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Safety

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AST encourages selfies from backcountry travellers

Soldotna nabs dual win over Kenai

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Sports/B-1

CLARION

Snow 22/10 More weather on Page A-2

P E N I N S U L A

Friday-Saturday, january 23-24, 2015 Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

Vol. 45, Issue 97

Question Which team do you think will win the Super Bowl? n The Seattle Seahawks n The New England Patriots To place your vote and comment, visit our Web site at www. peninsulaclarion. com. Results and selected comments will be posted each Tuesday in the Clarion, and a new question will be asked. Suggested questions may be submitted online or e-mailed to news@peninsulaclarion.com.

In the news Collins named special investigator for Nat. Guard claims C

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JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Attorney General Craig Richards has hired a retired state court judge to serve as a special investigator to look into allegations of sexual assault and other misconduct within the Alaska National Guard. Patricia Collins is expected to look at each allegation that has been made and determine if it was adequately investigated by law enforcement and handled appropriately by prosecutors. She also has been asked to determine whether cases should be investigated further. Her work is to span the time period between September 2010 and November 2014. Richards says Collins is to produce a confidential report by the end of April and another report that will be made public about a month later. Richards says the contract with Patricia Collins is for up to $50,000, plus reasonable expenses.

Inside ‘What we expect from the fish board — from any government body, for that matter — is a fair, open and transparent process.’ ... See page A-4

Index Opinion.................. A-4 Nation.................... A-5 World..................... A-7 Sports.....................B-1 Classifieds............ C-3 Comics.................. C-9

Check us out online at www.peninsulaclarion.com To subscribe, call 283-3584.

50 cents newsstands daily/$1.00 Sunday

Taking priority Feds open subsistence gillnetting on the Kenai, Kasilof rivers

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nglers on the most heavily used river in the state will be joined by another group of fishermen this year after the Federal Subsistence Board on Thursday voted to allow subsistence gillnetting on the Kenai River. The board also voted to allow the gear type on the Kasilof River after receiving proposals from the Ninilchik Tribal Council asking for a community set gillnet fishery for subsistence users. While the new fisheries primarily target sockeye salmon — subsistence users are allowed 4,000 per year in the Cook Inlet — the potential to harvest other species of fish was an ongoing sticking point in the discussion. Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologists were concerned

about resident species such as Dolly Varden and rainbow trout and the beleaguered king salmon runs. While the Ninilchik Tribal Council argued that the gillnets will catch far fewer king salmon than sport and commercial users do, state biologists said they were concerned that the new fishery is ill-prepared and potentially harmful to conservation efforts on struggling species. The Federal Subsistence Board operates as part of the U.S. Department of the Interior to control federal subsistence. It is made up of the regional directors of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Indian Affairs, the U.S. Forest Service, and there are three public members ap-

pointed by the Secretaries of the Interior and Agriculture: two represent rural subsistence users and one is the Federal Subsistence Board chairman. The tension between state management and federal management caused frustration among state biologists who attended the meeting. Matt Miller, Fish and Game Regional Fisheries Management Coordinator for Southcentral Cook Inlet, said the two have different directives and adding gillnetting to a river that had faced severe conservation restrictions from state biologists was frustrating and confusing. “It’s a non-selective gear type in an era of conservation. If you don’t say no to gillnets on the Kenai, what will you say no to?” See NETS, page A-10

By RASHAH McCHESNEY and DANIEL SUMMERS Morris News Service Alaska

Tyonek man jailed for Facebook post By DAN BALMER Peninsula Clarion

A Tyonek man was arrested Tuesday over a threatening Facebook post that left village residents concerned for their welfare. He told Alaska State Troopers he made the post after learning that his underage daughter had been molested. The Soldotna Public Safety Communication Center received a call Monday afternoon from Marilyn Johnson, principal of the Tebughna School in Tyonek who said she was fearful of what could happen to students and staff after reading a Facebook post from 26-yearold Justin Trenton. Troopers were unable to fly to Tyonek until Tuesday morning because of weather conditions.

In the meantime, citizens patrolled the town until troopers arrived. Trenton was charged with second-degree terroristic threatening, a class C felony. If convicted, the maximum penalty is five years in prison and a $50,000 fine. According to a trooper affidavit filed in court Tuesday, the responding trooper Sgt. Eugene Fowler obtained a copy of Trenton’s Facebook post. The post, which has since been deleted from Trenton’s page, alleged he knew about some people who molested his underage daughter and he let it be known he knew about it and would press charges. “I personally will be going around looking to soak myself in your blood,” Trenton wrote. “I got nothing going for me so

don’t think I won’t come at you for the (expletive) finish. All you sick (expletive) better run and get the hell out of the village before I get to you.” The K-12 Tebughna School, which serves 31 students, went into a “modified lockdown,” on Tuesday, according to a Facebook post from the Kenai Peninsula School District spokesperson Pegge Erkeneff. Erkneff wrote in a Wednesday email that the district would not be issuing a formal release of information on the matter. Parents were notified Monday evening that the school would be on a modified lockdown, which calls for the front doors to be locked and shades drawn over the windows, but classes remain in session. School activities returned to normal Wednesday, according

to the district post. When troopers contacted Trenton at his house, he stated he wasn’t going to harm anyone and he made the statements to “wake up the village” and “make them do something about the perverts that were preying on the children.” Trenton told troopers he understood he scared everyone and shouldn’t have worked it the way he did. Tyonek located on the western shore of Cook Inlet across from Nikiski, has a population of about 170 people. Trenton is currently jailed at Wildwood Pretrial Facility. His next court date is Jan. 30 in Kenai District Court. Reach Dan Balmer at daniel.balmer@peninsulaclarion. com.

Soldotna to vote on charter commision By KELLY SULLIVAN Peninsula Clarion

During a special election on Feb. 3, Soldotna voters will determine if the process for developing a home rule law charter will begin. If the formation of a charter commission is approved, the seven candidates receiving the most votes will fill the seven seats. Commission candidate, and city council member Pete Sprague, said this will be the first real step in starting the home rule process. “This is not the last step, this is one of the very early steps

in the process,” Sprague said. “Nothing has been decided at this point.” Sprague said the process of building a charter will be a lengthy, but very public process. “The process needs to be open and it will be,” said commission candidate and Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly President Dale Bagley. “Meetings will be open to the public, and will be advertised.” During his time on the assembly, Bagley noticed significant freedoms Kenai and Seward had as home rule cities that the city of Soldotna could not exercise. Many candidates

have cited concerns about the city’s revenue sources as a reason for pursuing a seat on the charter commission. Commission candidate, and owner of Birch Ridge Golf Course, Patrick Cowan said he was worried about the future of the city’s ability to collect sales tax during the winter season, which is nearly 90 percent of Soldotna’s revenue during those months. Soldotna services over 25,000 people annually, even though it is such a small geographical area, Cowan said. Commission candidate, and city council member, Keith Baxter said he is not going into C

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the process with preformed conclusions. According to Alaska statute, the charter commission will be provided model charters to look at as examples. Soldotna resident Jerry Farrington, who has been advocating for widening city driveway widths, said he is hoping to come up with a charter that equally benefits the public and the city government. Farrington said he hoped to be of assistance to the city, and that the public will take an interest in the process. Meetings of the charter commission shall be open to the See VOTE, page A-9

KPB adds oil & gas advisor By DAN BALMER Peninsula Clarion

Despite concerns about the state’s fiscal situation, the Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly on Tuesday approved the addition of a new special assistant to the mayor, a job that will focus attention to see the AK LNG project come to fruition. The assembly voted 6 to 3 to approve a new special assistant to the mayor’s office to focus on oil, gas and mining issues. Assembly members Wayne Ogle, Kelly Wolf and Stan Welles voted no. The three dissenting voters expressed their concern of spending for a position they questioned could have been delegated amongst present personnel. The position earns an annual salary of $98,171, including benefits and travel expenses, is expected to cost $161,800. The job, which Mayor Mike Navarre said he hopes to fill by the start of February, would be prorated to cost $67,500 for this fiscal year budget cycle, which ends on June 30. Navarre said the jobholder’s primary responsibilities would be to evaluate policies and legislation related to the Nikiski AK LNG gasline project. He said with the Legislature back in session, they are expected to discuss the tax structure and change the payment in lieu of taxes, which would have significant consequences to the borough. “If the LNG facility is built to its magnitude, it would more than quadruple the existing tax base for the Kenai Peninsula. The revenues are significant,” Navarre said. “It’s an investment in our future. We would be penny-wise and pound-foolish in terms of protecting future revenues and the ability to address economic impacts for a project this size.” Assemby member Kelly Cooper said she sees the immediate significance of having someone in Juneau with the borough’s interests in mind to help move the project forward. Ogle said in his mind Navarre, who is on the LNG advisory committee, is the best candidate suited for the job between his contacts from 12 years in the state Legislature. He said he would’ve liked to see the mayor’s office form a focus group and as the project develops use staff resources to monitor the situation. “I have enormous respect for the mayor’s capabilities and ability to know what’s going on,” Ogle said. “I don’t feel like we are in a climate to ramp up another high level position in borough government.” Navarre said with his current responsibilities as mayor he couldn’t spend the entire legislative session at the state capital. The special assistant would closely monitor and gather intelligence during the session and then inform the mayor when he would need to be in Juneau, he said. Wolf suggested the job could See ADVISOR, page A-10


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A-2 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 23, 2015

CLARION P

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(USPS 438-410) Published daily Sunday through Friday, except Christmas and New Year’s, by: Southeastern Newspapers Corporation P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Street address: 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 1, Kenai, AK Phone: (907) 283-7551 Postmaster: Send address changes to the Peninsula Clarion, P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Periodicals postage paid at Kenai, AK Represented for national advertising by The Papert Companies, Chicago, IL Copyright 2015 Peninsula Clarion A Morris Communications Corp. newspaper

Who to call at the Peninsula Clarion News tip? Question? Main number.............................................................................................. 283-7551 Fax............................................................................................................. 283-3299 News email...................................................................news@peninsulaclarion.com General news Will Morrow, editor ............................................ will.morrow@peninsulaclarion.com Rashah McChesney, city editor.............. rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com Jeff Helminiak, sports editor........................... jeff.helminiak@peninsulaclarion.com Fisheries, photographer.............................................................................................. ............................ Rashah McChesney, rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com Borough, courts..........................Dan Balmer, daniel.balmer@peninsulaclarion.com Education, Soldotna ................ Kelly Sullivan, kelly.sullivan@peninsulaclarion.com Kenai......................................... Ben Boettger, ben.boettger@peninsulaclarion.com General assignment............................... Ian Foley, ian.foley@peninsulaclarion.com Arts and Entertainment................................................ news@peninsulaclarion.com Community, Around the Peninsula............................... news@peninsulaclarion.com Sports............................................ Joey Klecka, joey.klecka@peninsulaclarion.com Page design........ Florence Struempler, florence.struempler@peninsulaclarion.com

Yellowstone transferring bison for slaughter BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Yellowstone National Park has begun shipping wild bison for slaughter as part of a plan to reduce the park’s population by as many as 900 animals this winter. On Wednesday and Thursday, more than 150 bison captured near the park’s northern border with Montana were removed from holding, loaded onto trailers and shipped off, according to the Buffalo Field Campaign, a wildlife advocacy group. There were 4,900 bison in the park last summer. For more than two decades, officials have tried to curb the animals’ winter migration into Montana to guard against potential disease transmission to livestock. Park spokesman Al Nash confirmed the shipments of recently-captured animals for slaughter. But he said the park no longer plans to offer timely updates on how many bison are captured and shipped. The information instead will be posted on a bi-weekly basis to an interagency bison management website. Nash said information on how many animals are being held also would be released on a bi-weekly basis. “There will be additional bison captured in coming weeks but it’s impossible to predict when and how many,” Nash said.

Circulation problem? Call 283-3584 If you don’t receive your newspaper by 7 a.m. and you live in the Kenai-Soldotna area, call 283-3584 before 10 a.m. for redelivery of your paper. If you call after 10 a.m., you will be credited for the missed issue. Regular office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Sunday. General circulation questions can be sent via email to circulation@peninsulaclarion.com. The circulation manager is Randi Keaton.

For home delivery Order a six-day-a-week, three-month subscription for $39, a six-month subscription for $73, or a 12-month subscription for $130. Use our easy-pay plan and save on these rates. Call 283-3584 for details. Mail subscription rates are available upon request.

Want to place an ad?

Classified: Call 283-7551 and ask for the classified ad department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or email classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com. Display: Call 283-7551 and ask for the display advertising department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Leslie Talent is the Clarion’s advertising director. She can be reached via email at leslie.talent@peninsulaclarion.com. Contacts for other departments: Business office.................................................................................. Teresa Mullican Production................................................................................................ Geoff Long Online........................................................................................ Vincent Nusunginya

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Thursday Stocks Company Final Change Agrium Inc...............107.20 +5.19 Alaska Air Group.......67.94 +2.96 ACS...........................1.60 +0.05 Apache Corp........... 63.94 +2.96 AT&T........................ 33.79 -0.21 Baker Hughes.......... 58.21 -0.12 BP ........................... 38.98 +0.16 Chevron.................. 108.92 +0.76 ConocoPhillips......... 65.30 +0.76 ExxonMobil.............. 92.87 +1.00 1st Natl. Bank AK.. 1,5800.00 -20.00 GCI.......................... 15.78 +0.41 Halliburton............... 40.82 +0.13 Harley-Davidson...... 65.62 +1.61 Home Depot........... 106.07 +2.54 McDonald’s.............. 90.89 +0.55 Safeway................... 35.29 +0.07 Schlumberger.......... 82.14 -0.07 Tesoro...................... 76.56 +2.48 Walmart................... 88.30 +1.66 Wells Fargo.............. 53.77 +1.67

Gold closed............1,302.09 +8.99 Silver closed............ 18.34 +0.21 Dow Jones avg..... 17,813.98 +259.70 NASDAQ................4,750.40 82.98 S&P 500................ 2,063.15 +31.03 Stock prices provided by the Kenai Peninsula Edward Jones offices.

Oil Prices Wednesday’s prices North Slope crude: $47.94, UP from $47.12 on Tuesday West Texas Int.: $47.28,UP from $46.39 on Tuesday

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 23, 2015

Around the Peninsula

Obituary Florence Lucile Thistle

Tribal funk band “Pamyua” to perform in Kenai

Longtime Soldotna resident Florence Lucile (Stanger) Thistle, 98, passed away Friday, Nov. 28, 2014 in Loveland, Colorado. She was born on October 18, 1916. In 1954 she moved to Alaska at the age of 38. She enjoyed gardening, going to garage sales, painting, and spending time with her children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren at her cabin in Anchor Point. She was an avid artist and loved to sketch and paint, she left behind a sizable collection of paintings she had created over her lifetime. Her family uses the words, “amazing” and “loving” to describe the kind of woman Lucile Thistle was. She loved to sit and tell her great-grandchildren stories about pioneering in Alaska, about her children, and her personal favorite, her childhood adventures with her three sisters, Hazel, Billie, and her twin Louise. She moved to Loveland, Colorado in 2012 and spent her last few years with family. She loved to have visitors, a smile would always light up her face when her greatgrandchildren, “her babies” came to visit. She was an amazing woman and touched the lives of so many. She will always be remembered by her family and friends. She was preceded in death by her husband Francis Thistle, her sisters Billie Gillian, Hazel Simms. She is also preceded in death by her children, Louise Bass, Raymond Bass, Glenn Bass, Leonard Thistle, and her greatgranddaughter Kelcee Rae Bass. She is survived by her twin sister Louise Livecy of Hobbs, New Mexico; her sons and daughters-in-law Larry and Janice Bass, and Neil and Clinton Thistle; 6 grandchildren; and her 17 great-grandchildren. A celebration of life is planned for summer of 2015 in Colorado. In lieu of flowers, her family asks you to please instead make memorial contributions to local charities; that is what Lucile would have preferred.

Pamyua will perform a concert at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 24, 2015, in the Renee C. Henderson Auditorium at Kenai Central High School. The concert is a fundraiser for the Kenaitze Indian Tribe’s Yaghanen Youth Program. Tickets will be available at the door or in advance at Kenaitze Indian Tribe offices, and are $10 general admission for all ages. Music from the Anchorage-based band ranges from Native American, to World Music, to what the band has called “tribal funk.” Alaska Magazine called them “one of the 10 greatest Alaska artists of the millennium,” according to the band’s website. They have performed worldwide, including at the grand opening of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian, and were featured in the Discovery Channel’s “Flying Wild Alaska” series. Pamyua (pronounced bum’yo-ah) is an Inuit word that as a verb means “to request an encore of a drumsong or a dance.” As a noun, the word means “the tail of an animal, object or idea.” The Kenaitze Indian Tribe’s Yaghanen Youth Program offers activities that encourage academic achievement, respect for all people and cultures, and teach life skills in a safe and positive atmosphere. For more information about the program, contact Michael Bernard at (907)335-7290 or email him at mbernard@ kenaitze.org.

Soldotna Library upcoming event YA Movie of the Month on Saturday at 3 p.m., in the Community Room. See the world from a kid’s eye view in this hilarious, heartwarming film based on Roald Dahl’s Matilda.

Kids Monopoly tournament registration open The Peninsula Winter Games Kids Monopoly tournament registration is now open. Register by calling the Soldotna Chamber of Commerce at 262-9814, or email Tami@Soldotnachamber.com. Kids ages 8-18 are eligible. This tournament kicks off the Peninsula Winter Games with check-in at 10 a.m. on Jan. 24 at the Soldotna Regional Sports Complex.

Nikiski Community Council meets

Peninsula Clarion death notice and obituary guidelines:

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The Peninsula Clarion strives to report the deaths of all current and former Peninsula residents. Notices should be received within three months of the death. Pending service/Death notices are brief notices listing full name, age, date and place of death; and time, date and place of service. These are published at no charge. Obituaries are prepared by families, funeral homes, crematoriums, and are edited by our staff according to newspaper guidelines. The fee for obituaries up to 500 words with one black and white photo ranges from $50 to $100. Obituaries outside these guidelines are handled by the Clarion advertising department. Funeral homes and crematoriums routinely submit completed obituaries to the newspaper. Obituaries may also be submitted directly to the Clarion with prepayment, online at www. peninsulaclarion.com, or by mail to: Peninsula Clarion, P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, Alaska, 99611. The deadline for Tuesday – Friday editions is 2 p.m. the previous day. Submissions for Sunday and Monday editions must be received by 3 p.m. Friday. We do not process obituaries on Saturdays or Sundays unless submitted by funeral homes or crematoriums. Obituaries are placed on a space-available basis, prioritized by dates of local services. For more information, call the Clarion at 907-283-7551.

The Nikiski Community Council will hold it’s next meeting on Monday at 7 p.m. This meeting is held at the former Nikiski Senior Center on Island Lake Road. This meeting is open to the public and community members are encouraged to attend. Any questions, call Darcy McCaughey at 398-6748.

Today 8 a.m. • Alcoholics Anonymous As Bill Sees It Group, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway Unit 71 (Old Carrs Mall). Call 398-9440. 9:45 a.m. • TOPS #AK 196 meets at The Grace Lutheran Church, in Soldotna. Call Dorothy at 262-1303. 10:15 a.m. • Visit the Soldotna Public

Library for a 45-minute free “Yoga Strength” session. Set to modern music, this class makes for a perfect introduction to yoga or a fun addition to your existing routine. Bring your own mat!

Noon

Free income tax help available This year, the AARP Tax-Aide volunteers will provide free tax preparation services at a new location, the Soldotna Public Library starting Feb. 5. Volunteers will be available Thursdays from 1-5 p.m. Volunteers available also Feb. 14, March 14, and April 11, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Items to bring: photo ID for all taxpayers; social security cards or ITIN cards for all persons listed on the tax return; copy of last year’s tax return; W-2 forms from each employer; unemployment compensation; SSA-1099 (Social Security); all 1099Rs pension/annuity; all 1099 forms(INT, DIV, B, MISC); and documentation showing original purchase price of sold assets; a list of all deductible expenses(medical, contributions, mortgage interest, property taxes, medical/business miles); all forms showing federal income tax paid; Child care expenses information; written bank account information for direct deposit. New for 2014 taxes: bring health insurance information. Form 1095A for people who bought from the ACA marketplace; a list of who on your tax return had coverage and for which months; exemption certificate number if you have one; and taxable income information for dependents listed on return. You can also go to www.aarp.org/taxaide to find the dates, times and locations of a site near you.

Junior Achievement Raffle tickets available The Kenai Junior Achievement Committee has put together a raffle fundraiser for the 2014-2015 school year. Junior Achievement is the world’s largest organization dedicated to giving young people the knowledge and skills they need to own their economic success, plan for their future, and make smart academic and economic choices. Tickets are $10 each and all proceeds benefit Junior Achievement programs on the Kenai Peninsula. Winning tickets will be drawn on March, 21, 2015 at the Kenai River Brown Bears hockey game. You need not be present to win. First place is $1,000, Second place is $600 and third place is $400. To purchase tickets, please contact Janet Johnson at johnsoja@denalifcu.com or 907-257-1669 or Renee Rybak at r.rybak@alaskausa.org or 907-395-4505.

Hospice training offered Hospice of the Central Peninsula is offering Hospice Volunteer Core Training 2015 at Christ Lutheran Church in Soldotna. Friday sessions are Jan. 30 and Feb. 6, 6-9 p.m. Saturday sessions are Jan. 31 and Feb. 7, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Registration is required. The cost is $25.00/person. For more information, call Hospice at 262-0453 or email Janice at hospice.admin@alaska. net.

• Twin City Al-Anon Family group, United Methodist Church, 607 Frontage Road in Kenai. Call • Alcoholics Anonymous re- 907-953-4655. covery group at 11312 Kenai Spur Highway, Suite 71 in the old Carrs Saturday Mall in Kenai. Call 262-1917. 8 a.m. 12:30 p.m. • Alcoholics Anonymous As Bill • Well Elders Live Longer exer- Sees It Group, 11312 Kenai Spur cise (W.E.L.L.) will meet at the Ni- Highway Unit 71 (Old Carrs Mall). kiski Senior Center. Call instructor Call 398-9440. Mary Olson at 907-776-3745. 9 a.m. 8 p.m. • Al-Anon book study, Central • Narcotics Anonymous Sup- Peninsula Hospital’s Augustine port Group “It Works” at URS Room, Soldotna. Call 907-953Club, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway, 4655. Unit 71, Kenai. 10 a.m. • AA 12 by 12 at the United • Narcotics Anonymous PJ Methodist Church, 607 Frontage Meeting, URS Club, 11312 Kenai Road, Kenai. Spur Highway, Unit 71, Kenai. 7 p.m. • Narcotics Anonymous support group “Dopeless Hope

Community Calendar

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Fiends,” URS Club, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway, Unit 71, Kenai. 8 p.m. • AA North Roaders Group at North Star Methodist Church, Mile 25.5 Kenai Spur Highway. Call 242-9477. The Community Calendar lists recurring events and meetings of local organizations. To have your event listed, email organization name, day or days of meeting, time of meeting, place, and a contact phone number to news@ peninsulaclarion.com.


