the disease. Share your thoughts about how we can help people in your community. Light refreshments will be provided. Registration is requested. Call 907-953-0160 or email harrismc78@gmail.com.

ASEA/AFSCME Local 52 scholarship ASEA/AFSCME Local 52 Cook Inlet Chapter is offering three scholarships to applicants who have not previously received a scholarship. Scholarship applications must be received or postmarked by May 31st of the current year. Applications are available at the ASEA/AFSME Cook Inlet Chapter website.http://www.afscmelocal52.org/index.php/ union-leadership/chapters/cook-inlet-chapter. If you have questions or need more information please send an email to cookinlet3432@outlook.com or ginakuntzman@yahoo. com. Emailed applications are not accepted.

Fishing Vessel Drill Conductor Class in Homer The Alaska Marine Safety Education Association (AMSEA) will offer a Fishing Vessel Drill Conductor class in Homer on April 27, 2019 from 8 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. The class will be conducted at the Best Western Bidarka Inn,

575 Sterling Highway. This class is free to commercial fishermen, thanks to support from the Alaska Department of Commerce, Community & Economic Development, the National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health, and AMSEA members. The cost is $175 for all others. Interested mariners may register at www.amsea.org or call 907747-3287.

‘Preserving Your Summer Harvest’ The Kenai Peninsula Food Bank and UAF Cooperative Extension Service is partnering to offer a special program on Wednesdays during the month of April. Come join us on April 24 for a free, tasty, hot meal prepared by the Kenai United Methodist Church and a brief presentation, “Preserving Your Summer Harvest.” Linda Tannehill with the Cooperative Extension Service, will cover what types of food you need to pressure can and which ones can you safely waterbath can? RSVP to Greg Meyer at 907-262-3111 or gmeyer@kpfoodbank.org.

Al-Anon support group meetings Al-Anon support group meetings are held at the Central Peninsula Hospital in the Kasilof Room (second floor) of the River Tower building on Monday at 7 p.m., Wednesday at 7 p.m. and Saturday at 9 a.m. Park around back by the ER and enter through the River Tower entrance and follow the signs. Contact Tony Oliver at 252-0558 for more information.

Donations for VFW May Garage Sale Spring Cleaning? Moving? Donate those reusable items to the VFW May Garage Sale. Drop off at VFW Post new building addition , Birch Street, Soldotna on Saturday April 20 and 27 between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. (No clothing or consignments). All proceeds go the the new Building addition. More info call Lee @ 420-7503


C4 | Sunday, April 21, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

A good-looking home

CHEEKY READER

PET PAL Dear Readers: Duncan, a Pet Pal alum, is back after having his teeth professionally cleaned. He’s wearing the “cone of shame” so he won’t scratch his mouth. Pro cleanings are important to keep the mouth and teeth healthy. To see Duncan and our other Pet Pals, visit www.Heloise.com and click on “Pet of the Week.” Do you have a furry friend you’d like to share? Email a picture and description to Heloise@Heloise.com. -- Heloise TIE ONE ON

Dear Heloise: Most of the suitcases at airport baggage claims are black. While a traveler can tie a bright ribbon to the suitcase Dear Heloise: My wife of 30 years came handle, it’s difficult to spot one’s luggage if it HINT FROM HIM

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[I don’t believe it!] Time to treat yourself “The Chosen” novelist Potok Vaper’s purchase, for short Performer at a canine talent show in “Garfield: The Movie” Water or rust “Au contraire …” Paul of “There Will Be Blood” “Toodle-oo!” Territories Mascara mishap Sort of Work with a number Just fabulous Guest bed when you don’t have an actual guest bed Mr. ____ (fictional sleuth) Grp. that often has its first meeting in the fall Onetime trans-Atlantic fliers, for short Things to skip Major to-do Thanks for waiting Word with “in,” “on” or “in on” Road safety spot, e.g., for short Blueprint details Cryptanalysis org. Tram part Enlightens Affix with a thumbtack Important address Ermines, in the summer Hits the jackpot They’re full of holes Actress Sohn of “The Wire” “Phooey!” Popular girl’s name any way you look at it Not just words “Curious …” Father figure? “Begone!” What “T” may represent commercially Clarinetist Shaw Bout enders, informally

Last Sunday’s Crossword Answers

P A S S A U T O S C A N T R Y L I T P O O G N U A S T O S P M I L E S H O N N E W B A L L C R Y A N S O C K P R A Y A D S S A I L M I N E S N O O

73 Samurai swords 75 Delish 77 Totally apt 79 What you might write to someone you like 80 2016 No. 1 Rihanna album 82 Peeples person? 83 Goddess represented wearing a solar disk 84 Artless nickname? 85 Wreck site 87 Web user 90 Cousin of a martini 92 Blogger’s code 93 Cuzco residents 95 Person with a record 97 Some breads … or a homophone for what bread loaves do 98 Historical records 100 Flower traditionally used to relieve inflammation 102 Airheaded 105 No-nos in many apartment buildings 107 Hook’s helper 108 Junk transporters 112 Get ready for a long auto trip 114 Gaping opening 115 Cook in the news 116 Troy of N.F.L. fame 117 ____ Spumante (wine) 118 Having a high B.M.I., say 120 Seemingly forever 122 Literary character who says, “Cassio’s a proper man” 123 TV’s “____ Is Us” 124 Object of wishful thinking? 125 Home of the 2016 men’s and women’s Olympic marathon winners

Man’s skill on dance floor attracts unwelcome attention DEAR ABBY: My husband loves to dance, and so do I. In fact, we met dancing many years ago. He takes Zumba classes despite his knee problems. I loved Zumba but stopped because it hurt my knees. Many times women have come up to him -- oblivious of my presence -- to tell him how good he is. This has happened on cruises and just now in a restaurant. I love that he’s a good dancer. But I don’t like random women telling him so. It feels like they are flirting. Yes, I am jealous because he is my husband. Are my feelings normal?

shouldn’t let it bother me. However, I want our inlaws to be fair with her. I know I can’t make it so outside our immediate family circle. Am I being unrealistic?

Abigail Van Buren

-PERPLEXED IN THE MIDWEST

DEAR PERPLEXED: I think so. -- JEALOUS IN THE EAST While you can’t change your in-laws’ DEAR JEALOUS: As long as your behavior, you CAN make sure your husband acts appropriately in ac- daughter knows she is much loved by cepting the compliments, you may be her parents, uncles, aunts and cousins.

overreacting. Instead of feeling jealDEAR ABBY: My fiance and I are ousy, why are you not feeling a twinge being married next month in a private of pride in his accomplishment? ceremony. We’re having a small family/ Your feelings are normal -- for closest friends barbecue reception the someone who is insecure. If you ac- following weekend. We do not want any cept that you can’t stop people from uninvited guests, but we also don’t want complimenting your husband, and to come across as rude. What’s your that giving him a verbal gold star suggestion for polite wording on inviisn’t necessarily flirting, you will both tations asking that there be no “extra” guests brought to our reception? Our be better off. budget is very tight. DEAR ABBY: My husband and I -- NOT A BRIDEZILLA are in our late 40s and raised three very successful sons. We had always wanted DEAR NOT A BRIDEZILLA: Put to adopt but were not able to until our nothing like that in writing. There is boys were grown. Everyone has been a rule of etiquette that only guests supportive except my husband’s par- whose names are on the invitations ents. should attend the event. If you feel Our daughter, whom we brought your prospective guests are ignorant home 3 1/2 years ago, is now 7. Any- of the social graces, CALL them and one who knows her adores her. She em- explain: “We would love you to celebraces family and has a beautiful rela- brate with us, but because our budget tionship with her big brothers and their is limited, we are unable to entertain uninvited guests. We hope you underfamilies. stand.” My in-laws have other grandchilTO MY READERS: I wish you all dren whom they shower with affeca very Happy Easter. tion. Our daughter, not so much. She doesn’t seem to mind, so I know I -- LOVE, ABBY

R U S H M A T A N E R S U N P U T T A B T L E E K R D A A O N Y U S E R A A S S A S T S B O U T O N F A F T E D E B A T O N S A O A V K R E

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A R P W A Y E O L D E A E P M E R S C O N M P A R O K A S E Z H I O R T I S I L O S T A N A R G L E R W E E O R S I M B T A U E N G

Z E S T A A M Y A C E T S K E T O

I P P O T H A N T O R Y T E X L O N E A N T S N E S A N S U R E L I E C T E D L A S S O N Y S E R O N E F R O S O S A W L C I L E E N E D R G E D

DOWN

What some carefree beachgoers do Got comfortable with Pickle Samosa ingredients Epitome of slowness Some track bets Takes a few courses? Goes on to say “Right you are!” Longtime broadcaster of the Masters golf tournament Runs perfectly Tasted, quaintly Down Quagmires Dutch cheese “Murder, She Wrote” setting In the club Start printing Treat with utter contempt Imitation Homes in the woods Seaside rental Get hitched Like the legs of a daddy longlegs

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63

34

4 1 5 8 9 2 6 3 7 4/14

21

32

9 3 8 5 6 7 4 2 1

Last Sunday’s Answer Key

20

27

2 7 6 4 3 1 5 9 8

Difficulty Level

19

31

9

4/21

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

1

4

Difficulty Level

SUDOKU

26 “Begone!” 1 127 Pricing word 128 Not bottled, say 129 ____ Park, Colo. 130 Full house, e.g.

2

Dear Heloise: During a cold spell last month, I became Ms. Clean for a few days. I disinfected doors, cabinet knobs, phones, keys, wall light switches, the refrigerator, microwave and stove handles, water spigots and handles on toilets. I did the car steering wheel, the gearshift and all the buttons and door latches, too. -- Elaine H., Port Charlotte, Fla. Thanks for sharing! -- Heloise

LEFT/RIGHT SYMMETRY By Will Nediger. Puzzles Edited by Will Shortz

7

5

MS. CLEAN

New York Times Crossword ACROSS

9 3

Dear Heloise: By applying a tiny bit of petroleum jelly and then a bit of lipstick to my cheeks, it makes for a great cheek color and always matches my lipstick. I can make it as dark or light as I like. I can even dig it out of the tube and put the lipstick in an old powder, cheek-color container along with a bit of the petroleum jelly. -- Dotty, via email

7 5

2019 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Dear Readers: A spring weekend affords the opportunity to boost the CURB APPEAL of your home! There are lots of areas you can spruce up; here are a few hints: * Repair cracks in the driveway. Pull and kill weeds, and remove any staining. Sweep thoroughly. * Freshen up, polish or replace hardware: house numbers, doorknobs, light fixtures, etc. Maybe a new color for the front door? * Take a look at the mailbox: Fresh coat of paint, new flag, new plants around the base? All good choices. The style of your mailbox should coordinate with the look of your home. * Cut away dead overgrowth and brush in front of the house. Consider renting a power washer to deep-clean the concrete. Experts agree: Symmetry is key (matching flowerpots on either side of the entry, for example) and will make your home stand out this spring! -- Heloise

6

arrives upside down. I solved that problem by applying brightly colored stickers to the bottom of my checked bag. - Sally T. in Minneapolis

116 121

122

3 Unit in a bar graph 8 86 ABC sitcom about the Johnsons 88 Oceania’s enemy, in “1984” 89 Probes 91 Slightly salty 94 Rip Van Winkle had a long one 96 Liftoff preceder 99 Sch. from which Lady Gaga and Woody Allen were dropouts 101 15-season show set in Vegas 102 Chihuahua, e.g. 103 Ottoman rank 104 Madcap 106 4-0, e.g. 107 Pump up 109 Poker variety 110 Part of an old train 111 Hair net 113 ____ stick 116 Some prosecutors, for short 119 Michael Jackson’s second album

Jaqueline Bigar’s Stars HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Sunday, April 21, 2019: You have the intelligence and energy needed to function at a high level. At the same time, you express caring and thoughtfulness. This year, others become more aware of you. If you’re single, suitors act as though you’re the honey they always wanted. Choose carefully; don’t commit unless you are 100 percent sure. If you’re attached, you and your sweetie will spend more and more happy hours together. SAGITTARIUS often encourages risks. Be careful. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Because you appear to be in the mood to take a big risk, you might cause someone to worry. Hopefully, this is a well-thought-out decision; your friend could be overreacting. Although you’re normally more cautious, a devil-may-care attitude prevails today. Tonight: Take this devilishness out with a loved one. This Week: On Wednesday and Thursday you’ll get direct feedback as to recent decisions and actions. Do listen. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH You seem calm, cool and collected, but you might feel confused about a special relationship that pulls you out of your daily life. Enjoy this tendency to go to extremes, yet be a little cautious. There is a tomorrow. Tonight: In the whirlwind of the moment. This Week: A partnership stars in your thoughts Monday and Tuesday. You ponder what to do about it for the remainder of the week. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH You might want to pull away and ponder the results you’re seeing. Could you be too involved with an issue to gain a perspective? You know what you desire but cannot seem to achieve it. Have some patience. Tonight: Know when to call it a night. This Week: It’s hard to believe, but others steal the show this week, creating some free time for you. Use it well.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Confusion surrounds communication. Try as you might, you could have difficulty getting going. Worry less about a conversation or decision. You’ll see everything work out. Tonight: Surprises could happen. This Week: Move with decisiveness on Monday and Tuesday, being particularly attentive to your work. You will want to have some extra time for networking Wednesday on. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH You continue to stretch and try something new. You like the variety. Be careful with a risk that could hit you financially. You might want to do some research. More information can never hurt you. Tonight: All smiles. This Week: Calming down after the weekend proves to be difficult. Tame your wildness if you can; otherwise, you will have to work very hard for the remainder of the week. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH After a recent busy streak, slow down and relax. A family member could be delighted that you have more time to visit. Mind you, this could be the family cat! Catch up on a friend’s news, too. Tonight: Make it early. This Week: Getting going will be slow, but you will identify with the tale of the hare and the tortoise. Yes, you will be the tortoise. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH You have what many would view as a dynamic imagination that sometimes could be a source of disappointment. Still, don’t allow a once-in-a-while flub to stop you. You gain from this creativity. Why not add some extra fun to your plans? Tonight: Let the good times flow. Get together with an old friend. This Week: If you can cut back the socializing, perhaps indulging in some networking and work, you could take off early on Friday. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Be aware that someone you’re dealing with has a very possessive nature. Could this be you? Even if feelings are mutual between you and another person, try to work through an

2019 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Hints from Heloise

up with this nifty trick at lunch. When you are served bread with cold, foil-covered butter pats, instead of smooshing the hard butter into your soft bread, hold the butter pat in your closed hand for a minute. Open the foil and spread nice, soft butter onto your bread. Works like a charm! -- Big Mike, San Clemente, Calif.

