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Combo

Rivals

Ribs, sauerkraut a perfect fall dish

SoHi, Kenai netters hit the hardcourt

Food/B-1

Sports/A-10

CLARION

Partly sunny 45/35 More weather on Page A-2

P E N I N S U L A

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2014 Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

Vol. 45, Issue 13

50 cents newsstands daily/$1.00 Sunday

Small catch, big value

Question Do you agree with a federal judge’s decision to overturn Alaska’s ban on same-sex marriage? n Yes n No To place your vote and comment, visit our Web site at www. peninsulaclarion. com.

Cook Inlet commercial fishermen see glut of pinks, pricier reds

In the news Magistrate marries gay couple in Barrow

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ANCHORAGE (AP) — A remote outpost on Alaska’s Arctic Coast where people are used to doing their own thing has applied that independent streak to gay marriage. A magistrate in Barrow has performed what is believed to be the state’s first gay marriage ceremony days ahead of schedule after a federal judge struck down the state’s ban. Couples lined up statewide Monday to apply for marriage licenses, beginning the clock on a mandatory threeday wait until ceremonies could be held. For Kristine Hilderbrand, 30, and Sarah Ellis, 34, it wasn’t about being first when they sought and received a waiver to the three-day wait from Magistrate Mary Treiber. Monday just fit their schedules better. Because Monday was Columbus Day, a federal holiday, members of Ellis’ family on the East Coast were able to call into the court’s sophisticated teleconference system used for lawyers and defendants spread out over the far-flung judicial district when Treiber conducted the marriage ceremony late Monday afternoon. U.S. District Judge Timothy Burgess ruled Sunday that the ban violated the due process and equal protection guarantees of the U.S. Constitution. Burgess on Tuesday denied the state’s request for a stay. Alaska officials plan to appeal his Sunday ruling to the 9th Circuit Court, and could also seek a stay from the appeals court, even though it has allowed gay marriages to go forward in other states within its jurisdiction. Cori Mills, a spokeswoman for the Alaska attorney general’s office, said in an email to The Associated Press on Tuesday that the state has not made a final decision yet whether to ask the 9th Circuit for the stay.

Index Opinion.................. A-4 Nation.................... A-5 World..................... A-8 Sports...................A-10 Police, courts....... A-13 Food...................... B-1 Classifieds............. B-3 Comics................... B-7 Check us out online at www.peninsulaclarion.com To subscribe, call 283-3584.

By RASHAH McCHESNEY Peninsula Clarion

Parnell, including the choice to support Senate Bill 21, mentioning how the current deficit facing the state due to a drop in oil prices would be $150 million greater had voters repealed the measure. Mallott later said SB21 should never have been put before the electorate. He said it was a shift in where the responsibility should be placed and reflects a breakdown in communication and leadership. Mallott made the comment in response to whether the state is properly utilizing the referendum process. He said referendums provide an outlet for elected officials to make sure they are creating policy that aligns with public opinion, but they are overused. Lee said he prefers public officials to be making the decisions, who are elected to be experts on the issues. In his responses during the forum, he

If measured in sheer volume of fish, the Upper Cook Inlet commercial harvest of salmon was low: preliminary Fish and Game estimates show it at about 20 percent less than the 10-year average harvest. But, when price-per-pound is factored in, the exvessel value of the 2014 harvest was high at $35 million — making it the second year in a row that Cook Inlet commercial harvesters have seen lower-than-average harvests with higher-than-average values. Last year, the commercial harvest in Upper Cook Inlet was valued at just over $39 million, ranking it as the 8th highest exvessel value since 1960, according to Fish and Game data. This year, commercial fishermen made just over $35 million, coming in at the 9th highest exvessel value since 1960. While commercial fishermen harvest all five species of Pacific salmon between the Northern District and Central District, which make up the Upper Cook Inlet area, sockeye salmon are the most valuable. More than 93 percent of the total value of the commercial fishery in the last 20 years has come from sockeye salmon. But, the value of the sockeye harvest wasn’t spread equally among fishermen — a trend in recent years as Upper Cook In-

See FORUM, page A-14

See FISH, page A-14

Photo by Kelly Sullivan/ Peninsula Clarion

Ice time

Jordan Knudsen races down the rink during with his peers during a Kenai Peninsula Hockey Association PeeWee C Tier III session Tuesday at the Kenai Multi-Purpose Facility in Kenai.

Candidates for lt. governor debate By KELLY SULLIVAN Peninsula Clarion

The three candidates running for lieutenant governor of Alaska outlined their platforms Tuesday during a public forum at the Kenai Visitor and Cultural Center. Andrew Lee, running on the Libertarian ticket, commented that he has not often been asked to join public forums for the lieutenant governor race since campaigning for the seat began. Lee, who has not previously held a position in public office, is up against the current mayor of Anchorage, Dan Sullivan, and Democrat Byron Mallott, who combined his campaign with independent candidate Bill Walker. Lee owns and operates a Bering Sea gold dredging company, and has a background in computer programming, which he said brings a unique skill to

Photo by Kelly Sullivan/ Peninsula Clarion

Candidates for lieutenant governor Andrew Lee, Byron Mallott and Dan Sullivan participate in a community forum Tuesday at the Kenai Visitor and Cultural Center in Kenai.

the table. Mallott is the former executive director of the Alaskan Permanent Fund Corporation and president of the Alaska Federation of Natives. He has also served as the mayor of Yakutat and Juneau.

Sullivan is reaching his term limit as Anchorage mayor. He previously served as chairman while he was a member on the Anchorage Assembly. During Tuesday’s forum, Sullivan referenced his support of running mate Gov. Sean

Homer residents try Senate candidates vie for to clean up beach By MICHAEL ARMSTRONG Homer News

HOMER (AP) — Illegal camping, late-night partying, reckless driving, drug dealing and trash on Bishop’s Beach: It all adds up to a trend that worries Old Town business and home owners. With the growing popularity of Bishop’s Beach has come some abuse that could change the character of the beach. “I think more is needed for our area down here,” said Bill Ostwald, owner of the old Haas studio and resident on Bunnell Avenue, at a meeting last month at Bunnell Street Arts Center. “I can just see a valuable resource that’s being destroyed. It’s pretty sad when you see vehicles driving through tide pools and beach berms.” At the meeting, Old Town neighbors met to share stories about problems and suggest solutions, including an idea that might be anathema to longtime Homer residents — limiting ve-

hicle use on the beach. Some of the ideas are: — Ban vehicles entirely; — Allow vehicle use by permit; or — Close the beach at night to vehicles. Neighbors also talked about other remedies to beach abuse, including landowners being more assertive about private property rights on the beach. The Old Town Neighborhood Association, a group formed to steer and direct improvements in Old Town, called the meeting. A stroll down Bishop’s Beach tells part of the story. Cars are parked at the east end of the beach in an area recommended for pedestrian use. Next to the mouth of Woodard Creek and west of the Homer Elks Lodge, several tents had been pitched at the bottom of the bluff on private property. Bags of trash scattered by birds littered the camping area. “The beach is very well used See BEACH, page A-14

Alaska veterans’ votes By NICHOLAS RICCARDI Associated Press

EAGLE RIVER — The focus of attention one recent Saturday at the Veterans of Foreign War post in this community on the fringe of Anchorage was college football, not the state’s hard-fought Senate race. When asked, Army veteran Ken Speegle thought about the race for a moment and said that, as a Republican, he’s pulling for challenger Dan Sullivan, a lieutenant colonel in the Marine Corps Reserve, against Democratic Sen. Mark Begich in November. But he says he won’t be heartbroken if Begich wins. Those mixed feelings hint at the tough competition for the support of veterans in the Alaska Senate race this year. “I wouldn’t be particularly happy that a Democrat won, but I wouldn’t be worried as a veteran,” said Speegle, who C

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served in Iraq and Afghanistan. The 50-year-old real estate agent said the incumbent has been “very aggressive” on veterans’ issues. Veterans represent an outsized share of the population in Alaska, where 1 in 10 residents has served in the military and an additional 35,000 troops are stationed at one of the state’s numerous military facilities. They may seem like natural supporters of Sullivan. But in this election, veterans and their votes are up for grabs. Veterans’ advocates credit Begich with helping pioneer a system that allows veterans to be treated at local hospitals rather than at Veterans Affairs facilities. That’s crucial in a state where the nearest VA hospital is in Seattle. The change also has helped Alaska avoid the lengthy waiting times for patients that caused a scandal in other states. “I’m not a shill for Mark

Begich,” said Ric Davidge, head of the Alaska Veterans Foundation and a Republican Party committeeman. “But we’re enormously blessed up here, and that blessing is directly related to Mark Begich.” He also credited the state’s senior senator, Republican Lisa Murkowski, and its veterans’ affairs agency. In an interview, Sullivan noted that the first policy paper he issued after announcing his candidacy last year was on veterans, warning of growing VA wait times in the rest of the country before the scandal made headlines. A first-time candidate who can be stiff on the stump, Sullivan by all accounts comes to life when he visits American Legion and VFW posts — usually impromptu events that are closed to reporters. But Begich has also long been a fixture at veterans’ halls and See VOTES, page A-14


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A-2 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, October 15, 2014

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(USPS 438-410) Published daily Sunday through Friday, except Christmas and New Year’s, by: Southeastern Newspapers Corporation P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Street address: 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 1, Kenai, AK Phone: (907) 283-7551 Postmaster: Send address changes to the Peninsula Clarion, P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Periodicals postage paid at Kenai, AK Represented for national advertising by The Papert Companies, Chicago, IL Copyright 2014 Peninsula Clarion A Morris Communications Corp. newspaper

Who to call at the Peninsula Clarion News tip? Question? Main number.............................................................................................. 283-7551 Fax............................................................................................................. 283-3299 News email...................................................................news@peninsulaclarion.com General news Will Morrow, editor ............................................ will.morrow@peninsulaclarion.com Rashah McChesney, city editor.............. rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com Jeff Helminiak, sports editor........................... jeff.helminiak@peninsulaclarion.com Fisheries, photographer.............................................................................................. ............................ Rashah McChesney, rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com Borough, Kenai, courts...............Dan Balmer, daniel.balmer@peninsulaclarion.com Education, Soldotna ................ Kelly Sullivan, kelly.sullivan@peninsulaclarion.com Arts and Entertainment................................................ news@peninsulaclarion.com Community, Around the Peninsula............................... news@peninsulaclarion.com Sports............................................ Joey Klecka, joey.klecka@peninsulaclarion.com Page design........ Florence Struempler, florence.struempler@peninsulaclarion.com

Circulation problem? Call 283-3584 If you don’t receive your newspaper by 7 a.m. and you live in the Kenai-Soldotna area, call 283-3584 before 10 a.m. for redelivery of your paper. If you call after 10 a.m., you will be credited for the missed issue. Regular office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Sunday. General circulation questions can be sent via email to circulation@peninsulaclarion.com. The circulation manager is Randi Keaton.

For home delivery Order a six-day-a-week, three-month subscription for $39, a six-month subscription for $73, or a 12-month subscription for $130. Use our easy-pay plan and save on these rates. Call 283-3584 for details. Mail subscription rates are available upon request.

Want to place an ad? Classified: Call 283-7551 and ask for the classified ad department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or email classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com. Display: Call 283-7551 and ask for the display advertising department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Leslie Talent is the Clarion’s advertising director. She can be reached via email at leslie.talent@peninsulaclarion.com. Contacts for other departments: Business office.................................................................................. Teresa Mullican Production................................................................................................ Geoff Long Online........................................................................................ Vincent Nusunginya

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Polar bear breaks into Kaktovik home ANCHORAGE (AP) — Ruby Kaleak’s part-time job on polar bear patrol in the village of Kaktovik, Alaska, usually means chasing the animals back to the Beaufort Sea. But she wasn’t expecting to shoo one of the biggest bears she’s ever seen out of a house last week. She was on duty Friday in the village of 300 people when a call came over the radio that a bear was inside a doorway, the Alaska Dispatch News reported. Kaleak heard two whispered words: “Qanitchaq, nanuq,” which in Inupiat means “arctic entryway, polar bear,” referring to the home’s narrow covered porch that serves as a barrier to the cold. Armed with a 12-gauge

Oil Prices Monday’s prices North Slope crude: $85.99, down from $86.55 on Friday West Texas Int.: $85.74, down from $85.82 on Friday

Tuesday Stocks Company Final Change Agrium Inc............... 83.88 +0.44 Alaska Air Group...... 42.69 +1.11 ACS...........................1.30 -0.03 Apache Corp............74.40 -1.53 AT&T........................ 33.84 +0.02 Baker Hughes.......... 52.47 -0.95 BP ........................... 40.61 -0.61 Chevron.................. 109.78 -2.25 ConocoPhillips......... 66.20 -1.87 ExxonMobil.............. 90.55 -0.29 1st Natl. Bank AK...1,700.00 — GCI...........................11.03 +0.33 Halliburton............... 49.63 -0.63 Harley-Davidson...... 56.40 -0.09 Home Depot............ 90.10 -0.50 McDonald’s...............91.10 +0.37 Safeway................... 33.97 +0.20 Schlumberger.......... 88.96 -1.97 Tesoro...................... 59.22 -1.17 Walmart....................77.98 +0.42 Wells Fargo.............. 48.83 -1.37 Gold closed............1,232.97 -2.90 Silver closed.............17.40 -0.09 Dow Jones avg..... 16,315.19 -5.88 NASDAQ................ 4,227.17 +13.52 S&P 500................ 1,877.70 +2.96 Stock prices provided by the Kenai Peninsula Edward Jones offices. C

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shotgun that can fire rounds of beanbags, firecrackers or lethal slugs, Kaleak and a co-worker drove to a house where the call may have originated. That’s where she saw a shadow in the home’s entryway that made her pause. Then, the head of a big polar bear popped up. “I was shocked. It was humongous,” Kaleak said. “Just

the neck and head was half the size of me, and I’m 5 (feet) 2 (inches).” The bear was feasting on a drum of seal oil in the entryway of 81-year-old Betty Brower’s home, said Flora Rexford, Brower’s granddaughter. Brower was home alone and crawled to the radio to call the bear patrol. No one was injured,

and the bear fled after Kaleak arrived. Polar bears’ primary habitat is sea ice, where they hunt for seals and other prey. As ice has receded to deep water beyond the continental shelf, more bears are remaining on land to look for food, according to biologists with the U.S. Geological Survey.

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Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Obituary Gerry Alan Lindgren

Redoubt Homemakers plan fall bazaar

Former Kenai resident Gerry Alan Lindgren died Sunday, Oct. 5, 2014 in Rome, Georgia. He was 46. Mr. Lindgren was born Sept. 14,1968 in Anchorage and raised in Kenai throughout his formative years. Mr. Lindgren was a world traveler and liked to spend time with family and friends. Gerry felt strongly about helping others, so in lieu of flowers please donate to any aids foundation, mental health facility, or pass it forward by helping someone in need to honor Gerry’s memory. Mr. Lindgren was preceded in death by his father, former Kenai resident James Lindgren; his mother, Zella Hubert, formerly of Anchorage; and his brother Lonnie Lindgren, formerly of Anchorage. He is survived by his domestic partner Silvio Cazorzi; his sisters, Monica Hall, Lori L. Anderson and her husband Mark Anderson, and Gina Gallagher and her husband Jesse Gallagher; his brother Lance Lindgren; his nieces Rebecca Brunni, Brittany Lindgren, Lacey Hill, Suzanne Callander, Codi, Zipporah, Isis and Neveah Anderson Jayne Hanna; and his nephews Richard Brunni, Chris Callander, Casey Anderson, Darien Lindgren, and Thor and Cody Gallagher. Those who loved him will forever miss him.

The Redoubt Homemakers FCE Fall Bazaar is Oct. 25 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. at Nikiski Fire Station No. 1, Mile 17.9 of the Kenai Spur Highway. Wares include quilts, pillows, aprons, towels, quilt patterns, wool fabric, simplicity bobbin winder, complete felting kit, cookbooks, hot pads, scrubbies, goat’s milk soaps, organic and locally grown jams-jellies-syrups, “Spirit of Alaska Women” books, baked goods and more.

Peninsula Clarion death notice and obituary guidelines:

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Around the Peninsula

The Peninsula Clarion strives to report the deaths of all current and former Peninsula residents. Notices should be received within three months of the death. We offer two types of death reports: Pending service/Death notices: Brief notices listing full name, age, date and place of death; and time, date and place of service. These are published at no charge. Obituaries: The Clarion charges a fee to publish obituaries. Obituaries are prepared by families, funeral homes, crematoriums, and are edited by our staff according to newspaper guidelines. Obituaries up to 300 words are charged $50, which includes a one-year online guest book memoriam to on Legacy.com. Obituaries up to 500 words are charged $100, which also includes the one-year online guest book memoriam. Tax is not included. All charges include publication of a black and white photo. Obituaries outside these guidelines are handled by the Clarion advertising department. How to submit: Funeral homes and crematoriums routinely submit completed obituaries to the newspaper. Obituaries may also be submitted directly to the Clarion, online at www.peninsulaclarion.com, or by mail to: Peninsula Clarion, P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, Alaska, 99611. Pre-payment must accompany all submissions not already handled by a funeral home or crematorium. Deadlines: Submissions for Tuesday – Friday editions must be received by 2 p.m. the previous day. Submissions for Sunday and Monday editions must be received by 3 p.m. Friday. We do not process obituaries on Saturdays or Sundays unless submitted by funeral homes or crematoriums. Obituaries are placed on a space-available basis, prioritized by dates of local services. Copyright: All death notices and obituaries become property of the Clarion and may not be republished in any format. For more information, call the Clarion at 907-2837551.

CIRCAC to discuss environmental monitoring, response and safety

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tion’s leading experts on end-of-life care. The presentation is for adults only. — A discussion on “Grief and the Holidays” is scheduled for 6-7:30 p.m. on Nov. 20 at the Kenai Community Library. Workshops are free and open to the public. The presentations are ideal for Hospice volunteers and potential volunteers, caregivers, health care professionals, clergy, mental health professionals and the general public. For more information or to register, call Hospice of the Central Peninsula at 907-262-0453 or email hospice.admin@alaska.net.

Join PenDOG for nose work class Peninsula Dog Obedience Group is starting an Introduction to Nose Work class Nov. 1 at 10:30 a.m. This is a fun sport for the dog and owner. Dogs are allowed to use natural instincts to search and find odor. The sport has been known to help the insecure dog to gain confidence, the aggressive dog to channel its energy into constructive behaviors and the well rounded dog to just have a lot of fun. For more information call Jan at 283-7570.

Cook Inlet Regional Citizens Advisory Council (Cook Inlet RCAC) will hold a joint Environmental Monitoring Committee (EMC) & Prevention, Response, Operations & Safety Committee (PROPS) meeting at Cook Inlet Spill Prevention and Response, Inc. (CISPRI), 51377 Kenai Spur Hwy, Nikiski on Oct. 24 beginning at 9:00 a.m. The public is welcome to at- Celebrate 4-H tend. For more information or an agenda, call 1-800-652-7222 October 5-11 was National 4-H Week. Did you know one of or 907-283-7222. Board materials will be available online just every 7 adult Americans was once a member of 4-H? More than prior to the meeting. ever, youth need meaningful ways to connect with and learn from positive adult mentors and role-models. If you are a 4-H Sterling Masons host spaghetti feed benefit Alumni we would like to hear from you and reconnect. For the The Sterling Masonic Lodge #22 is having an all-you-can- month of October the Cooperative Extension Office, Located eat Spaghetti Dinner on Saturday from 4-6 p.m. All proceeds below the Alaska Fish and Game Office on Kalifornsky Beach received from the dinner will benefit the Kenai Peninsula Food Road, is asking alumni to stop in, say howdy, sign our alumni Bank and the Sterling Area Senior Center. The menu includes list and put a pin on a map, in the county or town where you spaghetti, both meat and meatless sauce, regular, gluten-free, had your first 4-H experience. Everyone who signs the alumni whole-wheat and vegan pasta, garlic bread, salad, and dessert. list will get a chance to win a free Kenai Peninsula 4-H t-shirt A donations of $12 for the dinner is requested. For further in- or hoodie and 4-H themed goodie-bag. 4-H is a positive youth development program of the Uniformation, please call 252-4961. versity of Alaska Fairbanks and the Nation’s Land Grant University System. For more information about volunteering with Prostate cancer support group to meet or sponsoring your local 4-H program contact Jason Floyd at There will be a meeting for men affected by prostate cancer 907-262-5824. at 6 p.m. Thursday in the Augustine room at Central Peninsula Hospital. Family and friends are welcome. For information Health insurance sign-up class offered contact Jim at 260-4904. Peninsula Community Health Services will provide access to affordable insurance via: Affordable Care Act, Denali Care, Hospice community presentations planned Medicare and VA Enrollment. This is a free service. This is an Hospice of the Central Peninsula will host a series of com- open house style class. Fully qualified staff will be on site to help answer questions. For more information call 260-3691. munity presentations: — A presentation on “Five Wishes,” a popular living will, Services are available from 7-9 p.m. at Soldotna Prep (formerly will take place on Oct. 21 from 6-8 p.m. at the Soldotna Prep SMS) on the following dates: — October 21 (formerly Soldotna Middle School) library. “Five Wishes” is — November 4 a way to begin those difficult conversations and is a resource — November 18 for structuring discussions about the type of care you would — December 2 like to receive. It was written with the help of the American — December 16 Bar Association’s Commission on Law and Aging and the na-

Central Peninsula Hospital in the of local organizations. To have Augustine Room, Soldotna. Call your event listed, email organization name, day or days of meet252-0558. ing, time of meeting, place, and a 5:30 p.m. • Weight loss and health The Community Calendar lists contact phone number to news@ support group, Christ Lutheran recurring events and meetings peninsulaclarion.com. Church. Call 362-1340. 7 p.m. • Card games, Funny River Community Center. • Narcotics Anonymous support group “Clean Machine” at Central Peninsula Hospital’s Redoubt Room, 250 Hospital Place, Soldotna. Call 907-335-9456. • Alcoholics Anonymous “Into Action” group, 12X12 study meeting, VFW basement Birch Street, Soldotna, 907-262-0995. 8 p.m. • Al-Anon Support Group at

Community Calendar Today 8 a.m. • Alcoholics Anonymous As Bill Sees It Group, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway Unit 71 (Old Carrs Mall). Call 398-9440. 10:30 a.m. • Pre-School Storytime at the Soldotna Public Library. Call 2624227. 11 a.m. • Wee Read at the Kenai Community Library Noon • Alcoholics Anonymous recovery group at 11312 Kenai Spur Highway Suite 71 in the old Carrs Mall in Kenai. Call 262-1917. • TOPS group AK 222 Soldotna meets at Christ Lutheran Church, 128 Soldotna Ave. Call 260-1662.

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A-4 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, October 15, 2014

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Serving the Kenai Peninsula since 1970 VITTO KLEINSCHMIDT Publisher

WILL MORROW������������������������������������������������������������������������ Editor Teresa Mullican............... Controller/Human Resources Director LESLIE TALENT................................................... Advertising Director GEOFF LONG.................................................... Production Manager VINCENT NUSUNGINYA.................................... New Media Director Daryl Palmer.................................... IT and Composition Director RANDI KEATON................................................. Circulation Manager A Morris Communications Corp. Newspaper

What Others Say

State should look at strengthening Public Records Act State Sen. Bill Wielechowski of An-

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Opinion

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chorage announced Thursday that he plans to file a bill in the coming legislative session that would strengthen the state Public Records Act, providing less leeway when state officials or agencies claim privilege on documents requested by the public. One needn’t look much further than the calendar to understand part of the reason why the senator is making this announcement now — but the fact that politics might be a motivation doesn’t mean strengthening the Public Records Act isn’t a good idea. The Alaska Public Records Act, a series of laws governing public access to government documents, was passed decades ago in the push to make government more transparent in the wake of national scandals like Watergate. At the time of its passage, Alaska’s law was one of the strongest protections of public access to information in the country. As decades have passed, however, the state’s elected and appointed officials have become far less forthcoming and often outright obstructive to the release of government documents. Perhaps the most extreme example of the erosion of the act’s effect came when media organizations made a public records request in 2008 for emails Gov. Sarah Palin sent relating to the dismissal of Public Safety Commissioner Walt Monegan. Despite significant public outcry, the emails weren’t released until nearly three years later in 2011 — and then were incomplete, with thousands missing due to claims of “executive and deliberative process,” an oftcited exception to the Public Records Act. More recently, and mentioned directly by Sen. Wielechowski, Gov. Sean Parnell’s administration waited 86 days to deny a request by the Alaska Public Radio Network for email communications related to the developing Alaska National Guard scandal. Despite the relatively focused nature of the request, the 10-day statutory limit for approval or denial of records release and the fact that APRN staffers made more than two dozen calls in three months seeking an update on the emails, the governor’s office saw fit to deny it in full. Alaska Public Media and the Alaska Dispatch News are now suing over that denial. The Legislature itself, however, may be the worst offender in flouting the spirit of open government. The body carved out a whale-sized exemption for itself from the state Open Meetings Act, which requires public access to all meetings of public bodies where decisions are made. Legislators also have claimed their offices are not subject to public records laws. Sen. Wielechowski said his bill will require a “privilege log” of any documents that state officials or agencies wish to shield from public view and a specific legal justification for doing so. Such a change could be positive in that it puts the onus of claiming privilege on those who generate the documents before they receive requests that they become public. On the other hand, the requirement could accelerate the already widespread practice of claiming privilege on documents that have only tenuous connections to policy discussion. There are several reasons why Sen. Wielechowski’s bill is unlikely to make it to the governor’s desk. The Democratic senator is in the minority, and minoritysponsored bills are rarely allowed to the floor of the Legislature for a vote. The Legislature, and for that matter governors, have historically displayed little inclination toward making the mechanisms of government more transparent. But in the wake of scandals showing the clear danger of opacity in government affairs, Alaskans deserve a robust debate about expanding public access to information, particularly the workings of government itself. Sunlight, as they say, has always been the best disinfectant. — Fairbanks Daily News-Miner, Oct. 10

Church and state: still separate?