A-4 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 23, 2015

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Opinion

CLARION P

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Serving the Kenai Peninsula since 1970 VITTO KLEINSCHMIDT Publisher

WILL MORROW������������������������������������������������������������������������ Editor Teresa Mullican............... Controller/Human Resources Director LESLIE TALENT................................................... Advertising Director GEOFF LONG.................................................... Production Manager VINCENT NUSUNGINYA.................................... New Media Director Daryl Palmer.................................... IT and Composition Director RANDI KEATON................................................. Circulation Manager A Morris Communications Corp. Newspaper

Something to talk about Alaska fishery politics are never

boring, but Tuesday’s events certainly will give people plenty to talk about. On Tuesday, Board of Fisheries Chairman Karl Johnstone tendered his resignation after he was told by Gov. Bill Walker that he would not be reappointed. The Clarion reported that Walker expressed his disappointment in the fish board’s process for forwarding names of qualified candidates for commissioner of the Department of Fish and Game. The fish board signed off only on Sam Cotten, whom the governor appointed to the position on Tuesday. But the day’s events took another twist when the governor appointed Roland Maw — the candidate who had been snubbed for an interview by the fish board — to replace Johnstone on the board. Calling it an interesting turn of events is an understatement. In his role as executive director of the United Cook Inlet Drift Association, Maw has certainly been at odds with the fish board. And if the past is any indication, the governor will have a battle on his hands when it comes time for the Legislature to confirm his nomination. We hope that the Kenai Peninsula’s legislative delegation ensures that Maw gets a fair shake and works to prevent the spread of misinformation that led to former board member Vince Webster’s ouster in 2013. That said, the fish board needed a change. What we expect from the fish board — from any government body, for that matter — is a fair, open and transparent process. At least when it comes to Cook Inlet issues, Alaska residents have not been getting that. The Kenai Peninsula is the epicenter of fishing in Alaska. Nowhere else in the state do you see commercial fishing, guided and private sport fishing, personal-use fishing, subsistence fishing as well as fish processors all in one place. Having a voice in the decision-making process is a more than reasonable request. What we have now is an opportunity to move forward. When contacted by the Clarion following the announcement of Johnstone’s resignation but before the announcement of his nomination, Maw noted that the governor’s actions were not about him, but about a fair process. We hope that isn’t lip service, and that Maw will bring accountability to a board that has at times appeared to thumb its nose at the public process. Over the past couple of years — with low king returns affecting management decisions in all upper Cook Inlet fisheries — we’ve seen a number of people involved in commercial fishing and sport fishing come together to look for common ground and solutions that conserve fish while still providing fishing opportunities. We want to see that effort continue, but it is imperative to have a fish board that is willing to listen to grassroots solutions, and not impose the agendas of individual members or the few organizations that have been granted access. As we said, the governor’s actions certainly will have people talking. Some of those conversations are going to be colorful, others are going to be heated — but we look forward to a Board of Fisheries process in which those conversations matter.

Obama barrels into final act of presidency By JIM KUHNHENN Associated Press

AP News Analysis

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address marked a sweet spot in his presidency when economic signs and his own personal approval are on the rise. He made sure to capitalize, taking credit for policies he said raised the country out of its recession. But sweet spots are by definition fleeting — moments in time that can just as quickly sour. Tuesday’s speech capped a remarkably activist 11 weeks since Obama suffered the humiliation of Democratic losses that gave Republicans control of both chambers of Congress. But this was not a lessonslearned address. Instead, Obama drew lines in the sand that cautioned against Republican overreach. And while he offered a nod to bipartisanship on issues such as trade, he pushed a traditional Democratic economic agenda of tax increases for the rich, expanded paid leave for workers and increased aid for education. For a president two months removed from a devastating political loss, this was not a speech uttered in retreat. Instead, he brashly wagged his finger at his critics. “At every step, we were told our goals were misguided or too ambitious; that we would crush jobs and explode deficits,” he said. “Instead, we’ve seen the fastest economic growth in over a decade, our deficits cut by two-thirds, a stock market that has doubled, and health care inflation at its lowest rate in 50 years.” The White House is betting that by promoting the economic successes, Obama can boost his governing credibility. By laying credit at the doorstep of his own administration, Obama is looking to gain leverage over Republicans and weaken their resolve to undo his go-it-alone initiatives on immigration, climate change and Cuba. It’s a better bet today than it was last year or the year before that. But the global economy remains fragile and while the U.S. is better positioned to withstand overseas pressures, it is not immune. Europe is still wrestling with economic

stagnation and questions remain about the fate of its shared currency, the euro. China’s once exploding economy is slowing. Oil prices could bounce back up if OPEC nations decide to decrease production. And for all the improvements, the U.S. economy still has room to improve. Nearly 7 million people are working part-time but would prefer full-time work. Participation in the labor force dropped to a low of 62.7 percent. Some weaknesses predate the Great Recession; over more than three decades, productivity has increased but wages have stayed flat. Still, the moment is for now Obama’s to exploit. A Washington Post-ABC News poll released Tuesday showed Obama with an approval rating of 50 percent, the poll’s highest rating for the president in more than 18 months. Other polls also showed Obama’s approval rising, though not as high. But the Post-ABC poll shows that Obama’s better Jim Kuhnhenn covers the White House standing is largely the result of support co- for The Associated Press alescing among the groups that backed his presidential campaigns in the first place — Democrats, moderates, Hispanics and younger people. Cheaper gas, lower unemployment, a strong stock market no doubt have contribE-mail: news@peninsulaclarion.com uted to the good feelings. So have issues Write: Fax: that Obama has pushed that appeal to those Peninsula Clarion 907-283-3299 groups, including his executive action to P.O. Box 3009 Questions? Call: Kenai, AK 99611 907-283-7551 shield more than 4 million immigrants from deportation and his call for free community college for all. The Peninsula Clarion welcomes But the success of Obama’s remaining letters and attempts to publish all two years also depends on his relations those received, subject to a few with the ruling Republicans in Congress. guidelines: Obama cited trade as one of the most n All letters must include the writer’s prominent topics that could attract biparname, phone number and address. tisan support. The president is seeking n Letters are limited to 500 words “trade promotion authority,” or the ability and may be edited to fit available to negotiate trade deals that Congress can space. Letters are run in the order either approve or reject but not change. He they are received. wants that in order to conclude two major n Letters that, in the editor’s judgcommerce agreements — one with Europe ment, are libelous will not be and one with countries on the Pacific rim. printed. That’s where Democrats and his allies

Classic Doonesbury, 1980

Quotable “He expects us to stand idly by and do nothing while he cuts a bad deal with Iran. Two words: ‘Hell no!’ ... We’re going to do no such thing.” — House Speaker John Boehner on Congress’ plan to push for new sanctions against Iran, defying President Barack Obama. “The video speaks for itself that at no point was Jerame Reid a threat and he possessed no weapon on his person. He complied with the officer and the officer shot him.” — Walter Hudson, chairman and founder of the National Awareness Alliance, after a dashboard camera in a police cruiser in Bridgeton, New Jersey, showed Reid disobeying a police order not to move, getting out of the car with his hands raised and being shot and killed. “Because it’s the Patriots and they have a history, that brings in a different issue. There’s some type of culture there that’s conducive to cheating and that’s a problem.” — Former Pittsburgh Steelers running back Jerome Bettis to ESPN, commenting on an NFL investigation into whether New England purposely underinflated footballs during its AFC championship win over Indianapolis. C

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in organized labor abandon him. To succeed Obama is going to have to apply pressure on his friends and risk taking a hit on his own approval ratings. It won’t be easy. “Trade agreements or boosting wages? We can’t do both,” the liberal Economic Policy Institute declared Tuesday. So far, Obama and the GOP have stayed in their own corners, swinging at each other from a distance. Republicans began the year by seeking to undo Obama’s immigration initiative, weaken provisions in the 2010 financial regulations law, and force approval of the Keystone XL oil pipeline from Canada. Obama countered with seven veto threats in quick succession, including two on the very day of his State of the Union address. “Divided party government is always tough on a president,” said American University presidential scholar James Thurber. It is even worse during the last two years of a presidency. “You’re really a double lame duck.”

Letters to the Editor:

By GARRY TRUDEAU

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 23, 2015

Nation/World

New York politician arrested for bribery

Around the World Saudi state TV reports King Abdullah, longtime US ally, has died at 90 RIYADH, Saudi Arabia — Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah, the powerful U.S. ally who joined Washington’s fight against al-Qaida and sought to modernize the ultraconservative Muslim kingdom with incremental but significant reforms, including nudging open greater opportunities for women, has died, according to Saudi state TV. He was 90. More than his guarded and hidebound predecessors, Abdullah assertively threw his oil-rich nation’s weight behind trying to shape the Middle East. His priority was to counter the influence of rival, mainly Shiite Iran wherever it tried to make advances. He and fellow Sunni Arab monarchs also staunchly opposed the Middle East’s wave of pro-democracy uprisings, seeing them as a threat to stability and their own rule. And while the king maintained the historically close alliance with Washington, there were frictions as he sought to put those relations on Saudi Arabia’s terms. He was constantly frustrated by Washington’s failure to broker a settlement to the IsraelPalestinian conflict. He also pushed the Obama administration to take a tougher stand against Iran and to more strongly back the mainly Sunni rebels fighting to overthrow Syrian President Bashar Assad. Abdullah’s death was announced on Saudi state TV by a presenter who said the king died at 1 a.m. on Friday. His successor was announced as 79-year-old half-brother, Prince Salman, according to a Royal Court statement carried on the Saudi Press Agency. Salman was Abdullah’s crown prince and had recently taken on some of the ailing king’s responsibilities.

Saudi Arabia’s new monarch, King Salman, mediator in family disputes DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — Saudi Arabia’s new king, Salman bin Abdul-Aziz Al Saud, is a veteran of the country’s top leadership, versed in diplomacy from nearly 50 years as the governor of the capital Riyadh and known as a mediator of disputes within the sprawling royal family. Salman, 79, had increasingly taken on the duties of the king over the past year as his ailing predecessor and half-brother, Abdullah, became more incapacitated. Salman had served as defense minister since 2011 and so was head of the military as Saudi Arabia joined the United States and other Arab countries in carrying out airstrikes in Syria in 2014 against the Islamic State, the Sunni militant group that the kingdom began to see as a threat to its own stability. He takes the helm at a time when the ultraconservative Muslim kingdom and oil powerhouse is trying to navigate social pressures from a burgeoning youth population — over half the population of 20 million is under 25 — seeking jobs and increasingly testing boundaries of speech on the Internet, where criticism of the royal family is rife.

As protesters march outside, GOP pushes broad abortion curbs through the House C

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WASHINGTON — With thousands of abortion protesters swarming the city in their annual March for Life, Republicans muscled broadened abortion restrictions through the House on Thursday after a GOP rebellion forced leaders into an awkward retreat on an earlier version. By a near party-line 242-179 vote, the House voted to permanently forbid federal funds for most abortion coverage. The bill would also block tax credits for many people and employers who buy abortion coverage under President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul. A White House veto threat and an uncertain fate in the Senate mean the legislation has no realistic chance of becoming law. But on a day when crowds of anti-abortion demonstrators stretched for blocks outside Capitol windows — and hours after the embarrassing GOP stumble on another abortion measure — Thursday’s vote let party leaders signal that the Congress they now command is at least trying to end abortion. The GOP’s passage of one bill and the abrupt derailment of another forbidding most late-term abortions underscored the party’s perilous balancing act of backing abortion restrictions crucial to conservatives while not alienating women and younger voters wary of such restrictions.

By TOM HAYS and DAVID KLEPPER Associated Press

NEW YORK — Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, who bent state government to his will for more than 20 years as one of New York’s most powerful and canny politicians, was arrested Thursday on charges of taking nearly $4 million in payoffs and kickbacks. The 70-year-old Democrat was taken into custody by the FBI on federal conspiracy and bribery charges that carry up to 100 years in prison and could cost him his political seat. He was released on $200,000 bail. U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said Silver, a lawyer by training, lined up jobs at two firms and then accepted large sums of money over more than a decade in exchange for using his “titanic” power to do political favors. The money was disguised as “referral fees,” Bharara said. Silver, who seemed unfazed in court, did not enter a plea. “I’m confident that after a full hearing and due process I’ll be vindicated on the

charges,” said Silver, who even paused on his way out of court to sign a sketch artist’s rendering of the scene. The arrest sent shock waves through New York’s Capitol and came just a day after Silver shared the stage with Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo during his State of the State address, as Cuomo joked that he, Silver and the Senate majority leader were the “three amigos” of state government. At a meeting Thursday with the Daily News editorial board, Cuomo said of Silver’s arrest: “Obviously it’s bad for the speaker, but it’s also a bad reflection on government, and it adds to the negativity.” Silver is one of Albany’s most storied political figures, a consummate backroom operator with the power to singlehandedly decide the fate of legislation. Along with the Senate majority leader and the governor, he plays a major role in creating state budgets, laws and policies in a system long criticized in Albany as “three men in a room.” He controls, for ex-

ample, which lawmakers sit on which committees and decides whether a bill gets a vote. In a measure of his clout, he helped persuade Cuomo last spring to disband a state anti-corruption commission that was investigating Silver’s financial dealings and those of his colleagues. Despite his outsized influence, he is pretty much an unknown outside New York state. Even in Albany, he is one of the most private and least-understood figures, sometimes called “the Sphinx.” Silver’s wealth has long been a subject of discussion and controversy. But Bharara said New Yorkers could stop wondering. “Speaker Silver never did any legal work,” the federal prosecutor said. “He simply sat back and collected millions of dollars by cashing in on his public office and political influence.” Silver is the sixth New York legislative leader to face prosecution in the past six years. Bharara said the charges against Silver make clear that

“the show-me-the-money culture of Albany has been perpetuated and promoted at the very top of the political food chain.” Assembly Majority Leader Joe Morelle said Silver still has the backing of an overwhelming number of the chamber’s Democrats and they are not seeking his resignation as speaker. “We believe he can carry out his duties as speaker,” Morelle said. “We’re going to stand with him. ... We have faith in the speaker.” At one law firm specializing in personal injury Weitz & Luxenberg, Silver collected millions of dollars in so-called referral fees for lining up state grants for a doctor’s research, according to prosecutors. At a firm specializing in real estate tax law, Silver received big fees for using his political clout to steer powerful developers to the firm as clients, authorities said. A graduate of Brooklyn Law School, Silver was first elected to the Assembly in 1976, representing a district on Manhattan’s Lower East Side.

City gets OK to drink water after oil spill in river By MATTHEW BROWN Associated Press

BILLINGS, Mont. — Thousands of people in an eastern Montana city were told Thursday they can resume using tap water after tests showed no further signs of contamination from a weekend oil spill into a nearby river. The 6,000 residents of Glendive had relied on bottled water since Monday after elevated levels of cancer-causing benzene were found in the public water supply. The chemical came from 40,000 gallons of oil that spilled on Saturday from a pipeline breach beneath the Yellowstone River, about six miles upstream of the city. Paul Peronard with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said residents should open their taps and run the water to flush out any residual contamination. “If it doesn’t smell anymore you have cleaned it out, you’re

good,” Peronard said. “Citizens can start drinking it.” Filters added to the city treatment plant should protect against further contamination to the water supply. Yet even as Glendive appeared to have overcome the initial public health threat from the spill, officials struggled over how to clean up the crude released by the pipeline break. Most of that oil is believed trapped beneath ice on the river. The river’s environmental damage could take months to gauge. The section of river downstream from the spill is home to fish, including the endangered pallid sturgeon, and is used for irrigation, boating and other recreation. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recorded no wildlife covered by oil during initial flyovers of the spill area on Wednesday, though spokesman Ryan Moehring said the agency was still very early in its surveying.

— The Associated Press

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Most river activity takes place after the ice breaks up in the spring. So the longer the cleanup drags on, Glendive Mayor Jerry Jimison said, the more the spill’s effects will be felt. Resident Roseann Koepke, 65, said she’d been using bottled water to bathe, brush her teeth, drink and cook. Koepke ran the taps in her trailer home Thursday after her landlord told her the contamination had been cleared. But she turned off the water after the strong smell of oil gave her a headache. “I ran it for about ten min-

utes and had to open up the door for five minutes to get the smell out,” she said. “My God, did I end up getting a headache.” Also Thursday, government regulators and representatives of the Poplar Pipeline owner — Casper, Wyoming-based Bridger Pipeline — were trying to set up sites downstream where some oil might be recovered by cutting holes into the ice. The accident was the second large oil spill into Montana’s Yellowstone River in less than four years, raising questions about oversight of the nation’s aging pipeline network.


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A-6 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 23, 2015

Measles outbreak casts light on anti-vaccine movement By ALICIA CHANG AP Science Writer

LOS ANGELES — A major measles outbreak traced to Disneyland has brought criticism down on the small but vocal movement among parents to opt out of vaccinations for their children. In a rash of cases that public health officials are rushing to contain, at least 70 people in six states and Mexico have fallen ill since mid-December, most of them from California. The vast majority of those who got sick had not gotten the measles-mumps-rubella, or MMR, vaccine. While still a scourge in many corners of the world, measles has been all but eradicated in the U.S. since 2000 because of vaccinations. But the virus has made a comeback in recent years, in part because of people obtaining personal belief exemptions from rules that say children must get their shots to enroll in school. Others have delayed getting their children vaccinated because they still believe nowdiscredited research linking the measles vaccine to autism. “Some people are just in-

credibly selfish” by skipping shots, said Dr. James Cherry, a pediatric disease expert at the University of California, Los Angeles. As cases mount, several newspapers have criticized the anti-vaccine movement. Measles “is a disease that has been beaten by modern medicine. That makes it all the more frustrating that anti-science stubbornness has proven, in the case of the Disneylandrelated measles, that when it comes to contagious diseases, it’s a small world after all,” the Los Angeles Times said in an editorial last week. Barbara Loe Fisher, director of the National Vaccine Information Center, a Virginia-based nonprofit that favors letting parents decide whether to vaccinate, said, “I don’t think it’s wise or responsible to blame” unvaccinated people for the Disney outbreak. She noted that a small number of those stricken had been fully vaccinated. Health authorities believe the outbreak was triggered by a measles-stricken visitor to one of the Disney parks who brought the virus from abroad last month. As one of the world’s big-

gest tourist destinations, Disney was a perfect spot for the virus to spread, with large numbers of babies too young to be vaccinated and lots of visitors from countries that do not require measles shots. The disease has since spread beyond Disneyland. The infected ranged from 7 months to 70 years old, including five Disneyland workers. “It’s tragic to see measles making a resurgence,” said Deanne Thompson, a spokeswoman for the Orange County Health Care Agency. “When our immunity falls, it creates a problem for the whole community.” While all states require certain vaccinations for schoolchildren, parents in certain states such as California can opt out if they sign a personal belief waiver. In the past five years, the percentage of kindergartners in California who are up to date on all vaccinations has held pretty steady from 90.7 percent in the 2010-11 school year to 90.4 percent in 2014-15. But there are some wealthy communities in Los Angeles and Orange counties and in Northern California with double-digit vaccination exemption rates.

AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

Elizabeth Orsini takes pictures of her hairband with the Sleeping Beauty’s Castle in the background at Disneyland, Thursday, in Anaheim, Calif. Seventy people have been infected in a measles outbreak that led California public health officials to urge those who haven’t been vaccinated against the disease, including children too young to be immunized, should avoid Disney parks where the spread originated.

To control this latest outbreak, those who are not vaccinated were warned this week to stay away from Disney theme parks. Disney employees who have no proof of immunization and may have come into contact with sick colleagues were placed on paid leave until they are given the medical all-clear.

At Huntington Beach High School in Orange County, two dozen unvaccinated students were ordered home until the three-week incubation period is up. More than 30 babies in Northern California’s Alameda County have been placed in home isolation after possible

exposure. “I’m terribly upset that someone has made a choice that not only affects their child but other people’s children,” said Jennifer Simon, whose 6-month-old daughter, Livia, was isolated after it was learned she may have been exposed to measles during a visit to the doctor’s office.

Yemen’s US-backed president quits; country could split apart By AHMED AL-HAJ and MAGGIE MICHAEL Associated Press

SANAA, Yemen — Yemen’s U.S.-backed president quit Thursday under pressure from rebels holding him captive in his home, severely complicating American efforts to combat alQaida’s powerful local franchise and raising fears that the Arab world’s poorest country will fracture into mini-states. Presidential officials said Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi submitted his resignation to parliament rather than make further concessions to Shiite rebels, known as Houthis, who control the capital and are widely believed to be backed by Iran. The prime minister and his cabinet also stepped down, making a thinly veiled reference to

the Houthis’ push at gunpoint for a greater share of power. Houthis deployed their fighters around parliament, which is due to discuss the situation on Sunday. Yemeni law dictates that the parliament speaker — Yahia alRai, a close ally of former autocratic ruler Ali Abdullah Saleh — will now assume the presidency. Saleh still wields considerable power and is widely believed to be allied with the Houthis. There were conflicting reports suggesting that authorities in Aden, the capital of southern region of Yemen, would no longer submit to the central government’s authority. Even before the Houthis’ recent ascendance, a powerful movement in southern Yemen was demanding autonomy or a return to the full independence the region enjoyed before 1990. Southerners outrightly

reject rule by the Houthis, whose power base is in the north. The Houthis are Zaydis, a Shiite minority that makes up about a third of Yemen’s population. Concerns were also mounting about an economic collapse. Two-thirds of Yemen’s population are already in need of humanitarian aid, according to reported U.N. figures. Iran’s regional rival Saudi Arabia, which has long been Yemen’s economic lifeline, cut most of its financial aid to Yemen after the Houthis seized the capital in September. The Houthis deny receiving any Iranian support. The Houthis’ recent encroachments on Sunni areas have also fanned fears of a sectarian conflict that could fuel support for al-Qaida, a Sunni movement that has links to some of the country’s tribes and is at war with both the

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Shiites and Hadi’s forces. U.S. officials say the developments are already undermining military and intelligence operations against al-Qaida’s Yemen-based affiliate, which made its reach felt in this month’s deadly Paris attacks. Hadi’s resignation comes four months after President Barack Obama cited Yemen as a terrorism success story in a September speech outlining his strategy against the Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria, which involves targeted U.S. strikes on militants with the cooperation of a friendly ground force. Obama called it an approach “that we have successfully pursued in Yemen and Somalia for years.” In Washington on Thursday, a senior State Department said the U.S. Embassy remains open and will continue to operate as normal, although with reduced staff. The official says the U.S. is continuously reassessing the situation on the ground. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the

official was not authorized to publicly discuss embassy security. The resignations mark the collapse of an internationally backed transition that compelled Saleh, who ruled for three decades, to resign in 2012 following months of Arab Spring protests. Hadi’s rule was deeply undermined by Saleh loyalists who retained posts in state institutions and the security apparatus. Last year the U.N. Security Council imposed targeted sanctions on Saleh and two top Houthi leaders, accusing them of obstructing the political transition. Despite widespread fears, some observers said Thursday’s resignation of the elected president could encourage Yemenis to take to the streets just as they did in 2011 in against Saleh. “The coming hours will be decisive for Yemen for decades to come. Either they will usher in a new path, new openings, or we say our death prayers,” said Yemeni writer Farea Al-Muslimi. Shortly after Hadi’s resigna-

tion, the Supreme Security Committee, the top security body in Aden, the capital of the south, issued orders to all military bases, security bodies and popular committees composed of armed civilians to be on a state of alert and take orders only from Aden central command. It was not immediately clear how much mandate the security authorities have over the southern region, and analysts predicted that internal conflict among southern secessionist leaders would probably delay action toward a split with the north. The greater threat, they said, is fragmentation of other regions. “We are not talking here about split of north and south, but the fracture of the state to small pieces where each tribal region disintegrates,” said Al-Muslimi. Hadi’s resignation came despite efforts by U.N. envoy Jamal Benomar to implement a deal reached Wednesday to resolve the crisis. “We reached a deadlock,” Hadi said.