By Dave Green

innate, possibly suffocating, emotional craving. Tonight: Make it your treat. This Week: Curb spending, even if you’re socializing a lot for work. You will be much happier. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You won’t slow down. In fact, you’re likely to rev up your pace. Others might have difficulty keeping up with you or expressing the same enthusiasm. Your naturally gregarious personality helps another person finally lighten up. Tonight: Why worry about tomorrow? Live for tonight. This Week: Monday and Tuesday are prime time for you. Go for what you want. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HH You sense a lot going on behind the scenes. No matter what, you cannot seem to get the full story. Listen well; allow time before you respond. Someone might add in a word or two. Tonight: Once more, not to be found. This Week: Lie low until late Tuesday night. At that point, you are a force to behold. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH A friend could pop up from nowhere. This person wants and needs your complete attention. You might need to rearrange your schedule to accommodate the need. Make it your pleasure to spend some quality time together. Tonight: Where a lot of your friends hang. This Week: The best days socially and professionally are Monday and Tuesday. You have the remainder of the week to ponder what happened. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Stress could be getting the best of you. Many of you will need to handle some work or check in with another person who needs you a lot. Don’t allow moodiness to scar the day. Rather, relax and flow with the moment. Tonight: Could go to the wee hours. This Week: Accept what might feel like a necessary burden; the result could be spectacular. BORN TODAY Queen Elizabeth II (1926), actress Andie MacDowell (1958), musician Iggy Pop (1947)


Peninsula Clarion | Sunday, April 21, 2019 | C5

Contact us; www.peninsulaclarion.com, classified@peninsulaclarion.com • To place an ad call 907-283-7551

Merchandise

BEAUTY / SPA

SPOT SHRIMP. Shrimp season opens April 15. Call or text Polly at 907-399-1199 to reserve FRESH Prince William Sound Shrimp!

by May 2, 2019 EMPLOYMENT

DIRECT SERVICE ADVOCATE Part-Time Transitional Living Center

2350690

LEGALS Public Notice The Cook Inlet Regional Planning Team will be meeting on Thursday, April 25, 2019 at 10:00am at Cook Inlet Aquaculture Association headquarters (40610 Kalifornsky Beach Road, Kenai). Agenda topics include review Annual Management Plans for CIAA hatcheries, and the 2019 season. The public is invited to attend. More information is available on our website at www.ciaanet.org. Pub: April 12-24, 2019 852388

Provide support, advocacy and assistance to homeless women and children residing in transitional housing who have experienced domestic violence and/or sexual assault. Excellent interpersonal and written communication skills, ability to work with diverse populations, work independently and on a team and promote nonviolent behavior and empowerment philosophy. HS diploma or equivalent required; degree or experience working in related field preferred. Valid driver’s license required. Resume, cover letter and three references to:

KUBOTA TRACTOR 2007 Diesel B7610 4WD; Front Loader with Ballast Box, 3 cycle - 24 HP; $17,500. A workhorse machine that’s maintained like new with only 200 hours. The 4WD front loader makes short work of major projects for heavy duty jobs like hauling, raking and scraping in gardens, fields, paddocks and pastures. Perfect for upkeep of agricultural and livestock grounds or landscaping and general maintenance on large or smallscale business or personal property. The vehicle includes a post-hole digger, 3-point hitch and 9inch bit, landscape rake and chains. Also equipped with block heater so well-suited for cold weather use including snow removal and plowing. Serious inquires only; Located Anchorage; cash; akannmg@yahoo.com

From Stress to Refresh! Kenai Thai Massage Pranee & Yai

behind Wells Fargo 740-3379 Stacy Lewis is an expert on metal shafts. After all, she has one in her back.

Executive Director, The LeeShore Center, 325 S. Spruce St., Kenai, AK 99611 by May 2, 2019. EOE

As a young teen with scoliosis, Stacy underwent a complex, spinestraightening procedure, leaving her with a steel rod and five screws in her back. After long months of rigorous therapy, Stacy showed the world what talent, determination, and advanced orthopaedic surgery can accomplish.

EMPLOYMENT WANTED Cook/Prep cook Someone willing to do both duties. Competitive pay and benefits, flexible hours. Apply in person at the Duck Inn

Check out Stacy’s amazing path to the number one women’s ranking – and find your own inspiration at ANationInMotion.org.

SCOLIOSIS RESEARCH SOCIETY

Automobiles Wanted

srs.org

orthoinfo.org

DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. CALL 1-844-493-7877 (PNDC) Got an older car, boat or RV? Do the humane thing. Donate it to the Humane Society. Call 1-866-270-1180 (PNDC)

For more safety tips visit SmokeyBear.com 5d75x10d5_BW.qxd 9/7/05 5:55 PM

Page 1

A SUMMER MASSAGE Thai oil massage Open every day Call Darika 907-252-3985

WANTED! Old Porsche 356/911/912 for restoration by hobbyist 1948-1973 Only. Any condition, top $ paid! PLEASE LEAVE MESSAGE (707) 965-9546. Email: porscherestoration@yahoo.com. (PNDC) Stacy Lewis PSA_WSJ_5.35x10.5BW.indd 1

FCB 01031

Magazine BW 01031_OneSureWay_7x4.875_BW

Epsn 133 7” x 4.875”

6/11/13

3pm

NB

100%

1.0

H o p e i s m o r e p o w e r f u l t h a n a h u r r i c a n e.

Help victims of Hurricane Katrina and thousands of other disasters across the country each year by donating to the Disaster Relief Fund, which enables the Red Cross to provide food, shelter, counseling and other assistance to those in need.

This message brought to you by the American Red Cross and the Ad Council.

1-800-HELP NOW redcross.org

12/2/13 10:13 AM


C6 | Sunday, April 21, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

Contact us; www.peninsulaclarion.com, classified@peninsulaclarion.com • To place an ad call 907-283-7551 Health/Medical

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT

A PLACE FOR MOM. The nation’s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted, local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1-855748-4275. (PNDC)

EVERY BUSINESS has a story to tell! Get your message out with California’s PRMedia Release - the only Press Release Service operated by the press to get press! For more info contact Cecelia @ 916-288-6011 or http://prmediarelease.com/california (PNDC)

Medical/Professional Office Space

Attention: Oxygen Users! Gain freedom with a Portable Oxygen Concentrator! No more heavy tanks and refills! Guaranteed Lowest Prices! Call the Oxygen Concentrator Store: 1-855-641-2803 (PNNA)

1872’ office space, prime location, immaculate condition, network wired, utilities, mowing, snow plowing. Soldotna 398-4053

COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL SPACE FOR RENT WAREHOUSE / STORAGE 2000 sq. ft., man door 14ft roll-up, bathroom, K-Beach area 3-Phase Power $1300.00/mo. 1st mo. rent + deposit, gas paid 907-252-3301

FDA-Registered Hearing Aids. 100% Risk-Free! 45-Day Home Trial. Comfort Fit. Crisp Clear Sound. If you decide to keep it, PAY ONLY $299 per aid. FREE Shipping. Call Hearing Help Express 1-844-678-7756. (PNDC) Life Alert. 24/7. One press of a button sends help FAST! Medical, Fire, Burglar. Even if you can’t reach a phone! FREE Brochure. CALL 844-818-1860. (PNDC) Medical-Grade HEARING AIDS for LESS THAN $200! FDA-Registered. Crisp, clear sound, state of-the-art features & no audiologist needed. Try it RISK FREE for 45 Days! CALL 1-844-295-0409 (PNDC) OXYGEN - Anytime. Anywhere. No tanks to refill. No deliveries. The All-New Inogen One G4 is only 2.8 pounds! FAA approved! FREE info kit: 1-844-359-3986 (PNDC)

LOG HOME rotton log repair, residential remodel, Painting, and home maintenance Licensed Bonded Insured 235-9446 or 399-1695

Newer 1 bedroom duplex on Beaverloop Rd. 1,100 sq. ft. 1 large bedroom (275 sq. ft.) Vaulted ceilings throughout In-floor heating Gas appliances and heating Washer, dryer, & dishwasher Large 1 car heated garage Handicap accessible No smoking or pets Singles or couples preferred $1,100 monthly rent Landlord pays gas and garbage p/u First month’s rent and $1,000 deposit to move in 1-year lease required Call 283-4488

ARE YOU BEHIND $10k OR MORE ON YOUR TAXES? Stop wage & bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, & resolve tax debt FAST. Call: 1-844-229-3096 (PNDC)

ROOMS FOR RENT 3 bed/3 bath house 1200-1300/month includes w/d, elec, gas kitchenette, private bathroom, direct tv Call 907-254-0167

L E AR N

T O

RECOGNIZE

WILDFIRE HAZARDS

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT OFFICE SPACE RENTAL AVAILABLE 609 Marine Street Kenai, Alaska 404 and 394sq,ft, shared entry $1/sq.ft 240sq.ft.Shared conference/Restrooms $0.50/sq.ft 283-4672

IN

YOUR

COMMUNITY

A single ember from a wildfire can travel over a mile to your home or community. Learn how to reduce wildfire damage by spotting potential hazards at fireadapted.org.

F IRE A DAPTED.ORG

Now Accepting Applications fo Remodeled Spacious 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Affordable Apartments.

DID YOU KNOW 7 IN 10 Americans or 158 million U.S. Adults read content from newspaper media each week? Discover the Power of the Pacific Northwest Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com (PNDC)

Draft FCB 01031

Newspaper #1 FAC Watchout 01031_FAC01_NP11x21

Xerox 85 11.5” x 21”

5/22/13 10:30pm NB 100%

3.0

Adjacent to Playground/Park Onsite Laundry; Full Time Manager Rent is based on 30% of Gross Income & Subsidized by Rural Development For Eligible Households.

DID YOU KNOW Newspaper-generated content is so valuable it’s taken and repeated, condensed, broadcast, tweeted, discussed, posted, copied, edited, and emailed countless times throughout the day by others? Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising in FIVE STATES with just one phone call. For free Pacific Northwest Newspaper Association Network brochures call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com (PNDC)

Contact Manager at 907-262-1407 TDD 1-800-770-8973

DID YOU KNOW that not only does newspaper media reach a HUGE Audience, they also reach an ENGAGED AUDIENCE. Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising in five states - AK, ID, MT, OR & WA. For a free rate brochure call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com (PNDC)

Over $10K in Debt? Be debt free in 24 to 48 months. No upfront fees to enroll. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 1-888-231-4274 (PNDC)

REMOVE FIREWOOD

HOMES FOR RENT

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

DONATE YOUR CAR FOR BREAST CANCER! Help United Breast Foundation education, prevention, & support programs. FAST FREE PICKUP - 24 HR RESPONSE - TAX DEDUCTION. 1-855-385-2819. (PNDC)

CUT OVERHANGING BRANCHES

CLEAN GUTTERS

FOR RENT One Bed/one bath Nikiski $700, utilities included. First and last month + $200 deposit required. Pets on Approval Call 208-791-3142

“CHA-CHING”

Spectrum Triple Play! TV, Internet & Voice for $29.99 ea. 60 MB per second speed. No contract or commitment. More Channels. Faster Internet. Unlimited Voice. Call 1-888-960-3504. (PNDC) Unable to work due to injury or illness? Call Bill Gordon & Assoc., Social Security Disability Attorneys! FREE Evaluation. Local Attorneys Nationwide 1-844335-2197. Mail: 2420 N St NW, Washington DC. Office: Broward Co. FL (TX/NM Bar.) (PNDC)

If you want a little of that...we can help you sell your used sports and camping gear, furniture, boat or jewelry.

Give new life to an old chair. Watch it walk away when you place a Clarion Classified garage sale ad.

Call 283-7551 Clarion Classified Dept. classifieds@ peninsulaclarion.com

Call 907-283-7551 and ask for the Garage Sale Special

TODD’S GARAGE

Lawn Care

12528 KENAI SPUR HIGHWAY KENAI ALASKA, 99611

Roofing

Car Repair

Call Todd Today! 907-283-1408

Serving The PeninSula SinceSINCE 1979 1979 SERVING THEKenai KENAI PENINSULA Business cards carbonless Forms labels/Stickers raffle Tickets letterheads Brochures envelopes Fliers/Posters custom Forms rack/Post cards and Much, Much More!

Printing

The State of Alaska requires construction companies to be licensed, bonded and insured before submitting bids, performing work, or advertising as a construction contractor in accordance with AS 08..18.011, 08.18.071, 08.18.101, and 08.15.051. All advertisements as a construction contractor require the current registration number as issued by the Division of Occupational Licensing to appear in the advertisement. CONSUMERS MAY VERIFY REGISTRATION OF A CONTRACTOR. Contact the AK Department of Labor and Workforce Development at 907-269-4925 or The AK Division of Occupational Licensing in Juneau at 907-4653035 or at www.dced.state.ak.us/acc/home.htm

• 4 Wheelers • Welding and Electrical

Tree Service

Tue-Fr 9-5, Sat 10-4 • Closed Sunday/Monday 262-5333 • 800-760-5333

Specializing in Customized Mechanics

• Automotive • RV Repair, • Outboard • Snow Machines

Roofing

Notice to Consumers

Notices

Interstate Batteries After Market Body Parts Propane and AMSOIL

Insulation

Construction

Cleaning

RV Parts

Moose River RV Parts and Propane

Construction

Advertise in the Service Directory today! - Includes Dispatch. 283-7551

Advertise “By the Month” or save $ with a 3, 6 or 12 month contract. Call Advertising Display 283-7551 to get started!

Business Cards Raffle Tickets oFEnvelopes We Color the FUll SPeCtrUM YoUr PrintingRack/Post needS Cards (907) 283-4977 150 Trading Bay Dr. Suite 2 Carbonless Forms Letterheads Custom Forms And Much More Labels/Stickers Brochures Fliers/Posters

WE COLOR THE FULL SPECTRUM OF YOUR PRINTING NEEDS 150 Trading Bay Road, Kenai, AK (907) 283-4977


Peninsula Clarion | Sunday, April 21, 2019 | C7

SUNDAY MORNING/AFTERNOON A

B

(3) ABC-13 13 (6) MNT-5

8 AM

8:30

Larry King Special Report In Search

5

(8) CBS-11 11 (9) FOX-4

4

4

(10) NBC-2

2

2

(12) PBS-7

7

7

(20) QVC

137 317

(23) LIFE

108 252

(28) USA

105 242

(30) TBS

139 247

9 AM

B = DirecTV

APRIL 21, 2019

9:30 10 AM 10:30 11 AM 11:30 12 PM 12:30 1 PM

1:30

NBA Basketball Boston Celtics at Indiana Pacers. Eastern Conference First NBA Basketball Golden State Warriors at Los Angeles Clippers. Western Round, Game 4. (N) (Live) Conference First Round, Game 4. (N) (Live)

2 PM

2:30

Jerry Prevo

Manna-Fest Paid Program Soldotna The Church Christian Worship Hour “Hard Eight” (1996, Drama) Philip Baker Hall, John C. Reilly, Baxter Road Bible Church With Perry ‘G’ Church of of Almighty Gwyneth Paltrow. A veteran gambler takes on a down-and- Easter Pageant Stone ‘G’ God God out protege. Face the Na- Coffee With “Music Within” (2007, Drama) Ron Livingston, Melissa PGA Tour Golf RBC Heritage, Final Round. From Harbour Town Golf Links in Hilton Head Texas Music LifeLock Protion (N) America ‘G’ George, Michael Sheen. Island, S.C. (N) (Live) tection Ocean Mys- Pets.TV ‘G’ Recipe.TV ES.TV ‘PG’ Cars.TV (N) Comedy.TV Wayne Cotter; Kickin’ It: With Byron Al“Matchstick Men” (2003, Comedy) Nicolas Cage, Sam Rockwell, Alison teries With ‘PG’ ‘PG’ Matthew Baetz; Ty Barnett. len ‘PG’ Lohman. A con man bonds with his daughter and plans a swindle. Jeff Corwin ‘PG’ Try 3 Week Judge Judy Beverly Hills Dog Show From the Fairplex in Pomona, Calif. NHL Hockey Conference Quarterfinal: Teams TBA. (N) (Live) Judge Judy Naturally, Yoga Retreat ‘PG’ Teen drivers Danny Seo Now! collide. ‘PG’ (N) ‘G’ Samantha Weekends Rick Steves’ Fishing Born to Ex- Make It Artsy Cook’s Coun- My Greek Lidia’s Kitch- Jamie’s Joanne Taste of Ma- Dining with Lucky Chow Brown Place With Yankee Europe ‘G’ Behind the plore-Wiese “Time to Stop” try ‘G’ Table en ‘G’ Quick & Easy Weir’s Plates laysia-Yan the Chef ‘G’ “Food as ‘G’ Lines ‘G’ ‘G’ Food AZN” ‘G’

CABLE STATIONS (8) WGN-A 239 307

NBA Countdown (N) (Live) Paid Program ‘G’

A = DISH

Cops ‘PG’

3 PM

3:30

OutdoorsABC World man/Buck News (3) AB McNeely World’s Funniest Moments: Easter (6) MN

Face the Na- Tails of Valor (8) CB tion (N) (N) ‘G’ Mom ‘14’ Mom ‘14’ (9) FO Vets Saving Pets (N) ‘G’

The Champion Within ‘G’ (10) NB

NOVA “Secrets of Noah’s Ark” A new version of biblical flood (12) PB story. ‘PG’

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS. Cops ‘PG’

Cops ‘PG’

Cops ‘PG’

Cops ‘PG’

Cops ‘14’

Cops ‘PG’

Cops ‘14’

Cops ‘PG’

Cops ‘PG’

Cops ‘PG’

SU

CAB

Cops ‘PG’

Last Man Last Man Last Man Last Man (8) WG Standing Standing Standing Standing In the Kitchen With David (N) (Live) ‘G’ Susan Graver Style (N) Earth Brands Footwear (N) Denim & Co. (N) (Live) ‘G’ Susan Graver Style (N) LOGO by Lori Goldstein (N) (20) Q (Live) ‘G’ (Live) ‘G’ (Live) ‘G’ (Live) ‘G’ Joel Osteen Paid Program The Antoi“Joyful Noise” (2012, Comedy-Drama) Queen Latifah, Dolly Parton, Keke Palmer. Two “My Mom’s Letter From Heaven” (2019, Drama) Barry Wat- “Miracles From Heaven” (2016, Drama) ‘PG’ ‘G’ nette Tuff strong-willed women must work together to win a choir competition. son, Cindy Busby, Karen Holness. A rebellious teenager finds Jennifer Garner. Young Anna Beam recovers (23) L Story a letter from her dead mother. from a fatal digestive disorder. Growing Up Miz & Mrs ‘14’ Miz & Mrs ‘14’ “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix” (2007, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert (:32) “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” (2009, Children’s) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma (28) U Chrisley ‘14’ Grint, Emma Watson. Harry prepares a group of students to fight Voldemort. Watson. New dangers lurk for Harry, Dumbledore and their friends. “Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End” (2007, Adventure) Johnny Depp, Orlando “RoboCop” (2014, Science Fiction) Joel Kinnaman, Gary Oldman, Samuel L. “Edge of Tomorrow” (2014, Science Fiction) Tom Cruise, Emily Blunt, BrenBloom, Keira Knightley. Jack Sparrow’s friends join forces to save him. Jackson. A critically injured police officer is transformed into a cyborg. dan Gleeson. A soldier in an alien war gets caught in a time loop. (30) T

(6:00) “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Jour- (:45) “Django Unchained” (2012, Western) Jamie Foxx, Christoph Waltz, Leonardo DiCaprio. An ex-slave and a German The Last O.G. 138 245 ney” (2012, Fantasy) Ian McKellen. bounty hunter roam America’s South. ‘MA’ SportsCenter (N) (Live) 30 for 30 A look at the life and career of Junior Seau. NFL Combine Welcome/NFL MLS Soccer New York City FC at D.C. United. From Audi (34) ESPN 140 206 Field in Washington, D.C. (N) (Live)

The Last O.G. NBA Tip-Off NBA Basketball Toronto Rap (31) T ‘MA’ (N) (Live) tors at Orlando Magic. Baseball Tonight: Sunday MLB Baseball: Braves at (34) ES Night Countdown (N) Indians College Softball Auburn at Kentucky. From John Cropp Sta- SportsCenter (N) (Live) EA Sports Madden 19: Last (35) ES dium in Lexington, Ky. (N) (Live) Chance Qualifier (N) MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels. From Angel Stadium of Anaheim in Mariners Mariners All (36) RO Anaheim, Calif. (N) (Live) Postgame Access Bar Rescue ‘PG’ Bar Rescue A management- Bar Rescue ‘PG’ Bar Rescue “Hostile Take (38) PA heavy staff. ‘PG’ over” ‘PG’ (:15) “The Great Outdoors” (1988, Comedy) Dan Aykroyd, (:15) “The Breakfast Club” (1985, Comedy-Drama) Emilio (43) A John Candy, Stephanie Faracy. Estevez, Molly Ringwald, Judd Nelson. DC Super The Power- World of World of World of Victor and Total Drama Total Drama (46) TO Hero Girls puff Girls Gumball Gumball Gumball Valentino North Woods Law “Alligator Lone Star Law “Gulf ReLone Star Law Pulling in an River Monsters: Legendary (47) A Showdown” ‘PG’ con” ‘14’ illegal gill net. ‘14’ Locations (N) ‘PG’ Coop & Cami Coop & Cami Sydney to the Sydney to the Bunk’d ‘G’ Stuck in the Bizaardvark Bizaardvark (49) D Max ‘G’ Max ‘G’ Middle ‘G’ ‘G’ ‘G’ SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob The Loud The Loud The Loud The Loud (50) N House ‘Y7’ House ‘Y7’ House ‘Y7’ House ‘Y7’

(31) TNT

(35) ESPN2 144 209 (36) ROOT 426 687 (38) PARMT 241 241 (43) AMC

131 254

(46) TOON 176 296 (47) ANPL 184 282 (49) DISN

173 291

(50) NICK

171 300

(51) FREE

180 311

(55) TLC

183 280

(56) DISC

182 278

(57) TRAV 196 277 (58) HIST

120 269

(59) A&E

118 265

(60) HGTV 112 229 (61) FOOD 110 231

Cheerleading

Cheerleading From Orlando, College Softball Tennessee at Georgia. From Jack Turner Fla. Stadium in Athens, Ga. (N) (Live) Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Charlie Moore West Coast Mariners All Mariners Pre‘G’ ‘G’ ‘G’ ‘G’ Sport Access (N) game (N) Bar Rescue “Brokedown Bar Rescue “Put It on Cody’s Bar Rescue “Blowing Royal Bar Rescue “Punch-Drunk & Palace” ‘PG’ Tab” ‘PG’ Smoke” ‘PG’ Trailer-Trashed” ‘PG’ (7:15) “The Sandlot” (1993, Children’s) (:45) “Major League” (1989, Comedy) Tom Berenger, Charlie Sheen. A ragThomas Guiry, Mike Vitar. tag team tries to turn its poor performance around. Summer Craig of the World of World of World of World of World of World of Camp Island Creek ‘Y7’ Gumball Gumball Gumball Gumball Gumball Gumball Northwest Law An illegal North Woods Law “Mud Sea- North Woods Law “Judgment North Woods Law “Dirty bear baiting station. ‘14’ son” ‘PG’ Day” ‘PG’ Habits” ‘PG’ Jessie ‘G’ Stuck in the Coop & Cami Coop & Cami Sydney to the Big City Jessie ‘G’ Stuck in the Middle ‘G’ Max ‘G’ Greens ‘Y7’ Middle ‘G’ SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob Rainbow But- SpongeBob SpongeBob Ryan’s Mysterfly tery “The LEGO “Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel” (2009, Chil- “Finding Nemo” (2003) Voices of Albert Brooks, Ellen DeGeneres. Ani“Finding Dory” (2016, Children’s) Voices of Ellen DeGe(:05) “Rise of the Guard (51) FR Movie” dren’s) Zachary Levi, David Cross, Jason Lee. mated. A clown fish searches for his missing son. neres, Albert Brooks, Ed O’Neill. ians” (2012) Alec Baldwin Say Yes to Say Yes to Say Yes to Say Yes to Say Yes to Say Yes to Say Yes to Say Yes to Dr. Pimple Popper “The Last Dr. Pimple Popper “Mic Drop Dr. Pimple Popper ‘14’ Dr. Pimple Popper ‘14’ (55) T the Dress the Dress the Dress the Dress the Dress the Dress the Dress the Dress Unicorn” ‘14’ Pop!” ‘14’ Deadliest Catch “Swarm Deadliest Catch “Rival Sur- Return to the Moon: Zero Naked and Afraid: Tapped Naked and Afraid: Tapped Naked and Afraid: Tapped Naked and Afraid: Tapped Naked and Afraid: Tapped (56) D Chasers” (N) ‘PG’ vival” (N) ‘PG’ Hour (N) Out Out Out Out Out Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum In Search of Monsters “Moth- Legendary Locations “Out of Legendary Locations “End of Legendary Locations ‘G’ Mission Declassified ‘PG’ America Unearthed “Mont (57) TR ‘PG’ ‘PG’ man” ‘PG’ This World” ‘G’ the World” ‘G’ ezuma’s Curse” ToyMakerz (N) ‘PG’ The Cars That Made America Young visionaries wage The Cars That Made America The automobile transforms The Cars That Made America The suburbs fuel a demand Jesus: His Life Joseph’s faith (58) H is tested. ‘PG’ battle. ‘PG’ the country. ‘PG’ for new cars. ‘PG’ Hoarders “Charles & Alvin” A Hoarders “Terry; Adelle” A Hoarders A messy home Hoarders A gift-hoarding “Pearl Harbor” (2001, War) Ben Affleck, Josh Hartnett, Kate Beckinsale. Best friends become fighter pilots and romantic painter is obsessed with nude woman keeps dead cats in her poses a health hazard. ‘PG’ woman faces bankruptcy. ‘14’ rivals in 1941. (59) A women. ‘PG’ fridge. ‘PG’ Property Brothers: Buying & Property Brothers: Buying & Property Brothers: Buying & Property Brothers: Buying & Bargain Man- Bargain Man- Beachfront Beachfront Beachfront Beachfront Beachfront Beachfront (60) H Selling ‘G’ Selling ‘G’ Selling ‘G’ Selling ‘G’ sions sions Bargain Bargain Bargain Bargain Bargain Bargain The Pioneer The Pioneer The Pioneer The Pioneer Girl Meets Barefoot Con- 30-Minute 30-Minute The Kitchen “Fresh Festive Spring Baking Champion- Buddy Vs. Duff “The Grand Duff Takes Ace of Cakes (61) FO Woman ‘G’ Woman ‘G’ Woman ‘G’ Woman ‘G’ Farm (N) ‘G’ tessa Meals ‘G’ Meals ‘G’ Feast” ‘G’ ship “Easter Delights” ‘G’ Finale” ‘G’ the Cake ‘G’ ‘G’

Hoover Paid Program Cooking with Paid Program Hoover Retirement Rare 1908 Rare 1908 Shark Tank ‘PG’ Shark Tank Military-inspired Shark Tank The answer to Shark Tank ‘PG’ (65) CNBC 208 355 SmartWash ‘G’ (65) Emeril ‘G’ SmartWash Income Gold Coin Gold Coin jewelry line. ‘PG’ plastic bottles. ‘PG’ America’s News Headquar- America’s News Headquar- FOX News Sunday With The Journal Editorial Report America’s News Headquar- The Greg Gutfeld Show Fox Report with Jon Scott FOX News Sunday With (67) FNC 205 360 ters (N) (67) ters (N) Chris Wallace (N) ters (N) (N) Chris Wallace (N) (:10) The Of- (:45) The Office “The Sur(:20) The Of- (9:55) The Of- The Office The Office The Office The Office The Office “Super Troopers” (2001) Jay Chandrasekhar. Budget cuts (:10) “Happy Gilmore” (1996) (81) COM 107 249 fice ‘PG’ (81) Adam Sandler. plus” ‘PG’ fice ‘PG’ fice ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ threaten the jobs of five state troopers. (7:00) “30 Days of Night” (2007, Horror) “No Escape Room” (2018, Drama) Jeni Ross, Mark Ghani- “Jeepers Creepers 3” (2017) Jonathan Breck. A task force “Underworld: Rise of the Lycans” (2009, Fantasy) Michael “Underworld” (82) SYFY 122 244 Josh Hartnett, Melissa George. (82) mé, Brianna Barnes. embarks on a mission to destroy the Creeper. Sheen, Bill Nighy, Rhona Mitra.

PREMIUM STATIONS

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

CN

F

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PRE

(7:15) “Roll Bounce” (2005, (:10) “The Bourne Identity” (2002, Action) Matt Damon, (:10) “The Bourne Supremacy” (2004, Action) Matt Damon, “Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again” (2018, Musical Comedy) Wyatt VICE: The Fu303 504 Comedy-Drama) Bow Wow. Franka Potente. An amnesiac agent is marked for death after Franka Potente. Jason Bourne fights back when the CIA tries Amanda Seyfried. Pregnant Sophie reunites with her mom’s Cenac’s Prob- ture of Work ! H ‘PG-13’ a botched hit. ‘PG-13’ to kill him. ‘PG-13’ old pals and beaus. ‘PG-13’ lem Areas (6:45) “Jurassic World: “Tomb Raider” (2018, Adventure) Alicia Vikander, Dominic “Wonder Woman” (2017, Action) Gal Gadot, Chris Pine, Connie Nielsen. “Native Son” (2019, Drama) Ashton Sanders, Margaret Qual- (:20) “Crazy West, Walton Goggins. Young Lara Croft seeks a fabled tomb Wonder Woman discovers her full powers and true destiny. ‘PG-13’ ley, Nick Robinson. A young African-American man comes Rich Asians” ^ H ^ HBO2 304 505 Fallen Kingdom” (2018) Chris Pratt. ‘PG-13’ on a mythical island. ‘PG-13’ of age. ‘NR’ (6:35) “Dark- (:40) “Beyond Borders” (2003, Drama) Angelina Jolie, Clive Owen, Teri (10:50) “Atomic Blonde” (2017) Charlize (:45) Warrior “John China(:35) “Upgrade” (2018) Logan Marshall(:15) “King Arthur” (2004, Polo. A woman joins a doctor’s humanitarian efforts. ‘R’ Theron. A spy tries to take down an espioman” Mai Ling is urged to start Green. A man uses superhuman strength to Historical Drama) Clive Owen. + M + MAX 311 516 est Hour” (2017) nage ring in Berlin. ‘R’ a war. ‘MA’ punish his wife’s killers. ‘PG-13’ (7:45) “Daddy’s Little Girls” (2007, Ro“Molly’s Game” (2017, Biography) Jessica Chastain, Idris Elba, Michael “The Help” (2011, Drama) Viola Davis, Emma Stone, Bryce Dallas Howard. “Den of Thieves” (2018) Gerard Butler. Elite Cera. Molly Bloom runs high-stakes poker games for the wealthy. ‘R’ An aspiring writer captures the experiences of black women. ‘PG-13’ lawmen try to bring down a gang of tactical 5 SH 5 SHOW 319 546 mance) Gabrielle Union, Idris Elba, Louis Gossett Jr. ‘PG-13’ thieves. ‘R’ (7:30) “The Naked Gun “Pride & Prejudice” (2005, Drama) Keira Knightley, Mat(:10) “A Single Man” (2009, Drama) Colin Firth, Julianne “The Death of Stalin” (2017, Comedy) Steve Buscemi, “Drunkboat” (2010, Drama) thew MacFadyen. A man begins a convoluted courtship with a Moore, Nicholas Hoult. A gay man contemplates suicide after Andrea Riseborough. A power struggle ensues when dictator John Malkovich, John Good- 8 T 8 TMC 329 554 2 1/2: The Smell of Fear” (1991) ‘PG-13’ young woman. ‘PG’ his lover’s death. ‘R’ Joseph Stalin dies. ‘R’ man. ‘NR’ ! HBO

4

Clarion TV

SUNDAY AFTERNOON/EVENING A

B

4 PM

4:30

5 PM

A = DISH

5:30

6 PM

6:30

(3) ABC-13 13

American Idol “214 (Disney Night)” The contestants perform (:01) America’s Funniest Disney songs. (N) (Live) ‘PG’ Home Videos ‘PG’

(6) MNT-5

Raw Travel ‘PG’

5

(8) CBS-11 11 (9) FOX-4

4

4

(10) NBC-2

2

2

(12) PBS-7

7

7

50PlusPrime Pawn Stars Pawn Stars ‘G’ “The King’s ‘PG’ Bling” ‘PG’ The Inspec- Modern Fam- Frontiers ‘G’ CBS Weektors (N) ‘G’ ily ‘PG’ end News Funny You Funny You Entertainment Tonight (N) Should Ask Should Ask (N) ‘PG’ (N) ‘PG’ Leverage “The Blue Line Channel 2 NBC Nightly Job” The team tries to help a News: Week- News With hockey player. ‘PG’ end Lester Holt Nature “Big Birds Can’t Fly” Roadtrip Na- The DaytripLives and histories of flightless tion ‘PG’ per ‘G’ birds. ‘PG’

CABLE STATIONS

138 245

(34) ESPN 140 206 (35) ESPN2 144 209 (36) ROOT 426 687 (38) PARMT 241 241 (43) AMC

131 254

(46) TOON 176 296 (47) ANPL 184 282 (49) DISN

173 291

(50) NICK

171 300

(51) FREE

180 311

(55) TLC

183 280

(56) DISC

182 278

(57) TRAV 196 277 (58) HIST

120 269

(59) A&E

118 265

(60) HGTV 112 229 (61) FOOD 110 231 (65) CNBC 208 355 (67) FNC

205 360

(81) COM

107 249

(82) SYFY

122 244

303

^ HBO2 304 + MAX

311

5 SHOW 319 8 TMC

329

8 PM

8:30

(:01) American Idol “214 (Disney Night)” The contestants perform Disney songs. ‘PG’

9 PM

9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30

(:02) Shark Tank A treat that combines two desserts. (N) ‘PG’ Murdoch Mysteries Murdoch works with Brackenreid’s nephew. ‘PG’ Madam Secretary “Better Angels” (N) ‘14’ TMZ (N) ‘PG’

(:01) BACK Access (N) ‘PG’ PAIN RELIEF NOW! Heartland “Somewhere in Be- Soldotna tween” Tim gets trapped with Church of a visitor. ‘PG’ God KTVA Night- Castle An air marshal is murcast dered. ‘PG’ The Big Bang The Big Bang 2 Broke Girls Theory ‘14’ Theory ‘14’ ‘14’

Good Girls “Thelma and Louise” Beth and Ruby’s friendship fractures. ‘14’ Unforgotten on Masterpiece Holiday cottage. (N) ‘14’

Channel 2 Graham News: Late Bensinger Edition Jamestown Farlow returns from England. ‘14’

Family Feud ‘PG’ The Church of the Almighty God Major Crimes ‘14’ 2 Broke Girls ‘14’

NCIS: New Orleans “The Last Stand” A JAG lawyer disappears. ‘14’ Grantchester on Masterpiece “Grantchester” An old woman dies. ‘PG’

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

Person of Interest “B.S.O.D.” Bones The team keeps a ‘14’ case from Brennan. ‘14’ Tweak’d by Nature - Hair & Beauty We Love Featuring Body Care (N) (Live) ‘G’ Guerlain Fragrances (:03) “I Am Somebody’s Child: The Regina Louise Story” (2019, Drama) Ginnifer Goodwin, Angela Fairley. A woman tries to adopt an African-American girl. (:10) “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2” (2011, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe, Ru- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fampert Grint, Emma Watson. Harry may have to make the ultimate sacrifice. ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang Conan “Conan Without Bor- “Transformers” (2007, AcTheory ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘14’ Theory ‘14’ Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘14’ ders: Australia” Conan travels tion) Shia LaBeouf, Tyrese to Australia. ‘14’ Gibson, Josh Duhamel. (3:00) NBA Basketball Toronto Raptors at NBA Basketball Portland Trail Blazers at Oklahoma City Thunder. Western Inside the NBA (N) (Live) NBA Basketball Toronto Raptors at Orlando Magic. Eastern Conference First “Hobbit: Orlando Magic. (Live) Conference First Round, Game 4. (N Subject to Blackout) Round, Game 4. Desolation” (3:00) MLB Baseball Atlanta Braves at Cleveland Indians. SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter SportsCenter NBA BasketFrom Progressive Field in Cleveland. (N) (Live) ball (3:00) EA Sports Madden 19: 30 for 30 30 for 30 SportsCenter Special Welcome/NFL E:60 NBA Basketball Boston Celtics at Indiana Pacers. Eastern Last Chance Qualifier Conference First Round, Game 4. MLS Soccer Portland Timbers at Columbus Crew SC. From World Poker Tour WPT Uru- MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels. From Angel Stadium of Anaheim in Mariners Heartland Poker Tour From Poker Night Mapfre Stadium in Columbus, Ohio. guay - Part 1. (Taped) Anaheim, Calif. Postgame April 10, 2017. in America Bar Rescue “The Perks of Bar Rescue ‘PG’ Bar Rescue Withholding em- Bar Rescue “Crazy Little Bar Rescue “Pole Without a Bar Rescue Burnouts lose (:01) Wife Swap “DeGarmo Bar Rescue “Tanked and Being a Wallpaper” ‘PG’ ployee paychecks. ‘PG’ Thing Called Selman” ‘PG’ Purpose” ‘PG’ $200,000. (N) ‘PG’ vs. Mosby” ‘PG’ Toasty” ‘PG’ “The Break- “Pretty Woman” (1990, Romance-Comedy) Richard Gere, Julia Roberts. A Killing Eve Eve makes a dan- (:01) A Discovery of Witches (:02) Killing Eve “The Hungry (:02) A Discovery of Witches (:03) “Pretty Woman” (1990) fast Club” corporate raider hires a hooker to act as a business escort. gerous deal. (N) ‘14’ “Episode 3” (N) Caterpillar” ‘14’ “Episode 3” Richard Gere. Samurai Jack Final Space Bob’s Burg- Bob’s Burg- American Family Guy Family Guy Rick and Lazor Wulf Hot Streets Your Pretty American Family Guy Family Guy Rick and Lazor Wulf ‘14’ ‘14’ ers ‘PG’ ers ‘PG’ Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Morty ‘14’ (N) ‘14’ ‘14’ Face... Hell Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Morty ‘14’ ‘14’ (3:00) River Monsters: Leg- The Zoo “Andre the Baby The Zoo: Bronx Tales The Zoo A giraffe from Indi- (:01) Jeremy Wade’s Dark (:02) Fish or Die “Welcome to (:03) Extinct or Alive ‘PG’ Jeremy Wade’s Dark Waters endary Locations ‘PG’ Goat” ‘PG’ “Bouba’s Back” (N) ‘PG’ ana; cloud rats. (N) ‘PG’ Waters (N) the Jungle” (N) Sydney to the Sydney to the Coop & Cami Coop & Cami “Zootopia” (2016, Children’s) Voices of Ginnifer Goodwin, Sydney to the (:20) Sydney (8:50) BiCoop & Cami (9:50) Andi Stuck in the Bizaardvark Bizaardvark Max ‘G’ Max ‘G’ Jason Bateman, Shakira. Max ‘G’ to the Max zaardvark Mack ‘G’ Middle ‘G’ ‘G’ ‘G’ The Loud The Loud The Loud Henry Dan- Game Shak- Cousins for “Mr. Popper’s Penguins” (2011) Jim Carrey. A man turns The Office The Office Friends ‘PG’ (:35) Friends (:10) Friends (:45) Friends House ‘Y7’ House ‘Y7’ House ‘Y7’ ger ‘G’ ers ‘G’ Life ‘G’ his luxurious apartment into a penguin habitat. ‘PG’ ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ (3:05) “Rise of the Guard(:10) “Moana” (2016) Voices of Dwayne Johnson, Auli’i Cravalho. Animated. (:40) “Beauty and the Beast” (1991, Children’s) Voices of (:45) “Hook” (1991, Children’s) Dustin Hoffman, Robin Williams. Lawyer ians” (2012) Alec Baldwin A once-mighty demigod and a teen sail across the ocean. Paige O’Hara, Robby Benson. turns into Peter Pan to save kids from Captain Hook. Sister Wives “Moving Melt- Sister Wives “Leaving Las Sister Wives “More to Love: Sister Wives Meri’s motive is 90 Day Fiancé: Happily Ever After? “From the Beginning” A 90 Day Fiancé 90 Day Fiancé Sister Wives Meri’s motive is downs” ‘PG’ Vegas” ‘PG’ Tell All: Part 1” ‘PG’ revealed. (N) ‘PG’ look back at the couples. (N) ‘PG’ revealed. ‘PG’ Naked and Afraid: Tapped Naked and Afraid: Tapped Naked and Afraid: Uncen- Naked and Afraid “Swamp (:01) Naked and Afraid: Un- (:01) Expedition Unknown: Rediscovered “Origin of Christ” Naked and Afraid: UncenOut Out sored (N) ‘14’ Don’t Care” ‘14’ censored (N) ‘14’ Josh pursues the True Cross of Christ. (N) sored ‘14’ America Unearthed “Geor- America Unearthed “Stealing America Unearthed “The America Unearthed “Hawaii’s Lost Tribe; Viking Voyagers” Mission Declassified (N) ‘PG’ Mission Declassified ‘PG’ Mission Declassified ‘PG’ gia’s Maya Secret” America” Stone Of Destruction” Scott investigates a lost tribe. ‘G’ (3:00) Jesus: His Life JoJesus: His Life “Mary: The First Miracles” Jesus performs his Jesus: His Life “Judas: The Betrayal; Pilate: The Trial” The (:05) Jesus: His Life Jesus is crucified and resurrected. ‘PG’ (:03) Jesus: His Life ‘PG’ seph’s faith is tested. ‘PG’ first public miracle. ‘PG’ Last Supper; Pilate judges Jesus. ‘PG’ “Hacksaw Ridge” (2016, War) Andrew Garfield, Sam Worthington, Luke Bracey. Medic Des- “American Sniper” (2014, War) Bradley Cooper, Sienna Miller, Jake McDorman. Navy (:04) Live PD (:34) Live PD (:03) “American Sniper” mond Doss becomes a hero during World War II. SEAL Chris Kyle logs an incredible number of kills. Presents: PD Presents: PD (2014, War) Bradley Cooper, Cam ‘14’ Cam ‘14’ Sienna Miller. Beachfront Beachfront Beachfront Beachfront Beachfront Beachfront How Close How Close Caribbean Caribbean Island Life Island Life Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Caribbean Caribbean Bargain Bargain Bargain Bargain Bargain Bargain Life (N) ‘G’ Life (N) ‘G’ (N) ‘G’ (N) ‘G’ Life ‘G’ Life ‘G’ Bake You Rich “Baking Guy’s Grocery Games “Sa- Guy’s Grocery Games Guy’s Grocery Games “Big Worst Cooks in America Bake You Rich “Pie in the Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Worst Cooks in America ‘G’ Mashups” ‘G’ lute to Firefighters” ‘G’ Chicken pot pie. ‘G’ Budget Bonanza” ‘G’ (N) ‘G’ Sky” (N) ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ Undercover Boss An emUndercover Boss “Sky Undercover Boss “Gigi’s Undercover Boss “Gerber Undercover Boss “Taco Undercover Boss ‘14’ Cooking with Smokeless American Greed Michael ployee is terminated. ‘14’ Zone” ‘PG’ Cupcakes” ‘PG’ Group” ‘PG’ Bueno” ‘PG’ Emeril Grill Rosin; Marc Harris. ‘PG’ Watters’ World The Next Revolution With Life, Liberty & Levin (N) Watters’ World The Next Revolution With Life, Liberty & Levin FOX News Sunday With MediaBuzz Steve Hilton (N) Steve Hilton Chris Wallace (N) (3:10) “Happy Gilmore” (:15) “Super Troopers” (2001, Comedy) Jay Chandrasekhar, Kevin Heffer- “Happy Gilmore” (1996, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Christo- South Park South Park South Park South Park (:35) South (1996) Adam Sandler. nan. Budget cuts threaten the jobs of five state troopers. pher McDonald, Julie Bowen. ‘MA’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Park ‘MA’ (3:30) “Underworld: Awakening” (2012, (:27) “Underworld: Blood Wars” (2016, Fantasy) Kate Beck- “San Andreas” (2015, Action) Dwayne Johnson, Carla Gugino. A rescue Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Fantasy) Kate Beckinsale, Stephen Rea. insale, Theo James, Tobias Menzies. pilot must save his family after an earthquake. ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’

PREMIUM STATIONS ! HBO

7:30

APRIL 21, 2019

Rizzoli & Isles Jane makes a Madam Secretary “Global Chicago P.D. “Army of One” career decision. ‘14’ Relief” Henry is taken off the A vigilante murders pedoVFF cult case. ‘14’ philes. ‘14’ 60 Minutes (N) Motown 60: A Grammy Celebration Paying tribute to Motown Records. (N) ‘PG’ The SimpBob’s Burg- The SimpBob’s Burg- Family Guy Family Guy sons ‘14’ ers “Bobby sons “E My ers ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Driver” ‘14’ Sports” ‘PG’ Ellen’s Game of Games World of Dance “The Cut 2” Upper team and junior acts Contestants play for a chance perform. (N) ‘PG’ to win. ‘PG’ PBS News- Alaska InCall the Midwife Team tries Les Misérables on MasterHour Week- sight to unite mother and daughter. piece Fantine leaves Paris to end (N) (N) ‘14’ find work. (N) ‘14’

Last Man Last Man Last Man Last Man Last Man Last Man (8) WGN-A 239 307 Standing Standing Standing Standing Standing Standing (3:00) LOGO by Lori Gold- Susan Graver Style Easy-care, easy-wear designer fashions. (20) QVC 137 317 stein (N) (Live) ‘G’ (N) (Live) ‘G’ (2:30) “Miracles From Heav- (4:56) “I Am Somebody’s Child: The Regina Louise Story: (23) LIFE 108 252 en” (2016) Jennifer Garner, Special Edition” (2019, Drama) Ginnifer Goodwin. A woman Kylie Rogers. tries to adopt an African-American girl. (3:58) “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1” (2010, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe, (28) USA 105 242 Rupert Grint. Harry sets out to destroy the secrets to Voldemort’s power. “Transformers” (2007, Action) Shia LaBeouf, Tyrese Gibson, Josh Duhamel. Two races of (30) TBS 139 247 robots wage war on Earth. (31) TNT

7 PM

April 21 - 27, 2019

B = DirecTV

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

VICE: The Fu- (:35) “BlacKkKlansman” (2018, Comedy-Drama) John David Washington, 504 ture of Work Adam Driver, Laura Harrier. Ron Stallworth works under cover to infiltrate the KKK. ‘R’ (3:20) “Crazy Rich Asians” (2018, Last Week Veep “Pledge” Barry ‘MA’ Tonight-John ‘MA’ 505 Romance-Comedy) Constance Wu, Henry Golding. ‘PG-13’ (3:15) “King Arthur” (2004) Clive Owen. (:20) “The Fourth Kind” (2009, Suspense) Milla Jovovich, Will Patton, Elias Koteas. 516 Arthur and his knights embark on a rescue mission. ‘PG-13’ ‘PG-13’ (2:30) “Den of Thieves” Action ‘MA’ Billions “A Proper Sendoff” Chuck begins work in a new 546 (2018, Crime Drama) Gerard Butler. ‘R’ position. ‘MA’ (3:00) “Drunk- (:45) “Midnight Run” (1988, Comedy) Robert De Niro, Charles Grodin, 554 boat” (2010) Yaphet Kotto. A bounty hunter and an accused embezzler must duck the mob. ‘R’

April 21 - 27, 2019

Married ... Married ... Married ... Married ... Married ... Married ... With With With With With With LOGO by Lori Goldstein (N) Algenist Skin Care & Color Earth Brands Footwear (N) (Live) ‘G’ Cosmetics (N) ‘G’ (Live) ‘G’ “The Shack” (2017, Drama) Sam Worthington, Octavia Spencer, Avraham Aviv Alush. Three strangers take a man on a life-changing journey.

Game of Thrones Jon and Game of Thrones (N) ‘MA’ Barry “What?!” Veep “South Last Week (:35) Game of Thrones ‘MA’ (:35) Veep Daenerys struggle to unite a (N) ‘MA’ Carolina” ‘MA’ Tonight-John “South Carodivided North. ‘MA’ lina” ‘MA’ “Date Night” (2010) Steve Carell, Tina Fey. “Never Been Kissed” (1999, Romance-Comedy) Drew Bar- (:20) “Super Troopers 2” (2018) Jay ChanA case of mistaken identity leads to a wild rymore, David Arquette, Michael Vartan. A reporter poses as drasekhar. Five wacky lawmen get a shot at adventure. ‘PG-13’ a high-school student. ‘PG-13’ redemption in Canada. ‘R’ “Unfriended: Dark Web” (2018, Horror) (:35) “Black Swan” (2010, Drama) Natalie Portman, Mila (:25) “Being John Malkovich” (1999, ComColin Woodell. Something sinister targets a Kunis, Vincent Cassel. A ballerina’s drive to succeed threat- edy) John Cusack, Cameron Diaz, Catherine group of online friends. ‘R’ ens to consume her. ‘R’ Keener. ‘R’ The Chi Brandon helps Jer- Billions Axe discovers a trap The Chi “Past Due” Brandon The Chi “Past Due” Brandon Desus & Mero Billions ‘MA’ rika land a new client. ‘MA’ set for him. (N) ‘MA’ gets a new opportunity. (N) gets a new opportunity. ‘MA’ “Grits Ratio” ‘MA’ ‘MA’ “Inglourious Basterds” (2009, War) Brad Pitt, Mélanie Laurent, Christoph (:35) “The Death of Stalin” (2017, Comedy) Steve Buscemi, “TrainspotWaltz. Soldiers seek Nazi scalps in German-occupied France. ‘R’ Andrea Riseborough. A power struggle ensues when dictator ting” (1996) Joseph Stalin dies. ‘R’

Clarion TV

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release dates: April 20-26, 2019

16 (19)

C8 | Sunday, April 21, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

Next Week: Leonardo da Vinci

Founded by Betty Debnam

Spring’s Flowering Trees

Neighbors plant trees during a Baltimore community project.

Mini Fact: Washington, D.C., is famous for its cherry blossoms.

photo by Scott Kashnow

What is Arbor Day?

Arbor Day celebrates the importance of trees. (Arbor means tree.) National Arbor Day falls on the last Friday in April. Each state also has its own Arbor Day. Many states in the southern United States celebrate it in February or March. Many northern states celebrate it in May.

image courtesy Library of Congress

In spring, many flowers begin blooming on the ground and in the trees. Have the trees in your neighborhood burst into bloom yet? The Mini Page celebrates Arbor Day, April 26, by taking a good look at the beautiful trees of spring.

Blooming time

Most trees bloom in the spring. However, some trees, such as the hazelnut, bloom in late winter. Others, such as some magnolias, bloom during the spring and the summer. Trees might also bloom when something goes wrong with their environment. For example, hurricanes can strip the leaves off many trees. Afterward, some of these trees may start to flower, even if it’s the wrong season for blooming. Sometimes during mild winters, trees flower early. But if snow and ice come after the flowers are out, these flowers die. When it warms up again, trees may start growing leaves, but they may not be able to produce fruit.

Reproduction

All trees have flowers. It is the flowers that make the seeds. Pollen is a fine golden dust from flowers. In order for a flower to make seeds, pollen from the male part (the stamens) must reach the female part (the pistil). This is called pollination (pah-luh-NAY-shun).

images courtesy Arbor Day Foundation

Issue 16, 2019

After the female part receives the pollen, it can make seeds. Some tree types have male and female flowers Kids plant a tree as part of an on the same Arbor Day event. tree. Others have only female flowers or male flowers.

Arbor Day history

Arbor Day was started in 1872 by J. Sterling Morton, a journalist and politician in Nebraska. At that time, the state had very few trees, and settlers missed them. Morton urged Nebraskans to have a tree-planting holiday. On the first Arbor Day, the people in that state planted more than 1 million trees. In 1885, Nebraska named it a legal holiday, to be celebrated on April 22, Morton’s birthday. In 1970, President Richard Nixon first declared that Arbor Day would be celebrated nationally on the last Friday in April.

Fruits

Trees need a way to spread their seeds. One way they do this is to grow a fruit that encloses their seeds. Animals carry away the fruit. Or animals eat the fruit and the seeds pass through their bodies. The sugary food in juicy fruits, such as apples and oranges, helps new seeds get a good start. Not all fruit is sweet and juicy. A nut is actually a dry fruit with a hard, dry fruit ball around the seed.

Helping the environment

Flowering trees help the environment and the economy in many ways. Trees: • create beauty; • attract tourists; • provide shade and cooling; • help keep waterways clean; • make food for people and animals; • provide shelter for animals; • produce oxygen; • provide fuel for cooking and heating.

Resources On the Web:

• arborday.org/kids

At the library:

• “Tree” by Richard Spilsbury • “Healthy Trees, Healthy Planet” by Anne Flounders

The Mini Page® © 2019 Andrews McMeel Syndication

Try ’n’ Find

Mini Jokes

Words that remind us of flowering trees are hidden in this puzzle. Some words are hidden backward, and some letters are used twice. See if you can find: ANIMAL, ARBOR, BLOOM, DAY, FLOWER, FRUIT, HELP, IMPORTANT, LEAVES, NEBRASKA, NUTS, PISTIL, PLANT, POLLEN, POLLINATION, SEEDS, SPRING, STAMENS, TREES, WASHINGTON.

R H E L P Y P G P L

E I M T R E E S I A

W F R U I T S P S M

O Q K P Z W N T T I

L B L O O M E N I N

F A A L X N M A L A

I R K L N E A T F G

Y B S I U L T R S N

T O A N T L S O E I

Timmy: How do trees get on the internet? Tina: They log in!

N R R A S O Z P V R

A Q B T P P H M A P

L F E I G J W I E S

P V N O B Z C A L Y

D A Y N P S D E E S

N O T G N I H S A W

Eco Note

• 2 vegetable bouillon cubes with herbs or sea salt

What to do: 1. Rinse lentils really well in a fine-mesh strainer, then place all ingredients in a large pot. Bring to a big bubbly boil for a minute or so. 2. Turn heat to medium-low, stir and simmer, covered, for about 15 minutes until lentils become soft and mashy. 3. Turn off heat, then stir and mash well with a wooden spoon. Make it thinner if you like by stirring in 1 cup water. Soup will thicken overnight. Serves 4 to 6. Adapted from “The Help Yourself Cookbook for Kids” with permission from Andrews McMeel Publishing (andrewsmcmeel.com).

7 Little Words for Kids Use the letters in the boxes to make a word with the same meaning as the clue. The numbers in parentheses represent the number of letters in the solution. Each letter combination can be used only once, but all letter combinations will be necessary to complete the puzzle.

1. hippo or mouse, for example (6) 2. learning about (8) 3. 12 months (4) 4. not valuable (7) 5. what a college graduate has (6) 6. necessary (9) 7. having life (5)

REE

ORT LESS

AL

YE

YING ANT

VE

ALI

USE

AN

IM

AR

IMP STUD

DEG

The Mini Page® © 2019 Andrews McMeel Syndication

You’ll need: • 1 1/2 cups red lentils • 1 yellow onion, chopped • 4 cups water

©2019 Blue Ox Technologies Ltd. Download the app on Apple and Amazon devices.

Lentil Mental Magic Soup

* You’ll need an adult’s help with this recipe.

Cook’s Corner

The rings on a tree stump can tell us how old the tree is and what the weather was like during each year of the tree’s life. The light-colored rings represent wood that grew in the spring and early summer, while the dark rings represent wood that grew in the late summer and fall. One light ring plus one dark ring equals one year of the tree’s life. Tree rings usually grow wider in warm, wet years and are thinner in years when it is cold and dry. If the tree has experienced stressful conditions, such as a drought, the tree might hardly grow at all in those years. adapted from climatekids.nasa.gov

For later: Look in your newspaper for Arbor Day events nearby.

Teachers: For standards-based activities to accompany this feature, visit: bit.ly/MPstandards. And follow The Mini Page on Facebook!

Answers: animal, studying, year, useless, degree, important, alive.


Peninsula Clarion | Sunday, April 21, 2019 | C9

Meet Clarion sports reporter Jeff Helminiak By KAT SORENSEN Peninsula Clarion

Sports and Features Editor Jeff Helminiak has been working around his erratic schedule at the Peninsula Clarion since 1997. Helminiak moved to Kenai from Wisconsin shortly after a guided float trip with his father on the Tatshenshini-Alsek system in Southeast Alaska. “The notorious Southeast rain was absent for the whole trip,” Helminiak said. “I’d just graduated with a degree in journalism, and when we returned, we walked past the Juneau Empire office and I thought to myself, “You know, I could see being a journalist in Alaska.” Twenty-two years later and Helminiak is the longest standing employee at the Peninsula Clarion.

V irginia W alters

L ife in the P edestrian L ane I’m having a little trouble with gender neutrality. Mostly because I grew up with a brother and sister; I raised three boys and a girl, and I’ve been married a really long time. The idea that there is no real difference between male and female except a manufactured, artificial one just doesn’t square with my experience. As I understand gender neutrality, new parents won’t declare the baby’s gender when it is born, and will wait for it to choose when it’s old enough. (Notice the gender neutral pronoun??) Whenever that is.

“I didn’t know much about the area,” Helminiak said. “I remember driving down from Anchorage and getting really excited at all the scenery. As I headed to the central Kenai Peninsula, I was like, “What happened to the mountains?” Since that initial drive, though, Helminiak has explored everything the Kenai Peninsula has to offer. From skiing Tsalteshi Trails to hiking Cecil Rhode Mountain in Cooper Landing, he spends his time out of the office enjoying Alaska. Last summer, Helminiak found himself summiting Mount Ascension near Seward on a solo adventure. “I went planning to scout it out for a future hike and didn’t plan on getting to Jeff Helminiak has worked as a reporter for the Clarion the summit. I sliced open since 1997. (Photo courtesy of Jeff Helminiak) my hand on some shale and had to double back due to But there was still an oppor- wasn’t a cloud in the sky, a poor route on the glacier. tunity to summit and there so I took that opportunity.

Obviously, these newbies don’t know a thing about kids. Until about age 6, kids don’t recognize a difference in the genders anyway and then only because some second grader tells them to. I believe ‘neutrality’ gets mixed up with gender ’bias’ and has something to do with what toys they are handed to play with or the clothing we give them to wear. We hand Jr. a cowboy hat and he wants to wear a tiara…so what? So does the Burger King. Daughter likes to fix the outboard instead of play Barbie… good thing, you might need an extra hand out fishing some day. The argument isn’t whether a person can do anything he/she wants. That goes without saying. I just heard of a young woman who has won a full football scholarship to Central Methodist University to play defensive back. Something she had worked hard for since she was old enough to

It’s a ..?

throw a football. Her life goal is to be the first woman to play for the NFL. And male nurses have brought a totally new dimension to the previously all-female field because they bring a different perspective to the profession. Not because they are just like the women, but because they are not. I am of the age to remember when there was a major push to get male teachers into the primary grades because little boys needed more male role models since they had just spent their first six years being influenced by Mom. If the genders are the same, it shouldn’t have made any difference. Society has changed a bit from the original hunter-gatherer format we started with. The need to specialize is gone, but the brain wiring stays the same. Men tend to be more sin-

gle-minded,( I did not say stubborn!) because as the ‘hunters’ they needed to concentrate on finding and securing the day’s supply of meat. Women are better multi-taskers because their role as gatherer, and by default care-giver of small children, led to the need to be able to split their attention and still produce. That’s why men make such great shoppers. Oh, no, don’t TAKE one shopping, SEND him shopping. In and out, back in a flash. Of course there will be no improvisation and you won’t get anything that is not on the list but for sure if you asked for an onion, you will get AN onion. However, in full disclosure, sending Granddaughter to the store needs an extra half hour and room to store the onions because they were five pounds for $2 and she knew we’d

When I’ve seen Ascension since then, I really don’t believe I was up there.” When he’s not looking at the weekly weather forecast, watching for the bluebird days, Helminiak is keeping an eye on the weekly sports schedule. One of his favorite local events to cover is the Mount Marathon Race on the Fourth of July in Seward. “There’s something special, something universal, about it that draws spectators who otherwise would never attend a running race. I’ve yet to put my finger on what that something is,” he said. One year in particular stands out in his mind. Elite mountain runners Killian Jornet and Emelie Forsberg competed in 2015, winning the men’s and women’s race respectively. “I’ll always remember

when Forsberg crossed the line with a huge smile at 47 minutes, 48 seconds, obliterating the iconic 1990 record of 50:30 by Nancy Pease,” Helminiak said. “There was an odd, momentary pause among journalists and volunteers at the finish line in the seconds after she finished, with everybody clearly asking themselves, “Did that really just happen?”” Despite his love for sports, Helminiak finds it hard to make time for national level events. “I’m the sports editor, but because I work afternoons, nights and weekends, I rarely get to watch national sports live on TV,” Helminiak said. “That’s why I love the Australian Open men’s final. It starts at 11:30 p.m. on a Saturday night in Alaska. It’s the only event I can get off work and watch like a normal person.”

need them eventually and by the way avocados and banana were on sale too, so….. We tend to make jokes about that brain difference because it is still in operation but that’s what makes life interesting. Given the opportunity, men and women work well together. Men will get Plan A done fast and efficiently, but if Plan A doesn’t work (heaven forbid!) the women will produce either a different approach to Plan A or a Plan B (and C and D ). Both ways are beneficial to any project. And, whether you believe in Creation or in Evolution, why are there two genders if they are the same? The animal kingdom has several examples of species with only one gender (slugs and earthworms come to mind). Humans could look like the Pillsbury Doughboy and simply pinch off a little blob every

time they wanted to reproduce if in fact, they are the same. I think two genders developed because each has a specific role in maintaining the species (besides the obvious one) that complement each other: neither being better or lesser but equal in importance. Gender neutrality might seem like the next societal step but can only lead to confusion for the kids involved. Denying to acknowledge their gender because YOU are offended by the definition is the ultimate in narcissism and can only lead to future gender confusion. As I understand, if I had practiced gender neutrality in raising my four kids, the boys would all know how to cook and the girl could cuss like a sailor. Guess what! I was ahead of the time!! Like it or not, boys and girls are different. Ask any second grader.


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Spring Sports 2019 a Special Publication of the Peninsula Clarion

Index Track & Field Girls Softball Boys Baseball Girls Soccer Boys Soccer

2-3 4 5 6 7


Peninsula Clarion

Cook Inlet Academy Eagles Track & Field

Left to right: Coach Lacy West, Brianna Hammond, Grizzly Beard, Isaac Johnson.

Homer High School Mariners Track & Field Homer High School Track Day Friday

Date April 19

Meet Colony Invite

Place Away

Time TBA

Saturday

April 20

Colony Invite

Away

TBA

Thursday

April 25

Kodiak

Home

3:30 p.m.

Friday

April 26

SoHi Invite

Away

TBA

Saturday

April 26

SoHi Invite

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 4

Kenai Invite

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 11

Boroughs

Home

10 a.m.

Friday

May 17

Regions at SoHi

Away

10 a.m.

Saturday

May 18

Regions at SoHi

Away

10 a.m.

Friday

May 24

State at Palmer

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 25

State at Palmer

Away

TBA

Schedules subject to change

Back row, left to right: Coach Tannen Berry, Izzy Fisk, Aiden Brost, Adams Veldstra, Silas McGhee, Josh Manwiller, Anna Brock, Corbin Mattingly, coach Bob Ostrom. Middle row, left to right: Coach Nikki Fazenbaker, Katarina Hockema, Rachelle Biggs, Brooke Miller, Haylee Overson, Izzy Gregoire, Kaya Dalke, manager Brita Restad. Front row, left to right: Angelica Haakenson, Ella Blanton-Yourkowski, Evan Welty, Hunter Patton, Isabel Kulhanek, Caleb Evans. Not pictured: Marina Carroll, Ryan Carroll, Eli King. (Photo by Lifetouch)

Kenai High School Kardinals Track & Field Kenai High School Track Day Friday

Date April 5

Meet Place Big C Relays at The Dome Away

Time TBA

Saturday

April 6

Big C Relays at The Dome Away

TBA

Friday

April 19

Colony Invite

Away

TBA

Saturday

April 20

Colony Invite

Away

TBA

Friday

April 26

Soldotna Invite

Away

TBA

Saturday

April 27

Soldotna Invite

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 4

Kenai Invite

Home

TBA

Saturday

May 11

Boroughs at Homer

Away

TBA

Friday

May 17

Region meet at Soldotna

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 18

Region meet at Soldotna

Away

TBA

Friday

May 24

State at Palmer

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 25

State at Palmer

Away

TBA

Schedules subject to change

Back row, left to right: Jeff Easling, Maison Dunham, Tyler Hippchen, Sorin Sorenson, Billy Morrow, Kaden McKibben, Brooke Satathite, Nathan Haakenson, Denali Bernard, Samuel Roberts, Catie Stockton, Savannah Wilson, Jarrett Wilson, Brooke Ashley, Logan Satathite, Tucker Mueller, Josh Foster. Middle row, left to right: Candice Bowers, Melita Efta, Caden Hall, Kylie Anne-Raye, Grace Morrow, Kyaran Maturro, Jaycie Calvert, Betsy Moffett, Sabrina McConnell, Leah Fallon. Bottom row, left to right: Elias Machen-Gray, Luke Cross, Ocean Matley, Riley Graves, Hayley Maw, Shelbie Naylor, Gabie Tews, Kateryna Domanska, Summer Foster, Sydney Johnson.

Nikiski High School Bulldogs Track & Field Nikiski High School Track Day Friday

Date April 19

Meet Big C Relays

Place Away

Time TBA

Saturday

April 20

Big C Relays

Away

TBA

Friday

April 26

SoHi Invite

Away

TBA

Saturday

April 27

SoHi Invite

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 4

Kenai Invite

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 11

Boroughs at Homer

Away

TBA

Friday

May 17

Regions at SoHi

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 18

Regions at SoHi

Away

TBA

Friday

May 24

State at Palmer

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 25

State at Palmer

Away

TBA

Schedules subject to change

Back row, left to right: Justin Harris, Savannah Ley, Levi Anderson, Bryan McCollum, Hunter Greene, Garrett Ellis, Boden Quiner. Middle row, left to right: Eli Porter (coach), Patrick Henry, Kandice Cornett, Ndea Rollins, Brady Evoy, Bethany Carstens, Bailey Epperheimer, Paul Nelson (coach), Caleb Weeks. Bottom row, left to right: Shylea Freeman, Madalyn Stichal, Hamilton Cox, Quentin Oskolkof, Sidney Epperheimer, Griffin Grey.


Peninsula Clarion

Soldotna High School Stars Track & Field Soldotna High School Track Day Friday

Date April 19

Meet Colony Invite

Place Away

Time TBA

Saturday

April 20

Colony Invite

Away

TBA

Friday

April 26

SoHi Invite

Home

TBA

Saturday

April 27

SoHi Invite

Home

TBA

Saturday

May 4

Kenai Invite

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 11

Boroughs in Homer

Away

TBA

Friday

May 17

Regions at SoHi

Home

TBA

Saturday

May 18

Regions at SoHi

Home

TBA

Friday

May 24

State at Palmer

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 25

State at Palmer

Away

TBA

Schedules subject to change

Front row, left to right: Brittany Taylor, Mikayla Leadens, Danica Schmidt, Ituau Tuisaula, Galen Brantley III, Aaron Faletoi, Cody Nye, Bailey Leach, Chris Edelman, Robbie Mize, Ben Booth, Frazier Groseclose. Second row, left to right: Elena Dimitrovski, Ashley Anderson, Autumn Fisher, Erika Arthur, Kylie Ness, Alex Juliussen, Ivy Daly, Levi Benner, Jack Harris, Kaden Matson, Madilynn Kessler, Ryan Hill, Manny Jennings. Third row, left to right: Trenton Boots, Kalyn McGillivray, Aliann Schmidt, Morgan Bouschor, Josie Moore, Kaden Spies, Dylan Dahlgren, William Hamby, Wyatt Wurst, David Grinestaff, Michael Rutledge, Cameron Sorensen. Fourth row, left to right: Carson Dement, Gabby Lane, Kaidence Schaeffer, Ayla Read, Tessa Dearmoore, Saiyan Baker, Brian Whitaker, Tyler Morrison, Jordan Spies, Tytus Gilbert, Wyatt Dement, Aaron Michael Leonard, Rachel Spence. Top row, left to right: Emmy Reese, Jordan Ruffner, Diana Nasibog, Emma Brantley, Bethany Richmond, Ellie Burns, Corbin Wirz, Bradley Walters, Sean Babbot, Wyatt Medcoff, Zach Hanson, Will Simmons, Makbeb Denbrok, Nate Johnson, Logan Shane, Brock Wilson. Not pictured: Holleigh Jaime, Isreal Aley, Lia Benner, Brooklyn Chadburn, Giulia Giavari, Noah Harper, Spencer Kapp, Brian Kuhr, Reeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Lynn Lisenby, Malakhi Hanson, Melvin Loyd, Trenton Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reagan, Sophie Thomas, Jeremy Kupferschmid, Eli Cravens.

Alaska Kenai Peninsula Chapter Safari Club International 28th Annual Midnight Sun Fundraiser and Banquet Soldotna Sports Center Doors open at 5 PM

Tickets $70.00

safarikenai.auctionreg.org to purchase tickets Limited seating Get your tickets early All funds raised go to support women and youth hunting and shooting sports, humanitarian efforts conservation, hunters rights, veterans and American Wilderness Leadership School Come join us for a night of fun! Live auctions, silent auctions raffles and lots of firearms to give away.


Peninsula Clarion

Soldotna High School Stars Track & Field Soldotna High School Track Day Friday

Date April 19

Meet Colony Invite

Place Away

Time TBA

Saturday

April 20

Colony Invite

Away

TBA

Friday

April 26

SoHi Invite

Home

TBA

Saturday

April 27

SoHi Invite

Home

TBA

Saturday

May 4

Kenai Invite

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 11

Boroughs in Homer

Away

TBA

Friday

May 17

Regions at SoHi

Home

TBA

Saturday

May 18

Regions at SoHi

Home

TBA

Friday

May 24

State at Palmer

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 25

State at Palmer

Away

TBA

Schedules subject to change

Front row, left to right: Brittany Taylor, Mikayla Leadens, Danica Schmidt, Ituau Tuisaula, Galen Brantley III, Aaron Faletoi, Cody Nye, Bailey Leach, Chris Edelman, Robbie Mize, Ben Booth, Frazier Groseclose. Second row, left to right: Elena Dimitrovski, Ashley Anderson, Autumn Fisher, Erika Arthur, Kylie Ness, Alex Juliussen, Ivy Daly, Levi Benner, Jack Harris, Kaden Matson, Madilynn Kessler, Ryan Hill, Manny Jennings. Third row, left to right: Trenton Boots, Kalyn McGillivray, Aliann Schmidt, Morgan Bouschor, Josie Moore, Kaden Spies, Dylan Dahlgren, William Hamby, Wyatt Wurst, David Grinestaff, Michael Rutledge, Cameron Sorensen. Fourth row, left to right: Carson Dement, Gabby Lane, Kaidence Schaeffer, Ayla Read, Tessa Dearmoore, Saiyan Baker, Brian Whitaker, Tyler Morrison, Jordan Spies, Tytus Gilbert, Wyatt Dement, Aaron Michael Leonard, Rachel Spence. Top row, left to right: Emmy Reese, Jordan Ruffner, Diana Nasibog, Emma Brantley, Bethany Richmond, Ellie Burns, Corbin Wirz, Bradley Walters, Sean Babbot, Wyatt Medcoff, Zach Hanson, Will Simmons, Makbeb Denbrok, Nate Johnson, Logan Shane, Brock Wilson. Not pictured: Holleigh Jaime, Isreal Aley, Lia Benner, Brooklyn Chadburn, Giulia Giavari, Noah Harper, Spencer Kapp, Brian Kuhr, Reeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Lynn Lisenby, Malakhi Hanson, Melvin Loyd, Trenton Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reagan, Sophie Thomas, Jeremy Kupferschmid, Eli Cravens.

Alaska Kenai Peninsula Chapter Safari Club International 28th Annual Midnight Sun Fundraiser and Banquet Soldotna Sports Center Doors open at 5 PM

Tickets $70.00

safarikenai.auctionreg.org to purchase tickets Limited seating Get your tickets early All funds raised go to support women and youth hunting and shooting sports, humanitarian efforts conservation, hunters rights, veterans and American Wilderness Leadership School Come join us for a night of fun! Live auctions, silent auctions raffles and lots of firearms to give away.


Peninsula Clarion

Homer High School Mariners Girls Softball Homer High School Girls Softball Day Tuesday Friday Saturday Tuesday Friday Saturday Tuesday Thursday

Date April 23 April 26 April 27 April 30 May 3 May 4 May 7 May 9

Friday

May 10 Blue, Gold Battle in Away Anchorage May 11 Blue, Gold Battle in Away Anchorage May 13 Kenai Away May 17 Anchorage tourney Home May 18 Anchorage tourney Home May 24 NLC Tourney at Away Kenai May 25 NLC Tourney at Away Kenai May 30 State at Anchorage Away May 31 State at Anchorage Away June 1 State at Anchorage Away Schedules subject to change

Saturday Monday Friday Saturday Friday Saturday Thursday Friday Saturday Back row, left to right: Annalynn Brown, Zoe Adkins, Bri Hetrick, Grace Godfrey, Kaitlyn Johnson. Front row, left to right: Haylee Owen, Hannah Hatfield, Becca Shapman. Not pictured: Sadie Blake, Delilah Harris, Elizabeth Love, Kaylin Anderson. (Photo by Lifetouch)

Opponent Kenai Kodiak Kodiak Soldotna Rally in the Valley Rally in the Valley Soldotna Houston

Place Home Home Home Home Away Away Away Away

Time 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 2 p.m. 6 p.m. TBA TBA 6 p.m. 3, 5 p.m. TBA TBA 6 p.m. TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

Kenai High School Kardinals Girls Softball Kenai High School Girls Softball Day Friday

Date April 19

Opponent Kodiak

Saturday

April 20

Kodiak

Tuesday Friday Saturday Friday

April 23 April 26 April 27 May 3

Homer Palmer Palmer Houston

Monday Wednesday Friday Friday

May 13 May 15 May 17 May 24

Saturday Thursday Friday Saturday

Place Time Away 4, 6 p.m. Away 10 a.m., noon Away 6 p.m. Home 6 p.m. Home noon Home 4, 6 p.m. Home 2 p.m. Away 6 p.m. Home 2 p.m. Home TBA

Homer Soldotna Soldotna Northern Lights tourney May 25 Northern Lights Home tourney May 30 State at Anchorage Away May 31 State at Anchorage Away June 1 State at Anchorage Away Schedules subject to change

TBA TBA TBA TBA

Back row, left to right: Zaharah Wilshusen, Nereid Phillips, Amber Nash, Taylor Carver, Lexi Reis, Abby Every, Kaylee Lauritsen, Hermoine Lanfear, Nani Raposa, manager Emry Wolverton. Front row, left to right: Katrina Fisk, Elizabeth Brinner, Madeline Edelen, Kaidence Harvey, Kylan Lakshas, Caitlin Crabb, Tamara Frates. Not pictured: Payton Matturro, Andie Galloway.

Soldotna High School Stars Girls Softball Soldotna High School Girls Softball Day Thursday

Date Opponent April 25 Lathrop

Place Time Away 7 p.m.

Friday

April 26 West Valley

Away

Saturday

April 27 Delta

Away

Tuesday Saturday

April 30 Homer May 4 Houston

Away Home

Tuesday

May 7

Homer

Home

5:30, 7:30 p.m. 10 a.m., noon 6 p.m. noon, 2 p.m. 6 p.m.

Friday

May 10 Kodiak

Away

6 p.m.

Saturday

May 11 Kodiak

Away

noon

Wednesday May 15 Kenai

Home

6 p.m.

Friday

May 17 Kenai

Away

6 p.m.

