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Island near Juneau offers bear viewing

Bears seek 1st playoff series win

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CLARION

Rain 61/53 More weather on Page A-2

P E N I N S U L A

Friday-Saturday, September 12-13 Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

Vol. 44, Issue 296

Question Would you like to see the borough implement limited animal control to address cases of abused or neglected animals? n Yes; or n No. To place your vote and comment, visit our Web site at www. peninsulaclarion. com. Results and selected comments will be posted each Tuesday in the Clarion, and a new question will be asked. Suggested questions may be submitted online or e-mailed to news@peninsulaclarion.com.

50 cents newsstands daily/$1.00 Sunday

New terror fight casts shadow over 9/11 AP Photo/The Daily News, Robert Sabo

By RACHELLE BLIDNER and JONATHAN LEMIRE Associated Press

NEW YORK — The nation’s gathering war against a new upsurge in Islamic terror hung heavy over the 13th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks Thursday, stirring both anxiety and determination among those who came to ground zero to remember their loved ones. The familiar silence to mark the attacks and the solemn roll call of the nearly 3,000 dead came just hours after President and new ones pop up,” Vasile Barack Obama told the country Islamic State extremists. “It’s an ongoing war against Poptean said as he left the cerhe is authorizing stepped-up airterrorists. Old ones die out emony, where he had gone to strikes in Iraq and Syria against

Left: Firefighter Tom Engel with plays Taps at the end of memorial observances on the 13th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terror attacks on the World Trade Center Thursday in New York.

remember his brother, Joshua Poptean. “If we don’t engage them now, there’s a possibility there will be another 9/11 down the road.” Victims’ relatives and dignitaries gathered in the plaza where the twin towers once stood, an area of shimmering new skyscrapers, including the soon-to-open 1,776-foot One

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See 9/11, page A-12

Search called off for missing kayaker

In photos

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World Trade Center. The attacks were also commemorated in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, where former House Speaker Dennis Hastert gave the flag that flew atop the U.S. Capitol on 9/11 to the Flight 93 National Memorial. At the Pentagon, where Obama spoke at a wreath-laying ceremony, he didn’t mention the rise of Islamic State extremists specifically but noted: “We cannot erase every trace of evil from the world.” “That was the case before 9/11,” the president said, “and that remains true today.” Obama’s nationally televised

By DAN BALMER Peninsula Clarion

For an photo gallery of 9/11 remembrance ceremonies from around the country, visit www.peninsulaclarion. com

In the news Military exercise with Russia canceled ANCHORAGE, (AP) — An Air Force exercise involving the U.S., Canada and Russia was canceled because of Russia’s military intervention in Ukraine, a spokesman for NORAD said. The North American Aerospace Defense Command is charged with detecting and responding to airborne threats to those countries. Since 2007, NORAD and the Russian Federation Air Force had cooperated on the “Vigilant Eagle” exercise. Typically, exercises have been held in August or September near Alaska. The most recent iterations involved fighter jets intercepting a mock hijacked passenger airliner passing from Russia airspace into Alaska’s, or vice versa.

Index Opinion.................. A-4 Nation.................... A-6 World..................... A-8 Sports.....................B-1 Classifieds............ C-3 Comics.................. C-9 Check us out online at www.peninsulaclarion.com To subscribe, call 283-3584.

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion

Selling spuds

Falcon Kartchner leans on a swing arm for a scale as his mother, Marilyn Kartchner puts potatoes in a bucket for a customer Thursday Kenai. The family sold several varieties of homegrown potatoes and honey from a red pickup parked by the highway.

Serenity House to screen documentary on substance addiction and recovery stigma associated with addiction. “When I saw the trailer I got Employees of Central Penin- really excited,” said Serenity sula Hospital’s Serenity House House chemical dependency are hoping people will eat popcorn for breakfast Sunday during the morning screening of If you go: “The Anonymous People,” a The Anonymous Peodocumentary about addiction ple will be shown Sunand recovery, at the Orca Theday at the Orca Theater in Soldotna. ater, 3335 Kalifornsky For the price of a non-perishBeach Rd, Soldotna. able food item donation, movieDoors open at 9:30 goers will learn about the 23.5 a.m., show begins at million people in America liv10 a.m. ing in long-term recovery from alcohol and drug abuse and the By RASHAH MCCHESNEY Peninsula Clarion

counselor Aurora Graves. “It talks about being able to advocate for recovery, because recovery really happens, without treading on any traditions of an established 12-step type program and being able to change the stigma that’s associated with being in recovery.” The film screening is part of a partnership between the Serenity House and the Kenai Peninsula Food Bank to draw awareness to September as both National Recovery Month and Hunger Action Month. Graves said the partnership between the food bank and the

treatment center was a natural extension of work the two organizations do together with the addicted and recovering people on the Kenai Peninsula. “We actually do utilize the food bank quite heavily when we’ve got people who transition back out into the world,” Graves said. “A lot of times they’re unemployed and even if they are employed their income is low enough if they’ve got dependants at home and can’t make ends meet just yet and so we will ... take people over there and help them get not only See FILM, page A-12

Soldotna residents to hear more on Prop. 1 By KELLY SULLIVAN Peninsula Clarion

The City of Soldotna is providing more information for residents on Proposition 1. A by-mail question and answer flier will be sent to anyone registered to vote within city limits. The city will be adopting local financial disclosure requirements if approved by voters on the Regular Election Ballot

on Oct. 7. At the Wednesday City Council meeting, Pete Sprague suggested and the council unanimously approved three amendments made to the flier presented by city clerk Shellie Saner. The 12-question document was originally titled “Localizing Financial Disclosure Reporting Requirements,” but “and Modifying” was added to the title to account for revisions that would make the C

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disclosures specific to Soldotna, Sprague said. Sprague also wanted the information to properly reflect how many municipalities within Alaska have elected to opt out of the state filing system. The Alaska Public Offices Commission lists 122 communities that have adopted and developed local financial disclosures for public officials, Saner said.

See PROP. 1, page A-12

The search for a Kasilof man, who went out kayaking in the Cook Inlet near the Kasilof River Tuesday, was called off Thursday at 4 p.m. Leif Osmar, 38, was reported missing by his father Wednesday afternoon after he took his blue, 13-foot single-person kayak out, but had not returned after an unusually long period of time, according to a Coast Guard press release issued Thursday. The Coast Guard, Alaska State Troopers and Alaska National Guard began their search efforts Wednesday and continued searching through the night, said U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Diana Honings. Osmar’s blue kayak was found capsized a mile offshore of the Cook Inlet near Clam Gulch Wednesday, but no other signs of the kayaker were found. The trooper boat Augustine recovered the kayak during a later search. A life jacket was found floating about 300 yards away from the kayak, according to a troopers dispatch. Weather during the search was reported as calm, Honings said. “The decision to suspend our active search efforts is always difficult,” said Michael McNeil, search and rescue mission coordinator, Coast Guard Sector Anchorage. “Our heartfelt condolences go out to the family members of the missing kayaker.” A Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew, an Alaska National Guard 176 Wing HH-60 Pave Hawk helicopter crew of the 210th rescue squadron with two pararescuemen from the 212th rescue squadron aboard and an Alaska State Trooper helicopter crew made an initial search for Osmar. The search continued Thursday morning with a Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew. Coast Guard Cutter Roanoke Island arrived Thursday to search the Cook Inlet in the vicinity of Clam Gulch, Honings said. The troopers and National See OSMAR, page A-12


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A-2 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014

CLARION P

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(USPS 438-410) Published daily Sunday through Friday, except Christmas and New Year’s, by: Southeastern Newspapers Corporation P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Street address: 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 1, Kenai, AK Phone: (907) 283-7551 Postmaster: Send address changes to the Peninsula Clarion, P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Periodicals postage paid at Kenai, AK Represented for national advertising by The Papert Companies, Chicago, IL Copyright 2014 Peninsula Clarion A Morris Communications Corp. newspaper

Who to call at the Peninsula Clarion News tip? Question? Main number.............................................................................................. 283-7551 Fax............................................................................................................. 283-3299 News email...................................................................news@peninsulaclarion.com General news Will Morrow, editor ............................................ will.morrow@peninsulaclarion.com Rashah McChesney, city editor.............. rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com Jeff Helminiak, sports editor........................... jeff.helminiak@peninsulaclarion.com Fisheries, photographer.............................................................................................. ............................ Rashah McChesney, rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com Kenai, courts...............................Dan Balmer, daniel.balmer@peninsulaclarion.com Borough, education ......... Kaylee Osowski, kaylee.osowski@peninsulaclarion.com Soldotna .................................. Kelly Sullivan, kelly.sullivan@peninsulaclarion.com Arts and Entertainment................................................ news@peninsulaclarion.com Community, Around the Peninsula............................... news@peninsulaclarion.com Sports............................................ Joey Klecka, joey.klecka@peninsulaclarion.com Page design........ Florence Struempler, florence.struempler@peninsulaclarion.com

Circulation problem? Call 283-3584 If you don’t receive your newspaper by 7 a.m. and you live in the Kenai-Soldotna area, call 283-3584 before 10 a.m. for redelivery of your paper. If you call after 10 a.m., you will be credited for the missed issue. Regular office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Sunday. General circulation questions can be sent via email to circulation@peninsulaclarion.com. The circulation manager is Randi Keaton.

For home delivery Order a six-day-a-week, three-month subscription for $39, a six-month subscription for $73, or a 12-month subscription for $130. Use our easy-pay plan and save on these rates. Call 283-3584 for details. Mail subscription rates are available upon request.