I have always agreed that the two subjects that should be avoided in polite conversation are religion and politics. Well, since I’m forever talking politics, one can easily figure out what I think about polite conversation — obviously not much. But if there is any doubt, let’s discuss religion today. We can start with this question: Who are you going to believe, Antonin Scalia or Thomas Jefferson? Justice Scalia recently made a speech at Colorado Christian University in which he declared that there is nothing in the Constitution stating that “the government cannot favor religion over nonreligion.” It’s interesting that someone who is described as an “Originalist” would apply his own reasoning to the First Amendment, which specifically prohibits “an establishment of religion.” The author, Thomas Jefferson, made it clear what he meant. In an 1802 letter, he wrote that he intended a “wall of separation between church and state.” The problem with Scalia is that his point of view is not just idle opinion; his legal opinions can be part of the final word on this country’s laws. It’s a good thing, for instance, that the Supremes decided not to take on gay marriage, because at least one-ninth of the deciders, probably more, would base their vote on their religious views trumping equal treatment under the law. Without a doubt, the Founding Fathers were men of faith, and it is true that we say

Letters to the Editor Juneau road should go nowhere J.R. Myers, and the rest of the Gubernatorial candidates for that matter, would be wise to axe the Juneau road extension. Even if the State proceeds with the halfbillion dollar road project, drivers will still have to take a ferry to reach the capital. That’s right, after 50 miles of new pavement through some of the State’s most challenging terrain, the Juneau road would dead-end at new ferry terminal. Even worse, the operating costs would go up because the State will be responsible for running a ferry and bombing the forty-plus avalanche chutes. It’s no wonder the people of Haines, Skagway and Juneau have repeatedly stated a preference for community-to-community ferry service. If only we had a Governor who would listen to local communities and make decisions based on the best interest of the State. Garri Constantine Juneau

Applause Three cheers for community support Recently River City Cheer Booster Club

“under God” in the Pledge of Allegiance, but it is a huge leap from that to the demands that America be formally declared a “Christian nation,” as some hard-liners suggest. A new Pew survey Bob Franken shows that nearly a third of the respondents believe their house of worship should be allowed, encouraged, to give political endorsements ... coming out in favor of candidates. Absolutely: Let’s get rid of that prohibition, particularly since it’s such a charade. But then we also should eliminate the tax deduction for the different churches, synagogues, mosques, temples, etc. One could argue that such favorable treatment is an endorsement of religion that should be eliminated, but let’s not go there, because now we’re talking about money, which is really impolite. What happens when one faith or the other wants to impose its will on those who hold other beliefs, or none at all? In the wrong hands, we could be required to follow doctrine we don’t share and be punished for dissenting. Obviously, in this day and age, no one here contemplates the kind of religiongone-wild tyranny we see today among Muslim extremists. They justify brutal

held our 5th Annual Glow in the Dark Golf Tournament Fundraiser at the Kenai Golf Course. We are excited and proud to say, it was our fullest tournament to date! We would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to all those who participated to make this tournament a huge success. It was a beautiful evening for 27, four-person teams to come out and play 9 holes of glow in the dark golf. During this event we also drew for our much anticipated raffle ticket winners! We would like to congratulate our Grand Prize winner Kelly Rielly, who took home 2 round trip Alaska Airlines tickets anywhere Aaska Airlines flies, our 2nd place winner Rebekah Pollard will be enjoying $1000 cash and Harris Brooks will be choosing a firearm from Sportsman’s Warehouse valued at $500! Thank you to everyone who purchased raffle tickets! We appreciate your support and hope to hold another raffle in the near future! A special thank you to Kenai Safeway, Bridges Community Resources and Sportsman’s Warehouse for your help making our raffle a tremendous success! River City Cheer Booster Club would like to recognize the following outstanding business and families for their participation in our 5th Annual Glow in the Dark Golf Tournament Fundraisder: A&L Construction, Alyeska Tire Kenai, Alyeska Tire Soldotna, ATEC, Automated Laundry, C3, Chumley’s, CPH Rehab, Dr. Anderson’s office, Buckets, Dr. Bauder, Dr. Bobbie Behrens, Bub’s Pizza, Cakalicious, Carol Lasky, Don Jose’s, Dukowitz, Ellis Auto-

Classic Doonesbury, 1979

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violence in their demands for compliance to their oppressive interpretations of morality and vicious punishment for deviating from it. It’s hyperbole to use terms like “Taliban” to describe all but a few of the most hardscrabble zealots. For a large part, in this country we take pride in honoring someone’s right to faith or lack of faith. Except when we don’t. The question of gay marriage is just the latest arena that has been flooded with dogma. When we strip away the foolish arguments about propagation and a large amount of ignorant prejudice, we’re left with an opposition based on homosexuality violating “God’s law.” We hear it not just from Christians but hardliners from so many other religions. They cite their scriptures to make their point, and never mind that those same scriptures can be interpreted to justify anything. They’re entitled to their beliefs, but because there are so many of them, and they vote, we are left with what John Adams called a “tyranny of the majority.” It’s happened throughout our history, when the momentary popular passion of the times has backed various noxious oppressions. On the other hand, a beautiful part of our tradition is the profession of religious tolerance woven into our fundamental law. We can’t let the Antonin Scalias of this nation rip it from our fabric. Bob Franken is a longtime broadcast journalist, including 20 years at CNN.

motive, Everybody Rides, Highmark Distillery, IISCO, Kenai Golf Course, KSRM Radio Group, Leah’s Boutique, Magnum Motors, Mykle’s Restaurant, Ninilchik Charters, Peninsula Appliance Service, Peninsula Health Center, Peninsula Pediatric Dentistry, PESI, Ron’s Rent It Center, Scott Construction, Sean Kelly, SLP, Sherman Signs, Stanley Ford, Steam on Wheels, St. Elias Brewing Company, Summit Lake Lodge, Team Mariscal, The Grind, Trustworthy Hardware and Ultimate Tan. From all of our River City Cheer All Star competitive athletes, families and coaches we say thank you! River City Cheer Booster Club Soldotna

Letters to the Editor:

E-mail: news@peninsulaclarion.com Write: Fax: Peninsula Clarion 907-283-3299 P.O. Box 3009 Questions? Call: Kenai, AK 99611 907-283-7551

The Peninsula Clarion welcomes letters and attempts to publish all those received, subject to a few guidelines: n All letters must include the writer’s name, phone number and address. n Letters are limited to 500 words and may be edited to fit available space. Letters are run in the order they are received.

By GARRY TRUDEAU

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Nation

Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, October 15, 2014

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Justices stop parts of Texas abortion law By MARK SHERMAN Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday blocked key parts of a 2013 law in Texas that had closed all but eight facilities providing abortions in America’s second most-populous state. In an unsigned order, the justices sided with abortion rights advocates and health care providers in suspending an Oct. 2 ruling by a panel of the New Orleans-based U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals that Texas could immediately apply a rule making abortion clinics statewide spend millions of dollars on hospitallevel upgrades. The court also put on hold a provision of the law only as it applies to clinics in McAllen and El Paso that requires doctors at the facilities to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. The admitting privileges rule remains in effect elsewhere in Texas. Justices Samuel Alito, Antonin Scalia and Clarence

Thomas said they would have ruled against the clinics in all respects. The 5th Circuit is still considering the overall constitutionality of the sweeping measure overwhelmingly passed by the GOP-controlled Texas Legislature and signed into law by Gov. Rick Perry last year. Even as it weighs the merits of the law, the appeals court had said it could be enforced — opening the door for the emergency appeal to the Supreme Court. “We’re seeing the terrible impact these restrictions have on thousands of Texas women who effectively no longer have access to safe and legal abortion,” said Cecile Richards, president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America. “We’re relieved that the court stepped in to stop this, and we hope this dangerous law is ultimately overturned completely.” Abortion opponents predicted they will ultimately prevail. “This does not protect the health and safety of women who

AP Photo/The Monitor, Joel Martinez

People protest in front of the Whole Women’s Health clinic Oct. 4, in McAllen, Texas. Abortion-rights lawyers are predicting “a showdown” at the U.S. Supreme Court after federal appellate judges allowed full implementation of a law that has closed more than 80 percent of Texas’ abortion clinics.

are undergoing abortion,” said Joe Pojman, executive director of Texas Alliance for Life. “”This is definitely a short-term loss, but not necessarily a longterm loss.” The 5th Circuit decision had blocked an August ruling by Austin-based U.S. District

Judge Lee Yeakel, who had found that requiring hospitalstyle upgrades was less about safety than making access to abortion difficult. Yeakel’s ruling temporarily suspended the upgrade rules before they could go into effect Sept. 1 — and the order from the Supreme Court

means they are on hold again. Allowing the rules on hospital-level upgrades to be enforced — including mandatory operating rooms and air filtration systems — shuttered more than a dozen clinics across Texas. Until the nation’s highest court intervened, only abortion facilities in the Houston, Austin, San Antonio and the Dallas-Fort Worth areas remained open. And none was left along the Texas-Mexico border or outside any of the state’s largest urban areas. Some other clinics had closed even earlier amid enforcement of the rule on admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. That portion has already been upheld twice by the appeals court. The fight over the Texas law is the latest over tough new abortion restrictions that have been enacted across the country. The office of Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott, a Republican who is the favorite in next month’s governor’s race, is leading the defense of the law.

Democrat Wendy Davis launched her campaign for governor behind the celebrity she achieved through a nearly 13-hour filibuster last summer that temporarily blocked the law’s passage. Davis said she was “thankful that women can continue to make their own personal decisions.” Abbott’s office said he would continue to defend the law. Attorneys for the state have denied that Texas women would be burdened by fewer abortion facilities, saying nearly 9 in 10 would still live within 150 miles of a provider. The law’s opponents note that leaves nearly a million Texas women embarking on drives longer than three hours to get an abortion. Hilltop Women’s Reproductive Services in El Paso has been referring women who want abortions to another clinic it owns in New Mexico. Gloria Martinez, Hilltop’s administrative nurse, said she would call state officials Wednesday before deciding whether the clinic will resume performing abortions.

US, Russia vow intel-sharing on Islamic State By BRADLEY KLAPPER Associated Press

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PARIS — The United States and Russia vowed Tuesday to renew cooperation on a broad array of global security matters, including intelligence sharing on Islamic State militants, even as the two powers remained deeply at odds over the crisis in Ukraine. Although Secretary of State John Kerry didn’t use the term “reset” — a relationshipmending term President Barack Obama coined in his first term to tighten US-Russian ties — he employed familiar language about managing differences

and forging a better partnership on matters where they agree. After meeting for more than three hours in Paris with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, Kerry said both sides need to recognize they have “major responsibilities” as world powers, from combating Islamist extremism in the Middle East to dealing with Iran and North Korea’s nuclear programs. As a concrete example of their work together, he said the U.S. and Russia would start sharing intelligence on the Islamic State militants, which the U.S. and allies are fighting in Iraq and Syria. Lavrov, speaking separately,

confirmed intelligence-sharing would begin and also spoke positively about improving U.S.-Russian ties. “Mr. Kerry and I don’t represent warring sides,” he said. The nations play a “special role” in the world, he said. “We can cooperate better together to increase the effectiveness of settling problems for larger society. That especially concerns the fight against terrorism, which

has now become the main threat to the whole Mideast.” The divide in their positions over Ukraine clearly persisted, however. Russia and its allied forces in the country must halt remaining violence in the restive east, pull back forces and weapons and release any hostages, Kerry said, noting that he’d told Lavrov that any independence referendums wouldn’t be recognized by the world.

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The tone of Kerry’s news conference harkened back to the Obama administration’s first term, when Obama sought to reset ties between Washington and Moscow that were badly frayed by the 2008 war in Georgia and other tensions. The spirit of goodwill yielded a nuclear arms reduction pact and some other diplomatic successes, but the relationship became increasingly defined by hostil-

ity after Vladimir Putin’s return to the presidency in 2012. The Ukraine crisis sent them to a post-Cold War low. The “bulk” of Tuesday’s talks focused on issues other than Ukraine, Kerry stressed. He highlighted the international campaign against the Islamic State group in particular, saying both countries recognize the group “has absolutely no place in the 21st century.”


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A-6 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Icahn aide: Taj has to close if union pact remains By WAYNE PARRY Associated Press

WILMINGTON, Del. — A federal bankruptcy court judge will issue what the owners of Atlantic City’s Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort consider a life-or-death decision on Friday for the troubled gambling hall. Trump Entertainment Resorts and billionaire investor Carl Icahn want the judge to cancel the casino’s union contract, saying it can’t survive without shedding costly pension and health care obligations. Allan Brilliant, a lawyer for Icahn, told U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Kevin Gross on Tuesday that Trump Entertainment needs the financial relief that breaking the union contract would provide. As the judge appeared to be making up his mind whether to rule on the question, Brilliant said if the decision went against the company, the business could not survive. Trump Entertainment has threatened to close the casino

by Nov. 13 if it cannot shed its pension and health care obligations to the Taj Mahal’s 3,000 workers. “If you don’t grant the ... motion, it’s just not viable as a business,” Brilliant said. “Ultimately very quickly the casino will close. This is the window here; the window is open.” Icahn, who owns the Taj Mahal’s $286 million in debt, would swap that debt for ownership of the casino, and invest $100 million into it. But that investment is contingent on massive government aid from Atlantic City and the state. Kris Hansen, a lawyer for Trump Entertainment, made a similar argument. “If you do grant it, we have a chance to stay alive,” Hansen said. “The cost structure of this casino doesn’t work, and it needs to be fixed. If we’re successful, employees get to keep their jobs, even though they made some concessions. Having a job is better than not having a job.”

Earlier in the day, he likened the Taj Mahal to a critically ill patient on an operating table with a room full of doctors all looking at each other, with no one doing anything to save the patient. The company says it needs big union concessions and massive tax breaks from Atlantic City and New Jersey — both of which have already rejected the demand. It originally sought to have Atlantic City lower its property tax assessments by nearly 80 percent, to have the state contribute $25 million in tax credits, and for union workers to give up their pension and health insurance. It would provide $2,000 stipends for workers to find their own coverage under the Affordable Care Act. Kathy Krieger, a lawyer for Local 54 of the Unite-HERE union, said Icahn is trying to profit on the backs of the lowwage workers. She characterized Icahn’s stance as, “Let’s look at the poorest of the stakeholders here and make sure

they give up everything permanently before we’re even willing to move. That’s absolute nonsense. “ She said Icahn, who also owns the Tropicana Casino and Resort, is “asking for major concessions that will give him a huge competitive advantage over every other casino in Atlantic City.” After getting a negative reaction from Atlantic City Mayor Don Guardian and state Senate President Steve Sweeney, the company revised its financial request from the state. It is now seeking $175 million in relief through a socalled PILOT program — payments in lieu of taxes — and the receipt of two types of state economic grant not usually available to casinos: the Economic Redevelopment Grant and the Urban Revitalization Grant. State legislators would have to vote on letting the casinos into the program. The Taj Mahal would be the fifth of Atlantic City’s 12 casinos to close this year. The

AP Photo/Wayne Parry, File

This Sept. 22, 2011 file photo shows the Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort in Atlantic City NJ. Its owners and main casino workers union are clashing over the company’s demand for substantial union givebacks and government aid in return for keeping the casino open past November 2014.

company was supposed to have told state casino regulators by Monday whether they planned to close the casino, but got an extension until Oct. 20 to see what the judge decides.

Its lawyers said the casino’s financial situation is so dire that it has been selling used mattresses and televisions from the closed Trump Plaza casino to generate extra cash.

US worker killed by ex-colleague in Saudi Arabia By ABDULLAH AL-SHIHRI Associated Press

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia — A Saudi-American dual national who was recently fired from a U.S. defense contractor shot two American ex-colleagues in Saudi Arabia’s capital, killing one and wounding the other in what appeared to be a settling of scores, security and diplomatic officials said. The gunman, Abdulaziz Fahad Abdulaziz Alrashid, was taken into police custody after being injured a shootout with

Saudi security forces, said a statement released in Washington on behalf of the Saudi Embassy. Alrashid, 24, was recently dismissed from his job for drug-related issues, the statement said, citing the Saudi Interior Ministry for that information. A person with knowledge of the shooting, who was not authorized to discuss the incident publicly, told The Associated Press that the shooter believed that the victim he shot dead had turned him in for the alleged drug use.

The victims were employees of Vinnell Arabia, a U.S. defense contractor supporting Saudi National Guard military programs in the Saudi capital, Riyadh, and were shot about a kilometer (half-mile) from its facility in the city, said State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki. The site, on the eastern side of the capital, is also near the Saudi National Guard headquarters. “We are in close contact with the Saudi government as we continue to gather details about the shooting and motive,” Psaki

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said. “We are in the process of evaluating our security posture and will take appropriate steps to ensure the safety of all U.S. Mission personnel.” Randy Belote, a spokesman for Vinnell Arabia’s parent company, Northrop Grumman Corp., said in a statement that “As a long-term partner in Saudi Arabia, we offer our deepest sympathies to the family members of both Vinnell Arabia employees involved in the incident. We continue to support the Vinnell leadership as they work with Saudi authorities and

the State Dept. on this matter.” The attack was likely to send chills through the Western expatriate workforce in the kingdom, which has been on alert for possible terrorism. In September, Saudi police said they had arrested 88 people suspected of being part of an al-Qaida cell that was planning attacks inside and outside the kingdom. Saudi Arabia and four other Arab countries are taking part in U.S.-led airstrikes against the Islamic State group and alQaida fighters in Iraq and Syria.

Militants have vowed revenge. Attacks by al-Qaida militants from 2003 to 2007 were aimed at destabilizing and toppling the Western-allied monarchy. Among the most stunning attacks were deadly bombings of residential compounds in Riyadh where foreigners lived in 2003. Saudi officials responded at the time with a massive crackdown that saw many al-Qaida operatives killed or arrested. Others fled to neighboring Yemen, giving birth to one of the group’s most active branches.

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Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Details on infants found dead emerge

Around the World Federal government acknowledges it could have done more on Ebola

By DENISE LAVOIE AP Legal Affairs Writer

FORT WORTH, Texas — The nation’s top-disease fighting agency acknowledged Tuesday that an American nurse might not have been infected with Ebola if a special response team had been sent to Dallas immediately after a Liberian man there was diagnosed with Ebola. The stark admission from the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention came as the World Health Organization projected the pace of infections accelerating in West Africa — to as many as 10,000 new cases a week within two months. Agency Director Tom Frieden outlined a series of steps designed to stop the spread of the disease in the U.S., including increased training for health care workers and changes at the Texas hospital where the virus was diagnosed to minimize the risk of more infections. The announcement of the effort came after top health officials repeatedly assured the public over the last two weeks that they were doing everything possible to control the outbreak by deploying infectious-disease specialists to the hospital where a Liberian man was diagnosed with Ebola and later died. “I wish we had put a team like this on the ground the day the patient — the first patient — was diagnosed. That might have prevented this infection. But we will do that from today onward with any case anywhere in the U.S.,” Frieden said.

UXBRIDGE, Mass. — They were hidden away in closets just a few feet from where their siblings slept: the skeletal remains of three infants found in a squalid, vermin-infested house. On Tuesday, a judge ordered a Massachusetts woman held on $1 million cash bail after prosecutors said at least two of the babies may have been alive for “some period of time” before they were discovered. Prosecutors had asked for $5 million bail and said Erika Murray could face more serious charges in a case that has repulsed residents of the small town of Blackstone. Murray, 31, a resident of the town, had been held without bail since her arraignment last month on charges of fetal death concealment, witness intimida-

tion and permitting substantial injury to a child. The state Department of Children and Families removed four children ranging in age from 5 months to 13 years from Murray’s home in August after her 10-year-old son asked a neighbor for help in quieting a crying baby. The neighbor found the youngest child — the 5-month-old girl — and a 3-year-old girl both covered in their own feces, in separate bedrooms. Friends and neighbors have said Murray appeared to hide the existence of the two youngest children. A prosecutor said in court Tuesday that the two children had never been outside. After interviewing the 10-year-old and 13-year-old, police got a search warrant and went back to the house, where they found the skeletal remains of one baby with a full head of

Turkish strikes on Kurds complicate US efforts to defeat Islamic State militants WASHINGTON — In a fresh test for U.S. coalitionbuilding efforts, Turkey is launching airstrikes against Kurdish rebels inside its borders this week despite pleas from the Obama administration to instead focus on an international campaign to destroy Islamic State militants wreaking havoc in the region. Media reports about the Turkish strikes surfaced Tuesday as President Barack Obama and military chiefs from more than 20 nations gathered in Washington in a show of unity against the Islamic State group. “This is an operation that involves the world against ISIL,” Obama declared, referring to the militant group by one of its many names. The Turkish airstrikes occurred Monday and marked the country’s first major strikes against Kurdish rebels on its own soil since peace talks began two years ago. The strikes came amid anger among the Kurds in Turkey, who accuse the government there of standing by while Syrian Kurds are being killed by Islamic State militants in the besieged Syrian border town of Kobani. ­— The Associated Press

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hair in a backpack in the closet of an upstairs bedroom. After discovering those remains, police obtained another search warrant. During the second search, they found the remains of two other babies in another bedroom, also inside a closet. The two oldest children slept in the bedrooms. Both bodies were found wearing diapers and one-piece infant outfits, Assistant District Attorney John Bradley said during a bail hearing for Murray in Uxbridge District Court. Bradley said prosecutors still don’t know how the babies died or their ages and are awaiting findings from the state medical examiner’s office. He said the fact that two of the babies were clothed seems to indicate “at least two of the babies were alive for some period of time” before they died. Bradley said the charges against Murray could be up-

graded, depending on the medical examiner’s findings. Raymond Rivera III, identified in court as her live-in boyfriend, has not been charged in connection with the remains found inside the house. A friend of Rivera’s told The Boston Globe last month that Rivera was in “complete shock” when he learned he was the father of the two younger children. Bradley said Murray’s 13-year-old daughter and 10-year-old son told police that Murray instructed them to lie to their father, Rivera, and say Murray was babysitting for the two younger children. He faces drug charges for allegedly growing marijuana in the basement, and appeared briefly in Uxbridge District Court on Tuesday. A judge told Rivera he needs to hire an attorney. Rivera quickly left the courthouse while reporters were questioning Murray’s lawyer.


A-8 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, October 15, 2014

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World

Strong explosion hits Cairo, leaving 12 injured CAIRO (AP) — A strong blast hit a busy district in central Cairo on Tuesday night, leaving 12 injured, Egypt’s official news agency reported, as a court sentenced seven Islamic militants to death over earlier terror attacks. MENA quoted a senior security official as saying that the explosion was caused by a home-made bomb placed in the vicinity of a court house. The site of the attack is a busy district and near a subway station. The agency quoted Mohammed Sultan, a health minister official as saying that the blast caused no deaths and that 12

people were injured. No further details were immediately available. Egypt has witnessed a series of suicide bombings, assassinations and attacks over the past year after the military overthrow of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi after demonstrations demanding his resignation. Morsi’s ouster and a subsequent clamp down on his supporters sparked a wave of Islamic militants’ attacks targeting mainly police and army. Most of the major attacks were carried by al-Qaidainspired group Ansar Beit

al-Maqdis or Champions of Jerusalem which is based in northern region of Sinai Peninsula where Egyptian army carried a yearlong offensive. Earlier in the day, an Egyptian court sentenced seven convicted militants to death - all but one in absentia - over the killing of 25 soldiers last year. The ruling focused on chief suspect Adel Ibrahim also known as Adel Habarra, who is in custody and whom authorities said has been previously convicted in connection to bombings in the Red Sea resort of Taba in 2004, a claim his lawyers denied.

Authorities have said he is a senior member of Ansar Beit al-Maqdis. The group did not claim responsibility for the killing of the 25 soldiers. The decision is to be reviewed by the country’s grand Mufti, whose opinion is consultative. A final ruling is scheduled to be issued on Dec. 6. The attack last year saw militants ambush two minibuses carrying off-duty policemen in broad daylight near the border town of Rafah, days after security forces killed hundreds of people in a crackdown on sprawling protest camps in Cairo set up by Morsi supporters.