Friday

May 24 NLC tourney at Away Kenai May 25 NLC tourney at Away Kenai May 30 State at Away Fairbanks May 31 State at Away Fairbanks June1 State at Away Fairbanks Schedules subject to change

Saturday Thursday Friday Back row, left to right: James Knoebel (assistant), Briana Theel, Hanna Giugler, Harley Thomas, Bailey Smith, Emilie Grimes, Carmen Romero, Ashlyn Asp, Kelli Knoebel (head coach). Middle row, left to right: Emily Barto, Kylie Loop, Lillian Gomez, Janna Krieger, Casey Earll, Casey Card, Summer Tugan, Elora Olsen. Front row , left to right: Lexi Giles, Tori Giles, Bailey Berger, Ashley McDonald, Macie Schroeder, Austen McQueen, Emily Hinz, Angela Sorto. Not pictured: Estrella Slats.

Saturday

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA


Peninsula Clarion

Homer High School Mariners Boys Baseball

Homer High School Boys Baseball Day Wednesday Friday Saturday Thursday Friday Saturday Wednesday Friday Saturday Wednesday Thursday Saturday Thursday Friday Saturday

Back row, left to right: Timmy Hatfield, Jack Strydom, Liam Houlihan, Colby Marion, Coda Wood, Dodge Petrosius, Cade Hrenchir. Middle row, left to right: Coach James Webber, Harrison Metz, Noah Irons, Rhodes Turner, Ridge Marion, Austin Dash, Gabe Dash, coach Rich Sonnen, coach Mike Hayes. Front row, left to right: Manager Amiya Varga, Austin Ceccarelli, Karl Wickstrom, Hunter Warren, Mose Hayes. Not pictured: Seth Adkins, Colton Espeland. (Photo by Lifetouch)

Thursday Friday Saturday

Date April 24 April 26 April 27 May 2 May 3 May 4 May 8 May 10 May 11 May 15 May 16 May 18 May 23

Opponent Place Kenai Home Anchorage Away Anchorage Away Houston Home Grace Home Palmer Home Soldotna Home Wasilla Away Colony Away Soldotna Away Kodiak Home Kenai Away SC tourney at Away Houston May 24 SC tourney at Away Houston May 25 SC tourney at Away Houston May 30 State in Anchorage Away May 31 State in Anchorage Away June 1 State in Anchorage Away Schedules subject to change

Time 6:30 p.m. TBA TBA 6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 2 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m. 7 p.m. 2:30 p.m. TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

Kenai High School Kardinals Boys Baseball Kenai High School Boys Baseball Day Thursday

Place Time Away 6 p.m.

Wednesday April 24 Homer

Away

6:30 p.m.

Tuesday

April 30 Soldotna

Away

6:30 p.m.

Friday

May 3

Wasilla

Home

6:30 p.m.

Saturday

May 4

Colony

Home

Tuesday

May 7

Soldotna

Home

12:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m.

Friday

May 10 Grace

Home

6:30 p.m.

Saturday

May 11 Houston

Away

4 p.m.

Friday

May 17 Kodiak

Home

6:30 p.m.

Saturday

May 18 Homer

Home

2:30 p.m.

Thursday

Away

TBA

Away

TBA

Away

TBA

Thursday

May 23 SC tourney at Houston May 24 SC tourney at Houston May 25 SC tourney at Houston May 30 State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Friday

May 31 State in Anchorage Away

TBA

Saturday

June 1

TBA

Friday Saturday

Back row, left to right: Head coach Luke Oliver, Andrew Carver, Sam Berry, Knox Amend, Parker Mattox, Caleb Smith, J.T. Lott, Ben Spinka. Front row, left to right: Xander Amend, Harold Ochea, Clayton Koroll, Lance Kramer, Jackson Duperron, Jaryn Zoda, Seth Segura.

Date Opponent April 18 Palmer

State in Anchorage Away

Schedules subject to change

Soldotna High School Stars Boys Baseball Soldotna High School Boys Baseball

Back row, left to right: Kenny Griffin (assistant), Riley Johnson, Bryan Kingrey, Trenton Steadman, Davey Belger, Tanner Ussing, Ashton Jones, Atticus Gibson, Gavin Brennen, Logan Smith (assistant). Middle row, left to right: Timmy Cashman, Cameron Presley, Chris Jaime, Jeremy Kupferschmid, Lucas Kline, Josh Pieh, Sarah Mickelson, Josh Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Lena, Jacob Belger. Front row, left to right: Simon Graham, Brennen Werner, Seth Payment, Foster Boze, Trapper Thompson, Jacob Boze, Ethan Sewell, Carson Ratz. Not pictured: David Michael.

Day Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Tuesday Thursday Friday Saturday

Date April 24 April 25 April 26 April 27 April 30 May 2 May 3 May 4

Opponent Wasilla tourney Wasilla tourney Wasilla tourney Wasilla tourney Kenai Wasilla Colony Grace

Place Away Away Away Away Home Home Home Home

Tuesday Wednesday Friday Saturday Wednesday Thursday Friday

May 7 May 8 May 10 May 11 May 15 May 16 May 17

Kenai Homer Kodiak Kodiak Homer Houston Palmer

Away Away Away Away Home Away Away

Saturday Thursday Friday Saturday Thursday Friday Saturday

May 18 Wasilla Away May 23 SC at Houston Away May 24 SC at Houston Away May 25 SC at Houston Away May 30 State at Anchorage Away May 31 State at Anchorage Away June 1 State at Anchorage Away Schedules subject to change

Time TBA TBA TBA TBA 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 11 a.m., 1 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 1 p.m. 6 p.m. 7 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 2 p.m. TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA


Peninsula Clarion

Homer High School Mariners Boys Baseball

Homer High School Boys Baseball Day Wednesday Friday Saturday Thursday Friday Saturday Wednesday Friday Saturday Wednesday Thursday Saturday Thursday Friday Saturday

Back row, left to right: Timmy Hatfield, Jack Strydom, Liam Houlihan, Colby Marion, Coda Wood, Dodge Petrosius, Cade Hrenchir. Middle row, left to right: Coach James Webber, Harrison Metz, Noah Irons, Rhodes Turner, Ridge Marion, Austin Dash, Gabe Dash, coach Rich Sonnen, coach Mike Hayes. Front row, left to right: Manager Amiya Varga, Austin Ceccarelli, Karl Wickstrom, Hunter Warren, Mose Hayes. Not pictured: Seth Adkins, Colton Espeland. (Photo by Lifetouch)

Thursday Friday Saturday

Date April 24 April 26 April 27 May 2 May 3 May 4 May 8 May 10 May 11 May 15 May 16 May 18 May 23

Opponent Place Kenai Home Anchorage Away Anchorage Away Houston Home Grace Home Palmer Home Soldotna Home Wasilla Away Colony Away Soldotna Away Kodiak Home Kenai Away SC tourney at Away Houston May 24 SC tourney at Away Houston May 25 SC tourney at Away Houston May 30 State in Anchorage Away May 31 State in Anchorage Away June 1 State in Anchorage Away Schedules subject to change

Time 6:30 p.m. TBA TBA 6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 2 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m. 7 p.m. 2:30 p.m. TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

Kenai High School Kardinals Boys Baseball Kenai High School Boys Baseball Day Thursday

Place Time Away 6 p.m.

Wednesday April 24 Homer

Away

6:30 p.m.

Tuesday

April 30 Soldotna

Away

6:30 p.m.

Friday

May 3

Wasilla

Home

6:30 p.m.

Saturday

May 4

Colony

Home

Tuesday

May 7

Soldotna

Home

12:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m.

Friday

May 10 Grace

Home

6:30 p.m.

Saturday

May 11 Houston

Away

4 p.m.

Friday

May 17 Kodiak

Home

6:30 p.m.

Saturday

May 18 Homer

Home

2:30 p.m.

Thursday

Away

TBA

Away

TBA

Away

TBA

Thursday

May 23 SC tourney at Houston May 24 SC tourney at Houston May 25 SC tourney at Houston May 30 State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Friday

May 31 State in Anchorage Away

TBA

Saturday

June 1

TBA

Friday Saturday

Back row, left to right: Head coach Luke Oliver, Andrew Carver, Sam Berry, Knox Amend, Parker Mattox, Caleb Smith, J.T. Lott, Ben Spinka. Front row, left to right: Xander Amend, Harold Ochea, Clayton Koroll, Lance Kramer, Jackson Duperron, Jaryn Zoda, Seth Segura.

Date Opponent April 18 Palmer

State in Anchorage Away

Schedules subject to change

Soldotna High School Stars Boys Baseball Soldotna High School Boys Baseball

Back row, left to right: Kenny Griffin (assistant), Riley Johnson, Bryan Kingrey, Trenton Steadman, Davey Belger, Tanner Ussing, Ashton Jones, Atticus Gibson, Gavin Brennen, Logan Smith (assistant). Middle row, left to right: Timmy Cashman, Cameron Presley, Chris Jaime, Jeremy Kupferschmid, Lucas Kline, Josh Pieh, Sarah Mickelson, Josh Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Lena, Jacob Belger. Front row, left to right: Simon Graham, Brennen Werner, Seth Payment, Foster Boze, Trapper Thompson, Jacob Boze, Ethan Sewell, Carson Ratz. Not pictured: David Michael.

Day Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Tuesday Thursday Friday Saturday

Date April 24 April 25 April 26 April 27 April 30 May 2 May 3 May 4

Opponent Wasilla tourney Wasilla tourney Wasilla tourney Wasilla tourney Kenai Wasilla Colony Grace

Place Away Away Away Away Home Home Home Home

Tuesday Wednesday Friday Saturday Wednesday Thursday Friday

May 7 May 8 May 10 May 11 May 15 May 16 May 17

Kenai Homer Kodiak Kodiak Homer Houston Palmer

Away Away Away Away Home Away Away

Saturday Thursday Friday Saturday Thursday Friday Saturday

May 18 Wasilla Away May 23 SC at Houston Away May 24 SC at Houston Away May 25 SC at Houston Away May 30 State at Anchorage Away May 31 State at Anchorage Away June 1 State at Anchorage Away Schedules subject to change

Time TBA TBA TBA TBA 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 11 a.m., 1 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 1 p.m. 6 p.m. 7 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 2 p.m. TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA


Peninsula Clarion

Homer High School Mariners Girls Soccer Homer High School Girls Soccer

Back row, left to right: Coach Dan Newsted, Mya Houglum, Mariah McGuire, Hailee Alexander, Harmony Davidson, Kira Milne, Paige Jones, Jamie Parrish, Kim Lynn, Olivia Glasman. Third row, left to right: Kailee Dee, Sela Weisser, Aiyana Cline, Ava Halsted, Riley Doughty, Serena Fankhauser, Sailey Rhodes, Maddox Berg, coach Mike Tozzo. Second row, left to right: Kappa Reutov, Zoe Stonorov, Shine Carey, Summer McGuire, Kera Jones, Laura Inama, manager Katelyn Engebretsen. (Photo by Lifetouch)

Day Thursday Friday Saturday Tuesday Thursday Friday Thursday Friday Saturday Tuesday Thursday Friday Saturday Thursday Friday Saturday Thursday Friday Saturday

Date Opponent Place April 18 Ketchikan Away April 19 Juneau-Douglas Away April 20 Thunder Mountain Away April 23 Nikiski Home April 25 Voznesenka Home April 26 Grace Home May 2 Palmer Away May 3 Wasilla Away May 4 Houston Colony May 7 Nikiski Away May 9 Kenai Home May 10 Thunder Mountain Home May 11 Soldotna Away Conference at Homer Home May 16 May 17 Conference at Homer Home Conference at Homer Home May 18 May 23 State in Anchorage Away May 24 State in Anchorage Away May 25 State in Anchorage Away Schedules subject to change

Time TBA TBA TBA 2 p.m. 6 p.m. 5 p.m. 5 p.m. 5 p.m. Noon 2 p.m. 6 p.m. 7 p.m. 2 p.m. TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

Kenai High School Kardinals Girls Soccer Kenai High School Girls Soccer

Back row, left to right: Savaya Bieber, Joyce Trenton, Elora Jennings, Raelynn Passe, Abigail Schneiders, Nasma Miraji, Anya Danielson, Kailey Hamilton, Damaris Severson, Julia Hanson, Rileigh Pace, Jolie Peterkin, Jaala Lopez, Olivia Brewer, Memphis Lion. Front row, left to right: Srinda Rongsakul, Kiara Moses, Aria Fabiano, Maryrose Macabuag, Taylor Pierce, Rachael Pitsch, Alissa Maw, Karley Harden, Nevaeh Olson, Valerie Villegas, Jenna Streiff. Not pictured: Bethany Morris, Amber Matthews, Taylor Andrew, Alyssa Bucho.

Day

Date

Opponent

Place

Time

Saturday

April 20

Grace

Away

noon

Monday

April 22

Soldotna

Home

4 p.m.

Tuesday

April 23

Seward

Home

4 p.m.

Tuesday

April 30

Nikiski

Away

4 p.m.

Thursday

May 2

Wasilla

Away

5 p.m.

Friday

May 3

Colony

Away

5 p.m.

Saturday

May 4

Palmer

Away

2 p.m.

Monday

May 6

Soldotna

Away

4 p.m.

Thursday

May 9

Homer

Away

4 p.m.

Saturday

May 11

Thunder Mountain

Home

noon

Thursday

May 16

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Friday

May 17

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Saturday

May 18

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Thursday

May 23

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Friday

May 24

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 25

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Schedules subject to change

Nikiski High School Bulldogs Girls Soccer Nikiski High School Girls Soccer Day

Back row, left to right: Angela Druesedow, Kelsey Clark, Elo Osborne, Katrina Isabell, McKinsey Pitt, Adrienne Stynsberg, Lillian Carstens, Tika Zimmerman, Kiki Suparote, Elsa Norgrette, Emma Wik, Hannah Young, America Jeffreys. Bottom row, left to right: Siobhan Dempsey, McKinlee Jeffreys, Jordyn Stock, Sammy Napoka, Rosalie Anderson, Flavie Antoniotti, Tawnisha Freeman, Mady Weeks, Cailin Yeager.

Date

Opponent

Place

Time

Thursday

April 18

Palmer

Away

5 p.m.

Friday

April 19

Houston

Away

4 p.m.

Saturday

April 20

Redington

Away

noon

Tuesday

April 23

Homer

Away

2 p.m.

Friday

April 26

Seward

Away

4 p.m.

Monday

April 29

Soldotna

Home

4 p.m.

Tuesday

April 30

Kenai

Home

4 p.m.

Friday

May 3

Seward

Home

4 p.m.

Tuesday

May 7

Homer

Home

4 p.m.

Thursday

May 9

Voznesenka

Home

4 p.m.

Friday

May 10

Houston

Home

4 p.m.

Saturday

May 11

Redington

Home

noon

Thursday

May 16

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Friday

May 17

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Saturday

May 18

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Thursday

May 23

State at Anchorage

Away

TBA

Friday

May 24

State at Anchorage

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 25

State at Anchorage

Away

TBA

Schedules subject to change

Soldotna High School Stars Girls Soccer Soldotna High School Girls Soccer Day

Back row, left to right: Cyanna Lindquist, Gracie Bass, Sarah Rice, Serena Larrow, Hannah Delker, Marina Walton, Cameron Blackwell, Kianna Holland, Kate Harris. Middle row, left to right: Abbie Fullenweider, Lily Coon, Sarina Wilkinson, Grace McElroy, Katie Delker, Mykenna Foster, Ryann Cannava, Rhys Cannava, Victoria Cunha, Sierra Longfellow, Margardia Mendoca, Drysta Crosby-Schneider, Justine Thomas. Front row, left to right: Jolie Widaman, Sonora Martin, Kortney Birch, Haley Buckbee, Pauline Catacutan, Meijan Leaf, Journey Miller, Katharine Bramante, Roos Meijer, Faith Glassmaker, Caleigh Glassmaker, Jordan Strausbaugh. Not pictured: Sierra Kuntz, Aleena Zener, Autumn Chumley, Kyrie Medina.

Date

Opponent

Place

Time

Thursday

April 18

Houston

Away

4 p.m.

Friday

April 19

Grace Christian

Away

5 p.m.

Monday

April 22

Kenai

Away

4 p.m.

Thursday

April 25

Ketchikan

Away

TBA

Friday

April 26

Juneau-Douglas

Away

TBA

Saturday

April 27

Thunder Mountain

Away

Noon

Monday

April 29

Nikiski

Away

4 p.m.

Thursday

May 2

Colony

Away

7 p.m.

Friday

May 3

Palmer

Away

5 p.m.

Saturday

May 4

Wasilla

Away

2 p.m.

Monday

May 6

Kenai

Home

4 p.m.

Tuesday

May 7

Seward

Home

4 p.m.

Thursday

May 9

Thunder Mountain

Home

7 p.m.

Saturday

May 11

Homer

Home

2 p.m.

Thursday

May 16

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Friday

May 17

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Saturday

May 18

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Thursday

May 23

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Friday

May 24

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 25

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Schedules subject to change


Peninsula Clarion

Homer High School Mariners Boys Soccer Homer High School Boys Soccer

Back row, left to right: Coach Warren Waldorf, Tanner Reid, Parker Lowney, Avram Salzmann, Clayton Beachy, Phinny Weston, Henry Russell, Edson Knapp, Desmond Vanlierre, Daniel Reutov, Ethan Pitzman, coach Kenneth Schneider. Second row, left to right: Eyoab Knapp, Casey Otis, Tucker Weston, Zander Kulhanek, Liam James, Kazden Stineff. Front row, left to right: Tom Gorman, Austin Shafford, Dexter Lowe, Owen Glassman.

Day

Date

Thursday

April 18

Ketchikan

Opponent

Away

Place Time TBA

Friday

April 19

Juneau

Away

TBA

Saturday

April 20

Thunder Mountain

Away

TBA

Tuesday

April 23

Nikiski

Home

4 p.m.

Friday

April 26

Grace

Home

7 p.m.

Thursday

May 2

Palmer

Away

7 p.m.

Friday

May 3

Wasilla

Away

7 p.m.

Tuesday

May 7

Nikiski

Away

4 p.m.

Thursday

May 9

Kenai

Away

6 p.m.

Friday

May 10

Thunder Mountain

Home

4 p.m.

Saturday

May 11

Soldotna

Away

4 p.m.

Thursday

May 16

Conference at Homer

Home

TBA

Friday

May 17

Conference at Homer

Home

TBA

Saturday

May 18

Conference at Homer

Home

TBA

Thursday

May 23

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Friday

May 24

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 25

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Schedules subject to change

Kenai High School Kardinals Boys Soccer Kenai High School Boys Soccer

Back row, left to right: Scott Pitsch (assistant), Adam Trujillo, Nate Beiser, Evan Stockton, Leif Lofquist, Travis Verkuilen, Francisco Garmen Munarriz, Tomas Levy-Canedo, Travis McKinley, James Baisden, Damien Redder, Tucker Vann, Zachary Stockton, Lucas Tunseth, Kai McKibben, Austin Stafford, Jordan Smith, Shane Lopez (head coach). Front row, left to right: James Sparks, Caleb Easling, Riley Updike, Koda Poulin, Ezok Villalva, Johann Carranza, Samuel Baisden, Livai Castrellon, Koa Diorec, Zachary Burnett, River Tomrelle, Joe Hamilton, Daniel Cazares, Gage Charlesworth, Isaiah Daniels. On ground (L to R): Braedon Pitsch, Aidan Milburn.

Day

Date

Saturday

April 20

Monday

Opponent

Place

Time

Grace

Away

2 p.m.

April 22

Soldotna

Home

6 p.m.

Tuesday

April 23

Seward

Home

6 p.m.

Tuesday

April 30

Nikiski

Away

6 p.m.

Thursday

May 2

Wasilla

Away

7 p.m.

Friday

May 3

Colony

Away

7 p.m.

Saturday

May 4

Palmer

Away

4 p.m.

Monday

May 6

Soldotna

Away

6 p.m.

Thursday

May 9

Homer

Home

6 p.m.

Saturday

May 11

Thunder Mountain

Home

2 p.m.

Thursday

May 16

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Friday

May 17

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Saturday

May 18

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Thursday

May 23

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Friday

May 24

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 25

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Schedules subject to change

Nikiski High School Bulldogs Boys Soccer Nikiski High School Boys Soccer

Back row, left to right: Pedro Souza, Isaiah Gray, Caileb Payne, Koleman McCaughey, Shane Weathers, Michael Eiter, Mason Payne, Dylan Harris, Tyler Smith (assistant), Harrison Deveer (head coach). Front row, left to right: Sam Smith, Trevor Mysing, Gavin White, Justin Harris, Michael Mysing, Cooper Stock, Jace Kornstad.

Day

Date

Opponent

Place

Time

Thursday

April 18

Palmer

Away

7 p.m.

Friday

April 19

Houston

Away

6 p.m.

Saturday

April 20

Redington

Away

2 p.m.

Tuesday

April 23

Homer

Away

4 p.m.

Friday

April 26

Seward

Away

6 p.m.

Monday

April 29

Soldotna

Home

6 p.m.

Tuesday

April 30

Kenai

Home

TBA

Friday

May 3

Seward

Home

6 p.m.

Tuesday

May 7

Homer

Home

6 p.m.

Friday

May 10

Houston

Home

6 p.m.

Saturday

May 11

Redington

Home

2 p.m.

Thursday

May 16

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Friday

May 17

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Saturday

May 18

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Thursday

May 23

State at Anchorage

Away

TBA

Friday

May 24

State at Anchorage

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 25

State at Anchorage

Away

TBA

Schedules subject to change

Soldotna High School Stars Boys Soccer Soldotna High School Boys Soccer

Back row, left to right: Dylan Walton, Thomas Hudson, Aiden Willets, Kobe Miller, Levi Rosin, Alex Montague, Wyatt Nelson, Braden Lemm, Erik Dolphin (assistant coach). Front row, left to right: Hunter Woodward, Tyler Johnson, Jose Montague, Cameron Johnson, Josh Heiber, Ryder Giessler, Colton Sorhus, Lance Chilton, Austin Escott, Kaden Hoover. Ground, left to right: Trenton Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reagan, Kaleb Swank.

Day

Date

Thursday

April 18

Houston

Opponent

Away

Place

6 p.m.

Time 7 p.m.

Friday

April 19

Grace

Away

Monday

April 22

Kenai

Away

6 p.m.

Thursday

April 25

Ketchikan

Away

TBA

Friday

April 26

Juneau-Douglas

Away

TBA

Saturday

April 27

Thunder Mountain

Away

1:45 p.m.

Monday

April 29

Nikiski

Away

6 p.m.

Thursday

May 2

Colony

Away

5 p.m.

Friday

May 3

Palmer

Away

7 p.m.

Saturday

May 4

Wasilla

Away

4 p.m.

Monday

May 6

Kenai

Home

6 p.m.

Tuesday

May 7

Seward

Home

6 p.m.

Thursday

May 9

Thunder Mountain

Home

5 p.m.

Saturday

May 11

Homer

Home

4 p.m.

Thursday

May 16

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Friday

May 17

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Saturday

May 18

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Thursday

May 23

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Friday

May 24

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 25

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Schedules subject to change


Peninsula Clarion

Homer High School Mariners Boys Soccer Homer High School Boys Soccer

Back row, left to right: Coach Warren Waldorf, Tanner Reid, Parker Lowney, Avram Salzmann, Clayton Beachy, Phinny Weston, Henry Russell, Edson Knapp, Desmond Vanlierre, Daniel Reutov, Ethan Pitzman, coach Kenneth Schneider. Second row, left to right: Eyoab Knapp, Casey Otis, Tucker Weston, Zander Kulhanek, Liam James, Kazden Stineff. Front row, left to right: Tom Gorman, Austin Shafford, Dexter Lowe, Owen Glassman.

Day

Date

Thursday

April 18

Ketchikan

Opponent

Away

Place Time TBA

Friday

April 19

Juneau

Away

TBA

Saturday

April 20

Thunder Mountain

Away

TBA

Tuesday

April 23

Nikiski

Home

4 p.m.

Friday

April 26

Grace

Home

7 p.m.

Thursday

May 2

Palmer

Away

7 p.m.

Friday

May 3

Wasilla

Away

7 p.m.

Tuesday

May 7

Nikiski

Away

4 p.m.

Thursday

May 9

Kenai

Away

6 p.m.

Friday

May 10

Thunder Mountain

Home

4 p.m.

Saturday

May 11

Soldotna

Away

4 p.m.

Thursday

May 16

Conference at Homer

Home

TBA

Friday

May 17

Conference at Homer

Home

TBA

Saturday

May 18

Conference at Homer

Home

TBA

Thursday

May 23

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Friday

May 24

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 25

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Schedules subject to change

Kenai High School Kardinals Boys Soccer Kenai High School Boys Soccer

Back row, left to right: Scott Pitsch (assistant), Adam Trujillo, Nate Beiser, Evan Stockton, Leif Lofquist, Travis Verkuilen, Francisco Garmen Munarriz, Tomas Levy-Canedo, Travis McKinley, James Baisden, Damien Redder, Tucker Vann, Zachary Stockton, Lucas Tunseth, Kai McKibben, Austin Stafford, Jordan Smith, Shane Lopez (head coach). Front row, left to right: James Sparks, Caleb Easling, Riley Updike, Koda Poulin, Ezok Villalva, Johann Carranza, Samuel Baisden, Livai Castrellon, Koa Diorec, Zachary Burnett, River Tomrelle, Joe Hamilton, Daniel Cazares, Gage Charlesworth, Isaiah Daniels. On ground (L to R): Braedon Pitsch, Aidan Milburn.

Day

Date

Saturday

April 20

Monday

Opponent

Place

Time

Grace

Away

2 p.m.

April 22

Soldotna

Home

6 p.m.

Tuesday

April 23

Seward

Home

6 p.m.

Tuesday

April 30

Nikiski

Away

6 p.m.

Thursday

May 2

Wasilla

Away

7 p.m.

Friday

May 3

Colony

Away

7 p.m.

Saturday

May 4

Palmer

Away

4 p.m.

Monday

May 6

Soldotna

Away

6 p.m.

Thursday

May 9

Homer

Home

6 p.m.

Saturday

May 11

Thunder Mountain

Home

2 p.m.

Thursday

May 16

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Friday

May 17

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Saturday

May 18

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Thursday

May 23

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Friday

May 24

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 25

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Schedules subject to change

Nikiski High School Bulldogs Boys Soccer Nikiski High School Boys Soccer

Back row, left to right: Pedro Souza, Isaiah Gray, Caileb Payne, Koleman McCaughey, Shane Weathers, Michael Eiter, Mason Payne, Dylan Harris, Tyler Smith (assistant), Harrison Deveer (head coach). Front row, left to right: Sam Smith, Trevor Mysing, Gavin White, Justin Harris, Michael Mysing, Cooper Stock, Jace Kornstad.

Day

Date

Opponent

Place

Time

Thursday

April 18

Palmer

Away

7 p.m.

Friday

April 19

Houston

Away

6 p.m.

Saturday

April 20

Redington

Away

2 p.m.

Tuesday

April 23

Homer

Away

4 p.m.

Friday

April 26

Seward

Away

6 p.m.

Monday

April 29

Soldotna

Home

6 p.m.

Tuesday

April 30

Kenai

Home

TBA

Friday

May 3

Seward

Home

6 p.m.

Tuesday

May 7

Homer

Home

6 p.m.

Friday

May 10

Houston

Home

6 p.m.

Saturday

May 11

Redington

Home

2 p.m.

Thursday

May 16

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Friday

May 17

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Saturday

May 18

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Thursday

May 23

State at Anchorage

Away

TBA

Friday

May 24

State at Anchorage

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 25

State at Anchorage

Away

TBA

Schedules subject to change

Soldotna High School Stars Boys Soccer Soldotna High School Boys Soccer

Back row, left to right: Dylan Walton, Thomas Hudson, Aiden Willets, Kobe Miller, Levi Rosin, Alex Montague, Wyatt Nelson, Braden Lemm, Erik Dolphin (assistant coach). Front row, left to right: Hunter Woodward, Tyler Johnson, Jose Montague, Cameron Johnson, Josh Heiber, Ryder Giessler, Colton Sorhus, Lance Chilton, Austin Escott, Kaden Hoover. Ground, left to right: Trenton Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reagan, Kaleb Swank.

Day

Date

Thursday

April 18

Houston

Opponent

Away

Place

6 p.m.

Time 7 p.m.

Friday

April 19

Grace

Away

Monday

April 22

Kenai

Away

6 p.m.

Thursday

April 25

Ketchikan

Away

TBA

Friday

April 26

Juneau-Douglas

Away

TBA

Saturday

April 27

Thunder Mountain

Away

1:45 p.m.

Monday

April 29

Nikiski

Away

6 p.m.

Thursday

May 2

Colony

Away

5 p.m.

Friday

May 3

Palmer

Away

7 p.m.

Saturday

May 4

Wasilla

Away

4 p.m.

Monday

May 6

Kenai

Home

6 p.m.

Tuesday

May 7

Seward

Home

6 p.m.

Thursday

May 9

Thunder Mountain

Home

5 p.m.

Saturday

May 11

Homer

Home

4 p.m.

Thursday

May 16

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Friday

May 17

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Saturday

May 18

Conference at Homer Away

TBA

Thursday

May 23

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Friday

May 24

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Saturday

May 25

State in Anchorage

Away

TBA

Schedules subject to change


Peninsula Clarion

We have everything necessary for your child to excel in which ever program you choose. We are proud to offer Competitive and Recreational Cheer, Gymnastics and Tumbling for boys and girls from ages walking to 18

260-9990 â&#x20AC;˘ http://www.rivercitycheer.net

Open Gym every Friday (Family Friendly) 7:00-9:00 Preschool Playground (5 and under) every Monday 10:00-12:00


SUNDAY COMICS

Sunday, April 21, 2019

DILBERT®/ by Scott Adams


DOONESBURY/ by Garry Trudeau


SALLY FORTH/ by Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM/ by Mike Peters

B.C./ by Mastroianni and Hart

ZIGGY/ by Tom Wilson

DENNIS THE MENACE/ by Hank Ketcham


MORT WALKERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BEETLE BAILEY/ by Mort, Greg & Brian Walker

MARVIN/ by Tom Armstrong

THE BORN LOSER by Art & Chip Sansom

Profile for Sound Publishing

Peninsula Clarion, April 21, 2019  

April 21, 2019 edition of the Peninsula Clarion

Peninsula Clarion, April 21, 2019  

April 21, 2019 edition of the Peninsula Clarion