Want to place an ad? Classified: Call 283-7551 and ask for the classified ad department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or email classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com. Display: Call 283-7551 and ask for the display advertising department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Leslie Talent is the Clarion’s advertising director. She can be reached via email at leslie.talent@peninsulaclarion.com. Contacts for other departments: Business office.................................................................................. Teresa Mullican Production................................................................................................ Geoff Long Online........................................................................................ Vincent Nusunginya

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Follow the Clarion online. Go to peninsulaclarion.com and look for the Twitter, Facebook and Mobile links for breaking news, headlines and more.

Slain mountain lion tested for link to attack TERRY COLLINS Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — Wildlife officials said Thursday that it could take up to two days of testing to determine if they shot and killed the same mountain lion that attacked and injured a 6-year-old boy on a Northern California hiking trail. Rabies testing could be finished sometime Thursday, while DNA results could be available as early as Friday, said Lt. Patrick Foy, a California Fish and Wildlife spokesman. Officials have DNA from saliva and bite marks the big cat left on the boy and his clothing, and they also will check under its claws. After four days of scouring rugged terrain, search crews and dogs found and chased the mountain lion up a 70-foot-high tree Wednesday before fatally shooting it on a trail near the Silicon Valley city of Cupertino. Officials believe it has the right animal based on its description, its aggression toward the crew and close proximity to the spot of Sunday’s attack. “We’re pretty confident, otherwise we wouldn’t have killed it,” Foy said. “It’s highly likely,

Thursday Stocks Company Final Change Agrium Inc............... 90.99 -0.28 Alaska Air Group.......47.36 -0.13 ACS...........................1.69 +0.01 Apache Corp............97.63 +0.35 AT&T........................ 34.85 +0.15 Baker Hughes...........67.70 +0.43 BP ........................... 46.24 -0.28 Chevron.................. 123.83 -0.45 ConocoPhillips......... 79.38 +0.39 ExxonMobil...............97.03 +0.22 1st Natl. Bank AK...1,730.00 0 GCI...........................11.06 +0.04 Halliburton................67.07 +0.36 Harley-Davidson...... 65.21 +0.94 Home Depot............ 89.22 -0.03 McDonald’s.............. 92.96 -0.04 Safeway................... 34.58 +0.01 Schlumberger......... 104.45 +0.18 Tesoro.......................61.76 -1.21 Walmart....................76.10 -0.41 Wells Fargo...............51.59 +0.07 Gold closed.............1241.88 -7.91 Silver closed............ 18.70 -0.27 Dow Jones avg..... 17,049.00 -19.71 NASDAQ................ 4,591.81 +5.28 S&P 500................ 1,997.45 1.76 Stock prices provided by the Kenai Peninsula Edward Jones offices. C

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but we can’t be 100 percent certain until we get the DNA.” Wildlife officials defended the decision to kill the 65-pound juvenile mountain lion instead of trying to bring it in alive because it was deemed a threat to public safety. One wildlife expert said

Thursday that it was likely a tough call to kill the animal. “We don’t know if this animal had some sort of disease issues that affected its behavior,” said Janet Alexander, an operations director for the nonprofit Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley in San Jose. “In most situa-

tions, we would certainly prefer that nonlethal methods be used to capture an animal. We hope there won’t be any more incidents like this.” The male mountain lion killed this week was difficult to tranquilize and capture while up in a tree, Foy said.

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014

Obituaries Keelan Marie LaCross Keelan Marie LaCross, age 32, passed away peacefully in her sleep at her home in Soldotna on Sunday, August 31, 2014. She was born Thursday, August 5, 1982 in Fairbanks to Jack and Megan LaCross. Keelan had lived in Ferry, Anchorage, Arcata, California, San Francisco, California and Portland, Oregon. She will always be remembered for her talent and love of art and dance, and as a kind, loving, beautiful and creative person. We can all know that she is resting at peace. Keelan’s twin sister, Gwyneth wrote, “Words cannot describe how deeply I love my sister. Although not in the physical form, I know that Keelan will always be with me; her spirit having eternal life.” She was preceded in death by her father, Jack P. LaCross. Keelan is survived by her mother, Megan LaCross of Soldotna; twin sister, Gwyneth LaCross of Brooklyn, New York; and a

Around the Peninsula Classic car show rolls into Soldotna The Peninsula Center Mall’s annual Grease Lightning Show and Shine event for pre-1970s cars is Saturday from 4-8 p.m at the mall on the Sterling Highway in Soldotna. Registrants of the first 50 classic cars will receive a free beer mug. The event will include a DJ, food vendor and beer and wine.

First support meeting scheduled Have you lost a child, grandchild, or adult sibling of any age? The Compassionate Friends of the Kenai Peninsula will hold their first monthly support meeting on Sept. 23, 6:30-7:30 p.m. at the Soldotna Public Library. This is an opportunity to talk freely about the emotions and experiences you are going through and receive the understanding support of others who have “been there.” Activities will be provided for children ages 5-13. For more information, email tcfofthekenai@gmail.com or call Leslie at 907-398-3113.

Peninsula Clarion death notice and obituary guidelines:

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The Peninsula Clarion strives to report the deaths of all current and former Peninsula residents. Notices should be received within three months of the death. Pending service/Death notices are brief notices listing full name, age, date and place of death; and time, date and place of service. These are published at no charge. Obituaries are prepared by families, funeral homes, crematoriums, and are edited by our staff according to newspaper guidelines. The fee for obituaries up to 500 words with one black and white photo ranges from $50 to $100. Obituaries outside these guidelines are handled by the Clarion advertising department. Funeral homes and crematoriums routinely submit completed obituaries to the newspaper. Obituaries may also be submitted directly to the Clarion with prepayment, online at www.peninsulaclarion.com, or by mail to: Peninsula Clarion, P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, Alaska, 99611. The deadline for Tuesday – Friday editions is 2 p.m. the previous day. Submissions for Sunday and Monday editions must be received by 3 p.m. Friday. We do not process obituaries on Saturdays or Sundays unless submitted by funeral homes or crematoriums. Obituaries are placed on a space-available basis, prioritized by dates of local services. For more information, call the Clarion at 907-283-7551.

large extended family. A private family service will be held at a later date. Remembrances and memorials may be sent to Megan and Gwyn LaCross at PO Box 331, Soldotna, AK 99669. Please visit Keelan’s online memorial and sign her guestbook at www.alaskanfuneral.com.

Lydia M. Pollard Soldotna resident Lydia M. Pollard, 69, left this earth on Sunday, Sept. 7, 2014 at the Alaska Native Medical Center, laughing and smiling until the end. A panikhida prayer service will be 1:15 p.m. Monday, Sept. 15, at Peninsula Memorial Chapel in Kenai. Funeral services will be 2 p.m. Monday at Holy Assumption Russian Orthodox Church in Kenai. Burial will follow in the church cemetery. Archpriest Thomas Andrew will officiate. Lydia was born Apr. 3, 1945 in Kodiak. She worked with special needs children in Kodiak and was then co-owner of the Selway Tavern in Koskie, Idaho. She loved so much in life, all

Domestic Animal Protection League announces upcoming events The domestic animal protection league will be available to answer questions about a borough advisory vote on October 7 which will address protections for domestic animals outside of city limits. n Sept. 13 at 11 a.m., Information table and bake sale at Save-UMore on Kalifornsky Beach Road. n Sept. 15 from 7-9 p.m., Town hall meeting in the Sterling Community Center n Sept. 18 from 7:30-9 p.m., Town hall meeting in Nikiski Fire Station #1. n Sept. 19 from noon-4 p.m., Information table in the Kenai Safeway. n Sept. 23 from 5:30-7 p.m., Town hall meeting at the Funny River Road Community Center. n Sept. 24 at noon, Information table at the Seward Senior Citizen’s Center; 6-7:30 p.m., Town hall meeting in the Seward Community Library Museum. n Sept. 25 at noon, Information table at the new Nikiski Senior Center; 7-9 p.m., Town hall meeting at the old Nikiski Senior Center. n Sept. 30 from 7-9 p.m., Town hall meeting at the Cook Inlet Aquaculture Association Building. n Oct. 3 from 6-8 p.m., Town hall meeting in the Homer United Methodist Church.

Community Calendar Today 8 a.m. • Alcoholics Anonymous As Bill Sees It Group, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway Unit 71 (Old Carrs Mall). Call 398-9440. 9:45 a.m. • TOPS #AK 196 meets at The Grace Lutheran Church, in Soldotna. Call Dorothy at 2621303. Noon • Alcoholics Anonymous recovery group at 11312 Kenai Spur Highway, Suite 71 in the old Carrs Mall in Kenai. Call 262-1917. 12:30 p.m. • Well Elders Live Longer exercise (W.E.L.L.) will meet at the Nikiski Senior Center. Call instructor Mary Olson at 907776-3745.

8 p.m. • Narcotics Anonymous Support Group “It Works” at URS Club, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway, Unit 71, Kenai. • AA 12 by 12 at the United Methodist Church, 607 Frontage Road, Kenai. • Twin City Al-Anon Family group, United Methodist Church, 607 Frontage Road in Kenai. Call 907-953-4655. Saturday 8 a.m. • Alcoholics Anonymous As Bill Sees It Group, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway Unit 71 (Old Carrs Mall). Call 398-9440. 9 a.m. • Al-Anon book study, Cen-

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things purple, bowling, crocheting, flowers, people of all walks of life, Johnny Depp, Elvis Presley, hugging everyone, singing, dancing and of course her beloved San Francisco 49rs. Church was very important to her, where she loved having theological discussions with Father Thomas after church services. She helped start the church’s annual Christmas Bazaar and was the Friday Fry Bread cook. Her son remembers her taking him to “Gone with the Wind” and “Dr. Zhivago” whenever those movies came to Kodiak. For the past 5 years, Lydia helped take care of her mother. Lydia was preceded in death by her husband, Les Pollard. In addition to her son, Shannon, she is survived by her mother, Annie; sisters and brothers-in-law, Laura and Pat Mullan, Ramona and Lynn Stowe; brothers, Frank, Rocco, Mark and Antril Sanguinetti; twin grandchildren, Shane and Shana; great-grandsons, Joshua and Aiden; and survived by six young men, whom she adopted and mothered since their elementary days. She is also survived by her first husband, George “Corky” McCorkle. Memorial donations may be given to Holy Assumption Russian Orthodox Church, P.O. Box 1227, Kenai, AK 99611. Arrangements were by Peninsula Memorial Chapel in Kenai.

League of Women Voters planning forums The League of Women Voters of the Central Kenai Peninsula will hold their monthly meeting Friday at Christ Lutheran Church in Soldotna at noon. The League will be making calendar updates and planning Forums for the upcoming local election October 7 and the general election November 4. Bring a sack lunch and a friend. For more information contact Gail Knobf at 262-6635 or tiamat@eagle. ptialaska.net.

LeeShore to hold community awareness workshop The LeeShore Center will be holding its bi-annual Community Awareness Workshop on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Oct. 6–10 from 9 a.m.–5 p.m. at The LeeShore Center. Topics to be covered include domestic violence, sexual assault, the effects of domestic violence on children, the agency’s Batterer’s Intervention Program, and other related topics. The public is invited and may attend a portion or the entire workshop. Continuing education credits are available through Kenai Peninsula College. The Changing Patterns class on Tuesday is canceled during this week. For more information, call the Volunteer Coordinator at 907-283-9479.

tral Peninsula Hospital’s Augustine Room, Soldotna. Call 907-953-4655. 10 a.m. • Narcotics Anonymous PJ Meeting, URS Club, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway, Unit 71, Kenai. Noon • Homemade soup, Funny River Community Center. 7 p.m. • Narcotics Anonymous support group “Dopeless Hope Fiends,” URS Club, 11312 Kenai

Spur Highway, Unit 71, Kenai. 8 p.m. • AA North Roaders Group at North Star Methodist Church, Mile 25.5 Kenai Spur Highway. Call 242-9477. The Community Calendar lists recurring events and meetings of local organizations. To have your event listed, email organization name, day or days of meeting, time of meeting, place, and a contact phone number to news@peninsulaclarion.com.


A-4 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014

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Opinion

CLARION P

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Serving the Kenai Peninsula since 1970 VITTO KLEINSCHMIDT Publisher

WILL MORROW������������������������������������������������������������������������ Editor Teresa Mullican............... Controller/Human Resources Director LESLIE TALENT................................................... Advertising Director GEOFF LONG.................................................... Production Manager VINCENT NUSUNGINYA.................................... New Media Director Daryl Palmer.................................... IT and Composition Director RANDI KEATON................................................. Circulation Manager A Morris Communications Corp. Newspaper

School board actions assure steady leadership The Kenai Peninsula Borough School

District took an important step forward this week in naming an interim superintendent and outlining a plan to fill the position on a permanent basis. Current Superintendent Steve Atwater tendered his resignation to the school board in early August, just as the district was ramping up for the current school year. While Atwater’s resignation is effective Dec. 1, giving the board another few months to find his replacement, it has been noted that the middle of the school year is not the best time to find the ideal candidate. For any organization — large or small, public or private — certainty and confidence in leadership moving forward is critical for success. Planning for the unknown is both difficult and scary, and a void in a leadership position can be detrimental, especially for an organization as expansive as the school district. The school board made what we think are two good decisions this week. First, rather than try to rush to find a new superintendent at a time when the top candidates aren’t necessarily looking, the board opted to name an interim superintendent to finish out the school year, giving the board time to conduct a thorough candidate search. There’s no need to panic; the school district is in good shape. While there’s always issues that need to be addressed, the district is not facing a crisis. The district has a good handle on its finances, schools are performing well, and there is a team of experienced administrators overseeing district operations. The board has breathing room to find the right person for the job. Second is the selection of Sean Dusek to handle the duties of interim superintendent. In Dusek, the district has a person who has worked in the district in many different roles, from classroom teacher and coach to assistant superintendent. Dusek has a good sense of where the district has been, and where it’s going. He’ll be called on to oversee the school budget process, with much of the heavy lifting to be done just as he will be settling in to his new role. The next step is for Dusek and the school board to come to terms on an agreement, which is one thing we hope can be accomplished in a timely manner. The Kenai Peninsula Borough School District is a complex, diverse organization. The school board’s actions offer reassurance of steady leadership as we dive into another school year.

Quotable “We will hunt down terrorists who threaten our country, wherever they are. This is a core principle of my presidency: If you threaten America, you will find no safe haven.” — President Barack Obama in a prime-time address to the nation from the White House.

Letters to the Editor Sullivan erred when skipping fisheries debate

I had to ask myself this week, does Dan Sullivan actually want to get elected in November? I’m not sure he does, since he chose to skip the fisheries debate in Kodiak. Or he is a complete fool and had no idea the giant mistake he made by turning down this debate. Either way, Sullivan just proved what Senator Begich and Democrats have been People speaking out saying all along — he doesn’t know or care against domestic violence about Alaska. The good news is people are speaking Bill Starnes up and people are being heard as evidenced Nikiski by the recent developments in responses to violent actions against women. Today a CNN news anchor announced the BaltiTransfer agreement more Ravens has terminated their 4 million not a problem dollar contract with their star running back 1. It’s not a question of “Transfer of Ray Rice. Ray Rice is the person who was patients” because, if there were an emer- caught on video knocking out Janay Palmer gency at the surgery center, 911 would be in the elevator at a casino in Atlantic City, called and the patient would go to the hos- New Jersey, in February of this year. In adpital. Surely the hospital would not refuse dition to being brutal, his disrespect for his fiancee was demonstrated further by the the patient. 2. It is about limiting choice to the com- way he dragged her from the elevator. Like the principals in our Governor munity. Patients who have Veteran, Medicare, Medicaid will not be able to have Parnell-General Katkus-Alaska National service anywhere locally but the hospital, Guard sexual assault scandal the principals even when their physician practices at both in Rice’s case have been slow to recognize both the seriousness of violence against places and the cost would be less. 3. The hospital is community owned, women and slow to act responsibly in reand is dedicated to giving the best service sponse to these acts of violence. Do you to the community (see the mission state- think this may contribute to our high inciment for the hospital). If the patient were dence of sexual assault and domestic viobetter served by going somewhere other lence in Alaska? Thankfully Americans are waking up than the hospital, then the hospital should support the community in that decision, or to some of the injustices of our culture and expressing the unacceptability of feachange to provide that same service. 4. As to the hospital being hurt by the tures of our culture. Thus Roger Goodell’s competition from a surgery center, just 2 game suspension of Ray Rice was met look to Anchorage: Providence and Alaska with a public uproar that led to the eventual Regional are for-profit hospitals, and there termination of Ray Rice’s contract with the is a surgery center in Anchorage; they are Baltimore Ravens. Commentators on CNN raised the questions, “Why has it taken so not “going broke” because of it. 5. I don’t think the hospital board should long when the evidence has been in the be afraid of the surgery center, but use this hands of the police, the NFL commissionto review how well they are providing for er, and the Raven’s owners since Februthe community and maybe even (heaven ary?” and “Why wasn’t felony assault met

Classic Doonesbury, 1977

Letters to the Editor: E-mail: news@peninsulaclarion.com

Write: Peninsula Clarion P.O. Box 3009 Kenai, AK 99611

forbid) work with the surgery center for the betterment of the community. 6. There is no need to be arguing about where patients should be getting their services, our community is growing and there are plenty of patients to go around. I would like to work together to improve the health care services for our community. Tom Wilkinson RN CPAN. Director of Nurses, Surgery Center of Kenai and former Central Peninsula Hospital employee

Fax: 907-283-3299 Questions? Call: 907-283-7551

The Peninsula Clarion welcomes letters and attempts to publish all those received, subject to a few guidelines: n All letters must include the writer’s name, phone number and address. n Letters are limited to 500 words and may be edited to fit available space. Letters are run in the order they are received. n Letters addressed specifically to another person will not be printed. n Letters that, in the editor’s judgment, are libelous will not be printed. n The editor also may exclude letters that are untimely or irrelevant to the public interest. n Short, topical poetry should be submitted to Poet’s Corner and will not be printed on the Opinion page. n Submissions from other publications will not be printed. n Applause letters should recognize public-spirited service and contributions. Personal thank-you notes will not be published. C

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with jail time for the offender?” To this 41-year Alaskan, 5 years of Governor Parnell ignoring the reports of sexual abuses in the Alaska National Guard is unacceptable. The time for change is long overdue. Alaskan women, men and children deserve better from their elected officials. Hugh R. Hays Soldotna

Applause First Mini Book sale at Kenai Community Library successful Friends of the Kenai Community Library had a successful mini book sale at the Kenai Library meeting room on August 22 and 23. Many thanks to the volunteers that made the sale possible: Barb Christian, Eileen Bryson, Margaret Simon, Nora Satathite, Carolyn Ostrander, Donna Steele, Lee Tanner, Jeanine Moeller, Mary Armstrong, Gwen Klawunder, Kari Mohn, Ellen Hudson, Barb Sandahl, Cliff Heus, Phil Bryson, Jacob Dye, Louise Mika, Benjamin Jackinsky, Vicky Kummet, Steve Tressler, Patty Tressler, Don Oberg, Bill Switzer, Lee and Dee Cassell and Dale Cragg. The support from the Kenai Community Library staff and City of Kenai is also appreciated. Thank you to all who bought books and we hope to see you and your friends at the mega sale at the Home Gallery Furniture and Flooring store on September 18, 19, 20, 2014. Kathy Heus and Jean Taylor Co-chairs

Letters to the Editor:

E-mail: news@peninsulaclarion.com Write: Peninsula Clarion P.O. Box 3009 Kenai, AK 99611

Fax: 907-283-3299 Questions? Call: 907-283-7551

By GARRY TRUDEAU

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Alaska

Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014

A-5

Alaska Senators cool to Obama’s Mideast plan JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Alaska’s two U.S. senators reacted warily to President Barack Obama’s plan for a new military front in the Middle East, with Democratic Sen. Mark Begich saying he opposes calls by Obama to arm rebels in Syria. Begich said the U.S. needs greater assurances it would not be arming extremists who eventually would use the weapons against this country. On Wednesday, Obama laid

out a plan that includes airstrikes inside Syria and expanded strikes in Iraq as part of an effort to root out Islamic State extremists. He also announced plans to send more troops to help Iraqi security forces, and he called on Congress to authorize the training and arming of Syrian rebels fighting Islamic State militants and Syrian President Bashar Assad. Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski, like Begich, ac-

knowledged the threat posed by the Islamic State militants. But she said Obama fell short in defining clear objectives. “Action without a defined plan is not effective or sustainable foreign policy,” she said in a statement. “And it makes attracting a coalition of allies more difficult.” Republican U.S. Rep. Don Young said Americans “cannot turn a blind eye to what is happening.”

“Short of putting American boots on the ground, the United States should continue to use its superior firepower to confront and defeat this group of extremists,” he said in a statement. Young said he also believes countries like Turkey, Saudi Arabia and Egypt should commit resources to the effort. Begich and Young are each seeking re-election this year, with Begich’s race being closely watched nationally because it

could help decide which party controls the Senate. Begich said there cannot be a “rush into another decade-long ground war,” and he called for greater steps to prevent a terror attack in the U.S. “No one who has taken up arms against our country — even if they are American citizens — should be allowed freely into the United States,” he said in a statement. Begich’s GOP rival, Dan

Sullivan, a Marine Corps reservist, called Obama’s statements a “much-needed departure” from prior comments that indicated lack of a strategy for dealing with the militants. Sullivan, in a statement, said it’s critical for Obama to work with Congress and communicate to the American people a plan “to reverse and rout the spread of Islamic extremism” to protect Americans and U.S. allies in the region.

Anchorage man charged with strangling girlfriend By DAN JOLING Associated Press

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — A 28-year-old Anchorage man told his brother he had strangled his girlfriend, and when his brother said he intended to call police, the man drove off with the body in the

back seat of his car, police said Thursday. David Joseph Thomas a short time later called police himself and was found with the car and the body of Linda Anne Martz Bower, 19, in the parking lot of a pharmacy. He was charged with firstand second-degree murder and

booked into the Anchorage Jail early Thursday morning, said police spokeswoman Anita Shell. Police have not yet announced where Bower died, Shell said. “That’s part of the investigation,” she said. Thomas lives with his broth-

er in Eagle River, a community within the northern part of the municipality of Anchorage. Police at 10:24 p.m. Wednesday took a call from Thomas’ brother, who said Thomas had just told him he had strangled his girlfriend and that the body was still in his car. The brother told Thomas

he intended to call police, and Thomas drove off, Shell said. About 15 minutes later, police said, Thomas himself called and said he was at the Walgreens parking lot in Eagle River. Officers arrested him without resistance and found the Bower’s in the back seat of

Thomas’ Mercedes sedan. Thomas is being held without bail. Online court records had no listing for the case Thursday morning. Bower’s death is Anchorage’s 11th homicide in 2014.

Juneau foundation gift expected to be $48M JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — A gift to the Juneau Community Foundation from the former president of the city’s power utility will be about $48 million. Alaska Electric Light & Power owner Bill Corbus and his wife, Katie, in November promised to donate 90 percent of their shares in the company to the foundation that supports southeast Alaska charitable groups. The Juneau power company was founded in 1896 and has been family-owned for decades. Spokane, Washington-based Avista Utilities is buying Alaska Energy and Resources Co., the parent company of Alaska Electric Light & Power. The Corbuses in November said it was fitting to donate a major portion of the proceeds to the Juneau community. The foundation says the donation will be used to establish five endowed funds, a donor-advised fund, and directed grants.

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AP Photo/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Waning walruses This June 2014 released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows Pacific walruses in the Chukchi Sea off the coast of Alaska. Researchers are trying to get a better handle on the size of the Pacific walrus population ahead of an expected decision by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on whether the animals need special protections.

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A-6 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014

Nation & World

UN: 45 Fijian peacekeepers freed in Syria By EDITH M. LEDERER and RYAN LUCAS Associated Press

BEIRUT 0— Al-Qaidalinked militants released 45 Fijian peacekeepers captured two week ago in Syria, ending the U.N.’s fourth crisis over abducted soldiers in the Golan Heights since March 2013 amid questions about the future of its 40-year-old monitoring mission there. The Fijians were captured on the Syrian-controlled side of the Golan Heights by fighters from the Nusra Front, who have been battling Syrian government forces in the contested buffer zone between Syria and Israel. The 1,200-strong U.N. force that has patrolled the zone since 1974 has increasingly been caught in the spillover from Syria’s civil war. U.N. Spokesman Stephane Dujarric said “no demands were made and no concessions were made” to secure the release of the peacekeepers. “No ransom was paid,” he said. Qatar, a chief backer of rebels fighting to topple Syrian President Bashar Assad, said it played a role in the release. The

official Qatar News Agency reported that the tiny Arab Gulf emirate had “succeeded in the release of the Fijian soldiers” in response to a request from Fiji for its mediation. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon thanked the efforts “of all concerned” in the release, without naming anyone. He demanded that all parties respect the mandate of the U.N. force and the right of peacekeepers to move freely and safely, according to a statement from his office. Fiji’s Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama called the peacekeepers heroes who kept their cool under the “most extreme circumstances imaginable.” Speaking in Suva early Friday, he said his troops’ discipline ensured that no militants were killed and no U.N. soldiers harmed. The Fijian troops were captured Aug. 28, a day after militants seized control of the Syrian side of the Quneitra crossing from President Bashar Assad’s troops. Two groups of Filipino peacekeepers were also trapped at separate U.N. encampments that day, surrounded by rebel fighters who demanded they sur-

AP Photo/Gil Eliyahu

U.N. peacekeepers from Fiji drive their vehicles after they were released by Al-Qaida-linked Syrian militants in the Syrian-controlled side of the Golan Heights, seen from the border of the Israeli side Thursday. Al-Qaida-linked Syrian militants on Thursday released all 45 Fijian peacekeepers they had held captive for two weeks, the United Nations said, bringing an end to

render. They refused, and both groups eventually escaped — one busting out with the help of Irish colleagues, and the other by slipping away under the cover of darkness. Jordan’s U.N. Ambassador Dina Kawar said the idea of peacekeepers being taken hostage “is just impossible to

Shadow cast over 9/11 ceremonies By RACHELLE BLIDNER and JONATHAN LEMIRE Associated Press

NEW YORK — The nation’s gathering war against a new upsurge in Islamic terror hung heavy over the 13th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks Thursday, stirring both anxiety and determination among those who came to ground zero to remember their loved ones. The familiar silence to mark the attacks and the solemn roll call of the nearly 3,000 dead came just hours after President Barack Obama told the country he is authorizing stepped-up airstrikes in Iraq and Syria against Islamic State extremists. “It’s an ongoing war against terrorists. Old ones die out and new ones pop up,” Vasile Poptean said as he left the ceremony, where he had gone to remember his brother, Joshua Poptean. “If we don’t engage them now, there’s a possibility there will be another 9/11 down the road.”

Victims’ relatives and dignitaries gathered in the plaza where the twin towers once stood, an area of shimmering new skyscrapers, including the soon-to-open 1,776-foot One World Trade Center. The attacks were also commemorated in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, where former House Speaker Dennis Hastert gave the flag that flew atop the U.S. Capitol on 9/11 to the Flight 93 National Memorial. At the Pentagon, where Obama spoke at a wreath-laying ceremony, he didn’t mention the rise of Islamic State extremists specifically but noted: “We cannot erase every trace of evil from the world.” “That was the case before 9/11,” the president said, “and that remains true today.” Obama’s nationally televised announcement of his plans to “degrade and ultimately destroy” the militants, coming on the eve of the anniversary, sparked mixed feelings among 9/11 victims’ relatives. Some saw it as a sign of determination, others as bad timing.

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accept because it will happen more and more, and that will make countries hesitant about sending their armies, so we were very happy.” U.N. deputy spokesman Farhan Haq said the Fijians were released at the Syrian-side of the Quneitra crossing point near Israel and were “in good condition.” He told The Associated Press that they crossed into Israeli-controlled Golan territory, were then taken to a U.N. post further north, and then went to Camp Faouar inside the Syrian-controlled Golan, where the peacekeepers stay. Israel’s Channel Two news

reported that the Fijians were given food and medical attention after crossing into Israelicontrolled territory. Fiji’s U.N. Mission tweeted a photo of diplomats celebrating with their thumbs up, reading: “Free at last! Thumbs up from the Fiji Permanent Mission in New York to our 45 brave Fijian UNDOF peacekeepers.” The mission, known as UNDOF, was established in 1974, a year after the Arab-Israeli war. For nearly four decades, U.N. monitors helped enforce a stable truce between Israel and Syria, but the spillover from the Syrian war has made

troop contributors wary and several countries have withdrawn. Fiji’s government, however, has said it has no intention to pull out. Dujarric, the U.N. spokesman, said “my assumption is that the 45 would return home, and I hope they would be swapped out by new troops from Fiji.” UNDOF currently has troops from six countries: Fiji, India, Ireland, Nepal, Netherlands and the Philippines. But after the latest abduction, Ireland said it would review its participation in the mission. The Philippines has given notice it will not deploy a new contingent when its already-extended stint ends in October. For the Philippines, the August incident was the third time its peacekeepers got caught up in the Syrian violence. Twenty-one Filipino peacekeepers were abducted in March 6, 2013 by the Syrian rebel group Yarmouk Martyrs Brigade, which held them for three days. Another group of four Filipinos was abducted by the Yarmouk rebels in May 7, 2013, and released five days later. In another abduction, armed men broke into a U.N. outpost in the buffer zone on May 15, 2013, and captured three unarmed military observers from the U.N. Truce Supervision Organization. They were held by the Syrian men for about five hours and released.

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014

A-7

Protecting pregnant workers’ rights

Around the World Key Mideast allies commit to “do their share” to oppose Islamic State militants JIDDAH, Saudi Arabia — Key Arab allies promised Thursday to “do their share” to fight Islamic State militants, but NATO member Turkey refused to join in, signaling the struggle the U.S. faces in trying to get front-line nations to put aside their regional animosities and work together to defeat a common enemy. In a joint statement, the 10 Arab states agreed to stop the flow of fighters and funding to the insurgents and possibly to join military action. Their announcement followed a meeting between U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and his counterparts in the Red Sea coastal city of Jiddah. Kerry’s visit, on the anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, was aimed at pinning down the support regional allies are willing to give to U.S. plans to beat back the Islamic State group, which has seized large chunks of Iraq and Syria. In remarks to reporters after the meeting, Kerry noted the “particularly poignant day” for the discussions. “The devastating consequences of extremist hate remain fresh in the minds of all Americans, and to so many of our friends and allies around the world,” Kerry said of the terror attacks 13 years ago. “Those consequences are felt every day here in the Middle East.”

By expanding attacks inside Syria, the US may become entangled in rebel rivalries BEIRUT — In expanding its airstrikes into Syria against Islamic State extremists, the U.S. could find itself entangled in a morass of jihadis, rebel rivalries and religious hatred. Unlike Iraq, the U.S. has no firm allies inside Syria to take over areas if fighters from the Islamic State group are pushed back. Unless the West decisively backs the outgunned moderate rebels, it risks the unintended consequence of prolonging the widely discredited rule of President Bashar Assad. President Barack Obama said Wednesday that in the fight against the Islamic State group, the U.S. “cannot rely on an Assad regime that terrorizes its own people — a regime that will never regain the legitimacy it has lost.” “Instead, we must strengthen the opposition as the best counterweight to extremists like ISIL, while pursuing the political solution necessary to solve Syria’s crisis once and for all,” Obama said, referring to the Islamic State group by one of its acronyms. But it’s a lot more complicated.

Thousands of Superstorm Sandy victims could be asked to return FEMA funds

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NEW YORK — Thousands of people who received government aid after Superstorm Sandy slammed the East Coast may be forced to give some or all of that money back, nearly two years after the disaster. The Federal Emergency Management Agency is scrutinizing about 4,500 households that it suspects got improper payments, according to program officials and data obtained by The Associated Press through a public records request. As of early September, FEMA had asked around 850 of them to return a collective $5.8 million. The other cases were still under review. FEMA’s campaign to recover overpayments, called “recoupment” in government lingo, involves instances where the agency believes a household got more money than allowed under program rules, but not necessarily through an attempt to cheat the system. Fraud cases are handled separately.

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— The Associated Press

By HOPE YEN Associated Press

WASHINGTON — More than 120 members of Congress urged the Supreme Court on Thursday to recognize that pregnant workers are entitled to reasonable accommodations such as light duty, saying it’s needed to ensure that expecting mothers are not forced out of their jobs. In a friend-of-the-court brief, the Democratic lawmakers — 99 from the House, including Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, and 24 senators — said UPS delivery driver Peggy Young of Lorton, Virginia, was unfairly treated by her employer when it asked her to take unpaid maternity leave rather than provide a less strenuous position as her doctors advised.

Many of the lawmakers are pushing legislation to make the pregnancy protections explicit in federal law. They argue that the lower appeals court in Richmond, Virginia, ruled incorrectly by siding with UPS. Young, 42, should have received the light work accommodation because current federal law provisions are designed to “ensure that pregnant women were no longer treated as second-class citizens on the job,” they wrote. At issue is the 1978 Pregnancy Discrimination Act, which bars employers from discriminating based on pregnancy, childbirth or related conditions. The law requires that pregnant workers be treated at least as well as other employees similar in their ability or inability to work, but is silent as to whether it specifically re-

quires reasonable accommodations for pregnancy. UPS says its accommodation policies are “pregnancyneutral,” allowing light-duty assignments only in cases in which employees were injured on the job, had a disability as defined by the Americans With Disabilities Act or whose injuries made them ineligible for commercial driver’s licenses. The case comes as women now make up nearly half of the U.S. workforce. Of the women entering the workforce, threequarters will be pregnant and employed at some point, according to the lawmakers. President Barack Obama has called on Congress to pass the lawmakers’ bill, led by Sens. Bob Casey, D-Pa., Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., and Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., to make the

pregnancy protections unmistakable and clear. In July, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission also issued new guidelines that prohibit employers from forcing pregnant workers to take leave and acknowledge that employers may have to provide light duty for pregnant workers. Emily Martin, general counsel for the National Women’s Law Center, said the lower court ruling could especially hurt women in low-wage jobs. “Women are being asked to choose between the health of their pregnancy and their paycheck, and that’s a choice they shouldn’t have to make,” she said. The Supreme Court case is Young v. United Parcel Service, 12-1226. Oral arguments are scheduled for Dec. 3.

Eying Scotland, Spain Catalans seek secession vote By JOSEPH WILSON and ALAN CLENDENNING Associated Press

BARCELONA, Spain — Hundreds of thousands of Catalans energized by Scotland’s upcoming independence referendum protested Thursday for a secession vote aimed at carving out a new Mediterranean nation in what is now northeastern Spain. The events illustrated how the Scottish vote in just one week is captivating breakaway minded Europeans in several countries. Sporting bright yellow and red shirts representing the colors of the Catalonian flag emblazoned with the phrase “Now is the time,” protesters in Barcelona shouted “Independencia!” They crowded into two avenues that look like a “V’’ from the air to signal their desire for a Catalonia independence referendum that the central government in Madrid insists would be illegal.

Just how many showed up was in dispute after the protest ended Thursday evening. Barcelona police said 1.8 million people participated but the Spanish Interior Ministry’s regional office in Catalonia put the number at no more than 525,000, among them retired hospital director and economist Lluis Enric Florenca. “If the Yes wins in Scotland, and it looks like it will be close, and Europe accepts it, they will accept Catalonia, which is bigger and in relation to Spain stronger than Scotland in relation to England,” said Florenca, 65. “Catalonia is potentially much more powerful.” Catalonia regional leader Artur Mas said his government is not wavering from plans to hold a Nov. 9 referendum in the region of 7.6 million people, even though experts say any attempt is sure to be blocked by Spain’s Constitutional Court. Mas has repeatedly said he won’t call an illegal vote. “This is a very powerful

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message we are sending to Europe and the world,” Mas said. “Now is the moment to sit down and negotiate the terms for the Catalan people to be able to express themselves at the polls.” Polls have suggested that Scotland’s independence vote on Sept. 18 is too close to call and that has captivated a wide variety of groups in addition to Catalan separatists. They include pro-independence Basques in northern Spain; Corsicans who want to break away from France; Italians from several northern regions; and Flemish speakers in Belgium demanding more autonomy, independence or union with the Netherlands. “The dynamics at this point are with the Yes side, and if the Yes side actually wins it creates a strong precedent,” said Hugh O’Donnell, a professor of cultural politics at Glasgow Caledonian University. Unlike the Scottish ballot, a vote in Catalonia wouldn’t

result in secession. Mas’ proposed referendum would ask Catalans whether they favor secession. If the answer is Yes, Mas says, that would give him a political mandate to negotiate a path toward independence. Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy has vowed to block the vote because Spain’s constitution doesn’t allow referendums that don’t include all Spaniards, but Mas told reporters that would be a mistake. “The Catalan issue is one of the biggest issues the Spanish government is facing,” Mas said. “It is an error to try and solve this through legal means. Political problems are solved through politics, not with legal threats.” If Madrid refuses to allow an independence vote, a go-ahead by Mas could put him in perilous legal terrain. When the northern Basque region failed to obtain permission for a similar referendum in 2005, Spain said Basque leaders could face jail if they went ahead.


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A-8 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014

Ancient Greek tomb dig finds marble statues BY NICHOLAS PAPHITIS COSTAS KANTOURIS Associated Press

ATHENS, Greece — Archaeologists inching through a large 2,300-year-old tomb in northern Greece on Thursday uncovered two marble female statues flanking the entrance to one of three underground chambers, in another sign of the unusual attention and expense lavished on the unknown person buried there. The dig has gripped the public imagination amid non-stop media coverage, which Greek archaeologists say is placing an unfair burden on the excavation team. A Culture Ministry statement said the statues show “exceptional artistic quality.” Their upper sections were discovered last week, but their bodies — clad in semi-transparent robes — emerged after part of a blocking wall was removed. Less than half the tomb, which bears signs of having been plundered in antiquity, has been explored, and removing the tons of earth that fill it will take weeks. Although no

‘We local residents called the police and they chased them off. The whole surrounding area has plenty of holes left by illegal excavations.’ — Alekos Kochliaridis, former antiquities guard burials have been found so far, the opulence points to some senior official linked with ancient Greek warrior-king Alexander the Great. The barrel-vaulted tomb is among the biggest of its period in antiquities-rich Greece. Excavator Katerina Peristeri believes the mound was originally topped by a stone lion on a large plinth, found a few kilometers away 100 years ago, that was probably removed during Roman times. She has also voiced strong hopes that the site hasn’t been looted. Archaeologist Chryssoula Paliadelli, who is not involved in the excavation, told The Associated Press that the tomb has several exceptional features, including a monumental facade that leaves the top of the vault

exposed above two large marble sphinxes. The excavation, on a hillock near ancient Amphipolis, 600 kilometers (370 miles) north of Athens, has dominated local news coverage for a month, since Prime Minister Antonis Samaras visited it and preempted archaeologists by releasing details on the findings. A media blitz followed amid speculation that the tomb may contain buried treasure and the remains of an eminent figure — although Alexander himself was buried in Egypt. Dozens of tourists daily try to get a peek of the fenced-off site, and visitor numbers at the nearby Amphipolis museum have swelled. Peristeri has dated the tomb to between 325 BC and 300

BC. Alexander conquered a vast area from modern Greece to India, enriching many of his close friends and commanders. His death in 323 B.C. was followed by upheaval as his generals fought over the empire. Paliadelli, a professor at the University of Thessaloniki, said the media attention is greater than during the discovery in the late 1970s, in which she participated, of a rich unplundered tomb identified as that of Alexander’s father, King Philip II of Macedonia in a royal cemetery 200 kilometers (125 miles) to the west. “The media — television, the Internet — has developed so much,” she said. “We worked at a much calmer pace, despite the pressure from the nature of the finds — that included wood and leather artefacts that required urgent conservation.” The Association of Greek Archaeologists on Thursday criticized the Culture Ministry’s approach to the media, which it said was tailored to “satisfying a public opinion hooked on facile sensationalism and overconsumption of television, print and online sub-products.”

AP Photo/Culture Ministry

In this photo released on Thursday, by the Greek Culture Ministry, excavation staff work between two approximately life-sized female statues on a wall leading to a yet unexplored inner room of a huge underground ancient tomb, in Amphipolis, northern Greece. The tomb dates between 325 B.C. — two years before the death of ancient Greek warrior-king Alexander the Great — and 300 B.C.

The site, set among almond groves and tobacco fields, has about 20 police providing a 24-hour guard to deter looters, who have plagued the area in the past. Former antiquities guard Alekos Kochliaridis told the AP that robbers tried to excavate

the mound in 1952, brazenly turning up in broad daylight with a mechanical digger. “We local residents called the police and they chased them off,” he said. “The whole surrounding area has plenty of holes left by illegal excavations.”

Court martial recommended in Iraq vanishing marine By JONATHAN DREW Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. — A hearing officer has recommended a court martial for a Marine accused of deserting his unit a decade ago in Iraq and later winding up in Lebanon for eight years, a defense lawyer said Thursday. Civilian defense attorney Haytham Faraj said the officer overseeing the military equivalent of a grand jury recommended that 34-year-old Cpl. Wassef Hassoun face a general court martial on charges including desertion and theft. A Marine general will have the final say on whether to try Hassoun. Faraj also gave The Associated Press translated Lebanese government documents that he says illustrate how Hassoun

was tied up with court proceedings and prevented from leaving Lebanon. The same documents were given to the military court. Faraj said the hearing report by Lt. Col. Scott W. Martin notes the case consists mostly of circumstantial evidence and that many witnesses, including some in Iraq, would be hard to find. Still, Martin found that the government had enough evidence to proceed. “It’s not surprising,” said Faraj, himself a former U.S. Marine. “I think Lt. Col. Martin wrote a fair report.” A Marine public affairs officer declined to comment on Martin’s report. Hassoun is being held at Camp Lejeune. The case began in June 2004, when Hassoun disappeared from a base in Fallujah, Iraq. About a week later,

he appeared in a photo purportedly taken by insurgents. Hassoun was blindfolded and had a sword poised above his head. Hassoun, a naturalized American citizen who was born and grew up in Lebanon, turned up days later at the U.S. Embassy in Lebanon saying he was kidnapped by extremists. But the military doubted his story, and he was brought back to the U.S. while charges were considered. He was allowed to visit relatives in Utah in December 2004 when he disappeared again — eventually winding up back in Lebanon. Military prosecutors argue Hassoun was unhappy with his deployment and left the Marines in Iraq in 2004. They cited witnesses who said Hassoun didn’t like how the U.S.

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was interrogating Iraqis and that he said he wouldn’t shoot back at Iraqis. Military officials say a marriage for Hassoun had been arranged with a woman in Lebanon. They are now married and have a son who has dual U.S. and Lebanese citizenship. Faraj, who maintains the kidnapping story is true, said his client traveled to Lebanon in early 2005 while on leave and was soon arrested. Faraj argues that court proceedings in Lebanon were triggered by the U.S. charges against Hassoun. Military and legal experts have said it’s unusual that a foreign country would try someone on desertion or theft charges related to U.S. military service. Faraj conceded that it’s strange but suggested Leba-

nese authorities were acting on information from the U.S. government, which has pledged more than $1 billion in aid to that country since 2006. “I don’t really have an explanation for it,” Faraj said of the court proceedings. Marine prosecutors say Hassoun’s whereabouts were unknown for eight years. He was returned to the U.S. in 2014 after he contacted officials here. The 62 pages of translated documents say Hassoun was arrested in 2005 by Lebanese authorities after Interpol issued a bulletin triggered by his status as a deserter. The documents say Lebanese authorities released him but took his passport and prevented him from traveling. A document from the foreign affairs ministry lists theft

and desertion charges and refers to U.S. code of military justice. “The USA department of Navy asks the seizure of all documents and possessions that are with the escaped soldier,” states the March 2005 memo. Several memos include Lebanese officials discussing whether to allow extradition. Eventually, a Lebanese justice ministry document from 2006 states there is “no extradition approval.” “Lebanese court has the right to trial and judge him,” it says. A judgment from Lebanese military court dated in April 2013 states Hassoun was fined for theft of military tools. A Lebanese document months later indicates travel restrictions against him were lifted.

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014

A-9

Yahoo says gov’t threatened $250,000 a day fine By PETE YOST Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Yahoo said Thursday the government threatened to fine the company $250,000 a day if it did not comply with demands to go along with an expansion of U.S. surveillance by surrendering online information, a step the company regarded as unconstitutional. The outlines of Yahoo’s secret and ultimately unsuccessful court fight against government surveillance emerged when a federal judge ordered the unsealing of some material about Yahoo’s court challenge. In a statement, Yahoo said the government amended a law to demand user information from online services, prompting a challenge in 2007 during the George W. Bush administration. “Our challenge, and a later

appeal in the case, did not succeed,” Yahoo general counsel Ron Bell said in a statement. The new material about the case underscores “how we had to fight every step of the way to challenge the U.S. government’s surveillance efforts,” Bell added. “At one point, the U.S. government threatened the imposition of $250,000 in fines per day if we refused to comply.” Bell said the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court upheld the predecessor to Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act. Section 702 refers to the program called PRISM, which gave the government access to online communications by users of Yahoo. Former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden disclosed the program last year. Yahoo said it is committed to protecting users’ data and

that it will continue to contest requests and laws that it considers unlawful, unclear or overly broad. “We consider this an important win for transparency, and hope that these records help promote informed discussion about the relationship between privacy, due process and intelligence gathering,” said Bell. The newly released documents show that the Bush administration was taking a hard line and was miffed that Yahoo had even been allowed to get into court with its complaint. In sum, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court erred in permitting Yahoo to challenge the directives, said a court brief signed by then-U.S. Attorney General Michael Mukasey. Yahoo was arguing that what the Bush administration was doing violated the Fourth Amendment rights of custom-

ers of Yahoo. “The government has conducted warrantless foreign intelligence surveillance for decades, and such surveillance has been upheld under the Fourth Amendment by every appellate court to decide the question,” Mukasey wrote. “The government’s implementation of the Protect America Act is consistent with decades of past practice and adequately protects the privacy of U.S. persons,” said Mukasey. In its court papers, Yahoo urged that the government be reined in. Yahoo requested that the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court of Review reverse the lower court’s judgment and find that “the surveillance authorized by the directives is not ‘otherwise lawful,’” wrote Marc Zwillinger, a lawyer representing the Internet service provider.

AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File

This Oct. 17, 2012, photo, shows a sign in front of Yahoo! headquarters in Sunnyvale, Calif. Yahoo says the government threatened to fine the company $250,000 a day if it did not comply with demands to go along with an expansion of U.S. surveillance laws by surrendering online information, a step the company regarded as unconstitutional.

Retired General John Allen to coordinate Iraq and Syria effort By LOLITA C. BALDOR Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Retired Marine Gen. John Allen will coordinate the broad international effort to battle the Islamic State militants, as the campaign against the extremist group ramps up and nations begin to determine what role each will play, U.S. officials said Thursday. Allen, who has been serving as a security adviser to Secretary of State John Kerry, is expected to work with the nearly 40 nations around the world who have agreed to join the fight and help them coordinate

what each will contribute, several officials told The Associated Press. The officials spoke about Allen’s expected appointment on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the matter ahead of an announcement. Allen comes to the job with vast experience coordinating international allies on the warfront. He served as deputy commander in Iraq’s Anbar province from 2006 to 2008, working with Arab partners on organizing the Sunni uprising against al-Qaida. He moved from there to serve for two years as the deputy commander of U.S.

Central Command, which oversees military troops and operations in the Middle East, North Africa and Central Asia. Allen next became the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan from 2011 to 2013, where he worked with international allies who sent troops to the battlefield. As a result of his experience, Allen is very familiar many of the Middle East nations and leaders considered crucial to the latest effort to degrade and destroy the Islamic State group militants who have seized control of portions of Iraq and Syria in a ruthless reign of terror. He also has worked closely with

most of the key military and diplomatic leaders, including Gen. Lloyd Austin, the current head of U.S. Central Command, who will oversee America’s military campaign. President Barack Obama an-

Kids accidentally drink bleach mix

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JERSEY CITY, N.J. (AP) — More than two dozen children and two adults accidentally drank a mixture of bleach and water at a day care center Thursday and were briefly hospitalized. The Jersey City Fire Department told WABC-TV a substitute teacher’s aide at Growing

Tree Learning Center II in Jersey City was giving students water when she mistakenly used a bottle that had water and a little bleach in it. A spokesman for Jersey City Medical Center-Barnabas Health said the hospital received a call a few minutes before 11 a.m. Several ambulances

were sent, and other emergency crews also responded. “Somebody made a mistake and they were trying to give the children water but then they realized it was mixed with bleach,” JCMC dispatcher Barbara Allen, who took the 911 call, told the Jersey Journal.

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nounced Wednesday night that the U.S. will be expanding airstrikes in Iraq and into Syria, in an aggressive move to root out the Islamic State group extremists where ever they are. Obama, Kerry and Defense Secretary

Chuck Hagel have spent the last week meeting with international leaders overseas in an effort to build a broad coalition of nations — particularly Arab countries in the region — to aid the fight.


A-10 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014

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Religion

Where is that WORD you’ve been looking for?

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have been stuck searching for a word. No, I am not playing Scrabble or Words with Friends. This word offers much more than points or bragging rights. It is often elusive, and when it is realized I have found this word to be my anchor in the roughest storms of life. This word is HOPE. People truly thrive when they have hope and hope is the beginning of everything. The Bible brings the message of hope to a world that is broken and hope is the one thing that can change everything. Hope is a prominent theme in the Bible as 1 Corinthians 13:13 says, “And now

Voices of R eligion Frank A lioto these three remain: faith, hope, and love…” Often we hear messages about faith and we are called to live love, but unleashing hope in one’s life can be the difference between a situation destroying your future and a situation galvanizing your potential. God values hope as it is in the list of the top three human essentials. In the book, “The Hope Quotient,”

Church Briefs New Life Assembly hosts Beth Moore simulcast This Saturday, New Life Assembly is a host location for the live simulcast of Bible teacher and best-selling author Beth Moore. This event featuring her dynamic storytelling and passionate Bible teaching challenges and encourages women to grow deeply in their faith. Tickets are $20 and include simulcast fees and workbook, beverages and door prizes. Lunch will be available from several local food trucks on-site or you are welcome to bring your own lunch to enjoy. The event is from 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. at New Life Assembly, 209 Princess Street in Kenai. Call 283-7752 to reserve tickets.

author Ray Johnston explores why thriving people soar. Here is how he sums up the book: “thriving people commit to things that produce inner strength and hope.” We all have things in our lives that can make us sink. Sometimes we can even tend to stay sunk in discouragement and hope becomes a distant, fleeting fantasy or dream. Hope is not an unreliable sensation, wishful thinking, or even an unnecessary luxury. Hope is what gives you a picture for the future. Johnston explains “when hope is thriving, eleven things are unleashed in your life: You have more satisfying relationships. You’re

more productive. You’re less affected by stress. You’re more successful. You’re more satisfied. You’re more compassionate. You’re more willing to help people in need. You’re physically healthier. You hold yourself to higher standards. You’re more likely to assume leadership. You’re more likely to see God as loving, caring, and forgiving.” Doesn’t that make you want to live into that kind of hope? The invitation of the Bible is to develop hope and that hope is rooted in a relationship with God. God offers that invitation when he says,” I am the Lord; those who hope in me will not be disap-

at the Nikiski New Hope Christian Fellowship, Mile 23 North Road. All are welcome to attend. Aglow International is founded on prayer and compassionate outreach. It is global in ministry vision, yet rooted in small groups. Beginning Sept. 20, Nikiski Aglow will host the DVD teaching of Graham Cooke with “Game Changers.” The five themes are: 1.How you are known in heaven; 2.Establishing your internal overcomer; 3.Mind of Christ; 4.Reinventing your walk in the fruit of the Spirit; 5. Law of the Spirit of Life in Christ. For information call Bev at 776-8022 or 398-7311 or Paulette at 252-7372.

Youth group plans peony root fundraiser

pointed” (Isaiah 49:23). Have you found that HOPE? It can be the best word you will ever find as it can radically change your relationships, your marriage, your kids, your career, your church, your community, and the world. Frank Alioto is the pastor of The River Covenant Church: “An Alaskan church for people who would rather go to the River.” We gather on Sundays to explore the Unleashing Hope series on 9/28, 10:30 a.m. at K-Beach Elementary in Soldotna. Call 252-2828 or visit www.therivercovenantchurch.org.

who come. Please, no scary or inappropriate costumes. More information can be found at www.peninsulagrace.org or by calling 907-262-6442.

Food Pantry open weekly The Soldotna Food Pantry is open every Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. for residents in our community who may be experiencing food shortages. The Food Pantry is located at the Soldotna United Methodist Church at 158 South Binkley Street. Non-perishable food items or monetary donations may be dropped off at the church Tuesdays 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. or 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. and Sundays 9 a.m. to 12 noon. Thank you for your support.

The North Kenai Chapel Youth Group will be selling very nice Peony Roots this Saturday at the corner of the Spur Highway and the Main Street Loop in Kenai on Saturday from 10 United Methodist Church provides food pantry Take-a-Break hosts a.m.-3 p.m., directly across from the Saturday Market at the The Kenai United Methodist Church provides a food pantry Kenai Visitors Center. The youth group will use this money to for those in need every Monday from noon to 3 p.m. speaker training workshop attend the Fall 2014 Alaska Youth Conference in October. These The Methodist Church is located on the Kenai Spur Highway Have you ever wanted to share your story? Peninsula Take- roots usually sell for $25-$35 per root, they will be available at next to the Boys and Girls Club. The entrance to the Food Pana-Break will have a speaker training workshop Sept. 17 from the promotional offer of $15 per root. You will be able to plant try is through the side door. The Pantry closes for holidays. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. with a one hour break for lunch. This training them this fall. For more information contact the church office at 283-7868 is to be held at Soldotna Bible Chapel, corner of Marydale and or email kumcalaska@gmail.com. Kobuk in Soldotna. If you have an inspirational story of what Jesus has done in your life but don’t know how to organize it, Join Sterling Pentecostal for Kid’s Day Clothes 4 U at First Baptist Church learn the basics of creating and presenting your testimony with Sterling Pentecostal Church has scheduled a Kid’s Day training by Stonecroft Ministries staff. First Baptist Church Soldotna, located at 159 S. Binkley on Sept. 21. The 11:00 a.m. service will focus on kids with For further information and reservations, call Linda at 262- activities, songs, prizes, and message. Following the service Street, is re-opening its Clothes 4 U program. 4996. It is open on the second and fourth Saturday of each month a meal will be provided to all families and friends who come. from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. All clothing and shoes are free to the pubDoor prizes will be drawn at that time. Our Lady of the Angels For more information, call 262-7240 or visit sterlingpen- lic. tecostalchurch.com. changes Saturday mass time Our Lady of the Angels Catholic Church in Kenai will be Grace Brethren plans Harvest Carnival changing Saturday mass time to 5:30 p.m. beginning Saturday. Reconciliation will be Saturdays from 4:45-5:15 p.m. Sunday Peninsula Grace Brethren Church on K-Beach Road is mass time of 10:30 a.m. will not change. Any questions, please pleased to announce their fourth annual Kids Harvest Carnicall the parish office at 283-4555. val. It will be held on October 29 from 6:30-8 p.m. The car nival features games, candy, hot dogs, temporary tattoos, a costume contest, and a puppet show. Awards for the costume Nikiski Aglow to begin Bible study contest will be given at 7:40 p.m. followed by a puppet show. Nikiski Aglow meets each Saturday morning from 9-11 a.m. Admittance is free. Supplies are limited to the first 150 kids

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Clothes Quarters open weekly

Clothes Quarters at Our Lady of the Angels Church is open every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., and the first Saturday of every month from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, call 907-283-4555. Submit church announcements to news@peninsulaclarion. com.

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014

Court reports The following judgments were recently handed down in Kenai District Court: n Bryon Travis Hester, 20, of Anchorage, pleaded guilty to possession, control or consumption of alcohol by person under age 21, first offense, committed July 26. He was fined $600 with $400 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment and placed on probation for one year. n Paul M. Larson, 38, address unknown, pleaded guilty to one count of first-degree unlawful contact, committed Nov. 6, 2012. He was sentenced to 60 days in jail and fined a $50 court surcharge and a $50 jail surcharge. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Robert E. Mahan, 37, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to driving under the influence, committed July 1, 2013. He was sentenced to 120 days in jail with 100 days suspended, fined $4,000 with $1,000 suspended, a $75 court surcharge, $1,467 cost of imprisonment and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, had his license revoked for one year, ordered ignition interlock for 12 months and placed on probation for two years. n Daniel A. Osorio, 26, of Anchorage, pleaded guilty to an amended charge of no valid operator’s license, committed June 20. He was fined $500 and a $50 court surcharge. The following judgments were recently handed down in Superior Court in Kenai:

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munity activity that involves unsupervised contact with minors under the age of 18, not to knowingly have any inperson contact with a person under 18 years of age unless in the immediate presence of another adult who knows the circumstances of his crime and unless he receives written approval from the probation/ parole officer and treatment provider, not to reside where a person under the age of 18 is residing or staying, without the prior written approval of probation/parole officer and treatment provider, to advise all members of the household in which he is residing of his criminal history, not to possess sexually explicit materials per statute, not to enter public places where children gather, such as playgrounds, parks, schools and swimming pools, without the express written permission of the probation officer, not to participate in chat rooms, dating websites or any social media forums such as Facebook or MySpace, to complete a mental health assessment, and was placed on probation for 15 years after serving any term of incarceration imposed. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Amber M. Gilstrap, 26, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to attempted third-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance, committed March 6, 3013. She was sentenced to five years in prison with three years suspended, fined $5,0000, a $100 court surcharge and a $200 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, forfeited all items seized, ordered, among other conditions

of probation, not to use or possess any alcoholic beverages to excess or illegal controlled substances, including synthetic drugs and marijuana, not to possess, apply for or obtain a medical marijuana card or act as a caregiver while under supervision, to complete a substance abuse evaluation and comply with treatment recommendations, to have no contact with co-defendant without written permission from probation officer, to submit to search directed by a probation officer, with or without probable cause, for the presence of controlled substances, drug paraphernalia, evidence of controlled substance transactions or stolen property and was placed on probation for seven years after serving any term of incarceration imposed. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Glenn Thompson, 25, of Sterling, pleaded guilty to one count of second-degree theft, committed Jan. 28. He was sentenced to 60 months in prison with 47 months suspended and credit for time already served, fined a $100 court surcharge and a $200 jail surcharge, ordered to pay restitution, forfeited items seized, ordered, among other conditions of probation, to submit to search directed by a probation officer, with or without probable cause, for the presence of controlled substances or substance use and evidence of thievery such as unexplained cash receipts of transactions, and property that appears stolen or beyond his means, ordered to complete a substance abuse evaluation and comply with

treatment recommendations, ordered not to trespass on the premises of Kenai Safeway, Kenai Walmart and Kenai Home Depot and not to have any contact with a specifically named person, ordered to pay cost of appointed counsel, and placed on probation for three years after serving any term of incarceration imposed. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Vincent Beaver, 51, address unknown, pleaded guilty to failure to register as a sex offender, committed Sept. 21, 2013. He was sentenced to four years in prison with credit for time already served in this case, fined a $100 court surcharge and a $100 jail surcharge and ordered to pay cost of appointed counsel. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Amber M. Gilstrap, 26, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to one count of third-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance, committed July 26, 2012. She was sentenced to 10 years in prison with six years suspended, with credit for time already served in this case, fined $5,000, a $100 court surcharge and a $200 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, forfeited items seized, including items seized in the dismissed and uncharged cases, not including identity cards, ordered, among other conditions of probation, not to use or possess alcoholic beverages to excess or illegal controlled substances, including synthetic drugs and marijuana, not to possess, apply for or obtain a medical marijuana card or act as a caregiver while under supervision, to complete

n Justin Earl Taylor, 40, currently of Wildwood Correctional Facility, pleaded guilty to one count of first-degree sexual abuse of a minor, committed Sept. 1, 2006. He was sentenced to 42.5 years in prison with 12.5 years suspended, is credited for time already served, was fined a $100 court surcharge and a $200 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to comply with DNA Registration System requirements and to register as a sex offender and maintain registration for life, ordered, among other conditions or probation, not to consume alcohol at all, to have no contact with victim or victim’s immediate family without their written consent and the consent of probation office and/or sex offender treatment provider, while in and out of custody, to successfully complete a sex offender program, not to accept employment or engage in any volunteer com-

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a substance abuse evaluation and comply with treatment recommendations, to have no contact with co-defendant in this case without written permission from the probation officer, to be employed, actively seeking employment or actively engaged in school or vocational training while on probation, to submit to search directed by a probation officer for the presence of controlled substances, drug paraphernalia, evidence of controlled substance transactions or stolen property and was placed on probation for seven years after serving any term of incarceration imposed. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Scott Michael Jezorski, 23, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to third-degree misconduct involving weapons, committed April 4. Imposition of sentence was suspended and he was placed on probation for three years, fined a $100 court surcharge and a $200 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered, among other conditions of probation, to serve 100 days in prison, not to use or possess any alcoholic beverages or illegal controlled substances, including marijuana or synthetic drugs, to complete a substance abuse evaluation and comply with treatment recommendations, to submit to search at the direction of a probation officer, with or without probable, cause, for the presence of alcohol, controlled substances, drug paraphernalia, prohibited weapons, including but not limited to body armor, ammunition and firearms, not to use, possess, purchase, consume

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or ingest any product, preparation, mixture or substance, and not to possess any device intended to conceal alcohol or controlled substances use or to subvert a bodily fluid testing process. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Dylan Ely, 22, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to fourthdegree misconduct involving a controlled substance, committed Aug. 7, 2013. Imposition of sentence was suspended and he was placed on probation for three years, fined a $100 court surcharge and a $200 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, and ordered, among other conditions of probation, not to consume alcohol to excess, not to use or possess any product, preparation, mixture or substance, not to possess any device intended to conceal alcohol or controlled substance use or to subvert a bodily fluid testing process, not to use or possess any illegal controlled substances, including marijuana or synthetic drugs, not to associate with individuals who use or sell illegal controlled substances nor enter or remain in places where illegal controlled substances are used, manufactured, grown or sold, to submit to search directed by a probation officer, with or without probable cause, for the presence of stolen property, to complete a substance abuse evaluation and comply with treatment recommendations, to have no contact with victims in this case and not to enter any pawn shop for any purpose without prior approval from a probation officer. All other charges in this case were dismissed.


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A-12 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014

. . . Film

. . . 9/11

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the food they need but also help them figure out what’s a menu, help them develop that skill.” Graves and CPH Behavior Health Director Dr. Kristie Sellers said they hoped the documentary would change the way people think about their friends, neighbors and people in the community who are addicted to drugs or alcohol. Barriers to long-term recovery are different in every community. On the Kenai Peninsula, Graves said, one of the impediments to recovery can be the lack of public transportation. The logistics of traveling between communities to get to doctor’s appointments, treatment or work — especially without a valid driver’s license — can be daunting. More than 80% of the people admitted to Serenity House are either alcoholics or abuse alcohol to the extent that it is a significant factor in their problems, Sellers said, so the number of people who have broken state law and lost their driving privileges is high. “I think there’s a piece of all of us that says, ‘you got a DUI, I don’t really care that you have to pay a little bit of your salary and do without a few things to pay for your taxi.’ I mean, we all have a little bit of that, but what we don’t realize is that the taxi ride is well over $100 to get from Nikiski to (Soldotna),” Sellers said. “So while I’m totally fine with the person that has a DUI having some life consequences because of that, what happens here is that those life consequences are so large that they become a barrier to any kind of productive future activity.” Both Sellers and Graves said they hoped people would attend the screening and learn to

announcement of his plans to “degrade and ultimately destroy” the militants, coming on the eve of the anniversary, sparked mixed feelings among 9/11 victims’ relatives. Some saw it as a sign of determination, others as bad timing. “We’re all walking out the door today with tragic and sad and scary memories on us. ... It’s an invitation to fight on a day where we lost,” said Ellen Mora, who lost her cousin, Robert Higley. But she noted that her mother felt differently, seeing the speech as “us standing tall on the anniversary.” So did Tom Langer, who lost his pregnant sister-in-law, Vanessa Langer. “Thirteen years later, it feels like the world is still paying attention,” he said. Still others lamented that the U.S. was still battling terrorists 13 years after the attacks. “We’re fighting for nothing. We lost so many already, and we will lose so many more,” said Gary Lanham, whose father, Michael Lowe, died at the World Trade Center. While little about the annual ceremony at ground zero has changed, much around it has.

. . . Osmar Continued from page A-1

Guard ended their participation in the search on Thursday. According to a troopers dispatch, family members of Osmar told troopers they found his truck on the beach near his family’s fish camp near South Coho Highway at about 4:30 p.m. Tuesday. Troopers believe he went kayaking sometime between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. that day, according to the report. Osmar’s father, Dean Osmar, 1984 Iditarod champion, told the Coast Guard that his son’s life jacket was still at home and he did not believe he took any survival gear. News of Osmar’s disappearance has been difficult for the family to digest. Tim Osmar, the missing

Clarion file photo

Kelsey Cusack, volunteer Yoga teacher at the Serenity House treatment center, stands near a wall of handprints made by previous graduates of the substance abuse program. The organization is screening a documentary about addiction on Sunday

support addiction recovery in the same way that other types of diseases are socially supported. “If we have a rally for breast cancer, think about the number of people that show up to support breast cancer,” Sellers said. “I think that’s a mazing, but more people suffer from addiction than suffer from breast cancer. It’s amazing to me for a couple of reasons, one that we’ve put so much stigma on it that people would come out and rally for addiction and two that the whole thing that’s happened around breast cancer shows me that, as a society, when we put our hearts and minds together, we can make a change and if we can do it with breast cancer — why can’t we do it for addiction?”

man’s brother, said Leif was a free spirit who enjoyed adventurous activities like kayaking in the Cook Inlet. He said his brother was an experienced kayaker, but it still drove the family crazy how he would put himself at risk. “It was not unlike him to disappear into the woods for a couple days,” Tim Osmar said. “I never wanted to go in a kayak out (in Cook Inlet). He liked to live on the edge, and sometimes you fall off the edge.” Leif Osmar has two beagle puppies he took everywhere with him, Tim Osmar said. He could only speculate that maybe one of them might have fallen into the water and maybe his brother tried to save them and capsized. After searching for his brother Wednesday, Tim Osmar said he got sick of looking at the Inlet and got away to Wis-

consin to reflect on life and the memory of his brother. He said the chance of finding him alive after three days is slim. “We grew up together (in Kasilof) and fished every day in those waters,” he said. “The Inlet is really big and one wrong turn and it’s all over.” Honings said the search would remain suspended unless the coast guard receives any new developments. