Page 1

C

M

Y

K

Piccata

Hoops

Chicken makes for versatile dishes

Peninsula prep cagers in action

Food/B-1

Sports/A-10

CLARION

Ice, rain 38/34 More weather on Page A-2

P E N I N S U L A

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 14, 2015 Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

Vol. 45, Issue 89

Question Should lawmakers be constitutionally prohibited from using the earnings of the Alaska Permanent Fund to pay for state government? n Yes n No To place your vote and comment, visit our Web site at www. peninsulaclarion. com. Results and selected comments will be posted each Tuesday in the Clarion, and a new question will be asked. Suggested questions may be submitted online or e-mailed to news@peninsulaclarion.com.

50 cents newsstands daily/$1.00 Sunday

T200 postponed Race organizers hope for snow by Feb. 21 By IAN FOLEY Peninsula Clarion

Due to the lack of snow on the Kenai Peninsula, the 2015 Tustumena 200 sled dog race has been postponed. Originally scheduled for Feb. 7, the race will now take place on Feb. 21, pending more snowfall. The 200-mile sled dog race has been held since 1984 and the race’s trails extend through the Caribou Hills and other parts of the Kenai Peninsula. Last year,

the race was canceled due to similar weather constraints. Tami Murray, race director of the T200, said that while some people are disappointed, others are relieved. “The mushers are very pleased that we’re not canceling,” Murray said. “We’re giving it a chance. They’re fine with the date we’ve chosen.” Murray said that the race has been postponed several times in its history. Normally when a race is postponed, race organiz-

ers try to push it back a week, but this year Iditarod drop bag preparation would conflict with a one-week delay. “It takes about a week to put the trail in, so we need a week,” Murray said. “It gives mushers time to plan. A lot of them come from all over the state.” The race can’t be held later than Feb. 21, because many teams need time to rest and prePhoto courtesy Tami Murray/T200 pare for the Iditarod on March 7. This photo taken Saturday shows the lack of snow around FredMurray said that because of die’s Roadhouse in the Caribou Hills, one of the T200 Sled Dog See T200, page A-14 Race checkpoints. The race has been postponed until Feb. 21.

Nikiski shows support for staff

In the news Seismologists detect record number of quakes in 2014 C

M

Y

K

ANCHORAGE (AP) — Alaska experienced a busy year underground in 2014, according to experts who record the state’s earthquakes. The Alaska Earthquake Information Center detected 40,686 quakes in the state and bordering parts of Canada, significantly more that the previous high of nearly 32,000 in 2003, the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner reported. In 2013, 28,000 earthquakes were detected with the center’s seismometer network. “We’ve blown away those benchmarks,” said state seismologist Michael West. “There’s never been a year where we identified 40,000 earthquakes in a year.” Most of the 2014 earthquakes were not felt by people, West said, and were in the range of magnitude 2 or 3. With more than 400 recording stations across Alaska, and up-to-date maintenance, the health of the seismic network is better than ever, West said. Technological advances in instruments and software also have improved the center’s ability to detect earthquakes, he said. Those two reasons don’t explain the increase, however. “Then the third one, which is actually of interest, is the Earth itself,” West said. “Even when you strip away those other two, there really have been a disproportionate number of earthquakes in Alaska in the past year.”

Index Opinion.................. A-4 Nation.................... A-6 World..................... A-8 Sports...................A-10 Police, courts........A-12 Food...................... B-1 Classifieds............. B-3 Comics................... B-6 Check us out online at www.peninsulaclarion.com To subscribe, call 283-3584.

School board hears from community By KELLY SULLIVAN Peninsula Clarion

and businesses with the services they need.” According to council members Robert Molloy, Harry Knackstedt, and Brian Gabriel, one of those non-sexy things may be the city’s purchasing policy. The three of them plan to consider reforms. “Primarily, I’m looking at the purchasing code as it impacts professional services,” Knackstedt said. “How requests for proposals are done, how they are reviewed. It’s something I want to go through and kind of streamline a little bit.” Knackstedt, Molloy, and Gabriel also plan to take a look at Kenai’s comprehensive

More than a dozen community members spoke in support of the Nikiski Middle-High School administration and staff during the public presentation period at Monday’s Kenai Peninsula Borough School Board of Education meeting. The turnout was prompted by the school district’s investigation of two Nikiski MiddleHigh school administrators and two teachers. The district’s investigation began on Dec. 19 following formal complaints lodged by parents of “sexually suggestive” behavior at the school’s Christmas assembly. By the call to order at 7 p.m., it was standing room only in the Kenai Peninsula borough assembly room. Nikiski’s school colors adorned many audience members. Following nearly one hour of public comment, the school’s principal Dan Cartsens made a statement. Carstens said at no time did he intend to offend anyone with the content presented during the assembly. He said his only motivation was to further build on his relationships with students at the school. “Moving forward, I make connections with students and become a pillar in our community,” Carstens said. Ben Carpenter, one of the

See KENAI, page A-5

See SCHOOL, page A-14

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion

Working by torchlight

Eric Thomason, of Kenai, works on one of Snug Harbor Seafoods owner Paul Dale’s boats on Tuesday in Kenai.

Kenai city council plans for 2015 By BEN BOETTGER Peninsula Clarion

Now that 2015 has arrived, some members of Kenai’s city council are making plans for action. “I could go on and on about the things Kenai needs,” said Kenai Mayor Pat Porter. Her list includes an upgraded junk car ordinance, refurbishment of the city’s soccer fields, baseball diamonds, and parks, and designs for a possible amphitheater and convention center. Other council members said that rather than making definite plans, they are approaching the year with readiness for whatever problems it may present.

“I don’t have anything that’s pressing for me,” said council member Terry Bookey. “I’m going to see how the year goes, what comes up. I think the best-laid plans are sometimes thwarted just by what comes up inadvertently.” Council member Ryan Marquis said that he also intends to take a responsive, rather than active, stance. “I do not currently have any planned legislation to propose,” Marquis said. “Some people measure legislative success by the number of laws they can get passed in their career. I

tend to think it’s an equally important job to try and prevent new laws from being created, or at least speaking out against them.” When asked what issues he’d like the city to look at in 2015, Marquis said that taking care of basic procedures would be his priority. “The city should be concerned with some of the nutsand-bolts functions of the city; you know, the non-sexy stuff like wastewater system upgrades, street and light repairs, etc.,” Marquis said. “I want to see the city continue to be a place that provides residents

‘Try It Once’ to get active Program helps beginners try new activities By IAN FOLEY Peninsula Clarion

Try It Once, a program for people who are nervous about trying a new activity, will be held for the first time on Jan. 20 at the Nikiski Pool. Hosted by the Central Peninsula Change Club, in conjunction with the Cooperative Extension Service, Try It Once hopes to make people in the central peninsula area more active by offering one-off, begin-

ner-level classes for a variety of activities. The inaugural class, Lap Swimming for Fitness, is led by certified strength and conditioning specialist Angie Brennan, who will teach beginners how to design personal swim workouts as well as inform participants about pool etiquette. The instructor will show participants who enjoy the class how to continue in other programs. Linda Tannehill, an agent for

the Cooperative Extension Service and member of the Central Peninsula Change Club, said that classes are for beginners, people needing a refresher, people who want to be with other beginners, or for those who aren’t sure if they want to make a large financial investment with a longer course. “Our goal is to increase physical activity in the central peninsula area,” Tannehill said. “Not everybody wants to do See ONCE, page A-14 C

M

Y

K

Fish and Game sportfish director gets new job By RASHAH McCHESNEY Peninsula Clarion

Longtime Alaska Department of Fish and Game employee Charles “Charlie” Swanton has been appointed to the Deputy Commissioner’s position within the department. Swanton has also been nominated as the state’s Commissioner for the Pacific Salmon Commission. Swanton, who is currently attending a Pacific Salmon

Commission meeting in Vancouver, according to Fish and Game staff, has been the director of the department’s Division of Sportfish for seven years. “He stepped right into it,” said Fish and Game Deputy Commissioner Kevin Brooks. “That was part of getting him into the seat because there’s meetings this week and then additional ones next week as well. People fish in the sumSee FISH, page A-14


C

M

Y

K

A-2 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, January 14, 2015

CLARION P

E N I N S U L A

(USPS 438-410) Published daily Sunday through Friday, except Christmas and New Year’s, by: Southeastern Newspapers Corporation P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Street address: 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 1, Kenai, AK Phone: (907) 283-7551 Postmaster: Send address changes to the Peninsula Clarion, P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Periodicals postage paid at Kenai, AK Represented for national advertising by The Papert Companies, Chicago, IL Copyright 2015 Peninsula Clarion A Morris Communications Corp. newspaper

Who to call at the Peninsula Clarion News tip? Question? Main number.............................................................................................. 283-7551 Fax............................................................................................................. 283-3299 News email...................................................................news@peninsulaclarion.com General news Will Morrow, editor ............................................ will.morrow@peninsulaclarion.com Rashah McChesney, city editor.............. rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com Jeff Helminiak, sports editor........................... jeff.helminiak@peninsulaclarion.com Fisheries, photographer.............................................................................................. ............................ Rashah McChesney, rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com Borough, courts..........................Dan Balmer, daniel.balmer@peninsulaclarion.com Education, Soldotna ................ Kelly Sullivan, kelly.sullivan@peninsulaclarion.com Kenai......................................... Ben Boettger, ben.boettger@peninsulaclarion.com General assignment............................... Ian Foley, ian.foley@peninsulaclarion.com Arts and Entertainment................................................ news@peninsulaclarion.com Community, Around the Peninsula............................... news@peninsulaclarion.com Sports............................................ Joey Klecka, joey.klecka@peninsulaclarion.com Page design........ Florence Struempler, florence.struempler@peninsulaclarion.com

Circulation problem? Call 283-3584 If you don’t receive your newspaper by 7 a.m. and you live in the Kenai-Soldotna area, call 283-3584 before 10 a.m. for redelivery of your paper. If you call after 10 a.m., you will be credited for the missed issue. Regular office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Sunday. General circulation questions can be sent via email to circulation@peninsulaclarion.com. The circulation manager is Randi Keaton.

For home delivery Order a six-day-a-week, three-month subscription for $39, a six-month subscription for $73, or a 12-month subscription for $130. Use our easy-pay plan and save on these rates. Call 283-3584 for details. Mail subscription rates are available upon request.

Want to place an ad?

Classified: Call 283-7551 and ask for the classified ad department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or email classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com. Display: Call 283-7551 and ask for the display advertising department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Leslie Talent is the Clarion’s advertising director. She can be reached via email at leslie.talent@peninsulaclarion.com. Contacts for other departments: Business office.................................................................................. Teresa Mullican Production................................................................................................ Geoff Long Online........................................................................................ Vincent Nusunginya

Visit our fishing page! Go to peninsulaclarion.com and look for the Tight Lines link.

twitter.com/pclarion

facebook.com/ peninsulaclarion

Follow the Clarion online. Go to peninsulaclarion.com and look for the Twitter, Facebook and Mobile links for breaking news, headlines and more.

United could outsource airport jobs CHICAGO (AP) — United Airlines is considering cutting up to 2,000 jobs at 28 airports around the country and hiring a contractor to do the work. The airline needs to make sure its costs are competitive, and so it is considering outsourcing jobs of some bag handlers and customer-service agents, United spokesman Luke Punzenberger said on Tuesday. Employees were notified of the potential cuts on Monday, Punzenberger said. He said United was discussing the matter with the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, which represents the affected workers. The move follows United’s decision last year to outsource more than 600 jobs at 12 airports around the country. Most

Oil Prices Monday’s prices North Slope crude: $48.38, DOWN from $50.77 on Friday West Texas Int.: $46.07, DOWN from $48.36 on Friday

Tues. Stocks Company Final Change Agrium Inc.............. 100.02 -0.52 Alaska Air Group.......61.41 +0.80 ACS...........................1.59 -0.07 Apache Corp........... 58.46 +0.00 AT&T........................ 33.49 +0.00 Baker Hughes.......... 55.24 +0.15 BP ........................... 35.96 -0.09 Chevron.................. 104.20 -1.68 ConocoPhillips......... 62.44 -0.63 ExxonMobil.............. 90.00 -0.33 1st Natl. Bank AK.....1,590.00 +0.00 GCI.......................... 14.81 +0.37 Halliburton............... 38.29 -0.25 Harley-Davidson...... 64.19 -0.47 Home Depot........... 103.73 -0.69 McDonald’s.............. 92.83 -0.18 Safeway................... 35.30 +0.04 Schlumberger...........77.78 -0.27 Tesoro...................... 66.67 -3.33 Walmart................... 89.31 -0.71 Wells Fargo...............51.85 -0.20 Gold closed............1,230.65 +2.62 Silver closed.............17.03 +0.45 Dow Jones avg..... 17,613.68 -27.16 NASDAQ................ 4,661.50 -3.21 S&P 500................2,023.03 -5.23 Stock prices provided by the Kenai Peninsula Edward Jones offices. C

M

Y

K

were at airports served by smaller United Express regional flights. United Continental Holdings Inc. earned $1.12 billion in the first nine months of 2014, eclipsing the $571 million it made in all of 2013. Shares of United rose 49 cents to close at $66.41. They have lost less than 1 percent in January after gaining 77 per-

cent in 2014. The airports at which United is considering outsourcing jobs of employees including baggage handlers and customerservice agents: Anchorage, Alaska; Atlanta; Billings, Montana; Boise, Idaho; Fort Myers, Florida; Greensboro, North Carolina; Hartford, Connecticut; Indianapolis; Jacksonville, Florida; Kansas City;

McAllen, Texas; Miami; Nashville; Norfolk, Virginia; Oklahoma City; Omaha, Nebraska; Ontario, California; Providence, Rhode Island; Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; Reno, Nevada; Richmond, Virginia; San Antonio, Texas; Sacramento, California; San Jose, California; Spokane, Washington; St. Louis; Tulsa, Oklahoma; West Palm Beach, Florida.

C

M

Y

K


C

M

Y

K

Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Community Calendar Today 8 a.m. • Alcoholics Anonymous As Bill Sees It Group, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway Unit 71 (Old Carrs Mall). Call 398-9440. 10:30 a.m. • Bouncing Babies Storytime at the Soldotna Public Library. Call 262-4227. 11 a.m. • Redoubt Homemakers at Nikiski Fire Station No. 1. • Wee Read at the Kenai Community Library. Noon • Alcoholics Anonymous recovery group at 11312 Kenai Spur Highway Suite 71 in the old Carrs Mall in Kenai. Call 262-1917. • TOPS group AK 222 Soldotna meets at Christ Lutheran Church, 128 Soldotna Ave. Call 260-1662. 5:30 p.m. • Weight loss and health support group, Christ Lutheran Church. Call 362-1340. 7 p.m. • Card games, Funny River Community Center. • Narcotics Anonymous support group “Clean Machine” at Central Peninsula Hospital’s Redoubt Room, 250 Hospital Place, Soldotna. Call 907-335-9456. • Alcoholics Anonymous “Into Action” group, 12X12 study meeting, VFW basement Birch Street, Soldotna, 907-2620995. 8 p.m. • Al-Anon Support Group at Central Peninsula Hospital in the Augustine Room, Soldotna. Call 252-0558. The Community Calendar lists recurring events and meetings of local organizations. To have your event listed, email organization name, day or days of meeting, time of meeting, place, and a contact phone number to news@peninsulaclarion.com.

Peninsula Clarion death notice and obituary guidelines:

C

M

Y

K

The Peninsula Clarion strives to report the deaths of all current and former Peninsula residents. Notices should be received within three months of the death. We offer two types of death reports: Pending service/Death notices: Brief notices listing full name, age, date and place of death; and time, date and place of service. These are published at no charge. Obituaries: The Clarion charges a fee to publish obituaries. Obituaries are prepared by families, funeral homes, crematoriums, and are edited by our staff according to newspaper guidelines. Obituaries up to 300 words are charged $50, which includes a one-year online guest book memoriam to on Legacy. com. Obituaries up to 500 words are charged $100, which also includes the one-year online guest book memoriam. Tax is not included. All charges include publication of a black and white photo. Obituaries outside these guidelines are handled by the Clarion advertising department. How to submit: Funeral homes and crematoriums routinely submit completed obituaries to the newspaper. Obituaries may also be submitted directly to the Clarion, online at www.peninsulaclarion.com, or by mail to: Peninsula Clarion, P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, Alaska, 99611. Pre-payment must accompany all submissions not already handled by a funeral home or crematorium. Deadlines: Submissions for Tuesday – Friday editions must be received by 2 p.m. the previous day. Submissions for Sunday and Monday editions must be received by 3 p.m. Friday. We do not process obituaries on Saturdays or Sundays unless submitted by funeral homes or crematoriums. Obituaries are placed on a space-available basis, prioritized by dates of local services. Copyright: All death notices and obituaries become property of the Clarion and may not be republished in any format. For more information, call the Clarion at 907-283-7551.

Around the Peninsula Watershed forum event postponed

A-3

contact Jim at 260-4904.

Hazardous waste disposal day scheduled

The next hazardous waste disposal day is Saturday from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at the Central Peninsula Landfill. The Kenai Peninsula Borough’s hazardous waste program gives households and small businesses the opportunity to properly dispose of hazardous waste and chemicals. All businesses must pre-register with Emerald Alaska. Households with more the 55 gallons of waste must also pre-register. Emerald Alaska manages this event; the Kasilof Historical Association presents Kenai Peninsula Borough provides the location. To pre-regison Russian settlements ter and/or for specific waste disposal questions, call Emerald The Kasilof Regional Historical Association is hosting a free Alaska at 877-375-5040. For general questions, call the Kenai public presentation on “Early Russian Settlements on the Kenai Peninsula Borough Solid Waste Department at 907-262-9667. Peninsula” by Shana Loshbaugh. This event is scheduled for 7 p.m., Wednesday at the Kasilof Historical Museum, 24117 Kali- Judo club accepting new members fornsky Beach Rd. For nearly a century, Russians ruled the Kenai The Sterling Judo Club will be accepting new members startPeninsula, and many communities today have roots from that era. The talk will survey the historic events and profile what is known ing on Jan. 20. The club meets every Tuesday and Thursday, at about area communities at that time. In particular, it will discuss Sterling Elementary, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. (7 p.m. for younger the mysterious and controversial events surrounding the first Rus- participants). There are no instructor fees or other monthly fees. Sterling Judo Club is a nonprofit organization and all instructors sian posts at Kasilof and Kenai more than 200 years ago. volunteer their time. Annual USJF membership is $50. The Sterling Judo Club is led by Sensei Robert Brink, 7th degree black Order of the Purple Heart meets Thursday belt, Founder of the Anchorage Judo Club. For more information The Military Order of the Purple Heart will hold its monthly please contact Clayton Holland at 394-1823, or Sensei Bob Brink meeting at 1 p.m. Thursday at the Soldotna VFW. All Purple at 907-242-9330 or obobo1a@gmail.com. Information can also Heart veterans are welcome and spouses may become associate be found on the Sterling Judo Club’s Facebook Page. members. For more information, call Nick at 953-0576 or Joe at 281-4881. Hospice training offered The Kenai Watershed Forum will reschedule its Winter Speaker Series presentation with Robert Ruffner, originally scheduled for Wednesday. It will be rescheduled later this month or early February.

Hospice of the Central Peninsula is offering Hospice Volunteer Core Training 2015 at Christ Lutheran Church in Soldotna. There will be a meeting for men affected by prostate cancer Friday sessions are Jan. 30 and Feb. 6, 6-9 p.m. Saturday sessions at 6 p.m. Thursday in the Redoubt room at Central Peninsula are Jan. 31 and Feb. 7, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Registration is required. The Hospital. Family and friends are welcome. For information cost is $25/person. For more information, call Hospice at 2620453 or email Janice at hospice.admin@alaska.net.

Prostate cancer support group meets

Another wandering wolf arrives in Oregon By JEFF BARNARD Associated Press

GRANTS PASS, Ore. — Another wandering wolf has found its way to the Cascades of southwestern Oregon, where OR-7 has established his pack after trekking thousands of miles in search of a mate. An automatic trail camera snapped a photo of the new wolf in timberlands west of the Klamath County community of Keno, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist John Stephenson said Tuesday. The camera was set out by an Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife biologist after he spotted a track in the snow in December. The arrival of another wandering wolf confirms that the animal continues to spread widely across the region after being reintroduced in the Northern Rockies in the 1990s. The area was actually frequented by OR-7 before he settled down farther north, Ste-

phenson said. “I am surprised to see another wolf unrelated to (OR-7’s) Rogue pack down in that area so soon,” Stephenson said. “It does suggest some sort of dispersal corridor (through which) they are making their way over to that part of the state. But we have no way of knowing. We have a number of long-distance dispersers out there that aren’t collared. Even though it appears this one is staying in this area, I don’t think we completely know it will stick in that area or keep moving around.” OR-7 became famous around the world after his GPS tracking collar chronicled his travels once he left the Imnaha pack in northeastern Oregon in 2011. He meandered across mountains, forests, deserts and highways to the southern Cascades, south into Northern California, and back again before finding a mate last

C

M

Y

K

winter and settling down on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest and having a set of pups. The blurry photo taken Jan. 5 shows a grey wolf trotting down a gravel road past a stand of tall pine and fir trees. Though it does not show the animal’s head, it is clear from the body that it is an adult, Stephenson said. He adds that though it is grey, like OR-7, they know it is not him because his GPS tracking collar showed him far away at the time. Based on the photo, Oregon Fish and Wildlife would establish a new Area of Known Wolf Activity in the area next week, spokeswoman Michelle Dennehy said. Wildlife agencies last week confirmed official pack status on OR-7, his mate and their pups. Rob Klavins of the conservation group Oregon Wild said he hoped the state would get ahead of the curve and work to prevent conflicts between the wolves

and livestock by working with ranchers to take non-lethal steps to protect their herds grazing in the area. He cited U.S. Department of Agriculture statistics that about 1,000 cattle are lost each week in Oregon to weather, dogs, disease and other causes, while just five have been confirmed killed by wolves each of the last three years. Hugh Charley, past president of the Jackson County Stockmen, grazes cattle each summer in the area west of Keno where the wolf was sighted. Oregon Fish and Wildlife informed him and other ranchers of the wolf sighting last weekend at the group’s annual meeting. Though ranchers were not happy to learn another wolf moved into the area, Charley said he expected they would learn to live with them. “It’s not going to go away,” he said of wolves.


A-4 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, January 14, 2015

M

Y

K

Opinion

CLARION P

C

E N I N S U L A

Serving the Kenai Peninsula since 1970 VITTO KLEINSCHMIDT Publisher

WILL MORROW������������������������������������������������������������������������ Editor Teresa Mullican............... Controller/Human Resources Director LESLIE TALENT................................................... Advertising Director GEOFF LONG.................................................... Production Manager VINCENT NUSUNGINYA.................................... New Media Director Daryl Palmer.................................... IT and Composition Director RANDI KEATON................................................. Circulation Manager A Morris Communications Corp. Newspaper

What Others Say

Legislature should stay in Juneau Here we go again with the latest in-

Where was Barack Obama?

Let’s be blunt. They blew it big-time. Even the White House now admits it was a mistake not to send someone with a “higher profile.” That profile should have belonged to President Barack Obama. If there was ever a place and time that demanded the chief executive of the United States, it was in Paris on Sunday. But President Obama was nowhere to be seen among the millions who clogged the streets of the French capital, nowhere to be seen among the world leaders who came to symbolize a solid front for the ideals of freedom of expression and religious tolerance. The U.K.’s David Cameron was there, Germany’s Angela Merkel was, Israel’s Benjamin Netanyahu flew in, which was remarkable because the Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas was marching just a few feet away from Netanyahu. French President Francois Hollande was not exaggerating when he exclaimed, “Paris is the capital of the world today.” In all, more than 40 world leaders showed up to step out in response to the murderous attacks at the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo and in the kosher market the next day. But not Mr. Obama, the leader of the nation that claims to epitomize the freedoms of religion and expression. Not even U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry was there, although Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov joined the massive crowds moving down the Boulevard Voltaire. Kerry suddenly has decided he could squeeze Paris in later in the week, but at the rally on that Sunday, the United States

of America was represented by the U.S. ambassador and assistant secretary of state. Oh, by the way, Attorney General Eric Holder was in the city, preparing for some anti-terrorism meetings, but he Bob Franken didn’t join the walk. The politicians here have teed off on the administration. The foes are having a field day, friends are cringing. But Kerry was dismissive: “I really think, you know, this is sort of quibbling a bit.” Is it “quibbling” to wonder where this nation visibly stands when the stakes are so high, when the entire world community is under such a threat from deranged extremists. While Holder didn’t join in, he did manage to appear on the Sunday talk shows with warnings about the possibility of similar attacks in this country, telling “Face the Nation” that, “It’s something that frankly keeps me up at night, worrying about the lone wolf, or a group of people, who decide to get arms on their own, and do what we saw in France.” Unfortunately, what we didn’t see in France was the presence of a top U.S. leader arm in arm with his counterparts around the world, joining the million-plus in Paris and millions more around the planet who found it imperative that they show a human unity against the inhuman

stallment of Capitol Creep. Sen.-elect. Bill Stoltze, who represented Chugiak for many years in the state House, has proposed moving the annual session of the Alaska Legislature to Anchorage. When will this nonsense end? Gov. Bill Walker has tried to end it quickly by taking the smart step of sending word, not long after Mr. Stoltze said this week he intends to introduce a bill to move the Legislature, that he supports keeping things as they are — in Juneau. “While I typically do not commit on how I would deal with any particular legislation before it is on my desk, I do not favor moving the capital from Juneau,” the governor said in an email to the Juneau Empire. Discussion about moving the capital — the only state capital accessible solely by air or ferry — has pockmarked Alaska’s history. Numerous proposals have been put forward. Of those that have been put to a public vote, all have failed. The most recent effort came in 2002 and failed by a 2-to-1 ratio statewide, with Juneau spending more than $2 million to defeat the measure. One of the arguments put forward by proponents of moving the entire capital or even just the Legislature is doing so would increase access for Alaskans. If this is such a concern, however, why have lawmakers been so content with the shorter, 90-day legislative session rather than the 120-day session allowed by the Constitution and which was the norm before passage of a voter initiative in 2006? So much for wanting more access for The People. Today’s technology does provide for citizen access to our distant Legislature, even though the number of days they work is fewer. And the state’s system of Legislative Information Offices helps connect Alaskans with their lawmakers. Proponents of moving the Legislature probably will argue they have no larger goal of moving the capital. Perhaps that is so. But what about those who will come to power after them? Once this first step of Capital Creep is taken, others will someday push anew for that next step — moving the entire capital to Southcentral, where much of the state’s power already resides. Moving the capital would ravage the economy of Juneau, where state government is the largest employer. When will the covetous leaders from Southcentral Alaska cease this effort? Probably never. Alaska has larger issues to concern itself with now than this. Discussion about moving the Legislature or the capital our students. I wish you all the very best in might not seem to be something of concern to residents of Letters to the Editor the coming year. Interior Alaska, but Fairbanks can ill afford a further conSincerely, solidation of state power in Anchorage. Juneau always will Kelly King, Support for students in need all the friends it can get on this issue, and it should be with Tim Vlasak, KPBSD Director of transition making a difference able to count on Fairbanks for support. K-12 Schools/Federal Programs — Fairbanks Daily News-Miner, As Coordinator of the KPBSD Students Jan. 10 in Transition Program, I am humbled by Wrestling booster club appreciates sup-

Classic Doonesbury, 1980 

By GARRY TRUDEAU

the beautiful outpouring of support we have received over the past few months. This support has come in many forms, including awareness and fundraising events, financial contributions, donations of school supplies, hygiene products, winter gear, goodie-bags and gifts, meal cards, numerous food boxes, and a variety of miscellaneous supplies. Each of these efforts improves our ability to assist homeless children, youth, and families on the Kenai Peninsula. I would like to recognize those who have given so generously: The KCHS Leadership class, the Kenai Alternative High School Community Projects class, the KMS Leadership class, the Skyview Middle School Student Council, Damien Redder and Devin Every and families, Jenna Hansen and The Scene of the Crash, Hilcorp Alaska and local Hilcorp employees, Peninsula Community Health Services employees, 5 Star Realty, Stanley Ford, the Kenai Borough Employee’s Association and borough employees, Cabin Fever Creations and customers, Kaladi’s Coffee, the Ross Baxter Group, Julie English and family, Lanie Hughes and family, Febra Hensley and family, Andy Lovett, Travis and Jennifer Howell, and Dawn Musgrove. I would also like to thank those who remained anonymous, or attended/contributed to a drive or event held to benefit the Students in Transition Program. With sincere appreciation I thank these groups, agencies and individuals for their kindness and compassion. Please know that your time, energy, and resources really do make a positive difference in the lives of C

M

Y

K

port Congratulations to the following winners of the Kenai Central High School Wrestling raffle: 1st prize (Heritage 22/22 Magnum revolver-AK Trading & Loan) — Nadine Gabbett 2nd prize (Grill-Home Depot) — Richard VanderMartin 3rd prize (One Night Stay at Quality Inn) — Jason McEnerney 4th prize (Karlene’s Acupuncture Session) — Carolyn Vermette 5th prize (CARQUEST remote car starter) — Matt Aho 6th prize (Malston’s gold clock) — Leon Richard 7th prize (Karlene’s Essential Oil Massage) — Sonia Seay 8th prize (Paradisos gift certificate) — Kelly Schmoke 9th prize (King’s Treasures gift certificate) — Amber Glenzel 10th prize (Halcyon Spalon gift certificate) — Ben Stovall Thank you to these aforementioned businesses for their prize donations, to Safeway for allowing wrestlers to sell tickets at their store, to HiSpeed Gear for printing the tickets, and to all our wrestling friends who bought a raffle ticket. We greatly appreciate your support. In addition to our raffle drawing, other local businesses made donations to the wrestling program that we would also like to thank. Thank you to Alaska Trading Co. and Loan, Alaska Car Shop, ASRC Energy Services, Uptown Motel, Pollard Wireline, Kenai Satellite Phone Rentals, Tim’s Janitorial and

hordes who try to impose their vicious moral enforcement against anyone who dares to deviate. It’s not just ISIS, not just al-Qaida, but even established countries like Saudi Arabia and Pakistan, where religious dissenters face cruel punishment or even death. And for those who argue that somehow the attacks in Paris against Charlie Hebdo were understandable because the magazine was constantly presenting cartoons that were deeply offensive to Islam -- and it must be noted, many religions -- that misses the essential point: Do we have liberty if we can’t discuss ideas that are grievous insults? Who decides what constitutes what’s acceptable? We have an entire American tradition that is based on the belief that we are allowed, with minimal exceptions, to say and draw whatever we want. Or at least that’s what we are constantly proclaiming to the world. But our national leader didn’t demonstrate that by dropping everything to be part of the remarkable outpouring in Paris. All he dropped was the ball. Many of those who did attend can be accused of only giving lip service to the idea of free expression. But at least they considered the concept important enough to show up to project an image, if nothing else. Our president did not. He certainly should have. Bob Franken is a longtime broadcast journalist, including 20 years at CNN.

Carpet Cleaning, BP, Gilman and Associates, Trustworthy Hardware, Stanley Ford, All American Oilfield, National Oilfield Varco, Three Bears, Aspen Hotels, River City Dental, Medicenter, Edward JonesMatt Streiff, financial advisor, Arby’s, RadioShack, Napa, Orca Theater, Kelly Reilly Photography, Burger Bus, Save U More, Blockbuster, Pizza Hut, Coca Cola and C-Cups. Finally, we invite wrestling fans to the upcoming dual against Soldotna on January 22 at KCHS. In addition, the wrestling region tournament on January 30-31 will be hosted by the Soldotna Stars at the Soldotna Prep School. Hope to see you there! Sincerely, Stanley Steffensen and Ryan Moss, KCHS wrestling coaches and KCHS Wrestling Booster Club

One more Night Lights winner to mention Last week the Clarion published a letter from the Nikiski Community Council listing the winners of the Nikiski Night Lights Community Contest. I inadvertently and regretfully omitted our first place winner for the business category, and wish to thank Jennifer and Steve Chamberlain, owners of Charlie’s Pizza for their wonderful lights and decorations! Each year they add more. We appreciate their efforts! Bonita Miller Nikiski Community Council

Letters to the Editor:

E-mail: news@peninsulaclarion.com Write: Peninsula Clarion P.O. Box 3009 Kenai, AK 99611

Fax: 907-283-3299 Questions? Call: 907-283-7551

C

M

Y

K


C

M

Y

K

Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, January 14, 2015

A-5

NOAA makes final 2012 king salmon disaster dispersal By DJ SUMMERS Morris News Service-Alaska/ Alaska Journal of Commerce

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced on Jan. 12 the approval of a second round of disaster funds for research and to be distributed to fishermen who were negatively impacted by the chinook salmon fishery disasters in 2012; $13 million of the total $20.8 million will be paid out to a variety of sport and commercial users. “We are relieved that this second round of fisheries disaster funds has been approved, and look forward to getting direct payments to affected recreational and commercial businesses,” said Alaska National Marine Fisheries

. . . Kenai Continued from page A-1

C

M

Y

K

plan. The comprehensive plan, a document meant to provide a foundation for all the city’s land use decisions by outlining its basic goals, was last modified in 2003. In 2012 and 2013, the city council drafted an updated comprehensive plan that was rejected by Kenai voters through a ballot proposition in 2013’s municipal election. Knackstedt, serving his first year as a council member, said that the plan is “a living document” which needs to be updated to reflect regional changes. “Recently there’s been a lot of development around the inlet. The idea of the gas pipeline coming to Nikiski wasn’t really part of our thinking at the time. There’s a lot of industry growth around here, and we need to take a look at that, as to how that’s going to impact our city, and what we need to do to prepare for that. Those are all things that should be in a comprehensive plan.” If the city council initiates an update of the comprehensive plan, action will start in the Planning and Zoning commission. The commission’s revisions would be unlikely to

Service regional administrator Jim Balsiger. “Funds slated for salmon disaster research and restoration will help mitigate future fishery failures and impacts.” This grant will distribute $4.5 million to the recreational fishing sector and related businesses for loss of income, $6.4 million for salmon research in the Yukon/Kuskokwim region, $1.1 million for research in the Cook Inlet, and $700,000 to salmon buyers in the Cook Inlet area. In 2012, the U.S. Secretary of Commerce declared federal fishery disasters for the 2012 Upper Cook Inlet salmon fisheries, the 201012 Yukon River king salmon runs and 2011-12 Kuskokwim king runs.

In 2014, Congress appropriated $75 million for those disasters and others throughout the country. Since February, the federal fishery managers have been working with the state and others to develop a plan for distributing Alaska’s appropriation of $20.8 million, $7.8 million of which was distributed to commercial salmon fishermen in August 2014. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration collaborates with the State of Alaska to determine which groups will be eligible to receive the grant money. Cook Inlet, Yukon and Kuskokwim commercial fishermen received payments last fall as the first part of the fishery disaster relief funding.

come before the city council, much less city voters, in 2015. Nonetheless, several council members said they plan to begin the process this year. “I think about mid-year would be a good time to do that,” said Porter. Marquis said that the comprehensive plan was not a priority of his. “It has been a controversial topic in the past and I see that as something we can expect to see in the future. ... Personally, I’ve seen the previous attempt to create a new comprehensive plan do more harm than good and am not looking forward to stirring that hornet’s nest back up.” Kenai’s policy for granting conditional use permits, which allow businesses to operate in a certain part of the city, is something else Molloy wants to examine in the coming year. Molloy would like to see additional requirements for granting these permits. Molloy said that existing policy for use permits holds grantees to “very basic standards.” “Like your business has to be consistent with the comprehensive plan and the zone you’re in. That’s about it,” Molloy said. Although Molloy said he

hadn’t thought of any specific standards he would like to see added to conditional use permits, he was working with Knackstedt and Marquis on the issue and planned to hold work sessions on it in April. “(The conditional use policy) is going to be particularly important with respect to implementation of the new marijuana law, after the state passes regulations,” Molloy said. “We’ll need to look at the different potential businesses, and where they should be located in the city.” The state-level law allows that “a local government may prohibit the operation of marijuana cultivation facilities, marijuana product manufacturing facilities, marijuana testing facilities, or retail marijuana stores through the enactment of an ordinance or by a voter initiative,” and also gives local governments power to regulate “the time, place, manner, and number of marijuana establishment operations.” Molloy said that zoning ordinances might be a tool for the city’s marijuana regulation. Other councilors are also preparing to consider the city’s options with regard to marijuana, although many said that action on the issue would be premature in the current absence

‘Funds slated for salmon disaster research and restoration will help mitigate future fishery failures and impacts.’ — Jim Balsiger, Alaska National Marine Fisheries Service regional administrator

mated 443 permit holders from Cook Inlet’s East Side setnet fishery were eligible to apply for payments, as will an additional 96 Northern District fishermen. Yukon River fishermen received an estimated $4,952, with 631 permit holders eligible to apply, Speegle wrote in an email. That accounts for about $3.1 million of the total $3.2 million for Yukon and Kuskokwim permit holders. An estimated 489 Kuskokwim River fishermen will be eligible for $165 payments, Speegle wrote at the time.

The National Marine Fisheries Service announced Aug. 18, 2014, that $7.8 million of the $20.8 million appropriated for the 2012 disaster declarations for Cook Inlet, Yukon and Kuskokwim rivers salmon returns would be used for direct aid payments. Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission administered the grant and make the payments to eligible fishermen

with $3.2 million intended for Yukon-Kuskokwim region fishermen, and $4.6 million for Cook Inlet fishermen. Eligible Cook Inlet fishermen received a $2,000 fixed payment, plus a percentage based on their landings history from 2007 to 2011, according to NMFS spokeswoman Julie DJ Summers can be reached Speegle. at daniel.summers@alaskaAccording to information journal.com. provided by the NMFS, an esti-

of state regulations. Knackstedt said that however the issue is decided, it will require compromise. “The vote within the city of Kenai was about as close to 5050 as you could get,” Knackstedt said. “If you look at each extreme — if you make (growing or distributing) illegal in the city of Kenai, half the people are going to be upset. If you make it completely wide open, the other half is going to be upset. We’ll have to meet some kind of middle ground with this.” The marijuana issue was last discussed by the council at a November meeting in which Mayor Porter proposed holding

an event at which citizens could bring their opinions forth. The event was tentatively considered for March 2015. “At that point, it sounded like folks wanted to see what would happen at the state level,” said Bookey, referring to the November meeting. “I’m certainly in that camp, and don’t see myself supporting any sort of preemptive regulation, for sure. Afterwards, I’m going to be pretty cautious about additional regulation beyond what the state puts in anyway.” In the meantime, Knackstedt said that gathering information on the issue should be a priority.

C

M

Y

K

“My position is to personally bone up on it. ... For our city, it’s probably best to see what the state is doing, watch what direction bigger municipalities are going in. We might be able to draw from their experiences and their legislation. ... We have some time, so that’s a luxury we should utilize.” The state is currently preparing marijuana regulation through the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board, and plans to begin issuing licenses to marijuana businesses in early 2016. Reach Ben Boettger at ben. boettger@peninsulaclarion. com.


A-6 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, January 14, 2015

C

M

Y

K

Nation Republicans attack Obama’s agenda

Around the World France to boost anti-terror measures as official says arms for deadly attacks from abroad PARIS — France’s prime minister demanded tougher antiterrorism measures Tuesday after deadly attacks that some call this country’s Sept. 11 — and that may already be leading to a crackdown on liberties in exchange for greater security. Police told The Associated Press that the weapons used came from abroad, as authorities in several countries searched for possible accomplices and the sources of financing for last week’s attacks on the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police. A new suspect was identified in Bulgaria. “We must not lower our guard, at any time,” Prime Minister Manuel Valls told Parliament, adding that “serious and very high risks remain.” Lawmakers in the often argumentative chamber lined up overwhelmingly behind the government, giving repeated standing ovations to Valls’ rousing, indignant address — and then voted 488-1 to extend French airstrikes against Islamic State extremists in Iraq. “France is at war against terrorism, jihadism, and radical Islamism,” Valls declared. “France is not at war against Islam.”

Push for new cybersecurity legislation, amid new threats, contains programs long used WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama said Tuesday that recent cyberthreats to Sony and the military’s U.S. Central Command are reminders of the serious threats facing the nation. But an Associated Press review shows that some of his plans are retreads from years past. Obama laid out his plans this week as part of a push for new cybersecurity legislation — a week before his State of the Union address — that increases government informationsharing and protects businesses from lawsuits for revealing cyberthreats. Yet the president’s proposals are similar to congressional legislation that has been languishing on Capitol Hill, in part over privacy concerns. The White House is hoping a recent spate of cyberattacks and data breaches — including November’s hacking at Sony Pictures Entertainment, which the administration blamed on North Korea — will spur lawmakers to take up the issue. Privacy advocates also criticized other elements of this plan this week, especially involving data-sharing between companies and the government, in light of an ongoing debate about the scope of U.S. government surveillance and bulkdata collection. The president unveiled his plans Tuesday at the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center just outside Washington, saying cyberthreats pose “an enormous challenge” in which the U.S. must be “upping our game.”

Romney sparks new competition among GOP establishment 2016 contenders DES MOINES, Iowa — A shake-out among fiery conservatives with White House ambitions was always a sure thing. Now it appears the competition among the more establishment-minded GOP candidates for president will end up just as fierce. With Mitt Romney’s move in the past week toward launching a third run for president, there are three high-profile Republicans from the party’s mainstream suddenly competing for the same group of elite donors and staffing talent, just as the crowded 2016 presidential primary season begins. And that list — Romney, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush — doesn’t even include a group of Midwestern governors, led by Wisconsin’s Scott Walker, who also fit the mold of accomplished, economicminded executives driven as much by a pragmatic approach to governing as their conservative ideology.

By ERICA WERNER Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Defiant congressional Republicans attacked President Barack Obama’s agenda from all sides Tuesday, ignoring veto threats and pushing bills to uproot his policies on immigration and Wall Street, force approval of energy pipeline legislation he opposes and make him justify any new federal rules before he makes them. Obama invited his antagonists to the White House for their first face-to-face meeting since the new Republicancontrolled Congress convened. But their show of cordiality for the cameras did little to mask the partisan hostilities between Capitol Hill and the White House. “The key now is for us to work as a team,” said Obama, who has issued five veto threats with the new Congress not yet two weeks old. He cited taxes, trade and cybersecurity as areas for potential cooperation, and also told lawmakers he would work with them to come up with a proposal to authorize military

force against the Islamic State group. Back at the Capitol, the Senate debated legislation to force the administration to allow construction of the Canada-toTexas Keystone XL oil pipeline. And the House passed a regulatory reform bill that the White House says would impose “unprecedented and unnecessary” requirements on agencies trying to write rules. It would require more justifications and notice. That was to be followed by votes Wednesday on two other bills: One would alter a key section of the 2010 DoddFrank financial overhaul in a way that would help banks, and the other would block Obama’s executive actions on immigration, including removal of protections for immigrants who arrived in the country illegally as children. The Keystone bill passed the House last week and is expected to clear the Senate next week and head to Obama’s desk. Obama has threatened to veto all four pieces of legislation. Far from cowed, with the Senate in GOP hands for the

first time in eight years Republican lawmakers are ready to make him do it. “I’m a member of Congress; I’m not a potted plant. I don’t take my orders from the White House,” said Rep. Charlie Dent, R-Pa., after Republicans met behind closed doors to discuss their strategy. “There’s a new sheriff in the Senate, and so he’s not going to have a compliant majority leader in the Senate who’s going to bottle up and bury everything.” In contrast to the president’s tone of cooperation, White House press secretary Josh Earnest chided Republican lawmakers, saying the GOP’s approach to the opening days of the new Congress raises questions “about how serious they are about trying to work with the president.” “In the first five days that they’ve been in session, they’ve advanced five pieces of legislation all the way to the Rules Committee that they already know this president strongly opposes,” he said. Republicans had no plans to stop there. Citing the terrorist attacks in

Paris, Republican senators on Tuesday proposed restrictions on Obama’s ability to transfer terror suspects out of the federal prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for the remainder of his term — making it more difficult for Obama to fulfill his goal of closing the facility. “Now is not the time to be emptying Guantanamo,” Sen. Kelly Ayotte of New Hampshire told reporters. The contentious politics of divided government were on stark display as the House moved forward on a series of bills that face an uncertain future, at best, in the Senate — where the GOP remains six vote shorts of the 60-vote majority needed to advance most issues — and certain rejection by Obama. House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte of Virginia said his bill on regulations would take aim at the “endlessly escalating, excessive federal regulatory costs” under the Obama administration. The White House objected that it would “create needless confusion and delay.” The legislation passed 250 to 175.

Obama slammed for letting daughters listen to Beyoncé By THOMAS BEAUMONT Associated Press

DES MOINES, Iowa — Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee has accused President Barack Obama and his wife, Michelle, of double standards in parenting, saying in an interview published Tuesday that the first family shelters its daughters from some things but allows them to listen to the music of Beyoncé. The sharp rhetoric signals that, should he run for the Republican presidential nomination, Huckabee would make cultural and social issues the cornerstones of his campaign. While promoting his new book, the former Baptist pastor told People magazine, “I don’t understand how on one hand they can be such doting parents and so careful about the intake of everything — how much broccoli they eat and where

— The Associated Press

C

M

Y

K

they go to school ... and yet they don’t see anything that might not be suitable” in Beyoncé’s lyrics. He also said Beyoncé’s choreography is “best left for the privacy of her bedroom.” In his book, Huckabee describes the Grammy Awardwinning Beyoncé’s lyrics as “obnoxious and toxic mental poison.” He also accuses Beyoncé’s husband, rapper Jay-Z, of “exploiting his wife” like a “pimp.” The first lady’s office declined to comment on Huckabee’s comments. During a 2012, $40,000-perticket fundraiser in New York, the president thanked Beyoncé and Jay-Z for their friendship. “Beyoncé could not be a better role model for my girls,” Obama said. Beyoncé sang at Barack Obama’s second inauguration, as well at Mrs. Obama’s 50th birthday party at the White

House. Huckabee’s latest book, titled “God, Guns, Grits and Gravy,” is full of criticism of Washington, New York and Hollywood and serves as a direct appeal to cultural conservatives, long part of his political base. Huckabee’s rhetoric is likely to win him more fans among conservative activists who have tremendous sway in picking the GOP’s presidential nominees in early nominating states such as Iowa and South Carolina. Huckabee recently stepped down from his role as host of a weekend program on Fox News Channel. He ran for president in 2008, considered running in 2012, and has said he’s weighing whether to seek the GOP nomination in 2016. If he enters the contest, he has a strong network of pastors in the early states who can help mobilize their faithful. That

network helped him win the lead-off Iowa caucuses in 2008, as well as earn victories in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kansas, Louisiana, Tennessee and West Virginia. Huckabee is no stranger to such pointed statements. At a Republican National Committee meeting last year in Washington, he suggested Democrats wanted women to believe they were helpless without government-financed birth control. “If the Democrats want to insult the women of America by making them believe that they are helpless without ‘Uncle Sugar’ coming in and providing for them a prescription each month for birth control, because they cannot control their libido or their reproductive system without the help of the government, then so be it,” Huckabee said. “Let us take that discussion all across America.”

C

M

Y

K


C

M

Y

K

Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, January 14, 2015

A-7

NY defense lawyer: Silk Road creator is not a drug dealer By LARRY NEUMEISTER Associated Press

NEW YORK — A San Francisco man who launched an underground website as an economic experiment before abandoning it was fooled into taking the fall when investigators concluded it was used almost solely for drug dealing, a defense lawyer told jurors Tuesday after the government portrayed his client as the mastermind of a worldwide digital drug market. Ross William Ulbricht was “left holding the bag” by operators of the Silk Road website after they were alerted that federal investigators were closing in, defense attorney Joshua Dratel said in his opening statement at Ulbricht’s criminal trial. “Ross is not a drug dealer. Ross is not a kingpin. Ross is not involved in a conspiracy,” Dratel said. The 30-yearold has pleaded not guilty to charges of narcotics trafficking, computer hacking and money laundering. Minutes earlier, Assistant U.S. Attorney Timothy How-

ard described Ulbricht as all of those things and more, calling him a kingpin who created a website where “anybody anywhere in the world could buy and sell dangerous drugs with a click of a mouse.” Howard said it was “as quick and easy as ordinary online shopping.” About a dozen protesters stood in front of the courthouse for part of the day with signs and jury nullification fliers in support of Ulbricht. After the trial finished for the day, Judge Katherine Forrest said she would consider establishing an anonymous jury to protect them if the protests persisted. Dratel said: “People think they’re helping the defense by being out there. They’re not.” In his opening, Howard said Ulbricht made $18 million in bitcoins by enabling drug dealers to earn over $200 million through more than a million drug sales after the website was activated in 2011 until it was shut down by the government in October 2013. Howard said 95 percent of items sold on Silk Road were

‘This is a case about a dark secret part of the Internet that was home to an enormous marketplace for the sale of illegal drugs. — Assistant U.S. Attorney Timothy Howard illegal drugs, though the site also featured fake passports and tools to hack into computers and email accounts. “This is a case about a dark secret part of the Internet that was home to an enormous marketplace for the sale of illegal drugs,” he said. The prosecutor said Ulbricht operated “like a traditional drug boss,” setting rules for thousands of drug dealers who catered to customers who could “pick their drug of choice and have it delivered right to their doorstep.” Howard said Ulbricht was willing to use threats and violence to protect his turf. He alluded to murders-for-hire that Dratel dismissed as plots in which there was “no evidence

the people involved ever existed.” Ulbricht also is charged in Baltimore federal court in an attempted murder scheme. Ulbricht disputes he operated online under the alias “Dread Pirate Roberts,” a reference to a swashbuckling character in “The Princess Bride.” But Howard said Ulbricht was “caught red handed” in a public library in San Francisco on the day he was arrested, talking online as “Dread Pirate Roberts” with an undercover FBI agent who had infiltrated the website as a trusted member of its support staff. He said trial witnesses would include a computer programmer who provided Ulbricht advice in 2010 and 2011. The prosecutor said Ulbricht

AP Photo/Seth Wenig

Supporters of Ross William Ulbricht hold signs during the jury selection for his trial outside of federal court in New York, Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2015. Murder-for-hire allegations are central to Ulbrichtt’s trial. He is charged with running an online black market where drugs were sold as easily as books and electronics.

confessed he was running a website that sold illegal drugs and “bragged that he was the mastermind.” Dratel said Ulbricht created Silk Road as “an economic experiment” but handed it off to

others after a few months because it was “too stressful for him.” He said Ulbricht was lured back to be “in that library that day to take the fall for the people operating the website.”

Virginians decide lawmaker’s fate amid sex scandal By LARRY O’DELL Associated Press

C

M

Y

K

RICHMOND, Va — The writers of TV’s “Scandal” would be hard-pressed to invent a crisis more difficult to manage than the case of “Fighting Joe,” a jailed Virginia lawmaker running in Tuesday’s special election to fill the same seat he’s supposed to be resigning from. Through four elections, most voters have overlooked or even embraced Joseph D. Morrissey’s flamboyant history of fistfights, contempt of court citations and disbarment. The 57-year-old bachelor, who fathered three children out of wedlock with three different women, repeatedly won at least 70 percent of the vote as a Democrat. But would voters be OK with his conviction in a sex scandal involving his 17-year-old secretary, whose nude photo was

found on his cellphone and allegedly shared with a friend? Would they mind that the young woman — who denies they had sex — is now pregnant? Virginians were watching in suspense until polls closed Tuesday at 7 p.m., as voters cast ballots in a three-way race for the seat Morrissey was supposed to be vacating. Morrissey, who claimed his phone was hacked and denies any wrongdoing, has made a career of never backing down. He hung boxing gloves in his office and promised “Joe will fight for you” in campaign ads on city buses. At one point, he waved an assault rifle inside the House chamber while arguing for gun control. He resigned his seat -- effective Tuesday, the day of this special election -- after he was convicted last month of contributing to the delinquency of a minor. His agreement to serve

six months in jail for the misdemeanor avoided a felony trial that could have barred him from office and put him in prison for years. But Morrissey wouldn’t give up — he promptly quit his party to run as an independent for his Richmond-area House of Delegates seat, sleeping in jail and wearing an electronic monitoring device as he campaigned each day against Democrat Kevin Sullivan and Republican Matt Walton. Legislators from both parties denounced him as unfit to serve and began studying how to expel him if he wins. House Clerk G. Paul Nardo said it takes two-thirds of the 100-member House to expel a member, which hasn’t happened since 1876. The Virginia Constitution says a legislator can be kicked out for disorderly behavior, but does not define it. “Mr. Morrissey’s decision to

run in this election is deceitful, selfish and disrespectful to this institution and the people he supposedly desires to serve,” said House Speaker William J. Howell, a Republican. House Democratic Minority Leader David J. Toscano called it “both outrageous and sad.” But Morrissey says the people, not politicians, should decide who represents them — and vowed a voting rights battle if they try to remove him. His latest troubles began when Coleman Pride told authorities that the lawmaker was preying on his daughter when she worked at his law office in 2013 — allegations he repeated in campaign ads last week for Morrissey’s Democratic opponent. But Morrissey’s staunchest defender is Myrna Pride, now 18, who went public this month with her side of the story.

C

M

Y

K

The Associated Press does not usually identify victims of sex crimes, but Myrna Pride’s name has become well known in the district since she was named in Morrissey’s criminal case. She denies they had sex — while declining to identify the father of her unborn baby — and she publicly defended Morrissey on Monday in a radio interview. Richmond radio host Jack Gravely was interviewing Coleman Pride on WLEE about his daughter’s relationship with Morrissey when the lawmaker called in to defend himself. Myrna Pride then showed up in person, accusing her father and others of manufacturing the entire scandal to get back at Morrissey for his help in a dispute over her father’s child support. It was Morrissey’s role in the family’s dispute that reportedly prompted police to serve

a search warrant of his office Monday afternoon, with only hours to go before the voting started. Morrissey called that a political dirty trick. “The only person that has shown any respect or kindness, or been there for me, is Mr. Morrissey,” Myrna Pride told a WTVR reporter on Monday. “Right now it’s a friendship. I don’t speak with him often. I call here and there to check on him. I want to see how his spirits are going.” Morrissey supported her in turn. “I think Myrna needs to stay away from the media, but I think she has handled herself in an exemplary fashion,” he told the radio host. “She is a very smart young lady. She is kind, she is considerate. She will go on to do very well.”


A-8 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, January 14, 2015

C

M

Y

K

World

Charlie Hebdo released new version

Irreverent French newspaper fronts Muhammad and receives more threats By MARTIN BENEDYK and LORI HINNANT Associated Press

PARIS — Charlie Hebdo released a new version of its irreverent and often offensive newspaper Tuesday, defiantly putting a caricature of the Prophet Muhammad on the cover that drew immediate criticism and threats of more violence. The newspaper also skewered other religions, and ran a double-page spread illustrating Sunday’s march in Paris that drew more than a million people to condemn terrorism, claiming that the turnout was larger “than for Mass.” “For the past week, Charlie, an atheist newspaper, has achieved more miracles than all the saints and prophets combined,” it said in the lead editorial. “The one we are most proud of is that you have in your hands the newspaper that we always made.” Charlie Hebdo planned an unprecedented print run of 3 million copies Wednesday — one week to the day after the assault by two masked gunmen

that killed 12 people, including much of its editorial staff and two police officers. It was the beginning of three days of terror that saw 17 people killed before the three Islamic extremist attackers were gunned down by security forces. Surviving staff members are now using the offices of the Liberation newspaper, which has loaned out space. The latest cover shows a weeping Muhammad, holding a sign reading “I am Charlie” with the words “All is forgiven” above him. Zineb El Rhazoui, a journalist with the weekly, said the cover meant the journalists are forgiving the extremists for the attack. Renald Luzier, the cartoonist who drew the cover image under the pen name “Luz” said it represents “just a little guy who’s crying.” Then he added, unapologetically: “Yes, it is Muhammad.” Speaking at a news conference in Paris on Tuesday at which he repeatedly broke down crying, Luzier described weeping after he drew the picture.

AP Photo/Christophe Ena

Renald Luzier, known as Luz, left, and columnist Patrick Pelloux, look at the Charlie Hebdo paper during a press conference in Paris, France, Tuesday. The surviving staff of Charlie Hebdo is putting out an unprecedented 3 million copies of its upcoming issue.

Charlie Hebdo had faced repeated threats and a firebombing for depictions of the prophet, and its editor and his police bodyguard were the first to die. Many Muslims believe all images of the prophet are blasphemous. Before the new edition was

even released, one of Egypt’s top Islamic authorities had warned Charlie Hebdo against publishing more cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad. Dar al-Ifta, which is in charge of issuing religious edicts, called the planned cover an “unjustified provocation” for millions

of Muslims who respect and love their prophet and warned the cartoon would likely spark a new wave of hatred. Indeed, criticism and threats immediately appeared on militant websites, with calls for more strikes against the newspaper and anonymous threats from radicals, according to the SITE Intelligence Group, a U.S.-based terrorism monitor. The latest issue of Charlie Hebdo maintained the intentionally offensive tone that made the newspaper famous in France. The first two pages included drawings by the slain cartoonists: One showed a much-loved late French nun talking about oral sex; another showed Muslim, Christian and Jewish leaders dividing up the world. The lead editorial laid out a vigorous defense of secularism, and of the newspaper’s right to lampoon religions and hold their leaders accountable — and ended with a critique of the pope. But most of the controversy centered on the cover and its depiction of the Prophet Mu-

hammad. Around the world, news organizations took different approaches to illustrating stories about the Charlie Hebdo cover. In the United States, CBS programs and The New York Post ran images of the cover, while the ABC network didn’t. The New York Times also didn’t publish it, but included a link to it. CNN didn’t show the cover online or on the air. The Associated Press had not run previous Charlie Hebdo cartoons showing Muhammad, and declined to run the latest one as well, based on its policy to avoid images designed to provoke on the basis of religion. In Europe, Spain’s leading daily newspapers published the image online and the state broadcaster showed it on news bulletins. In Britain, The Times of London, the Guardian and the Independent went with the image, while The Daily Telegraph didn’t. The BBC showed the new cover on news programs. Germany’s Sueddeutsche Zeitung, Der Spiegel and Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung all used it on their websites.

12 dead in bus attack that could doom Ukraine’s shaky truce By MSTYSLAV CHERNOV and PETER LEONARD Associated Press

DONETSK, Ukraine — An attack on a passenger bus in eastern Ukraine killed 12 people Tuesday, likely dealing the final blow to hopes that a shortlived and shaky cease-fire could take hold. Across Donetsk, the city that Russian-backed separatists call their capital, explosions and the sound of shells whistling overhead are again unnerving the local population. The holiday period was spent in relative tranquility after a new truce was called in December between government troops and Russian-backed militia. But by late last week, that uneasy calm was steadily unraveling. In the single largest loss of life so far this year, civilians traveling on a commuter bus from Donetsk were killed Tuesday afternoon by what Ukrainians say were rockets fired from a Grad launcher in rebel territory. Regional authorities loyal to Kiev said the bus was passing a Ukrainian army checkpoint at the time, putting it in the line of fire. Leading rebel representative Denis Pushilin denied responsibility for the attack. The warring sides are now trading accusations over who is responsible for the breakdown in the truce that led to Tues-

day’s deaths. Military spokesman Andriy Lysenko said that separatist attacks in recent days suggest an attempted onslaught to push back the frontline is under way. Separatist leader Alexander Zakharchenko said Ukraine’s armed forces unilaterally resumed hostilities and that his fighters would respond in kind. An AP reporter over the weekend saw a convoy of around 30 military-style trucks without license plates heading for Donetsk, suggesting that new supplies were coming in for the rebels. NATO’s top commander, Gen. Philip Breedlove, said Tuesday that there has been a continued resupply and training of rebel forces over the holiday period. “Those continue to provide a concern and something that we have to be thinking about,” Breedlove said. Ukraine and the West have routinely accused Russia of being behind such consignments. Moscow flatly rejects the charges, although rebel forces are so well-equipped with powerful arms that the denials have become increasingly hollow. “These are separatists that are clearly backed by Russia,” U.S. State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf said Tuesday, adding that Russia must do more to stop the violence and restore Ukrainian sovereignty.

In the rebel-held Donetsk suburb of Makiivka, the thrash of outgoing mortars shakes still-inhabited neighborhoods on a daily basis. Separatists have consistently denied using residential areas for cover, but there are ample eyewitness accounts undermining those claims. Ukrainian responses to artillery lobbed out of Donetsk are woefully inaccurate and regularly hit houses and apartment blocks, often killing people inside. The separatist military headquarters in Donetsk said Tuesday that 12 people had been killed and another 30 injured in the preceding threeday period. It did not specify who had been killed. There is little sign of life in Makiivka these days. People rush home from work or aid distribution points and occasionally come out of shelters to exchange information about where shells are landing. Maria Ivanovna, a local retiree, told AP she is inured to

C

M

Y

K

the blasts and drew an arc with her arm to show how shells fly over her home toward the government-held airport on the northern edge of the city. “We will survive the same way we did after World War II. Ration cards for bread. 300 grams (11 ounces) for children, 800 grams for factory workers and 1,200 grams for miners,” she said. A senior U.N. human rights official said this week that developments look poised to go in one of three directions — a frozen conflict, an escalation in violence or an evolution to sustainable peace. “In case of frozen conflict, we will more or less continue to be seeing (the same) human rights violations that we have facing so far,” the official said, speaking on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the issue. “But in case of escalation of hostilities, which is quite possible, we could also be seeing further internationalization of the conflict and far

more human rights violations and suffering.” The grimmest of outcomes appears most likely. A hoped-for round of peace negotiations this week between the leaders of Russia, Ukraine, Germany and France has been put on ice — possibly indefinitely. Ukrainian military authorities talk like they are bracing for the long-haul and Tuesday laid out plans for a new round of mobilization. Volodymyr Talalai, deputy

head of the army’s mobilization planning, said recruits will be drawn from all regions of the country. He gave no figure for how many people will be mobilized, but said that the primary aim of the upcoming drive is to enable the rotation of forces. Unremitting violence is radicalizing the mood. One resident of Donetsk’s Petrovsky neighborhood — one of the most intensely bombed — said she took up arms and joined the separatist army after a rocket hit a home in her neighborhood.

C

M

Y

K


C

M

Y

K

Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, January 14, 2015

A-9

As world watches Paris, Nigeria suffers its own attacks By CHRISTOPHER TORCHIA Associated Press

JOHANNESBURG — Nigeria’s president was among leaders who condemned last week’s attack by Islamic extremists on the French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo, yet his response to the slaughter of civilians by militants in his own country has been muted. Some commentators criticized President Goodluck Jonathan’s reticence about the violence in Nigeria’s Baga town, and the lack of a broader international outcry on par with the reaction to the attacks in France. The slogan “I am Baga” — a play on “I am Charlie,” the expression of solidarity with the targeted French weekly — is now circulating on social media. The global sympathy and the

defiant rally in Paris that drew foreign leaders after the assaults that killed 17 people overshadowed the killing of hundreds and perhaps as many as 2,000 people in Baga, a northeastern town near Chad. Jonathan, who has been touting his domestic record ahead of a re-election bid next month, was quick to express solidarity with France. “The President believes that the cowardly and ignoble attack by violent extremists is a monstrous assault on the right to freedom of expression,” said a statement by his office the day after the attacks in France. It did not release a similarly forceful statement about Baga. The attack there started on Jan. 3 and was another bloody marker in a murky, grinding conflict in which information is often scarce, the insurgency is seen

by many as a local problem and violence is routine. The United Nations, the United States and other countries have condemned the violence by Islamic extremist group Boko Haram, and international aid groups are mobilizing to help survivors. On Monday, U.S. State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf expressed some exasperation with the comparatively little interest in Nigeria’s killings after taking a barrage of questions from media about the weekend rally in Paris. “I would like to see how many minutes we spend on Boko Haram compared to a march,” Harf told the State Department press corps. “I just want to point that out to people.” The difference between the reactions to the bloodshed in

Paris and in Baga also is related to the broader context, experts say. The Paris shootings, whose victims included prominent cartoonists, had an enormous impact beyond France’s borders because they were seen as an assault on “fundamental liberty” and an “existential attack on all of Europe,” said Michael Jennings, a senior lecturer in international development at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London. The violence in Nigeria, however, does not capture similar attention because it “is often presented as part of the ongoing history of violence between communities,” Jennings said. Muna Ndulo, a law professor and African development expert at Cornell University in the United States, noted that whereas in Paris the media

presence was heavy and many events played out before the cameras, “in Nigeria, you still have to contend with actually trying to ascertain what exactly went on. To some extent, that does affect the way people look at things.” Survivors of the Baga killings described the horrors they witnessed but independent reporting from the scene is virtually impossible for now because the town remains under Boko Haram control. Accounts of the numbers of casualties vary widely. The Nigerian military said 150 people were confirmed dead, but other estimates put the toll at several hundred and as high as 2,000. Additionally, Ndulo said, the attackers in Paris were French citizens of foreign descent who said they were inspired by al-Qaida and the

Islamic State, raising sensitive questions of “inclusivity” and immigration and security policy that many countries can relate to because they face similar tensions within their own populations. In contrast, many fighters in the homegrown Boko Haram movement are Nigerians who may feel alienated by poverty and poor governance, he said. Jennings warned about the perils of viewing Boko Haram, which recently seized a military base in neighboring Cameroon, as a local problem. “All too often, conflicts have been assumed to be localized, just left alone until they reach a pitch where they show their international significance,” he said. “The danger is that we don’t see the links, we don’t see people moving back and forth.”

Pope Francis backs search for wartime truth in Sri Lanka Tuesday By NICOLE WINFIELD and BHARATHA MALLAWARACHI Associated Press

C

M

Y

K

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka — Pope Francis brought calls for reconciliation and justice to Sri Lanka on Tuesday as he began a weeklong Asian tour, saying the island nation can’t fully heal from a quarter-century of brutal civil war without pursuing the truth about abuses that were committed. The 78-year-old pope arrived in Colombo after an overnight flight from Rome and immediately spent nearly two hours under a scorching sun greeting dignitaries and wellwishers along the 28-kilometer (18-mile) route into town. The effects were immediate: A weary and delayed Francis skipped a lunchtime meeting with Sri Lanka’s bishops to rest before completing the rest of his grueling day. “The health of the pope is good,” the Vatican spokesman, the Rev. Federico Lombardi, assured late Tuesday. “He was a little tired after the 28 kilometers under the sun, but now he has again his strength.” Francis is the first pope to

visit Sri Lanka since the government crushed a 25-year civil war by ethnic Tamil rebels demanding an independent Tamil nation because of perceived discrimination by governments dominated by the Sinhalese majority. U.N. estimates say 80,000 to 100,000 people were killed during the war, which ended in 2009; other reports suggest the toll could be much higher. With 40 costumed elephants lining the airport road behind him and a 21-canon salute booming over the tarmac, Francis said that finding true peace after so much bloodshed “can only be done by overcoming evil with good, and by cultivating those virtues which foster reconciliation, solidarity and peace.” He didn’t specifically mention Sri Lanka’s refusal to cooperate with a U.N. investigation into alleged war crimes committed in the final months of the war. But he said, “The process of healing also needs to include the pursuit of truth, not for the sake of opening old wounds, but rather as a necessary means of promoting justice, healing and unity.” A 2011 U.N. report said up

to 40,000 Tamil civilians may have been killed in the last months of the civil war, and accused both sides of serious human rights violations. It said the government was suspected of deliberately shelling civilians and hospitals and preventing food and medicine from getting to civilians trapped in the war zone. The Tamil Tiger rebels were accused of recruiting child soldiers and holding civilians as human shields and firing from among them. A few months after the U.N. report was released, the government of longtime President Mahinda Rajapaksa released its own Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation Commission findings, which concluded that Sri Lanka’s military didn’t intentionally target civilians at the end of the war and that the rebels routinely violated international humanitarian law. Sri Lanka’s new president, Maithripala Sirisena who unseated Rajapaksa last week, has promised to launch a domestic inquiry into wartime abuses, but has also pledged to protect everyone who contributed to the defeat of the Tamil Tiger separatists from international

legal action. Lombardi, the Vatican spokesman, said the responsibility for finding the truth was Sri Lanka’s alone and stressed that Francis had made clear that the goal of determining the truth isn’t to open old wounds. Sirisena, who was sworn in Friday, told Francis in the airport welcoming ceremony that his government aims to promote “peace and friendship among our people after overcoming a cruel terrorist conflict.” “We are a people who believe in religious tolerance and coexistence based on our centuries-old heritage,” he said. In a show of that coexistence, the pope’s welcome ceremony at Colombo’s airport featured traditional dancers and drummers from both ethnic groups and a children’s choir serenading him in both of Sri Lanka’s languages. Tamils, however, say they are still discriminated against, and human rights activists said the previous government wasn’t serious about probing rights abuses. The Vatican estimated that some 200,000-300,000 people lined Francis’ route in from

C

M

Y

K

the airport, which he traveled entirely in his open-sided popemobile. While some who had staked out positions since dawn were frustrated that he sped past so quickly, Francis took so long greeting well-wishers that he canceled a meeting with Sri Lanka’s bishops in the afternoon after falling more than an hour behind schedule. “This is like Jesus Christ himself coming to Sri Lanka!” marveled Ranjit Solis, 60, a retired engineer. He recalled that Pope Paul VI only spent two hours in Sri Lanka in 1970, while St. John Paul II spent a day in 1995. “The current pope is coming for three days! He serves the poor and is concerned about poor countries. It’s a great thing.”

After resting up, Francis met with Sirisena privately at the presidential palace in the late afternoon and then rallied to greet dozens of saffron-robbed Buddhist monks and representatives of Sri Lanka’s other main religions. At one point, he donned a saffron shawl over his shoulders, a traditional Tamil sign of honor. “What is needed now is healing and unity, not further division and conflict,” Francis told the audience. “It is my hope that interreligious and ecumenical cooperation will demonstrate that men and women do not have to forsake their identity, whether ethnic or religious, in order to live in harmony with their brothers and sisters.”


A-10 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, January 14, 2015

C

M

Y

K

Sports

Ninilchik boys, CIA girls notch victories By JOEY KLECKA Peninsula Clarion

The Ninilchik boys toppled Cook Inlet Academy for the first time in three years Tuesday night at CIA, using a strong first-half effort to notch a 57-41 win. The last time the Wolverines came out winners against the Eagles, Ninilchik senior Sam Mireles was a freshman. Tuesday, Mireles came up big with 22 points, many as a result of pinpoint assists from teammates that resulted in acrobatic layups. “We locked down on defense like our coach showed us,” Mireles explained. “We locked down and when (CIA) tried to run their plays, they just ran out the clock on themselves.” Ninilchik sophomore Austin White — a key big man for the Wolverines — added 13 points and 11 rebounds, and Tyler Presley chipped in 13 as well. “It’s a big win for sure,” said Ninilchik coach Nickolas Finley. “It’s always tough to play CIA, they’re well-coached. Justin (Franchino) does a great job with them, and they’re always going to throw something different at you.” Ninilchik (2-1 overall) used gritty defensive play to keep CIA (2-3) off balance for most of the game. After starting on an 11-4 run, CIA was held scoreless while Ninilchik scored 17 unanswered points from 1 minute, 25 seconds, left in the first quarter to 5:08 left in the second. The Eagles also featured a starting lineup without Timmy Smithwick, who did not play the first half due to a coaching decision. “We took the first two weeks of practice this year and didn’t touch a basketball,” Finley said. “We worked on defense and conditioning, and it showed.” Smithwick led CIA with 12 points — all in the second half — while teammates David Barlow and Andrew Hammond added 10 apiece. Franchino said turnovers cost his team in the first half, while lack of execution was the determining factor in the second. “Ninilchik’s a good team, but they’re not sixteen points better than us,” Franchino said about the halftime deficit. “But we had built a hole. That was a

winnable game, but we did not execute properly, we continued to make poor decisions on offense and we got out of position on defense.” The Eagles committed 16 first-half turnovers, but managed to clean it up in the second with only four. Twenty of Ninilchik’s 30 first-half points were due to offensive rebounds and CIA turnovers. Ninilchik led 30-16 at the half, and extended it with a few big buckets from Mireles to 4120 with 4:08 to go in the third quarter, but CIA attempted to rally back late in the period with a few clutch 3-pointers. Smithwick drained a trey with 1:34 remaining that closed the deficit to 41-28. White, who stands 6-foot-8 for Ninilchik, garnered a lot of attention from CIA, which allowed Mireles and Presley to get better looks at the basket. “They were double- and triple-teaming him at times, so we used him more to spread the floor,” Finley said. “Sam took advantage of that. He stepped in there and took shots.” CIA made one final push midway through the fourth quarter, cutting the lead from 18 points to 10 with 3:55 remaining on the heels of a pair of breakaway layups by Smithwick and Andrew Hammond, but the Wolverines put the icing on the cake with two layups from Mireles. “Going into the game, our game plan was already set on (Smithwick), so as soon as he was back in, it was like all right, let’s go,” Finley said. “We did a good job.” Ninilchik will move on to play Wasilla Lake on Thursday, and will travel to Seldovia on Friday in a rematch of a 57-54 loss last week. CIA will play Wasilla Lake on Saturday. CIA girls 40, Ninilchik 17 The Eagles eased to a conference victory over the Wolverines on the strength of 26 combined points from Danielle Hills and Ashleigh Hammond. The Eagles led 18-9 early in the third quarter, then proceeded to score 19 unanswered points to ice the game early. “I wish I could tell you exactly what happened,” said CIA coach Kenny Leaf. “Danielle just came alive in the third quarter.” Hills, a sophomore, chipped in

Sports Briefs Jets close in on Bowles NEW YORK — The New York Jets are close to an agreement with Arizona Cardinals defensive coordinator Todd Bowles to make him their head coach, according to two people with knowledge of the negotiations. Bowles told ESPN in a text that he was taking the job, but the people told The Associated Press that no agreement had been completed as of late Tuesday night. The people spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because the deal had not been finalized. A few hours after hiring Mike Maccagnan as their general manager, the Jets were closing in on signing the 51-year-old Bowles to replace Rex Ryan, who was fired, along with GM John Idzik, on Dec. 29 after six seasons. Bowles, a highly sought candidate after leading Arizona’s defense the last two seasons, had a second interview Tuesday with owner Woody Johnson and consultants Charley Casserly and Ron Wolf — along with Maccagnan — and apparently impressed the Jets enough to move forward.

Elway says he wants Manning back ENGLEWOOD, Colo. — If John Elway gets to choose, his quarterback next season will be Peyton Manning. His coach: To be determined. During a news conference Tuesday, Elway said he did not press Manning for a decision on his future when they met the day after Denver’s 24-13 loss to Indianapolis in the AFC divisional playoffs. The Broncos GM and executive vice president said he expects to reconvene with Manning in about a month to see where he stands — although he’ll touch base with the five-time MVP as he conducts his coaching search. Elway said he has not contacted anybody about his open head coaching job but said coordinators Jack Del Rio and Adam Gase, candidates for other openings, would get a look. He described the parting with John Fox as the culmination of a disagreement over what it takes to win the Super Bowl and stuck to a statement that has lived with him since he signed Manning: “There is no Plan B. Plan A is still the same — to win a world championship.”

Solo free of domestic violence charges KIRKLAND, Wash. — U.S. goalkeeper Hope Solo had domestic violence assault charges against her dismissed Tuesday, ending what she called “one of the most difficult and emotionally draining times of my life.” Now she can turn her attention fully to World Cup preparations. The case had been set for trial in a week in suburban Seattle. The U.S. Soccer Federation had resisted pressure from some to suspend Solo after she was charged with two misdemeanor counts of fourth-degree assault stemming from an altercation with her half-sister and 17-year-old nephew at a party in June. — The Associated Press

nine of the team’s points during the run, including a few timely jump shots, to end with 13 total. Hammond also had 13 points, and freshman Madeline Carey added six. “(Hills) was in a little of a mismatch, and we told the girls to watch for that,” Leaf added. “She’s very quick, and very strong on the boards. She’s our leading rebounder.” After leading 10-2 at the end of the opening quarter, CIA (3-1) was held to eight points by Ninilchik, which led to an 18-7 halftime lead. But from the 7:10 mark of the third quarter to 6:22 of the fourth, the home-court Eagles owned the next nine field goals to bust the game wide open. Leaf said the Wolverines figured out CIA’s defensive press in the second quarter, but were stymied in the third. Jordan Finney topped Ninilchik with nine points, while Olivia Delgado and Krista Sinclair added four apiece. “We’re a team that still doesn’t know how to play together, and CIA is faster than we are,” said Ninilchik coach Rod Van Saun. Ninilchik (2-1) also did not play any games in December while most of the rest of the state was. The Wolverines opened their season a week ago with a pair of games against Seldovia and the Nikiski JV. “Those early games really help,” Van Saun said. “It teaches you what you need to learn in practice. This was a good game for us to learn.”

Soldotna girls 35, Homer 24 The visiting Stars avenged a loss at the Kenai River Challenge earlier this season by topping the Mariners in a nonconference affair Tuesday. Soldotna started particularly strong on defense, taking a 14-4 lead after one quarter and a 21-6 lead at halftime. Hayley Ramsell scored 10 points to pace the Stars, while Haley Miller and Lindsey Wong each pitched in eight. For the Mariners, Aurora

Nikolaevsk boys 49, Nikiski JV 15

Waclawski led the way with eight points.

Soldotna boys 53, Homer 46 The visiting Stars held off the Mariners for a nonconference victory Tuesday. Soldotna led 17-13 after one quarter and 31-22 at halftime, but Homer stormed back in the third quarter, cutting the gap to 37-34. However, the Stars re-established order in the fourth quarter. Brooks Furlong paced the Stars with 16 points, while Nate Spence chipped in 12. For Homer, Sheldon Hutt had 15 points, while Kenneth Schneider dropped in 10 before fouling out.

Seward girls 25, Kenai 23 The host Seahawks turned back the Kardinals in a defensive struggle Tuesday in nonconference play. Seward’s Jasmine Perea led all scorers with 18 points. Kenai’s top scorer was Allie Ostrander with five points.

Seward boys 59, Kenai 37 Michael Wolfe had a monster game, and the host Seahawks had a monster third quarter, in streaking to a nonconference victory over the Kardinals on Tuesday. Wolfe had 30 points on the night, including four 3-pointers. Ten of his points came in the third quarter, when the Seahawks outscored the Kards 24-6 to take a 5125 lead. Austin McKee paced the Kardinals with six points.

Nikolaevsk girls 38, Nikiski C 16 The host Warriors cruised to a nonconference victory over the Bulldogs C-team on Tuesday. Nikolaevsk had a 7-3 lead after the first quarter, but led 23-7 by the half. Serafima Kalugin had 13 points for the Warriors, while Megan Hickman added 12. Rylee Jackson paced the Nikiski C-team with six.

The host Warriors were in total control in notching a nonconference victory over the Bulldogs Cteam on Tuesday. Nikolaevsk led 30-2 after one quarter. Nikit Fefelov and Neil Gordeev each had 14 points to lead the Warriors, while Kalenik Molodih added 10. For Nikiski, Tyler Litke led the way with five points. Tuesday BOYS Wolverines 57, Eagles 41 Ninilchik CIA

11 19 11 5

13 14 —57 14 11 —41

NINILCHIK (57) — Appelhanz 2 2-2 7, Presley 6 0-0 13, Mireles 9 2-3 22, Geppert 1 0-0 2, Bartolowits 0 0-0 0, White 6 1-2 13. Totals 22 5-7 57. CIA (41) — A. Hammond 4 2-2 10, B. Hammond 0 2-2 2, R. Smithwick 2 1-2 7, Miller 0 0-0 0, Barlow 4 0-0 10, J. Smithwick 0 0-2 0, T. Smithwick 4 1-2 12. Totals 14 6-10 41. 3-point field goals — Ninilchik 2 (Presley 1, Appelhanz 1); CIA 7 (T. Smithwick 3, Barlow 2, R. Smithwick 2). Fouled out — none. Warriors 49, Bulldogs C 15 Nikiski Nikolaevsk

2 5 30 17

4 10

4 —15 2 —59

NIKISKI C (15) — Wallis 0 0-0 0, Perry 2 0-0 4, McCollum 0 0-0 0, Litke 2 1-2 5, Hensley 1 0-0 2, Okamoto 0 0-0 0, Cutsforth 0 0-0 0, Bruce 0 0-0 0, Braswell 1 0-0 2, Foultne 0 0-0 0, Sepeda 1 0-0 2. Totals — 7 1-2 15. NIKOLAEVSK (59) — K. Molodih 4 2-3 10, Trail 1 0-2 2, Whaley 1 0-0 2, Yakunin 0 0-0 0, N. Fefelov 6 0-0 14, Gordeev 7 0-0 14, F. Molodih 4 0-0 8, J. Fefelov 3 0-3 6, Kalugin 1 1-2 3. Totals — 25 3-10 59. 3-point goals — Nikolaevsk 2 (N. Fefelov 2). Team fouls — Nikiski 9, Nikolaevsk 3. Fouled out — none. Seahawks 59, Kardinals 37 Kenai Seward

10 9 14 13

6 12 —37 24 8 —59

KENAI CENTRAL (37) — Theisen 1 2-2 4, Ivy 2 0-0 5, McKee 3 0-0 6, Brazell 1 0-0 2, Tr. Landry 0 0-0 0, Ta. Landry 1 2-2 4, Jackman 2 0-0 4, Vest 2 1-2 5, Foree 1 0-0 2, Dye 0 0-0 0, Wortham 2 1-3 5. Totals — 16 6-9 37. SEWARD (59) — Jacobson 0 0-0 0, Berry 1 1-3 3, Marshall 2 2-2 8, A. Pahno 2 2-5 6, Zweifel 0 0-0 0, Brewi 0 0-0 0, Estes 0 0-0 0, Wolfe 10 6-6 30, Sieverts 2 0-0 4, N. Pahno 0 0-3 0, DeBoard 0 0-0 0, Jackson 3 2-3 8. Totals — 20 13-22 59. 3-point goals — Kenai 1 (Ivy 1); Seward 6 (Wolfe 4, Marshall 2). Team fouls — Kenai 20, Seward 10. Fouled out — none. Stars 53, Mariners 46 Soldotna Homer

17 14 13 9

6 16 —53 12 12 —46

SOLDOTNA (53) — Kuntz 2 0-0 6, Weltzin 2 2-4, Furlong 5 3-3 16, Spence 5 2-5 12, Duke 1 0-0 2, Gibbs 0 2-2 2, Fowler 4 0-0 9. Totals — 19 9-14 53. HOMER (46) — B. Beachy 3 0-0 6, Reutov 2 0-0 4, Schneider 3 2-2 10, Nelson 2 0-0 4, Brown 1 2-4 4, Tedesco 0 1-2 1, Trowbridge 1 0-0 2, Hutt 6 2-3 15. Totals — 18 7-11 46. 3-point goals — Soldotna 5 (Kuntz 2, Furlong 2, Fowler); Homer 3 (Schneider 2, Hutt). Team fouls — Soldotna 13, Homer 15. Fouled out — Schneider. GIRLS Eagles 40, Wolverines 17 CIA Ninilchik

10 2

8 5

17 2

5 —40 8 —17

CIA (40) — DeLon 0 0-0 0, Carey 3 0-0 6, Taplin 0 0-0 0, Hills 6 1-3 13, Brush 1 0-0 2, Lyons 1 0-0 2, Hammond 6 0-0 13, Orth 2 0-0 4. Totals 18 1-3 40. NINILCHIK (17) — Delgado 1 2-2 4, Appelhanz 0 0-0 0, Cooper 0 0-0 0, Sinclair 2 0-0 4, Goins 0 0-0 0, Finney 4 1-4 9, Clark 0 0-0 0. Totals 7 3-6 17. 3-point field goals — CIA 1 (Hammond). Fouled out — none. Warriors 38, Bulldogs C 16 Nikiski Nikolaevsk

3 4 7 16

6 7

3 —16 8 —38

NIKISKI C (16) — Yamaguchi 0 0-0 0, Jensen 0 0-0 0, E. Tiner 0 0-0 0, Epperheimer 0 0-2 0, A. Tiner 0 0-0 0, Jackson 3 0-2 6, Litzen 1 1-2 3, Porter 1 3-6 5, Feltman 1 0-0 2. Totals — 6 4-12 16. NIKOLAEVSK (38) — Ki. Klaich 2 3-6 7, Kr. Klaich 1 0-0 2, Fefelov 2 0-0 4, Johnson 0 0-0 0, Kalugin 6 1-2 13, Gordeev 0 0-0 0, Dorvall 0 0-0 0, Hickman 3 6-10 12, Jones 0 0-0 0. Totals — 14 10-18 38. 3-point goals — none. Team fouls — Nikiski 12, Nikolaevsk 12. Fouled out — none. Seahawks 25, Kardinals 23 Kenai Seward

8 8

3 5

5 4

7 —23 8 —25

KENAI CENTRAL (23) — Ostrander 2 0-0 5, Holmes 0 0-0 0, Drury 1 0-0 2, Steinbeck 2 0-0 4, Barcus 1 2-6 4, Beck 1 2-3 4, Every 1 2-2 4. Totals — 8 6-11 23. SEWARD (25) — Anderson 0 0-0 0, Honebein 1 0-4 2, Jackson 0 0-1 0, Lapinskas 0 0-0 0, Perea 7 4-6 18, Clemens 2 1-2 5. Totals — 10 5-13 25. 3-point goals — Kenai 1 (Ostrander 1). Team fouls — Kenai 14, Seward 13. Fouled out — Holmes. Stars 35, Mariners 24 Soldotna Homer

14 4

7 2

6 10

8 —35 8 —24

SOLDOTNA (35) — Nelson 3 0-1 6, Shaw 1 0-0 2, Jackson 0 1-2 1, Wong 3 2-2 8, Ramsell 4 2-2 10, Miller 4 0-6 8, Glaves 0 0-0 0. Totals — 15 5-13 35. HOMER (24) — Alexander 1 1-2 3, Clark 0 0-0 0, Akers 3 0-3 6, Fellows 1 1-2 3, Waclawski 3 2-2 8, Stafford 1 0-0 3, Fairbanks 0 0-0 0, Kann 0 0-0 0, Hendrickson 0 1-4 1. Totals — 9 6-13 24. 3-point goals — Homer 1 (Stafford). Team fouls — Soldotna 17, Homer 16. Fouled out C — none.

M

Y

K

Scoreboard Football

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

AP Top 25

Tuesday’s Games Carolina 3, Colorado 2, SO Boston 4, Tampa Bay 3 Detroit 3, Buffalo 1 N.Y. Islanders 3, N.Y. Rangers 0 Pittsburgh 7, Minnesota 2 St. Louis 4, Edmonton 2 Nashville 5, Vancouver 1 Winnipeg 8, Florida 2 Dallas 5, Ottawa 4 San Jose 3, Arizona 2 Wednesday’s Games Montreal at Columbus, 3 p.m. Philadelphia at Washington, 4 p.m. Toronto at Anaheim, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Los Angeles, 6:30 p.m. All Times AST

The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, final records, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts 1. Ohio St. (59) 14-1 1,475 2. Oregon 13-2 1,402 3. TCU 12-1 1,349 4. Alabama 12-2 1,297 5. Florida St. 13-1 1,212 5. Michigan St. 11-2 1,212 7. Baylor 11-2 1,098 8. Georgia Tech 11-3 1,071 9. Georgia 10-3 925 10. UCLA 10-3 908 11. Mississippi St. 10-3 767 12. Arizona St. 10-3 756 13. Wisconsin 11-3 724 14. Missouri 11-3 710 15. Clemson 10-3 683 16. Boise St. 12-2 653 17. Mississippi 9-4 543 18. Kansas St. 9-4 509 19. Arizona 10-4 499 20. Southern Cal 9-4 315 21. Utah 9-4 302 22. Auburn 8-5 216 23. Marshall 13-1 161 24. Louisville 9-4 116 25. Memphis 10-3 94

Pv 5 3 6 1 2 7 4 10 13 14 8 15 17 16 18 21 9 11 12 24 23 19 NR 20 NR

Others receiving votes: Notre Dame 28, Stanford 27, Nebraska 22, Air Force 21, Duke 18, LSU 12, Utah St. 11, Arkansas 10, Minnesota 9, Oklahoma 7, Texas A&M 7, N. Illinois 4, Colorado St. 2.

NHL Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 45 27 14 4 58 146 122 Montreal 41 26 12 3 55 111 95 Detroit 43 23 11 9 55 120 107 Boston 44 23 15 6 52 117 114 Florida 41 20 12 9 49 102 113 Toronto 43 22 18 3 47 137 132 Ottawa 42 17 17 8 42 114 118 Buffalo 44 14 27 3 31 82 150 Metropolitan Division N.Y. Islanders 43 29 13 1 59 134 116 Pittsburgh 42 26 10 6 58 129 100 Washington 42 23 11 8 54 125 106 N.Y. Rangers 40 24 12 4 52 124 98 Philadelphia 43 17 19 7 41 119 129 Columbus 40 18 19 3 39 104 131 New Jersey 44 15 21 8 38 96 124 Carolina 43 14 24 5 33 91 114

WESTERN CONFERENCE 29 9 28 13 27 13 22 14 19 16 18 17 18 19

4 2 3 8 7 9 5

NBA Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Toronto 25 12 Brooklyn 16 22 Boston 13 23 Philadelphia 7 30 New York 5 35 Southeast Division Atlanta 30 8 Washington 26 12 Miami 17 21 Charlotte 15 24 Orlando 14 27 Central Division Chicago 26 13 Milwaukee 20 19 Cleveland 19 20 Indiana 15 25 Detroit 14 24

62 130 94 58 134 95 57 140 107 52 121 111 45 131 139 45 115 127 41 113 128

27 10 6 60 121 118 23 16 5 51 119 120 20 13 10 50 121 112 23 15 3 49 114 109 22 18 3 47 123 114 16 22 4 36 99 139 10 25 9 29 99 149

C

M

Y

K

Southwest Division Houston 27 11 Memphis 26 11 Dallas 27 12 San Antonio 23 16 New Orleans 18 19 Northwest Division Portland 30 8 Oklahoma City 18 19 Denver 17 20 Utah 13 26 Minnesota 6 31 Pacific Division Golden State 30 5 L.A. Clippers 25 13 Phoenix 23 18 Sacramento 16 22 L.A. Lakers 12 27

Men’s Scores EAST Butler 79, Seton Hall 75, OT Iona 74, Fairfield 58 Mass.-Lowell 62, Maine 59 Penn 67, Niagara 56 Syracuse 86, Wake Forest 83, OT VCU 65, Rhode Island 60 West Virginia 86, Oklahoma 65 SOUTH Abilene Christian 95, Northwestern St. 81 Kentucky 86, Missouri 37 Lipscomb 60, SC-Upstate 58 Louisville 78, Virginia Tech 63 Miami 90, Duke 74 Nicholls St. 61, Houston Baptist 57 South Carolina 68, Alabama 66 Tennessee 74, Arkansas 69 Virginia 65, Clemson 42 MIDWEST

Pct GB .676 — .421 9½ .361 11½ .189 18 .125 21½

Georgetown 78, DePaul 72 Indiana 76, Penn St. 73 Iowa 77, Minnesota 75 Kansas 67, Oklahoma St. 57 N. Iowa 63, Bradley 52 Ohio St. 71, Michigan 52

.789 — .684 4 .447 13 .385 15½ .341 17½

Stephen F. Austin 109, Cent. Arkansas 58 Texas A&M 74, Mississippi St. 70 Tulsa 66, UConn 58

.667 — .513 6 .487 7 .375 11½ .368 11½

Boise St. 82, UNLV 73, OT Montana 86, Montana Tech 44 Santa Clara 77, Saint Katherine 63

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Hockey

Central Division Nashville 42 Chicago 43 St. Louis 43 Winnipeg 44 Dallas 42 Colorado 44 Minnesota 42 Pacific Division Anaheim 43 San Jose 44 Los Angeles 43 Vancouver 41 Calgary 43 Arizona 42 Edmonton 44

Basketball

All Times AST

.711 .703 .692 .590 .486

— ½ ½ 4½ 8½

.789 .486 .459 .333 .162

— 11½ 12½ 17½ 23½

.857 — .658 6½ .561 10 .421 15½ .308 20

Tuesday’s Games Atlanta 105, Philadelphia 87 Washington 101, San Antonio 93 Minnesota 110, Indiana 101 Phoenix 107, Cleveland 100 Golden State 116, Utah 105 Dallas 108, Sacramento 104, OT Miami 78, L.A. Lakers 75 Wednesday’s Games Houston at Orlando, 3 p.m. San Antonio at Charlotte, 3 p.m. Philadelphia at Toronto, 3:30 p.m. New Orleans at Detroit, 3:30 p.m. Memphis at Brooklyn, 3:30 p.m. Washington at Chicago, 4 p.m. Atlanta at Boston, 4 p.m. Dallas at Denver, 5 p.m. Miami at Golden State, 6:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Portland, 6:30 p.m.

SOUTHWEST

FAR WEST

Women’s Scores EAST W. Michigan 62, Buffalo 59 Yale 53, St. Peter’s 45 SOUTH Campbell 75, Gardner-Webb 74 Coastal Carolina 71, Charleston Southern 62 High Point 67, UNC Asheville 50 Liberty 70, Longwood 48 Radford 55, Winthrop 47 Tulane 71, UCF 70 SOUTHWEST Baylor 79, Iowa St. 47 Lamar 82, Cent. Arkansas 46

Transactions BASEBALL COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE — Suspended LHP Enrique Garcia 50 games following a second positive test for a drug of abuse in violation of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League BOSTON RED SOX — Promoted Raquel Ferreira to vice president of baseball administration, Amiel Sawdaye to vice president of amateur and international scouting, Mark Wasinger to special assistant for player personnel, Mike Murov to assistant director of major league operations, Brian Abraham to assistant director of player development, Mike Rikard to director of amateur scouting,

Steve Sanders to assistant director of amateur scouting and Dave Klipstein to special assignment scout. Named Paul Fryer global crosschecker, Joe McDonald baseball operations analyst, Adrian Lorenzo major league staff assistant, Dr. Richard Ginsburg director of the behavioral health program, Jason Bartley physical therapist and clincical educator, Nancy Clark team nutritionist, Todd Gold amateur scout for North and South Carolina, Stephen Hargett amateur scout for northern Florida, Josh Labandeira amateur scout for northern California, Justin Horowitz assistant amateur and international scout, Gus Quattlebaum assistant director of professional and international scouting, Brian Bannister professional scout and analyst, Francisco Polanco area scout for the Dominican Republic, Lenin Rodriguez area scout in Venezuela and Bob Tewksbury, Laz Gutierrez and Justin Su’a mental skills coaches. KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Agreed to terms with manager Ned Yost on a one-year contract extension through the 2016 season. TEXAS RANGERS — Agreed to terms with OF Carlos Peguero, LHP Chad James, C Kevin Torres, RHPs Kyle Lotzkar and Francisco Mendoza and INFs Edwin Garcia, Guilder Rodriguez and J.T. Wise on minor league contracts. Promoted Casey Candaele to minor league field coordinator, Josue Perez to minor league hitting coordinator and Chris Briones to minor league catching coordinator. Named Dwayne Murphy minor league assistant hitting/outfield coordinator, Juan Lopez assistant minor league catching coordinator and Bruce Hines minor league baserunning coordinator. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Agreed to terms with LHP Wandy Rodriguez on a minor league contract. COLORADO ROCKIES — Traded RHP Chris Martin to the N.Y. Yankees for cash considerations. LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Agreed to terms with C A.J. Ellis on a one-year contract. MIAMI MARLINS — Agreed to terms with RHP Nick Masset on a minor league contract. MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Named Gary Lucas pitching coach, Liu Rodriguez coach and Steve Timmers strength and conditioning specialist Steve Timmers of Wisconsin (MWL) and Jose Ramos pitching coach, Alex Mena trainer and Alistair Matthews strength and conditioning specialist for the DSL Brewers. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Agreed to terms with RHP Jose Valverde on a minor league contract. WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Agreed to terms with 1B/OF Mike Carp and C Steven Lerud on minor league contracts. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA — Suspended Brooklyn F Kevin Garnett one game for initiating an altercation with Houston

C Dwight Howard, who was fined $15,000. FOOTBALL National Football League BALTIMORE RAVENS — Signed OT Marcel Jones, DB Quinton Pointer, FB Kiero Small, DE Zach Thompson, QB Keith Wenning and TEs Allen Reisner and Konrad Reuland to future contracts. BUFFALO BILLS — Terminated the contract of defensive coordinator Jim Schwartz. Named Greg Roman offensive coordinator. CHICAGO BEARS — Announced director of pro personnel Kevin Turks is no longer with the team. DALLAS COWBOYS — Signed LB Mister Alexander and RB Ryan Williams to future contracts. DENVER BRONCOS — Signed QB Bryn Renner, RB Kapri Bibbs, C Matt Paradis, DE Gerald Rivers and WRs Isaiah Burse, Bennie Fowler and WR Nathan Palmer to future contracts. NEW YORK GIANTS — Signed DB Trevin Wade and OL Emmett Cleary to future contracts. NEW YORK JETS — Named Mike Maccagnan general manager. PITTSBURGH STEELERS — Promoted linebackers coach Keith Butler to defensive coordinator. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Placed WR Paul Richardson on injured reserve. Signed QB B.J. Daniels from the practice squad. HOCKEY National Hockey League ARIZONA COYOTES — Recalled D Philip Samuelsson from Portland (AHL). MONTREAL CANADIENS — Recalled F Stefan Fournier from Wheeling (ECHL) to Hamilton (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Assigned D Seth Helgeson to Albany (AHL). Recalled F Joe Whitney from Albany. WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Recalleed D Steven Oleksy from Hershey (AHL). OLYMPIC SPORTS U.S. SKI AND SNOWBOARD ASSOCIATION — Named Brooke McAffee vice president and chief financial officer. SOCCER Major League Soccer MLS — Signed D Said Abdul-Salaam, Fs Akeil Barrett and Andy Craven and M Connor Hallisey. NEW YORK CITY FC — Signed M Mix Diskerud. SEATTLE SOUNDERS — Acquired G Troy Perkins. COLLEGE AMERICAN FOOTBALL COACHES ASSOCIATION — Elected Cincinnati coach Tommy Tuberville president and Arizona coach Rich Rodriguez and Central (Iowa) coach Jeff McMartin to the board of trustees. FURMAN — Named Kyle Gillenwater defensive coordinator. LSU — Named Kevin Steele defensive coordinator. SUSQUEHANNA — Named Tom Perkovich football coach. WISCONSIN — Named Joe Rudolph associate head football coach and offensive coordinator. Announced defensive coordinator Dave Aranda will return.


C

M

Y

K

Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, January 14, 2015

A-11

Islanders’ Halak notches shutout vs. Rangers By The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Frans Nielsen’s short-handed tally capped the Islanders’ three-goal second period, Jaroslav Halak made 27 saves in his fourth shutout of the season, and Long Island’s team cooled off the New York Rangers with a 3-0 victory on Tuesday night. The Rangers had won five straight and 13 of 14 — a run punctuated by a three-game California sweep last week — but the Eastern Conference-leading Islanders finished a seven-game road trip with their third straight win.

franchise record. Trevor Daley and Erik Cole also scored Perreault tied the franchise record for in the second, as Dallas took a 5-3 lead. most goals in a game. Ilya Kovalchuk Anders Lindback stopped all 14 Ottawa was the last to do it for the Thrashers in shots in the period. He made 34 saves and 2005 and Pascal Rheaume had the first gave up two goals in relief. one. Starter Kari Lehtonen allowed two goals in five shots while playing just 10:30 before his earliest exit this season.

SHARKS 3, COYOTES 2

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Brenden Dillon scored his first goal of the season in the third period and Antti Niemi stopped 27 shots to lift San Jose past Arizona. Joe Pavelski scored his 22nd goal early in the second period and Tomas Hertl scored just over a minute later for the Sharks. Dillon scored his first goal in 62 games early in the third period on a deJETS 8, PANTHERS 2 flected shot and Niemi made some big WINNIPEG, Manitoba — Mathieu saves down the stretch to give San Jose Perreault scored four goals to tie a fran- a victory before opening a seven-game chise record as Winnipeg cruised past homestand. Florida. Dustin Byfuglien added two goals and SENATORS 5, STARS 4 an assist and Jay Harrison and Evander DALLAS — John Klingberg scored Kane also scored for the Jets, who have coach Paul Maurice his 500th win as a two goals in a four-goal second period head coach. The eight-goal output was a when Dallas rallied from two down to take season high for the Jets, one short of the a two-goal lead.

PENGUINS 7, WILD 2 PITTSBURGH — David Perron scored twice and added an assist to lead Pittsburgh. Paul Martin, Kris Letang and Chris Kunitz each had a goal and an assist for the Penguins. Marcel Goc and Brandon Sutter also scored for Pittsburgh. Sidney Crosby had three assists for the Penguins, who had little trouble with the floundering Wild. Marc-Andre Fleury made 30 saves, including several key stops early to give his teammates time to find a rhythm.

RED WINGS 3, SABRES 1 BUFFALO, N.Y. — Petr Mrazek made 25 saves in his first start in place of injured

starting goalie Jimmy Howard, and Detroit each for the Bruins, who held the Lightbeat Buffalo. ning to 16 shots. Darren Helm, Gustav Nyquist and Tomas Tatar scored for the Red Wings, BLUES 4, OILERS 2 who have won three of four. ST. LOUIS — Vladimir Tarasenko scored his 24th goal and had an assist, deHURRICANES 3, fenseman Barret Jackman earned his secAVALANCHE 2, SO ond two-point night of the season, and St. RALEIGH, N.C. — Victor Rask and Louis won its fifth straight. Benoit Pouliot scored twice in the third Elias Lindholm scored shootout goals, while Anton Khudobin stoned both Colo- period for Edmonton, but the Oilers musrado shots as Carolina stymied the Ava- tered a season-low 15 shots and never got closer than a two-goal deficit. lanche’s comeback. Jordan Staal scored his first of the season and Patrick Dwyer the other goal for PREDATORS 5, CANUCKS 1 the Hurricanes, who have won five straight home games against the Avalanche with NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Colin Wilson one in overtime and the other in the shoo- had two goals and two assists and Craig tout. Smith added a power-play goal to lead Nashville. The Predators lost goalie Pekka Rinne, BRUINS 4, LIGHTNING 3 who leads the NHL with 29 wins, to a BOSTON — Rookie David Pastrnak lower-body injury in the third period. He scored twice for the second straight game had stopped 20 of 21 shots before being and Milan Lucic had a goal and an assist replaced by Carter Hutton. Filip Forsberg and Mike Fisher also as Boston won its fourth straight. Brad Marchand also scored and Torey scored for Nashville, winners of four Krug and David Krejci had two assists straight. Mike Ribeiro had two assists.

Miami shocks Duke at Cameron Indoor Stadium

C

cisive outcome since last month’s 48 percent from the field (31 of West Virginia’s bench amassed er VCU player to reach double fig- er with 5.1 seconds remaining. 39-point rout of UCLA. 65). Rozier hit 4 of 6 from behind 55 points, led by Carter and Adri- ures as he scored 10 points. the arc. an. The Mountaineers’ previous BUTLER 79, No. 21 high from its bench this season No. 2 VIRGINIA 65, TENNESSEE 74, SETON HALL 75, OT was 35. No. 9 KANSAS 67, No. 24 CLEMSON 42 No. 19 ARKANSAS 69 NEWARK, N.J. — Roosevelt OKLAHOMA STATE 57 CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — Josh Jones scored a season-high 23 No. 17 VCU 65, LAWRENCE, Kan. — Frank — Malcolm Brogdon scored 16 Richardson scored 20 points and points, Kellen Dunham added RHODE ISLAND 60 points, and Virginia took command Mason III had 16 points and nine Tennessee withstood a furious Ar- 21 and Butler knocked off Seton KINGSTON, R.I. — Treveon kansas comeback to hang on for a Hall. with a 29-6 run to start the second rebounds, Kelly Oubre Jr. added half of a victory against Clemson. 14 points and Kansas beat Okla- Graham scored 16 of his 26 points victory over the Razorbacks. Justin Anderson added 15 homa State to remain perfect in the in the second half and Virginia After trailing by 13 points with No. 23 NORTHERN IOWA Commonwealth rallied for a vic- under four minutes left, Arkansas points for the Cavaliers (16-0, 4-0 Big 12. 63, BRADLEY 52 The Jayhawks (14-2) moved tory over Rhode Island. Atlantic Coast Conference), who (13-3, 2-1 Southeastern ConferPEORIA, Ill. — Seth Tuttle VCU (14-3, 4-0 A-10) has now ence) cut the margin to three and won their 20th consecutive game to 3-0 in league play for the ninth at John Paul Jones Arena. The win, straight year largely thanks to its won a conference-best nine con- had a chance to tie the game when scored 15 points and sank four late with former Virginia great and ability to get to the foul line. Kan- secutive games. Anton Beard was fouled by Kevin free throws to help Northern Iowa Mo Alie-Cox was the only oth- Punter while attempting a 3-point- beat Bradley. three-time national player of the sas was 32 of 46 on free throws year Ralph Sampson in attendance, while attempting just 43 field No. 1 KENTUCKY 86, gave Virginia it first 4-0 start in goals in a game made choppy by MISSOURI 37 conference play since the 1994-95 the abundance of whistles. LEXINGTON, Ky. — Aaron season. Harrison scored 16 points includNo. 16 WEST VIRGINIA 86, ing five 3-pointers, and Kentucky No. 6 LOUISVILLE 78, No. 18 OKLAHOMA 65 finally earned a conference victory VIRGINIA TECH 63 MORGANTOWN, W.Va. — in regulation by drilling Missouri. LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Chris Jevon Carter scored 18 points and After needing overtime to beat Mississippi and Texas A&M by Jones had a career-high 11 assists West Virginia got its strongest pernine total points, the Wildcats (16- and Terry Rozier scored 16 points formance of the season from its 0, 3-0 Southeastern Conference) as Louisville easily brushed off bench to beat Oklahoma. Devin Williams added 14 had the overmatched Tigers (7-9, Virginia Tech. Louisville (15-2, 3-1 ACC) tied points and 11 rebounds while Na1-2) under control by halftime with a 44-18 lead. The margin eventu- a season-high with 10 3-pointers than Adrian scored a season-high ally reached 49 in the final minute and had one of its best shooting 11 for the Mountaineers (15-2, 3-1 M as Kentucky rolled to its most de- performances of the season hitting Big 12).

Y

K

By The Associated Press

DURHAM, N.C. — Angel Rodriguez scored 24 points and Miami shot 67 percent after halftime to upset No. 4 Duke 90-74 on Tuesday night, snapping the Blue Devils’ 41-game home winning streak. Manu Lecomte had a careerhigh 23 points for the Hurricanes (12-4, 2-1 Atlantic Coast Conference), who dominated the final 20 minutes with their pesky defense and attacking dribble penetration that the Blue Devils just couldn’t defend.

C

M

Y

K


C

M

Y

K

A-12 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Police reports

Around the State Man charged with assaulting 2 women, 2-year-old child ANCHORAGE — A 21-year-old Anchorage man suspected of assaulting two women and a 2-year-old child is being held on felony assault charges and $250,000 bail. Anchorage police say Alexie Kapotak Jr. was arrested early Tuesday at a home on Minnesota Drive. Troopers took a disturbance call just before 2 a.m. and went to the home. The found two women with what officers called severe physical injuries. The child was unconscious and officers say injuries to the toddler were life-threatening. Kapotak was found hiding in the home’s bathroom. Police say he resisted arrest and assaulted a police officer. The two injured women are related. Police say Kapotak was in a domestic relationship with one of the women.

Anchorage senator proposes hemp as agricultural crop ANCHORAGE — An Anchorage lawmaker has proposed to make hemp an agricultural crop in Alaska. Democratic Sen. Johnny Ellis says he decided to introduce the bill after seeing bipartisan support for hemp in last year’s federal farm bill. The Alaska Dispatch News reports that hemp is a type of cannabis plant that lacks the high levels of the psychoactive ingredient THC found in marijuana. Hemp seeds and fibers can be used to make products such as clothing, food and paper. However, hemp is considered a controlled substance by the federal Drug Enforcement Administration, and a permit is required from DEA to cultivate it. Ellis said just how Alaska would go about permitting hemp would be a point of discussion during the committee process.

Searchers find Kivalina man who lost snowmobile in river KIVALINA — A Kivalina man whose snowmobile broke through river ice Monday was found safe. Alaska State Troopers say 29-year-old Danny Foster left the northwest Alaska village to fish on the Wulik River and was reported overdue just before 10 p.m. Monday. The Northwest Arctic Borough search and rescue coordinator dispatched searchers on snowmobiles, who reported hazardous conditions on the river. At about 12:45 a.m. Tuesday, they spotted Foster walking on a trail. He was transported to Kivalina in good health. Kivalina is 80 miles northwest of Kotzebue.

Salvage truck wreck closes Seward Highway ANCHORAGE — Traffic is moving freely Tuesday morning on the only highway south of Anchorage. The Seward Highway was closed Monday night for about three hours after a salvage truck overturned, spilling debris into both lanes of the highway. The accident happened about midway between Beluga Point and Indian, and high winds hindered the clean-up process. KTUU reports the road reopened late Monday night. The only vehicle involved was the salvage truck, and there were no injuries.

n On Dec. 23 at about 7:20 p.m., Soldotna police stopped a vehicle on the Kenai Spur Highway near Frontier Avenue. Toni Bismark, 33, of Anchorage, was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol and taken to Wildwood Pretrial on $500 bail. n On Dec. 23 at 9:35 p.m., Soldotna police responded to a residence for a report of an intoxicated minor. John Q. Wilson, 18, of Soldotna, was issued a criminal citation for minor consuming alcohol and released to a parent. n On Dec. 24 at 7:53 p.m., Soldotna police stopped a vehicle on the Kenai Spur Highway near Marydale Avenue. Michael J. Cotton, 32, of Kenai, was issued a criminal citation for sixth-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance and released. n On Dec. 25 at 9:16 a.m., Soldotna police responded to the River Terrace RV Park for the report of an assault. Debbie L. Stockman, 60, of Soldotna, was issued a criminal citation for fourth-degree assault and released. n On Dec. 26 at 10:05 p.m., Soldotna police contacted Tommy Nicholson, 18, of Soldotna, in the parking lot of the Caribou Family Restaurant. Nicholson was issued a criminal citation for sixth-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance and released. n On Dec. 26 at 12:14 a.m., Kenai police conducted a routine traffic stop at the Kenai Spur Highway and Evergreen Street. Marcelo Bejarano, 19, of Soldotna, was issued a summons for driving while license suspended and was released from the scene. n On Dec. 26 at 10:14 p.m., Kenai police responded to the area of Walmart for a report of a shoplifter. Police located the subject and issued Warren C. Belford, 29, of Kenai, a summons for fourth-degree theft and second-degree criminal mischief. He was released from the scene.

— The Associated Press

C

M

Y

K

n On Dec. 27 at 2:28 a.m., Soldotna police responded to the Maverick Saloon for a report of an intoxicated male refusing to leave the bar after being denied service. Mark Jackson, 25, of Soldotna, was arrested for being a drunken person on a licensed premise and taken to Wildwood Pretrial on $500 bail. n On Dec. 28 at 2:02 a.m., Soldotna police contacted Ben Tikka, 28, of Soldotna, at the Sterling Highway Tesoro 2 Go. Tikka was issued a criminal citation for driving in violation of a license limitation and released. n On Dec. 29 at about 8:00 p.m., Kenai police were called to a vehicle vs. moose accident near the Kenai Spur Highway and Linwood Lane. Following investigation, Danielle D. Graybeal, 21, of Sterling, was issued a summons for failure to insure vehicle. A passenger in Graybeal’s vehicle, Darren A. Rose, 19, of Sterling, was found to have an outstanding warrant from Soldotna Alaska State Troopers for failure to appear for remand, no bail, three days to serve. Rose was taken to Wildwood Pretrial on the warrant. n On Dec. 29 at 1:32 a.m., Soldotna police stopped a vehicle on Turnbuckle Terrace near Kleeb Loop. Christopher Stroh, 29, of Kenai, was arrested for providing false information to police and resisting arrest, then taken to Wildwood Pretrial on $1,000 bail. n On Dec. 29 at 2:03 p.m., Soldotna police responded to a report of a disturbance at a residence on Park Avenue. Raymond E. Smith, 58, of Soldotna, was arrested for first-degree burglary, fourth-degree assault and fourth-degree criminal mischief and was taken to Wildwood Pretrial without bail. n On Dec. 29, following investigation into an assault that had occurred on Dec. 19, near Peninsula Avenue and Broad Street, Viola A. Skura, 49, of Kenai, was issued a summons for fourth-degree assault. n On Dec. 29, investigation of a theft that had occurred

sometime in late October or early November resulted in Roland W. Zumwalt, 30, of Soldotna, being charged with second-degree theft. Zumwalt was remanded at Wildwood Pretrial, where he was already being held on other charges. n On Dec. 31 at 9:26 a.m., Soldotna police responded to Safeway for a shoplifter. Lauren A. Roesing, 26, of Kasilof, was arrested for fourth-degree theft, providing false information to police and on an outstanding arrest warrant for failure to appear on an original charge of fourth-degree theft. Roesing was taken to Wildwood Pretrial on $1,000 bail. n On Dec. 31 at 11:38 p.m., Soldotna police stopped a vehicle on Funny River Road near the Sterling Highway. Brett Roller, 44, of Kenai, was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol and chemical test refusal and was taken to Wildwood Pretrial without bail. n On Dec. 31 at 2:44 p.m., Kenai police received a report of a woman in Walmart hiding items in a tote and attempting to leave the store. Officers arrived and contacted Elisa G. Harman, 46, of Kenai. After investigation, Harman was arrested on charges of fourth-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance, second-degree theft, first-degree criminal trespass and two counts of violating conditions of release and was taken to Wildwood Pretrial pending arraignment. n On Jan. 1 at 2:31 p.m., Kenai police conducted a traffic stop on a 4-wheeler off Bridge Access Road. James R. Williams, 52, of Soldotna, was arrested for driving while license suspended, misuse of plates and violating conditions of release and was taken to Wildwood Pretrial. n On Jan. 1 at 2:46 a.m., Soldotna police received a report of a disturbance occurring in the back of a limousine being driven on Kalifornsky Beach Road toward Soldotna. The limousine was located in the parking lot of Hooligan’s. A passenger in the vehicle,

Rebecca Ryan, 23, of Sterling, was arrested for three counts of fourth-degree assault and taken to Wildwood Pretrial on $1,500 bail. n On Jan. 2 at 1:08 a.m., Soldotna police received a report of a possible traffic collision in the drive 
through at Taco Bell. The responding officer was nearly struck head-on by the suspect vehicle as the officer approached Taco Bell on Devin Drive, and the officer stopped the vehicle nearby. Harley D. Hill, 18, of Soldotna, was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol, minor consuming alcohol, minor operating a vehicle after consuming alcohol and fourth-degree misconduct involving weapons. He was taken to Wildwood Pretrial without bail. n On Jan. 2 at 9:50 p.m., Soldotna police contacted Kevin McGee, 24, of Soldotna, and arrested him on an outstanding warrant. He was taken to Wildwood Pretrial on $500 bail. n On Jan. 3 at 2:55 p.m., Soldotna police stopped a vehicle on Marydale Avenue at Marydale Court. Rebel R. Nelson, 61, of Sterling, was issued a criminal citation for not having vehicle liability insurance and released. n On Jan. 3 at 5:49 p.m., Soldotna police responded to a disturbance in the emergency room at the Central Peninsula Hospital. Patricia Davis, 35, of Soldotna, was arrested on two counts of disorderly conduct and taken to Wildwood Pretrial on $500 bail. n On Jan. 4 at 7:18 a.m., Soldotna police responded to the Catholic Church for a suspicious vehicle. Tina Prevost, 34, of Anchor Point, was arrested for an outstanding arrest warrant and providing false information to police. She was taken to Wildwood Pretrial without bail. n On Jan. 4 at 9:01 p.m., Soldotna police stopped a vehicle on Cohoe Avenue at Farnsworth Boulevard. A passenger, David D. Antila, 49, of Soldotna, was arrested on an outstanding warrant and taken to Wildwood Pretrial on $250 bail.

C

M

Y

K


C

M

Y

K

Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, January 14, 2015

The following judgments were recently handed down in District Court in Kenai: n Christopher H. Benney, 27, of Homer, pleaded guilty to no motor vehicle liability insurance, committed Nov. 20. He was fined $500 and a $50 court surcharge. Paul Joseph Damico, 53, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to violating condition of release for a felony, committed Dec. 16. He was fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered not to consume or buy alcohol for two years and placed on probation for two years. n Nicholas Charles Dushkin, 43, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to driving under the influence, committed March 8. He was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 160 days suspended, fined $4,000 with $1,000 suspended, a $75 court surcharge, $1,467 cost of imprisonment and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, had his license revoked for one year, ordered ignition interlock for 12 months, or-

C

M

Y

K

Court reports dered not to possess or consume alcohol for three years and placed on probation for three years. n Pamela K. Ferris, 45, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to driving under the influence, committed Sept. 25. She was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, fined $3,000 with $1,500 suspended, a $75 court surcharge, $330 cost of imprisonment and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, had her license revoked for 90 days, ordered ignition interlock for six months and placed on probation for one year. n Ashley Moran, 29, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to violating condition of release for a felony, committed Feb. 14. She was fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended and placed on probation for two years. n Alecia Marie Tangman, 30, of Nikiski, pleaded guilty to one count of an amended

charge of attempted fourthdegree misconduct involving a controlled substance and one count of driving under the influence, committed Oct. 10. On count one, she was sentenced to 330 days in jail with 300 days suspended, fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, forfeited items seized and placed on probation for three years. On count two, she was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, fined $2,000 with $500 suspended, a $75 court surcharge, $330 cost of imprisonment and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, had her license revoked for 90 days, forfeited items seized and placed on probation for three years. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Taylor Thibodeaux, 18, of Soldodtna, pleaded guilty to sixth-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance, committed Nov. 28. Thibodeaux was fined $150

and a $50 court surcharge. n Sarah Jean Whitaker, 21, of Sterling, pleaded guilty to one count of failure to give immediate notice of an accident and one count of an amended charge of no valid operator’s license, committed Aug. 16. On count one, she was fined a $50 court surcharge and a $100 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to pay $1,000 restitution and placed on probation for one year. On count two, she was fined $150 and a $50 court surcharge. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Amber Gayle Felger, 34, of Kasilof, pleaded guilty to an amended charge of thirddegree theft, committed Nov. 27. She was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 160 days suspended, fined $500 with $250 suspended, a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to pay restitution, forfeited items seized, ordered to have no contact with a specifically named individual, ordered to pay cost of appointed counsel and placed on probation for two years. All other charges in this case were dis-

C

M

Y

K

missed. n James Z. Fulton, 36, of Hot Springs, Arkansas, pleaded guilty to driving while license cancelled, suspended, revoked or limited, committed Nov. 7. He was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 80 days suspended, may perform 80 hours of community work service in lieu of jail time (served by the 10 days served in jail), had his license revoked for 90 days and placed on probation for one year. n Alexandria Mae Hensley, 19, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to violating conditions of release for a misdemeanor, committed Sept. 13. She was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended, fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, ordered not to consume or buy alcohol for two years and placed on

A-13

probation for two years. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Michael David Henson, 25, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to third-degree theft, committed Sept. 20. Imposition of sentence was suspended and he was placed on probation for one year, fined a $50 court surcharge, ordered to perform 40 hours of community work service, ordered to pay restitution and ordered to have no contact with any Subway restaurant on the Peninsula. n Delores L. Howell, 58, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to an amended charge of reckless driving, committed Aug. 17. She was fined $1,000 with $500 suspended, a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, had her license revoked for 30 days and placed on probation for one year.


C

M

Y

K

A-14 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, January 14, 2015

. . . T200 Continued from page A-1

volunteers would be great. As for the amount of snow needed to have a successful race, Murray said that three feet of snow would be optimal, but a race could work with between one and two feet. Despite the lack of snow in recent years, Murray doesn’t anticipate moving the race from the Kenai Peninsula in the future. “If we did (move the race), it wouldn’t be the T200,” Murray said. “It’s the only place to do it on the Kenai Peninsula that would be a challenging race.” Teams already registered for this year’s race can get a full refund or participate on the later race date.

the postponement, she expects some teams to drop out of the race. “I can see (teams not participating),” Murray said. “A lot of these teams are running in other races.” Of the 50 registered teams, Murray said that about six are from the Kenai Peninsula. Murray said there is a waiting list of several teams just in case some teams back out. While she isn’t too concerned about mushers dropping out, Murray said she does worry about having enough volunReach Ian Foley at ian.foteers. She said that having 50 ley@peninsulaclarion.com.

. . . Once Continued from page A-1

timidation factor of going into a spinning class for the first time if all the participants have already been doing it for a year or six months,” she said. The date and location of the spinning class have yet to be determined, but Tannehill said she would like to design a series of classes that cover a wide variety of activities. While Tannehill hopes that Try It Once proves successful, it’s not without challenges. “I think the biggest challenge is getting people over the fear of getting into a swimsuit,” Tannehill said. “It’s after the holidays.” For more information, call the Cooperative Extension Service at 907-262-5824.

master swim. That can be intense for some people.” Tannehill said that with the lack of snow this winter, people who want to remain active will hopefully turn to other forms of physical activity. “We’re thinking that maybe the swimming might be good timing for people to start thinking about ‘OK, I can’t do the skiing or snowshoeing that I usually do, so maybe I’ll try something else — until the snow comes,’” she said. “I’m optimistic. I’m all for being outdoors.” Tannehill said the next Try It Once class will teach people about spinning. Reach Ian Foley at ian.fo“You can imagine the in- ley@peninsulaclarion.com.

. . . Fish Continued from page A-1

In his new role, Swanton will be working with the Pacific Salmon Commission and the Pacific Salmon Treaty between the United States and Canada — which governs the harvest and sharing of the nations’ salmon resources, said Brooks. That agreement, most recently approved in 2008, will be up for renegotiation an 2018, according to the Pacific Salmon Commission.

mer and they meet in the winter.” Deputy Sportfish Division Director Tom Brookover has been named as acting director of the Sport Fish Division. Acting Commissioner Sam Cotten appointed Swanton to his new role, according to a Tuesday news release. The nomination to the Pacific Salmon Commission Rashah McChesney can be is a presidential appointment, reached at rashah.mcchesney@ according to the release. peninsulaclarion.com.

. . . School Continued from page A-1

parents who had questioned the skits produced by school staff on the school district’s Facebook page, was the first to speak during the public comment period. He said wanted to know if the school district found the behavior at the assembly to be appropriate or inappropriate. School board president Joe Arness said that would not be answered at the meeting. Kenai Peninsula Borough School District spokeswoman Pegge Erkeneff said the school district is not at liberty to release the result of the investigation because the matter was an internal personnel issue. “The four employees were at their regularly assigned work duties on Wednesday, January 7, after the investigation was completed,” Erkeneff said. Nikiski Middle-High School teacher Joe Rizzo said he did not feel that the staff members

should have been put on administrative leave following the assembly. “I think that due process was skirted in this issue,” Rizzo said. “This action was based on inaccurate comments on the district’s Facebook page.” Erkeneff said the school district had received several official complaints, which is what prompted the investigation. She said she does not want the public to “underestimate the confidence the district has in the administrators at Nikiski High School to do their job.” The school district declined to provide copies of the complaints. The Clarion is further pursuing this information. Under the Public Complaints Concerning School Personnel section in the school district’s policy manual, if an issue is not able to be resolved between the staff member the complaint is being lodged against and the concerned party, the school district may need to handle the matter. Rizzo said he was unhappy

Around Alaska Lack of snow limits K300 to Kuskokwim River BETHEL — This year’s Kuskokwim 300 Sled Dog Race is going to be entirely an ice event. Race manager Zach Fansler tells KYUK that a lack of snow is preventing the race from using any trails off the river this year. So the entire 300 mile race will be run on the frozen Kuskokwim River. Race officials used donated equipment this week to clear a giant ice dam near Kalskag to make it ready for Friday’s start. The race starts in Bethel, and mushers will travel to Aniak and then back to Bethel on the same trail; 31 mushers are signed up for this year’s race.

Meyer decides against Pierre for press work JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — The incoming president of the Alaska Senate said Tuesday that he has decided against hiring a former state military affairs official to help the Senate majority press office this session. Sen. Kevin Meyer, R-Anchorage, last week told colleagues by email that he had decided to hire McHugh Pierre on contract to work in the majority press shop. Details, however, had yet to be worked out, and Meyer said a contract was never signed. Pierre was asked to resign his job as a deputy commissioner in the state Department of Military and Veterans Affairs in September following a report from the National Guard Bureau’s Office of Complex Investigations into allegations of sexual assault and other misconduct within the Alaska National Guard and the ouster of the state’s adjutant general.

C

M

Y

K

with the fact that current procedure would require taking staff out of the building during an investigation, and suggested the school district review and revise the process. Jason Tauriainen, a special education aide at the school, said he felt the teachers had not acted inappropriately during the assembly. “The faculty show has always been done it with the intent of entertainment for the kids,” Tauriainen said. “It is about trying to balance having a good time, making it funny for them and making it fun and giving them ways to bond with the teachers.” Many comments focused on the high integrity of school staff and their commitment to the students. James Freeman had posted video on social media that his daughter had taken of the assembly. “In no way shape or form did I ever question the staff’s ability to do their job,” Freeman said. “I questioned the inappropriate-

ness of what they portrayed and what they had shown in front of the school body. I don’t think that was a place for that skit.” No changes to school district policy are currently being considered, Erkeneff said. “Any policy changes are a several month process completed with approval from the school board,” Erkeneff said. “Any policy change within the school is up to the administration.” Carpenter said he hopes that in the future the school district will release the results of the investigation. “There was an emotional display of support for our wonderful teachers tonight and rightfully so,” Carpenter said. “They do a commendable job day in and day out. I hope that the district behaves in a transparent manner to give the rightfully concerned parents confidence that their concerns are being taken seriously.” Reach Kelly Sullivan at kelly. sullivan@peninsulclarion.com.

Pierre said he did nothing wrong and that he had previously informed then-Gov. Sean Parnell’s office that he did not plan to stay on after the November elections in order to open a business and pursue a master’s degree. He has since started a communications firm. In an interview Tuesday, Meyer said Pierre, whose communications experience includes work with former Gov. Frank Murkowski, is a communications specialist and it was unfortunate things turned out as they did. Meyer said he didn’t want a situation in which senators had to spend more time justifying Pierre’s hire than focusing on better communication with the public, which is the caucus’ aim. Senators also are planning hearings related to the National Guard issue.

Juneau assembly puts temporary brakes on pot businesses JUNEAU — Juneau is putting the brakes on marijuana businesses. The Juneau Empire reports the Juneau Assembly voted Monday to not consider issuing any land use permits for marijuana farms or documentation related to pot businesses until Oct. 19, or six months after the legislative session ends. The Legislature is expected to write regulations for marijuana businesses this session following voter approval of the recreational use of marijuana. The assembly’s action doesn’t have much of an effect on the general public. Marijuana still becomes legal on Feb. 24, even though the state has until Nov. 24 to finalize regulations for sales. The first permit for a retail store can be issued a year later. — The Associated Press C

M

Y

K


C

Food Y

SECTION

B Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, January 14, 2015

M K

n Also inside Classifieds Comics

B-3 B-6

P ioneer P otluck ‘G rannie ’ A nnie B erg

About ... little-little sister and little-little brother On a farm, Northern, Colorado 1945 and 1947

I

C

M

Y

K

do not remember my big-little sister, Virginia Ruth being born in August of 1940- as I was only 3 1/2 years old and my brother John Jr. was 2 1/2 yrs old. But I do remember little-little sister, Elaine Mary and little-little brother, James David and the day they were born. I was 8 years old and my birthday is in April. My little-little sister Elaine Mary was born in April also. I was so happy! Dad woke me up early the morning April 4th, 1945. “Get up, you have to help me get breakfast. You have a baby sister and her name is Elaine Mary.” “WHAT?” I said in disbelief. “Where did she come from and where is MOM?” “She’s in the hospital with Elaine, so you have to help me.” Always being proud to “help Dad” I jumped up grabbed my clothes and headed for the warmest place in the house to get dressed - in the kitchen, in front of the old wood-coal cook stove. One of Dad’s jobs was to keep the stove hot and at night by “banking it.” Filling the cavern of the stove with a few corn cobs, a small layer of wood and sticks, then a layer of coal. Shutting the door, he would turn down the damper and let the stove do the rest. In the morning with glowing coals in the bottom of the stove, he would open the damper, put more coal on the glowing coals and shut the door and “lett’er cook.” The stove got hot - the coffee pot perked and the smell of coffee drifted through the house. Dads biggest production for breakfast was oatmeal! He loved oatmeal and he pretended he did not hear us when we said, we did not want very much, as he would pile 4 big spoon fulls of the graygluey glop into our bowls. (He boiled in on top of the hot wood stove, stirring and stirring until it was glop!) The best part of Dad’s oatmeal was the cold thick cream he poured over the top and a big spoonful of sugar on top of that. We had to eat every bite! For years and years I did not eat or make my kids eat oatmeal, unless there was nothing left in the house to eat. Now, in my 70’s, that hot oatmeal tastes pretty good, but my Dad would frown at what I added to make it good tasting. Cinnamon,

B

ecause they are so versatile and nearly everyone enjoys eating them, I like to keep a stash of boneless, skinless chicken breasts in the freezer. When fresh chicken breasts are on sale, especially when there’s a buy one-get one free offer, I never pass them up. So long as they are properly wrapped, first by removing the chicken from the store’s packaging, then re-wrapping it in heavy-duty foil and plastic freezer bags, chicken parts may be frozen for up to one year without any loss of quality. And, if you have chicken breasts on hand, you’ll never be at loss for a meal, whether it’s supper for your family or dinner for guests – expected, or not. With just a few additional ingredients (here, capers are a must), you can put together a company-worthy meal, such as Chicken Piccata, in nothing flat. Chicken Piccata may look like a time-consuming, complicated dish, but nothing could be further from the truth. In reality, the side dishes will take more time to make prepare than the chicken itself. I served my chicken along with

T he

K itchen A de S ue Ade rice (cooked in chicken broth), but roasted small potatoes or some pasta would do nicely, as well. Sautéed fresh mushrooms, dotted with peas, also served as an accompaniment because that’s what I had on hand. A well–stocked freezer and pantry is a lifesaver for the busy cook. When you see a buy, especially on chicken grab it and sale or not, pick up those capers, too. Photos by Sue Ade unless otherwise indicated

Sue Ade is a syndicated food writer Chicken Piccata is a quick and easy dish, good for family suppers or when with broad experience and interest in guests are coming to dinner. the culinary arts. She has worked and resided in the Lowcountry of South Carolina since 1985 and may be reached at kitchenade@yahoo.com.

2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, butterflied,* cut in half and pounded thin ½ cup all-purpose flour, divided Salt and fresh ground pepper ½ cup low-sodium chicken broth Juice of one lemon, plus lemon slices for garnish 3 tablespoons olive oil 5 tablespoons butter, divided 2 cloves garlic, finely minced ¼ cup dry white wine 1 heaping tablespoon capers, rinsed 2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley Place all but 2 teaspoons of the flour in a shallow baking dish. Sprinkle the flour with a little salt and pepper, mixing well. Dredge chicken in the flour, shaking off excess; set aside. In a small bowl, whisk together the Chicken Piccata is a tasty, attractive dish good served with rice and a side chicken broth, lemon juice and remaining two teaspoons of flour unof vegetables, such as sautéed mushrooms mixed with peas. til smooth and no lumps remain; set aside. In a large skillet, heat oil and 3 tablespoons of the butter over medium heat. When butter foams, fry the

chicken until golden brown, about 2 to 3 minutes per side, then transfer chicken to a plate. Add garlic to pan, sautéing until soft. (Watch garlic carefully so that it does not burn.) Deglaze pan with the wine. Add the broth mixture and capers to the pan and cook until thickened, about two minutes. Return chicken to the pan and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove chicken to a platter. Add remaining 2 tablespoons of butter to the pan, whisking well. Season sauce with salt and pepper, to taste, then pour over chicken. Garnish chicken with lemon slices and sprinkle parsley over all. Makes 4 servings. *Kitchen Ade note: To butterfly a chicken breast, place it on a cutting board. Place the flat of your hand on top of the breast. Using a sharp knife, slice into one side of the breast, starting at the thick end and ending at the thin point. (Do not cut clear through to the other side.) Now open the breast – it should look something like a butterfly.

What is a caper? Capers are the unripened olive green flower buds of a perennial shrub native to the Mediterranean. The buds are picked, more or less daily, before they begin to open and are then pickled in vinegar. (Capers can also be found packed in sea salt.) With their pungent and slightly bitter taste, capers add piquancy and unique flavor to a wide range of sauces and dishes and are a key ingredient in piccata recipes. The most prized capers are called “non-pareilles,” which are 6-7mm in size.

Sue Ade

See ABOUT, page B-2

See CHICKEN, page B-2

Tiny Cokes: Less guilt means more money for makers By CANDICE CHOI AP Food Industry Writer

NEW YORK — Americans want to cut back on soda, and they’re willing to pay more to do it. With people drinking less soda amid health concerns, Coke and Pepsi are pushing smaller cans and bottles that contain fewer calories and, they say, induce less guilt. That all comes at a price: Those cute little cans can cost more than twice as much per ounce. The shift means 7.5-ounce “minicans” and 8-ounce and 8.5-ounce glass and aluminum bottles are taking up more space on supermarket shelves. The cans and bottles have been around for a few years, but Coke and Pepsi are making them more widely available and marketing them more aggressively. As part of its “Share-a-Coke” campaign that printed popular names on cans and bottles last year, for instance, Coke says it distributed a million mini-cans. The focus on pushing smaller packages signals a shift from the past couple of decades, when beverage makers measured success by the sheer volume of soda they sold. Yet soda consumption has declined persistently in recent years, with public health officials blaming it for making people fat and calling for special taxes and even warning labels on cans.

Soda hit its peak in 1998, when Americans on average drank the equivalent of 576 cans of it a year, according to data from the industry tracker Beverage Digest. That figure was down to about 450 cans a year in 2013. Instead of fighting what seems to be a losing battle, Coke and Pepsi are pushing smaller cans and bottles that give their products a sense of newness among the growing proliferation of beverage choices. The companies also say the tiny sizes cater to people’s desire for more modest servings. “Coca-Cola is so delicious, but it’s like sun tanning or cigarettes — they’re these wonderful things that we now know are horrible for us,” said Lauren Utvich, a 31-year-old food stylist in New York, who bought the Coke minicans when she first spotted them. Utvich doesn’t normally drink soda, but she likes that the mini-cans turn Coke into a relatively guiltless treat. But that’s not the only reason she bought them. “Let’s be honest. I like them because they’re freaking adorable,” said Utvich, who didn’t pay attention to how much they cost. During a presentation in November, Coke’s North American president Sandy Douglas said the health and wellness trend has set up “a tremendous opportunity for the Coca-Cola brand with our smaller packages.” He noted a regular 12-ounce can

of Coke on average sell for 31 cents. By comparison, a 7.5-ounce mini-can sells for 40 cents. That translates to 2.6 cents-per-ounce for a regular can, versus 5.3 cents-per ounce for the mini version. Coca-Cola said that while it may be selling less soda, smaller packs are pushing up revenue. Sales of Coke’s smaller sizes — which include a 1.25-liter bottle as an alternative to the 2-liter bottle — were up 9 percent last year through October, according to the presentation by Douglas. By comparison, sales of its 12-ounce cans and 2-liter bottles edged up 0.1 percent. That doesn’t mean Coke and Pepsi are abandoning their more generous servings, which still dominate the industry. And it’s not clear how big the appetite for the newer cans and bottles can grow over time. In 2013, minicans accounted for 1.1 percent of sales volume in supermarkets, according to Beverage Digest. But they accounted for 2.4 percent of sales dollars, more than double their volume share. Bonnie Herzog, a Wells Fargo beverage industry analyst, said the smaller options are part of how Coke is repositioning itself amid changing habits around soda. She noted the company is also pushing Coke Life, a reducedcalorie drink sweetened with a mix of sugar and stevia. “It’s responsible and it’s realistic,” Herzog said, noting the smaller sizes C

M

Y

K

AP Photo/Matt Rourke

A 7.5-ounce can of Coca-cola, right, is posed next to a 12-ounce can for comparison, Monday, Jan. 12, 2015 in Philadelphia. As people cut back on soda, the two beverage giants, Coke and Pepsi, are increasingly pushing smaller cans and bottles they say contain fewer calories and induce less guilt.

are marketed as “moments of pleasure” people don’t have to give up. Soda’s bad reputation, after all, is in part the result of mushrooming sizes. For decades, Coke was sold primarily

in 6.5-ounce glass bottles. In 1955, the company started introducing larger servings after Pepsi-Cola marketed a bigger glass bottle, according to Dan See SODA, page B-2


C

M

Y

K

B-2 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Sue Ade Grannie Annie is the author of Grannie Annie Cookbook series, featuring Alaskan recipes and stories

…Chicken, Continued from page B-1

PEPPER STEAK I used to make this when we had moose in the freezer and had lots hungry Alaskan mouths to feed. 1 1/2 pounds of round steak, beef or moose, cut in thin strips, partially frozen is best and a sharp knife. 1 clove of garlic minced 1 cup onion chopped 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon each pepper & ground ginger 1 teaspoon sugar 1 cup soy sauce 1 large green pepper, cut in thin strips* 4 large tomatoes cut in eighths * 1 can 16oz bean sprouts-drained 1 Tablespoon cornstarch 1/2 cup cold water Brown steak in small amount of vegetable oil, stirring over medium high heat. In a small bowl, combine, onion, garlic, salt, pepper, ginger and soy sauce. Pour over

steak and simmer 10 minutes. Add green pepper, tomatoes, and bean sprouts. Stir in and heat through. Combine the water and cornstarch, add to the meat and vegetable mixture, stirring carefully, until thick. Remove from heat. Serve with steamed rice. NOTE: I had to make sure in late 1968 to 1970 living on Daniels Lake, that I had all the ingredients before I ever started this recipe. I always used dehydrated onions and green peppers were not in the pantry at all. Fresh tomatoes, only if your garden friendly neighbor shared his crop with you in the late summer. We usually had plenty of moose in the freezer.