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 23, 2015

A-7

Japan faces deadline to free Islamic State hostages By MARI YAMAGUCHI and ELAINE KURTENBACH Associated Press

TOKYO — The deadline to pay ransom for two Japanese hostages of the Islamic State group was fast approaching Friday, as the mother of one of the captives appealed for her son’s rescue. With time running short, the mother of one of the hostages, 47-year-old journalist Kenji Goto, appealed for understanding and urged the government to help him. “Time is running out. Please, Japanese government, save my son’s life,” said Junko Ishido, who described herself as an educator. “My son is not an enemy of the Islamic State,” she said in a tearful appearance in Tokyo.

Ishido said she was astonished and angered to learn from her daughter-in-law that Goto had left less than two weeks after his child was born, in October, to go to Syria to try to rescue the other hostage, 42-year-old Haruna Yukawa. “My son felt he had to do everything in his power to try to rescue a friend and acquaintance,” she said. In very Japanese fashion, Ishido apologized repeatedly for “all the trouble my son has caused.” The status of efforts to free the two men was unclear, with hours to go before the presumed deadline. The national broadcaster NHK reported that it had received a message from Islamic State “public relations” saying that a statement would be re-

leased soon. Lacking clout and diplomatic reach in the Middle East, Japan has been scrambling for a way to secure the release of the two men, one a journalist, the other an adventurer fascinated by war. Two Japanese who said they have contacts with a leader in the Islamic State group offered Thursday to try to negotiate, but it was unclear if the Japanese government was receptive to the idea. Ishido said she had not had any contact with the government. The militants threatened in a video message to kill the hostages within 72 hours unless they receive $200 million. Based on the video’s release time, that deadline would expire sometime Friday.

Government spokesman Yoshihide Suga reiterated Friday that Japan was trying all possible channels to reach those holding the hostages, and that its policy of providing humanitarian aid for those displaced by conflict in the Middle East was unchanged. “We are doing our very best to coordinate with related parties, including through tribal chiefs,” Suga said. Suga confirmed Thursday that the government had confirmed the identity of the two hostages, despite obvious discrepancies in shadows and other details in the ransom video that suggest it may have been altered. Japanese officials have not directly said whether they are considering paying any ransom, though Prime Minister Shinzo

Abe said their lives were the top priority. Tokyo lacks strong diplomatic connections in the Middle East, and Japanese diplomats left Syria as the civil war there escalated, adding to the difficulty of contacting the group holding the hostages. There was no sign the government had taken action on an offer to try to negotiate with the Islamic State group by Ko Nakata, an expert on Islamic law and former professor at Kyoto’s Doshisha University, along with freelance journalist Kousuke Tsuneoka. Nakata and Tsuneoka, who both are converts to Islam, said Thursday that they have a contact in the Islamic State group and were prepared to go.

Nakata and Tsuneoka, who was released after being held hostage in Afghanistan in 2010, visited Syria in September in an unsuccessful attempt to gain Yukawa’s release. Goto was seized sometime after late October when he entered the area. It is unclear if the two would be allowed to go to Syria, since they have been questioned by Japan’s security police on suspicion of trying to help a Japanese college student visit Syria to fight with the Islamic State group. Since Japan’s military operates only in a self-defense capacity a home any rescue attempt would require help from an ally like the United States.

Israeli man under house arrest for leaked Madonna songs By DANIEL ESTRIN Associated Press

JERUSALEM — An aspiring singer who auditioned for Israel’s top TV song competition was placed under house arrest Thursday on suspicion of hacking into international pop star Madonna’s computer and stealing and selling unreleased songs, his lawyer said. Police said Israel’s cybercrime unit arrested 38-year-old Adi Lederman on Wednesday after an investigation coordinated with the FBI, which

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confirmed its involvement. Police also accused Lederman of stealing songs from other international artists whom they declined to name. Songs from Madonna’s upcoming album “Rebel Heart,” to be released in March, were leaked online in December. At the time, she urged her fans not to listen to the stolen copies that had surfaced, writing on Instagram: “I have been violated as a human and an artist.” She later released six songs, calling it an “early Christmas gift” for fans. Madonna welcomed Leder-

man’s initial arrest, writing on her Facebook page that she was “profoundly grateful to the FBI, the Israeli Police investigators and anyone else who helped lead to the arrest of this hacker.” She called the hack “deeply devastating.” Madonna has long claimed a special bond with Israel. The diva has made personal pilgrimages to the country, she practices Kabbalah, a form of Jewish mysticism, and she launched her 2012 “MDNA” tour in Israel. The investigation began after Madonna’s representative

in Israel lodged a complaint, a police official said, speaking on condition of anonymity in line with protocol. Lederman, a Tel Aviv resident, auditioned for the Israeli reality show “A Star is Born” in 2012. When asked by one of the

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judges what he does for a living, he responded: “Mainly wasting my life away, it seems, because I’m told that I should be on stage.” He sang Stevie Wonder’s “Don’t You Worry About a Thing.” Efrat Nahmany-Bar, a lawyer for Lederman said he denies the

allegations. She said Lederman has not been charged and believes there was not sufficient evidence for an indictment. She said Lederman has no access to computers under the terms of his house arrest.


A-8 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 23, 2015

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Religion

Make it personal by simply talking to God

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s a child I waited for this moment in our church service. After the time of music and singing concluded, one of our pastors ventured forward and repeated a phrase I had heard countless times. I positioned on the edge of my seat, waiting for what was next. Then with welcoming arms extended and mouth pursed to form that phrase I knew so well, Pastor Jim would say, “Prayer is simply talking to God.” In unison I would utter the same phrase quietly to myself and then he would simply pray and talk to God. What a lesson on prayer! No big words or complicated phrases, just talking to God. I could do that! Two-thousand years ago Jesus roamed the arid countryside of Israel with a band of twelve disciples preaching about the good news of God and healing people of their ail-

witnessed Jesus praying so many times. They likely even prayed all oices of together. Who knows how long it took them to ask this question, but eligion Jesus took the opportunity teach them how to pray. Frank A lioto Jesus then says, “When you ments. These disciples, on an ongopray…” (11:2). This phrase tells the ing basis, were witness of something reader that the disciples did pray, but new God was doing with humanity: they just were lacking a seemingly He was making things personal. important element of really connectWhile Jesus on some levels appeared ing with God. Jesus then pens what religious, worshipping in the temple many of us refer to as “The Lord’s and taking part in activities, he was Prayer.” “Our Father in heaven, halinitiating a new way of relating with lowed be your name, your kingdom God in a personal relationship. come, your will be done, on earth In Scriptures we see this so clear- as it is in heaven. Give us today our ly. In Luke 11:1 we see Jesus is off daily bread. And forgive us our debts, praying to His heavenly Father. One as we also have forgiven our debtors. of his disciples sees Jesus modelAnd lead us not into temptation, but ing this intimate relationship and deliver us from the evil one.” (Matasks a very simple question, “Lord, thew 6:9-13). While reciting this teach us to pray...” They must have prayer can be helpful, it is more of a

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Church Briefs Celebrate Mardi Gras The 19th Annual Mardi Gras fundraiser will be Feb. 13 at Our Lady of the Angels Catholic Church in Kenai. Come for a Cajun dinner, live music, and fundraising activities. Proceeds will go to the youth program including a summer mission trip. Dinner tickets are $15. Doors open at 5:00 p.m. and dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are available at both Hi Speed Gear locations and the Parish office. For more information please call 283-4555.

Midnight Son starts youth programs Registration for the Midnight Son Seventh Day Adventist Adventurers children program will be open until the end of January. Meetings are every Wednesday at 6:30. Call or text Toni Loop at 7401476. The Midnight Son Adventurer program is raising money for uniforms. The are selling giant chocolate kisses for $5 each. Currently there is plain chocolate, chocolate peanut butter and a non-chocolate rice crispy kiss. Delivery is between February 4-18. But you can preorder now by calling or texting Toni Loop at 740-1476.

Bible study group starting The Midnight Son Seventh Day Adventist Church is starting a Weekly Women’s Bible Study group. The first book to be read is “Unglued” by Lysa Terkeurst. For more information call or text Crystal Sumner at

model way of praying for the important things that help shape a personal relationship with the living God. Unpacking it we see there is an aspect of praise and thanks to God. We also find a call to align our lives with the purpose why Jesus came. In the latter part of the prayer Jesus addresses the need to receive and give forgiveness to others and to avoid temptation. Jesus covers it all! After this brief prayer, I bet His disciples scrambled to get it down and to pray like Jesus. What a relief to know that it was not just a specific formula, but a way to be in conversation with God. Years later I talked with Pastor Jim and he shared something was missing in his definition of prayer. He updated it by adding, “Prayer is simply talking and listening to God.” God invites humanity into an intimate relationship. While prayer can be as easy as

simply talking to God, it also involves active listening. Listening not just for a “voice,” but what God is communicating through the truth of Scriptures, from the Holy Spirit, and through His people and creation. While I also love formal prayers, prayer can simply be a conversation with God who has created us for relationship. He wants us to personally know and talk to Him. Take time today to “Simply talk and listen to God.” Frank Alioto is the pastor of The River Covenant Church: “An Alaskan church for people who would rather go to the River.” We gather on Sundays at 10:30 a.m. at K-Beach Elementary in Soldotna. Call 252-2828 or visit www.therivercovenantchurch. org.

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tions may be dropped off at the church on Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. or on Sunday from 9 a.m. until noon. For Calvary Baptist kids club meets more information or if you have questions, please Calvary Baptist Church has resumed its Awana call 262-4657. Kids Club on Sunday evenings. The group meets at Kenai Middle School from 5:15-7:30 p.m. All kids, United Methodist Church ages 3 through sixth grade, are welcome. See the Calvary Baptist Awana web page for further details provides food pantry and Club schedule: calvarykenai.org/awana. The Kenai United Methodist Church provides a food pantry for those in need every Monday from Bible study with Nikiski Aglow noon to 3 p.m. The Methodist Church is located on Nikiski Aglow meets each Saturday morning the Kenai Spur Highway next to the Boys and Girls from 9-11 a.m. at the Nikiski New Hope Christian Club. The entrance to the Food Pantry is through the Fellowship, Mile 23 North Road. All are welcome side door. The Pantry closes for holidays. For more information contact the church office at to attend. Aglow International is founded on prayer 283-7868 or email kumcalaska@gmail.com. and compassionate outreach. It is global in ministry vision, yet rooted in small groups. Nikiski Aglow is hosting the DVD teaching of Graham Cooke with Clothes 4 U at First Baptist Church “Game Changers.” The five themes are: 1. How you First Baptist Church Soldotna, located at 159 S. are known in heaven; 2. Establishing your internal Binkley Street, is re-opening its Clothes 4 U proovercomer; 3. Mind of Christ; 4. Reinventing your gram. It is open on the second and fourth Saturday walk in the fruit of the Spirit; 5. Law of the Spirit of of each month from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. All clothing and Life in Christ. For information call Bev at 776-8022 shoes are free to the public. or 398-7311 or Paulette at 252-7372.

Soldotna Food Pantry open weekly

Clothes Quarters open weekly

The Soldotna Food Pantry is open every Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. for residents experiencing food shortages. The Food Pantry is located at the Soldotna United Methodist Church, at 158 South Binkley Street, now offers a Food Pantry for citizens in the community who are experiencing food shortages. Non-perishable food items or monetary dona-

Clothes Quarters at Our Lady of the Angels Church is open every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., and the first Saturday of every month from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, call 907-2834555.

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Submit church announcements to news@peninsulaclarion.com.

Iraqi Torah scroll makes mysterious journey to Jerusalem JERUSALEM (AP) — A 200-year-old Torah scroll has taken an unusual and mysterious journey from Baghdad to Jerusalem, where it was greeted with candies and song in a jubilant dedication ceremony Thursday. Israeli experts in Jewish scribal tradition who restored the Hebrew parchment say it was written two centuries ago by two different scribes in northern Iraq using pomegranate ink, a rarelyused writing material. The scroll is a remnant of Iraq’s 2,500-year-old Jewish community, one of the world’s oldest, which all but disappeared when large numbers of Jews left for Israel following the creation of the Jewish state in 1948. During the 2003 invasion of Iraq, American soldiers discovered ancient Iraqi Jewish Torahs and other community documents in the waterlogged basement of Iraqi intelligence headquarters in Baghdad and took the manuscripts to the U.S. for restoration. They have gone on display in the U.S., and American officials have promised to return the items to Iraq.

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 23, 2015

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n On Jan. 3 at 7:03 p.m., Alaska State Troopers responded to a residence off of Tall Tree Road in Anchor Point for a disturbance. While at the residence, troopers made contact with Jontomas W. Sullivan, 27, of Anchor Point. Investigation revealed that Sullivan had recklessly caused physical injury to a family member and put three additional family members in fear of physical injury. Further investigation revealed that Sullivan had damaged property at the residence, valued at less than $250. Sullivan was arrested for four counts of fourth-degree assault and fifth-degree criminal mischief (domestic violence) and was taken to the Homer Jail without bail. n On Jan. 4 at 8:37 p.m., troopers responded to a report of a domestic disturbance at a residence in Soldotna. Involved parties were contacted on scene. Following the investigation, Sara Mitchell, 23 of Soldotna, was arrested and taken to Wildwood Pretrial on one count of fifth-degree criminal mischief (domestic violence). n On Jan. 6 at 10:08 p.m., Soldotna police stopped a vehicle on the Sterling Highway at Binkley Street. Marcus Olsen, 24, of Nikiski, was issued a criminal citation for driving without liability insurance and released. n On Jan. 6 at 10:12 p.m., Soldotna police responded to a disturbance at a residence on Redoubt Avenue. Franklin Trigg, 43, of Soldotna, was arrested for fourth-degree assault and fourth-degree criminal mischief and taken to Wildwood Pretrial. n On Jan. 7 at 1:11 a.m., Soldotna police responded to the Kenai Peninsula College dormitory for an intoxicated male. Donovan Phillip, 21, of Soldotna, was arrested on an outstanding failure to appear warrant on the original charge of habitual minor consuming and was taken to Wildwood Pretrial on $500 bail. n On Jan. 8 at about 11:40 a.m., Jacob Benjamin Hudlow, 35, of Sterling, was arrested on three charges of third-degree misconduct involving weapons and a probation violation, after he was contacted by Soldotna based troopers and Kenai Probations officers at a residence off Blexis Avenue in Sterling. Investigation revealed that Hudlow was in possession of three concealable firearms and a small explosive device. Hudlow is currently on felony probation for fourth-degree misconduct

Police reports involving controlled substances with requirements not to possess prohibited weapons. He was taken to Wildwood Pretrial without bail. n On Jan. 8, troopers contacted Andrea Grisel, 37, of Soldotna after she slid off the road into the ditch. Grisel was found to be driving on a revoked license. She was issued a criminal citation and was released on scene. n On Jan. 8 at about 6:40 p.m., troopers conducted a traffic stop on a vehicle near the intersection of Poppy Wood Street and West Poppy Lane. The passenger, identified as Bridget Samson, 24 of Soldotna, who had an outstanding felony probation violation warrant, fled on foot from the scene. Following a short foot pursuit, Samson was taken into custody and taken to Wildwood Pretrial on the warrant and resisting or interfering with arrest. n On Jan. 9 at about 12:30 p.m., after troopers contacted Elizabeth Gail Miller, 22, of Kenai, at a residence off Carver Road in Kenai, she was arrested for two counts of second-degree theft, first-degree forgery, attempted fraudulent use of an access device (less than $750), and attempted fourth-degree theft. Miller’s charges stem from investigation of a report that she had stolen numerous electronics and a check that she attempted to cash at a Soldotna bank. She was taken to Wildwood Pretrial without bail. n On Jan. 9, troopers conducted a traffic stop on a green 1996 Subaru station wagon for failing to maintain its lane of travel on North Fireweed Street in Soldotna. Investigation into the traffic contact resulted in the arrest of Dennis E. Miller, 64, of Soldotna, for driving under the influence and sixth-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance 6th degree. Miller was taken to Wildwood Pretrial on $750 bail. Miller’s vehicle was towed from the scene. n On Jan. 9 at 6:54 p.m., troopers responded to a report of a motor vehicle accident near Mile 100 of the Sterling Highway. Investigation revealed that Glenn Johnson, 69,

of Kasilof, had struck a moose while traveling northbound on the Sterling Highway. No other vehicles were involved and no injuries were reported. n On Jan. 9 at 4:33 p.m., Soldotna police responded to a residence on Redoubt Avenue for a disturbance. Patricia Davis, 35, of Soldotna, was arrested for fourth-degree assault and taken to Wildwood Pretrial without bail. n On Jan. 9 at 9:48 p.m., Soldotna police stopped a vehicle on the Sterling Highway near Devin Drive. Cameron McCollum, 20, of Nikiski, was issued a criminal citation for driving in violation of a restricted license and released. n On Jan. 9, Alaska State Troopers Criminal Suppression Detail responded to a report of an alarm at a residence near Sport Lake Road in Soldotna. Investigation resulted in contact with and the arrest of David Walsh, 39, of Kasilof, for fifthdegree misconduct involving weapons. Walsh was taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility on $250 bail. n On Jan. 10 at 3:02 p.m., Federal Fish and Wildlife Service Refuge Officers and Alaska State Troopers attempted to conduct a traffic stop on a vehicle near Mile 6 of Swanson River Road in Sterling. The driver of the vehicle, identified as Thomas Conn, 56, of Sterling, attempted to elude responding units and lost control of his vehicle on the northern section of Scout Lake Loop. He was apprehended shortly thereafter. Further investigation revealed that Conn had been driving under the influence of alcohol and on a revoked license. Conn was arrested and taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility without bail on the charges of felony failure to stop at the direction of a peace

officer, driving under the influence, driving while license revoked and resisting arrest. n On Jan. 10 at 6:14 p.m. Alaska State Troopers received a REDDI (Report Every Dangerous Driver Immediately) report on a vehicle in Soldotna. Shortly after, another REDDI report was received on the same vehicle. Troopers located the vehicle at a residence on Myrna Avenue Soldotna. The driver was identified as Kaitlin Stropes, 21, of Soldotna. Investigation revealed that Stropes was driving under the influence of a controlled substance. Stropes was arrested for driving under the influence and taken to Wildwood Pretrial on $500 bail. n On Jan. 10 at 1:55 a.m., Soldotna police stopped a vehicle on the Sterling Highway near Funny River Road. Daniel Gentry, 28, of Soldotna, was arrested on an outstanding warrant and for providing false information to police and was taken to Wildwood Pretrial without bail. n On Jan. 10 at about 9:20 p.m., Alaska State Troopers attempted to conduct a traffic stop for equipment and moving violations near the intersection of the Seward Highway and Nash Road in Seward. The vehicle failed to stop after being directed and attempted to elude the trooper, traveling east on Nash Road. During the brief pursuit, the vehicle performed a U-turn, almost striking the trooper driving in the opposite lane. The vehicle stopped a short distance later and the trooper contacted the driver, Frank Duarte, 51, of Seward. Investigation revealed that Duarte was impaired by alcoholic beverages. He was arrested and taken to the Seward Jail without bail for driving under the influence and first-degree failure to stop at the direction of a police officer.

. . . Vote Continued from page A-1

public at all times, according to Alaska statute. A journal of commission proceedings shall be kept and made available for public inspection at the borough office. Baxter said he believes moving to home rule is in the best interest of the city. He said the charter will not dictate policy, but how policy is created. “You don’t pass a bed tax with a charter,” Baxter said. “You define how it could be pursued. If approved, one of the first actions the commission will take is to come up with dates for meetings, Baxter said. Sprague said regardless of how voters feel about moving to home rule, he hopes everyone will turn out on Feb. 3. Reach Kelly Sullivan at kelly. sullivan@peninsulclarion.com.

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n On Jan. 11 at 1:35 p.m., Alaska State Troopers from Soldotna contacted Steven Meadows, 26, of Kenai, at his residence. He was arrested on an outstanding arrest warrant for failure to appear and was taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility on $500 bail. n On Jan. 11 at 2:19 p.m., Soldotna police stopped a vehicle at Mile 94 Sterling Highway. Daniel M. Rink, 30, of Anchorage, was found to be in possession of marijuana. He was issued a criminal citation for sixth-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance and released. n On Jan. 11 at 2:36 a.m., troopers and Soldotna police responded to a report of a physical disturbance on Dawn Drive in Soldotna. Troopers contacted all parties involved in the physical altercation and determined that Mitchum Ivanoff, 24, of Soldotna, had physically assaulted a family member, placed another family in fear and caused damage to the residence. Ivanoff was arrested for two counts of fourth-degree assault (domestic violence) and fourth-degree criminal mischief (domestic violence). He was arrested and taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility without bail. n On Jan. 12 at 7:06 p.m., Soldotna police stopped a vehicle near Mile 93 of the Sterling Highway after a REDDI (Report Every Dangerous Driver Immediately) report was received. Jordan Newton, 32, of Kenai, was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol and a felony probation violation and taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility without bail. n On Jan. 12 at 8:35 a.m. Brandon J. Cleveland, 27, of Bethel, presented himself to Kenai police due to three outstanding Palmer Alaska State

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Troopers Judicial System warrants: failure to appear for status hearing, with $125 bail; probation violation – batterer’s intervention program on the original charge of fourth-degree assault, with $125 bail, and probation violation - domestic violence intervention program on the original charge of fourth-degree assault, with $1,000 bail. Cleveland was taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility on the warrants. n On Jan. 12 at 4:46 p.m. Kenai police made a routine traffic stop near Mile 7.5 of the Kenai Spur Highway. As a result of the stop Caleb J. Alexander, 24 of Kenai, was issued a summons to court for sixth-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance. n On Jan. 12 at about 2:20 p.m., Alaska State Troopers responded to a domestic disturbance in progress on Danver Street in Anchor Point. Investigation lead to the arrest of Darian Rastopsoff, 30, of Anchor Point, on charges of two counts of fourth-degree assault, interfering with the report of a domestic violence crime and violating conditions of release. Rastopsoff was taken to the Homer Jail without bail. n On Jan. 12 at 5:33 p.m., Anchor Point troopers were notified of an assault that had just occurred off North Fork Road in Anchor Point. Troopers responded to the residence and contacted the parties involved. Investigation revealed that Lorelei M. Reece, 21, of Anchor Point, had physically assaulted a family member and had also choked the family member to the point that it interrupted the victim’s breathing. Reece was arrested for fourth-degree assault and third-degree assault, both domestic violence crimes, and was taken to the Homer Jail and held pending arraignment.


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A-10 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 23, 2015

. . . Nets

those salmon could be harvested on the Kenai river. tional fishing permits. The risk to king salmon The Ninilchik Traditional Council’s proposal isn’t worth the gain for the sockeye, he said. River are upriver from the areas where Fish and Game operates its in-season sonar projects to adds a 10-fathom, or 30 foot, gillnet to the existEncelewski argued that the millions of sockcount and project the final numbers of the strug- ing rod and reel, dipnet and fish wheel subsis- eyes harvested by the Cook Inlet commercial

Cook Inlet subsistence harvest limits

Continued from page A-1

While the board made time and area amendments to the Kasilof River proposal — including a requirement that any community set gillnet fishery would need a operational plan before it hit the water — no caveats were added to Kenai River proposal.

Kenai River The Federal Subsistence Board voted 4-3 to allow gillnetting on the Kenai River with the Bureau of Land of Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Forest Service opposing the move. The Ninilchik subsistence community will be able to operate one 10 fathom, or 30-foot long, net to take salmon. Users would not be allowed to obstruct more than half of the river’s width with stationary fishing gear and, if other subsistence stationary gear is in the water the gillnet would be set at least 200 feet away. One permit for the Ninilchik subsistence community would be made available. However, board members said managers would also have to consider proposals from the subsistence communities in Cooper Landing and Moose Pass — meaning that up to three nets could potentially be used in the river. The permits would be awarded by the federal fishery manager and the Kenai National Wildlife refuge manager. Fishing will be allowed from June 15-August 15 on the Kenai River unless it is closed or otherwise restricted by federal action and salmon taken in the gillnet fishery would be included in the dipnet, and rod and reel fishery annual harvest limits for the Kenai River. Subsistence fishing areas on the Kenai River include the Russian River Falls, Kenai River Mile 48 — just south of Skilak Lake — and Moose Range Meadows. Fish and Game Sportfishing Area Management Biologist Robert Begich said he was concerned about the new fishery, both because of its location and its potential to affect the department’s ability to count and project how many king salmon would make it up the river to spawn. Subsistence users can harvest 1,000 late-run king salmon in the Cook Inlet and the areas where

. . Advisor Continued from page A-1

be contracted out for someone to lobby legislators in Juneau for the borough instead of funding a permanent position. Navarre said he wasn’t opposed

Graphic courtesy the 2013/2015 Federal Subsistence Regulations

gling fish stock. “We would need their harvest for our projections to be correct,” he said. Last year, managers projected that 16,671 chinook salmon escaped into the river, or about 1,671 fish above the lower end of the river’s escapement goal range. Managers have struggled to meet the king salmon goal on the Kenai River and the fishery has become increasingly restrictive in recent years. In 2014, the Kenai king salmon fishing season began with an unprecedented closure for early-run king salmon, and Fish and Game also used a provision that required anglers to use barbless hooks later in the season — a first in the state. Begich said he was also concerned with the idea of a gillnet being used downstream of Skilak Lake because of the variety of species holding in the area during the June through August time period. “Those fish are all in different stages of preand post-spawning and when you put a gillnet in the water up there, you’re going to catch everything,” he said. “It’s a non-selective gear type so you’re going to be catching spawning-colored reds that you’re not going to want to catch, pinks, spawning-colored kings, everything.”

Kasilof The board voted unanimously in favor of an amended proposal to allow gillnetting on the Kasilof River. The new regulation will allow for one community setnet in the Kasilof River, aimed primarily at plentiful sockeye salmon runs. Last year, Fish and Game counted nearly 440,000 sockeye in the

to the idea but felt the borough would get “more bang for their buck” than having a temporary consultant. The assembly heard from two people during public testimony, both opposed to the new position. Nikiski resident Wenda Kennedy asked if the position was

necessary and questioned the “narrow focus” to have someone work solely on the LNG project. Navarre said the position encompasses overall oil, gas and mining industries but the immediate focus would be on legislation related to the LNG project this year. If for whatever reason

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tence fisheries available on the river. The council argued that the current dipnet, rod and reel, and fish wheel allowances are not sufficient for their subsistence needs. By statute, subsistence is to be given a higher consideration than other fisheries, and the council argued that not allowing the most effective means to fish salmon would break that promise. “Subsistence fishery is supposed to be the number one consideration,” said Executive Director of the Ninilchik Traditional Council Ivan Encelewski. “We’re not going to get a $100,000 seine permit just to satisfy our subsistence needs. We (subsistence users) feel like we get the short end of the stick.” Salmon harvested from the gillnet fishery will be included as part of each household’s 25-perhousehold limit for sockeye from the Kasilof river. The federal board amended the time and area available to subsistence gillnetters by allowing fishing only in July 1-31. The Kasilof sockeye and king salmon runs stretch from June 16-August 15 while the coho and pink salmon seasons run from June 16 to Oct. 31. The amendments also specified that the permit will be experimental for five years, then the board will review its performance. Before the community net can hit the water, the board also required that it have an operational plan which would include information like mesh size, allocation and location restrictions. Miller, the Fish and Game regional coordinator, said the addition of the experimental gillnet fishery flies in the face of the opportunities already available to the Ninilchik such as educathe project does not move forward, the assembly has the option during the next budget process to evaluate the necessity of the position, he said. Kasilof resident George Pierce said he was under the impression that lawmakers would keep the mayor in the loop on pending legislation pertaining

and sport fisheries are, in practice, prioritized by means of the conservation measures for sinking chinook stocks. “We’re talking 4,000 sockeyes here,” said Encelewski “Conservation gets the priority, not us.”

Looking ahead After the meeting Kenai Peninsula users said they were surprised by the decision Kenai River Sportfishing Association Executive Director Ricky Gease said he was surprised by the decision because commercial and sport fishermen had worked with the issue of gillnets on the rivers in the past. “I wonder what changed from the finding from 2007 when they said they didn’t want to use gillnets because of the indiscriminate nature and conservation concerns for Dolly Varden, rainbow trout and salmon,” Gease said. Despite the criticism, board members said they had a responsibility to consider the subsistence users in the inlet. Hydaburg mayor Tony Christianson, rural representative for the Federal Subsistence Board, said it was the board’s job to look at more than the potential economic impact a fishery could have. “We only have the one thing to look after, and it’s the interests of the subsistence community,” he said. I’m here to fight for the people. I’m here to look after their needs, and their need is food, not money.” Reach Rashah McChesney at rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com.

to the LNG project. “Let’s wait until we get some pipe laid,” he said. “We have studied this thing to death. Why hire somebody now when we could be waiting 15 years.” Navarre said he was happy to see the position be approved because it would serve an important function to the borough

and prepare for the future and monitor legislation this year. He said he has talked with a couple people interested and hopes to hire someone in the next couple weeks. Reach Dan Balmer at daniel.balmer@peninsulaclarion. com. C

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Ironies work out in end In high school, Campbell never wanted to play in Alaska By JEFF HELMINIAK Peninsula Clarion

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion

In this September 2014 file photo, Brown Bears’ Ben Campbell practices before the team’s season at the Soldotna Regional Sports Complex in Soldotna.

The career of Brown Bears defenseman Ben Campbell has been marked by two ironies that worked out in the end. Both can be tied to his high school career at Duluth Denfeld in Minnesota. Campbell, son of Scott and Celine Campbell, had the childhood that one might expect of somebody coming of age in hockey-mad Minnesota. His first Christmas present was a pair of Velcro hockey skates, and he

remembers growing up at rinks watching his older brother, Tyler, play. “Since birth, I’ve had a passion for the game,” Campbell said. By middle school, as he made allstar team after all-star team, it was apparent he had a shot to get to the high levels of the game, like the Tier II North American Hockey League. As a junior at Denfeld, he got just that chance when the Alaska Avalanche of Wasilla, a team that has since moved, wanted to tender him. “I said no,” said Campbell, who is 6-foot, 185 pounds. “I didn’t want to

Bears ready to face Chill By JEFF HELMINIAK Peninsula Clarion

The Coulee Region (Wisconsin) Chill have gone five games without a win. The Kenai River Brown Bears have gone 14 See SERIES, page B-4

See BEARS, page B-4

Kenai Central High School’s Ellery Steffensen takes down Soldotna High School’s Hunter Bourgeois during the 160-pound match Thursday at Kenai Central High School in Kenai.

Soldotna defeats Kenai By JOEY KLECKA Peninsula Clarion

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After being handed a dual loss by Kenai earlier this season, the Soldotna Stars wrestling team was looking for redemption before the season comes to an end. In the final regular season meet of the year, the Stars finished strong, topping Kenai Photos by Kelly Sullivan/ Peninsula Clarion Central 48-32 in a dual meet Soldotna High School’s James Gallagher tries to knock Kenai Central High School’s Dylan Carter Thursday. The Stars lost a 45-36 dual off his feet during the 182-pound match Thursday at Kenai Central High School in Kenai.

meet to the Kards in early December, but with wrestlers finally beginning to get healthy again after a season of illness and injury, SoHi coach Neldon Gardner was happy to see his team come away with the win. “I would rather do duals like this than a long tournament any day of the week,” Gardner said, adding that he believes the dual format works the best in the longer season in which the large schools compete. “We used to pack the bleach-

ers for these meets back in the day, and if we had more of these dual meets, I think we’d get our fan base back,” he said. Gardner said the turnaround from the previous meeting with Kenai and Thursday’s dual came down to two key matchups. Phillip Lawton gained six points for SoHi in the 113-pound bout, notching a pin of Kenai’s Natalie Chavez with 54 seconds to spare. Lawton did not make weight last See DUAL, page B-4

Sanarov hat trick lifts Homer over Kenai Central Staff report

Kiril Sanarov scored four goals as the Homer hockey team topped Kenai Central 7-1 in Northstar Conference action at the Soldotna Regional Sports Complex on Thursday. Homer finishes league play at 3-6-1 overall, currently good for the fourth seed heading into the league tournament. But Kenai and Soldotna play a huge game Jan. 31 at the sports complex that could change that. If the

Stars can beat the Kardinals, SoHi also finishes 3-6-1 and moves ahead of Homer due to the head-to-head tiebreaker. But if Kenai wins, the Kards would move to 3-7-0 and finish ahead of Soldotna for the No. 5 seed. Homer took a 2-0 lead after the first period on goals by Tim Blakely, assisted by Garrett Butcher and Dmitry Kuzmin, and Sanarov, assisted by Anton Kuzmin. Kenai then cut the lead to 2-1 in

the second period on a goal by Tristan Bulot, assisted by Jakeb O’Brien and Cody Arbelovsky. The Kards then had a power play heading into the third period, but Homer scored short-handed and never looked back. Clem Tillion had the short-handed tally, assisted by Sanarov and Woope Huffman. The Mariners then began to pour it on as Sanarov scored on assists from Clem Tillion and Ulian Kuzmin, Dmit-

ry Kuzmin scored on an assist from Robby Larson, Sanarov scored on an Anton Kuzmin assist, and Sanarov scored on a Charlie Meake assist. Markian Polushkin had 21 saves on 22 shots. For Kenai, Nate O’Lena had 30 saves on 35 shots, and Bradley Kishbaugh had 10 saves on 12 shots. Thursday Mariners 7, Kardinals 1 Homer Kenai

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First period — 1. Homer, Blakely (Butcher, D. Kuzmin), 2:42; 2. Homer, Sanarov (A. Kuzmin), 10:54. Penalties — none. Second period — 3. Kenai, Bulot (O’Brien, Arbelovsky), 0:26. Penalties — Homer 1 for 2:00. Third period — 4. Homer, C. Tillion (Sanarov, Huffman); 5. Homer, Sanarov (C. Tillion, A. Kuzmin), 2:32; 6. Homer, D. Kuzmin (Larson), 4:51; 7. Homer, Sanarov (A. Kuzmin), 7:47; 8. Homer, Sanarov (Meake), 12:28. Penalties — Homer 1 for 2:00; Kenai 2 for 4:00. Shots on goal — Homer, 45 shots; Kenai, 22 shots. Goalies — Homer, Polushkin (22 shots, 21 saves); Kenai, O’Lena (35 shots, 30 saves); Kishbaugh (12 shots, 10 saves).

Davis nabs X Games bronze Brady, Belichick try to deflate controversy over footballs

Staff report

Soldotna snowmachiner Cory Davis isn’t done wowing the crowd just yet. Davis took home another X Games medal Thursday in Aspen, Colorado, adding to his burgeoning collection. Davis collected a bronze by winning the third-place round of the snowmobile speed-and-style event with a score of 84.33 points, beating out Levi La-

Vallee’s score of 50.01. The competition is based on both speed and style, with competitors often pulling off brilliant midair stunts. The bronze is the third of Davis’ X Games career. The 26-year-old earned a silver medal in the snowmobile long jump event at last year’s Winter X Games, which equaled the silver he took in the 2013 X Games speedand-style event.

Gordon to cut back after 2015 By JENNA FRYER AP Auto Racing Writer

Jeff Gordon, with a nagging back injury, a young family he wanted to spend more time with and a phenom waiting in the wings at Hendrick Motorsports, knew midway through last season that he had one more year in him. NASCAR’s most charismatic driver, the man behind the wheel of the famed and sometimes feared No. 24, had decided it was time to call it quits on one of the most successful careers in motorsports history. The four-time champion conferred with Rick Hendrick, the only team owner he has had

over 23 years of Sprint Cup racing, and settled on a date. The 43-year-old Gordon announced Thursday that 2015 will be his final season as a fulltime driver, saddening legions of fans, fellow drivers and others who watched him became the face of stock car racing as the sport exploded in popularity a generation ago. In an interview with The Associated Press, Gordon said he reached his decision last summer. He had seen other drivers embark on distracting farewell tours, and he didn’t want to be that guy. Although he told his crew chief of his decision after narrowly missing out on shot at a fifth championship, it took

time to settle on the day to tell the world. It started with a conversation with his two young children when they woke up for school. They worried they won’t go to the race track anymore, that other kids might think of them differently if their father is not a famous race car driver. The conversation with Ella and Leo made the decision a reality for Gordon — and he wept. “Ella just stared at me, she’d never seen me cry like that before,” Gordon told AP. “After that, I seriously broke down. It hit me like a ton of bricks, and I got so emotional and thought, ‘How am I going to get through this day?’”

By HOWARD ULMAN AP Sports Writer

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — The two men most responsible for delivering wins for the New England Patriots both said Thursday they have no explanation for how footballs used to reach the Super Bowl were underinflated by 2 pounds per square inch. Patriots quarterback Tom Brady said he has not been contacted by the NFL, even as league officials investigate whether the team cheated against the Indianapolis Colts in the AFC championship game. “I don’t know what happened,” Brady said, answering questions from reporters hours after Patriots coach Bill Belichick said he almost never thinks about football pressure and doesn’t know what happened, either. “I didn’t alter the ball in any way,” Brady said. Unlike Belichick, who answered questions briefly after a long opening remark by repeatedly saying “I’ve told you everything I know” and “I don’t C

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have an explanation,” Brady answered many questions for a half hour and said he doesn’t think about the conditions of the ball during games. “I get the snap, I drop back, I throw the ball,” Brady said. “I don’t sit there and try to squeeze it and determine that.” He does, however, have his preferences — he likes the football to be pumped to 12.5 pounds per square inch of air pressure, he said. The NFL requires balls to be inflated between 12.5 and 13.5 pounds per square inch. Brady said he never has knowingly played with a ball with less than 12.5 pounds per square inch of pressure. “To me, that’s a perfect grip for the football,” said Brady, who will face the Seattle Seahawks in the Super Bowl on Feb. 1 in Glendale, Arizona. “I would never do anything outside the rules of play.” With different approaches, Belichick and Brady sent a unified message: Both said they have no clue how the footballs were tampered with or switched during last Sunday night’s 45-7 win over the Colts, and started

learning about the issue along with fans and everyone else. “I have no knowledge of anything, any wrongdoing,” Brady said when asked who on the Patriots was responsible for the underinflated footballs. “I’m very comfortable saying nobody did it as far as I know.” Asked if he should have tried harder to learn what happened, considering the possible effect on the team’s reputation, Brady said, “I think there’s a lot of people that have more information than me.” Brady said he picks the game balls he wants to use several hours before kickoff, then doesn’t think about them at all. He said he didn’t know the protocol for handling game balls after he chooses them. “Once I approve the ball, that’s the ball that I expect out there on the field,” Brady said. “It wasn’t even a thought, inkling or concern of mine that they weren’t the same ball.” Belichick said that before this week, he didn’t give air pressure in footballs much thought at all.


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B-2 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 23, 2015

No. 2 Virginia rolls Yellow Jackets By The Associated Press

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — Malcolm Brogdon scored 13 points and No. 2 Virginia ran its home winning streak to 21 games with a 57-28 victory against Georgia Tech on Thursday night. Nine other players scored on a balanced night for the Cavaliers (18-0, 6-0 Atlantic Coast Conference), who pretty much broke the game open with a 10-0 first-half run because of how effective their defense was against the Yellow Jackets. The burst turned a 13-10 lead into a 13-point margin that never again dipped into single digits. Virginia led 28-16 at halftime and, at the midpoint of the second half, Georgia Tech (9-9, 0-6) had added just four more points and trailed 41-20 as Cavaliers reserves started anticipating a chance to play. No. 3 GONZAGA 68, SAINT MARY’S 47 SPOKANE, Wash. — Kevin Pangos scored 14 points as No. 3 Gonzaga cruised past archrival Saint Mary’s to take sole possession of first place in the West Coast Conference.

Przemek Karnowski added 12 points and Kyle Wiltjer 11 for Gonzaga (19-1, 8-0 West Coast), whose only loss this year is at No. 7 Arizona. This is the best start in program history. Brad Waldow scored 14 points to lead Saint Mary’s (15-4, 7-1), which saw its nine-game winning streak snapped. Gonzaga has won 12 straight games and has the nation’s longest home winning streak at 35, dating to 2012.

No. 7 ARIZONA 89, STANFORD 82 STANFORD, Calif. — Stanley Johnson had 19 points and seven rebounds and No. 7 Arizona handed Stanford its first home loss of the season. Brandon Ashley added 17 points while playing with foul trouble in the Wildcats’ 10th straight win in the rivalry. Arizona (17-2, 5-1 Pac-12) tied the game at 52 with 14:34 left on Ashley’s three-point play and went ahead on his 3-pointer the next time down the floor in a decisive sequence that helped the Wildcats pull away. The Cardinal (13-5, 4-2) dropped to 9-1 at home in Maples Pavilion and had a three-game winning streak snapped with just their second defeat in nine

games. Chasson Randle scored 26 points and became just the third Stanford player to reach 2,000 points and 15th in conference history.

No. 8 NOTRE DAME 85, VIRGINIA TECH 60 BLACKSBURG, Va. — Jerian Grant scored 18 points to lead Notre Dame past Virginia Tech. Grant shot 6 of 9 from the floor, including two 3-pointers, as the Fighting Irish (18-2, 6-1 ACC) won their third straight game. Pat Connaughton added 17 points and hit five 3-pointers on a night when the Fighting Irish shot 12 of 26 from beyond the 3-point arc. The Irish led 38-28 at halftime and broke open the game with a 17-6 run to start the second half. Jackson hit two 3-pointers in that run, and a layup by Auguste gave Notre Dame a 55-34 lead — its biggest lead of the game — with 14:52 remaining. Ahmed Hill scored 13 points for Virginia Tech (8-10, 0-5), which lost for the fifth straight time, four by double figures.

Kevin “Yogi” Ferrell scored 24 points and Collin Hartman added a career high 15 to lead Indiana over Maryland. The Hoosiers (15-4, 5-1 Big Ten) have won four straight and are tied with No. 6 Wisconsin for the conference lead. Jake Layman had 13 points and Jared Nickens finished with 12 for Maryland (17-3, 5-2), which was off all night. The defense was shredded for a season-high point total and the league’s best 3-point defense allowed Indiana to make 15 3s.

DePAUL 64, No. 24 SETON HALL 60

NEWARK, N.J. — Billy Garrett Jr. scored 14 points before fouling out and Myke Henry also had 14 to help DePaul come from behind and edge Seton Hall. It was DePaul’s first win on the road against Seton Hall, and it snapped a 51-game losing streak for the Blue Demons (11-8, 5-2) against ranked teams — dating to 2008, when they defeated No. 17 Villanova. DePaul outscored Seton Hall 17-5 over the final five minutes. No. 23 INDIANA 89, Angel Delgado set career highs No. 13 MARYLAND 70 with 19 points and 19 rebounds for BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — the Pirates (13-5, 3-3).

Bulls topple Spurs By The Associated Press

CHICAGO — Derrick Rose scored 22 points and the struggling Chicago Bulls beat the San Antonio Spurs 104-81 on Thursday night. The Bulls came away with a much-needed win after dropping six of eight and handed the defending champions their most lopsided loss of the season. The Central division leaders broke this one open in the third quarter, outscoring the Spurs 31-20, and snapped San Antonio’s fourgame win streak. JAZZ 101, BUCKS 99 MILWAUKEE — Gordon Hayward scored 13 of his game-high 24 points in the fourth quarter and the Utah Jazz held on for the win as the Bucks missed their last five shots in the closing minute. The Jazz appeared to be in control after a 15-3 run, taking a 101-92 lead on two free throws by Hayward with 2:35 remaining. But the Bucks pulled within the final score on Jared Dudley’s 3-pointer from the top right with 1:29 left.

The Bucks had a final opportunity when an officials review awarded them the ball out of bounds under the basket with 7.1 seconds left. Brandon Knight missed a jumper with two seconds left and Zaza Pachulia missed the tip-in at the buzzer.

CELTICS 90, TRAIL BLAZERS 89 PORTLAND, Ore. — Evan Turner hit a 3-pointer with 1.9 seconds left and the Boston Celtics overcame the shorthanded Portland Trail Blazers. Avery Bradley had 18 points to lead the Celtics, who snapped a three-game losing streak. Jared Sullinger added 17 points and nine rebounds.

CLIPPERS 123, NETS 84. LOS ANGELES — Blake Griffin scored 22 of his 24 points in the first half, when the Clippers led by 33 points, and Los Angeles went on to its largest victory ever over the Brooklyn Nets. J.J. Redick and Jamal Crawford added 17 points each, DeAndre Jordan had 14 points and 12 rebounds, and Chris Paul had a season-high 17 assists for the Clippers.