Protests have waned amid the ongoing crackdown on Morsi supporters and other government critics. But as the school year started this week, students rallied at many universities across the country. Security forces stormed at least two large universities to quell demonstrations. Human Rights Watch said Tuesday that more than 110 university students have been arrested since Saturday. The rights group said security forces arrested students in their homes and from the protests on university campuses. Human Rights Watch called on Egyptian au-

thorities to release the students, saying the arrests “appear to be solely directed at the students’ peaceful exercise of the right to free assembly.” “This mass arrest of students is a pre-emptive strike on free speech and free assembly,” said Joe Stork, deputy Middle East and North Africa director, in the statement. Security forces have permanently deployed around a number of campuses, and universities enacted new regulations to curb student activities. Last year universities saw regular protests that routinely descended into violence.

Conservative bishops move away from gay overture By NICOLE WINFIELD Associated Press

VATICAN CITY — A fight for the soul of the Catholic Church has broken out, and the first battlefield is a document on family values that pits increasingly alarmed conservatives against more progressive bishops emboldened by Pope Francis’ vision of a church that is more merciful than moralistic. On Tuesday, conservative bishops distanced themselves from the document’s unprecedented opening toward gays and divorced Catholics, calling it an “unacceptable” deviation from church teaching that doesn’t reflect their views and vowing to make changes to the final version. The report, released midway through a Vatican meeting on such hot-button family issues as marriage, divorce, homosexuality and birth control, signaled a radical shift in tone about welcoming gays, divorced Catholics and unmarried couples into the church.

Its message was one of almost-revolutionary acceptance and understanding rather than condemnation. Gays, it said, had gifts to offer the church and their partnerships, while morally problematic, provided gay couples with “precious” support. The church, it added, must welcome divorced people and recognize the “positive” aspects of civil marriages and even Catholics who live together without being married. The leaders of the bishops’ meeting, or synod, that produced it stressed Tuesday that it was merely a working paper and was never intended to be a statement of church doctrine, but rather a reflection of bishops’ views that will be debated and amended before a final version is released on Saturday. Still, its dramatic shift in tone thrilled progressives and gay rights groups, and dismayed conservatives already deeply uncomfortable with Francis’ aim to make the church a “field hospital” for wounded souls that focuses far less on the rules

and regulations emphasized by his two predecessors. The document was remarkable both in what it said and what it didn’t say: Absent were assertions of Catholic doctrine present in most church documents that gay sex is “intrinsically disordered” and that couples who cohabitate are “living in sin.” In their place were words of affirmation and welcome. “The report, obviously composed under pressure, has easily given rise to some misinterpretation,” British Cardinal Vincent Nichols said Tuesday. “It is not a doctrinal or decisive document. It is, as stated in its conclusion, ‘intended to raise questions and indicate perspectives that will have to be matured and made clearer on reflection.’” Several conservatives who participated in the synod immediately distanced themselves from the report. The head of the Polish bishops’ conference, Cardinal Stanislaw Gadecki, called it “unacceptable” and a devia-

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tion from church teaching. South African Cardinal Wilfrid Fox Napier said the report didn’t reflect the opinion of the synod in its entirety and contained problematic positions. He hoped the final report “will show the vision of the synod as a whole and not the vision of a particular group.” “My worry is that the message has gone out — and it’s not a true message — that this synod has taken up these positions, and whatever we say hereafter is going to be as if we’re doing some damage control, which is certainly not what is in my mind,” he told reporters. Hard-line American Cardinal Raymond Burke, the head of the Vatican’s supreme court, told Catholic World Report that the document contained positions “which many synod Fathers do not accept and, I would say, as faithful shepherds of the flock cannot accept.” He accused the Vatican press operation of releasing “manipulated” information about the synod debate that didn’t reflect

the “consistent number of bishops” who opposed such a tone. To some extent, he had a point. The Vatican has greatly reduced independent access to information about the closeddoor proceedings, withholding bishops’ individual speeches from public view, much to the dismay of Burke and other conservatives who want their side known. The only information released has been summaries of the day’s debate by the Vatican spokesman, whose briefings have reflected a general a tone of opening and welcome. The briefings made scant reference to gays at all, and yet the provisional report gave significant ink to the issue. The Vatican spokesman, the Rev. Federico Lombardi, said while he only recalled one major speech about gays out of 265, it was likely that bishops’ written remarks covered the material and were reflected in the document. The big question looming is how the battle over the final

document will shake out. The bishops themselves elected a host of known conservatives to lead the working groups hammering out details of the final report. In an apparent bid to counter their influence, Francis appointed six progressives to draft the final document. The Vatican on Tuesday highlighted areas that will be debated in the coming days. In a summary of bishops’ reactions, the Vatican press office said bishops had “appreciated” the report but that some offered additional reflections “to bring together various points of view.” These bishops suggested that the final document highlight faithful Catholic families to avoid “a near-exclusive focus on imperfect family situations.” On gays, they said “prudence” was required “so that the impression of a positive evaluation of such a tendency on the part of the church is not created.”

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Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, October 15, 2014

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Hong Kong police clear protesters out of tunnel By KELVIN CHAN and SYLVIA HUI Associated Press

HONG KONG — Hundreds of Hong Kong police officers moved in early Wednesday to clear pro-democracy protesters out of a tunnel outside the city government headquarters, clashing with protesters in the worst violence since the demonstrations began more than two weeks ago. Officers, many of them in riot gear and wielding pepper spray, pushed back the crowd and tore down barricades and removed concrete slabs the protesters used as road blocks around the underpass. The operation came hours after a large group of protesters blockaded the tunnel, expand-

ing their protest zone after being cleared out of some other streets. The protesters outnumbered the police officers, who later returned with reinforcements to clear the area. Police said they had to disperse the protesters because they were disrupting public order and gathering illegally. They arrested 37 men and 8 women during the clashes, which police said injured four officers. A police spokesman told local television that none of those arrested were hurt. “I have to stress here that even though protesters raised their hands in their air it does not mean it was a peaceful protest,” said the spokesman, Tsui Wai-Hung. He said some protesters kicked the officers and attacked them with their um-

‘I have to stress here that even though protesters raised their hands in their air it does not mean it was a peaceful protest.’ — Tsui Wai-Hung, spokesman brellas. Local television channel TVB showed footage of around six police officers taking a man aside, placing him on the ground and kicking him. Tsui did not provide details of the incident when questioned by reporters. Officers took away many protesters, their hands tied with plastic cuffs, and pushing others out to a nearby park. The student-led protesters are now into their third week of

occupying key parts of the city to pressure the Asian financial hub’s government over curbs recommended by Beijing on democratic reforms. The protests have been largely peaceful, but turned violent overnight, apparently in response to police stepping up action in the past two days to remove barricades and close in on the main protest zone. Positions on both sides have been hardening since the government called off negotiations

last week, citing the unlikelihood of a constructive outcome given their sharp differences. The protesters want Hong Kong’s deeply unpopular Beijing-backed leader, Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying, to resign. They also want the Hong Kong government to drop plans for a pro-Beijing committee to screen candidates for the inaugural election to choose his replacement. Leung has said there is “almost zero chance” that China’s government will change its rules for the election, promised for 2017. The demonstrations have posed an unprecedented challenge to the government. Organizers say as many as 200,000 people thronged the streets for peaceful sit-ins after police used tear gas on Sept. 28 to disperse

the unarmed protesters. The numbers have seen dwindled. Police have chipped away at the protest zones in three areas across the city by removing barricades from the edges of the protest zones, signaling growing impatience with activists’ occupation of busy streets. The clearance operation was the latest in a day of tit-for-tat actions between authorities and demonstrators that began Tuesday morning when police used chainsaws and sledgehammers to tear down barricades on a road on the edge of the protest zone. Activists responded Tuesday evening by barricading the tunnel with tires, metal barricades, water-filled plastic safety barriers and concrete slabs taken from drainage ditches.

UN rights chief: Libyan civil society under threat CAIRO (AP) — The U.N. human rights chief warned Tuesday that civil society, bloggers and professionals in Libya face a “climate of fear” created by warring militias whose clashes left 17 dead in western region. Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein says his agency has received numerous reports of assaults targeting rights advocates in Libya including murder, abduction and death threats. Many have fled or suspended their work. The U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights said in a statement that the attacks amount to “war crimes.” He said perpetrators benefit from “total impunity” for such attacks and threaten Libya’s few

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independent voices. In one incident last month, two well-known activists were among 10 people killed in eastern Benghazi. Violence and rivalries have deeply split Libya, which has fallen into chaos since the 2011 NATO-backed uprising that toppled dictator Moammar Gadhafi. Militias mostly from the coastal city of Misrata and allied to Islamist political factions took control of the capital after fierce battles with rival anti-Islamist militias mostly from the mountain town of Zintan. The battles left hundreds dead, displaced thousands and forced diplomats and foreigners to flee.

On Tuesday, fighting continued in vicinity of small western town of Kikla, nearly 150 kilometers (93 miles) west of Tripoli, leaving 17 dead, according to a hospital official. The deaths bring total number of people

killed over the past four days to over 60 and 170 injured. In eastern Libya, a new round of battles appeared imminent after renegade Gen. Khalifa Hifter announced in a late televised statement new of-

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fensive to “liberate” Benghazi, second largest city, “from terrorists.” Benghazi has fallen into hands of Islamist extremist militias in the past few months. The militias overran army bar-

racks and seized large amounts of weapons. Hifter’s forces called for an “armed uprising” on Wednesday in Benghazi, urging youth to carry weapons and fight for their own neighborhoods.


A-10 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, October 15, 2014

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Sports

Stars “Dig Pink” and notch sweep of Kards By JEFF HELMINIAK Peninsula Clarion

There was a lot on the line Tuesday night, and the host Soldotna volleyball team responded with a 25-19, 25-17 and 25-17 Northern Lights Conference victory over Kenai Central. “Kenai is our rival and it was senior night,” Soldotna coach Sheila Kupferschmid said after her squad moved to 4-5 in the league and 8-5 overall. “We know Kenai has a very good team. “I just think the kids were up for it.” In addition, the match was a Dig Pink event. Dig Pink matches are fundraisers for the Side-Out Foundation. According to the organization’s website, Side-Out was established in 2004 to unite volleyball players and coaches in working toward breast cancer awareness, education and patient services. Both the Stars and Kardinals (1-8, 5-8) came into the game after losing all three NLC matches on a weekend trip to the Matanuska-Susitna valleys. “They were all so close,” Kupfer-

schmid said. “I told the kids to stay strong for senior night. I’m happy. The seniors played so well.” In addition to losing three on the Valley swing, Kenai had two seniors leave the team Monday. Kenai coach Tracie Beck said her team was able to overcome that and bring a lot of energy. “I’m really proud of the girls stepping up and taking care of business,” Beck said. The Stars were able to give seniors Taylor Wilson, Skylar Shaw, Hayley Ramsell, Haley Miller, Alex Ashe and Bailey Rosin a night to remember by getting stronger as the games, and as the match, wore on. In the first game, the Kards had a 12-10 lead and trailed 19-18, but Ramsell, who had nine kills, two aces and two blocks, served out the last three points for the win. “If the games were to 16, it would have been a fun night,” Beck said. In the second game, Kenai had a 15-14 lead and had the game tied at 16, but SoHi got five straight service points from Rosin in rolling to the 25-17 win.

The Stars missed four serves in the game, but Kupferschmid said she was pleased with the service game overall because it kept Kenai off-balance, thus keeping the Kards’ hitters from getting rolling. The coach said that because SoHi doesn’t have a lot of height, merely trying to get each serve in is not an option. She said the key is to find consistency and not misfire too often, as was the case when the Stars missed 21 serves in a close loss to Palmer. “Anymore, this game is a slugfest, and that goes all the way back to the service line,” Kupferschmid said. But placement can still count as much a power, and that’s why SoHi cruised in Game 3, taking a 17-10 lead and riding it home. While Ramsell is able to rely on power, Shaw (six kills, 21 digs), Makenna Rosin (five kills) and Bailey Rosin (six service points, six kills, 20 digs) found the holes in the Kenai defense. “They were doing a good job of hitting their spots,” Kupferschmid said. The coach also said Lindsey Wong,

who had eight service points, three kills, five digs and two blocks, did a great job setting up the offense. Meanwhile, Ashe was steady in the back row with 27 digs. For the Kards, Abby Beck had six kills, three assists and 13 digs, Kiana Harding had five kills and three aces, Kyla Whannell had a pair of kills and Alli Steinbeck had seven assists. “The girls were definitely getting after it,” coach Beck said. “We’ll take this and grow as we get more confidence in our rotation.” Soldotna hosts Anchorage Christian Schools on Friday at 6 p.m. and Grace Christian on Saturday at 1:30 p.m. The Kards host Homer on Friday at 5:30 p.m. and ACS on Saturday at 12:30 p.m. Homer 3, Nikiski 1 The Mariners avenged a loss to the Bulldogs earlier in the season to pull even in the season count Tuesday evening in Homer. Homer won with game scores of 25-22, 25-14, 23-25 and 25-19.

Leading the charge were seniors Larsen Fellows and Jane Rohr with 12 kills each. Fellows added six service aces, and McKi Needham and Rohr had four apiece. Kayla Pittman added eight kills and Maggie Larue had 20 digs. Nikiski coach Stacey Segura said for reasons that she could not explain, her defense played sluggishly. “It was unusual for us, we’re usually pretty quick,” Segura said. “I don’t think we showed up really until the third game, and that was the first time we were able to get ahead.” Senior libero Laura Hufford still managed to provide 31 digs for the Bulldogs. Additionally, Rachel Thompson had 17 assists and 12 digs. Brittany Perry and Brianna Vollertson each notched six kills, Ayla Pitt had five kills, and Zykiah Cooney sent out three serving aces. Nikiski, which is 5-3 in the Southcentral Conference (8-6 overall), will face Cordova in a pair of conference matches Friday and Saturday in Cordova.

Isles win battle Royals 1 game from World Series Kansas City of New York outpitches The Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — Kyle Okposo scored his 100th NHL goal to snap a tie 48 seconds into the third period, and the undefeated New York Islanders netted four goals on seven shots in the final frame to beat the sliding New York Rangers 6-3 on Tuesday night. The Islanders, who opened with a home-and-home sweep of Carolina, improved to 3-0 when they broke loose for four goals in the first 10:59 of the third to send the Rangers (1-3) to their third straight loss. Okposo made the most of the second costly turnover by defenseman Michael Kostka to score his first of the season. Brock Nelson made it 4-2 at 4:50 with his fourth goal, and Mikhail Grabovski connected 30 seconds later to make it a three-goal edge. Ryan Strome assisted on those two goals that left Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist on his knees and shaking his head. DEVILS 2, LIGHTNING 1 TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — Cory Schneider made 26 saves, Mike Cammalleri had a tiebreaking goal in the third period, and the Devils beat the Lightning to extend their season-opening winning streak to three games, all on the road. Travis Zajac had the other New Jersey goal. Alex Killorn scored for the Lightning, who completed a season-opening four game homestand at 2-1-1. Evgeni Nabokov stopped 23 shots in his Tampa Bay debut. With Lightning star Steven Stamkos serving a minor penalty, Cammalleri gave New Jersey a 2-1 lead from near the post at 11:19 of the third.

MAPLE LEAFS 3, AVALANCHE 2 TORONTO (AP) — Phil Kessel scored 34 seconds into over-

time and the Maple Leafs earned a win over the Avalanche. James van Riemsdyk and Joffrey Lupul also scored for Toronto. Goaltender James Reimer, who took a delay of game penalty in the third period, made 22 saves to pick up another victory in his second straight start. Ryan O’Reilly and Matt Duchene scored for Colorado. With a pair of assists, former Calgary Flames captain Jarome Iginla picked up his first two points with his new team. Colorado goaltender Semyon Varlamov was sharp in making 37 saves.

STARS 4, BLUE JACKETS 2 COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Tyler Seguin scored three goals, including the tiebreaker with 7:44 left in the third, lifting the Stars a victory over the Blue Jackets for their first win of the season. Seguin redirected Jamie Benn’s shot to give the Stars the lead then added an empty-netter. Benn scored and three assists for the Stars, who matched their goal total while starting 0-1-1. Kari Lehtonen had 33 saves, including several in the closing minutes. Ryan Johansen scored both goals for the Blue Jackets, who were trying to get to 3-0 for the first time in the franchise’s 14 seasons. Jack Johnson added two assists and Sergei Bobrovsky stopped 31 shots.

SHARKS 6, CAPITALS 5, SO WASHINGTON (AP) — Matt Irwin and John Scott were unlikely goal-scorers, and the previously stingy San Jose Sharks finally sprung a leak or two before coming away with a shootout victory over the Capitals. The Sharks led 3-0 in the first period, 4-1 in the second, and 5-3 late in the third before Washington’s Alex Ovechkin and Troy See NHL, page A-11

Ferguson wins 100th as UAF hockey coach FAIRBANKS, Alaska (AP) — University of Alaska men’s hockey coach Dallas Ferguson has reached a milestone. With the Nanooks’ 5-2 win over Maine Saturday, Ferguson won his 100th game as Alaska’s coach, the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner reported. “To be honest I wasn’t aware that the win was my 100th until the team presented me with the game puck,” Ferguson said in a release. “But, I love coaching and I love the University of Alaska, so to reach this milestone is an incredible honor.” Ferguson was hired in 2008 to lead Alaska after serving four years as an assistant. He has taken the school to its only NCAA tournament appearance in 20 10. His teams have won at least 16 games in five of his first six seasons. His record at the Fairbanks university is 100-96-32.

“He has truly built a successful hockey program in the right way, and we look forward to many more wins,” Nanooks athletic director Gary Gray said. He has coached more than 30 players who have gone to play professionally, including New York Islanders goalie Chad Johnson. The Wainwright, Alberta, native played for the Nanooks from 1992-96. He had 17 goals and 87 assists for 104 total points, putting him at 24th on the Nanooks’ all-time scoring list. Saturday’s win over the Black Bears in Anchorage gave Alaska its first Kendall Hockey Classic title since 2009. This weekend the Nanooks will host the Brice Alaska Gold Rush tourney in Fairbanks. Other teams participating are Air Force, Penn State and Alaska Anchorage.

Baltimore to grab 3-0 lead in ALCS

DAVE SKRETTA AP Sports Writer

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Mike Moustakas had his eye on the ball from the moment it left Adam Jones’s bat, tracking it against the bright lights of Kauffman Stadium. When it settled into his glove and he tumbled into a dugout suite, a dozen fans were waiting to pick him right back up. Just like Moustakas has picked up his team during its perfect postseason. The third baseman with the four playoff homers dazzled with his glove Tuesday night. And when Billy Butler drove in the go-ahead run with a sacrifice fly in the sixth inning, the long-downtrodden Kansas City Royals were on their way to a 2-1 victory over the Baltimore Orioles and a commanding 3-0 lead in their AL Championship Series. “It really did fire up the whole stadium,” Royals first baseman Eric Hosmer said of his teammate’s circus catch. “Hats off to the fans in the dugout suite, pick him up and put him back on the field. That was great. Moose finding ways to get it done.” The entire team has found ways to get it done. The wildcard Royals have won 10 straight postseason games, including all seven this year, in their first playoff appearance in 29 years. The only thing that’s slowed Kansas City so far was a rainout Monday. “We’ve got a snowball effect going right now,” Butler said. “The confidence couldn’t be any higher. That’s when you come to the park each day, focus on the next pitch, focus on

AP Photo/Charlie Riedel

Kansas City Royals third baseman Mike Moustakas makes a catch on a ball hit by Baltimore Orioles’ Adam Jones during the sixth inning of Game 3 of the American League baseball championship series Tuesday, in Kansas City, Mo.

your job and just not be the guy to end the streak.” Fresh off a combined threehitter, Kansas City will send Jason Vargas to the mound for Game 4 on Wednesday, trying to advance to its first World Series since 1985. Miguel Gonzalez will go to the mound

for the Orioles. “It’s hard to take advantage of mistakes when they’re not making any,” Orioles first baseman Steve Pearce said. “This is tough, man. We’ve got one loss left. We’ve got to find a way to start pulling this out. We got to find somebody

to get it done.” The Orioles are the 34th team to trail 3-0 in a best-ofseven major league postseason series — the only team to come back and win was the Boston Red Sox in the 2004 ALCS against the Yankees, STATS said.

Giants top Cards on error in NLCS JANIE McCAULEY AP Baseball Writer

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A wild pitch, a wide throw and an 18-inning marathon. These playoff-tested Giants keep finding wacky ways to win in another special October. An errant throw by reliever Randy Choate on a bunt allowed Brandon Crawford to score the winning run in the bottom of the 10th inning, lifting San Francisco over the St. Louis Cardinals 5-4 on Tuesday for a 2-1 lead in the NL Championship Series. “Everybody’s saying: ‘How are the Giants doing it? How are the Giants winning games?’” said Gregor Blanco, who laid down the sacrifice. “We just reC

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ally believe in each other. We play together.” Crawford drew an eightpitch walk from Choate to begin the inning, ending a stretch of 16 straight Giants retired since Tim Hudson’s two-out single in the fourth. After failing on two sacrifice attempts, Juan Perez singled to bring up Blanco. Blanco fouled off a bunt try, too, but then pushed one to the third-base side of the mound and the left-handed Choate’s side-arm throw sailed past lunging second baseman Kolten Wong, who was covering first base. “We had trouble getting the bunt down,” Crawford said. “So I was happy he got it down. He put it in a great spot and made those guys make a play,

and fortunately (we) saw the throw go wide.” Randal Grichuk tied it with a solo homer in the seventh that chased Hudson. Game 4 in the best-of-seven series is Wednesday night, with Ryan Vogelsong pitching for the Giants against fellow righty Shelby Miller. Choate blamed himself. He has done pitcher fielding practice for decades. “He did exactly what I wanted him to do,” the pitcher said. “It was easy. It was right there and I blew it. The ball just sailed on me.” This walkoff win came 12 years to the day after Kenny Lofton’s single in the ninth inning ended the 2002 NLCS against the Cardinals and sent

the Giants to the World Series. It also came on a day Hall of Famer Willie McCovey surprised players with his return to the ballpark after a long stint in the hospital nursing an infection. “Is this a rule we can’t hit a home run?” a relieved manager Bruce Bochy joked, sitting back in his office chair. In the Division Series clincher only a week earlier against Washington, Joe Panik scored the go-ahead run in a 3-2 win on Aaron Barrett’s bases-loaded wild pitch. That came after winning Game 2 2-1 in 18 innings. The Giants also scored the tying run in the ninth inning Sunday on a wild pitch, a 5-4 loss in Game 2 of the NLCS.

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Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Winston’s attorney challenges FSU KAREEM COPELAND Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — The adviser for the family of Jameis Winston has asked Florida State why it has chosen now to engage in the Title IX process and accuses the school of trying to protect its own interests and responding to media pressure, according to a letter obtained Tuesday by The Associated Press. Florida State announced last week it will use an independent official in a student code of conduct hearing. A female student said Winston sexually assaulted her in December 2012. Attorney David Cornwell notes in a letter that university and federal policy requires a timely investigation. He asks university officials why Florida State has ignored those guidelines and writes that Winston deserves a prompt explanation. Winston was never arrested and Florida State Attorney Willie Meggs declined to press charges against Winston last December due to a lack of evidence. The AP does not identify people who say they are victims of sexual abuse. No date has been set for the university hearing. Florida State has notified Winston that the hearing will be held to be determined if four sections

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of the code of conduct have been violated, two for sexual misconduct, two for endangerment. The quarterback has five class days from last Friday to respond to the university. Florida State spokeswoman Browning Brooks Tuesday declined comment beyond what the university released in its timeline last week. However, she referred to two passages in the release that she said explains the delay in which Cornwell is inquiring about. In the release, Florida State said the athletic department did not file a report with the Title IX administrator or Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities after Winston and two other student-athletes that were present said the sex was consensual. The decision was based on that and the Tallahassee Police Department’s decision not to press charges in January 2013. The university also said because the Victims Advocate Program continued to have “confidential interactions” with the woman for months, they were “duty-bound not to share any of the information with FSU Title IX officials.” The university stated that the woman was not made available for an interview with the school until Aug. 6, 2014. The woman’s lawyers have maintained that she was willing to talk throughout the process.

time in franchise history. They’re off to their worst start since they were 0-3-1 in 2008-09. Tim Jackman, Devante SmithContinued from page A-10 Pelly and Matt Beleskey scored for the Ducks. Brouwer scored 1:16 apart to tie Mark Streit and Wayne Simthe game with 4:35 remaining in monds each scored power-play regulation. goals for the Flyers. Jakub Voracek sent the game into OT with the tying goal. Claude Giroux scored the DUCKS 4, FLYERS 3, SO lone shootout for the Flyers. PHILADELPHIA (AP) — William Karlsson scored and JaSABRES 4, kob Silfverberg each scored in the HURRICANES 3, SO shootout to lift the Ducks to a win over the Flyers. RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — MarThe Flyers (0-2-2) lost their cus Foligno had two goals, Zemsecond straight game in a shootgus Girgensons scored on a backM out and are winless through the hand to end a long shootout, and first four games for only the fourth

A-11

Scoreboard baseball MLB Postseason LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES (Best-of-7) American League All AL games televised by TBS Kansas City 3, Baltimore 0 Friday, Oct. 10: Kansas City 8, Baltimore 6, 10 innings Saturday, Oct. 11: Kansas City 6, Baltimore 4 Monday, Oct. 13: Baltimore at Kansas City, ppd., rain Tuesday, Oct. 14: Kansas City 2, Baltimore 1 Wednesday, Oct. 15: Baltimore (Gonzalez 10-9) at Kansas City (Vargas 11-10), 12:07 p.m. National League San Francisco 2, St. Louis 1 Saturday, Oct. 11: San Francisco 3, St. Louis 0 Sunday, Oct. 12: St. Louis 5, San Francisco 4 Tuesday, Oct. 14: San Francisco 5, St. Louis 4, 10 innings Wednesday, Oct. 15: St. Louis (Miller 10-9) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 8-13), 4:07 p.m. (FS1) Thursday, Oct. 16: St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:07 p.m. (FS1) Royals 2, Orioles 1 Bal. 010 000 000—1 3 0 K.C. 000 101 00x—2 7 0 W.Chen, Gausman (6) and Hundley; Guthrie, Frasor (6), K.Herrera (7), W.Davis (8), G.Holland (9) and S.Perez. W_Frasor 1-0. L_W. Chen 0-1. Sv_G.Holland (3). Giants 5, Cardinals 4 S.L. 000 201 100 0—4 9 1 S.F. 400 000 000 1—5 6 0 (10 innings) Lackey, Gonzales (7), Neshek (8), Maness (9), Choate (10) and Pierzynski; T.Hudson, Affeldt (7), S.Casilla (9), J.Lopez (10), Romo (10) and Posey. W_Romo 1-1. L_Choate 0-1. HRs_St. Louis, Grichuk (1).

hockey NHL Standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts Montreal 4 3 1 0 6 Tampa Bay 4 2 1 1 5 Ottawa 3 2 1 0 4 Toronto 4 2 2 0 4 Detroit 2 1 1 0 2 Boston 4 1 3 0 2 Buffalo 4 1 3 0 2 Florida 3 0 2 1 1 Metropolitan Division New Jersey 3 3 0 0 6 N.Y. Islanders 3 3 0 0 6 Pittsburgh 2 2 0 0 4 Columbus 3 2 1 0 4 Washington 3 1 0 2 4 N.Y. Rangers 4 1 3 0 2 Philadelphia 4 0 2 2 2 Carolina 3 0 2 1 1 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division Nashville 3 2 0 1 5 Minnesota 2 2 0 0 4 Chicago 2 2 0 0 4 Dallas 3 1 1 1 3 Colorado 4 1 2 1 3 St. Louis 2 1 1 0 2 Winnipeg 3 1 2 0 2 Pacific Division San Jose 3 3 0 0 6 Anaheim 4 3 1 0 6 Vancouver 2 2 0 0 4 Calgary 4 2 2 0 4 Los Angeles 3 1 1 1 3 Arizona 2 1 1 0 2 Edmonton 2 0 1 1 1 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Tuesday’s Games Anaheim 4, Philadelphia 3, SO San Jose 6, Washington 5, SO Buffalo 4, Carolina 3, SO Calgary 3, Nashville 2, SO N.Y. Islanders 6, N.Y. Rangers 3 Dallas 4, Columbus 2 Toronto 3, Colorado 2, OT New Jersey 2, Tampa Bay 1 Los Angeles 6, Edmonton 1 Wednesday’s Games Boston at Detroit, 4 p.m. Calgary at Chicago, 4 p.m. Edmonton at Arizona, 6:30 p.m. All Times ADT

basketball NBA Preseason EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division

the Sabres beat the Hurricanes for their first victory of the season. Girgensons was Buffalo’s eighth shooter in the tiebreaker. The two squads, which met in the 2006 Eastern Conference finals before the Hurricanes won their only Stanley Cup, came into the game as the only NHL teams without a point.

W L Brooklyn 1 0 Toronto 3 1 Boston 2 2 New York 2 2 Philadelphia 1 3 Southeast Division Washington 3 1 Charlotte 2 1 Atlanta 2 1 Orlando 2 1 Miami 0 4 Central Division Cleveland 2 0 Detroit 2 1 Chicago 2 2 Indiana 1 2 Milwaukee 1 3

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— 1 1½ 2 1

1.000 — .667 1 .500 1½ .333 2 .250 2½ 1.000 — .500 1½ .333 2 .333 2 .000 3

Transactions BASEBALL American League TAMPA BAY RAYS С Named Matt Silverman president of baseball operations and Brian Auld team president.

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Tanner Pearson had two goals and an assist, and linemates Jeff Carter and Tyler Toffoli added a goal and an assist apiece in the Kings’ vic-

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Tuesday’s Games New York 84, Philadelphia 77 Cleveland 106, Milwaukee 100 Atlanta 109, Miami 103 New Orleans 117, Houston 98 Oklahoma City 117, Memphis 107 Wednesday’s Games Sacramento vs. Brooklyn at Beijing, China, 3:30 a.m. Detroit at Charlotte, 7 a.m. Indiana vs. Cleveland at Cincinnati, OH, 3 p.m. Toronto vs. Boston at Portland, ME, 3:30 p.m. All Times ADT

KINGS 6, OILERS 1

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Joe Colborne scored the only goal of the shootout to lift the Flames to a win over the Predators. T.J. Brodie and Mark Giordano also scored for Calgary, which im-

.750 .667 .667 .667 .000

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division Houston 3 1 New Orleans 2 2 Dallas 1 2 Memphis 1 3 San Antonio 0 0 Northwest Division Utah 3 0 Oklahoma City 2 1 Minnesota 1 1 Portland 1 2 Denver 1 3 Pacific Division Golden State 3 0 Phoenix 1 1 Sacramento 1 2 L.A. Lakers 1 2 L.A. Clippers 0 3

proved its record to 2-2-0.

FLAMES 3, PREDATORS 2, SO

Pct GB 1.000 ½ .750 — .500 1 .500 1 .250 2

National League LOS ANGELES DODGERS С Named Andrew Friedman president of baseball operations. Announced general manger Ned Colletti will stay on as a senior adviser to team president and CEO. Announced OF Roger Bernadina refused his outright assignment and has elected to become a free agent. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association TORONTO RAPTORS С Exercised their fourth-year team options on C Jonas Valanciunas and F Terrence Ross for the 2015-16 season. WASHINGTON WIZARDS С Exercised their fourth-year contract option on G Bradley Beal and their third-year option on F Otto Porter. Women’s National Basketball Association NEW YORK LIBERTY С Announced they will not renew the contract of coach and general manager Bill Laimbeer. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS С Signed LB Kaelin Burnett and CB Ross Weaver to the practice squad. Released LB Jonathan Brown from the practice squad. CHICAGO BEARS С Signed LB Terrell Manning to the practice squad. CINCINNATI BENGALS С Placed WR Marvin Jones on the injured reserve list. Signed WR Greg Little. Waived LB Khairi Fortt. Released WR Colin Lockett from the practice squad. Signed WR Cobi Hamilton to the practice squad. CLEVELAND BROWNS С Signed DL Sione Fua. Placed DL Armonty Bryant on injured reserve. Released WR Lee Doss from the practice squad. DENVER BRONCOS С Placed LB Danny Trevathan on recallable injured reserve. GREEN BAY PACKERS С Signed TE Ike Ariguzo to the practice squad. Released G Jordan McCray from the practice squad. MIAMI DOLPHINS С Reinstated DL Derrick Shelby from the suspended list. Placed RB Knowshon Moreno on injured reserve. NEW YORK GIANTS С Placed

tory over the Oilers. Jonathan Quick made 31 saves for the defending Stanley Cup champions, who have won two straight in dominant fashion after an 0-1-1 start. Los Angeles captain Dustin Brown and Justin Williams also scored as the Kings excelled with

WR Victor Cruz and CB Trumaine McBride on injured reserve. Signed WR Kevin Ogletree and CB Chandler Fenner. Signed WR Chris Harper, CB Victor Hampton and LB Carlos Fields to the practice squad. Released WR Travis Harvey from the practice squad. Placed CB Bennett Jackson on the practice squad/injured list. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS С Resigned QB Josh Johnson. Released S Bubba Ventrone. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS С Signed DE Greg Scruggs. Released S Steven Terrell. HOCKEY National Hockey League BOSTON BRUINS С Signed F Simon Gagne to a one-year contract. Waived F Bobby Robins for purpose of assignment. Sent F Jordan Caron to Providence (AHL). DALLAS STARS С Recalled LW Curtis McKenzie from Texas (AHL). MINNESOTA WILD С Named Richard Park player development coach. Reassigned D Stu Bickel to Iowa (AHL). MOTORSPORTS NASCAR С Fined Brad Keselowski $50,000 and Tony Stewart $25,000 for their post-race conduct on Oct. 11 at Charlotte Motor Speedway. SOCCER Major League Soccer PORTLAND TIMBERS С Announced the formation of Timbers 2, a professional team that will compete in USL PRO starting in 2015. SEATTLE SOUNDERS FC С Announced the formation of Sounders 2, a professional team that will compete in USL PRO starting in 2015. COLLEGE SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE С Announced the retirement of commissioner Mike Slive, effective July 31, 2015. NEW JERSEY CITY С Named Rell Smith women’s bowling coach. RICHARD STOCKTON С Announced men’s soccer coach Jeff Haines will retire at the conclusion of the 2014 season and will become an assistant athletic director.

another huge game from That 70s Line, the jersey-number-inspired nickname for Carter, Toffoli and Pearson. Toffoli’s beautiful short-handed goal and Pearson’s first career twogoal game were the highlights of another big night for the trio, which has 16 points in five games.


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A-12 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Police reports n On Sept. 14 at 7:02 p.m., Soldotna police responded to Soldotna Creek Park for the report of an intoxicated male. Manuel Martin, 54, of Kenai, was issued a criminal citation for sixth-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance and released. n On Sept. 18 at 11:26 a.m., Alaska State Troopers responded with the Girdwood Fire Department for a reported singlevehicle rollover near Mile 77 of the Seward Highway and contacted Jennifer A. Jackson, 41, of Soldotna. Investigation revealed that Jackson was traveling northbound on the Seward Highway and was passing other northbound vehicles. Jackson’s 2011 Nissan Versa hydroplaned on wet pavement, entered the southbound ditch and rolled. Jackson received minor injuries, and the vehicle was a total loss. n On Sept. 18 at 9:14 p.m., troopers arrested Karen Wessolleck, 51 of Nikiski, on charge of fourth-degree assault (domestic violence). Wessolleck was contacted at her residence following a report that she had hit a male multiple times with a piece of wood. She was taken to Wildwood Pretrial without bail. n On Sept. 20 at 5:35 p.m., troopers received a call reporting a disturbance in the North Skilak Campgrounds. The caller reported that a drunken male was driving in the campgrounds and was involved in an argument with a female as they attempted to load a boat. Troopers responded and located the vehicle as it traveled north near Mile 2.5 of Skilak Road. During the stop, investigation revealed that Michael Bejsovec, 49, of Anchorage, had been operating a motor vessel on Skilak Lake

while impaired by alcoholic beverages and had operated the vehicle in the campgrounds while impaired by alcoholic beverages. Investigation further revealed that he had almost hit two pedestrians with his vehicle, causing them to move off of the road out of fear for their safety. Bejsovec was arrested for operating a vessel while under the influence, driving under the influence and two counts of reckless endangerment. He refused to provide a breath sample and was also arrested for refusal to submit to a chemical test. He was taken to the Seward Jail without bail. n On Sept. 20 at 1:45 a.m., Soldotna police stopped a vehicle on the Sterling Highway near Kobuk Street. Nathan Raible-Clark, 24, of Seattle, was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol and chemical test refusal and was taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility on $1,000 bail. n On Sept. 20 at 6:42 p.m., Soldotna police received a report that Kristina Goolsby, 33, of Soldotna, had violated her conditions of release in a pending criminal case. Investigation led to Goolsby being arrested for violating her conditions of release and being taken to Wildwood Pretrial without bail. n On Sept. 20 at 8:28 p.m., troopers arrested Brent Eckert, 48 of Nikiski, on an arrest warrant for failure to appear for pretrial conference hearing for misuse of plates. Upon contacting Eckert, he was found to be in possession of marijuana and heroin. Eckert was additionally charged with fourth-degree and sixth-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance and was taken to Wildwood Pretrial. n On Sept. 20 at 4:13 p.m., Kenai police received a report of a hit-and-run in the local parking

lot of a business. After investigation, officers contacted Michael D. Massey, 61, of Anchorage. Massey was issued a summons for leaving the scene of damageonly collision and released at the scene. n On Sept. 20 at 12:47 p.m., Kenai Police Department was advised of a possible violation of condition of release. Officers contacted the parties involved and, after investigation, Justin R. Hart, 32, of Kenai, was arrested on the charge of violating condition of release by being out of sight of his third-party custodian. Vicky L. Hart-Kummert, 57, of Kenai, was issued a summons violation of custodial duties and released. Justin Hart was taken to Wildwood Pretrial pending arraignment. n On Sept. 21 at 12:28 a.m., Alaska State Troopers conducted a traffic stop at North Harbor Road and Third Avenue in Seward, after a vehicle almost struck a trooper who was on foot during a separate traffic stop. During the stop, investigation revealed that Anthony Bolanos, 27, of Aliso Viejo, California, was operating the vehicle while impaired by alcoholic beverages and while his California driver license was revoked. Bolanos, who had two prior driving under the influence convictions within the last 10 years, was arrested for felony driving under the influence and driving while license revoked. He refused to provide a breath sample and was also arrested for felony refusal to submit to a chemical test. He was taken to the Seward Jail without bail. n On Sept. 21 at 6:27 p.m., the Soldotna Public Safety Communications Center received a 911 call reporting that Joshua Brown, 32, of Anchorage, had been injured after he rolled his ATV on Crown Point Mine Trail. Moose Pass Medics were

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dispatched and responded with troopers and U.S. Forest Service officers. A medic and the Forest Service officer responded up the trail with another rider to contact Brown and bring him down the trailhead. All responders and Brown returned to the trailhead parking lot at 8:55 p.m. Brown made his own arrangements to seek treatment at Providence Medical Center in Seward. n On Sept. 21 at about 12:10 p.m. Alaska State Troopers was conducting follow-up investigation in Nikiski for separate incidents involving domestic violence and numerous property crimes. During the course of the investigations, troopers learned the location of Brandon Bernier, 34, of Nikiski, who had an outstanding parole arrest warrant. He was arrested for the parole arrest warrant and taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility pending arraignment. Taylor Lawler, 19, of Nikiski, was found to be hiding the wanted subject. She was arrested for first-degree hindering prosecution (C felony) and taken to Wildwood Pretrial pending arraignment. Kristopher Bayes, 23, of Nikiski, was arrested for fourth-degree assault (domestic violence) and was also taken to Wildwood Pretrial pending arraignment. n On Sept. 21, Alaska Wildlife Troopers, Soldotna Post, cited Arseny Polushkin, 27, of Homer, for failure to validate his harvest ticket after taking a bull moose. Bail was set at $160 in Homer District Court. n On Sept. 21 at about 2:50 a.m., 911 received a call of a motor vehicle collision and shots being fired on Jim Avenue in Sterling. Alaska State Troopers arrived and contacted Christopher Allen, 49, of Sterling, who

reported that he had shot at the operator of the other vehicle, who had run from the scene. A passenger in the other vehicle was taken to and treated at Central Peninsula Hospital for injuries sustained during the collision. Troopers concluded the investigation on Sept. 24, and Allen was arrested for first-degree assault, seconddegree assault, third-degree misconduct involving weapons and reckless endangerment and was taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility without bail. n On Sept. 21 at 12:28 a.m., Alaska State Troopers was advised of a domestic disturbance in Lowell Point. Investigation revealed that Jonathan Leighton, 30, of Seward, had assaulted a female and had prevented her from breathing by choking her at one point. Leighton fled the scene prior to troopers’ arrival, and a warrant was requested and issued for his arrest. Later in the day, he turned himself into troopers and was arrested for second- degree assault (domestic violence) and was taken to the Seward Jail without bail. n On Sept. 21 at 11:04 a.m., Kenai police responded to Sterling Court on a report of an intoxicated driver. Matthew D. Bell, 27, of Soldotna was arrested for driving under the influence and was taken to Wildwood Pretrial. n On Sept. 21, Kenai police arrested Darry D. Flyum, 46, of Homer for second-degree assault, two counts of third-degree assault, third-degree misconduct involving a weapon and fourthdegree misconduct involving a controlled substance, stemming from a Sept. 8 incident at Walmart. Flyum was taken to Wildwood Correctional Facility. n On Sept. 21 at 5:05 a.m.,

Soldotna Dispatch received a report of a motor vehicle accident with injuries at Mile 4 of Holt Lamp Light Road in Nikiski. On arrival, troopers contacted David Schwenke, 26, of Nikiski. Schwenke was trapped between his vehicle and the ground. After medics extricated Schwenke, he was taken to Central Peninsula Hospital for evaluation. The case is currently under investigation. n On Sept. 23 at 12:42 a.m., Alaska State Troopers responded to a reported assault at an Anchor Point residence. Investigation revealed that Lorelei Reece, 21, of Anchor Point, had assaulted a household member. Reece fled the scene prior to troopers’ arrival. The Homer Court has issued a warrant for Reece’s arrest. n On Sept. 23 at 3:45 p.m., troopers arrested Julia Dawn Strouf, 22, of Nikiski, after she was contacted at a residence in Nikiski. Strouf had an outstanding no bail arrest warrant for failure to comply with Wildwood Pretrial to schedule a remand date. Strouf’s original charge was for driving with a revoked license. She was taken to Wildwood Pretrial with 10 days to serve. n On Sept. 23 at about 2:50 a.m., Kenai Police Department received a report from Alaska State Troopers of a possible intoxicated driver leaving a bar in Soldotna, possibly headed to Nikiski. A short time later, Kenai police located the vehicle turning onto the Kenai Spur Highway from Bridge Access Road. An officer conducted a traffic stop and, after investigation, Miranda L. Endresen, 21, of Nikiski, was arrested for driving under the influence and taken to Wildwood Pretrial pending arraignment.

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Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Court reports The following judgments were recently handed down in District Court in Kenai: n Travis Brian Brazington, 23, of Sterling, pleaded guilty to fourth-degree criminal mischief, a domestic violence offense committed Sept. 3. He was sentenced to 30 days in jail with 25 days suspended, may perform 40 hours of community work service in lieu of jail time, was fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to pay restitution and placed on probation for one year. n Curtis Parker, 21, of Sterling, pleaded guilty to an amended charge of third-degree theft, committed April 13. He was sentenced to 360 days in jail with 315 days suspended, fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to pay restitution, ordered to have no contact with victim, forfeited items seized and placed on probation for three years. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Thomas J. Fruichantie, 49, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to an amended charge of third-degree theft, a misdemeanor committed Oct. 28. He was sentenced to 360 days in jail with 330 days suspended, fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to pay restitution, ordered to register all garage/used goods sales with law enforcement (sales items are open to search/verification that they are not reported stolen), ordered to register all items /motor vehicles/trailers purchased or intended to be sold with the De-

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partment of Motor Vehicles within five calendar days and prior to sale to another person, ordered not to possess or sell items without identification marks, ordered to have no contact with five specifically named individuals and placed on probation for three years. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n David A. Morgan, 40, of Chugiak, pleaded guilty to driving while license cancelled, suspended, revoked or limited, committed Aug. 22. He was sentenced to 20 days in jail with 10 days suspended, may perform 80 hours of community work service in lieu of jail time, was fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, had his license revoked for 90 days and placed on probation for one year. n Sam A. Renney, Jr., 32, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to no motor vehicle liability insurance, committed April 12. He was fined $500, a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended and placed on probation for one year. n Jacob Darrell Snyder, 19, of Nikiski, pleaded guilty to one count of no motor vehicle liability insurance and one count of an amended charge of attempted fourth-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance, committed Nov. 28. On count one, he was fined $500. On count two, he was fined a $50 court surcharge, forfeited all items seized and placed on probation for one year. n Nicholas Douglas Tuttle, 24, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to fourth-degree assault, a domestic violence offense committed Aug. 21. He was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 120 days suspended, fined a $50 court sur-

charge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment and placed on probation for three years. n Hunter K. Williams, 21, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to an amended charge of first-degree criminal trespass, committed April 23. He was sentenced to 320 days in jail with 300 days suspended, fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, forfeited all items seized, ordered to pay restitution, ordered to have no contact with victim or a specific Kenai address, ordered to not possess any controlled substances without a valid prescription and was placed on probation for three years. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Jacob R. Allen, 21, address unknown, pleaded guilty to driving while license revoked, committed Sept. 29, 2013. He was sentenced to 20 days in jail with 10 days suspended, may perform 80 hours of community work service in lieu of jail time, was fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, had his license revoked for 90 days, ordered to pay cost of appointed counsel and placed on probation for one year. n Michael Jay Bauer, 57, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to driving under the influence, committed

April 20. He was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, fined $2,000 with $500 suspended, a $75 court surcharge, $330 cost of imprisonment and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, had his license revoked for 90 days, ordered ignition interlock for six months and placed on probation for one year. n Una Yvette Britton, 47, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct – loud noise disturbing neighbor, committed Aug. 25. She was fined $500 and a $50 court surcharge. n Christopher A. Duck, 43, of Fairbanks, pleaded guilty to third-degree theft, committed Aug. 18. He was sentenced to 300 days in jail with 290 days suspended, may perform 80 hours of community work service in lieu of jail time, was fined $1,000 with $250 suspended, a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, forfeited items seized, ordered to have no contact with Soldotna Fred Meyer store and placed on probation for one year. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Daniel Aaron Evans, 18, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to driving without a valid operator’s license, committed July 22. He was fined

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$150 and a $50 court surcharge. n Anna Evanson, 28, of Sterling, pleaded guilty to an amended charge of no valid operator’s license, committed June 6. She was sentenced to 40 days in jail with 30 days suspended, may perform 80 hours of community work service in lieu of jail time, was fined a $50 court surcharge and a $100 jail surcharge with $100 suspended and placed on probation for one year. n Wade E. Greenough, 51, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to drunken person to license premises, committed April 26, 2013. He was fined $1,000 with $750 suspended, a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered not to consume alcohol to excess and placed on probation for two years. n Josie Rene Harvey, 25, of Anchorage, pleaded guilty to driving under the influence, committed Sept. 4, 2012. She was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, fined $3,000 with $1,500 suspended, a $75 court surcharge, $330 cost of imprisonment and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, had her license revoked for 90 days, ordered not to possess controlled substances, including marijuana, without a valid

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prescription and was placed on probation for three years. n Dean W. Hatch, 54, of Nikiski, pleaded guilty to driving under the influence, committed Aug. 15. He was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, fined $2,000 with $500 suspended, a $75 court surcharge, $330 cost of imprisonment and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, had his license revoked for 90 days, ordered ignition interlock for six months and placed on probation for one year. The following dismissals were recently handed down in District Court in Kenai: n A charge of no motor vehicle liability insurance against Monte J. Betz, 47, address unknown, was dismissed. Date of the charge was Nov. 13. n Charges of one count of violating a protective order and two counts of violating conditions of release for a misdemeanor against Brandie Louise Cornell, 34, of Soldotna, were dismissed. Date of the charges was Nov. 17. n A charge of disorderly conduct against Michael Allan Hallford, 49, of Kasilof, was dismissed. Date of the charge was June 4.


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A-14 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, October 15, 2014

. . . Forum Continued from page A-1

Alaska. Mallott was the only candidate to speak in support of raising the minimum wage, which he said will stimulate the economy over time. The currently proposed raises are very modest, he said. “The government should not be trying to artificially set minimum wage standards,” Sullivan said. “That is not the role of the government.” Lee agreed with Sullivan, saying he does not want the government to interfere with contracts between individuals. In terms of the Alaska LNG Project, he said the state should be acting as a partner to facilitate success, not to be in a position of ownership. “I personally believe the pipeline is a pipe dream,” Lee said. Mallott said he believes the project should move forward in a way that does not create divisiveness within the state. Sullivan said other methods of generating revenue exist in Alaska, such as the sedentary timber industry, which could be managed as a viable renewable resource. He also pointed to the potential for manufacturing, utilizing some of Alaska’s natural resources. Each candidate agreed Alaska is a resource rich state, with the potential for a strong economy, if those resources are properly exploited.

. . . Fish Continued from page A-1

often attributed his viewpoint as aligning with Libertarian standards. The Libertarian ticket is the only one on the ballot to endorse the pro-choice position and strongly supports funding to public schools, Lee said. When it comes to Proposition 2 and the potential for legalization in Alaska, Lee said he supports the libertarian viewpoint that citizens should be allowed the maximum amount of personal freedoms, as long as they do not harm others. But he said during campaigning he has met pot smokers who will be voting against the proposition. “If you like your drug dealer, you keep your drug dealer, but maybe Prop 2 doesn’t help that,” Lee said. Sullivan said he has somewhat of a libertarian streak in him and agrees people should be able to do what they want in their own homes. However, legalized recreational marijuana may limit eligible workers who are abiding by state law, but want to work for a company that requires a drug test to get hired on. Mallott said legalization is creating an industry Alaska does not need. Substance abuse is already a local issue here, he said. The Walker-Mallott ticket is non-partisan, bipartisan and all Reach Kelly Sullivan at kelpartisan, Mallott said. The plat- ly.sullivan@peninsulaclarion. form is about seeing change in com.

let setnetters find themselves on an increasingly restrictive fishing schedule due to low numbers of king salmon returning to area streams. Between the two types of commercial fishing in the Upper Cook Inlet, drift gillnetting boats caught approximately 1.47 million sockeye salmon, or about 64 percent of the total salmon harvest in Upper Cook Inlet. In 2013, drift fishermen caught about 1.65 million sockeye salmon, compared to the setnet harvest of 992,000 fish. In 2012, when setnet fishermen were shut down for the bulk of the season, drift fishermen took nearly 93 percent of the total salmon harvest. Typically, harvest is more evenly split between drift and set gillnet fishermen, said Commercial Area Management Biologist Pat Shields in a previous Clarion interview. However, as sockeye salmon continue to return to the inlet in large numbers and king salmon numbers continue to drop, disparities in harvest between the two gear types have become more pronounced. “Typically it’s not quite a fifty-fifty split between drifters and setnetters,” said Assistant

. . . Votes

by all age groups and different user groups with different purposes in mind,” said Homer Police Chief Mark Robl in a phone interview last Friday. The big issue most everyone at last week’s meeting complained about was reckless driving, vehicles on the beach and how to control use. Robl said during the school year, Bishop’s Beach becomes a hangout for high school age teenagers, with reckless driving a major problem. “You’ll see a bunch of them racing around there at lunch time, and then right after school it gets hit pretty hard,” he said. Drivers also seem to be mak-

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holds roundtables on military issues. The Democrat said that while his party usually doesn’t win the majority of veterans’ votes, he has a strong record. Begich beat a veteran to become mayor of Anchorage, and he won the state’s three military bases in his 2006 race against Sen. Ted Stevens, who was a veteran. “In Alaska, veterans are a big deal,” Begich said in an interview. “I can show a record of delivering services.”

It’s not just the range of military facilities that pulls veterans to Alaska — it’s the adventurous, gun-friendly, live-and-letlive lifestyle, said David Joslin, a former combat medic who was wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan. “Guys that spent a decade at war, we don’t want the (issues) of the lower 48,” said Joslin, 42. Tony Unsderfer, an avid hunter and gold-miner, sat at the VFW in Eagle River, pointing out the mounted wolverine that he shot. When talk switched to politics, Unsderfer, a Vietnam veteran, said he was voting for Sullivan. “He’s an old military guy, too,” Unsderfer said of the Republican candidate.

. . . Beach Continued from page A-1

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Area Management Biologist Aaron Dupuis. “Usually the drifters get a bit more, but the difference increased quite a bit since we’ve had a low abundance of kings.” Among setnetters, a disparity in harvest on the east side of the Cook Inlet was also more pronounced as setnetters in the Kenai and East Forelands section of the set gillnet fishery found themselves in the water for 6 openings during the 2014 fishing season, while the Kasilof section was opened 14 times. However, a special harvest area concentrated at the mouth of the Kasilof River and open to all setnet fishermen who fish on the east side of the Cook Inlet was opened for hundreds of hours in July. The total sockeye salmon harvest in the upper subdistrict was approximately 705,000 fish — the second lowest since 2001. “It’s not unprecedented for them to fish those few days,” Dupuis said of the set gillnet fishery. “There have been times when we’re trying to make goals in the Kenai River that they’re kept out of the water. But, given the abundance of sockeye salmon in the inlet, it is unusual for them to be kept out of water.” Dupuis said the low numbers of king salmon — a fish caught

more often in the setnet fishery than in the drift gillnet fishery — are primarily responsible for the restrictive fishing regime setnetters find themselves operating under. Elsewhere in Upper Cook Inlet, setnetters in the western subdistrict, fished three 16-hour periods a week from July 5 through August 5 as the Crescent River sockeye run was considered above-average. Setnetters in that district caught 29,500 sockeye salmon. Kalgin Island commercial fishermen and those in the Northern District were below average. On Kalgin Island, approximately 39,000 sockeye salmon were harvested — the 10-year average is 64,000 — and in the Northern District 35,700 sockeye salmon were harvested, which is about 60 percent less than the 47-year average. In addition to sockeye, commercial fishermen harvested nearly 134,00 coho salmon, about 29 percent less than the 10-year average; 632,000 pink salmon, about 75 percent greater than the 10-year harvest; and about 115,000 chum salmon. Approximately 4,331 king salmon were caught in the commercial fisheries in the entirety of Cook Inlet, or about 70 percent less than the previous 10year average. In the Lower Cook Inlet,

pink salmon harvests were much higher than those of other salmon. Fishermen harvested 298,000 of them, and the vast majority were caught in the Outer District, an area along the eastern side of the Kenai Peninsula that starts southeast of Elizabeth Island and runs north along the coast toward Seward, ending at a point just south of Aialik Bay. Fishermen harvested nearly 164,000 pink salmon in that district, though that figure was down from a ten-year harvest average of about 546,000 pink salmon. Commercial harvests of sockeye and chum salmon in the Outer District were significantly higher than the ten-year harvest average in the area. Elsewhere in Lower Cook Inlet, fishermen caught fewer chinook salmon, sockeye salmon and chum salmon than the 10-year harvest average, according to the preliminary lower Cook Inlet season summary. When the season ended, commercial fishing and hatchery cost recovery and brood stock gathering efforts led to a harvest estimate of about 651,000 salmon — about 68 percent by the commercial fishermen and 32 percent by hatcheries, according to the summary.

ing short trips to and from the beach, Ostwald said. “It’s a drug problem,” he said. “It’s a perfect spot for them. They can see what’s coming.” That’s a challenge for police, Robl said. Cops make frequent patrols, but it’s hard to sneak up on the beach. An ordinance passed last summer would help address the speeding issue. The council appropriated $84,000 for speed bumps and solar-power speed awareness signs to go in next spring. The signs would gauge a car’s speed and flash the number. Limiting driving on the beach would be a bigger challenge. Historically, Bishop’s Beach has been a highway between towns and cabins. People also drive the beach to collect

coal for burning in stoves or to get to setnet sites, activities some said should be by permit. Robl said it would be hard to enforce a permitting process for vehicles using the beach. “There might be a middleof-the-road answer, something like closing the beach during hours of darkness,” he said. The city prohibits vehicles in areas like Beluga Slough, Mariner Park Slough, the end of the Spit and the east end of Mud Bay. Under a “cooperation, not regulation” guideline set by the Beach Policy Committee in 2003, signs suggest pedestrian access for the east end of Bishop’s Beach — the side to the left from the parking lot. That hasn’t worked, as a hard-packed trail to the east shows. Another issue has been ille-

gal camping on private and city property. Robl said the rules for camping on city property are clear: It’s prohibited except in designated camping areas, like on the Homer Spit. Camping on Bishop’s Beach is illegal — but OK if on private property with permission of the landowner. The tents near Woodard Creek are on private property. Defining private property in the Bishop’s Beach area can get tricky, but generally city land starts at mean high tide or a tide of 17.5 feet, said City Planner Rick Abboud. Robl said if landowners have unwanted campers on their property, they should call police. Police have warned several campers of illegal camping. Landowners also can prohibit partying or making campfires on their property.

Rashah McChesney can be reached at rashah.mcchesney@ peninsulaclarion.com.

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B Wednesday, October 15, 2014

About speeding to a birthday party

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n Also inside Pioneeer Potluck Classifieds Comics

B-2 B-3 B-7

Spareribs and Sauerkraut

Good for casual one-dish fall suppers

W Grannie Annie Keystone Drive, Soldotna, Alaska

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hrough the years, a few of our friends have met to celebrate our birthdays. With our busy summer schedules, if we did not do take the time, we would not see them and friends are important. We decided to meet for birthdays at different restaurants, but on this occasion we were invited to Judy and Jim Platz, beautiful bed and breakfast, Call of the River, on the banks of the Kenai River, to celebrate Susan’s birthday. Everyone brought a favorite dish or casserole and we had a grand time catching up on the news. Dolores brought her Pinni machine and all the ingredients to make a wonderful sandwich. I made the birthday carrot cake. I am sorry I cannot remember all the other delicious food that every one contributed, because Bernie made this day hilarious! Susan, Marty, Dolores and I arrived first. We were given a tour of the Bed and Breakfast and were setting around waiting for Bernie and catching up on the gossip, when the phone rang. It was Bernie in her high pitched, in a tizz, voice - “I am gong to be late!! A Trooper pulled me over!” Where are you asked Judy? Just about two blocks from you Bernie says! “ And Please don’t tell anybody, I am so embarrassed!” Well that request lasted about a minute as Susan got Judy to tell the whole story and we all laughingly said “Oh we have to see this!” Keystone Drive was completely torn up for road repairs. There was detours, flags and warning signs up and down the road. Reduce your speed limit to 25 was one of them. Seems like Bernie, in a rush to get to the birthday party, was gong slightly over the speed limit and got pulled over. At first when she saw the flashing lights, she thought it was a pilot car, so ignored the red and blue flashing lights in her rear view mirror. When she realized it was a trooper and he was after her, she pulled over. She rolled down her window and the first thing that fell out of her mouth was “I am going to a birthday party and I have a hot casserole and I don’t want it to get cold!” The trooper said “You were going 5 miles over the speed limit!”...Bernie says “But I have a hot casserole for lunch and they are waiting on me!” Then a second thought hit her and she asked “Would you like to come to lunch with us?” Taken by surprise, the trooper declined her invitation and let her go with a warning to obey the signs. Then she and the trooper looked up the road and there was Marty, Dolores, Susan, and I in the middle of the road waving at her-beckoning to hurry, jumping up and down, pointing and laughing. Judy stood in her yard, not joining us as she was slightly embarrassed at the antics of her guests!! Dolores recalls this event as one of the funniest of her life. Bernie finally showed up, her casserole was still warm and wonderful. And this is just one of the many stories about birthday parties!

hen the weather turns chilly, it’s hard to beat the appeal of a one-pot meal simmering on the stove. Be it the sight (and sound) of food cooking, or the aroma that wafts through the house, these things bring us instantaneous comfort. In addition, for the busy cook, onedish meals are time-efficient, offering the greatest reward for the least effort. Whether you’re fixing supper for yourself or your family, or preparing a meal for company, one-dish meals are equally at home. Casual meals are flexible, too, and may be adjusted according to budget, preference, dietary needs and – the season. In autumn, spareribs and sauerkraut, made with red onion and a Granny Smith apple, is especially tasty and nice accompanied by some crusty rye bread. Alternatively, instead of bread, serving fresh-baked soft pretzels would be a good, especially with October being National Pretzel Month. (Unless you wish to make your own, soft ready-to-bake pretzels come frozen, so look for them at the supermarket.) For dessert and more fall flavor, spice cake is excellent, particularly when the recipe, which follows, comes from frequent recipe contributor Caroline Kennedy, of Bluffton. The

Kitchen Ade Sue Ade

cake, which starts with a boxed mix, is flavorful and ultra-moist, thanks to the addition of extra cinnamon and pumpkin. Recipes for one-dish meals, for breakfast, brunch, lunch and supper are popular and a boon when extended family and friends visit, sometimes for extended stays. Keep them in mind for the holidays, and if you don’t already have one of generous size – plan to get a bigger pot. Sue Ade is a syndicated food writer with broad experience and interest in the culinary arts. She has worked and resided in the Lowcountry of South Carolina since 1985 and may be reached at kitchenade@yahoo.com.

Photos by Sue Ade unless otherwise noted

Flavorful and satisfying, easy one-dish Spareribs and Sauerkraut is good for supper on chilly fall nights.

Over medium heat, sauté onion and apple until softened. Add sauerkraut and Worcestershire to pot, stirring well to combine. Lay ribs on top, pulling up some of the sauerkraut to surround ribs, then add potatoes to

pot. Pour some of the sauerkraut/water mixture into the pot. Simmer, covered, for 2 hours (adding more juice/ water to keep ingredients moist during cooking), until rib meat is fall-offthe-bone tender. Makes 4 servings.

Browned baby-back pork ribs, sauerkraut, chopped onion and apples, as well as potatoes, are the makings of a satisfying one-pot autumn meal.

Pumpkin Spice Cake Recipe courtesy Caroline Kennedy, Bluffton

“Great for fall!”

Serve Spareribs and Sauerkraut with crusty rye bread, or, for a change, fresh-baked soft pretzels. October is National Pretzel Month.

Spareribs with Sauerkraut 1 rack pork baby back ribs, cut into 1 to 2-rib pieces Vegetable oil 1 large red onion, chopped 1 large Granny Smith apple, cored and chopped 2 (1-pound) packages sauerkraut 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce Salt Fresh ground pepper 1 cup water 6 small red potatoes, scrubbed and

cut in half. Preheat broiler. Drain sauerkraut, reserving juice. Add 1 cup water to the reserved sauerkraut juice; set aside. Season ribs lightly with salt and fresh ground pepper, rubbing the seasoning into the ribs to coat. Broil ribs on both sides until browned. Remove ribs from oven and pour accumulated juices into a large Dutch oven. Add 1 to 2 tablespoons oil to the juices in the pot to coat the bottom of the pot.

1 (16.5-ounce) box Duncan Hines spice cake mix 3 large eggs 1 cup canned pumpkin ½ cup cold water ½ cup canola oil or applesauce 1 (3.4-ounce) package Jell-O instant vanilla pudding mix 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon ½ cup chopped pecans, optional* Favorite cream cheese frosting, or whipped topping (such as Cool Whip)* Non-stick baking spray, for pan

pan with baking spray. In large bowl, combine dry cake mix, eggs, pumpkin, water, oil or applesauce, pudding mix and cinnamon. Beat at medium speed for 2 minutes. Stir in pecans, if using.* Pour into prepared pan. Bake 25 to 30 minutes, or until tester inserted in center comes out clean. Cool on wire rack. Frost with favorite cream cheese frosting, or serve with refrigerated whipped topping. Store in refrigerator. Makes 16 servings. *Kitchen Ade note: I opted to place pecans on top of cake before baking and served Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Gen- the cake with just a light dusting of erously grease a 13 x 9-inch baking confectioners’ sugar.

RIGHT: Caroline Kennedy’s Pumpkin Spice Cake, topped with chopped pecans, is moist, flavorful and full of fall flavor.

See GRANNIE ANNIE, page B-2

10 fresh ways to use Brussels sprouts BY ALISON LADMAN Associated Press

AP Photo/Matthew Mead

This Sept. 22 photo, shows fried Brussels sprouts in Concord, N.H. Chic menus at restaurants around the country have begun serving Brussels sprouts after kale introduced Americans to the idea that there actually are many ways to prepare most vegetables.

Not so long ago there really was only one way to eat Brussels sprouts. It involved boiling the sprouts into oblivion. Once they were reduced to near mush, you’d mound them on your plate, maybe add some butter and salt. You’d then gag down a few bites on the premise that they were healthy, but mostly spend the rest of the meal pushing them around your plate until enough time had passed that it was acceptable to throw them away. Then along came kale. Kale changed the vegetable world. Kale, in all its wrinkled good-

ness, suddenly made vegetables cool, hip even. More importantly, kale introduced Americans to the idea that there actually are many ways — including many delicious ways — to prepare most vegetables. Waiting in the wings for their own hipster moment? Brussels sprouts. Soon they were popping up on chic menus at restaurants around the country. And they most certainly were not boiled to oblivion. So to help you embrace the hipper, more delicious side of Brussels sprouts, we’ve assembled 10 fresh ideas for getting your greens. C

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10 Fresh ways with Brussels sprouts: — Oven-roasted: Cut sprouts in half, then toss with just a touch of olive oil. Sprinkle with kosher salt and black pepper. Spread on a rimmed baking sheet and roast at 425 F for 15 minutes. Add cubes of golden delicious apples and roast for another 10 minutes. Sprinkle with toasted sesame oil and toasted sesame seeds. — Pan-roasted: Cut sprouts in half and place in a deep skillet with 1/2 cup water. Cover and cook over medium heat for 10 minutes. Add 1/2 cup honey, 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, 1/2 teaspoon black

pepper, 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes and 3 cloves minced garlic. Cook, uncovered and stirring now and again, for 10 to 15 minutes, or until tender and browned. — Slaw: Shave or shred 1/2 pound of sprouts. The slicing disc of a food processor is ideal. Add 1/2 cup sliced scallions, 1/2 thinly sliced bell pepper and 1/2 cup corn kernels. Whisk together 1/4 cup mayonnaise, 1/4 cup buttermilk, 2 tablespoons lemon juice and 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar. Season with kosher salt, black pepper and a splash of hot sauce. Toss with the vegetables until thoroughly coated. See FRESH, page B-2


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B-2 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, October 15, 2014

. . . Fresh Continued from page B-1

Grannie Annie is the author of Grannie Annie Cookbook series, featuring Alaskan recipes and stories

BERNIE’S BIRTHDAY CASSEROLE TATOR TOT HALIBUT On page 32 of the Grannie Annie’s Cookin’ Fish from Cold Alaskan Waters Preheat oven to 400°. 1 Tblsp horseradish Oil a 2 quart shallow oven proof dish. Or 2 Tblsp minced onion and rectangle 9 ax 13 foil lined and oiled, cake 1 tsp minced garlic pan 4 to 6 shakes of hot sauce. You will need: Mix to blend. Put small amount of sauce in About one pound of Halibut or salmon, cut bottom of pan and lay fish on top. in large serving pieces Spread rest of sauce over top of fish. Top In a bowl mix: with frozen Tater Tots. Sprinkle with salt and 1 can of cream of mushroom or shrimp or pepper and bake in hot oven - 375 to 400° for asparagus soup, undiluted 35 to 45 minutes. Test to see if fish is done. (Bernie made her own cream of mushroom If I am not mistaken, Bernie topped this with sauce for her casserole) sour cream and fresh Parmesan cheese. It was 1/2 cup sour cream Yummy!

OATMEAL CHERRY CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES I received this from the Good News Presbyterian Church Bulletin from La Salle, Colorado. It’s a keeper! Thanks! 3/4 cups butter 2 cups of flour 1 cup of sugar 2 cups of old fashion oats 1 cup of dark brown sugar 1 teas baking soda 1/2 teas salt 1 teas cinnamon - I added one more! Cream and add: Fold in 1 cup chocolate chips 2 eggs 3/4 cups dried cherries 2 tea vanilla 1/2 cup chopped walnuts - my addition 1 teas almond extract Drop by spoon full on cookie sheet and 1 ounce of milk — I used one tablespoon bake 350° about 10 minutes or until they are full golden on the edges. These keep well in cookMix the next four ingredients together and ie jar. incorporate into batter Great taste!

GRANNIE’S SWEET AND SOUR CHICKEN As always, I never have ALL ingredients for recipes-so this is my version! I received this from the Good News Presbyterian Church Bulletin from La Salle, Colorado. It’s a keeper! Thanks! Make two cups of cooked rice flavored with garlic salt To make batter to deep fry chicken: 1 1/2 cups flour 1/2 teas baking powder A pinch of soda A shake of celery salt 1/4 teas garlic salt Enough water to make a medium batternot too thick. Stir and let set while you cut 2 chicken breasts into no larger than a teaspoon, piec-

ses You can use halibut or salmon also Dip into batter and let drip before carefully deep fat frying Drain on paper towel and set aside while you assemble vegetables 1 onion cut in half from the top down, cut in two so as to have large pieces of onion 1 carrot, 1 stalk of celery cut in matchstick proportions 1 bell pepper, green or red cut in large pieces

. . . Grannie Annie Continued from page B-1

A note about my last storyAbout Learning to Live off the Alaskan Land. Several local friends reminded me that there was indeed grocery stores around. Tanglewood, Old M&M in North Kenai and a store in town. Because we had, at the time, six kids plus two adults and a few guests off and on in a boom-oil town community meant that I cooked all the time.

So did my friends for their families and guests. To help alleviate the price of groceries locally and have a varity, we traveled to Anchorage -”about 200 miles” to get canned goods, laundry soap, and shop for clothes for all the kids to school. We all piled into the 4 wheel drive 1968 Ford Pickup-new then-and yes all eight of us! Some of those trips left perma-

nent marks in the dash board of the truck - teeth marks! No doubt from boredom or seeing the roads covered with ice and snow. The old road was “twisty and turny” full of switch backs, narrow, steep two lanes and most of the time full of ice and snow. Who ever sat on my lap left the teeth marks - I think it was Susan!

— Home fries: Quarter 1/2 pound sprouts and 1/2 pound new potatoes. Boil for 3 to 5 minutes, or until al dente. Drain and pat dry with paper towels. In a large deep skillet, melt 3 tablespoons butter with 1 tablespoon vegetable oil. Add the sprouts and potatoes and cook over medium-high until browned on all sides and tender. Season with salt and black pepper. — Hash: Blanch quartered sprouts in boiling water for 3 to 5 minutes, or until al dente. Combine in a skillet with diced corned beef and a diced onion. Add a splash of oil if the corned beef doesn’t have much fat on it. Cook until everything is browned, turning occasionally. Serve topped with fried or poached eggs. — Grilled cheese: Toss halved sprouts with a bit of oil, salt and black pepper. Roast on a rimmed baking sheet for 20 minutes at 425 F. Arrange the following between 2 slices of sourdough bread: sprouts, Emmenthaler or Swiss cheese, and sliced pickles that have been patted dry with paper towels. Melt a little butter in a skillet and griddle the sandwich until the cheese is melted and the bread is browned and crispy, flipping halfway through. — Saute: Saute chopped salami, chopped pancetta and quartered sprouts with a chopped onion until the vegetables are tender and everything is golden brown. Remove from the pan with a slotted spoon, leaving any fat in the pan. Sear pork chops in the pan until they reach 145 F at the center, approximately 4 to 5 minutes per side for a 1-inch-thick chop. Top the chops with the sprout mixture.

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— Fried: Heat a large saucepan with 1/2 inch of oil until very hot, about 300 F. Working in batches, fry quartered sprouts until browned and crispy, about 4 to 6 minutes. Drain on paper towels and toss with salt and grated Parmesan cheese. — Pizza: Blanch quartered sprouts in boiling water for 3 to 5 minutes, or until al dente. Drain and pat dry with paper towels. On a prepared pizza crust, arrange sprouts, thinly sliced red onions, sliced mushrooms and mozzarella. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes. Top with a

drizzle of olive oil and a sprinkle of salt. — Warm grain salad: Boil barley until tender, according to package instructions. Blanch quartered sprouts and small diced butternut squash in boiling salted water for 7 to 8 minutes, or until tender. Drain and combine with the barley. Add a handful of dried cranberries and the zest and juice of an orange and a lemon. Drizzle with olive oil, then season with salt, black pepper and chopped fresh tarragon.

Milan Expo will include food trucks from the US By BETH J. HARPAZ AP Travel Editor

NEW YORK — The U.S. will show itself off as “Food Truck Nation” at the Milan Expo, bringing six authentic food trucks to Italy as part of its participation in the event opening in May for six months. The Expo theme is food and nutrition. The food trucks will be parked near the USA pavilion and will celebrate regional food and ethnic fusion trends, with a rotating menu including barbecue, Tex-Mex, salad he series is written by a 44 year resident of Alaska, Ann Berg of Nikiski. Ann shares wraps and even kimchi tacos, her collections of recipes from family and friends. She has gathered recipes for more according to Mitchell Davis, that 50 years. Some are her own creation. Her love of recipes and food came from executive vice president of the her Mother, a self taught wonderful cook. James Beard Foundation and an She hopes you enjoy the recipes and that the stories will bring a smile to your day. official with the Friends of the Grannie Annie can be reached at anninalaska@gci.net USA Pavilion. The Expo is the modern incarnation of the old World’s Fairs that thrilled 19th- and Cookbooks make great gifts! 20th-century audiences with The “Grannie Annie” Cook Book Series includes: “Grannie Annie’s Cookin’ on the new products and futuristic Woodstove”; “Grannie Annie’s Cookin’ at the Homestead”; “Grannie Annie’s Cookin’ technology. While the Expos have lost their gee-whiz luster Fish from Cold Alaskan Waters”; and “Grannie Annie’s Eat Dessert First.” They are due to globalization and the available at M & M Market in Nikiski. proliferation of technology in

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AP Photo/Matthew Mead

This Sept. 22 photo, shows a Brussels sprout pizza in Concord, N.H. Chic menus at restaurants around the country have begun serving Brussels sprouts after kale introduced Americans to the idea that there actually are many ways to prepare most vegetables.

everyday life, Expos continue to attract millions of visitors. More than 73 million people attended the Shanghai Expo in 2010. Twenty million people are expected for the Milan Expo, with 6 million tickets already sold, according to Alessandro Mancini, head of Expo ticketing and tourism, who spoke in New York Tuesday with Milan’s mayor, Giuliano Pisapia. Seven to 8 million of those visitors are expected to come from outside Italy, including a million from the U.S. Milan’s famous opera house, La Scala, is normally closed in the summer, but will host concerts and performances daily during the Expo. Dozens of countries are building individual pavilions at the Expo site and a number of small countries will share pavilions themed on foods they consume or grow, such as coffee, cocoa and rice. Exhibitions will also explore topics such as food safety, nutrition and crop biodiver-

sity. The U.S. also plans to operate a temporary James Beard American Restaurant in central Milan for the duration of the Expo, offering uniquely American meals such as Thanksgiving dinner and a Gospel brunch, according to Davis. Tickets to the Expo are $45 a day, but organizers say most visitors will need two or three days to see the massive event, including informational exhibits, art and culture, marketplaces, live performances including Cirque du Soleil shows, and noteworthy architecture, such as Norman Foster’s wavy-walled design for the United Arab Emirates pavilion. Tickets are on sale in the U.S. and are expected to become available from various outlets over the next few months. Ticket-sellers include Eataly, the Italian food emporium in Manhattan, which is hosting a display of statues and other artifacts from Milan’s Duomo (cathedral).

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Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, October 15, 2014 B-3

Contact us

www.peninsulaclarion.com classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com

Classified Index EMPLOYMENT Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/ Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Commercial Property Condominiums/ Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

REAL ESTATE RENTALS Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums/ Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

Drivers/Transportation

Healthcare

MEDICAL ASSISTANT/ Clinical Reimbursement Coordinator

General Employment

NEWSPAPER INSERTER Now Taking Applications. 25- 30 hours per week. Evenings to early morning shift. No experience necessary. Applicants must be able to lift up to 35 lbs. & be deadline orientated. Pre-employment substance abuse testing required. Applications available at the Clarion front office

By bringing together medical, dental, and behavioral health services, PCHS offers highquality, coordinated care for the entire family. PCHS has Full-time hire position for

• • • • •

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

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Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn & Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

RECREATION Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boat Charters Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snowmobiles Sporting Goods

TRANSPORTATION Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

PETS & LIVESTOCK Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

8am- 5pm, Monday-Friday. 150 Trading Bay Rd. in Kenai. The Peninsula Clarion is an E.O.E

General Employment

PUBLIC NOTICES/ LEGAL ADS Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

Central Peninsula Hospital is seeking qualified candidates for the following positions: Cook, Full Time at Heritage Place- High school diploma or GED is required. Institutional or restaurant cooking experience strongly preferred. Food Handler's card within 30 days of hire. Night Monitor/Cook, Per Diem at Serenity House- High school diploma or GED is required.

Positions will be open until filled. Job description and application available online at www.pchsak.org Careers Please send cover letter, resume & application to: Human Resources, 230 E. Marydale Ave., Suite 3, Soldotna, AK, 99669 or fax to 907/260-7358.

CPH offers an excellent benefit package including major medical, dental/ vision insurance, educational assistance, retirement planning, and many other great advantages.

PCHS is an equal opportunity employer.

Interested applicants may find additional information and apply online at www.cpgh.org. Pre-employment drug screen is required. EOE

Healthcare

Office & Clerical

EDUCATION and TRAINING ASSISTANT

Appraisal Technician - Temporary Kenai Peninsula Borough:

Under the general direction of the residential appraisal manager, or designee, this position performs real property inspections within the Kenai Peninsula boundaries, conducts field surveys, and assists in the valuation (assessment) process. Salary is $23.34/hr. Recruitment period closes 10/17/14. For complete job description, including minimum qualifications, and to apply, go to: http://agency.governmentjobs.com/kenaiak/ default.cfm

General Employment ENERGETIC, EXPERIENCE OPERATOR FOR PRINTING PRESS.

Requirements: Able to perform pre and post press duties. Operate and maintaining printing press, cutting, folding, scoring and perforating machines. Strong, organizational and good communication skills, and ability to handle deadlines. Some training provided to the right applicant. Hours Monday- Friday, 8am- 5pm. Pay dependent on experience. Applications available at Peninsula Clarion, 150 Trading Bay Rd. Kenai, Alaska.

Position open at our family- owned and operated Greek Restaurant. Seeking Assistant-Manager

with experience in operating and maintaining all aspects of the business. Must have marketing experience. Must have a college degree. Must be fluent in Greek. Must be able to write in Greek. Pay level depends on level of experience. Please contact us by phone at (907)283-2222 or via email at anamilok85@hotmail.com

RECEPTIONIST/ CLERK

Good command of the English language with excellent grammar, spelling and mathematical skills. Proficiency with both Mac and PC computer platforms using standard Word/ Excel and Outlook. Exceptional customer service and telephone skills. Accuracy in data entry with a high attention to detail. Professional appearance. Ability to meet deadlines and complete multiple tasks. Positive attitude and being self motivated. The successful candidate will work directly with customers, perform some light bookkeeping, and learn to answer phones using a 42+line switchboard. Hours are Monday – Friday 8am- 5pm. Position starts above minimum wage with benefits. Submit completed application attention: Peninsula Clarion Leslie Talent PO Box 3009 Kenai, AK 99611 Email resumes to leslie.talent@peninsulaclarion.com or fax (907)283-8144 No Phone Calls. The Peninsula Clarion is an EOE. Applications are available at our offices on 150 Trading Bay Road in Kenai, Suite 1.

Responsibilities: provide community and staff training and education. Recruit, train and oversee agency volunteers. Assist with agency events. Develop and maintain agency's social media components. Experience in public relations, social media development, education instruction, program assessment, and public speaking. Excellent organizational, written and verbal communication skills. Proficient with various software applications. Ability to work with diverse population, work independently, model direct-communication and non-violent behavior. Resume, cover letter and references to Executive Director, The LeeShore Center, 325 S. Spruce St., Kenai, AK 99611 by October 15, 2014. EOE.

Healthcare

DIRECT SERVICE ADVOCATE Transitional Living Center Part-Time

CHILD CARE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Part-Time Eligibility Technician

Organized, energetic and creative person to positively assist women and children residing in transitional / supportive housing. Excellent understanding of or working experience in domestic violence/sexual assault, and related victim issues. Must promote and model non-violent behavior, empowerment philosophy, positive parenting and direct communication. HS diploma or equivalent required, degree in related field preferred. Valid driver's license required. Resume, cover letter and three references to Executive Director, The LeeShore Center, 325 S. Spruce St., Kenai, AK 99611 by October 26, 2014. EOE.

2 Office Logistic Coordinator Fast paced; action driven duties. Requires excellent communication and organizational skills.

Office & Clerical

Call (9O7)262-3557.

Healthcare

Now Hiring

Support Staff Healthcare

RECEPTIONIST/ STERILIZATION TECH. Specialty Dental Office seeking a part time receptionist/sterilization tech to join our team! Fast paced and busy work. Must be organized and enjoy working with kids. Experience with computers and working in the dental field is preferred.

DOE Drop off resumes: 36275 Kenai Spur Suite 1 or fax (907)260-5447

OUTSIDE SALES REPRESENTATIVE

The Peninsula Clarion is accepting applications for an additional outside sales representative. Sales experience is a must. This position requires a dependable vehicle & an Alaskan drivers license. Position offers excellent earning potential. Benefits available.

Send resume and/or application to: Peninsula Clarion. Attn.: Leslie Talent PO Box 3009 Kenai AK 99611 NO PHONE CALLS leslie.talent@peninsulaclarion.com or deliver to: 150 Trading Bay, Kenai.

Apartments, Unfurnished ALL TYPES OF RENTALS

Healthcare

1 Administrative Assistant Great opportunity with varied duties. Word and excel skills required.

PATHOLOGY LABORATORY NOW HIRING

Cook Inlet, AK Saxon Drilling is a growing international oilfield services company that operates an established drilling and well servicing business to oil & gas exploration and production companies in North America, South America, the Middle East, and South East Asia. We are looking for a Rig Safety Training Coordinator (RSTC) to support our drilling rigs in the Cook Inlet area of Alaska. This position works with local management in establishing and continuously improving the Health Safety and Environment culture within the worksite, and assists the rig managers in coordinating and implementing the QHSE management system and tools. Maintains a strong presence in the field through regular rig visits and interactions with employees at all levels. Ensures daily implementation of HSE systems. Provides required safety related training and new employee orientations as needed. Ensures that company policies are posted, known, understood and applied by all employees. 3-5 yrs experience in similar safety roles. Previous experience in the oil and gas industry preferred. Must have initiative, high energy levels, and good communication skills. Must be comfortable training/presenting in front of small and large groups. Competitive compensation and great benefits. Apply online at: http://www.saxonservices.com/ Saxon Drilling is an Equal Opportunity Employer

Responsible for conducting interviews and ongoing case management to determine eligibility for childcare subsidies. Qualifications: HS diploma or GED, understanding of and ability to apply state, federal, and internal regulations and procedures. Strong organization and mathematical skills, data entry ability, excellent communication and decision making skills, ability to work with diverse population, work independently and as a team. Resume, cover letter and references to Executive Director, The LeeShore Center, 325 S. Spruce St., Kenai, AK 99611 by October 17, 2014. EOE.

General Employment

NOW HIRING! HSE - RIG SAFETY TRAINING COORDINATOR

Sales & Marketing

General Employment

NOTICES/ ANNOUNCEMENTS Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

Healthcare

• Individual Service Provider

SERVICES Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

Accounting Supervisor Charge Nurse Custodian Certified Medical Assistant Clinical Applications Coordinator

PCHS has Part-time hire position for

FINANCIAL Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgage/Loans

Needed for surgeon’s office. Must have strong clinical background, knowledge of medical terminology and good typing skills. Duties include: Coding, billing, collections, obtaining prior authorizations, answering telephones, assisting physician in clinic. Typing test required. Salary DOE. Send resume to: 220 Spur View Drive Kenai 99611 or fax (907)283-6443 or call (907)283-5400.

First Student 36230 Pero St. Soldotna, AK 99669 907-260-3557

Join the Clarion Newspaper Team!

Oil & Refinery

Healthcare

DISPATCHER for Soldotna.

To place an ad call 907-283-7551

This position works hand in hand with individuals experiencing developmental disabilities. As a support staff you will assist them with daily living skills in their own home to ensure they are safe, respected, mentored and having fun. Daily activities may include fishing, hiking and outdoor sports. Your main job is to create opportunities for consumers to be active members of our community.

Advertising Assistant Proficiency with both Mac and PC computer using Word/ Excel and Outlook, as well as experience with other software programs desirable. Exceptional customer service and telephone skills, accuracy in data entry with a high attention to detail. Professional appearance. Ability to meet deadlines and complete multiple tasks, this individual will support the Advertising Department with office related tasks, may work directly with customers in a receptionist capacity, perform data entry on a daily basis, and learn to answer phones. Hours are Monday – Friday, 8am- 5pm. Salary DOE. Benefits available. Submit completed application attention: Leslie Talent Peninsula Clarion PO Box 3009 Kenai, AK 99611 No Phone Calls. The Peninsula Clarion is an EOE. Applications are available at our offices on 150 Trading Bay Road in Kenai, Suite 1.

Qualifications, Education and Experience Required: High School Diploma or Equivalent. Must be 21 years of age and submit to a background check and drug screening. Must also have a clean driving record, current auto insurance and be able to transport consumers in your own vehicle. We have Full-time and Part-time schedules available. For a complete job description and application please visit fcsonline.org Please return application packet to Frontier Community Services 43335 K-Beach Rd Suite #36 Soldotna, AK 99669 Or email to work@fcsonline.org C

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Property Management and Oversight Division 170 N. Birch Suite 101, Soldotna (907)262-2522 Mary.Parske@century21.com www.Century21FreedomRealty.com

Employment Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

General Employment BUILDING MAINTENANCE PERSON 15hr/ wk. Maintain grounds, repairs, janitorial tasks, painting units, $12- $15. DOE. Apply in Person Monday- Thursday 8am- noon. Northwood Apts. 190 W. Park Ave. Soldotna

BEEP! BEEP! YOUR NEW RIDE IS WAITING IN THE CLASSIFIEDS

General Employment Karaoke DJ and One night DJ

WANTED

Apply in person at The Duck Inn

Real Estate For Sale Commercial Property Condominiums/Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

Homes KENAI 3-Bedroom, 2-Bath, 1,020sq.ft., garage, 610 Ponderosa St. $185,000. (907)953-9648

SOLD! Classifieds Sell!

283-7551


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B-4 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Homes

Apartments, Furnished

Multiple Dwelling

Alaskan Dream.

DOWNTOWN Soldotna on the river. 2-bedroom, 1-bath, Seasonal/ Permanent, furnished/ unfurnished, NO pets/ NO smoking. Credit/ background checks. $895., (907)252-7110

K-Beach (W. Poppy) Duplex for Sale or Rent. Spacious 1100sqft. (x2), 3-Bedroom, 1-bath Garage, laundry. New bathrooms. One COMPLETELY REMODELED... paint, flooring, kitchen. Exterior to be painted this month. Excellent rental history. Currently rented one side month-to-month; remodeled side not rented. Perfect place to live and have other side pay most of your mortgage! $1,450. to rent remodeled side. Purchase for $268,000. OBO. (907)252-9153.

PRIME KENAI RETAIL/ OFFICE SPACE 1,832SqFt to 20,000SqFt. Rates start @ $.50SqFt. Call Carr Gottstein Properties, (907)564-2424 or visit www.carrgottstein.com

Rentals Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

HOME FOR SALE.

NIKISKI 3-Bedroom, 2 1/2-baths, large kitchen with island, wood burning stove, 2-car garage. approximately 2000sqft., on 2 acres. Very peaceful, a lot of wildlife. $310,000. (907)776-8487, (907)394-1122.

3-Bedroom, 2-bath, K-beach area home, over 2200ft, 1.23 acres. 2200+ square foot home with 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 car garage,shed, two story addition with second living room and downstairs family room. Located just off K-beach in a desirable, K-beach elementary school location. Energy upgrades made from 3 star to 4 star. Motivated sellers. (907)252-1960

SIGN UP TO GET FREE AMBER ALERTS ON YOUR CELL PHONE. wirelessamberalerts.org

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uct: NCM Campaign: ‌ Component: ‌ Bleed: ‌ Gutter: 0 dSize: ‌ Color: ‌ MECH: WP ‌ CT2: ‌ ‌ k St. New York, NY 10014 212 366-3500

SOLDOTNA large mother-in-law apt. 1-bedroom (750sq.ft.) apt on river, fully furnished. For. 1 or 2 people. includes gas, wifi, cable, you pay electric, great view, right in town but quiet. $800. month. (907)394-1425

Apartments, Unfurnished Brunswick Apts. Soldotna. 1-bedroom, $580., 2-bedroom $630., Storage, Washer/dryer on premises. (907)252-9634, (907)262-7986. No AHFC. Application outside 340 Apt. 5.

283-7551

Homes

Seasonal TOWNHOUSE Condominium On the River in Soldotna Fully furnished 1-bedroom, cable, from $880. Utilities included. No smoking/ pets. (907)262-7835

Cabins OCEAN FRONT Cabin, furnished, 1-bedroom, 1-bath, full kitchen, Satellite TV. No smoking/ pets. $800/ Month utilities included plus deposit. (907)262-5561.

EXCELLENT OCEAN VIEW! Bay Arm Apartments, Kenai. Accepting applications for studio apartment, utilities PRF DQC PRD AD CW AEincluded. CLI CD $25. nonrefundable application fee. No pets. (907)283-4405.

Duplex

12:21 PM

REDOUBT VIEW Soldotna’s best value! Quiet, freshly painted, close to schools. 1-Bedroom from $625. 2-Bedroom from $725. 3-Bedroom, 2-bath, from $825. No pets. (907)262-4359.

Lots For Rent LAND FOR LEASE 2- 4 Sections with gravel pad, fenced & secure. (907)283-3335 or email us at caitlin@kpedd.org

Office Space for Lease. 744sq.ft. Secure office space available for lease, $700. per month plus utilities. Great parking and customer entrance. (907)283-3335 or email us at caitlin@kpedd.org

WEST POPPY DUPLEX for Rent or sale. 1,100sqft. 3-Bedroom, 1-bath, garage, laundry. Exterior newly painted. Excellent rental history. $1,300. to rent available early Nov. Buy for $263,000. OBO. (907)252-9153.

Homes 1-BEDROOM HOUSE Beaver Loop. Single or couple preferred. No smoking, no pets. $675. (907)283-4488.

Apartments, Furnished

1-BEDROOM Small house 5 minutes Soldotna, 10 minutes Kenai. Utilities paid, cable available. Short or long term rental. Immaculate! (907)262-7881

1-KASILOF QUIET Waterfront cabins. Furnished, Dish, WIFI, washer/dryer. Pets OK. $550. + Seasonal. (907)398-6620

USED TWIN DISC 506 2-1 transmission, right-hand rotation. $2,500. (907)567-3334

Health

Transportation Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

THAI HOUSE MASSAGE

Located in Kenai Behind Wells Fargo/ stripmall. Specials. Monday-Saturday, 11am-6pm (907)252-6510,

Trailers 2014 24FT. x 8.5FT Enclosed Trailer / Car Hauler 10,400 GVW. Trailer has side door & 30in.x30in. side window. Clean title in hand. Trailer is lightly used, in excellent shape. $9,800. Call (907)299-7252 or email thesnaders@gmail.com

Pets & Livestock Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

Office Space

SOLDOTNA DUPLEX 1-bedroom each side, washer/dryer, Utilities included. $950. (907)262-7122

NIKISKI Lakefront Apartments HEADLINE: 10.5 • COPY: 10.5 • LEGAL ‌ 2-Bedroom/1-Bath $850. each plus Tax, Electric. 1-Bedroom/1-Bath $550. plus Tax Century 21 Freedom Realty Property Management (907)262-2522

DATE

WHY RENT ????? Why rent when you can own, many low down & zero down payment programs available. Let me help you achieve the dream of home ownership. Call Now !!! Ken Scott, #AK203469. (907)395-4527 or cellular, (907)690-0220. Alaska USA Mortgage Company, #AK157293.

WINTER MASSAGE Relaxation. Buy one, get one free. (907)598-4999, (907)398-8896

Boat Supplies/ Parts

SOLDOTNA/ Endicott Executive home, River front, furnished 3-bedroom, 3-bath, appliances included, long term lease, $2,200. (907)252-7110

KENAI 1-Bedroom, furnished, heat, cable included. No pets. $700. month. (907)283-5203, (907)398-1642.

FSBO

Homes

NINILCHIK 3-bedroom home. $750. month you pay heat we pay electric. Available Nov. 1st. (907)242-6698

EFFICIENCY APT. Killer view $450./ month. Plus utilities Clam Gulch Mile 118 (907)260-2092.

Retail/Commercial Space

Homes

NIKISKI New home, 3-bedroom, 2-bath, garage, walking distance to Nikiski Rec. Center. Indoor pool & ice rink. $1,345. per month. Leave message (907)776-3325

Health

Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boats Charter Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snow Mobiles Sporting Goods

NIKISKI Holt Lamplight. 3-bedroom, 2-bath, home. Washer/dryer, partially furnished. $1,100. plus utilities. No pets/ no smoking. Deposit required. (907)776-6544

1-LARGE ROOM FULLY FURNISHED Soldotna, quiet setting, includes utilities. (907)394-2543. Beautiful 3375sq.ft. home on 1.5 acres with an attached 2-car garage, a 1200sq.ft., heated, insulated shop, and a greenhouse. 4-bedrooms, 3-bathrooms, including a large master suite (15 x 25) with a jetted tub, 2-large bedrooms and one average size bedroom. The kitchen and dining areas have been updated with granite counter tops, laminate floors, lots of cabinets, and two pantries. French doors lead from the kitchen/ dining to the deck. Unfinished basement with water treatment system, boiler, on demand hot water, laundry, and lots of room for storage, a gym, or additional living space. Oversize garage has a 10' counter with a built in utility sink which is great for processing fish and game. Located in Soldotna. $350,000. Contact Steve (907)299-0461 or Nancy (907)953-0495 to make an appointment to see this home.

Recreation

Homes

Dogs

Financial Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgages/Loans

Merchandise For Sale Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn/Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

Services

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Pawsitive training for all dogs & puppies. Agility, Conformation, Obedience, Privates & Rally. www.kenaikennelclub.com (907)335-2552

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Health

Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Services Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

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605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

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Funeral Homes

Print Shops

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Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, October 15, 2014 B-5

Bids Subcontractor and Supplier Bids Requested for Ship Creek Water Treatment Facility Heat Exchanger Bids Requested October 23, 2014 Bid Time: 2:30 pm Alaska Time

OCTOBER 14, 2014 WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON/EVENING

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NGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

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303 504 304 505 311 516 319 546

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2014 CrossFit Games (N)

2014 CrossFit Games (N)

30 for 30

30 for 30 E:60 Mike and Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Shorts Mike College Football Montana State at UC Davis. From Aggie Stadium in Davis, Calif.

Seahawks Press Pass Cops ‘PG’

Graham Bensinger Cops ‘PG’

Cops ‘14’

Cops ‘PG’

Parks and Parks and Recreation Recreation Mally: Color Cosmetics ‘G’

Rules of En- Rules of En- 30 Rock ‘14’ 30 Rock ‘14’ gagement gagement QVC Fashion Closet ‘G’

Girlfriend Intervention A woman must learn how to love herself. (N) ‘PG’ NCIS A Marine photographer goes missing. ‘PG’ The Big Bang The Big Bang Theory ‘14’ Theory ‘14’

(:01) Girlfriend Intervention Discovering simple pleasures. ‘PG’ Partners in Partners in Crime ‘PG’ Crime ‘PG’ Conan (N) ‘14’

(:02) “Run for Your Life” (2014, Drama) Amy Smart, Aislyn Watson. ‘14’ (:01) NCIS: Los Angeles “Absolution” ‘14’ Cougar Town Conan ‘14’ ‘14’

(:01) Franklin & Bash ‘14’

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Cops ‘14’

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iMPACT Wrestling (N) ‘14’

NFL Live Seahawks Press Pass

Clarion TV

Chimney Cleaning

Bathroom Remodeling

260-4943

CHIMNEY SWEEPS

Tim’s

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262-4338

252-3965

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Licened • Bonded • Insured

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– Based in Kenai & Nikiski – Long Distance Towing

Slide Backs • Winch Out Services • Auto Sales Vehicle Storage • Roll Over Recoveries

Towing

Reddi Towing & Junk Car Killers We don’t want your fingers,

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AND

HEATING

No matter how old your system is we can make it more efficient. FREE Kenai: 283-1063 Text us at: ESTIMATES Nikiski: 776-8055 394-4017 email us at: linton401@gmail.com Soldotna: 262-1964 394-4018 UNLIMITED MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS License # 34609

Rain Gutters

24/7 PLUMBING

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Roofing

Raingutter Technicians with over 20 years Alaskan Experience CONTINUOUS CUSTOM ALUMINUM & STEEL GUTTERS

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OF ALASKA

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Rain Gutters

RAINTECH

283-3362

fax 907-262-6009

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Small Engine Repair

Notices

Installation

Notice to Consumers The State of Alaska requires construction companies to be licensed, bonded and insured before submitting bids, performing work, or advertising as a construction contractor in accordance with AS 08..18.011, 08.18.071, 08.18.101, and 08.15.051. All advertisements as a construction contractor require the current registration number as issued by the Division of Occupational Licensing to appear in the advertisement. CONSUMERS MAY VERIFY REGISTRATION OF A CONTRACTOR . Contact the AK Department of Labor and Workforce Development at 907-269-4925 or The AK Division of Occupational Licensing in Juneau at 907-4653035 or at www.dced.state.ak.us/acc/home.htm

Handyman

Construction

Construction

Computer Repair

130 S Willow Street, Suite 8 • Kenai, AK 99611

• Carpentry • General Handyman Work • Sheetrock • Painting • Woodwork • Tree Removal • Hauling • Cleanup & Repairs • Decks • Kitchen Remodels • Bath • Siding • Remodels • Unfinished Projects?

ROOFING

Tim Wisniewski, owner • Residential & Commercial • Emergency Water Removal • Janitorial Contracts • Upholstery Cleaning

O N E AL ASK AN H AN DYM AN SERV ICE

LLC

Lic #39710

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11

Advertise “By the Month” or save $ with a 3, 6 or 12 month contract. Call Advertising Display 283-7551 to get started!

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HaveGENERAL ToolsCONTRACTING Will Travel

Computer Repair, Networking Dell Business Partner Web Design & Hosting

Mike and E:60 E:60 Mike Seahawks All High School Football Tahoma at Kent Meridian. Access Cops ‘14’ Cops ‘PG’ Cops ‘PG’ Jail ‘14’

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

Full or Partial Bathroom Remodels

Call Today ( 9 0 7 ) 2 8 3 - 5 1 1 6

SportsCenter (N) (Live)

(3:15) “Rise of the Guard- “Runaway Bride” (1999, Romance-Comedy) Julia Roberts, Boardwalk Empire Chalky “We’re the Millers” (2013, Comedy) Jennifer Aniston, Jason Real Time With Bill Maher Last Week To- On the Run ians” (2012) Voices of Chris Richard Gere, Joan Cusack. A columnist tries to get the scoop encounters Narcisse in Har- Sudeikis, Will Poulter. A dealer goes to Mexico with a fake ‘MA’ night-John Tour: BePine. ‘PG’ on a commitment-shy gal. ‘PG’ lem. ‘MA’ family to score drugs. ‘R’ yoncé (:15) “The Way, Way Back” (2013, Comedy-Drama) Steve REAL Sports With Bryant “Ride Along” (2014, Comedy) Ice Cube. A (:45) Dracula Boardwalk Empire Chalky “12 Years a Slave” (2013, Historical Drama) Chiwetel Ejiofor, Carell, Toni Collette. A fatherless boy finds a mentor in a wa- Gumbel ‘PG’ cop invites his sister’s boyfriend to join him on Untold: HBO encounters Narcisse in Har- Michael Fassbender. A free black New Yorker is kidnapped ter-park employee. ‘PG-13’ a shift. ‘PG-13’ First Look lem. ‘MA’ and sold into slavery. ‘R’ (3:15) “The Incredible Burt (:05) “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey” (2012, Fantasy) Ian McKellen, Martin Free- The Knick (:45) “The Best Man Holiday” (2013, Comedy-Drama) Morris Chestnut, (10:55) Lingerie Feature 4: Wonderstone” (2013) Steve man, Richard Armitage. Bilbo Baggins joins the quest to reclaim a lost kingdom. ‘PG-13’ “The Golden Taye Diggs, Regina Hall. Longtime friends reunite over the Christmas holiModel Perfection A compilaCarell. Lotus” ‘MA’ days. ‘R’ tion of episodes. ‘MA’ (3:30) “Save the Date” (:15) “Ping Pong Summer” (2014, Comedy) Marcello Conte, Inside the NFL ‘PG’ Homeland “Shalwar Kameez” The Affair Noah Solloway Homeland “Shalwar Kameez” Inside the NFL ‘PG’ (2012, Romance-Comedy) Judah Friedlander, Amy Sedaris. A family vacation changes ‘MA’ escapes the city. ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Lizzy Caplan. ‘R’ the life of a teenager. ‘NR’ (3:00) “Mumford” (1999, (4:55) “Silver Linings Playbook” (2012, Comedy-Drama) “Bounce” (2000, Romance) Gwyneth Paltrow, Ben Affleck, “Possession” (2002) Gwyneth Paltrow. (:45) “Elizabethtown” (2005) Orlando Comedy) Loren Dean, Hope Bradley Cooper. A man intends to rebuild his life and reunite Joe Morton. A widow’s new beau inadvertently caused her Scholars discover the love letters of two long- Bloom. A flight attendant helps a man get Davis. ‘R’ with his estranged wife. ‘R’ husband’s death. ‘PG-13’ dead poets. ‘PG-13’ back on track. ‘PG-13’

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Computer Problems

9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30

“Rush Hour 3” (2007) Jackie Chan, Chris Tucker. Carter and Franklin & Bash “Spirits in Lee battle Chinese gangsters in Paris. the Material World” ‘14’ SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live)

October 12 - 18, 2014

Automobile Repair

9 PM

“Men in Black” (1997) Tommy Lee Jones, Will Smith. Secret “The Matrix” (1999, Science Fiction) Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss. (:01) “The Matrix Reloaded” (2003) Keanu Reeves. Freedom agents monitor extraterrestrial activity on Earth. A computer hacker learns his world is a computer simulation. fighters revolt against machines. The Cleve- The Cleve- American American Family Guy Family Guy Robot Chick- Aqua Teen The Boon- The Cleve- American Family Guy American Family Guy land Show land Show Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ en ‘14’ Hunger docks ‘MA’ land Show Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ To Be Announced Dirty Jobs “Custom Meat Dirty Jobs Mike paves roads Dirty Jobs “Water Softener Gator Boys “The Fast Track” Dirty Jobs Mike paves roads Dirty Jobs “Water Softener Processor” ‘14’ in Nebraska. ‘PG’ Technician” ‘PG’ (N) ‘PG’ in Nebraska. ‘PG’ Technician” ‘PG’ Dog With a Dog With a Girl Meets Girl Meets Dog With a Liv & Mad- “Mostly Ghostly” (2008) Sterling Beaumon. 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PREMIUM STATIONS

errod Carmichael: Love at Boardwalk Empire Chalky (:15) Hunted: The War he Store ‘MA’ encounters Narcisse in Har- Against Gays in Russia ‘MA’ ! HBO lem. ‘MA’ eal Time With Bill Maher “The 50 Year Argument” (2014, Documen- “The Secret C M MA’ tary) The history of the New York Review of Life of Walter ^ HBO2 Books. ‘NR’ Mitty” heYKnickKEleanor’s behavior (9:50) “The Hangover Part III” (2013) Brad- “Sexuecomes more erratic. ‘MA’ ley Cooper. All bets are off when the Wolfpack ally Bugged!” + MAX hits the road. ‘R’ (2013) ‘NR’ m Rome on Showtime Inside the NFL ‘PG’ Homeland “Shalwar Kameez” N) ‘MA’ ‘MA’ 5 SHOW

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2014 CrossFit Games (N)

Plumbing & Heating

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8 PM

Wheel of For- Toy Story OF It’s the Great Modern Fam- (:31) blackish Nashville “I Feel Sorry for Me” ABC News at (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live ‘14’ (:37) Nightline tune (N) ‘G’ TERROR! ‘G’ Pumpkin ily (N) ‘PG’ “Crazy Mom” Avery tries to drown his sor- 10 (N) (N) ‘G’ ‘PG’ rows. (N) ‘PG’ Celebrity Celebrity The Walking Dead “Wildfire” The Walking Dead “TS-19” All Everybody Everybody How I Met The Office The Wendy Williams Show Name Game Name Game Rick leads the group to the is not what it it seems. ‘MA’ Loves Ray- Loves Ray- Your Mother “Basketball” (N) ‘PG’ CDC. ‘MA’ mond ‘PG’ mond ‘PG’ “Stuff” ‘PG’ ‘14’ KTVA 6 p.m. Evening News Survivor “We’re a Hot Mess” Criminal Minds “A Thousand Stalker A bride is shot by a KTVA Night- (:35) Late Show With David Late Late (N) (N) ‘PG’ Suns” (N) ‘14’ sniper. (N) ‘14’ cast Letterman ‘PG’ Show/Craig The Big Bang The Big Bang Hell’s Kitchen “12 Chefs Red Band Society Jordie Fox 4 News at 9 (N) Anger Man- Two and a TMZ (N) ‘PG’ Entertainment Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘14’ Compete” Italian opera-ingets the freedom he wants. agement ‘14’ Half Men ‘PG’ Tonight spired dishes. (N) ‘14’ (N) ‘14’ Channel 2 Newshour (N) The Mysteries of Laura A Law & Order: Special Vic- Chicago PD Two teenage girls Channel 2 (:34) The Tonight Show Star- (:36) Late body is found in a home’s tims Unit “Holden’s Manifesto” disappear. (N) ‘14’ News: Late ring Jimmy Fallon ‘14’ Night With bathroom. (N) ‘14’ (N) ‘14’ Edition (N) Seth Meyers PBS NewsHour (N) Nature “Animal Misfits” Odd How We Got to Now With How We Got to Now With Manifest Destiny The Cold Charlie Rose (N) and bizarre creatures adapt to Steven Johnson “Clean” Steven Johnson Advance- War between U.S. and the life. (N) ‘PG’ (N) ‘PG’ ments in navigation. ‘PG’ USSR. ‘G’

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

ESPN the Magazine: NBA 144 209 Season Preview (N) (Live) Women’s College Soccer 426 687 Wake Forest at Duke. Cops ‘PG’ Cops ‘PG’ 241 241

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(59) A&E 1-800-423-6246. To view information about your rights in this proceeding, go to ouse Hunt- www.atg.wa.gov/DPY.aspx. Hunters Int’l Jennie Garth Jennie Garth Jennie Garth Jennie Garth (60) HGTV rs (N) ‘G’ DATED 16th day of tail; September 2014 hopped “Mummies and thisChopped Blowfish date Chopped First round includes (61) FOOD ummies” (N) ‘G’ palm; basil juice.by ‘G’MARGARET snouts.PIWONSKI, ‘G’ he Profit Tempers boil at Paid Program Deputy Paid Program Paid Program County Clerk Paid Program (65) CNBC

7:30

OCTOBER 15, 2014

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’

arks and Parksparcels and Rules of En- Rules of En- Lots 30 Rockare ‘14’ approxi30 Rock ‘14’ Raising Hope Raising Hope Raising Hope Raising Hope Raising Hope Raising Hope 58 throughout Alaska. (8) WGN-A 239 307 ‘14’ ecreation mately Recreation0.5gagement ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ to 7 acresgagement in size. Information on the eck the Halls sale ‘G’ and the Linen Closet Pillows, bedding, home accessories. ‘G’ In the Kitchen With David “PM Edition” Cooking with David Comforts of Home ‘G’ parcels can be viewed on the Trust (20) QVC 137 317 Venable. ‘G’ Land Office's website at www.mhtrustland.org im of Queensor “Culture (:01)269-8658 Kim of Queens Kim (:02) Dance Moms: Abby’s Celebrity Wife Swap ‘PG’ Celebrity Wife Swap ‘PG’ Celebrity Wife Swap ‘PG’ call (907) lash” Addison, Hannah and tries to transform a pig farmer. Studio Rescue “Point of No (23) LIFE 108 252 PUBLISH: 8/4, 5, 7, 10, 11, 13, 15, 19, 21, 24, 25, ayven compete. ‘PG’ (N) ‘PG’ Return” ‘PG’ 27, 29, 31, Chrisley 9/2, 4, 7, 9, 10, 11, 14, 21, Special 23, hrisley Chrisley Chrisley (:04)15, Law19, & Order: NCIS “Ships in the Night” ‘14’ NCIS “Recruited” A murder at NCIS A Marine is found (28) USA 105 242 25, 28, 29, 10/1, 3, 5, 7 8, 9, 12, 15, 17,Unit 2014 beaten to death. ‘PG’ nows Best Knows Best Knows Best Knows Best Victims ‘14’ a college fair. ‘PG’ 1856/2285 einfeld “The Seinfeld “The Conan (N) ‘14’ Cougar Town Conan ‘14’ The Cleve- American American American American Family Guy pera” ‘PG’ Virgin” ‘PG’ ‘PG’ land Show Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ (30) TBS 139 247 “Pilot” ‘14’ adley Cooper. Three pals (:02) CSI: NY A judge is as- (:02) CSI: NY “Means to an (3:00) PGA Tour Golf Grand Slam of Golf, Day 2. From Bermuda. (N Same-day Tape) (31) TNT 138 245 a wild bash. Public Notices sassinated. ‘14’ End” ‘14’

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service directory ADVERTISING WORKS! 283-7551 Advertising Dept.

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B-6 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, October 15, 2014

R O F E L SA

Considering the Sale of Your Home?

Before the sign goes up, make sure your ® REALTOR will showcase your home in THE Central Peninsula’s most comprehensive Real Estate Guide. Brought to you monthly by your peninsula neighbors at the Clarion.

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Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Woman who abuses boyfriend can’t figure out how to stop DEAR ABBY: Our 5-year-old daughter, “Maya,” was diagnosed with a severe peanut and tree nut allergy before she was 2. My parents have completely overhauled their house and have gone nut-free. My husband’s parents, on the other hand, refuse to cooperate with Maya’s diet restrictions when she visits. I have tried talking to them, which in turn upsets Abigail Van Buren my husband. He keeps making excuses for them, even though he demanded the school become nut-free to accommodate her. We were scheduled to go to their house for an early Thanksgiving when they revealed that the house still wasn’t safe for Maya to come to. My husband’s solution was to go there for the weekend and leave us behind. How can I get my in-laws to understand, and my husband to stand up for his daughter and me? — LOOKING OUT FOR MAYA DEAR LOOKING OUT FOR MAYA: You can’t. Your husband is still under his parents’ thumb.

While he may love his parents, his first responsibility is to you and his children. Until he finds his backbone and realizes that, he will remain at his parents’ beck and call. I’m glad you’re looking out for your daughter because her father doesn’t appear to be emotionally equipped to do it. DEAR ABBY: I can no longer go to funeral visitations. I have buried my parents, two sisters, four brothers and nine nieces and nephews. The number of loved ones I have lost, and the visitations and funerals I have had to attend, have been overwhelming. I can’t face it anymore. How do you suggest I avoid them? I am running out of excuses, and I’m tired of being a no-show. — HATES FUNERALS IN ILLINOIS DEAR HATES FUNERALS: People deal with loss in different ways, and you don’t have to apologize for feeling the way you do. Stop making excuses and start telling the truth. When you are notified about a death, offer your condolences, a donation, flowers, and explain that after 17 deaths in your family, you no longer attend funerals because it has become too much for you. That way, no one will think you don’t care or wonder why you didn’t show up.

Hints from Heloise

Jacqueline Bigar’s Stars

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that will help you get what you desire without upsetting those close to you. Understanding will evolve as a result. Tonight: Enjoy the moment, and worry less about the future. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH You’ll be able to mobilize your energy, express compassion and avoid a difficult situation. Nevertheless, an argument suddenly could ensue from a misunderstanding. See what happens if you choose to go with the flow. Tonight: Let a hassle wash right over you. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Listen to others, yet also tap into your own knowledge. You could be driven to express your ideas, but others might not be in the mood to receive them. You tend to be more creative than many people, so don’t give up just yet. Wait. Tonight: Get some extra R and R. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Friends will make a point of sharing what is on their mind. You might have difficulty accepting what you are hearing. Let their words resonate, even for a day or so, before responding. You could be juggling different concerns. Tonight: Hang with a favorite person. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You might want to ask some questions if a loved one becomes overassertive. Getting to the root of the problem might be more important than you realize. Consider your options. A discussion might be necessary, but it also will be freeing. Tonight: Take a midweek break. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Seek out more information.

By Leigh Rubin

Ziggy

Honor a change in your life, but expect to bypass the issue at hand. Other parties might not know how to handle your choices, so make it a point to be more open and funloving. Tonight: Opt for some kind of mental distraction. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You might come off as being feistier than you realize. A friendship will allow you to express some of your resistance and feel accepted at the same time. Cut back a tendency to go overboard when indulging a loved one. Tonight: Go with someone else’s suggestion. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH Allow more give-and-take with a very strong associate. This person might need to feel recognized. Your immediate circle of friends will support your choices. Find someone who will play devil’s advocate for you, as you will need some feedback. Tonight: Where the gang is. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH You could be questioning what would be the best way to handle a volatile situation. If you don’t want to engage in a long disagreement, you might consider letting it go. Emphasize your friendships. Tonight: Get as much done on your to-do list as possible. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHYou could be at your wits’end and feel unsure about what needs to happen or what you should do. Understand what is going on with different parties, and tap into your resourcefulness. Stay on top of a situation involving an authority figure. Tonight: Make the most of the moment.

To peel or not to peel? Dear Heloise: As a newlywed, my husband and I had recently moved to Texas. There was a roadside stand selling Fredericksburg peaches, so I pulled over and bought some gorgeous ones, excited to make my husband’s favorite dessert, peach cobbler. Well, I had never made this dessert before. I found a recipe, followed it and was so proud of the beautiful cobbler I made. I couldn’t wait for my husband to try it. He took the first bite, looked at me and said, “I love you, but you do know you are supposed to peel the peaches first.” I had no idea! The recipe stated to use canned peaches. We still laugh about that cooking disaster 23 years later! — Lauren W., via email Well, we’ve all been there. How sweet that your husband said it that way! Folks, want to fess up to your kitchen “mistake or mishap and tell the world? Write to me and spill the beans. No full names printed, if you want. — Heloise Freezing buttermilk Dear Heloise: I have a problem. When I have a recipe that calls for ingredients I don’t have in the cupboard or refrigerator, I have to buy it. Buttermilk usually is in a quart carton. Once it is in my refrigerator, my dear husband worries about it having gone bad. What can I do with the surplus? Can it be frozen? — Arline R., via email How do you tell if buttermilk has gone bad? I’m really not sure! But tell your husband not to worry, because buttermilk can be frozen. Be sure to thaw it in the refrigerator. You will need to remix it after thawing, because the fat will separate from the rest of the milk. — Heloise P.S.: They do sell powdered buttermilk.

SUDOKU

By Tom Wilson

By Dave Green

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Friday.

9 5 7 4 2 3 8 1 6

2 3 1 6 8 9 7 5 4

6 8 4 1 7 5 3 9 2

3 9 2 8 5 7 6 4 1

5 1 6 2 3 4 9 7 8

4 7 8 9 6 1 2 3 5

8 4 5 3 9 2 1 6 7

1 2 9 7 4 6 5 8 3

Difficulty Level

7 6 3 5 1 8 4 2 9

2014 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

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A baby born today has a Sun in Libra and a Moon in Cancer. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2014: This year you become more concerned with your public and/or professional reputation. If you remain focused, you will achieve a longterm desire. Be careful of a tendency to go overboard or overindulge in some way. You might want to employ self-discipline more often. If you are single and want to find Mr. or Ms. Right, it can happen this year. If you are attached, the two of you are often out and about together enjoying yourselves. You could make a mutual long-term goal a reality this year. CANCER knows how to grab your attention. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Others seek you out, but they might not appreciate the reception you give them. You might feel as if you don’t want to be distracted. Be clear with a key person in your life; he or she has much to share and would like to pitch in. Tonight: Sort through your messages. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Don’t push away a partner with your need to rein in a situation. If you do, you will evoke a negative response. Your vision could be very different from how someone else sees the same issue. Talk less and listen more. Tonight: Avoid a snippy conversation. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH You might want to change what is happening around you. Tap into your creativity to find a way

10/14

Previous Puzzles Answer Key

B.C.

By Johnny Hart

Garfield

By Eugene Sheffer

By Jim Davis

Take It from the Tinkersons By Bill Bettwy

Tundra

Shoe

6 9 2 4 6 8 7 5 6 9 7 6 8 3 2 8 4 5 1 1 9 1 4 9 6 Difficulty Level

By Chad Carpenter

By Chris Cassatt & Gary Brookins

Mother Goose and Grimm

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10/15

By Michael Peters

2014 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

DEAR ABBY: I think I have an abuse problem. I have been with my boyfriend for a year, and already I feel like he is fed up with me. I don’t want to lose him. When I was younger, my father used to abuse me. It was years ago, but I feel like I might have gotten that trait from him. In addition, I have a tendency to smack my boyfriend on the arm when he’s verbally abusing me. I just want it to stop. I love this man and I feel terrible after I do it. I keep telling him I’m sorry and that I have the worst tendency to act on impulse. Please tell me how to stop because I CANNOT lose him. Any suggestions? — SORRY IN KANSAS CITY, MO. DEAR SORRY: If you want your relationship to improve, you must realize it will take effort not only on your part but also your boyfriend’s. Neither of you handles anger or frustration appropriately. He shouldn’t verbally abuse you if something bothers him. And you need to find other ways than hitting him to make him stop. Couples counseling could help you communicate more effectively with each other. Many licensed mental health professionals offer it. Please don’t wait.

Crossword

B-7


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B-8 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, October 15, 2014

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Peninsula Clarion

10/15/14

SMORES & RIGS celebrate summer reading at K-Beach & Soldotna Elementary Dr. Atwater talks with Project Search student Forrest at CPH.

Page 2 Ms. Romatz & Marcou roll out the total summer minutes read at K-Beach El.

Soldotna Rotarians Jodi Stuart & Cathy Halligan give summer readers books & t-shirts at K-Beach RIGS assembly.

Ms. Romatz leads summer readers in the traditional RIGS dance.

Soldotna El mascot “Timber” opens the SMORES assembly at Soldotna El.

SMORE’S participants get books and t-shirts from Soldotna Rotarians.

Ms. Baktuit & Terri Diamond congratulate Logan Cotton SMORES champion.

Bill Larned

sings a song he wrote especially for the Wilderness Act’s 50th Anniversary.



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Ramon, Daisy & Jose invite you to step to the Salsa Bar at Playa Azul.

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Ms. Romatz crowns Queen Grace “Ruler of Summer Reading.”

Fourteen years ago Gloria Sweeney and other K-Beach Elementary teachers working on the masters created a program known as RIGS (Reading Is Great in Summer.) First graders who were the first RIGS participants are now sophomores in college and according to Sweeney underscore the success of the summer program for remedial reading skills, “It would be interesting to follow up with those students, I have kept the records from all those years so I can look back to the beginning and see the progress

of our readers at that time. Since the beginning we did tabulate reading scores to see if it was making a difference and it was amazing as we saw them with a two month jump when they returned to school in the fall,” she said. The younger readers dominated the RIGS program this year with the “Queen of Reading” being third grader Grace Hallam totaling up 5,600 minutes, “My favorite book was Diary of a Wimpy Kid, but being crowned queen was kind of embarrassing,” said Queen

Grace at her RIGS coronation. Meanwhile, Soldotna Elementary inaugurated a summer reading program for the first time this year called SMORE’S (Summer Months are Open for Reading Everywhere.) Ms. Baktuit organized a SMORE’S committee at Soldotna El as well as a very entertaining assembly that showed kids that all their heroes love to read as well, “We wanted to get across to the kids that just because it’s summer learning shouldn’t stop and if we keep on reading over the summer our skills keep

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climbing, plus that it is such a fun thing to do in the summer while on the beach or camping to pull out a book and get reading to keep our mind muscles working. We brought in community heroes to let the kids see that everyone reads in the summer and that it’s important for whatever job you have in the community reading will be an integral part of what they’re doing,” she said. “The energy in the assembly was amazing today,” said Soldotna El principal Terri Diamond, “This was our first year and we expect the

enthusiasm to grow next year.” Ten year old Logan Cotton a 5th grader was the SMORE’S reading champ having read 3,930 minutes, “Enders Game was my favorite summer book and I’m reading better this fall than I was in the spring when school let out, and yes reading is fun. When I grow up I want to be something like a football player or a welder so I can stay in Alaska,” said Logan. Sponsors of both the summer reading programs included the Soldotna Rotary Club, VFW Ladies Auxiliary and Tesoro.


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Page 2 Clarion Dispatch, October 15, 2014

Project Search partnership completes 3rd year

Project Search sponsors & partners celebrate 3 years of success at CPH

Project SEARCH held its third community open house September 29th at Central Peninsula Hospital (CPH.) The event allowed this year’s interns to showcase their accomplishments. Project SEARCH shows what takes place when a school district and hospital collaborate to create a business-led, one-year school-towork program for students with disabilities,” wrote Pegge Erkeneff, communications specialist for the Kenai Peninsula School District (KPBSD.) Project SEARCH creator Erin Reilly introduced the program

to Alaska three years ago and the success achieved has surpassed expectations according to Fran Stetson of the KPBSD, “The students that have come through the program are exceptional at the end. The hospital creates an environment where these students have to step up to meet high expectations and they do it, employers will be lucky to get them because these guys know how to work,” she told the Dispatch. Dr. Steve Atwater, KPBSD superintendent said, “One of our on-going challenges is to ensure that our students with disabilities make

a smooth transition to life after high school. Project SEARCH is thus, a wonderful way to help us meet this challenge.” The Project SEARCH High School Transition Program is a total workplace immersion, facilitating a seamless combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and relevant job-skills training through strategically designed internships. Through a series of three target-

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Forrest, Project Search intern shares his accomplishments with the community.

ed internships the students acquire competitive, marketable, and transferable skills. Students also build communication, teamwork and problem-solving skills which is important to their overall development as a young worker. The goal: independent adults prepared for competitive employment opportunities. “We’ve helped turn these young

people into productive citizens and realize their full potential,” commented John Todd of CPH. “Here at the hospital we are all about providing opportunities for folks to be workers in our community. We have some great success stories that have gone from interns to employees here at CPH,” he said. Kenai Peninsula Project

SEARCH is made possible through the collaborative efforts of Project SEARCH Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Central Peninsula Hospital, Kenai Peninsula Borough School District, the Governor’s Council on Disabilities and Special Education, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, and Frontier Community Services.

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Clarion Dispatch, October 15, 2014

Page 3

Voices of the Wilderness celebrates 50th Anniversary of Wilderness Act

KNWR Mgr. Andy Loranger & wildlife photographer Tom Collopy at Voices of the Wilderness opening at KVCC.

Traveling wildlife Exhibit celebrates Alaska’s wilderness at KVCC.

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The golden anniversary of the Wilderness Act was well celebrated at the opening of the “Voices of the Wilderness” traveling exhibit that opened October 3rd at the Kenai Visitors & Cultural Center (KVCC.) Kenai National Wildlife Refuge (KNWR) manager Any Loranger welcomed guest artists and families to the event, “The wilderness act represents permanent protection for some of our nation’s wildest places which ultimately led to the designation of the Kenai Wilderness within the KNWF. Within the exhibit itself there is some unbelievable work by wilderness photographers like Tom and Mary Collopy with images that many local folks will recognize from the Kenai Wilderness. Additionally we have works by artists in residence who have spent time within some of Alas-

ka’s most iconic and beautiful remote wilderness areas. There are photographs as well as paintings and a wide variety of media on display at the exhibit. Something not to be missed are the works of students led by Michelle Ostrowski our KNWR environmental education specialist and PEEPS program. It’s amazing to see the work these kids did and to read their essays about wilderness. The kids captured the essence of wilderness and of course there is no greater honesty than that of a child and what they put on paper and in their images that is on display here is absolutely wonderful,” he said. Photographer Tom Collopy speaking about the Wilderness Act said, “The big thing is not to take this place we have here for granted. Those of us who came here from the lower 48

realize that what we have here is special and it motivates me and people like me make sure we don’t repeat here the mistakes that were made out there. The images Mary and I brought here are from the Kenai Refuge and are evocative images that cause people to grasp the importance of wilderness in their Traveling wildlife Exhibit celebrates Alaska’s wilderness at KVCC. lives. It’s an ongoing effort and great challenge that requires a lot of time outdoors and from a couple of months or years may come one or two of those images. To translate into a one inch square sensor the feeling a sense of what it’s like to be out in a wild pristine place.” Only half of the Voices of the Wilderness show is displayed at the Kenai exhibit the other half is at the Islands & Oceans Visitors Center and like the Kenai show will be open for public viewing through October 25th.

www.peninsulaclarion.com

283-7551

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Page 4 Clarion Dispatch, October 15, 2014

Playa Azul joins a family of Mexican Restaurants Ramon Gonzalez, the new owner of Playa Azul in Kenai brings the popular café into a family of Mexican restaurants with over 25 years of authentic tried and perfected family recipes. “I have 7 brothers and we all share our ideas to make our best recipes even better. We opened our first restaurant in Palmer in 1990 and we are very proud to now own the Playa Azul and all of us work very hard to improve our recipes to be sure we are providing our communities with the best, freshest made from scratch Mexican food anywhere in Alaska,” says Ramon. Playa Azul is open 7 days a week 11:00am – 9:00pm and Daisy, Daniel or Jose will be happy to serve you your favorite cold beer or glass of wine to accompany your special autumn meal. Take-out orders are always available just call 283-2010 or drop in Playa Azul just past Forest Lane in Kenai on the Spur Hwy.

Daniel, Daisy & Jose welcome you to Playa Azul.

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Clarion Dispatch, October 15, 2014

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Page 6 Clarion Dispatch, October 15, 2014

To place an ad call 283-7551 or go online at www.peninsulaclarion.com Photo courtesy of Daryl Palmer

Classifieds Classified Index

Clarion Dispatch

Employment Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted Real Estate - For Sale Commercial Property Condominiums/Town homes Farms/Ranches Homes

Real Estate - For Sale (Cont’d) Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property Real Estate - Rentals Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums Town homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals

Drivers/Transportation

DISPATCHER for Soldotna. First Student 36230 Pero St. Soldotna, AK 99669 907-260-3557

General Employment PATHOLOGY LABORATORY NOW HIRING 1 Administrative Assistant Great opportunity with varied duties. Word and excel skills required. 2 Office Logistic Coordinator Fast paced; action driven duties. Requires excellent communication and organizational skills.

Transportation (Cont’d) Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted PETS & LIVESTOCK Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies Services Appliance Repair Auction Services

Healthcare

EDUCATION and TRAINING ASSISTANT

First Student 36230 Pero St. Soldotna, AK 99669 907-260-3557

Drivers/Transportation

Merchandise For Sale (Cont’d) Real Estate - Rentals (Cont’d) Musical Instructions Vacation Rentals Office/Business Equipment FINANCIAL Vacations/Tickets Auctions Wanted To Buy Business for Sale Recreation Financial Opportunities Aircrafts & Parts Mortgage/Loans All-Terrain Vehicles Merchandise For Sale Archery Antiques/Collectibles Bicycles Appliances Boat Supplies/Parts Audio/Video Boats & Sail Boats Building Supplies Boat Charters Computers Boats Commercial Crafts/Holiday Items Campers/Travel Trailers Electronics Fishing Exercise Equipment Guns Firewood Hunting Guide Service Food Kayaks Furniture Lodging Garage Sales Marine Heavy Equipment/Farm Machinery Motor Homes/RVs Lawn & Garden Snowmobiles Liquidation Sporting Goods Machinery & Tools Transportation Miscellaneous Autos Music

Healthcare

NOW HIRING SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS & BUS ATTENDANTS for Soldotna & Seward areas. HIRING BONUS!

10/15/14

Services (Cont’d) Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/Electric Satellite TV

Services (Cont’d) Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling Notices/Announcements Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/Announcements Worship Listings Public Notices/Legal Ads Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

Employment

Healthcare

Central Peninsula Hospital is seeking qualified candidates for the following positions:

Now Hiring

Support Staff

Responsibilities: provide community and staff training and education. Recruit, train and oversee agency volunteers. Assist with agency events. Develop and maintain agency's social media components. Experience in public relations, social media development, education instruction, program assessment, and public speaking. Excellent organizational, written and verbal communication skills. Proficient with various software applications. Ability to work with diverse population, work independently, model direct-communication and non-violent behavior. Resume, cover letter and references to Executive Director, The LeeShore Center, 325 S. Spruce St., Kenai, AK 99611 by October 15, 2014. EOE.

This position works hand in hand with individuals experiencing developmental disabilities. As a support staff you will assist them with daily living skills in their own home to ensure they are safe, respected, mentored and having fun. Daily activities may include fishing, hiking and outdoor sports. Your main job is to create opportunities for consumers to be active members of our community. Qualifications, Education and Experience Required: High School Diploma or Equivalent. Must be 21 years of age and submit to a background check and drug screening. Must also have a clean driving record, current auto insurance and be able to transport consumers in your own vehicle. We have Full-time and Part-time schedules available. For a complete job description and application please visit fcsonline.org Please return application packet to Frontier Community Services 43335 K-Beach Rd Suite #36 Soldotna, AK 99669 Or email to work@fcsonline.org

Healthcare

Call (9O7)262-3557.

Cook, Full Time at Heritage Place- High school diploma or GED is required. Institutional or restaurant cooking experience strongly preferred. Food Handler's card within 30 days of hire. Night Monitor/Cook, Per Diem at Serenity House- High school diploma or GED is required. CPH offers an excellent benefit package including major medical, dental/ vision insurance, educational assistance, retirement planning, and many other great advantages. Interested applicants may find additional information and apply online at www.cpgh.org. Pre-employment drug screen is required. EOE

Hospitality & Food Service THE RESTAURANT new in Sterling.

Looking For Full-Time/ Part-Time Sushi Chef/ Chef/ Steward/ Waitress/ Dishwasher/ Admin. cashier/ Laborer. (907)953-2773

Office & Clerical

Healthcare

General Employment

Advertising Assistant DIRECT SERVICE ADVOCATE Transitional Living Center Part-Time

By bringing together medical, dental, and behavioral health services, PCHS offers highquality, coordinated care for the entire family.

Appraisal Technician - Temporary Kenai Peninsula Borough:

Under the general direction of the residential appraisal manager, or designee, this position performs real property inspections within the Kenai Peninsula boundaries, conducts field surveys, and assists in the valuation (assessment) process. Salary is $23.34/hr. Recruitment period closes 10/17/14. For complete job description, including minimum qualifications, and to apply, go to: http://agency.governmentjobs.com/kenaiak/ default.cfm

General Employment Position open at our family- owned and operated Greek Restaurant. Seeking Assistant-Manager

with experience in operating and maintaining all aspects of the business. Must have marketing experience. Must have a college degree. Must be fluent in Greek. Must be able to write in Greek. Pay level depends on level of experience. Please contact us by phone at (907)283-2222 or via email at anamilok85@hotmail.com

General Employment Join the Clarion Newspaper Team!

NEWSPAPER INSERTER Now Taking Applications. 25- 30 hours per week. Evenings to early morning shift. No experience necessary. Applicants must be able to lift up to 35 lbs. & be deadline orientated. Pre-employment substance abuse testing required. Applications available at the Clarion front office

PCHS has Full-time hire position for

• • • • •

Accounting Supervisor Charge Nurse Custodian Certified Medical Assistant Clinical Applications Coordinator

Organized, energetic and creative person to positively assist women and children residing in transitional / supportive housing. Excellent understanding of or working experience in domestic violence/sexual assault, and related victim issues. Must promote and model non-violent behavior, empowerment philosophy, positive parenting and direct communication. HS diploma or equivalent required, degree in related field preferred. Valid driver's license required. Resume, cover letter and three references to Executive Director, The LeeShore Center, 325 S. Spruce St., Kenai, AK 99611 by October 26, 2014. EOE.

PCHS has Part-time hire position for

• Individual Service Provider Positions will be open until filled. Job description and application available online at www.pchsak.org Careers Please send cover letter, resume & application to: Human Resources, 230 E. Marydale Ave., Suite 3, Soldotna, AK, 99669 or fax to 907/260-7358. PCHS is an equal opportunity employer.

Healthcare

Healthcare

CHILD CARE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Part-Time Eligibility Technician

RECEPTIONIST/ STERILIZATION TECH. Specialty Dental Office seeking a part time receptionist/sterilization tech to join our team! Fast paced and busy work. Must be organized and enjoy working with kids. Experience with computers and working in the dental field is preferred.

Responsible for conducting interviews and ongoing case management to determine eligibility for childcare subsidies. Qualifications: HS diploma or GED, understanding of and ability to apply state, federal, and internal regulations and procedures. Strong organization and mathematical skills, data entry ability, excellent communication and decision making skills, ability to work with diverse population, work independently and as a team. Resume, cover letter and references to Executive Director, The LeeShore Center, 325 S. Spruce St., Kenai, AK 99611 by October 17, 2014. EOE.

DOE Drop off resumes: 36275 Kenai Spur Suite 1 or fax (907)260-5447

8am- 5pm, Monday-Friday. 150 Trading Bay Rd. in Kenai.

283-7551

The Peninsula Clarion is an E.O.E

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Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

Proficiency with both Mac and PC computer using Word/ Excel and Outlook, as well as experience with other software programs desirable. Exceptional customer service and telephone skills, accuracy in data entry with a high attention to detail. Professional appearance. Ability to meet deadlines and complete multiple tasks, this individual will support the Advertising Department with office related tasks, may work directly with customers in a receptionist capacity, perform data entry on a daily basis, and learn to answer phones. Hours are Monday – Friday, 8am- 5pm. Salary DOE. Benefits available. Submit completed application attention: Leslie Talent Peninsula Clarion PO Box 3009 Kenai, AK 99611 No Phone Calls. The Peninsula Clarion is an EOE. Applications are available at our offices on 150 Trading Bay Road in Kenai, Suite 1.

Sales & Marketing OUTSIDE SALES REPRESENTATIVE

The Peninsula Clarion is accepting applications for an additional outside sales representative. Sales experience is a must. This position requires a dependable vehicle & an Alaskan drivers license. Position offers excellent earning potential. Benefits available.

Send resume and/or application to: Peninsula Clarion. Attn.: Leslie Talent PO Box 3009 Kenai AK 99611 NO PHONE CALLS leslie.talent@peninsulaclarion.com or deliver to: 150 Trading Bay, Kenai.

Every Friday in the Peninsula Clarion

www.peninsulaclarion.com

General Employment BUILDING MAINTENANCE PERSON 15hr/ wk. Maintain grounds, repairs, janitorial tasks, painting units, $12- $15. DOE. Apply in Person Monday- Thursday 8am- noon. Northwood Apts. 190 W. Park Ave. Soldotna

Karaoke DJ and One night DJ

WANTED

Apply in person at The Duck Inn

Part-Time Housekeeper, competitive wage & Benefits. --------Prep/ Dishwasher needed.

Apply at The Duck Inn

SHE MAY NOT LIVE TO SEE HER CHILD GROW UP She is running out of breath and running out of time… Thousands of young women are living with a deadly lung disease called LAM — and don’t know they have it. LAM is often misdiagnosed as asthma or chronic bronchitis. There is no known cure. But there is hope. Learn more about LAM.

thelamfoundation.org

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Clarion Dispatch, October 15, 2014 Page 7

Apartments, Furnished

Homes

Alaskan Dream.

Beautiful 3375sq.ft. home on 1.5 acres with an attached 2-car garage, a 1200sq.ft., heated, insulated shop, and a greenhouse. 4-bedrooms, 3-bathrooms, including a large master suite (15 x 25) with a jetted tub, 2-large bedrooms and one average size bedroom. The kitchen and dining areas have been updated with granite counter tops, laminate floors, lots of cabinets, and two pantries. French doors lead from the kitchen/ dining to the deck. Unfinished basement with water treatment system, boiler, on demand hot water, laundry, and lots of room for storage, a gym, or additional living space. Oversize garage has a 10' counter with a built in utility sink which is great for processing fish and game. Located in Soldotna. $350,000. Contact Steve (907)299-0461 or Nancy (907)953-0495 to make an appointment to see this home.

Apartments, Unfurnished

Homes

DOWNTOWN Soldotna on the river. 2-bedroom, 1-bath, Seasonal/ Permanent, furnished/ unfurnished, NO pets/ NO smoking. Credit/ background checks. $895., (907)252-7110 KENAI 1-Bedroom, furnished, heat, cable included. No pets. $700. month. (907)283-5203, (907)398-1642. Seasonal TOWNHOUSE Condominium On the River in Soldotna Fully furnished 1-bedroom, cable, from $880. Utilities included. No smoking/ pets. (907)262-7835

Cabins OCEAN FRONT Cabin, furnished, 1-bedroom, 1-bath, full kitchen, Satellite TV. No smoking/ pets. $800/ Month utilities included plus deposit. (907)262-5561.

Homes 1-BEDROOM Small house 5 minutes Soldotna, 10 minutes Kenai. Utilities paid, cable available. Short or long term rental. Immaculate! (907)262-7881

Apartments, Unfurnished ALL TYPES OF RENTALS

Property Management and Oversight Division 170 N. Birch Suite 101, Soldotna (907)262-2522 Mary.Parske@century21.com www.Century21FreedomRealty.com

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PRIME KENAI RETAIL/ OFFICE SPACE 1,832SqFt to 20,000SqFt. Rates start @ $.50SqFt. Call Carr Gottstein Properties, (907)564-2424 or visit www.carrgottstein.com

Rentals

Real Estate For Sale

Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

Commercial Property Condominiums/Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

Homes KENAI 3-Bedroom, 2-Bath, 1,020sq.ft., garage, 610 Ponderosa St. $185,000. (907)953-9648

Apartments, Unfurnished Brunswick Apts. Soldotna. 1-bedroom, $580., 2-bedroom $630., Storage, Washer/dryer on premises. (907)252-9634, (907)262-7986. No AHFC. Application outside 340 Apt. 5. EXCELLENT OCEAN VIEW! Bay Arm Apartments, Kenai. Accepting applications for studio apartment, utilities included. $25. nonrefundable application fee. No pets. (907)283-4405. REDOUBT VIEW Soldotnaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best value! Quiet, freshly painted, close to schools. 1-Bedroom from $625. 2-Bedroom from $725. 3-Bedroom, 2-bath, from $825. No pets. (907)262-4359.

Apartments, Furnished 1-KASILOF QUIET Waterfront cabins. Furnished, Dish, WIFI, washer/dryer. Pets OK. $550. + Seasonal. (907)398-6620 1-LARGE ROOM FULLY FURNISHED Soldotna, quiet setting, includes utilities. (907)394-2543. For more safety tips visit SmokeyBear.com

FCB

Newsprint

Epsn 133

8/08/13

NIKISKI Holt Lamplight. 3-bedroom, 2-bath, home. Washer/dryer, partially furnished. $1,100. plus utilities. No pets/ no smoking. Deposit required. (907)776-6544 NIKISKI New home, 3-bedroom, 2-bath, garage, walking distance to Nikiski Rec. Center. Indoor pool & ice rink. $1,345. per month. Leave message (907)776-3325 SOLDOTNA/ Endicott Executive home, River front, furnished 3-bedroom, 3-bath, appliances included, long term lease, $2,200. (907)252-7110 WHY RENT ????? Why rent when you can own, many low down & zero down payment programs available. Let me help you achieve the dream of home ownership. Call Now !!! Ken Scott, #AK203469. (907)395-4527 or cellular, (907)690-0220. Alaska USA Mortgage Company, #AK157293.

Lots For Rent LAND FOR LEASE 2- 4 Sections with gravel pad, fenced & secure. (907)283-3335 or email us at caitlin@kpedd.org

Office Space Office Space for Lease. 744sq.ft. Secure office space available for lease, $700. per month plus utilities. Great parking and customer entrance. (907)283-3335 or email us at caitlin@kpedd.org

Rooms For Rent KASILOF $400/ month, utilities included. Daily/ weekly/ monthly rates. (907)260-9006.

Financial Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgages/Loans

HUNGER DOES NOT

DISCRIMINATE! PLEASE HELP Building To Nourish Campaign Kenai Peninsula Food Bank 262-3111

EFFICIENCY APT. Killer view $450./ month. Plus utilities Clam Gulch Mile 118 (907)260-2092.

1:39pm

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Page 8 Clarion Dispatch, October 15, 2014 Merchandise For Sale Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn/Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

Miscellaneous HOT WATER HEATER. Ariston 4-gal. $100. Call Jerry (907)252-2128

Recreation Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boats Charter Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snow Mobiles Sporting Goods

Transportation Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

Services

Health

Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Services Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

Trailers 2014 24FT. x 8.5FT Enclosed Trailer / Car Hauler 10,400 GVW. Trailer has side door & 30in.x30in. side window. Clean title in hand. Trailer is lightly used, in excellent shape. $9,800. Call (907)299-7252 or email thesnaders@gmail.com

WINTER MASSAGE Relaxation. Buy one, get one free. (907)741-0800, (907)398-8896

Health

Pets & Livestock Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

**ASIAN MASSAGE** Please make the phone ring. Call anytime. (907)741-0800

Located in Kenai Behind Wells Fargo/ stripmall. Specials. Monday-Saturday, 11am-6pm (907)252-6510,

Freebies

Alaska Statewide Land Sale The Alaska Mental Health Trust Land Office is holding a sealed bid auction for approximately 58 parcels throughout Alaska. Lots are approximately 0.5 to 7 acres in size. Information on the sale and the parcels can be viewed on the Trust Land Office's website at www.mhtrustland.org or call (907) 269-8658 PUBLISH: 8/13, 20, 27, 9/3, 10, 17, 24, 10/1, 8, 15, 2014

1856/2285

FREE TO GOOD HOME. Born 6/29/14 Short hair, female, black & white, kitten. Gets along with dogs. (907)394-0900

Public Notices/ Legal Ads Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

Each week, our Classified section features hundreds of new listings for everything from pre-owned merchandise to real estate and even employment opportunities. So chances are, no matter what you’re looking for, the Classifieds are the best place to start your search.

The early stages of communication disorders are easier to spot

when you know the signs. Early detection can improve treatment and quality of life. For more info visit IdentifyTheSigns.org.

283-7551 www.peninsulaclarion.com

RESOLVE

Health

TO LEARN SOMETHING NEW

Get started with the Employment section of the Classifieds. The Classifieds are your best source for a comprehensive collection of area job opportunities. Don’t spend another year with a job that doesn’t encourage you to grow; open your eyes to new career choices with the Classifieds.

KENAI KENNEL CLUB

Pawsitive training for all dogs & puppies. Agility, Conformation, Obedience, Privates & Rally. www.kenaikennelclub.com (907)335-2552 www.peninsulaclarion.com

283-7551

Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

Keep a Sharp Eye on the Classifieds

Public Notices

Health THAI HOUSE MASSAGE

Dogs

Notices/ Announcements

www.peninsulaclarion.com

**ASIAN MASSAGE** The right touch, wonderful, relaxing. Call anytime. (907)598-4999

283-7551

For more safety tips visit SmokeyBear.com

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Clarion Dispatch, October 15, 2014 Page 9

Would you like to have your business highlighted in Yellow Advantage?

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Automotive Insurance

Business Cards

Located in the Willow Street Mall

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

Walters & Associates Located in the Willow Street Mall

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

alias@printers-ink.com

150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai

283-4977

Bathroom Remodeling AK Sourdough Enterprises Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

Contractor

Carhartt Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing 35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dentistry

35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

Dentistry

Extractions, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing

Dentistry

Kenai Dental Clinic Emergency appts. available Denali Kid Care/Medicaid

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

Funeral Homes

Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD Extractions, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD

Print Shops

Peninsula Memorial Chapels & Crematory Kenai........................................283-3333 Soldotna ..................................260-3333 Homer...................................... 235-6861 Seward.....................................224-5201

Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK

Insurance

Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK

Family Dentistry

AK Sourdough Enterprises

Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD

Boots

Every Day in your Peninsula Clarion â&#x20AC;˘ www.peninsulaclarion.com

Computer Repair

Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK

Walters & Associates

ZZZpeninsulaclarionFRP

150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai............................. 283-4977

Rack Cards

Emergency appts. available Denali Kid Care/Medicaid

605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

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Online

Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing 35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

Emergency appts. available Denali Kid Care/Medicaid

CHECK US OUT

Outdoor Clothing

Kenai Dental Clinic

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

Kenai Dental Clinic

150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai............................. 283-4977

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

Teeth Whitening

alias@printers-ink.com

Located in the Willow Street Mall

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

AK Sourdough Enterprises

alias@printers-ink.com

Walters & Associates

Extractions, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

Remodeling

www.peninsulaclarion.com

Looking for a companion?

Advertise â&#x20AC;&#x153;By the Monthâ&#x20AC;? or save $ with a 3, 6 or 12 month contract. Call Advertising Display 283-7551 to get started!

â&#x20AC;˘ Experienced â&#x20AC;˘ Trustworthy â&#x20AC;˘ Dependable â&#x20AC;˘ Attention to detail Serving the Kenai Peninsula for over 11 years Licensed â&#x20AC;˘ Bonded â&#x20AC;˘ Insured â&#x20AC;˘License #33430

260-4943

CHIMNEY SWEEPS Chimney Cleaning

Automobile Repair

Bathroom Remodeling

Full or Partial Bathroom Remodels

Timâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Sales, Installation & Repairs Come see our new show room. Licensed â&#x20AC;˘ Bonded â&#x20AC;˘ Insured All Repairs Guaranteed

Cleaning

Advertise in the Service Directory today! - Includes Dispatch. 283-7551

Installation Services LLC

262-4338

HaveGENERAL ToolsCONTRACTING Will Travel

Licensed, Bonded & Insured

Notice to Consumers

Plumbing & Heating

Notices Licened â&#x20AC;˘ Bonded â&#x20AC;˘ Insured

Fax: (907) 262-2347

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Based in Kenai & Nikiski â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Long Distance Towing

Slide Backs â&#x20AC;˘ Winch Out Services â&#x20AC;˘ Auto Sales Vehicle Storage â&#x20AC;˘ Roll Over Recoveries

Reddi Towing & Junk Car Killers We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want your fingers,

just your tows!

907. 776 . 3967

24/7 PLUMBING AND

HEATING

No matter how old your system is we can make it more efficient. FREE Kenai: 283-1063 Text us at: ESTIMATES Nikiski: 776-8055 394-4017 email us at: linton401@gmail.com Soldotna: 262-1964 394-4018 UNLIMITED MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS License # 34609

35158 KB Drive Soldotna, aK 99669

Roofing

Raingutter Technicians with over 20 years Alaskan Experience CONTINUOUS CUSTOM ALUMINUM & STEEL GUTTERS

Phone: (907) 262-2347

Do you look forward to your gas bill each month? If not, you should call

OF ALASKA

Roofing

RAINTECH

The State of Alaska requires construction companies to be licensed, bonded and insured before submitting bids, performing work, or advertising as a construction contractor in accordance with AS 08..18.011, 08.18.071, 08.18.101, and 08.15.051. All advertisements as a construction contractor require the current registration number as issued by the Division of Occupational Licensing to appear in the advertisement. CONSUMERS MAY VERIFY REGISTRATION OF A CONTRACTOR . Contact the AK Department of Labor and Workforce Development at 907-269-4925 or The AK Division of Occupational Licensing in Juneau at 907-4653035 or at www.dced.state.ak.us/acc/home.htm

Handyman

252-3965

35 Years Construction Experience

R ep a ir or R ep la c em en t of R oofin g, Sid in g,Sh eetroc k ,D ec k s,W in d ow s, D oors & M ost B u ild in g C om p on en ts. C lea n -u p & H a u lin g. & Insured 690-3490 776-3490 Licensed Lic.# 952948

Rain Gutters

130 S Willow Street, Suite 8 â&#x20AC;˘ Kenai, AK 99611

â&#x20AC;˘ Carpentry â&#x20AC;˘ General Handyman Work â&#x20AC;˘ Sheetrock â&#x20AC;˘ Painting â&#x20AC;˘ Woodwork â&#x20AC;˘ Tree Removal â&#x20AC;˘ Hauling â&#x20AC;˘ Cleanup & Repairs â&#x20AC;˘ Decks â&#x20AC;˘ Kitchen Remodels â&#x20AC;˘ Bath â&#x20AC;˘ Siding â&#x20AC;˘ Remodels â&#x20AC;˘ Unfinished Projects?

ROOFING

283-3362

fax 907-262-6009

907-260-roof (7663) Member of the Kenai Peninsula Builders Association

www.rainproofroofing.com

Small Engine Repair

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Computer Repair, Networking Dell Business Partner Web Design & Hosting

Construction

Call Today ( 9 0 7 ) 2 8 3 - 5 1 1 6

Construction

Computer Problems

Tim Wisniewski, owner â&#x20AC;˘ Residential & Commercial â&#x20AC;˘ Emergency Water Removal â&#x20AC;˘ Janitorial Contracts â&#x20AC;˘ Upholstery Cleaning

O N E AL ASK AN H AN DYM AN SERV ICE

LLC

Lic #39710

Computer Repair

K

Installation

Y

Rain Gutters

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Towing

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Check out the Peninsula Clarion Classifieds! 283-7551

service directory ADVERTISING WORKS! 283-7551 Advertising Dept.

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Profile for Sound Publishing

Peninsula Clarion, October 15, 2014  

October 15, 2014 edition of the Peninsula Clarion

Peninsula Clarion, October 15, 2014  

October 15, 2014 edition of the Peninsula Clarion