When cleaning fresh mushrooms before cooking, keep in mind that moisture is their enemy, so do not rinse them. To free mushrooms of any remaining soil, (the soil mushrooms are grown in is sterile), use a soft brush or dry paper towel.

ASIAN B.B.Q MOOSE RIBS 2 to 4 pounds of moose ribs, sawed in two and split into two ribs pieces OR Spareribs about 2 to 3 pounds - cut in two rib pieces 1 - 10oz jar of plum jelly-or any jelly you have on had. 1/3 cup dark corn syrup or brown sugar 1/2 cup soy sauce 1/4 cup chopped onions 2 cloves garlic minced 2 tsp ground ginger - or 1 tsp grated fresh

ginger Heat everything, except the ribs, until well blended. Pour over ribs in large pan and marinate for 4 to 6 hours or overnight. Place the ribs in baking pan or bake on a medium hot B.B.Q grill - watch carefully-turning often. OR bake in oven at 350° for 1 to 2 hours, covered the first hour. Turn and baste in the pan juices. Serve with lots of napkins.

1 pound fresh mushrooms or dry paper towel, then cut into thick slices. In 2 minced shallots a large skillet, heat butter with oil over medi4 tablespoons butter um-high heat until butter begins to foam. Add 2 tablespoons vegetable oil mushrooms and shallots and sauté until mush½ cup frozen peas, cooked rooms are lightly browned and have just begun Salt and fresh ground black pepper to release their juices, about 8 to 10 minutes. 1 tablespoons minced fresh parsley, op- Gently stir in peas to combine. Season to taste tional with salt and pepper and sprinkle with parsley, if desired. Gently clean mushrooms with a soft brush Makes 4 servings.

MESSY-CAN FIESTA BAKE My kids could not pronounced Mexican - so this is what came out of their mouths. You can find it on page 77 in ‘‘Cookin’ at the Homestead”. Actually it is Enchilada Pie . I found this recipe on the back of a can. I sometimes think I should name a cookbook, “I Found this on the Back of a Can!” 1 pound ground beef, moose, elk, venison, turkey or a combination of half beef. 1 cup chopped onion 3/4 cup chunky salsa 1 pkg. taco seasoning mix 1/4 to 1/2 cup water 1 cup corn-drained 1/2 cup pinto beans-drained 1/2 cup sliced ripe olives-drained 1 pkg of Jiffy Corn Meal Muffin Mix 1 cup shredded cheese-divided 1 4oz can of diced green chilies Cook beef and onion, drain. Stir in salsa, taco seasoning and water. Bring to boil and reduce to simmer for 5 to 6 minutes until thickened. Stir in corn, beans and olives. Spoon into a oiled 8X8 square baking dish.

. . . About Continued from page B-1

Craisins or cherries or blueberries, sometimes prunes added. After it “cooks” in the microwave for one and half minutes, then the cup of oatmeal gets yogurt and crushed walnuts or pecans. Now that’s the way I eat oatmeal!! The closest thing to my childhood and thick cream, is at Christmas time, pouring eggnog and a sprinkle of cinnamon on my cherrywalnut-oatmeal. That morning of the birth of my little-little sister, Elaine, my Aunt Ruth came to help Dad with the rest of the chores of the day and baby sit my biglittle brother, Sonny (John Jr) big-little sister, Ginger and me, the oldest. We had so much fun with Aunt Ruth!! She had a constant smile on her face and always giggled and laughed at anything we did. She made the worst of chores fun. She read and sang to us. She also had fun, with my help, finding things in “Mom’s Kitchen.” A place that Mom kept perfectly spotless-clean and everything in order. Auth Ruth would put one of Moms aprons on and tie one on me. She would push the kitchen stool up to the sink, so I could help with the dishes or mixing up pancakes for breakfast,...( Yeah! no Dads oatmeal!) ...or pealing potatoes for supper. I never wanted her to leave after she stayed and

Prepare the topping and preheat the oven at 350° In a small bowl: Mix the corn meal muffin mix to pkg directions. Stir in: 1/2 cup shredded cheese 1 4oz can diced green chilies Stir well and spread over the meat mixture. Bake uncovered in oven for 30 to 40 minutes until crust is golden brown. Top with another 1/2 cup of shredded cheese. Place back in oven 5 minutes. Remove from oven, cut and serve with salsa, sour cream, chopped onions and shredded lettuce. Dessert: Chocolate Pie or brownies.

helped Mom with “the new baby.” I spent most of my time begging to hold Elaine, with her curly brown hair and cute little noises. Mom had a rocking chair in the corner of the kitchen and I had to sit down in it and then the baby would be handed to me. I rocked and sang to her until she went to sleep. Aunt Ruth or Mom would pick her up and take her to the bassinette in the bedroom. When ever Elaine was awake I wanted to hold her. My Mom would tell me to “put her down- you are spoiling her!” Then Dad woke me up, the morning of October 1, 1947 and repeated. “Get up and help me fix breakfast. You have a baby brother and his name is James David.” And I repeated.... “What! Where did he come from and where is Mom?” This ten year old once again helped Dad with the oatmeal and when Aunt Ruth arrived to help in Moms kitchen. Through laughter and smiles we fixed meals, washed and dried the dishes. We put clothes on Elaine Mary and Ginger and I got to baby sit her while Aunt Ruth was busy with household chores. Then she would sit down with Sonny, Ginger, Elaine and me and read to us. I would beg to hold and feed Jimmy with his brown hair and big brown eyes. And once again Mom would scold me “Put him down-you are spoiling him!” My job got more complicated as Jimmy got to the

point he could walk. Actually he never walked - he ran. Out doors in the sunshine when he was three, he could “distapeer” at a blink of an eye. He was my hand full. I could swing Elaine for hours but not Jimmy. He was on the move and never stayed in one place. He figured out how to climb trees, hay lofts and tractors. He never minded fences, as he ducked under them and was off to see what Dad was doing in the fields. I enjoyed my sisters and brothers. Ginger had long, thick, wavy auburn hair that I loved to brush. Elaine had curly brown hair I loved to comb and put ribbons in. I had white fuzzy, straight as a string, hair that I combed, but it really did not matter as it was fuzz no matter what. My attempt to cut Jimmy hair, with a big dull kitchen shears.... well, Dad never said anything, but he took him out of the highchair, put him in the pickup and headed to town to the barber shop! Those big kitchen shears “dista-peared.” We have all gotten older and have families of our own. I appreciate I have them in my life. Sometimes I would like to hold and rock them again! Oh.. by the way - I was reminded by Aunt Ruth’s daughter, Barbara Faye Scott, that her Mother called me “Edith Ann” also! Yes she did! Thanks for jerking my memory into this story!

C

M

Y

K

For increased flavor and interest, substitute low-sodium broth for water when preparing rice and form into a round shape, using a ring mold, for serving.

1 cup long grain rice ¼ cup minced onion 2 tablespoons butter 2 cups low-sodium chicken broth

(Do not allow onion to brown.) Add broth and bring to a boil, then stir in rice. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover pan, and simmer for 20 minutes, or until all the broth is absorbed. Fluff rice with fork and serve, or shape into a In a 2-quart heavy saucepan, over medium ring with a ring mold, if desired. Makes four heat, sauté onion in butter until translucent. servings, ¾ cup each.

T

he Grannie Annie series is written by a 47 year resident of Alaska, Ann Berg of Nikiski. Ann shares her collections of recipes from family and friends. She has gathered recipes for more that 50 years. Some are her own creation. Her love of recipes and food came from her Mother, a self taught wonderful cook. She hopes you enjoy the recipes and that the stories will bring a smile to your day. Grannie Annie can be reached at anninalaska@gci. net

Cookbooks make great gifts! The “Grannie Annie” Cook Book Series includes: “Grannie Annie’s Cookin’ on the Woodstove”; “Grannie Annie’s Cookin’ at the Homestead”; “Grannie Annie’s Cookin’ Fish from Cold Alaskan Waters”; and “Grannie Annie’s Eat Dessert First.” They are available at M & M Market in Nikiski.

. . . Soda Continued from page B-1

Deane, president of the Coca-Cola Collectors Club. Eventually, he noted Coke sold a 3-liter plastic bottle in some regions. Fountain sodas got bigger, too. In 1976, 7-Eleven introduced its 32-ounce Big Gulp, followed by a Double Gulp that holds 64 ounces, or a half-gallon of liquid. A small drink at McDonald’s today is 16 ounces, while a large is 30 ounces. But the bigger sizes that helped enrich Coke and Pepsi also backfired, with many now seeing them as a culprit for the nation’s obesity rates. In November, voters in Berkeley, California approved a special, per-ounce tax on sugary drinks. Even as Coke and Pepsi fight such measures through their industry lobbying group, they’re embracing the mantra of moderation. This fall, Coke, Pepsi and Dr Pepper pledged at the Clinton Global Initiative to slash calorie consumption from beverages in the U.S. by 20 percent over the next decade. It sounds dramatic, but calories from drinks were falling anyway as people moved away from soda on their own in favor of options like bottled water. One of the ways the companies promised to achieve their goal: Smaller sizes.

C

M

Y

K


CLASSIFIEDS C

M

Y

K

Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, January 14, 2015 B-3

Contact us

www.peninsulaclarion.com classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com

Classified Index EMPLOYMENT Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/ Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Commercial Property Condominiums/ Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

REAL ESTATE RENTALS Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums/ Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

FINANCIAL Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgage/Loans

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

C

M

Y

K

Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn & Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

RECREATION Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boat Charters Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snowmobiles Sporting Goods

TRANSPORTATION Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

PETS & LIVESTOCK Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

SERVICES Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

NOTICES/ ANNOUNCEMENTS Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

PUBLIC NOTICES/ LEGAL ADS Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

Finance & Accounting

General Employment

Apartments, Unfurnished

To place an ad call 907-283-7551

Health

ALL TYPES OF RENTALS

BUSINESS OFFICE ASSISTANT The Peninsula Clarion newspaper has an opening for a Business Office Assistant. Experience in a business office environment, excellent customer service skills, knowledge of PC platform as well as proper grammar and spelling skills are a must. Accounting experience preferred but not required. The ideal candidate must be able to multitask, meet deadlines, be able to work individually and in a team environment, and have a positive atti tude. This person will do data entry, billing, filing and basic accounting functions among other duties. This is a full-time position with benefits. Salary DOE. Interested parties can submit an application by mailing it to: Peninsula Clarion Attn: Teresa Mullican PO Box 3009 Kenai, AK 99611 Email resumes to: teresa.mullican@peninsulaclarion.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE The Peninsula Clarion is an equal opportunity employer. Applications are available at our offices on 150 Trading Bay Road in Kenai.

General Employment

BECOME AN OCEAN RANGER Help protect Alaska's environment and its people! Be an observer onboard cruise ships for the summer, monitoring State environmental and marine discharge requirements and identifying any potential safety, sanitation, and/or health risks. Compensation includes both salary and benefits.

Property Management and Oversight Division 170 N. Birch Suite 101, Soldotna (907)262-2522 Mary.Parske@century21.com www.Century21FreedomRealty.com

Minimum Qualifications: 1.) Designated Duty Engineer (DDE) or Third Assistant Engineer (3 A/E) or degree in marine safety and environmental protection from accredited maritime institution. 2.) American Maritime Officers (AMO) Union member. 3.) Pass criminal background check, able to enter Canada. 4.) Of sound physical condition and able to pass post-offer physical examination. 5.) Successful completion of Ocean Ranger training. To Apply: 1.) Online at www.Crowley.com/oceanrangers by 02/15/15. 2.) Email: marinejobs@crowley.com with questions.

Apartments, Unfurnished

Alaska residents are encouraged to apply! RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE FOR RENT:

Office & Clerical

KENAI, AK Come join a family-friendly, innovative work environment. The Kenaitze Indian Tribe has opened our Dena'ina Wellness Center, featuring an integrated model of care. Employees at Kenaitze In dian Tribe deliver health, social service, education and tribal court services to tribal members, Alaska Native/American Indian people and others. Kenaitze Indian Tribe is recruiting for the following Full Time Position: OPTOMETRIST The Optometrist is responsible for the efficient and effective delivery of clinical services to our Un'ina (customers). Optometrist examines patients' eyes, test their sight, give advice on visual problems and prescribe and fit spectacles or contact lenses when needed. The Optometrist is trained to recognize diseases of the eye, such as glaucoma and cataracts, as well as general health conditions such as diabetes. Optometrist will refer patients to medical practitioners when necessary, as well as sometimes sharing the care of patients with chronic conditions. The Optometrists is accountable to ensure their practice is operated as specified in grants and contracts in accordance with applicable statutes and regulations, the Tribes' polices and procedures, and professional ethics. Benefits include Holidays, Paid Time Off, Extended Sick Leave, Medical/Dental/Life & Accidental Death Insurance, 401(k) For the job description or to apply visit our website at http://kenaitze.applicantpro.com. For questions call 907-335-7200. P.L. 93-638 applies

ALASKA 1st REALTY 44045 Kalifornsky Beach Rd., Soldotna www.Alaska1stRealty.com, e-mail; Alaska1stRealtyInc@gmail.com, phone: (907)260-7653

The Peninsula Clarion newspaper has an opening for a Classified Inside Sales Representative. Experience in a business office environment, excellent customer service skills, knowledge of PC and Mac platforms as well as proper grammar and spelling skills are a must. The ideal candidate must dress professionally, be able to multitask, meet deadlines, do data entry and have a positive attitude. This person will answer incoming and make outgoing calls and must be able to work individually and as part of a team. This is a full-time position with benefits. Interested parties can submit an application by mailing it to: Peninsula Clarion Attn: Leslie Talent PO Box 3009 Kenai, AK 99611 E-mail resumes to: leslie.talent@peninsulaclarion.com

FIVE STAR REALTY Property Management Experts with more than 25 year experience. Available in the Office Monday-Friday 8:00-5:00 Diane Melton, Owner/Broker We provide 24 hour emergency service. Five Star Realty Always reach for the Stars Phone: 262-2880

Rentals

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

The Peninsula Clarion is an equal opportunity employer. Applications are available at our office on 150 Trading Bay Road in Kenai.

Oil & Refinery

General Employment

!

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Greater Soldotna Chamber of Commerce & Visitor Center – Soldotna, Alaska !!!!!!!!!!!

The Soldotna Chamber of Commerce is seeking an EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR to work with the Board of Directors to implement the full range of Chamber activities including administration, hiring and supervision of staff, membership development and fundraising, marketing the Chamber and the City of Soldotna and developing and maintaining a collaborative working relationship between the Soldotna Chamber of Commerce, public policy/ governmental organizations and other regional chambers and organizations to foster a strong business environment for the members. The ideal candidate will have a four-year degree in a business or non-profit management related field or the equivalent of education and work experience, at least three years of community or public service experience, fundraising and/or grant writing experience, knowledge of nonprofit and business budgeting, management and record keeping, exceptional written and oral communication skills, strong time management and organizational skills, and be adept with Microsoft Office. Previous work experience in a Chamber of Commerce and/or Visitor Center is desirable. Salary is D.O.E. with benefits. Submit cover letter, resume and three references to: director@soldotnachamber.com or Soldotna Chamber of Commerce, 44790 Sterling Hwy., Soldotna, AK 99669. Posting closes 1/20/15.

Your Ad Could Be Here! 283-7551

Apartments, Unfurnished

PROJECT MANAGER Trihydro Corporation has an opening for a Project Manager in Soldotna, AK. Applicants must have a BS in Geology or Civil/Env Engineering and ten years of relevant experience. Applicants with refinery, petrochemical, or upstream oil and gas experience and professional certification are preferred. Duties will include project management, technical report preparation, field work, health and safety compli ance, oversight of field crews performing general environmental services, client/business development, and oversight of operation activities for groundwater remediation systems. The selected applicant will oversee the delivery of work scope, schedule, budgets, and client expectations within an active petroleum refinery. Additionally, the selected applicant will assist in the development of a Trihydro office in the Soldotna area. Applicants must have a clean driving record. Applicants must live or be available to relocate to the Kenai Peninsula. Excellent technical writing, client management, and Microsoft Office computer skills are required. Submit application, resume and cover letter at: www.trihydro.com Trihydro is an EEO/AA employer.

Employment Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

COLONIAL MANOR (907)262-5820 Large 1-Bedroom, Walk-in closet, carport, storage, central location. Onsite manager. DUPLEX APARTMENT with awesome fenced yard! 2 bed 1 bath on Walker Lane, Kenai. 1 car garage, W/D in unit. $600 deposit and $1,250 per month includes gas, water, and trash. Tenant pays electric. Pets additional $250 deposit. Call Ryan 907.394.1764. REDOUBT VIEW Soldotna’s best value! Quiet, freshly painted, close to schools. 1-Bedroom from $625. 2-Bedroom from $725. 3-Bedroom, 2-bath, from $825. No pets. (907)262-4359.

Construction & Trades FINISH CARPENTERS Part time 80 hours per month. Week on, week off. Call 6pm-8pm only 394-2880.

Apartments, Furnished

Real Estate For Sale

1-LARGE ROOM FULLY FURNISHED Soldotna, quiet setting, includes utilities. (907)394-2543.

Commercial Property Condominiums/Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

EFFICIENCY 1-Person basement unit Downtown Kenai, quiet, adult building. No smoking/ pets, $575. including tax/ utilities. Security deposit/ lease. (907)283-3551.

Put your ad here....for just peanuts a day!

SOLDOTNA 4-PLEX Furnished 2-Bedroom, washer/dryer. $925. includes utilities. (907)394-4201, (907)394-4200. C

M

Y

K

Merchandise For Sale Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn/Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

Miscellaneous

Homes

CLASSIFIED INSIDE SALES REPRESENTATIVE

ASIAN MASSAGE Please make phone ring! Call anytime (907)741-0800

www buyfivestarak.com

Duplex KENAI 2-Bedroom, 1-bath, washer/dryer, Gas paid, $800. plus tax. $800. deposit. No pets. No smoking. (907)252-1060

Homes 3-BEDROOM, 2-Bath over size 2-car garage. Sterling, 4 miles to Soldotna. No smoking/pets. W/D $1,450. month plus utilities, (907)394-3939, (907)262-3806. STERLING Small, 2-bedroom, washer/dryer, $750/ month, plus utilities, gas, tax $15, $700 deposit. No smoking/ pets. (907)262-6093.

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

ALASKA MASSAGE GRAND OPENING Call Anytime 741-2662 262-0830 Thank you

Recreation Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boats Charter Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snow Mobiles Sporting Goods

Transportation Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

Pets & Livestock Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

Dogs

NIKISKI 3-Bedroom, $950 per month. Pets allowed, includes utilities. Call (907)776-6563. PRIVATE 4 BEDROOM Mobile Home with large Lean to. Very private with beautiful views. Pets on approval only. No smoking inside 500.00 fine. You pay electricity, gas and phone. New flooring throughout. Come and take a look. Have photos on phone. $800 per month. 776-8072

KENAI KENNEL CLUB

Pawsitive training for all dogs & puppies. Agility, Conformation, Obedience, Privates & Rally. www.kenaikennelclub.com (907)335-2552

Services Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Services Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

Notices/ Announcements Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

Public Notices/ Legal Ads Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

Keep a Sharp Eye on the Classifieds

Each week, our Classified section features hundreds of new listings for everything from pre-owned merchandise to real estate and even employment opportunities. So chances are, no matter what you’re looking for, the Classifieds are the best place to start your search.

283-7551 www.peninsulaclarion.com

Office Space SMALL OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE 100 sqft to 1600 sq ft. Offices available in Kenai on North Willow Street near airport. Please contact 283-7864 for details.

Financial Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgages/Loans

283-7551

CLICKS

EVERYTHING WITH US.

It’s the only site you need to stay in sync with the world around you.

www.peninsulaclarion.com


CC MM YY KK

B-4 January 8, 14,2014 2015 B-4 Peninsula PeninsulaClarion, Clarion,Wednesday, Monday, December

Would you like to have your business highlighted in Yellow Advantage? • Reach readers in the newspaper and online that are ready, willing and able to buy your goods and services. • Have your business stand out from the competition by creating top of mind awareness. • Ads appear EVERYDAY in the newspaper • Easy to use online search engine puts your business ahead of the competion. • Update your ads and listings frequently.

),1' $1< %86,1(66 $1< 6(59,&( $1< 7,0( $7 PENINSULACLARION&20

Peninsula Clarion Display Advertising

(907) 283-7551

025( ,1)2

*HW FRXSRQV DQG VSHFLDO RIIHUV

180%(5

*HW SKRQH QXPEHUV

:(% 6,7(

0$36

9LVLW EXVLQHVV ZHEVLWHV *HW GLUHFWLRQV

)RU PRUH LQIRUPDWLRQ FDOO Display Advertising DW 907 283-7551

Get your business listed 283-7551

Automotive Insurance

Boots

Walters & Associates

Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing

Located in the Willow Street Mall

35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

Business Cards

Bathroom Remodeling

Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK

AK Sourdough Enterprises Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai

283-4977

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

GOT JUNK?

Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing 35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

283-7551

Contractor

Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD

AK Sourdough Enterprises Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

Extractions, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

Computer Repair

Dentistry

Walters & Associates

Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD

Located in the Willow Street Mall

Carhartt

Sell it in the Classifieds

Every Day in your Peninsula Clarion â&#x20AC;˘ www.peninsulaclarion.com

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dentistry

alias@printers-ink.com

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

Extractions, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

Need Cash Now?

Place a Classified Ad.

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

283-7551

Public Notices

Notice to Creditors IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE STATE OF ALASKA AT KENAI In the Matter of the Estate of LARS R. FROSTAD

) ) ) ) )

Deceased. Case No. 3KN-14-00237PR NOTICE TO CREDITORS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that KNUT FROSTAD has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be presented to the personal representative, c/o Faulkner Banfield, P.C., 8420 AIrport Boulevard, Suite 101, Juneau, AK 99801-6924 or filed with the Superior Court for the State of Alaska, Third Judicial District at Kenai, Alaska.

DATED this 31st day of December 2014. PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE KNUT FROSTAD

PUBLISH: 1/7, 14, 21, 2015

2046/73750

ZZZpeninsulaclarionFRP

Family Dentistry Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD Extractions, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Insurance Walters & Associates Located in the Willow Street Mall

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

Outdoor Clothing Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing

Funeral Homes

35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

Peninsula Memorial Chapels & Crematory Kenai........................................283-3333 Soldotna ..................................260-3333 Homer...................................... 235-6861 Seward.....................................224-5201

Print Shops Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK alias@printers-ink.com

150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai............................. 283-4977

Rack Cards Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK alias@printers-ink.com

150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai............................. 283-4977

Remodeling AK Sourdough Enterprises Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

SHE MAY NOT LIVE to see her child grow up

CITY OF SOLDOTNA Planning & Zoning Commission Notice of Public Hearing January 21, 2015 The Soldotna City Planning and Zoning Commission will hold a public hearing on Wednesday, January 21, 2015 at 5:30 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chamber, 177 N. Birch St., Soldotna, Alaska, on the following items: Resolution PZ 2015-001 - A Resolution of the Planning and Zoning Commission Recommending that Section 17.10.240(E)(1) of the Soldotna Municipal Code be Amended to Remove the Minimum Lot Size Requirement Specific to Development of Two-Family Dwellings (Duplex) in the Single-Family/Two-Family Residential Zoning District. All application materials and associated documents can be viewed in the Planning Department at Soldotna City Hall.

She is running out of breath and running out of timeâ&#x20AC;Ś Thousands of young women are living with a deadly lung disease called LAM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know they have it. LAM is often misdiagnosed as asthma or chronic bronchitis. There is no known cure. The LAM Foundation offers support for women with LAM and is leading research to fight this tragic disease.

All interested persons are invited to attend and participate in the public discussion. Written comments may be sent to the Planning & Zoning Commission, c/o John Czarnezki, 177 North Birch Street, Soldotna, AK 99669. For further information, call John Czarnezki at 907-262-9107.

Could you or someone you know have LAM?

MC

Y

K

C

MC

Y

KY

Learn more. Visit thelamfoundation.org

The weatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right to hit the streets in hot newLet wheels! on thesome classifieds usCount shed for easy at-home auto shopping. Check out the light on job listings from dealers and private owners, then make a smart move opportunities, real to a smooth new ride. estate, and great deals on used cars www.peninsulaclarion.com in the classified Call 283-7551 section of the PUBLISH: 1/14, 16, 2015

C

2051/319

C

M

Y

K


C

M

Y

K

Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, January 14, 2015 B-5 Peninsula Clarion

www.peninsulaclarion.com • 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite #1, Kenai, Alaska 99611 • 283-7551 • FAX 283-3299 • Monday - Friday 8 A.M. - 5 P.M.

Classified Ad Rates Number of Days Run

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON/EVENING A

B

5

(8) CBS-11 11 (9) FOX-4

4

(10) NBC-2

2

(12) PBS-7

7

4:30

Justice With Judge Mablean ‘PG’ The Insider (N)

(3) ABC-13 13 (6) MNT-5

4 PM

Supreme Justice

5 PM News & Views (N)

5:30 ABC World News

Inside Edition Family Feud Family Feud (N) ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’

The Ellen DeGeneres Show KTVA 5 p.m. (N) ‘G’ First Take Mike & Molly Entertainment Anger Man‘14’ Tonight (N) agement ‘14’ 4 The Dr. Oz Show ‘PG’

Channel 2 News 5:00 2 Report (N) Wild Kratts Wild Kratts BBC World 7 Baby elephant. Power disc. ‘Y’ News Ameri‘Y’ ca ‘PG’

CABLE STATIONS

A = DISH

CBS Evening News Two and a Half Men ‘14’ NBC Nightly News (N) ‘G’ Alaska Weather ‘G’

6 PM

6:30

7 PM

B = DirecTV

7:30

JANUARY 14, 2015

8 PM

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’

Wheel of For- The Middle “A The Goldtune (N) ‘G’ Quarry Story” bergs (N) ‘PG’ ‘PG’ Celebrity Celebrity The Walking Dead “Clear” Name Game Name Game Rick leads a weapons run. (N) ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘MA’ KTVA 6 p.m. Evening The Mentalist “Little Yellow News (N) House” (N) ‘14’ The Big Bang The Big Bang American Idol Vocalists in Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ Kansas City, Mo., audition. (N) ‘PG’ Channel 2 Newshour (N) The Mysteries of Laura Arson leads to the death of a teenager. (N) ‘14’ PBS NewsHour (N) Nature Evolution of dogs. ‘G’

8:30

9 PM

Celebrity Wife Swap Coolio’s 108 252 and Mark McGrath’s mates. ‘PG’ NCIS “Bounce” Reopened 105 242 investigation. ‘PG’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ 139 247

(28) USA (30) TBS (31) TNT (34) ESPN (35) ESPN2 (36) ROOT (38) SPIKE (43) AMC (46) TOON (47) ANPL (49) DISN (50) NICK (51) FAM (55) TLC (56) DISC (57) TRAV (58) HIST (59) A&E (60) HGTV (61) FOOD (65) CNBC (67) FNC (81) COM (82) SYFY

ABC News at (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live ‘14’ (:37) Nightline (N) ‘G’ 10 (N) How I Met Your Mother ‘14’ KTVA Nightcast Anger Management ‘14’

The Office The Wendy Williams Show “Did I Stutter?” (N) ‘PG’ ‘PG’ (:35) Late Show With David (:37) The Talk Letterman ‘PG’ (N) ‘14’ Two and a TMZ (N) ‘PG’ Entertainment Tonight Half Men ‘14’

Channel 2 (:34) The Tonight Show Star- (:36) Late News: Late ring Jimmy Fallon ‘14’ Night With Edition (N) Seth Meyers Scientists You Must Know Charlie Rose (N) Three little-known scientists. ‘G’

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

America’s Funniest Home How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Rules of En- Rules of En- Parks and (8) WGN-A 239 307 Videos ‘PG’ Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother gagement gagement Recreation In the Kitchen With David “PM Edition” Cooking with David Venable. ‘G’ Susan Graver Style ‘G’ White Hot Linens ‘G’ (20) QVC 137 317 (23) LIFE

9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30

Modern Fam- (:31) blackish Forever “Skinny Dipper” ily (N) ‘PG’ (N) ‘PG’ Henry contemplates revealing the truth. ‘PG’ The Walking Dead Rick and Everybody Everybody the Governor convene. ‘MA’ Loves Ray- Loves Raymond ‘G’ mond ‘PG’ Criminal Minds J.J. confronts Stalker The Mayor is victimher demons. ‘14’ ized by a stalker. ‘14’ (:01) Empire “The Outspoken Fox 4 News at 9 (N) King” Bunkie’s murder is investigated. (N) ‘14’ Law & Order: Special Vic- Chicago PD Burgess is reltims Unit A teen is assaulted egated to desk duty. (N) ‘14’ after a party. ‘14’ NOVA “Big Bang Machine” Nazi Mega Weapons Adolf Restarting the Large Hadron Hitler’s command complex. Collider. ‘G’ (N) ‘PG’

Celebrity Wife Swap Tracey Gold and Carnie Wilson. ‘PG’ NCIS An agent is gunned down. ‘14’ Seinfeld “The Seinfeld “The Seven” ‘PG’ Cadillac” ‘PG’

Parks and Recreation

Raising Hope Raising Hope ‘PG’ ‘PG’ Vera Bradley: Handbags & Accessories ‘G’ Little Women: LA The ladies Little Women: LA “Mama Little Women: LA “Baby (:02) Big Women: Big Love (:02) Little Women: LA embark on a booze cruise. ‘14’ Drama” Trevore has lunch Bump” Traci struggles with Kristi breaks down. (N) ‘14’ Traci struggles with feelings of with his mother. ‘14’ feelings of envy. ‘14’ envy. ‘14’ NCIS Vance investigates a NCIS “Detour” Jimmy and NCIS Gibbs and McGee travel NCIS A suspect from a NCIS: Los Angeles “War boxer’s death. ‘PG’ Ducky go missing. ‘14’ to Afghanistan. ‘PG’ 15-year-old case. ‘PG’ Cries” ‘14’ Seinfeld “The Seinfeld ‘PG’ The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang Conan (N) ‘14’ Cadillac” ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘14’ Theory ‘14’ Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘14’

30 Rock ‘14’ 30 Rock ‘14’

(:02) Little Women: LA Trevore has lunch with his mother. ‘14’ NCIS: Los Angeles “The Watchers” ‘PG’ Cougar Town Conan ‘14’ ‘14’

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

(:15) “The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug” (2013, Fantasy) Ian McKellen, Martin Free- Looking ‘MA’ Girls “Iowa” ‘MA’ HBO 303 504 man, Richard Armitage. Bilbo and company encounter the fearsome dragon Smaug. ‘PG-13’ !

+ MAX 311 516 5 SHOW 319 546 8 TMC

329 554

January 11 - 17, 2015

Clarion TV

© Tribune Media Services

Full or Partial Bathroom Remodels

260-4943

Cleaning

Licensed • Bonded • Insured •License #33430

HaveGENERAL ToolsCONTRACTING Will Travel

Tim Wisniewski, owner • Residential & Commercial • Emergency Water Removal • Janitorial Contracts • Upholstery Cleaning

283-3362

Notices

Licensed, Bonded & Insured

Installation

252-3965

35 Years Construction Experience

Angle Arrow -

Arrow -

Banner-

Best Stamp-

Checkmark-

Dollar Symbol-

Electric-

Firecracker-

For Sale Sign-

Heart-

Look-

Magnet-

New-

Pot of Gold-

Star-

Wow! Stamp-

Just tell us which graphic you like! An affordable way to grab people’s attention

Classified Ad Specials Private Party Only - Prices include sales tax. NO REFUNDS on specials. Cannot be combined with any other offer

Garage Sale - $26.00* 2 Days - 30 words

Includes FREE “Garage Sale” Promo Kit

Wheel Deal

Selling a Car - Truck - SUV? Ask about or wheel deal special

Monthly Specials!

Ask about our seasonal classified advertising specials. For items such as boats, motorcycles, RVs and snowmachines

Information

Important Classified Advertising Information

• In the event of typographical errors, please call by 10 A.M. the very first day the ad appears. The Clarion will be responsible for only one incorrect insertion. • Prepayment or credit card required. • Ads can be charged only after an approved credit application has been filed. • Ads may also be charged to a current VISA or MasterCard • Billing invoices payable on receipt. • No refunds under $5.00 will be given. • Minimum ad is 10 words. • One line bold type allowed. Additional bold text at $1.00 each word. • Blind Box available at cost of ad plus $15.00 fee. • The publisher reserves the right to reject any advertisement deemed objectionable either in subject or phraseology or which is considered detrimental to the newspaper.

Place your ad online at ShopKenaiPeninsula.com

Ad Deadlines Line Ads

10 A.M. The Previous Day Monday - 11 A.M. Friday Sunday - 10 A.M. Friday

Corrections

In the event of typographical errors, please call by 10 A.M. the very first day the ad appears. The Clarion will be responsible for only one incorrect insertion.

Faxed ads must be recieved by 8:30 A.M. for the next day’s publication

Computer Problems Call Today ( 9 0 7 ) 2 8 3 - 5 1 1 6

130 S Willow Street, Suite 8 • Kenai, AK 99611

The State of Alaska requires construction companies to be licensed, bonded and insured before submitting bids, performing work, or advertising as a construction contractor in accordance with AS 08..18.011, 08.18.071, 08.18.101, and 08.15.051. All advertisements as a construction contractor require the current registration number as issued by the Division of Occupational Licensing to appear in the advertisement. CONSUMERS MAY VERIFY REGISTRATION OF A CONTRACTOR . Contact the AK Department of Labor and Workforce Development at 907-269-4925 or The AK Division of Occupational Licensing in Juneau at 907-4653035 or at www.dced.state.ak.us/acc/home.htm

Member of the Kenai Peninsula Builders Association

www.rainproofroofing.com

Small Engine Repair

907-260-roof (7663)

– Based in Kenai & Nikiski – Long Distance Towing

Slide Backs • Winch Out Services • Auto Sales Vehicle Storage • Roll Over Recoveries

Reddi Towing & Junk Car Killers We don’t want your fingers,

just your tows!

?

Computer Repair, Networking Dell Business Partner Web Design & Hosting

fax 907-262-6009 Seamless Gutters

Construction

ROOFING

HEATING

Roofing

AND

No matter how old your system is we can make it more efficient. FREE Kenai: 283-1063 Text us at: ESTIMATES Nikiski: 776-8055 394-4017 email us at: linton401@gmail.com Soldotna: 262-1964 394-4018 UNLIMITED MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS License # 34609

Call 283-7551

Notice to Consumers LLC

• Carpentry • General Handyman Work • Sheetrock • Painting • Woodwork • Tree Removal • Hauling • Cleanup & Repairs • Decks • Kitchen Remodels • Bath • Siding • Remodels • Unfinished Projects?

35158 KB Drive Soldotna, aK 99669

24/7 PLUMBING

$10 - With your classified Line ad.

11

Lic #39710

Do you look forward to your gas bill each month? If not, you should call

Add - A - Graphic

Tim’s

Bathroom Remodeling

• Experienced • Trustworthy • Dependable • Attention to detail Serving the Kenai Peninsula for over 11 years

Minimum of $6.30 per ad or 10 Word Minimum per Day Plus 6% Sales Tax • VISA & MasterCard welcome. Classified ads also run in the Dispatch and Online (except single day ads) *Ask about our recruitment ad pricing, details & deadlines

Advertise “By the Month” or save $ with a 3, 6 or 12 month contract. Call Advertising Display 283-7551 to get started!

Advertise in the Service Directory today! - Includes Dispatch. 283-7551

Bathroom Remodeling

K

Construction

Y

Plumbing & Heating

M

Towing

C

“Beautiful Creatures” (2013, Fantasy) Alden Ehrenreich, (:05) Real Time With Bill (:05) Togeth- (:35) Looking Alice Englert, Jeremy Irons. Star-crossed teens uncover dark Maher ‘MA’ erness ‘MA’ ‘MA’ secrets in their town. ‘PG-13’ (2:30) “47 (:45) “Austin Powers: International Man of (:15) “Epic” (2013, Adventure) Voices of Colin Farrell, Josh “Now You See Me” (2013, Comedy-Drama) Jesse Eisen“47 Ronin” (2013, Adventure) Keanu Reeves, Hiroyuki Ronin” (2013) Mystery” (1997, Comedy) Mike Myers, Eliza- Hutcherson. Animated. A teenager is magically transported to berg, Mark Ruffalo. Agents track a team of illusionists who are Sanada, Tadanobu Asano. Outcast samurai seek revenge on beth Hurley. ‘PG-13’ a secret realm. ‘PG’ thieves. ‘PG-13’ a treacherous overlord. ‘PG-13’ (2:30) “The (:45) “The Incredible Burt Wonderstone” (2013, Comedy) (:25) “Bullet to the Head” (2012, Action) Banshee “The Fire Trials” “The Untouchables” (1987, Crime Drama) Kevin Costner, “Stacked Racks From Mars” Wolverine” Steve Carell, Steve Buscemi. Secretly feuding magicians try Sylvester Stallone, Sung Kang, Sarah Shahi. Carrie faces backlash about Sean Connery. Incorruptible government agents move against (2014, Adult) Erika Jordan. to save their popular act. ‘PG-13’ ‘R’ her past. ‘MA’ ‘NR’ Al Capone. ‘R’ (3:30) “Bounce” (2000) Gwyneth Paltrow. A (:25) “Aeon Flux” (2005, Science Fiction) Inside the NFL Highlights Shameless “Milk of the Gods” Episodes House of Lies Web Therapy Inside the NFL Highlights Web Therapy widow’s new beau inadvertently caused her Charlize Theron. A rebel assassin hunts a from every NFL game. ‘PG’ Fiona balances her day job. “Episode 401” ‘MA’ (N) ‘14’ from every NFL game. ‘PG’ ‘14’ husband’s death. government leader. ‘PG-13’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ (3:35) “Cocktail” (1988, Romance) Tom (:20) “Quartet” (2012) Maggie Smith, Billy “Lucky Them” (2013, Comedy-Drama) Toni (:40) “The Last Shot” (2004) Matthew Brod- (:15) “Adult World” (2013, Comedy) Emma Roberts, John Cruise. An arrogant young bartender uses his Connolly. A diva intrudes on a trio of retired Collette. A rock journalist tracks down her erick. An FBI agent tricks a screenwriter to Cusack, Evan Peters. An aspiring poet has to take a job as a charm and good looks. ‘R’ opera singers. ‘PG-13’ former boyfriend. ‘R’ make a sham movie. ‘R’ clerk at an adult bookstore. ‘R’

Computer Repair

^ HBO2 304 505

63¢ 44¢ 36¢ 29¢

White Hot Linens ‘G’

Supernatural “The Man Who Supernatural A demon kid- Supernatural ‘14’ Grimm Investigating a teach- Grimm Investigating a sus- Grimm Nick and Hank reopen Grimm “Game Ogre” ‘14’ Supernatural Castiel issues a 138 245 Would Be King” ‘14’ naps Lisa and Ben. ‘14’ er’s death. ‘14’ pected arson case. ‘14’ a cold case. ‘14’ warning. ‘14’ NBA Basketball Atlanta Hawks at Boston Celtics. From TD Garden in Bos- NBA Basketball Los Angeles Clippers at Portland Trail Blazers. From the SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) NBA Basketball: Clippers at 140 206 ton. (N) (Live) Rose Garden in Portland, Ore. (N) (Live) Trail Blazers College Basketball College Basketball UCLA at USC. From Galen Center in Los College Basketball San Diego State at Wyoming. From Basketball NBA Tonight NFL Live (N) SportsCenter (N) 144 209 Angeles. (N) (Live) Arena-Auditorium in Laramie, Wyo. (N) (Live) (N) College Basketball Notre College Basketball Air Force at New Mexico. From Univer- College Basketball Western Washington at Central Wash- Seahawks Seahawks All College Basketball Florida State at Pittsburgh. From Pe426 687 Dame at Georgia Tech. (N) sity Arena in Albuquerque, N.M. (N) (Live) ington. (N) (Live) Press Pass Access tersen Events Center in Pittsburgh. Bar Rescue “Scary Mary’s” Bar Rescue “Spoiled Brat Bar Rescue ‘PG’ Bar Rescue Withholding em- Bar Rescue “A Dash of Bit- Framework A furniture design Bar Rescue Jon Taffer reBar Rescue Jon helps an 241 241 ‘PG’ Party” ‘PG’ ployee paychecks. ‘PG’ ters” ‘PG’ competition. ‘PG’ vives the Canyon Inn. ‘PG’ owner of a pool hall. ‘PG’ (2:30) “Out “Under Siege” (1992, Action) Steven Seagal, Tommy Lee Jones, Gary “Hard to Kill” (1990) Steven Seagal, Kelly LeBrock. Years “On Deadly Ground” (1994, Action) Steven Seagal, Michael Caine. An oil- “Aliens vs. 131 254 for Justice” Busey. A Navy cook thwarts a plot to hijack a battleship. after nearly dying, a policeman seeks revenge. company troubleshooter battles a corrupt chairman. Predator” King of the King of the The Cleve- The Cleve- American American Family Guy Family Guy Robot Mr. Pickles The Venture American American Family Guy Family Guy Robot 176 296 Hill ‘PG’ Hill ‘PG’ land Show land Show Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Chicken ‘MA’ Bros. ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Chicken To Be Announced To Be Announced Treehouse Masters “Bionic Treehouse Masters ‘PG’ Treehouse Masters “Levitat- Treehouse Masters “Treetop Treehouse Masters ‘PG’ Treehouse Masters “Levitat184 282 Treehouse” ‘PG’ ing Lighthouse” ‘PG’ Candy Kitchen” ‘PG’ ing Lighthouse” ‘PG’ Jessie ‘G’ Jessie ‘G’ I Didn’t Do I Didn’t Do Liv & Maddie Girl Meets “The Little Rascals” (1994, Comedy) Travis I Didn’t Do Austin & Jessie ‘G’ Dog With a Liv & Mad- That’s So That’s So 173 291 It ‘G’ It ‘G’ World ‘G’ Tedford, Bug Hall. It ‘G’ Ally ‘G’ Blog ‘G’ die ‘G’ Raven ‘Y7’ Raven ‘G’ Nicky, Ricky Henry Dan- The Thunder- The Thunder- Every Witch Max & Shred Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Fresh Prince Fresh Prince Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Everybody Everybody 171 300 ger ‘G’ mans ‘Y’ mans ‘Y’ Way (N) ‘G’ ‘G’ Raymond Raymond Boy Meets Boy Meets Melissa & Melissa & Melissa & Melissa & Melissa & Baby Daddy “Liar Liar” (1997, Comedy) Jim Carrey, Maura Tierney. A The 700 Club ‘G’ Melissa & Melissa & 180 311 World ‘G’ World ‘G’ Joey ‘14’ Joey ‘14’ Joey ‘14’ Joey ‘14’ Joey (N) ‘14’ (N) ‘14’ fast-talking lawyer cannot tell a lie. Joey ‘14’ Joey ‘14’ My Strange My Strange My Strange My Strange My Strange Addiction “Men My 600-Lb. Life: Where Are My 600-Lb. Life: Where Are My Strange My Strange My 600-Lb. Life: Where Are My Strange My Strange 183 280 Addiction Addiction Addiction Addiction in Doll Suits” ‘14’ They Now? They Now? (N) Addiction Addiction They Now? Addiction Addiction Naked and Afraid “The Naked and Afraid Nicaraguan Naked and Afraid “Dual Survival” (N) Dual Survival The biggest Dude, You’re Screwed: Su- Dual Survival The biggest Dude, You’re Screwed: Su182 278 Jungle Curse” ‘PG’ rain forest. ‘14’ fights from the series. (N) per Screwed (N) ‘14’ fights from the series. per Screwed ‘14’ Man v. Food Man v. Food Bizarre Foods With Andrew Man v. Food Man v. Food Bizarre Foods With Andrew Bizarre Foods America ‘PG’ Fast Foods Gone Global Fast Foods Gone Global Bizarre Foods America ‘PG’ 196 277 Chicago. ‘G’ ‘PG’ Zimmern ‘PG’ ‘G’ ‘PG’ Zimmern ‘PG’ “Asia” ‘PG’ “Africa” ‘PG’ American Pickers “The Belly American Pickers “Love ’Em American Pickers “Mad as a American Pickers “EveryAmerican Pickers (N) ‘PG’ (:03) Down East Dickering (:03) American Pickers ‘PG’ (:01) American Pickers ‘PG’ 120 269 Dance” ‘PG’ and Leave ’Em” ‘PG’ Picker” ‘PG’ thing Must Go” ‘PG’ “Back in Black” (N) ‘PG’ The First 48 “Alias; Duel” A Wahlburgers Donnie Loves Jenny The Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty (:01) Wahl- (:31) Donnie (:02) Donnie Loves Jenny (:01) Duck Dy- (:31) Duck Dycouple prepare for their wed- “Frog in One” ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ (N) ‘PG’ burgers (N) Loves Jenny The couple prepare for their nasty ‘PG’ nasty ‘PG’ 118 265 popular teenager is gunned. ‘PG’ ‘14’ ding. ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ wedding. ‘PG’ Buying and Selling “Ken & Buying and Selling “Daniel Buying and Selling “Sunita & Property Brothers “Sandra Property Brothers “Amy & House Hunt- Hunters Int’l Property Brothers “Franklin Property Brothers “Amy & 112 229 Kimberly” ‘G’ & Iris” ‘G’ David” ‘G’ & Kyle” ‘G’ Graham” (N) ‘G’ ers (N) ‘G’ & Heather” ‘G’ Graham” ‘G’ The Pioneer Southern at Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Mystery Din- Mystery Din- Mystery Din- Mystery Din- Restaurant: Impossible Restaurant: Impossible “Fi- Mystery Din- Mystery Din110 231 Woman ‘G’ Heart ‘G’ ers ‘G’ ers ‘G’ ers ‘G’ ers ‘G’ “Revved Up” (N) ‘G’ ery Family Fusion” ‘G’ ers ‘G’ ers ‘G’ Shark Tank A bike lighting Shark Tank ‘PG’ The Car The Car Shark Tank Enclosed tabletop Shark Tank A capsule that The Car The Car Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program 208 355 system. ‘PG’ Chasers (N) Chasers food screen. ‘PG’ keeps beverages hot. ‘PG’ Chasers Chasers The O’Reilly Factor (N) The Kelly File (N) Hannity (N) The O’Reilly Factor The Kelly File Hannity On the Record With Greta Red Eye (N) 205 360 Van Susteren (3:58) Fu(:28) Futura- Daily Show/ (:29) South South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park Workaholics Broad City Daily Show/ (:31) At Mid- (:01) Worka- (:31) Broad 107 249 turama ‘PG’ ma ‘PG’ Jon Stewart Park ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ (N) ‘14’ (N) ‘14’ Jon Stewart night ‘14’ holics ‘14’ City ‘14’ (3:30) “The Bleeding” (2009, Horror) Vinnie “Blade: Trinity” (2004, Horror) Wesley Snipes, Kris Kristofferson, Jessica “The Scorpion King” (2002) The Rock, Steven Brand. A “The Spirit” (2008, Action) Gabriel Macht. A rookie cop, be122 244 Jones, Michael Matthias. Biel. Blade and a pair of vampire slayers battle Dracula. warrior battles an evil ruler and a sorceress. lieved to be dead, fights crime in Central City.

PREMIUM STATIONS

Price Per Word, Per Day*

1 .............................. 6 .............................. 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

www.peninsulaclarion.com

907. 776 . 3967 C

M

Y

K


C

M

Y

K

B-6 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Before you lose your cool, find out what makes you hot DEAR ABBY: I’m a good person, but when I get frustrated over something, I fly off the handle. I date, have several close friends and a good job in a field I enjoy. Stresses in life are normal. But sometimes I blow up over things. When it happens, I can see my co-workers and friends are taken aback by my behavior. I need to improve this. I’m worried my explosive temper will affect my relationships, my job and the people I see socially. I heard you have a booklet about this issue. Where can I get one, and do you have any advice for me? — HOT AND BOTHERED IN ATLANTA DEAR HOT AND BOTHERED: Yes, I do. While anger is a normal emotion, the problem with a hairtrigger temper is that people who fly off the handle often shoot themselves in the foot. That’s why it’s important to develop tools to recognize, control and channel anger effectively without exploding. A first step in doing that is to analyze what may be setting you off. Does being overtired, hungry or not feeling up to par cause you to lash out? Feeling vulnerable has been known to make people feel angry and has negatively affected relationships. When a person’s beliefs or values are questioned, they can

become angry and, believe it or not, low self-esteem causes people to fly off the handle. People who suffer from feelings of inadequacy constantly try to prove themselves — which drives them to win every “battle” whether it’s a discussion about sports or any other subject that arises. Most adults learn from Abigail Van Buren early childhood to manage anger. But it’s equally important to learn to EXPRESS anger in ways that are constructive. In my booklet “The Anger in All of Us and How to Deal With It,” I offer tools for channeling anger. (First among them is to recognize you are becoming angry before losing control.) It also contains suggestions for managing and expressing anger appropriately. It can be ordered by sending your name and mailing address, plus a check or money order for $7 (U.S. funds) to Dear Abby — Anger Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. Shipping

Rubes

a daily basis. Someone you care about could be closed down, which will have you wondering why. Know that it could be a ploy to draw you closer to him or her. Tonight: Put up your feet and relax. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH If you follow your intuition, you will land like a cat on all fours. You might have difficulty sorting through information, as there seems to be a lot of it heading your way all at once. A partner will want to take the lead. Tonight: Don’t allow someone to intimidate others. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Stay centered, know your limits and recognize what is needed. You could feel overwhelmed by everything you hear. Listen to a loved one who has a lot to share. You might want to pull back and try a different approach. Tonight: Head home early. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Communication could be challenged, as confusion seems to run through the moment. You might feel overwhelmed by what has occurred. You know what you want, and you understand why you are going to proceed in a certain way. Tonight: Reach out to a close friend. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHYou often question how much you need to do with or for someone else. You might express a tendency to be excessive. Try not to react to a loved one’s need to control you; just go with the flow, and you will be a lot happier. Tonight: Trust that everything will work out. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You might want to move in a

By Leigh Rubin

Ziggy

By Eugene Sheffer

and handling are included in the price. I hope it will be helpful for you. It takes maturity to identify and verbalize negative emotions rather than lash out at others. Being able to calmly say, “When you do that (or say that) it makes me angry” will earn you the respect of others. And it’s the key to defusing anger before losing control. DEAR ABBY: What are my financial obligations if I invite a gentleman to a formal out-of-state wedding? Must I pay 100 percent for airfare, hotel, meals and clothing? — PROPER MISS IN OHIO DEAR PROPER MISS: If the man is a gentleman, he will offer to split the cost of the airfare, hotel and meals with you. If he’s not — or can’t afford it — then the person footing the bills will be you and only you. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Hints from Heloise

Jacqueline Bigar’s Stars A baby born today has a Sun in Capricorn and a Moon in Scorpio. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015: This year you have the power within you to transform any segment of your life that you choose. Be wary of someone who always seems to add uproar to any situation. If you are single, you will meet someone who could affect your life the second half of your birthday year. This person is very different from you. If you are attached, the two of you opt for less restriction and more freedom. Let go of negativity, and accept your sweetie as he or she is. SCORPIO could be your best friend or your worst enemy. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You could see a situation develop that might cause you to stand back and rethink a decision. Do not get caught up in a power play. You are likely to find it difficult to honor someone else’s needs when so much uproar seems to be happening. Tonight: Defer to a friend. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHYou could feel challenged by a partner. The unexpected could occur and force you to change your plans. An associate tends to challenge you for control. A friend will come to the rescue, but know that a loved one might feel left out. Tonight: Say “yes” to an invitation. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH Be aware of what is happening with a co-worker whom you see on

Crossword

new direction. The unexpected is likely to occur, and it could take some time to sort out what is really going on. Chaos seems to reign supreme! Loosen up, and enjoy what is being offered, despite all the confusion. Tonight: Keep to your budget. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Listen to news that heads your way. You’ll correctly sense that you do not have the full story. A financial matter needs some attention. Going to extremes, whether emotionally or financially, is likely to mark your behavior. Tonight: Listen to what a friend shares. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You could be in a strange mood, and might feel somewhat negative. A meeting will allow you to revise your perspective and/or knowledge. As a result, you are likely to be more optimistic than you have been in the recent past. Tonight: Invite a friend to join you. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH You could be in the mood to do something a bit different. Curb impulsiveness. Your sixth sense plugs right in and draws some unexpected results. Don’t close down because someone isn’t coming through as you might have hoped he or she would. Tonight: Say “yes” to an offer. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Honor a fast change, and you’ll feel much better than you have in a while. You are likely to become difficult or uneasy as pressure builds to do something in a certain way. Detach, and consider revising your thinking and attitude. Tonight: Take off ASAP.

What’s floating in my vinegar? Dear Heloise: I put some white vinegar into a pint canning jar. It’s more convenient than pouring out of a gallon jug for quick uses. Why does it get “floaties” in it? I just rinse out the jar with hot water and use the same jar again. — A Reader, via email The “floaties” you see are nothing more than “mother,” which is not harmful at all. Don’t panic or even pour them out. Mother is caused by natural bacteria that may develop after a bottle of vinegar is opened. Most vinegar we buy is pasteurized. Some other vinegars (nonpasturized or homemade) may develop feathery, floating objects. There’s no harm in eating it, or you can strain it out, and the remaining vinegar is A-OK to use. I keep several gallons of vinegar handy all over the house. My favorite pamphlet is Heloise’s Fantabulous Vinegar Hints and More, because it’s just crammed with my special recipes and hints for you. To receive one, please send $5 and a long, self-addressed, stamped (70 cents) envelope to: Heloise/ Vinegar, P.O. Box 795001, San Antonio, TX 78279-5001. Add a teaspoon or so of vinegar into a large vase of flowers to help them last longer. — Heloise No explosion Dear Readers: When cooking or heating certain foods in the microwave, you need to be extra careful so that there is not an explosion! It’s important to follow the directions. Most “solid” foods, especially whole potatoes, an apple or even a hot dog, need to be “vented” so steam will escape. You should pierce this food to release some moisture. Otherwise, “boom,” and a mess to clean up! — Heloise

SUDOKU

By Tom Wilson

1 5 6 9 2 4 3 8 7

7 3 8 6 1 5 2 4 9

9 4 2 3 8 7 5 6 1

8 1 4 7 5 9 6 3 2

6 7 5 8 3 2 9 1 4

3 2 9 4 6 1 7 5 8

2 9 3 5 4 8 1 7 6

4 6 7 1 9 3 8 2 5

Difficulty Level

5 8 1 2 7 6 4 9 3

2015 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Friday.

1/13

Previous Puzzles Answer Key

B.C.

Tundra

By Johnny Hart

Garfield

Shoe

By Jim Davis

Take It from the Tinkersons By Bill Bettwy

By Chad Carpenter

By Chris Cassatt & Gary Brookins

Mother Goose and Grimm

C

M

Y

K

By Michael Peters

C

M

Y

K


C

M

Y

K

Peninsula Clarion

01/14/15

Chief Mokracek of CES wants YOU! Page 2

From hot pink to hot camo formal wear the Seavey family has it at Safia’s Bridal.

Kaladi Bros. starts the first day of the year for charity. Page 2 C

M

Y

K

All Alaskans get & can give back through their PFD. Page 2

While the name Seavey has become synonymous with Iditarod champions and “Ididaride” sled dog rides for tourists from Seward to Sterling, in 2015 Safia and Danny Seavey intend to become known as the place on the Peninsula for bridal and formal attire for all occasions. With over 900 dresses in stock Safia’s Bridal, formerly Alaska Wedding Brokers in Sterling is now open in Soldotna on the Spur Highway in the JoAnn Fabrics strip mall. “We bought everything that Deb had accumulated and had become known for carrying and brought it to the new location where we have a lot more space to look and try on whatever you see. We’ve put a lot of work into the new show room and want to get the word out that you don’t have to drive out to Sterling anymore we’re right here in town to help you dream or get ready for your special occasion,” said Safia.

Accompanying Safia at their new bridal shop is the next generation of Seavey’s, 9-year-old Allikz, who already knows a lot about shoes, 3-year-old Emma, who loves playing dress up and 3-month-old Emma who may be bound to be the next female Iditarod champion in a few years. After all in the Susan Butcher era a nationally popular t-shirt slogan was, “Alaska! Where men are men and women win the Iditarod!” “Last year was my third race,” says Danny, “I grew up with four brothers and now I have three daughters so my life has turned pink and I figure this is an investment for my future as the father of brides,” he laughed. “It’s new for me too,” added Safia, “I love pretty things and making the dreams of girls who do come true at reasonable prices.” As anyone who is planning a wedding in the New Year or has a prom coming up in 2015 knows

now is the time to start checking out what’s available. “We offer an experience in shopping that certainly is an alternative to the internet. We have beautiful stock on hand with mirrors and fitting rooms where you and your family or friends can share in the fun, give their opinions and mix and match colors and accessories, take phone photos and include your friends. I have a lot of fun being part of the total experience and working with the clients, we help everyone stay within their budget or help them create one,” said Safia. For the guys Safia’s has everything from traditional tuxedos to the Alaska camo tux with all the accessories to accompany them. Safia’s is offering a $99 prom tuxedo rental for the guys and a great selection of prom dresses, “But folks should come in soon!” Safia’s Bridal shop is open Wednesday – Saturday 11:00am – 5:00pm.

Safia & Allikz Seavey welcome you to the new Safia’s Bridal shop in the JoAnn Fabric mall.

The largest selection of formal & wedding apparel now in Soldotna at Safia’s Bridal.

Put your ad here....for just peanuts a day!

C

M

Y

K


C

M

Y

K

Page 2 Clarion Dispatch, January 14, 2015

Kaladi Bros. Baristas make New Year’s Day a “free day” for Stitches of Love

For many years the baristas at Kaladi Brothers Coffee shops have spent their New Year’s Day working for free and donating profits to local charities. This year Kaladi manager Amira Marey joined by baristas Amy George, Bradley Smith, Emma Brenner and Megaera Opheim, volunteered and raised nearly $1,300 to be donated to “Stitches of Love.” “It started at the stores in Anchorage with the intent of helping youth and a few years ago we decided to do it here and for a local charity and this year we choose Stitches of Love,” Amira told the Dispatch. Stitches of Love is a local group that uses their talents as seamstresses to provide handmade quilts for children. “We are a group of women who back in 2004 decided to make quilts for every child locally that goes into foster care. Since then we have been joined by so many talented ladies that we have expanded and have been able to provide quilts to other organizations like Hospice, the former Homeless shelter and

lots of other places we have given multiple hundreds of quilts,” said Hale. “Our employees love it and we never have trouble getting volunteers to work on New Year’s Day, we double our employees on shift to meet the demand our customers come in knowing what’s going on and it makes a very pleasant atmosphere and experience. The music is good and everybody has a good time. It’s become a New Year’s tradition for many of our regular customers and its fun knowing that you are doing something that benefits the community. The Kobuk location has been around for so long that it’s become part of many folks daily routine, this place belongs to them and this is where they come to visit and have their favorite beverage, it’s just part of life in Soldotna,” said Amy. The tip jar totaled some $232 according to Marey and the proceeds from the drinks made the total over $1,300 that will go to buy materials for quilts made Kaladi Bros. starts the first day of the year for charity. this year by Stitches of Love.

Amira Marey & Kaladi Bros baristas donated their New Years’ Day time and profits to Stitches of Love. Amira, Emma & Sharron Hale show one of the cozy quilts made by Stitches of Love for local foster care kids.

Permanent Fund Dividend filing and sharing starts the New Year for Alaskans Only in Alaska is Permanent Fund Dividend (PFD) filing a New Year’s family tradition. One that goes back to 1982 when the first checks were issued to every man, woman and child claiming residency in the 49th State and before anyone had heard of the internet. Applications had to be filled out and witnessed then posted before the deadline. In 2015 the majority of Alaskans will file electronically and in probably a quarter of the time with no postage required. And with the advent of electronic PFD filing a new “only in Alaska New Year’s tradition” started six years ago, the tradition of giving back to organizations that benefit all Alaskans through what is known as the Pick. Click.Give program. The inaugural year of Pick.Click.Give in 2009 saw 5,173 Alaskans contribute $545,000. “That was an exciting start,” said Josselyn O’Connor of the Kenai Watershed Forum, “but last year saw 26,773 statewide participants give $2,771,400 and that was huge for non-profits who are able to use these funds with more flexibility in their organizations because they are not restricted like grant funds and can go toward the greatest need,” she said. For participating non-profits on the Peninsula it means they are reaching potential contributors outside of their local area, “We are receiving donations from Alaskans in Bethel and Kodiak that know what we are doing on the Peninsula and want to support the work that KWF is doing so it extends our reach without the expense of solicitation,” said O’Connor. The Pick. Click.Give program has allowed Alaskans to choose their favorite non-profit that provides a wide array community services from Boys & Girls Clubs to Hospice and Food Banks. “Not only are these services that all of will use at some point of our life time but it gives families a chance to instill the priceless benefits of

philanthropy in their children. Together families can go on line, talk with their children about the different organizations, what they do and let the child choose the amount and where to give their money. They share in the reward of giving as they grow, it’s a unique opportunity in parenting,” said O’Connor. Last year the Pick.Click.Give added another incentive for Alaskans to participate called the “Double your dividend sweepstakes.” When you file by March 31st and participate in the Pick.Click.Give you are automatically entered to win an extra PFD. Ten lucky Alaskans who share part of their PFD through Pick.Click.Give will be given an extra dividend if you check the non-anonymous box. If you’ve already filed, it’s easy to log on again and choose a cause that matters to you, according to O’Connor. “But you may remain anonymous if you choose; you just won’t be in the sweepstakes.” For more information go to www.pickclickgive.org. See PICK, page A-3

6-year-old Cora O’Connor loves Alaska and knows how to Pick, Click, Give of her very own PFD.

C

M

Y

K

C

M

Y

K


C

M

Y

K

CES Chief Mokracek wants YOU! In 2014 Central Emergency Services (CES) was the fourth busiest fire station in the entire state of Alaska only answering fewer calls than Anchorage, Fairbanks and Juneau. According to CES Chief Chris Mokracek that has motivated some changes for the coming year. “To run that many calls requires staffing. We are really good in having the equipment to meet the demand for the service area, but future staffing is the big issue and that really is our biggest expense,” Chief Mokracek told the Dispatch in an interview. With financial resources being strained Mokracek says CES is returning to a model that has proven effective throughout history, “To maintain the status quo in regards to the mil rate we are

looking at augmenting our services with volunteer firefighters. No one wants to pay more taxes and we feel this is the most fiscally responsible way to augment our staffing for the service area and meet the needs of the community.” Mokracek believes the community has the talent pool to fill the need and that the program will offer other benefits for the individual volunteer, “Kenai Peninsula College has their paramedic program and a fire science program that is going strong and we feel we can establish a very good partnership with KPC utilizing students to augment our staffing while providing seasoning for future job applicants. We also will be able to provide some housing through a resident pro-

gram where students can live at the stations and be available to respond to calls while saving housing expense and giving back to the community by providing service to the CES area. This has been a very effective program nationwide and also in Fairbanks,” he said. In coming days the CES volunteer recruitment campaign will be gearing up with posters throughout the service area, “January is our big drive and application will be collected through this month and have an orientation in February to get the ball rolling. Becoming a volunteer for CES is a time intensive endeavor with requirements which must be met to maintain membership. The minimum age is 18 but there is no maximum age

and of course we appreciate any past experience, if you are an EMT, ETT or certified fire fighter that’s great but if not we will provide the training necessary. There are all kinds of rolls that need to be filled from driving a fire apparatus, responding to fires or emergency medical incidents we can find a spot for you,” said Mokracek. Stipends are paid to volunteers for emergency responses, attending training sessions and some department related events. If you are interested in becoming a resident volunteer contact CES at 907-262-4792 ext 3 or visit the website at centralemergencyservices.com or stop by the administrative offices at 253 Wilson Lane in Soldotna and pick up a membership packet. Chief Mokracek of CES wants YOU!

. . . Pick Continued from page A-2

C

M

Y

K

Clarion Dispatch, January 14, 2015

From habitat restoration to hospice care Alaskans are sharing their PFD’s in record numbers.

C

M

Y

K

Page 3


C

M

Y

K

Page 4 Clarion Dispatch, January 14, 2015

To place an ad call 283-7551 or go online at www.peninsulaclarion.com Photo courtesy of Dan Ra

Classifieds Classified Index

Clarion Dispatch

Employment Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted Real Estate - For Sale Commercial Property Condominiums/Town homes Farms/Ranches Homes

Real Estate - For Sale (Cont’d) Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property Real Estate - Rentals Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums Town homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals

Oil & Refinery

General Employment

BECOME AN OCEAN RANGER Help protect Alaska's environment and its people! Be an observer onboard cruise ships for the summer, monitoring State environmental and marine discharge requirements and identifying any potential safety, sanitation, and/or health risks. Compensation includes both salary and benefits. Minimum Qualifications: 1.) Designated Duty Engineer (DDE) or Third Assistant Engineer (3 A/E) or degree in marine safety and environmental protection from accredited maritime institution. 2.) American Maritime Officers (AMO) Union member. 3.) Pass criminal background check, able to enter Canada. 4.) Of sound physical condition and able to pass post-offer physical examination. 5.) Successful completion of Ocean Ranger training. To Apply: 1.) Online at www.Crowley.com/oceanrangers by 02/15/15. 2.) Email: marinejobs@crowley.com with questions. Alaska residents are encouraged to apply!

Employment Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

BEEP! BEEP! YOUR NEW RIDE IS WAITING IN THE CLASSIFIEDS

Real Estate - Rentals (Cont’d) Merchandise For Sale (Cont’d) Vacation Rentals Musical Instructions FINANCIAL Office/Business Equipment Auctions Vacations/Tickets Business for Sale Wanted To Buy Financial Opportunities Recreation Mortgage/Loans Aircrafts & Parts Merchandise For Sale All-Terrain Vehicles Antiques/Collectibles Archery Appliances Bicycles Audio/Video Boat Supplies/Parts Building Supplies Boats & Sail Boats Computers Boat Charters Crafts/Holiday Items Boats Commercial Electronics Campers/Travel Trailers Exercise Equipment Fishing Firewood Guns Food Hunting Guide Service Furniture Kayaks Garage Sales Lodging Heavy Equipment/Farm Machinery Marine Lawn & Garden Motor Homes/RVs Liquidation Snowmobiles Machinery & Tools Sporting Goods Miscellaneous Transportation Music Autos

Homes

PROJECT MANAGER Trihydro Corporation has an opening for a Project Manager in Soldotna, AK. Applicants must have a BS in Geology or Civil/Env Engineering and ten years of relevant experience. Applicants with refinery, petrochemical, or upstream oil and gas experience and professional certification are preferred. Duties will include project management, technical report preparation, field work, health and safety compli ance, oversight of field crews performing general environmental services, client/business development, and oversight of operation activities for groundwater remediation systems. The selected applicant will oversee the delivery of work scope, schedule, budgets, and client expectations within an active petroleum refinery. Additionally, the selected applicant will assist in the development of a Trihydro office in the Soldotna area. Applicants must have a clean driving record. Applicants must live or be available to relocate to the Kenai Peninsula. Excellent technical writing, client management, and Microsoft Office computer skills are required. Submit application, resume and cover letter at: www.trihydro.com Trihydro is an EEO/AA employer.

Real Estate For Sale Commercial Property Condominiums/Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

Commercial Property MIXED USE BUILDING 7 Offices, 2-bedroom apt., pizza restaurant. Ideal for owner occupant for the offices and commercial rentals as well. Highway Frontage in Soldotna. 7200sq.ft. for $631,000. ($88. per Sq.Ft.) MLS #13-15371 McKay Investment (907)260-6675

01/14/15

Transportation (Cont’d) Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted PETS & LIVESTOCK Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies Services Appliance Repair Auction Services

Services (Cont’d) Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/Electric Satellite TV

Services (Cont’d) Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling Notices/Announcements Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/Announcements Worship Listings Public Notices/Legal Ads Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

Homes

AFFORDABLE KENAI RIVER FRONT HOME Pristine 3-bedroom home on river. Fishing platform, large lot with extra RV space. Dramatic price adjustment, 12 miles out Funny River Road. $473,000. MLS# 14-11664 McKay Investments Co. (907)260-6675 KENAI KEYS PRICE REDUCTION 4-Bedroom, 2-bath in gated community, with boat launch a stone’s throw. ABOVE the flood plain. Contemporary and scrupulously maintained 2 level home. A steal at $315,000. NOW $295,000. MLS# 12-12227 McKay Investment Co.

(907)260-6675

Manufactured Mobile Homes MOBILE ON 1.29Acres 3-bedroom, 2-bath showroom condition. New well, septic. Lot has rights to gated Kenai River boat launch (Funny River area). $149,500. MLS# 14-11704 McKay Investments Co. (907)260-6675

Rentals Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

Apartments, Unfurnished COLONIAL MANOR (907)262-5820 Large 1-Bedroom, Walk-in closet, carport, storage, central location. Onsite manager. DUPLEX APARTMENT with awesome fenced yard! 2 bed 1 bath on Walker Lane, Kenai. 1 car garage, W/D in unit. $600 deposit and $1,250 per month includes gas, water, and trash. Tenant pays electric. Pets additional $250 deposit. Call Ryan 907.394.1764. REDOUBT VIEW Soldotna’s best value! Quiet, freshly painted, close to schools. 1-Bedroom from $625. 2-Bedroom from $725. 3-Bedroom, 2-bath, from $825. No pets. (907)262-4359.

Apartments, Furnished SOLDOTNA 4-PLEX Furnished 2-Bedroom, washer/dryer. $925. includes utilities. (907)394-4201, (907)394-4200.

Apartments, Unfurnished

Apartments, Unfurnished ALL TYPES OF RENTALS

Homes FIVE STAR REALTY Property Management Experts with more than 25 year experience. Available in the Office Monday-Friday 8:00-5:00 Diane Melton, Owner/Broker

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE FOR RENT: ALASKA 1st REALTY 44045 Kalifornsky Beach Rd., Soldotna www.Alaska1stRealty.com, e-mail; Alaska1stRealtyInc@gmail.com, phone: (907)260-7653

News, Sports, Weather & More! C

M

Y

K

Property Management and Oversight Division 170 N. Birch Suite 101, Soldotna (907)262-2522 Mary.Parske@century21.com www.Century21FreedomRealty.com

We provide 24 hour emergency service. Five Star Realty Always reach for the Stars Phone: 262-2880

www buyfivestarak.com

Put your ad here....for just peanuts a day!

C

MC

Y

K


C

M

C

M

Y

K

Y

K

Clarion Dispatch, January 14, 2015 Page 5

B-4 Peninsula Clarion, Monday, December 8, 2014

Would you like to have your business highlighted in Yellow Advantage? â&#x20AC;˘ Reach readers in the newspaper and online that are ready, willing and able to buy your goods and services. â&#x20AC;˘ Have your business stand out from the competition by creating top of mind awareness. â&#x20AC;˘ Ads appear EVERYDAY in the newspaper â&#x20AC;˘ Easy to use online search engine puts your business ahead of the competion. â&#x20AC;˘ Update your ads and listings frequently.

Peninsula Clarion Display Advertising

(907) 283-7551

),1' $1< %86,1(66 $1< 6(59,&( $1< 7,0( $7 PENINSULACLARION&20 025( ,1)2

*HW FRXSRQV DQG VSHFLDO RIIHUV

180%(5

*HW SKRQH QXPEHUV

:(% 6,7(

9LVLW EXVLQHVV ZHEVLWHV *HW GLUHFWLRQV

0$36

)RU PRUH LQIRUPDWLRQ FDOO Display Advertising DW 907 283-7551

Get your business listed 283-7551

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dentistry

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

Bathroom Remodeling AK Sourdough Enterprises Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

GOT JUNK?

Sell it in the Classifieds

283-7551

35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

Business Cards Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK

Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD Extractions, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

Computer Repair

Dentistry

Located in the Willow Street Mall

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

Carhartt

Need Cash Now?

Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing 35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Walters & Associates

283-4977

Place a Classified Ad.

283-7551

Advertise in the Service Directory today! - Includes Dispatch. 283-7551

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

HaveGENERAL ToolsCONTRACTING Will Travel

252-3965

35 Years Construction Experience Licensed, Bonded & Insured

35158 KB Drive Soldotna, aK 99669

fax 907-262-6009

907-260-roof (7663) Member of the Kenai Peninsula Builders Association

www.rainproofroofing.com

Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing

Funeral Homes

35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

Peninsula Memorial Chapels & Crematory Kenai........................................283-3333 Soldotna ..................................260-3333 Homer...................................... 235-6861 Seward.....................................224-5201

Print Shops

Remodeling AK Sourdough Enterprises Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

alias@printers-ink.com

150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai............................. 283-4977

www.peninsulaclarion.com

Tim Wisniewski, owner â&#x20AC;˘ Residential & Commercial â&#x20AC;˘ Emergency Water Removal â&#x20AC;˘ Janitorial Contracts â&#x20AC;˘ Upholstery Cleaning

283-3362

283-7551

Computer Problems Call Today ( 9 0 7 ) 2 8 3 - 5 1 1 6

?

Computer Repair, Networking Dell Business Partner Web Design & Hosting 130 S Willow Street, Suite 8 â&#x20AC;˘ Kenai, AK 99611

Advertise Online 24/7 P @

The State of Alaska requires construction companies to be licensed, bonded and insured before submitting bids, performing work, or advertising as a construction contractor in accordance with AS 08..18.011, 08.18.071, 08.18.101, and 08.15.051. All advertisements as a construction contractor require the current registration number as issued by the Division of Occupational Licensing to appear in the advertisement. CONSUMERS MAY VERIFY REGISTRATION OF A CONTRACTOR . Contact the AK Department of Labor and Workforce Development at 907-269-4925 or The AK Division of Occupational Licensing in Juneau at 907-4653035 or at www.dced.state.ak.us/acc/home.htm

Do you look forward to your gas bill each month? If not, you should call

LUMBING AND HEATING

No matter how old your system is we can make it more efficient. Kenai: 283-1063 Text us at: Nikiski: 776-8055 394-4017 email us at: linton401@gmail.com Soldotna: 262-1964 394-4018 UNLIMITED MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS License # 34609

FREE ESTIMATES

The weatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right to hit the streets in hot new wheels! Count on the classifieds for easy at-home auto shopping. Check out the

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Based in Kenai & Nikiski â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Long Distance Towing

Small Engine Repair

ROOFING

150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai............................. 283-4977

www.peninsulaclarion.com

Notices

Installation

K

Seamless Gutters

Y

Roofing

M

Construction

Lic #39710

C

alias@printers-ink.com

Outdoor Clothing

Notice to Consumers LLC

â&#x20AC;˘ Carpentry â&#x20AC;˘ General Handyman Work â&#x20AC;˘ Sheetrock â&#x20AC;˘ Painting â&#x20AC;˘ Woodwork â&#x20AC;˘ Tree Removal â&#x20AC;˘ Hauling â&#x20AC;˘ Cleanup & Repairs â&#x20AC;˘ Decks â&#x20AC;˘ Kitchen Remodels â&#x20AC;˘ Bath â&#x20AC;˘ Siding â&#x20AC;˘ Remodels â&#x20AC;˘ Unfinished Projects?

Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK

Advertise â&#x20AC;&#x153;By the Monthâ&#x20AC;? or save $ with a 3, 6 or 12 month contract. Call Advertising Display 283-7551 to get started!

Cleaning

260-4943

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

Timâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Bathroom Remodeling

Bathroom Remodeling

Licensed â&#x20AC;˘ Bonded â&#x20AC;˘ Insured â&#x20AC;˘License #33430

Located in the Willow Street Mall

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Extractions, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

Rack Cards

Walters & Associates

Extractions, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD

Full or Partial Bathroom Remodels

â&#x20AC;˘ Experienced â&#x20AC;˘ Trustworthy â&#x20AC;˘ Dependable â&#x20AC;˘ Attention to detail Serving the Kenai Peninsula for over 11 years

Insurance

Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD

AK Sourdough Enterprises

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

alias@printers-ink.com

150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai

Family Dentistry

Computer Repair

Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing

Located in the Willow Street Mall

Contractor

Plumbing & Heating

Walters & Associates

Boots

Every Day in your Peninsula Clarion â&#x20AC;˘ www.peninsulaclarion.com

Slide Backs â&#x20AC;˘ Winch Out Services â&#x20AC;˘ Auto Sales Vehicle Storage â&#x20AC;˘ Roll Over Recoveries

Reddi Towing & Junk Car Killers We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want your fingers,

just your tows!

Towing

Automotive Insurance

ZZZpeninsulaclarionFRP

907. 776 . 3967

listings from dealers and private owners, then make a smart move to a smooth new ride.

Finance & Accounting

BUSINESS OFFICE ASSISTANT The Peninsula Clarion newspaper has an opening for a Business Office Assistant. Experience in a business office environment, excellent customer service skills, knowledge of PC platform as well as proper grammar and spelling skills are a must. Accounting experience preferred but not required. The ideal candidate must be able to multitask, meet deadlines, be able to work individually and in a team environment, and have a positive atti tude. This person will do data entry, billing, filing and basic accounting functions among other duties. This is a full-time position with benefits. Salary DOE. Interested parties can submit an application by mailing it to: Peninsula Clarion Attn: Teresa Mullican PO Box 3009 Kenai, AK 99611 Email resumes to: teresa.mullican@peninsulaclarion.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE The Peninsula Clarion is an equal opportunity employer. Applications are available at our offices on 150 Trading Bay Road in Kenai.

Apartments, Furnished 1-LARGE ROOM FULLY FURNISHED Soldotna, quiet setting, includes utilities. (907)394-2543. EFFICIENCY 1-Person basement unit Downtown Kenai, quiet, adult building. No smoking/ pets, $575. including tax/ utilities. Security deposit/ lease. (907)283-3551.

Cash in on your $$$ TRASH! $$$ The Classifieds Can Help.

283-7551

Duplex KENAI 2-Bedroom, 1-bath, washer/dryer, Gas paid, $800. plus tax. $800. deposit. No pets. No smoking. (907)252-1060

Homes 3-BEDROOM, 2-Bath over size 2-car garage. Sterling, 4 miles to Soldotna. No smoking/pets. W/D $1,450. month plus utilities, (907)394-3939, (907)262-3806.

Office & Clerical

Office Space

CLASSIFIED INSIDE SALES REPRESENTATIVE

The Peninsula Clarion newspaper has an opening for a Classified Inside Sales Representative. Experience in a business office environment, excellent customer service skills, knowledge of PC and Mac platforms as well as proper grammar and spelling skills are a must. The ideal candidate must dress professionally, be able to multitask, meet deadlines, do data entry and have a positive attitude. This person will answer incoming and make outgoing calls and must be able to work individually and as part of a team. This is a full-time position with benefits. Interested parties can submit an application by mailing it to: Peninsula Clarion Attn: Leslie Talent PO Box 3009 Kenai, AK 99611 E-mail resumes to: leslie.talent@peninsulaclarion.com

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE The Peninsula Clarion is an equal opportunity employer. Applications are available at our office on 150 Trading Bay Road in Kenai.

Homes 3-BEDROOM, 2-BATH Sterling. Fully furnished. No pets/smoking. $850. month + utilities Seasonal (907)229-2648 STERLING Small, 2-bedroom, washer/dryer, $750/ month, plus utilities, gas, tax $15, $900 deposit. No smoking/ pets. (907)262-6093.

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes NIKISKI 3-Bedroom, $950 per month. Pets allowed, includes utilities. Call (907)776-6563. PRIVATE 4 BEDROOM Mobile Home with large Lean to. Very private with beautiful views. Pets on approval only. No smoking inside 500.00 fine. You pay electricity, gas and phone. New flooring throughout. Come and take a look. Have photos on phone.

News, Sports, Weather & More!

Pets & Livestock

Miscellaneous

SMALL OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE 100 sqft to 1600 sq ft. Offices available in Kenai on North Willow Street near airport. Please contact 283-7864 for details.

Financial

Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgages/Loans

NEED CITIZENS HELP An incident occurred on September 30th at 5pm at mile 80.5 of the Sterling Hwy. in Sterling near Bing Brownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Two vehicles passed the situation in progress. If you saw a woman in the middle of the highway waving her hands, please contact Lori at 252-0288

Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

Dogs

ASIAN MASSAGE Please make phone ring! Call anytime (907)741-0800

Recreation Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boats Charter Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snow Mobiles Sporting Goods

Merchandise For Sale Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn/Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

KENAI KENNEL CLUB

Miscellaneous ALASKA MASSAGE GRAND OPENING Call Anytime 741-2662 262-0830 Thank you

Pawsitive training for all dogs & puppies. Agility, Conformation, Obedience, Privates & Rally. www.kenaikennelclub.com (907)335-2552

www.peninsulaclarion.com

Call Today 283-7551 www.peninsulaclarion.com

C

M

Y

K

Notices/ Announcements Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

Public Notices/ Legal Ads

Call 283-7551 Shop the classifieds for great deals on great stuff.

Visit Us Online!

Services Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Services Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

www.peninsulaclarion.com

Transportation Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

Health

Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

Subscribe Today!

283-3584

150 Trading Bay Rd â&#x20AC;˘ 283-7551

www.peninsulaclarion.com

C

MC

Y

KY


C

M

Y

K

Page 6 Clarion Dispatch, January 14, 2015

show your support for our troops by logging on to

www.AmericaSupportsYou.mil

C

M

Y

K

NOTE TO PUB: DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW, FOR ID ONLY. NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAs. Troop Support - Newspaper - B&W - ASYYR1-N-10133-M “Done The Same” 11 1/2 x 21 85 Line Screen digital files at Schawk: (212) 689-8585 Ref#: 259147

C

M

Y

K

Profile for Sound Publishing

Peninsula Clarion, January 14, 2015  

January 14, 2015 edition of the Peninsula Clarion

Peninsula Clarion, January 14, 2015  

January 14, 2015 edition of the Peninsula Clarion