Gasols to start Brothers set to make history at All-Star game By BRIAN MAHONEY AP Basketball Writer

Pau and Marc Gasol have been voted the first brothers to start in the NBA All-Star game, while Toronto’s Kyle Lowry made a late surge in fan balloting and will start for the Eastern Conference. Lowry passed Dwyane Wade and will start alongside Washington’s John Wall, the first time the East has had two first-time starters at guard since 2000. Golden State’s Stephen Curry made his own late surge to pass LeBron James as the overall leading vote-getter, the league announced Thursday. Kobe Bryant was also voted to start at West guard, though that’s in jeopardy because of a torn right rotator cuff. Pau Gasol of Chicago will start up front for the East along with James and Carmelo Anthony for the Feb. 15 game in New York. Memphis’ Marc Gasol joins New Orleans’ Anthony Davis and the Clippers’ Blake Griffin in the West frontcourt. Tom and Dick Van Arsdale played in the 1970 and 1971 games, but the Gasols — once traded for each other — are the first brothers to chosen to start. “Knowing that I will be facing my brother Pau for the opening tip, it will be a true accomplishment for our family and a memory I will cherish for the rest of my career,” Marc Gasol said in a statement through the Grizzlies. “It holds special meaning to be voted in by the fans, and I look forward to representing my teammates, the organization, the city of Memphis and entire MidSouth community and Grizzlies fans across the world.” Both Gasols were among the leaders in all the balloting updates, but Lowry was running more than 100,000 votes behind Wade, a perennial All-Star and fan favorite, when the last results were released. Fans rewarded him for his hard-nosed play in leading the Raptors to a huge lead in the Atlantic Division with his first All-Star appearance. Wall earned his first last year, and now he’s earned his first start. The East hasn’t had both its guards making their first start since Philadelphia’s Allen Iverson and Charlotte’s Eddie Jordan in 2000. Fans had to vote for two guards and three frontcourt players. The reserves will be picked by the head coaches in each conference and be announced next Thursday. The star of the NBA-leading Golden State Warriors, Curry ended up with more than 1.5 million votes, more than 42,000 ahead of James, who had a 13,285-vote lead over the sharpshooter at the last update. Curry, who just two years ago was an All-Star snub, becomes the first Warriors player elected to consecutive starts since Chris Mullin in 1991-92. C

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 23, 2015

Scoreboard

Sports Briefs LOS ANGELES — Kobe Bryant tore his right rotator cuff in the Los Angeles Lakers’ latest defeat, the club announced Thursday. Bryant injured his right shoulder in the second half of the Lakers’ loss at New Orleans on Wednesday night when he drove the baseline for a two-handed dunk. An MRI exam Thursday in San Antonio revealed the tear, and Bryant headed home to Los Angeles while the Lakers prepared to play the Spurs on Friday. The Lakers are expected to release an update on Bryant’s condition Friday. Lakers coach Byron Scott and the team declined to speculate on the severity of Bryant’s injury, but many rotator cuff injuries require surgery and several months of rehabilitation. Bryant has a high pain threshold and an impressive ability to play through injury, but the Lakers have already been limiting Bryant’s playing time to preserve his health beyond this largely lost season for the 16-time NBA champion club.

Mickelson starts slow in his return LA QUINTA, Calif. — Phil Mickelson got most of the attention in his return to competition after a four-month break. Blake Adams got a lot more out of his comeback round. Mickelson shot a 1-under 71 on Thursday in the Humana Challenge in his first event since the Ryder Cup, leaving him eight strokes behind leader Michael Putnam. “Even though this score is the worst I’ve had in a long time, in months, I’m excited about my game and getting back out tomorrow,” Mickelson said. “I can’t wait to get started again, because I just feel like I played a little tight today, kind of steered it a little bit.” Adams had a 64 on PGA West’s Jack Nicklaus Private Course in his return from hip replacement surgery. He last played a PGA Tour event in March and had surgery in July. “Very, very blessed to be back out here,” Adams said. “It’s been a long road to get back. You never know what you’re going to get when you have total hip replacement.” The 39-year-old Adams had six straight birdies from No. 14 to No. 1, added three in a row on Nos. 5-7 and closed with a bogey. Playing on a major medical extension, he has 16 events to earn $497,044 to keep his tour card.

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NHL Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 48 30 14 4 64 156 127 Detroit 47 27 11 9 63 139 119 Montreal 45 29 13 3 61 123 106 Boston 48 25 16 7 57 126 121 Florida 44 20 14 10 50 107 122 Ottawa 46 19 18 9 47 126 128 Toronto 48 22 23 3 47 142 150 Buffalo 47 14 30 3 31 89 167 Metropolitan Division N.Y. Islanders 46 31 14 1 63 151 129 Pittsburgh 46 26 12 8 60 138 117 N.Y. Rangers 44 27 13 4 58 134 106 Washington 46 24 13 9 57 137 120 Philadelphia 48 19 22 7 45 130 146 Columbus 45 20 22 3 43 113 142 New Jersey 47 17 22 8 42 107 134 Carolina 46 16 25 5 37 98 120

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division Nashville 45 30 10 5 65 137 104 St. Louis 46 29 13 4 62 148 111 Chicago 47 30 15 2 62 148 108 Winnipeg 48 26 14 8 60 135 117 Colorado 48 20 18 10 50 125 137 Dallas 46 21 18 7 49 144 151 Minnesota 46 20 20 6 46 128 137 Pacific Division Anaheim 47 31 10 6 68 139 124 San Jose 48 25 17 6 56 131 132 Vancouver 45 26 16 3 55 124 114 Calgary 47 25 19 3 53 136 125 Los Angeles 47 20 15 12 52 129 126 Arizona 46 16 25 5 37 105 156 Edmonton 47 12 26 9 33 109 158 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Thursday’s Games No games scheduled Friday’s Games No games scheduled Saturday’s Games No games scheduled

Basketball EASTERN CONFERENCE

GREENSBORO, N.C. — Ashley Wagner knew she wouldn’t lose any sleep this night. A year after a miserable trip to the U.S. Championships, Wagner won the short program with 72.04 points Thursday. Her performance had her thinking beyond nationals and to contending for international medals. Defending champ Gracie Gold was second, 5.02 back after doubling the toe loop in her triple-triple combination. In 2014, Wagner was the one with all the pressure after winning the previous two U.S. titles, and she cracked, finishing a distant fourth to spend a night fearing she’d missed out on an Olympic berth. Wagner made the team because of her previous successes and finished seventh in Sochi with some redemptive performances. After winning bronze at the Grand Prix Final last month, she vowed that she needed more difficulty in her programs to make the podium at the world championships. Wagner tried a triple lutz-triple toe loop combination in competition for the first time Thursday. She two-footed the second landing but was heartened by the jump. “I think that it is one of the steppingstones along the way to becoming one of the top ladies internationally,” she said. The top of the U.S. standings looked familiar. Polina Edmunds, the third U.S. woman at the Sochi Games, was third, .98 points behind Gold. And in fourth, just .76 behind her, was Mirai Nagasu, the skater bumped from the Olympic team by Wagner.

Solo suspended for 30 days Jerramy Stevens, the husband of U.S. national team goalkeeper Hope Solo, was driving a team vehicle when he was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence earlier this week, a person familiar with the details of the arrest said Thursday. The person spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity because they could not discuss the case publicly. TMZ first reported the details regarding the vehicle. Stevens, a former tight end for the Seattle Seahawks, was pulled over in Manhattan Beach, California, about 1:30 a.m. Monday for driving without headlights. Solo was the only passenger in the car but she was not arrested or detained. U.S. Soccer on Wednesday suspended Solo from the national team for 30 days. She will not travel to a pair of exhibition matches next month in Europe. Solo was in Southern California for training camp with the team, which is preparing to play in the World Cup starting in June. “I think it’s best for me to take a break, decompress from the stress of the last several months, and come back mentally and physically ready to positively contribute to the team,” Solo said in a statement following her suspension. It was the latest off-field trouble for the 33-year-old Olympian. Earlier this month, a judge dismissed two misdemeanor counts of domestic violence against her. The charges stemmed from an altercation with her half-sister and 17-year-old nephew at a party in Washington state last June. Solo had pleaded not guilty in that case, and she continued to play for the U.S. team and with her National Women’s Soccer League team, the Seattle Reign, while awaiting trial.

Atlantic Division W L Toronto 27 15 Brooklyn 18 25 Boston 14 26 Philadelphia 8 34 New York 7 36 Southeast Division Atlanta 35 8 Washington 29 14 Miami 18 24 Charlotte 18 25 Orlando 15 30 Central Division Chicago 28 16 Cleveland 23 20 Milwaukee 21 21 Detroit 17 26 Indiana 15 29

Pct GB .643 — .419 9½ .350 12 .190 19 .163 20½ .814 — .674 6 .429 16½ .419 17 .333 21 .636 — .535 4½ .500 6 .395 10½ .341 13

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division Memphis 30 12 Dallas 30 13 Houston 29 14 San Antonio 27 17 New Orleans 21 21 Northwest Division Portland 31 13 Oklahoma City 22 20 Denver 18 24 Utah 15 28 Minnesota 7 34 Pacific Division Golden State 34 6 L.A. Clippers 29 14 Phoenix 26 18 Sacramento 16 26

Thursday’s Games Chicago 104, San Antonio 81 Utah 101, Milwaukee 99 Boston 90, Portland 89 L.A. Clippers 123, Brooklyn 84 Friday’s Games Toronto at Philadelphia, 3 p.m. Oklahoma City at Atlanta, 3:30 p.m. Indiana at Miami, 3:30 p.m. Charlotte at Cleveland, 3:30 p.m. Orlando at New York, 3:30 p.m. Chicago at Dallas, 4 p.m. New Orleans at Minnesota, 4 p.m. L.A. Lakers at San Antonio, 4:30 p.m. Houston at Phoenix, 5 p.m. Boston at Denver, 5 p.m. Sacramento at Golden State, 6:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games New York at Charlotte, 3 p.m. Detroit at Milwaukee, 3:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Memphis, 4 p.m. Brooklyn at Utah, 5 p.m. Washington at Portland, 6 p.m. All Times AST

Women’s Scores EAST Albany (NY) 72, UMBC 62 Boston College 60, Duke 56 Delaware 80, Coll. of Charleston 49 Drexel 63, Hofstra 56 Fairfield 43, Rider 40 Maine 74, Vermont 46 Penn St. 79, Indiana 75 Quinnipiac 73, Marist 55 Siena 54, Monmouth (NJ) 52 Stony Brook 64, Mass.-Lowell 60 Syracuse 68, Pittsburgh 60 Towson 65, Northeastern 61 SOUTH

NBA Standings

Wagner wins short program

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L.A. Lakers 12 31 .279 23½

Hockey

Bryant has torn rotator cuff

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.705 — .524 8 .429 12 .349 15½ .171 22½ .850 .674 .591 .381

— 6½ 10 19

Alabama 51, Auburn 50 Appalachian St. 70, South Alabama 59 E. Kentucky 64, Murray St. 59 Florida Gulf Coast 79, SC-Upstate 61 Florida St. 68, Louisville 63 Georgia 54, Texas A&M 51 James Madison 92, William & Mary 50 Lipscomb 75, Jacksonville 63 Louisiana Tech 92, North Texas 57 Louisiana-Lafayette 69, Arkansas St. 57 Louisiana-Monroe 56, Texas-Arlington 51 Maryland 85, Michigan St. 56 Middle Tennessee 65, Old Dominion 48 Mississippi St. 64, Mississippi 62 North Carolina 67, NC State 63 North Florida 81, N. Kentucky 79, 2OT Southern Miss. 65, Rice 54 Stetson 75, Kennesaw St. 64 Tennessee 75, LSU 58 Texas A&M-CC 74, SE Louisiana 53 UAB 60, Charlotte 52 UNC Wilmington 76, Elon 68 Vanderbilt 55, Arkansas 53 MIDWEST Detroit 73, Oakland 62 Green Bay 65, Cleveland St. 61 IUPUI 71, Denver 54 Iowa 76, Michigan 70 N. Dakota St. 77, Nebraska-Omaha 60 Nebraska 89, Wisconsin 72 North Dakota 68, Idaho 62 Northwestern 68, Illinois 67 Notre Dame 89, Georgia Tech 76 Purdue 90, Minnesota 88, OT South Dakota 73, IPFW 72 Youngstown St. 75, Wright St. 70 SOUTHWEST

McNeese St. 104, Incarnate Word 101, 2OT Sam Houston St. 63, Abilene Christian 58 Stephen F. Austin 59, Lamar 55 Texas St. 67, Georgia Southern 57 UALR 82, Troy 56 UTSA 60, Marshall 48 W. Kentucky 78, UTEP 71 FAR WEST CS Bakersfield 70, UMKC 67 CS Northridge 72, UC Irvine 63 Cal Poly 57, Cal St.-Fullerton 48 Gonzaga 52, Saint Mary’s (Cal) 42 Hawaii 58, UC Davis 53 Loyola Marymount 82, Santa Clara 57 Montana 69, N. Arizona 42 N. Colorado 64, E. Washington 56 New Mexico St. 74, Grand Canyon 62 Pacific 71, Portland 69 S. Utah 74, Montana St. 69 Sacramento St. 84, Idaho St. 53 San Francisco 70, Pepperdine 58 Seattle 75, Chicago St. 51 Texas-Pan American 59, Utah Valley 52 UC Riverside 89, UC Santa Barbara 74 Weber St. 60, Portland St. 51

Men’s Scores EAST Albany (NY) 62, Hartford 53 Bryant 74, LIU Brooklyn 69 Canisius 64, Fairfield 50 DePaul 64, Seton Hall 60 George Washington 79, Fordham 59 Iona 78, Rider 68 New Hampshire 73, Vermont 68 Northeastern 82, James Madison 59 Providence 69, Xavier 66, OT Rhode Island 59, La Salle 47 Robert Morris 63, Mount St. Mary’s 59, OT Sacred Heart 78, Fairleigh Dickinson 77, OT St. Bonaventure 100, Duquesne 97, OT Stony Brook 65, Mass.-Lowell 45 Temple 73, South Florida 48 UConn 67, UCF 60 UMBC 76, Maine 59 Wagner 63, St. Francis (Pa.) 58 SOUTH Appalachian St. 64, South Alabama 53 Belmont 72, UT-Martin 67 Chattanooga 86, VMI 64 ETSU 70, The Citadel 59 Florida Gulf Coast 71, SC-Upstate 68 Gardner-Webb 79, Longwood 67 Jacksonville St. 71, E. Kentucky 67 Kennesaw St. 88, Stetson 82 Lipscomb 80, Jacksonville 77, 2OT Louisiana-Lafayette 96, Arkansas St. 59 Miami 65, NC State 60 Middle Tennessee 68, Old Dominion 58, OT Morehead St. 78, Tennessee Tech 74 North Florida 74, N. Kentucky 66 Notre Dame 85, Virginia Tech 60 Presbyterian 72, Campbell 70 Radford 73, High Point 66 Samford 89, UNC Greensboro 78 Texas-Arlington 61, LouisianaMonroe 57 Towson 53, Elon 51 UAB 81, Charlotte 76, OT UNC Asheville 75, Coastal Carolina 65 UTSA 82, Marshall 68

Lynch fined for gesture NEW YORK (AP) — The NFL has fined Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch $20,000 for making an obscene gesture during last Sunday’s NFC championship game, a person with knowledge of the fine told The Associated Press on Thursday.

The league did not specify what the gesture was in the win over Green Bay, but Lynch grabbed his crotch after scoring a go-ahead touchdown in the fourth quarter. Lynch was fined $11,000 for a similar gesture in Seattle’s win over Arizona on Dec. 21.

— The Associated Press

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Virginia 57, Georgia Tech 28 W. Carolina 60, Mercer 52 W. Kentucky 71, UTEP 66, OT Winthrop 71, Liberty 56 Wofford 74, Furman 49 MIDWEST Indiana 89, Maryland 70 Murray St. 77, E. Illinois 62 N. Dakota St. 69, IUPUI 61, OT Oakland 66, Milwaukee 53 Ohio St. 69, Northwestern 67 SIU-Edwardsville 69, Austin Peay 65 Seattle 75, Chicago St. 67 South Dakota 68, W. Illinois 58 UMKC 66, CS Bakersfield 63 SOUTHWEST Arkansas 93, Alabama 91, OT Georgia Southern 45, Texas St. 43 North Texas 73, Louisiana Tech 66 Rice 58, Southern Miss. 56 UALR 73, Troy 65 Utah Valley 72, Texas-Pan American 54 FAR WEST Arizona 89, Stanford 82 Arizona St. 79, California 44 Cal Poly 66, Cal St.-Fullerton 55 E. Washington 95, N. Colorado 85 Gonzaga 68, Saint Mary’s (Cal) 47 Montana 64, N. Arizona 57 Montana St. 79, S. Utah 65 New Mexico St. 85, Grand Canyon 63 North Dakota 71, Idaho 63 Oregon 75, Southern Cal 67 Oregon St. 66, UCLA 55 Portland 72, Pacific 69 Portland St. 69, Weber St. 63 Sacramento St. 62, Idaho St. 59 San Francisco 71, Pepperdine 59 Santa Clara 65, Loyola Marymount 62 UC Irvine 80, CS Northridge 49 UC Santa Barbara 83, UC Riverside 75 Washington 52, Colorado 50

Transactions BASEBALL OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER — Suspended Minnesota RHP Hudson Boyd (Cedar Rapids-MWL); free agent RHP Chris Capper; Texas OF Chris Grayson (Frisco-TL) and Cleveland RHP Duke von Schamann (Akron-EL) 50 games each, without pay, for violating the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Agreed to terms with RHPs Jairo Asencio, Scott Carroll, Jesse Crain, Logan Kensing, Arcenio Leon, J.D. Martin and Brad Penny; LHPs Zach Phillips and Joe Savery; Cs George Kottaras and Geovany Soto; INFs Juan Diaz and Andy LaRoche; and OFs Tony Campana and Michael Taylor on minor league contracts. SEATTLE MARINERS — Agreed to terms with UTL Shawn O’Malley on a minor league contract. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Agreed to terms with INF Kelly Johnson on a minor league contract. COLORADO ROCKIES — Named Doug Jones pitching coach for Boise (NWL), Dave Burba pitching coach for New Britain (EL), and Brandon Emmanuel pitching coach for Modesto (Cal). SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Agreed to terms with OF Gregor

Blanco on a two-year contract. WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Agreed to terms with 1B-OF Kila Ka’aihue and RHP Evan Meek on minor league contracts. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA — Fined Miami G Dwyane Wade $15,000 for making an obscene gesture during a game against Charlotte on Wednesday, Jan. 21. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL — Fined Seahawks RB Marshawn Lynch $20,000 for making an obscene gesture during last Sunday’s NFC championship game. CHICAGO BEARS — Named Frank Smith tight ends coach and Jason George strength and conditioning coach. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — Named Ryan Day quarterbacks coach. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Named Mike Bajakian quarterbacks coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Assigned LW Josh Anderson to Springfield (AHL). SAN JOSE SHARKS — Assigned D Dylan DeMelo and Fs Tomas Hertl and Barclay Goodrow to Worcester (AHL). SKIING U.S. SKI TEAM — Named Brandon Dyksterhouse interim women’s tech coach through the remainder of the season. SOCCER Major League Soccer D.C. UNITED — Announced the option for F Fabian Espindola was extended and he now has designated player status. SEATTLE SOUNDERS FC — Named Ante Razov assistant coach. North American Soccer League ARMADA FC — Signed MF Marcos Flores. National Women’s Soccer League WASHINGTON SPIRIT — Signed F Estefania Banini. COLLEGE ARKANSAS — Named Dan Enos offensive coordinator. CARSON-NEWMAN — Announced sand volleyball as a varsity sport. FIU — Announced the resignation of Cindy Russo women’s basketball coach. GEORGIA — Signed football coach Mark Richt to a two-year contract extension through 2019. HOLY CROSS — Named Catherine Roy women’s assistant rowing coach. LANDER — Named Lee Squires men’s soccer coach. SOUTHERN NEW HAMPSHIRE — Announced the resignation of baseball coach Scott Loiseau to become assistant baseball coach and recruiting coordinator at Oklahoma. TEXAS-PAN AMERICAN — Named Donovan Dowling men’s assistant soccer coach. THIEL — Named Amanda Baur women’s volunteer assistant lacrosse coach.


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B-4 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 23, 2015

. . . Bears Continued from page B-1

play in Alaska. As it is, I’ve played all of my three years here.” Instead, as a junior, Campbell tendered with the Alexandria (Minnesota) Blizzard of the NAHL. But he decided to spend his senior year at Denfeld because he thought he had a good shot at making the famous Minnesota state hockey tournament. (As it was, Campbell didn’t make state, as Denfeld lost to a Marshall team featuring a defenseman named Jake Bushey. More on that later, but, spoiler alert, that will be the second irony.) Alexandria changed coaches after Campbell’s senior year, and the new coach wanted veteran defensemen, so Campbell was traded to Fairbanks. “Fairbanks picked me up and it turned out to be a blessing in disguise,” Campbell said. “That’s a great program that wins championships and gets the fan support that they do. “At that point, I don’t think it could have worked out any better.” Campbell played in 54 games for the Ice Dogs in 2012-13, finishing with three goals and eight assists with a minus-3. Last season, he had two goals and 12 assists in 45 games with a minus-7 when the other irony struck. In early February, Campbell was traded to the in-state rival Brown Bears. And the player coming to Fairbanks was Bushey, Campbell’s old rival from Minnesota high school days. “I grew up playing against Marshall, because Marshall and Denfeld are rival high schools,” Campbell said. “I then played against him when I was in Fairbanks and he was in Kenai. “Then I was traded for him. It was funny how it worked.” But at first, Campbell said he wasn’t amused. He liked his friends and billet family in Fairbanks, and loved playing for the program. He said a talk with Bears head coach Geoff Beauparlant, a former Ice

Dogs assistant, helped. Beauparlant said the team liked Campbell’s size, toughness, ability to move the puck and ability to play on special teams. The coach also sold Campbell on an increased role that would allow him to grow more as a player. “The biggest thing with Ben is his passion,” Beauparlant said. “He wants to play the game. He’s a competitor.” Campbell quickly adjusted to the Brown Bears. “I love where I am now,” said Campbell, whose billet parents are Eric Trevino and Natalie Villegas of Kenai. “I’m happy to be with the Trevinos.” But Campbell will be the first to admit it was tough watching the Ice Dogs, after narrowly dispatching the Brown Bears in five games in the playoffs, go on to win the Robertson Cup. Campbell nearly had the gamewinner in the waning seconds in the third period of the decisive Game 5, but Ice Dogs goalie Kevin Aldridge made a sprawling save to deny him. Fairbanks then won in overtime. It stands as one irony that Campbell narrowly missed out on. “You could have been writing a different story,” Beauparlant said. “He had the opportunity on his stick, and he made a great read on that play in Game 5, realizing the time on the clock and jumping in on the rush. “Like (Ice Dogs) coach (Trevor) Stewart was saying, ‘The guy I traded almost put the nail in the coffin.’” Naturally, Campbell would have loved nothing more than to squeeze that chance by Aldridge. “I did feel I should have been a part of that team, but it was kind of out of my control,” Campbell said. “There’s definitely still a bit of resentment when the Ice Dogs come to town, or when we go up to Fairbanks to play them. “There’s more edge to my game. I want to prove them wrong.” Campbell would also like to bring a little of what Fairbanks has to Kenai River. “They have a swagger about them,” Campbell said. “When they walk into

Nikolaevsk girls start with victory Staff report

The Nikolaevsk girls opened the ConocoPhillips/ Warrior Rumble with a 41-21 win over Fort Yukon Thursday at the Warrior Dome in Nikolaevsk. Megan Hickman and Serafima Kalugin led the Warriors with 12 points apiece, while teammate Vera Fefelov chipped in eight. In all, seven different players scored for Nikolaevsk. Fort Yukon was led by Aquinnah Tremblay with seven points. The Eagles had only four players in the scoring column. Nikolaevsk started fast with a 17-4 lead after one quarter, then held steady to lead 25-14 at halftime. In the second half, the Warriors held Fort Yukon to seven points to clinch the win. The Nikolaevsk boys lost 70-56 to Fort Yukon. Jerry Carroll led Fort Yukon with 20 points, while Aaron Solomon chipped in 16. Jonah Fefelov led Nikolaevsk with 14 points while teammate Felemon Molodih added 13 and Nikit Fefelov had 11. The Warriors led 14-10 after one quarter and 35-24 at the halftime break, but Fort Yukon rallied to claim the win. The Eagles outscored Nikolaevsk 21-9 in the third quarter to take a 45-44 lead, then put up 25 points in the fourth to ice the game. In all, Fort Yukon outscored Nikolaevsk 46-21 in the second half. In the early girls game, Newhalen topped Tri-Valley 5830. Rhiannon Nanalook had 25 points for Newhalen, while Zoe Anelon had 12. For TriValley, Zabrina Byfuglien led the way with 10 points. In the early boys game, Newhalen notched a 59-25 victory. Lucas Zacker had 28 points for Newhalen, while Douglas Kalmbacher added 11. For Tri-Valley, Logan Juhl had nine points. The round-robin tournament continues today and Saturday. Today, the Tri-Valley and Fort Yukon girls play at 2:45 p.m., the Tri-Valley and Fort Yukon boys play at 4:15 p.m., the Nikolaevsk and Newhalen girls play at 5:45 p.m., and the Nikolaevsk and Newhalen boys play at 7:45 p.m. Saturday, the Fort Yukon

and Newhalen girls play at 9 a.m., the Fort Yukon and Newhalen boys play at 10:30 a.m., the Nikolaevsk and TriValley girls play at noon, and the Nikolaevsk and Tri-Valley boys play at 1:30 p.m. CIA girls 39, Dillingham 29 The Eagles took control early and finished off Dillingham on the first day of the Dean Cummings Tournament in Delta on Thursday. Kendra Brush, Ashleigh Hammond and Madison Orth combined for 36 points for CIA, each scoring 12 apiece, and Emma Lyons brought down 12 rebounds. CIA coach Kenny Leaf said his squad charged out of the box with a strong press and were getting good looks at the basket, but were still struggling to score. Even so, Dillingham was held to two points in the first quarter, both on free throws. CIA represents the only Class 1A team at the tournament, which is comprised mostly of 3A schools. The eight-team tournament continues Friday with CIA matching up against Hutchison at 3:30 p.m. Leaf said anyone wishing to keep up with the action can find live web streaming at basketball. kdhs.fm. Hutchison boys 74, CIA 62 The Hawks topped the Eagles on the opening day of the Dean Cummings Tournament in Delta, putting CIA in the consolation bracket. The Eagles will face Dillingham today at 8 a.m. CIA junior Timmy Smithwick scored a career-high 46 points, but it still was not enough for the Eagles. “I thought it was the best game we’ve played all year,” said CIA coach Justin Franchino. “We just played a really good team, they had like nine or ten 3’s, mostly in the second half.” Franchino said his squad managed to stay with Hutchison for much of the game, but the Hawks pulled away with four minutes remaining.

. . . Series Continued from page B-1

games without a win. The two meet for a three-game series at the Soldotna Regional Sports Complex, with 7:30 p.m. games tonight and Saturday, and a 3 p.m. puck drop Sunday. “Something’s gotta give, right?” Kenai River head coach Geoff Beauparlant said. “Something’s gotta give.” Last season, the Chill and the Bears were in a battle for the fourth and final playoff spot out of the North American Hockey League Midwest Division. Coulee Region ended up losing its last seven games as the Bears made the playoffs for the sixth straight year. However, the Chill didn’t let that disappointment carry over into this season. They were lingering with the Fairbanks Ice Dogs and Minnesota Wilderness at the top of the Midwest Division standings before this

a building, they know they are going to win. “Anything less than winning is just not acceptable. That’s the attitude I try to bring here.” Last season, the Bears edged the Coulee Region (Wisconsin) Chill for a playoff spot, then this season Kenai River got off to an inconsistent start before a current 14-game stretch without a win has left them with the second-worst record in the league. “The team mentality is we can pull out of this,” Campbell said. “We don’t have any other option. Our only option at this point is to stay with the process, work hard in practice and trust in what the coaching staff is telling us.” Despite the slide, Campbell has remained a steady performer. He is tied for third on the team with 21 points. The only real blemish is his minus-21,

. . . Dual Continued from page B-1

time, which created a 12-point swing. The other turnaround match came in the 138-pound bout, which Soldotna senior Ryan Winter won with a pin on Kenai’s Matt Vandermartin with just 40 seconds left. At the previous dual at Soldotna, Vandermartin got the win by pinning Winter. “After Christmas break, our whole team put in a lot of work, we worked our butts off, and came out and it’s starting to show,” Winter said shortly after his match. “This is a big (meet) today.” Vandermartin came out strong against Winter, using two takedowns to eke out a 5-2 lead after the first two-minute round. However, Winter scored a takedown in the final few seconds of the second round to lead 7-6 heading into the third and final round. At the end, points didn’t matter, as Winter caught Vandermartin in a pin. “I was using leg rides, I’ve been working that on him,” Winter said. “The kid is really tough. I just beat him on

current skid. But even as it stands, they are in great position to make the playoffs. The Wilderness lead the division with 56 points, while Fairbanks has 53 points and the Chill (20-11-6) have 46. Kenai River (11-25-2) with 24 points and the Minnesota Magicians with 28 points are battling for the final spot out of the division. In Wisconsin in early December, Coulee swept the Brown Bears by scores of 6-2, 6-4 and 5-2. “They’re deep and their goaltending is solid,” Beauparlant said. “They play a simple hockey game, but they compete and they work hard.” Beauparlant said his team is coming around. “I had a really good conversation with a friend of mine who watched all four games we played against Fairbanks,” Beauparlant said. “He’s nobody that’s associated with our organization, but he’s somebody I trust. “He said that every game we were better and competing harder. He felt the team was getting closer to the way I want them to play and to the

but that’s what tends to happen when a team is 11-25-2. “A lot of it is we’ve just finally found our way in the defensive zone as a team,” Beauparlant said. Campbell said his first goal right now is to make the playoffs, and with that he’d like to earn a Division I scholarship. “I’m far more worried about team success than personal success,” he said. “Personal success comes with team success. “With Fairbanks, Amarillo, Janesville, there’s a reason those teams get 10 to 12 Division I commitments.” Beauparlant said players like Campbell are the reason he believes the Bears will pull out of their skid. “The big thing is he has that deep, deep desire to win,” Beauparlant said. “That’s what it takes to make it through

way the staff wants them to play.” In particular, Beauparlant is happy with how the team is playing during five-on-five hockey. The big disparity in losing the last four games to Fairbanks was on special teams. Fairbanks was 9 for 19 on the power play, while the Bears were 0 for 17. “Our special teams have to be better than they were against Fairbanks,” Beauparlant said. The Bears will get forward Adam Kresl back for the Coulee series. Kresl had been out since mid-November. That means Kenai River either has to cut somebody, or put somebody on injured reserve. Beauparlant said the team would decide late Thursday or today on the move, depending on whether Colton Fletcher has to be put on injured reserve with an ankle he injured against Fairbanks. Notes: The Coulee series will be Central Peninsula Hospital cancer awareness weekend. Jerseys will be auctioned off Friday and Saturday. Sunday’s 3 p.m. start will be half price for all fans — $7 for adults and $5 for kids.

the first round of the playoffs. “When we make the playoffs this year, we’re going to be a scary team to play against, and that’s because of the type of passion that Ben brought to our club.” Campbell also would like to find some time to enjoy more of Alaska in the future. He’s had some epic fourwheeler trips in Fairbanks and has seen some great northern lights, but he’d like to see what the state is like when the ice is out. “At the beginning of my career, I didn’t want to play here, but it’s been a fantastic experience,” he said. “I’ve actually put some thought into living in Alaska this summer and do the camping and hiking I didn’t get to experience in my career. “I’d like to experience all the sun instead of the darkness.”

‘After Christmas break, our whole team put in a lot of work, we worked our butts off, and came out and it’s starting to show. This is a big (meet) today.’ — Ryan Winter, Soldotna wrestler top, and I tried to stay off my back.” Winter, who enters next weekend’s region meet as one of the favorites in the 138-pound division, said Thursday’s meet was important to fine-tuning his craft. “I’ve got a couple tough kids in my weight class, but I think I have what it takes to be in the finals,” he said. After the 160-pound bout that saw Kenai’s Ellery Steffensen pin Soldotna’s Hunter Bourgeois with 11 seconds left in the first round, Kenai and Soldotna were tied on team points with 24 apiece. The Stars took a 30-24 lead after Kenai forfeited the 170-pound match, but Dylan Carter of Kenai brought the Kards back to within a point of the Stars in the 182-pound final, gaining five points with a technical fall on James Gal-

lagher of SoHi with 22 seconds left in the second round. Carter led 7-1 after the first round, and continued to extend the lead in the second. “He’s a lot stronger than I thought he was, but I think I tired him out a bit,” Carter said. “We always like to compete with (Kenai), and I feel like if Kenai can keep their numbers up, it can be a really good rivalry.” Carter, who was leading 16-1 at the time of the call, is another favorite for SoHi to grab a region title. Carter claimed the triple crown of wrestling at the Alaska State Wrestling Championships last May, winning all three matches in folkstyle, freestyle and Greco-Roman grappling. “I think I can do it, and all this mat time is helping out,” Carter said. “My weight’s close now, I feel like it.”

After Carter’s match, Soldotna claimed another six points off a Kenai forfeit in the 195-pound match, giving them a 36-29 lead, then clinched the dual win with a forfeit in the 220-pound match. Overall, Kenai gave up six matches to forfeits, which proved to be the difference. “It’s been a real rollercoaster or yo-yo year,” Gardner said about the season. “We’ve not had a one hundred percent lineup all year. It’s probably the worst year I’ve had as far as kids sitting out for sickness and injury.” Soldotna High School will host the Region III wrestling meet next weekend, starting Jan. 30. Thursday at Kenai Central High School

1. Soldotna 48 points; 2. Kenai Central 32. 98 — double fft.; 106 — Tyler Vaughn, Ken, fft. unknown; 113 — Phillip Lawton, Sol, pinned Natalie Chavez, Ken, 5:06; 120 — Austin Craig, Sol, pinned Shayna McKinley, Ken, 1:27; 126 — Seth Hutchison, Sol, fft. unknown; 132 — Cody Quelland, Sol, fft. unknown; 138 — Ryan Winter, Sol, Matt Vandermartin, Ken, 5:20; 145 — Keyshawn McEnerny, Ken, dec. Talon Musgrave, Sol, 16-9; 152 — Paul Steffensen, Ken, pinned Eli Damon, Sol, 4:39; 160 — Ellery Steffensen, Ken, pinned Hunter Bourgeois, Sol, 1:49; 170 — Bailey Blumentritt, Sol, fft. unknown; 182 — Dylan Carter, Ken, tech. James Gallagher, Sol, 16-1; 195 — Sage Hill, Sol, fft. unknown; 220 — Taylor Macrae, Sol, fft. unknown; 285 — Zach Koziczkowski, Ken, pinned Dalton Best, Sol, 3:33.

Federer bows out in Australia By JOHN PYE AP Sports Writer

MELBOURNE, Australia — For the first time in a dozen years, Roger Federer won’t feature in the Australian Open semifinals after being beaten 6-4, 7-6 (5), 4-6, 7-6 (5) Friday in the third round by Andreas Seppi. The 17-time Grand Slam champion had never lost to Seppi in 10 previous meetings, but made some uncharacteristic errors including nine double-faults — including one to surrender a mini break in the fourth-set tiebreaker. Seppi, a 30-year-old Italian who had only advanced beyond the second round once at his nine previous trips to Melbourne Park, held his nerve despite some withering winners from Federer, who registered his 1,000th career match win when he collected the Brisbane International title earlier this month to open the season. Federer has won the Australian title four times, and had reached the semifinals or better C

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at Melbourne Park every year since winning the championship for the first time in 2004. “I had to believe that I could win,” said Seppi, who said he stuck out his racket and hoped for the best on match point — a forehand that sailed past Federer and landed in the corner. “I was just trying to stay relaxed and just focusing on every shot and to breathe calm and don’t get nervous. “I think I did pretty well. Very well. I’m very happy I could manage the emotions.” Eugenie Bouchard struggled through a scrappy opening set before getting on top in a 7-5, 6-0 third-round win over Carolina Garcia that featured 10 breaks of serve. There were six service breaks by the time the scores were level at 4-4, but seventhseeded Bouchard started finding rhythm late and got the crucial break in the 12th game. “Yeah, I don’t think it was the prettiest tennis out there,” said Bouchard, who reached the semifinals in her first trip to Melbourne Park last year and went on to make the semifinals

or better at two of the other three majors in a breakthrough season. “But I’m happy that I just kept going. Even if it wasn’t going so well, I was able to turn it around.” Third-seeded Simona Halep advanced with a 6-4, 7-5 win over Bethanie Mattek-Sands, missing twice when she served for the match in the eighth and 10th games before finally serving out. Halep, who opened the season by winning the Shenzhen Open in China, will next play Yanina Wickmayer, who beat No. 14-seeded Sara Errani 4-6, 6-4, 6-3. “Here I started last year to play my best tennis. I (reached) my first quarterfinal in Grand Slams ... then I made final in French Open,” Halep said. “I have more confidence now during Grand Slams and I believe I have my chance at every tournament.” No. 10 Ekaterina Makarova had a 6-4, 6-4 win over No. 22 Karolina Pliskova and No. 21 Peng Shuai beat Yaroslava Shvedova 7-6 (7), 6-3 to move into a possible fourth-round

showdown with No. 2 Maria Sharapova, who was playing No. 31 Zarina Diyas in a night match. Sixth-seeded Andy Murray beat Joao Sousa 6-1, 6-1, 7-5 to set up a 4th round clash with No. 10 Grigor Dimitrov. Murray is attempting to become the first man to win the Australian Open after losing three times in the final. He lost to Novak Djokovic in 2013 and 2011 and Roger Federer in 2010. Dimitrov had a tough thirdrounder against 2006 Australian Open finalist Marcos Baghdatis before winning 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3, 6-3. Seventh-seeded Tomas Berdych beat Viktor Troicki 6-4, 6-3, 6-4 , needing eight match points to clinch it. “It looks not very nice on the paper — mostly, all of them on a big first serve,” said Berdych, a semifinalist here last year and the 2010 Wimbledon runner-up. “It was a great save from him. I needed to wait one more game ... when the first chance came up, I served well and took it.”

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Fishing for halibut Author’s note: This column first appeared in the Clarion on May 23, 2003.

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or years, most anglers fished for halibut in Southcentral waters with the same bait and technique: a chunk of herring on either a “c” hook or a “j” hook, fished on the bottom. Some still do. But many have learned that other baits and methods can be far more productive and a whole lot more fun. If you think the halibut is just a scavenger that scrounges along the bottom, looking for a chunk of rotting herring with a hook inside, you might benefit by changing your way of thinking about this fish. It deserves more respect than you’ve been giving it. The halibut is an aggressive, strong-swimming predator. It eats crabs, shrimp, herring and sandlance. It also can chase down and devour cod, pollock, greenling and even salmon. Although it probably spends most of its life on or near the bottom, the halibut often feeds at other depths, even near the surface. When you realize that a halibut will eat just about anything it can get in its mouth, and that it will aggressively pursue prey, you will start to realize that there are many ways to catch this fish. One method I’ve written about several times is jigging. Because halibut are predators, they will often go after a jig that looks like a wounded baitfish. I’ve caught halibut on just about every jig imaginable, including some I’ve made with 1/2-inch copper plumbing pipe. Of all the jigs, my favorite is the 5 1/2-ounce Crippled Herring. It’s heavy enough to fish down to about 150 feet — tide allowing — and light enough that it doesn’t wear you out after a few minutes of jigging. (I use a relatively light jigging outfit, a 7-foot rod and 50-pound-test Power-Pro line.) Other reasons I like this jig: It’s well made; it flutters like a falling, wounded baitfish on the “drop”; the hook seldom tangles in the line; it’s light enough to cast; it requires no bait; and being an imitation baitfish, it will catch most any fish around, including salmon, rockfish and lingcod. When the bite is slow, all it takes to liven things up is to add a small piece of white halibut skin to the hook. Not so much that it kills the action, but just enough to add some scent. Incidentally, I crimp the barbs of the hooks on all my jigs. This makes it easy and quick to release fish, boots and people. With other types of jigs, you can use big baits. With big baits, you don’t have to jig as much. The hook on a 16-ounce, soft-plastic “grub tail” is big enough to hold a herring fillet and a piece of squid, octopus or salmon-belly skin. I See PALMER, page C-2

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Before you go, say ‘cheese’ Troopers encourage posting a selfie for backcountry travelers By MEGAN EDGE Alaska Dispatch News

ANCHORAGE (AP) — Alaska State Troopers are looking for your selfies — those ubiquitous self-portraits, usually snapped with smartphone cameras, that make up countless Facebook profile pictures and online avatars. But they don’t want selfies snapped in bedrooms or bathrooms, in the privacy of your own home. They’re suggesting Alaskans take a selfie right before heading out into the backcountry, as a way to account for their whereabouts. Troopers spokesperson Beth Ipsen said the advice to snap a selfie is part of a larger push to encourage those venturing into the backcountry to fill out a “wilderness trip plan,” a form that

she said has been around for “quite a while.” The form can be found on the Department of Public Safety website. Ipsen suggested Alaskans leave a printout of the wilderness plan on the dashboard of their vehicle, on their kitchen counter, or with someone reliable who can notify authorities if the traveler hasn’t returned at a planned time. It asks for basic information — birthdate, address, expected departure and arrival dates, method of travel and the type of gear being carried. The selfie is an added tool, Ipsen said, and the snapshot should be taken and texted right before you head into the woods. It can show details the form can’t: the design of a helmet or AP Photo/Alaska Dispatch News, Beth Ipsen jacket, decals on a snowmachine or In this photo, Beth Ipsen takes a selfie showing her clothing and snowother identifiers. mobiles before heading out in the wilderness near Cantwell. Alaska State “What is nice about the selfie is Troopers are suggesting outdoor trekkers take a “selfie” right before heading See SELFIE, page C-2 out into the backcountry as a way to account for their whereabouts.

Ice park takes shape

Above: Ice blocks are lined out for the Kids Park Maze as work begins on this year’s Ice Alaska Ice Park in Fairbanks Monday in preparation for the 2015 BP World Ice Art Championships. The park opens Feb. 23.

FAIRBANKS (AP) — Workers are building an ice playground in a city in Alaska’s interior, including a pirate ship slide made from 65 refrigerator-sized blocks of ice. The work began Monday at the George Horner Ice Park in Fairbanks ahead of the annual world ice sculpture championships, the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner reported. A giant ice lens also is planned for the park, according to ice championships chairman Dick Brickley. It will be 12 feet in diameter and powerful enough to focus the sun’s rays and start a fire, he said. The ice is so clear, the rays go right through it, and one small telescope in the past started a fire on a piece of plywood without melting, Brickley said. Another new attraction this year is an experimental sculpture that will be carved on land, then displayed underwater. “It’s kind of a neat new con-

Right: An Qui Feng of Harbin, China cuts away at an ice block while working on a sculpture that will depict Gov. Bill Walker and Lt. Gov. Byron Mallott as work begins on this year’s Ice Alaska Ice Park.

AP Photos/ Fairbanks Daily News-Miner, Eric Engman

cept,” Brickley said. The attractions must be completed by the time the park opens Feb. 23. That’s when teams of artists participating in the 2015 BP World Ice Art championships begin making sculptures. The artists are from 16 countries. The ice being harvested this year is crystal-clear aqua blue, Brickley said. This winter has been warmer and there’s been less snow than usual, which is actually good for ice formation, he said. Snow can shield ice from cold air. A new piece of ice art that’s scheduled to go up this week will feature a sculpture of Gov. Bill Walker and Lt. Gov. Byron Mallott. The sculpture will be outside the Carlson Center for the Fairbanks inaugural ball for the new Walker administration. The event is scheduled for Saturday.

What do caribou and wood bison have in common?

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ast weekend on a drive back from Anchorage, whizzing by the Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center at 57 miles per hour my daughter pointed out a strange looking moose on the side of the Seward Highway. “That isn’t a moose,” I explained, “that is a wood bison.” And why are wood bison living in pens next to the Seward Highway? They are part of a reintroduction effort by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADFG) and the Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center. The fate of these wood bison has been in the news lately as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) published a final rule in May 2014 that gives the green light to the reintroduction of a “nonessential experimental” population in interior Alaska scheduled for March 2015. Wood bison are native to Alaska and were plentiful over a large portion of the state until their extirpation in the early 1900s. The reasons for their disappearance are not clearly known but probably related to overharvest

R efuge N otebook N ate O lson and habitat loss. Wildlife transplants are nothing new in Alaska. The reasons for transplanting animals generally fall into two categories. The first is to provide human related benefits such as recreational hunting, economic gain, or an additional food supply. The second is related to species recovery in their historic range. Kodiak Island is a dramatic example of the first category. With the exception of the brown bear, the island had very few native mammals as a result of its glacial history. Sitka blacktailed deer, mountain goats, Roosevelt elk, reindeer, beaver, red squirrel, snowshoe hare and American marten have all been introduced within the last century, none of which are native

to Kodiak. Wood bison fall into the second category, as do caribou on the Kenai Peninsula. Historically, caribou were abundant on the Kenai Peninsula, but were completely wiped out in the early 1900s. The cause of their extirpation is unclear but likely due to a combination of human-caused fires that destroyed winter habitat and market hunting in the late 1800s. The last 13 caribou on the peninsula were shot in 1912 near Ptarmigan Head in the Caribou Hills. A joint USFWS-ADFG plan was hatched to restore caribou to the peninsula after a 1952 USFWS assessment concluded that range conditions could again support caribou. In May 1965, 15 caribou from the Nelchina herd were released on the former Kenai National Moose Range between Chickaloon River and Mystery Creek. This seed population became the KePhoto by Tom Seaton, ADFG nai Mountain herd which now ranges over Chickaloon River, Big Indian Residents from the village of Shageluk on the Innoko River assist ADFG and USFWS staff in constructing a holding pen as part of the wood bison Creek and Resurrection Creek. To augment that first transplant ef- reintroduction effort. 100 wood bison are scheduled to be released on the See REFUGE, page C-2 lower Innoko River in March 2015.  . C

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. . . Palmer

and they will come. A whole herring is hard for them to resist. Continued from page C-1 This rig requires more attention than a circle hook. mention these latter for their The circle hook, which was staying power. When you’re designed for commercial fishing in deep water, you long-line fishing, requires no don’t want to have to keep help from the angler. The fish checking your bait. hooks itself. The Gamakatsu When halibut aren’t biting bait hook, on the other hand, jigs, or when I want to rest is fished like the old “j” hook. for a while, I’ll switch to bait. The first time your rod-tip My favorite bait rig is a 7/0 moves downward, you set Gamakatsu “Octopus” hook, the hook. There’s no waiting about 18 inches of 50-poundaround for the fish to do it for test leader, a heavy-duty swivel you. One disadvantage of this between leader and line, and rig is that the fish is likely to a sinker “slider” on the line. I swallow the hook. Using larger use a whole herring, about 6 size herring will increase the inches long. I thread the hook odds that you’ll catch larger through its lower jaw and out halibut. If you’re after barn its snout, then toward the tail, doors, use foot-long “horse” wrapping the leader around herring and larger hooks. the top half of the body two or I hope the above tips for three times. The hook ends up catching halibut will give you just forward of the tail, with some ideas of your own. With the bend and point exposed. this fish, no idea is too far out. When you snug up the leader, this rig naturally wants to roll a Les Palmer can be reached little. The movement is sensed at les.palmer@rocketmail.com. by halibut and other predators,

. . . Refuge Continued from page C-1

fort, another 29 caribou from the Nelchina herd were released at Watson Lake near Sterling in April 1966. These caribou became the Kenai Lowlands herd that ranges in and around Sterling, Kenai and Soldotna. Although the 1965-66 introductions were successful, the two principal historic caribou ranges on the Kenai, the Caribou Hills and Skilak-Tustumena Benchlands, were still caribou-free. So in April 1985, 28 caribou from the Nelchina herd were released near Glacier Creek. In April 1986, 18 caribou each were released at both Emma and Green Lakes in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, and 16 caribou at Caribou Lake in the Caribou Hills. From this second series of transplants emerged the Killey River, Twin Lakes and Fox River herds. The Twin Lakes herd subsequently merged with the Killey River herd in 2002. Although caribou didn’t reoccupy Caribou Hills, caribou reintroduction on the Kenai Peninsula is considered a success. The Killey River, Kenai Mountain and Fox River herds provide hunting opportunities, and the Kenai Lowland herd provides wildlife viewing opportunities for residents and tourists during several months of the year. As you can probably tell by looking outside, this winter is quite a departure from the norm. In fact, for the last two winters, we have seen very unusual warm temperatures and little snowfall. This recent spike is part of a longer warming and drying trend that began in earnest in the late 1970s. Average January temperatures at the Kenai Airport have increased 7

degrees since 1977! Climate envelope models, mirroring field data, forecast dramatic vegetation changes on the peninsula. Spruce bark beetle-killed forests on the southern peninsula show strong signals of grassland conversion. Alpine tundra in the Kenai Mountains show strong signals of upslope forest (white spruce and hemlock) and shrub conversion. Perhaps we should begin thinking of adding another category to our list of reasons for transplanting animals. What about introducing species adapted to a warmer climate or “keystone” species that can help shape a changing ecosystem? For example, although there is no evidence that wood bison ever occupied the Kenai, it wasn’t so long ago that steppe bison roamed Caribou Hills (see previous Refuge Notebooks articles by Dawn Magness and Dick Reger). If ecosystems continue changing as predicted, bison introduction to the peninsula might be up for discussion. But don’t hold your breath as a number of legal issues would need addressing to introduce new species to the Kenai Refuge, especially within Congressionally-designated wilderness. Time will tell if climate trajectories will continue as predicted and whether our views on managing wildlife populations change accordingly. But for now it seems that the wood bison will once again roam free within a small portion of their historic range. Nathan Olson is the wildlife biologist-pilot at Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. Find more information about the refuge at http://www.fws.gov/refuge/ kenai/ or http://www.facebook. com/kenainationalwildliferefuge.

Yukon Quest organizers consider route change ANCHORAGE (AP) — Organizers of the 1,000-mile Yukon Quest International Sled Dog Race are considering changing the race route this year because of warmer-than-usual weather. KTUU reports there is still open water in Whitehorse in Canada’s Yukon Territory. Race

Cabin visit provides winter adventure By BRETT FRENCH The Billings Gazette

LIVINGSTON, Mont. (AP) — It was 17 below zero when I stepped out of the cabin at about 6 a.m. The weekend’s heavy snowfall seemed to envelop the surrounding forest in cotton batting, insulating the mountain valley from all sound except for the squeak of snow underfoot. Then a rifle shot rang out. Or at least that’s what I thought it was. But it was too dark for accurate shooting. The sound had reverberated from the nearby hillside and there was no movement, not even any fresh tracks from other foolhardy winter souls. That’s when I realized the shot was actually one of the trees cracking from the cold after its sap had frozen. Also known as frost cracks or freeze pops, it’s not uncommon for trees to explode in especially cold weather. The Sioux reportedly refer to January as the “moon of cold-exploding trees.” Supposedly the Woodland Cree also refer to the month as “frost — exploding trees — moon.”

Trail breakers A group of us had broken trail through knee-deep snow two nights earlier to the Forest Service cabin at Big Creek, in the Paradise Valley. Towing a child’s sled holding a cooler and carrying an external-

. . . Selfie Continued from page C-1

that it can be taken at the beginning of an outing and it is a recent photograph,” Ipsen said. “If I don’t show up to work on Monday, there’s a picture of the clothes I was wearing, the machine I was riding, and any tiny bit of information can help.” As an example, Ipsen said such identifiers could allow a helicopter to “zero in” on a specific injured snowmachiner in a heavily trafficked area. Ipsen became the face of the life-saving selfie technique after a Monday post on the Alaska State Troopers Facebook page. She posted a screenshot of a text-message conversation she had with her mother on New Year’s Eve before heading out to ride in the Eureka area. The first photo captures a bundled-up Ipsen in a red coat, purple scarf and dark beanie. Behind her are the front ends of two snowmachines. In the text, Ipsen tells her mother to “send in the cavalry” if she’s not back at work Monday, and provides another photo of the snowmachine she’s riding. Since her post, Ipsen said she’d thought of other ways to

officials are working on plans for an alternate route for the race between Whitehorse and Fairbanks. The race begins Feb. 7 in Whitehorse. Organizers say no decision has been made and conditions could still change substantially. Twenty-six mushers, including four past Yukon Quest champions, are signed up for this year’s race.

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But also without such snowy winter adventures, I would never appreciate little amenities quite as much or the harsh beauty of the deep cold. frame backpack fully loaded, it seemed like a long slog with my heart hammering at maximum rpm. According to the Forest Service’s website, the original cabin was built in 1907. That two-story structure — now boarded up — still stands next to the rental cabin, which was built in 1924, according to the sign nailed above the door. The “newer” cabin is the largest in the Yellowstone Ranger District, a spacious (and difficult to heat) 28-foot-by-40-foot log structure with a big main room/dining area heated by a woodstove, three bedrooms and a large kitchen with a separate wood cookstove. “It offers rustic accommodations with limited amenities,” the website notes, meaning that the only running water is in Big Creek, out the back door, and the bathroom is a cold jaunt to a vault toilet outside.

Still popular Despite its remote location — about 35 miles south of Livingston, 5 miles down a gravel road and a half-mile hike in from the where the snowplow stops — Big Creek Cabin sees a

steady stream of visitors around the Christmas holiday and continuing through the winter. That’s possibly because it’s a less expensive place to stay — $50 a night — than many of the other lodging options in the popular valley that provides the only year-round road access to Yellowstone National Park, as well as being close to coveted Chico Hot Springs, with its naturally heated pools. Chico’s pools had attracted our group, that and the fact that it was located roughly halfway between our spread-out families.

Morning commute It seemed only fitting that after spending two nights celebrating the holidays with friends at Chico and the cabin that I was due for something to go wrong. On the drive out down the winding mountain road, I discovered too late on a sharp turn that my brakes were frozen. Naturally I panicked and tried standing on the brake pedal when I should have punched the gas so the front wheels of my four-wheeldrive truck could have pulled the vehicle around the corner. I just wasn’t thinking too clearly

at 7 a.m. without my morning cup of coffee. The truck headed straight for a large tree on the downhill side of a drop-off that I was sliding toward. All I could see was the tree, how large it was, how much speed I would pick up on the drop down the steep hillside until I smacked into it. Luckily, I was going so slow that the firm snow on the edge of the road gave only enough to let the front driver’s-side tire punch off the gravel. Unfortunately, this lifted the back passenger tire up off the road so it had no traction. After failed attempts at chaining up the tire, the truck finally broke free after some digging around the undercarriage and some solid tugs from my friend’s smaller car with a tow rope. I couldn’t help but think how thankful I was that I didn’t have to make this commute every morning, and how hardy the folks were that used to stay in such remote locations year-round. After rolling around in the snow digging and chaining, it took hours for me to warm up, partly because the air was so cold that my truck’s radiator fluid never warmed up enough to spit out more than lukewarm air. Blessed are a hot shower and a warm cup of coffee. But also without such snowy winter adventures, I would never appreciate little amenities quite as much or the harsh beauty of the deep cold.

improve the selfie, like taking a photo wearing her helmet. Ipsen said that although the ‘I was going to be by myself, and before selfie hasn’t saved a life yet, it I left I took everything out and had my could, and it’s a technique help- boyfriend take a photo in case I didn’t ful not only for snowmachiners but for anyone going to the come back. He had a picture of everybackcountry, all year long. thing I was taking that day. Give as much “I had my boyfriend take a photo during the summer be- about your trip as possible. It could save fore I headed out for a day trip your life.’ hike on the Ermine Trail near Cantwell,” she said. “I was go— Beth Ipsen ing to be by myself, and before I left I took everything out and had my boyfriend take a photo had a picture of everything I much about your trip as posin case I didn’t come back. He was taking that day. Give as sible. It could save your life.”

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 23, 2015 C-3

Classified Index EMPLOYMENT

Homes

Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/ Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Commercial Property Condominiums/ Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

REAL ESTATE RENTALS Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums/ Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

FINANCIAL Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgage/Loans

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

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Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn & Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

Real Estate For Sale Commercial Property Condominiums/Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

Homes DOUBLE DOWN DISCOUNT KENAI KEYS Gated secure community on Kenai RIver. Estate disposal with huge discount. 4 Bedroom, 2-bath, adjacent to launch ramp. Price adjustment to $275,000 MLS# 12-12227 McKay Investment Co.

(907)260-6675

RECREATION Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boat Charters Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snowmobiles Sporting Goods

TRANSPORTATION Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

www.peninsulaclarion.com

283-7551

Rentals Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

Homes

Apartments, Unfurnished SOLDOTNA 1-Bedroom, 1-bath, apartment, washer/dryer No smoking/ pets. $750. (907)252-7355.

Apartments, Furnished 1-LARGE ROOM FULLY FURNISHED Soldotna, quiet setting, includes utilities. (907)394-2543. EFFICIENCY 1-Person basement unit Downtown Kenai, quiet, adult building. No smoking/ pets, $575. including tax/ utilities. Security deposit/ lease. (907)283-3551.

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better way...

PETS & LIVESTOCK Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

SERVICES Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

NOTICES/ ANNOUNCEMENTS Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

Got something you really want to sell? Put it in front of the faces of thousands of readers everyday in the Classifieds. Call today to place your ad!

PUBLIC NOTICES/ LEGAL ADS Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

283-7551

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C-4 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 23, 2015

Apartments, Furnished

Homes

Apartments, Furnished

KENAI Large 1-bedroom furnished, $600., plus utilities. No animals/ smoking. (907)398-1303

Duplex SOLDOTNA Mackey Lake Quiet Location New Construction 3-Bedroom, 2-Bath Heated Garage Washer/Dryer Secure storage Radiant Heat Nonsmoking/Pets $1,450. (907)260-3470

Apartments, Unfurnished

Homes 3-BEDROOM, 2-Bath over size 2-car garage. Sterling, 4 miles to Soldotna. No smoking/pets. W/D $1,450. month plus utilities, (907)394-3939, (907)262-3806. NIKISKI New home, 3-bedroom, 2-bath, garage, walking distance to Nikiski Rec. Center. Indoor pool & ice rink. $1,345. per month. Leave message (907)776-3325

Apartments, Unfurnished

STERLING Small, 2-bedroom, washer/dryer, $750/ month, plus utilities, gas, tax $15, $700 deposit. No smoking/ pets. (907)262-6093.

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE FOR RENT:

NIKISKI 1-Bedroom, $600. per month. Pets allowed, includes utilities. Call (907)776-6563.

ALASKA 1st REALTY 44045 Kalifornsky Beach Rd., Soldotna www.Alaska1stRealty.com, e-mail; Alaska1stRealtyInc@gmail.com, phone: (907)260-7653

PRIVATE 4 BEDROOM Mobile Home with large Lean to. Very private with beautiful views. Pets on approval only. No smoking inside 500.00 fine. You pay electricity, gas and phone. New flooring throughout. Come and take a look. Have photos on phone. $800 per month. 776-8072

Apartments, Unfurnished

ALL TYPES OF RENTALS Property Management and Oversight Division 170 N. Birch Suite 101, Soldotna (907)262-2522 Mary.Parske@century21.com www.Century21FreedomRealty.com

Office Space SMALL OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE 100 sqft to 1600 sq ft. Offices available in Kenai on North Willow Street near airport. Please contact 283-7864 for details.

Homes

Apartments, Unfurnished STERLING SENIOR HOUSING ADA Handicap equipped. Includes heat, carport. Non-smoking. 1& 2-bedrooms. (907)262-6808

Homes FIVE STAR REALTY Property Management Experts with more than 25 year experience. Available in the Office Monday-Friday 8:00-5:00 Diane Melton, Owner/Broker We provide 24 hour emergency service. Five Star Realty Always reach for the Stars

www.peninsulaclarion.com

283-7551

REMOVE FIREWOOD

Phone: 262-2880

www buyfivestarak.com

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Photo: Eric Ogden

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Contact us

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Drivers/Transportation NOW HIRING

BUS ATTENDANTS & NON-EXPERIENCE SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS: hiring bonus of $250. FOR ALASKA LICENSE EXPERIENCE SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS: Hiring Bonus of $1,000. First Student 907-260-3557

Education

CLASSIFIEDS General Employment ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT for Medical Director. We are looking for an Administrative Assistant/Coordinator to handle communications and policy standards between 3 laboratories managed by the Medical Director. Be a part of making a difference in health care. No prior experience needed. Must have excellent organzation and reading skills, good communication skills and be self directed. Microsoft Word/Excel, 40 WPM needed. Please call our office 907-262-3557 or come by our office for an application. PENINSULA PATHOLOGY INSTITUTE 44455 Sterling Hwy. Soldotna

General Employment Clerical III iGrad Student Coach Soldotna, AK

43335 K Beach Rd. Ste 31 High School diploma, positive attitude, strong written,verbal, clerical, and computer skills. Experience with mentoring and diverse cultures a plus. Complete GCSD application on the Galena City School District website: http://www.galenaalaska.org/employment.html

Salary based on Educational Support Personnel Agreement including a benefit package

General Employment

BECOME AN OCEAN RANGER Help protect Alaska's environment and its people! Be an observer onboard cruise ships for the summer, monitoring State environmental and marine discharge requirements and identifying any potential safety, sanitation, and/or health risks. Compensation includes both salary and benefits.

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Minimum Qualifications: 1.) Designated Duty Engineer (DDE) or Third Assistant Engineer (3 A/E) or degree in marine safety and environmental protection from accredited maritime institution. 2.) American Maritime Officers (AMO) Union member. 3.) Pass criminal background check, able to enter Canada. 4.) Of sound physical condition and able to pass post-offer physical examination. 5.) Successful completion of Ocean Ranger training. To Apply: 1.) Online at www.Crowley.com/oceanrangers by 02/15/15. 2.) Email: marinejobs@crowley.com with questions. Alaska residents are encouraged to apply!

General Employment Looking for a full-time VETERINARY TECHNICIAN/ASSISTANT and a part-time RECEPTIONIST Experience preferred but not required. Pay is commensurate with experience. Applications available at office Mon.- Sat. 44066 Kalifornsky Beach Road, Soldotna, AK 99669. (907)262-4581.

General Employment

CITY OF KENAI, ALASKA Position Vacancy The City of Kenai, Alaska is seeking applicants for an ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT II position in the City Clerk’s Office. Salary is $23.42 per hour. Under the direction and supervision of the City Clerk, The Administrative Assistant II is responsible for providing a variety of administrative tasks in support of the City Clerk’s Office. The Assistant provides clerical and receptionist functions as well as a broad range of clerical support activities. This position requires daily contact with City employees, outside agencies, and the general public. The work schedule includes days and evenings, as well as shift extensions. Position announcement, job description and application are available through the Alaska Job Center Network, (907) 335-3010. Submit a City of Kenai application form by February 6, 2015 to Peninsula Job Service, 11312 Kenai Spur Hwy., Kenai, AK 99611.

KENAI, AK Come join a family-friendly, innovative work environment. The Kenaitze Indian Tribe has opened our Dena'ina Wellness Center, featuring an integrated model of care. Employees at Kenaitze Indian Tribe deliver health, social service, education and tribal court services to tribal members, Alaska Native/American Indian people and others. Kenaitze Indian Tribe is recruiting for the following Full Time Position: DENTAL HYGIENIST Responsible for conducting dental hygiene examinations and treatment on patients and assisting in improving the knowledge level of patients on preventative oral hygiene. Benefits include Holidays, Paid Time Off, Extended Sick Leave, Medical/Dental/Life & Accidental Death Insurance, 401(k) For the job description or to apply visit our website at http://kenaitze.applicantpro.com. For questions call 907-335-7200. P.L. 93-638 applies

General Employment

General News/Sports/Outdoors Reporter The award-winning Homer News is seeking a full-time general news reporter, who will also cover sports, outdoors and schools. Proven writing ability and photography skills needed. Some knowledge of InDesign and Associated Press style a plus. Weekend and night work part of the job. The successful applicant will demonstrate the ability to consistently meet deadlines, per- form as a team player and successfully generate and follow through on story ideas. Resumes and references may be e-mailed to: lori.evans@homernews.com or faxed to 907-235-4199 or delivered to Homer News at 3482 Landings St., Homer, AK 99603. This position will remain open until a qualified candidate is found.

Healthcare RECEPTIONIST FULL TIME Responsible for administrative and clerical work including typing, filing, answering and routing multi line calls. Greeting the public, front office maintenance and general office support. Proficient with various software programs. Excellent organization, communication and customer service skills. Ability to multi-task, work with diverse population, work independently and as a team. Prior receptionist experience required. Send cover letter, resume and references to: Executive Director, The Lee Shore Center, 325 S. Spruce St., Kenai, AK 99611 by February 3rd, 2015 EOE.

Healthcare

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BROWN AGENCY

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/ INSURANCE AGENT TRAINEE Brown Agency, an all-lines Independent insurance agency, is seeking an administrative assistant/insurance agent trainee with proven office management skills who is interested in a career in the Insurance industry. Brown Agency will provide all education expenses and training necessary to obtain an insurance license, as well as a competitive compensation package. Please provide a resume and a copy of a current typing test in person to the address below by 1/30/2015 BROWN AGENCY 110 South Willow Street, Suite #106 Kenai, AK 99611 (907)283-7834

Transportation

Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

Pets & Livestock Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

Construction & Trades

Dogs

FINISH CARPENTERS Part time 80 hours per month. Week on, week off. Call 6pm-8pm only 394-2880.

Financial Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgages/Loans

KENAI KENNEL CLUB

Pawsitive training for all dogs & puppies. Agility, Conformation, Obedience, Privates & Rally. www.kenaikennelclub.com (907)335-2552

Merchandise For Sale Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn/Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

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Miscellaneous ALASKA MASSAGE GRAND OPENING Call Anytime 741-2662 262-0830 Thank you

Wanted to Buy

Recreation By bringing together Medical, Dental, and Behavioral Health Services, PCHS offers high quality, coordinated care for the entire family.

PCHS has Part-time hire position for

• Individual Service Provider Positions will be open until filled. Job description and application available online at www.pchsak.org Careers Please send cover letter, resume & application to: Human Resources, 230 E. Marydale Ave., Suite 3, Soldotna, AK, 99669 or fax to 907/260-7358. PCHS is an equal opportunity employer.

Trucks

Professional/Management

SILVER COINS Will buy, Pre-1965 Dimes, Quarters, 50cents, Dollars 690-4273

• Care Coordinator • Behavioral Health Clinician • Certified Medical Assistant

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Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boats Charter Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snow Mobiles Sporting Goods

Call 907-283-7551 and ask for the Garage Sale Special

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 23, 2015 C-5

To place an ad call 907-283-7551


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C-6 January 23, 2015 B-4 Peninsula PeninsulaClarion, Clarion,Friday, Monday, December 8, 2014

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130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

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Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

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35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

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130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

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908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Outdoor Clothing Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing

Funeral Homes

35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

Peninsula Memorial Chapels & Crematory Kenai........................................283-3333 Soldotna ..................................260-3333 Homer...................................... 235-6861 Seward.....................................224-5201

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Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

Health

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ASIAN MASSAGE Please make phone ring! Call anytime (907)741-0800

Bids KENAI PENINSULA BOROUGH SCHOOL DISTRICT INVITATION TO BID #122-15 Office Furniture The Kenai Peninsula Borough School District hereby invites qualified vendors to submit a proposal for acceptance by the District to purchase Office Furniture One (1) original of the sealed bid must be submitted to the Purchasing Department, Kenai Peninsula Borough School District, 139 East Park Avenue, Soldotna, AK 99669, no later than 4:00 PM local time on February 17, 2015. Bid can be obtained by calling 907-714-8876 during normal business hours, or from the District website www.kpbsd.k12.ak.us Kenai Peninsula Borough Code requires that businesses or individuals contracting to do business with the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District be in compliance with Borough tax provisions.

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Notice to Absent Defendant

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF ALASKA THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT AT KENAI

Northern Enterprises Boat Yard, Inc.

) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) )

Plaintiff(s)

Joe Cloud

Defendant(s)

Case No. 3KN-14-00629CI

NOTICE TO ABSENT DEFENDANT To Defendant: JOE CLOUD You are hereby summoned and required to file with the court and answer to the complaint filed in this case. Your answer must be filed with the court at Alaska Court System, 125 Trading Bay Rd., AK 99611 within 30 days after the last date of publication of this notice. In addition, a copy of your answer must be sent to the plaintiffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorney, Gregory D. Stein, Baldwin & Butler LLC, whose address is: 125 N. Willow Street, Kenai, AK 99611 If you fail to file your answer within the required time, a default judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This is an action for *Breach of Agreement and collection of debt The relief demanded is Judgment of $34,841.55 plus costs and attorney fees. You have been made a party to this action because You signed the Agreement and promised to pay the debt. January 8, 2015 For more safety tips visit SmokeyBear.com

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 23, 2015 C-7

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Classified Ad Rates Number of Days Run

FRIDAY AFTERNOON/EVENING A

B

5

(8) CBS-11 11 (9) FOX-4

4

(10) NBC-2

2

(12) PBS-7

7

4:30

Justice With Judge Mablean ‘PG’ The Insider (N)

(3) ABC-13 13 (6) MNT-5

4 PM

Supreme Justice

5 PM News & Views (N)

ABC World News

Inside Edition Family Feud Family Feud (N) ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’

The Ellen DeGeneres Show KTVA 5 p.m. (N) ‘G’ First Take Mike & Molly Entertainment Anger ManTonight (N) agement ‘14’ 4 ‘14’ The Dr. Oz Show ‘PG’

Channel 2 News 5:00 2 Report (N) Wild Kratts ‘Y’ Wild Kratts ‘Y’ BBC World News Ameri7 ca ‘PG’

CABLE STATIONS

A = DISH

5:30

CBS Evening News Two and a Half Men ‘14’ NBC Nightly News (N) ‘G’ Alaska Weather ‘G’

6 PM

6:30

7 PM

B = DirecTV

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’

Wheel of For- Last Man (:31) Cristela tune (N) ‘G’ Standing ‘PG’ “Super Fan” ‘PG’ Celebrity Celebrity Bones “The Woman in the Name Game Name Game Car” Witness Protection Pro(N) ‘PG’ ‘PG’ gram. ‘14’ KTVA 6 p.m. Evening Undercover Boss “Rocket News (N) Fizz” (N) ‘PG’ The Big Bang The Big Bang World’s Funniest Fails Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ Popular videos feature epic fails. (N) ‘14’ Channel 2 Newshour (N) Constantine “Quid Pro Quo” Thousands of people slip into comas. ‘14’ PBS NewsHour (N) Washington Alaska EdiWeek With tion Gwen Ifill

8 PM

JANUARY 23, 2015

8:30

9 PM

9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30

Shark Tank A darts-like card (:01) 20/20 ‘PG’ game. ‘PG’

ABC News at (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live ‘14’ (:37) Nightline (N) ‘G’ 10 (N)

Bones “The Superhero in the Alley” A lonely teenager is murdered. ‘14’ Hawaii Five-0 “Ho’onani Makuakane” ‘PG’ Glee Rachel hopes to form a deal with Will. (N) ‘14’

How I Met Your Mother ‘14’ KTVA Nightcast Anger Management ‘14’

Everybody Everybody Loves Ray- Loves Raymond ‘PG’ mond ‘PG’ Blue Bloods “Partners” ‘14’ Fox 4 News at 9 (N)

Grimm “Tribunal” Nick gath- Dateline NBC (N) ‘PG’ ers the team to find Monroe. (N) ‘14’ American Masters Stage ma- American Masters Stage magician Ricky Jay. (N) ‘PG’ gician Ricky Jay. (N) ‘PG’

The Office ‘PG’

The Late Late Show Entertainment Tonight

Channel 2 (:34) The Tonight Show Star- (:36) Late News: Late ring Jimmy Fallon ‘14’ Night With Edition (N) Seth Meyers Live From Lincoln Center Charlie Rose (N) With Joseph Calleja and Michael Fabiano. (N) ‘G’

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Rules of En- Rules of En (8) WGN-A 239 307 Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother gagement gagement (12:00) 28th Annual California Gold Rush Sale (N) ‘G’ Computer Shop ‘G’ (20) QVC 137 317

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(23) LIFE

108 252

(28) USA

105 242

(30) TBS

139 247

(31) TNT

138 245

(34) ESPN 140 206 (35) ESPN2 144 209 (36) ROOT 426 687 (38) SPIKE 241 241

Parks and Parks and Raising Hope Raising Hope 30 Rock ‘14’ 30 Rock ‘14’ Recreation Recreation ‘PG’ ‘PG’ Carole Hochman Heavenly Dyson: Designs for LivGotta Have It! “ElectronSoft Sleepwear ‘G’ ing ‘G’ ics” ‘G’ Bring It! The Dancing Dolls Bring It! “Bucking for ReBring It! Miss D takes the Bring It! “Prepare 4 Battle Bring It! (N) ‘PG’ (:02) Preachers’ Daughters (:02) Bring It! ‘PG’ (:02) Bring It! Preview of the head to Memphis, Tenn. ‘PG’ venge” Camryn and Tamia dance floor. ‘PG’ Preview” Preview of the upThe girls head out on a misupcoming season. ‘PG’ begin to bump heads. ‘PG’ coming season. (N) ‘PG’ sion trip. (N) ‘14’ Law & Order: Special Vic- Law & Order: Special Vic- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- “Fantastic Four” (2005) Ioan Gruffudd, Jessica Alba. Cosmic tims Unit “Mother” ‘14’ tims Unit ‘14’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ radiation grants four people unusual powers. Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld “The Seinfeld “The Seinfeld “The The Big Bang The Big Bang King of the Nerds Twelve “Mr. Deeds” (2002, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Winona Ryder, King of the Nerds Twelve Nap” ‘PG’ Yada Yada” Millennium” Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ new nerds arrive to compete. Peter Gallagher. A pizza maker inherits a fortune from a new nerds arrive to compete. ‘PG’ ‘PG’ (N) ‘14’ distant relative. ‘14’ Castle Alexis thinks an inmate Castle A relationship therapist Castle “Disciple” ‘PG’ Cold Justice “Burned (Fair- Wake Up Call Trying to save Cold Justice “Burned (Fair- Wake Up Call Trying to save “Bad Boys” (1995) Martin is innocent. ‘PG’ is murdered. ‘PG’ view Park, OH)” ‘14’ a sinking business. view Park, OH)” ‘14’ a sinking business. Lawrence, Will Smith. NBA Basketball Chicago Bulls at Dallas Mavericks. From American Airlines Winter X Games Aspen. From Aspen, Colo. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) NBA Basketball Chicago Center in Dallas. (N) (Live) Bulls at Dallas Mavericks. College Basketball 2015 Australian Open Tennis Third Round. From Melbourne, Australia. (N) (Live) 2015 Australian Open Tennis Third Round. (N) Women’s College Basketball Burton High Snow Motion WHL Hockey Everett Silvertips at Kelowna Rockets. (N) (Live) College Basketball Pacific at Portland. From Chiles Center College Basketball Washington at Colorado. Fives (N) ‘PG’ in Portland, Ore. Cops ‘PG’ Jail ‘14’ Cops ‘PG’ Cops ‘PG’ Cops ‘14’ Cops ‘PG’ Cops ‘PG’ Cops ‘PG’ Cops ‘PG’ Cops ‘14’ Cops ‘14’ Cops ‘14’ Cops ‘PG’ Jail ‘14’ Cops ‘PG’ Cops ‘14’

(3:00) “Braveheart” (1995, Historical Drama) Mel Gibson, Sophie Marceau, Patrick McGoo (43) AMC 131 254 han. A Scottish rebel rallies his countrymen against England. King of the King of the The Cleve- The Cleve- American American (46) TOON 176 296 Hill ‘PG’ Hill ‘PG’ land Show land Show Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced (47) ANPL 184 282 (49) DISN 173 291 (50) NICK 171 300 (51) FAM

180 311

(55) TLC

183 280

(56) DISC 182 278 (57) TRAV 196 277 (58) HIST 120 269 (59) A&E

118 265

(60) HGTV 112 229 (61) FOOD 110 231 (65) CNBC 208 355 (67) FNC

205 360

(81) COM 107 249 (82) SYFY 122 244

“Terminator Salvation” (2009, Science Fiction) Christian Bale, Sam “Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines” (2003) Arnold Schwarzenegger. A Worthington. Humanity fights back against Skynet’s machine army. cyborg protects John Connor from a superior model. Family Guy Family Guy Newsreaders The Heart, The Venture American American Family Guy Family Guy Newsreaders ‘PG’ ‘14’ (N) ‘14’ She Holler Bros. ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ ‘PG’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Treehouse Masters “Vincent Treehouse Masters “Meditat- Treehouse Masters “Treehive Treehouse Masters “Meditat- Treehouse Masters “Treehive Beehive” ‘PG’ Van Treehouse” ‘PG’ ing Maple” ‘PG’ Beehive” (N) ‘PG’ ing Maple” ‘PG’ (3:00) Movie I Didn’t Do I Didn’t Do Austin & Dog With a Girl Meets Girl Meets Phineas and Wander Over I Didn’t Do Liv & Mad- Dog With a Dog With a Dog With a Dog With a It ‘G’ It ‘G’ Ally ‘G’ Blog ‘G’ World ‘G’ World ‘G’ Ferb ‘G’ Yonder It ‘G’ die ‘G’ Blog ‘G’ Blog ‘G’ Blog ‘G’ Blog ‘G’ Nicky, Ricky Henry Danger The Thunder- The Thunder- Every Witch Max & Shred Bella and the Bulldogs Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Fresh Prince Fresh Prince Friends ‘PG’ (:36) Friends (:12) Everybody Loves Raymans ‘G’ mans ‘G’ Way (N) ‘G’ ‘G’ “Newbie QB” ‘G’ ‘PG’ mond ‘PG’ Boy Meets Boy Meets “Dirty Dancing” (1987, Romance) Jennifer Grey, Patrick Swayze. A shel- “Rock of Ages” (2012, Musical) Julianne Hough, Diego Boneta. Two young The 700 Club Miraculous Boy Meets Boy Meets World ‘G’ World ‘G’ tered teen falls for a street-wise dance instructor. people chase their dreams in Los Angeles. healings. (N) ‘G’ World ‘G’ World ‘G’ What Not to Wear “Noel” ‘PG’ What Not to Wear “Mayim” What Not to Wear “Beryl” What Not to Wear ‘PG’ Love, Lust or Love, Lust or Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Love, Lust or Love, Lust or Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL ‘PG’ ‘PG’ Run (N) Run (N) Run Run Gold Rush Parker’s car is Gold Rush A new Klondike Gold Rush “Piles of Gold” Gold Rush - The Dirt (N) ‘PG’ Gold Rush “Gold Road” Alaskan Bush People The Gold Rush “Gold Road” ‘PG’ Alaskan Bush People The totaled. ‘PG’ claim. ‘PG’ ‘PG’ (N) ‘PG’ family searches for food. family searches for food. Ghost Adventures “AlcaMysteries at the Museum A Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Castle Expedition Unknown “Amelia Earhart Special” The disap- Mysteries at the Castle ‘PG’ traz” ‘PG’ tattered briefcase. ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ (N) ‘PG’ pearance of Amelia Earhart. ‘PG’ The Men Who Built America “When One Ends, Another Be- American Pickers: Off the American Pickers “Full American Pickers ‘PG’ American Pickers “Museum (:03) American Pickers “Pint- (:01) American Pickers “Full gins” The changing face of America. ‘PG’ Road ‘PG’ Steam Ahead” ‘PG’ Man” ‘PG’ Sized Picker” ‘PG’ Steam Ahead” ‘PG’ Nightwatch “Retaliation” New Criminal Minds “A Family Criminal Minds Multiple mar- Criminal Minds “Foundation” Criminal Minds The team in- Criminal Minds The BAU (:01) Criminal Minds An (:01) Criminal Minds The Orleans police look into a Affair” A series of murders in ried couples are murdered. The team searches for a kid- vestigates gothic murders. ‘14’ reopens Morgan’s cousin’s infamous killer inspires a team searches for a kidnapshooting. ‘14’ Atlanta. ‘14’ ‘14’ napper. ‘14’ case. ‘14’ copycat. ‘14’ per. ‘14’ Caribbean Caribbean Caribbean Caribbean Love It or List It, Too An Love It or List It, Too “Susan Love It or List It, Too (N) ‘G’ House Hunt- Hunters Int’l House Hunt- Hunters Int’l Love It or List It, Too ‘G’ Life ‘G’ Life ‘G’ Life ‘G’ Life ‘G’ open modern space. & Harvey” ‘G’ ers ‘G’ ers ‘G’ Best. Ever. “Best. BBQ. Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Ever.” ‘G’ Shark Tank Old-fashioned ice The Celebrity Apprentice “A Family Affair” Selling wedding The Car The Car The Car The Car America’s Gun: The Rise of Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program cream men. ‘PG’ dresses for charity. ‘PG’ Chasers Chasers Chasers Chasers the AR-15 The O’Reilly Factor (N) The Kelly File (N) Hannity (N) The O’Reilly Factor The Kelly File Hannity On the Record With Greta Red Eye (N) Van Susteren (3:56) Fu(:26) Futura- The Nightly Daily Show/ (5:58) South (:29) Broad Kroll Show “Pineapple Express” (2008, Comedy) Seth Rogen, James Franco, Gary Daniel Tosh: Completely Kyle Kinane: I Liked His Old turama ‘14’ ma ‘14’ Show Jon Stewart Park ‘MA’ City ‘14’ ‘14’ Cole. A stoner flees after witnessing a murder. Serious ‘14’ Stuff Better (N) ‘MA’ (3:00) “Blast Vegas” (2013) “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” (2008) Harrison Ford, Cate 12 Monkeys “Mentally Diver- Helix “Reunion” (N) ‘14’ (:01) 12 Monkeys “Mentally (:01) Helix “Reunion” ‘14’ Frankie Muniz. ‘14’ Blanchett. Indy and a deadly Soviet agent vie for a powerful artifact. gent” (N) ‘14’ Divergent” ‘14’

PREMIUM STATIONS ! HBO 303 504 ^ HBO2 304 505 + MAX 311 516 5 SHOW 319 546 8 TMC

329 554

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

(3:30) Jennifer Lopez: Dance (:15) “The Skeleton Key” (2005, Suspense) Kate Hudson, “Wedding Crashers” (2005, Comedy) Owen Wilson, Vince Real Time With Bill Maher (N Real Time With Bill Maher Togetherness Looking ‘MA’ Again The singer’s first world Gena Rowlands, John Hurt. A nurse works in a New Orleans Vaughn. Partygoers spend a wild weekend with a politician’s Same-day Tape) ‘MA’ ‘MA’ “Handcuffs” tour. ‘14’ house with an odd history. ‘PG-13’ family. ‘R’ ‘MA’ (3:30) “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire” (2005, Fan- (:15) “The Grand Budapest Hotel” (2014, Comedy-Drama) “Grudge Match” (2013, Comedy) Robert De Niro, Sylvester “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey” (2012, Fantasy) Ian tasy) Daniel Radcliffe. Voldemort lays a trap for Harry at the Ralph Fiennes, F. Murray Abraham. A renowned concierge Stallone, Kevin Hart. Retired boxing rivals return to the ring for McKellen, Martin Freeman. Bilbo Baggins joins the quest to Triwizard Tournament. ‘PG-13’ mentors a lobby boy. ‘R’ one last fight. ‘PG-13’ reclaim a lost kingdom. ‘PG-13’ (3:15) “The (:45) “The Wolverine” (2013, Action) Hugh Jackman, Hiroyuki Sanada, (6:55) “Lone Survivor” (2013, War) Mark Wahlberg, Taylor Banshee “A Fixer of Sorts” Banshee “A Fixer of Sorts” Banshee “A Fixer of Sorts” Waterboy” Famke Janssen. Wolverine confronts the prospect of real mortality. ‘PG-13’ Kitsch, Eric Bana. Taliban fighters in 2005 Afghanistan attack Lucas’ secret is threatened by Lucas’ secret is threatened by Lucas’ secret is threatened by (1998) four Navy SEALs. ‘R’ arrest. ‘MA’ arrest. ‘MA’ arrest. ‘MA’ (3:05) “The Impossible” “The Trip” (2010, Comedy) Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon, Shameless “I’m the Liver” Lip “Django Unchained” (2012, Western) Jamie Foxx, Christoph Waltz, Leon- (:45) Shameless “I’m the (:45) House of (2012, Drama) Naomi Watts. Paul Popplewell. Steve Coogan goes on a food tour of north- has his first day of work. ‘MA’ ardo DiCaprio. An ex-slave and a German bounty hunter roam America’s Liver” Lip has his first day of Lies ‘MA’ ‘PG-13’ ern England. ‘NR’ South. ‘R’ work. ‘MA’ (3:40) “Beneath the Darkness” (2011, (:20) “Step Up Revolution” (2012) Ryan “Akeelah and the Bee” (2006, Drama) Laurence Fishburne, “Dead Poets Society” (1989, Drama) Robin Williams, Rob- (:10) “Barb Wire” (1996, Suspense) Dennis Quaid. Teens discover a Guzman. A young woman strives to be a pro- Angela Bassett, Keke Palmer. A girl hopes to compete in a ert Sean Leonard. An unorthodox teacher inspires his prep- Action) Pamela Anderson mortician’s dark secret. ‘R’ fessional dancer in Miami. spelling bee. ‘PG’ school students. ‘PG’ Lee. ‘R’

January 18 - 24, 2015

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C-8 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 23, 2015 Digital Vision/Getty Images

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 23, 2015

New desk comes with a view co-worker would like to avoid DEAR ABBY: I like my job a lot, but I have recently been assigned a different desk. I now sit next to someone who regularly draws his blood with a lancet and gives himself a shot for his diabetes just a foot away from me. I am extremely uncomfortable around blood and needles. I don’t want to make waves because this person has been here a lot longer than I have, and apparently, no one has ever been bothered by it. Am I being silly? Would it be improper to ask my supervisor to move me? Moving desks is a big enough deal that I will have to give a reason. Help. — SQUEAMISH IN GREAT FALLS, MONT. DEAR SQUEAMISH: Because the sight of blood and needles makes you uncomfortable, discuss this with your supervisor ASAP. While these are procedures many people with diabetes must attend to on a daily basis, you shouldn’t have to watch if you don’t want to. DEAR ABBY: My daughter and son-in-law were blessed with a child two years ago. My ex-husband (not my daughter’s father) has hardly been in her life since our divorce 15 years ago. She never called him Dad. We have both remarried.

He and his new wife have moved close to the kids and want to be grandparents. I don’t have a problem with them being close to my daughter, but I resent them being called “grandparents.” I feel that title should be reserved. Frankly, this has put a chasm in an otherwise close relationship. My daughter Abigail Van Buren and son-in-law don’t understand why I’m having a problem with it. Please give me some advice. — EARNED THE RIGHT IN VIRGINIA DEAR EARNED: OK. While I understand your jealousy, for all concerned, you need to realize that the more love and attention a child has, the better. Your grandchild will benefit from having many caring adults in his/her life as long as they’re not at each other’s throats. While your ex and his wife may not technically be grandparents, if you blow this out of propor-

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Hints from Heloise

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Ziggy

HHHHH You might have to handle a task, but your mind will be on a loved one. Break free from the shackles of your schedule, and go be with this person. Remember that life is for living. Sometimes you get too caught up with work and responsibilities. Tonight: As you like it. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Perhaps you don’t realize how much you enjoy staying close to home. However, given the opportunity, you might consider having a home-based business, if you don’t already. Make a call to someone who can help you clear up a problem. Tonight: Kick back. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Express what you feel, and remember to be diplomatic. You will get better results than if you were to proceed in your usual way. Someone might be trying to win a power play, but this person doesn’t know how strong and willful you are. Tonight: Head out with friends. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You could have the best intentions, but you might unknowingly trigger others. Do some soul searching or have a discussion with a trusted friend. You will want to root out this problem in order to have better communication. Tonight: Treat a friend. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH You might feel as if you’re on top of the world, yet a problem could be brewing within a friendship. This issue will need to be addressed. Ask yourself how important this person is to you, and then proceed accordingly. Tonight: You are noticed wherever you are.

New driver has old oil Dear Heloise: My son recently got his first car and is very into learning how to take care of it. He learned how to change his own oil, which is great. I do want to teach him responsibility in other ways. Do you have hints for disposing of old oil? — Paula P. in Atlanta Paula, good for your son learning early how to take care of a car. It will save him a lot of money in the long run and can be an enjoyable hobby for some. Do collect the oil in a leakproof container, like a plastic milk jug or old oil can. Many gas stations or quick-oilchange shops will take the old oil at no charge. You can check with repair shops to see if they will take it. There also are collection centers in almost every city for hazardous waste. Whatever you do, don’t let him just throw it away! Oil should never be put in trash cans or landfills, or poured down a sewer drain. The oil can end up in sewers, water supplies or other places that are extremely harmful to the environment. — Heloise Travel hint Dear Heloise: On a recent trip, I purchased several souvenirs. Later, I realized that some of the pieces were not even made in that country. Talk about disappointing. My hint is to be careful when buying souvenirs. Double-check where they were made and if they actually represent the country you are visiting. Sometimes the tourist attractions are not the best places to buy souvenirs. Visit places off the beaten path, and you will be surprised at the beautiful things you can find to remember your trip! — Greta G., via email

SUDOKU

By Tom Wilson

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Friday.

9 3 4 8 7 2 6 5 1

8 5 7 1 6 9 3 2 4

2 1 6 4 3 5 8 7 9

1 7 2 9 8 6 4 3 5

4 6 8 7 5 3 1 9 2

3 9 5 2 4 1 7 8 6

6 8 1 5 2 7 9 4 3

5 4 9 3 1 8 2 6 7

Difficulty Level

7 2 3 6 9 4 5 1 8

2015 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

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fore you can even verbalize what you feel needs to be done. Try not to hold a grudge. This person might want control at any cost. The only way to win a power struggle here is not to play. Tonight: Leader of the gang. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Reach out for more information and/or to an expert if you are not satisfied with what you are hearing. You could be questioning what works for you. Distance yourself from the issue as much as possible; only then can you make a good decision. Tonight: Follow the music. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHYou’ll want to cut back and relax more, yet you might resist letting go of certain responsibilities. Figure out what you really want to do, and you won’t have a problem. A loved one will let you know where he or she is coming from. Tonight: Munchies with a friend. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHYou seem to be unusually resourceful when dealing with someone who can be very controlling. Be aware of your objective, and don’t play into this person’s control games. The results will be a lot better than you might have expected. Tonight: Accept a special invitation. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHYou could be at your wits’end when dealing with a difficult, controlling person. Avoid getting into a conflict by backing away carefully. The only way to be effective is to be nonreactive. Listen to others’ feedback. Tonight: Accept a colleague’s invitation. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

By Eugene Sheffer

tion, you risk alienating your daughter, so I advise against it. DEAR ABBY: I am a professor at a university on a military base in Germany. Most of my students are soldiers, their families or retirees, so my students range in age from 18 to 60. I do not yet have my Ph.D., only my master’s. I communicate a lot with my students through email. How should I sign my emails to them? I can’t say Dr. So-and-So. Do I use my full name or Professor So-and-So? While I’m friendly with my students, I still believe in keeping a professional distance, and I want to convey a sense of professionalism in my emails. — PROFESSOR SO-AND-SO DEAR PROFESSOR SO-AND-SO: Sign your communications with your students exactly the way you have signed the one you have written to me.

Jacqueline Bigar’s Stars A baby born today has a Sun in Aquarius and a Moon in Pisces HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, Jan. 23, 2015: This year you’ll find that your finances are a key factor in making plans, especially as you consider a major life change. Sometimes you prevent yourself from realizing how you really feel about a situation. Be aware of this tendency, as it could cause a problem. If you are single, 2015 will be a year to remember. Expect to encounter an abundance of suitors; at least one of them will be very appealing. If you are attached, the two of you have a tendency to go overboard, but you always manage to have a ball doing it. Make sure to schedule special time together as a couple. PISCES wants to be involved in your life, but it is your call. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHYou could be facing a decision that will force you to go within. You might resist the process at first, but you will warm up to it eventually. Don’t fight it, and you will have an easier time. Make time to have a discussion with a key confidant. Tonight: Try not to be so visible. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Zeroinonwhat you want.Information you are receiving could be subject to dramatic change, even if you don’t see it yet. Emphasize your goals and priorities. A get-together with friends will be highlighted. Make a note of what is not being said. Tonight: TGIF! GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHYou could be startled by how someone else takes a stand be-

Crossword

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Previous Puzzles Answer Key

B.C.

By Johnny Hart

Garfield

By Jim Davis

Take It from the Tinkersons By Bill Bettwy

Tundra

Shoe

By Chad Carpenter

By Chris Cassatt & Gary Brookins

Mother Goose and Grimm

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By Michael Peters


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C-10 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 23, 2015

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Profile for Sound Publishing

Peninsula Clarion, January 23, 2015  

January 23, 2015 edition of the Peninsula Clarion

Peninsula Clarion, January 23, 2015  

January 23, 2015 edition of the Peninsula Clarion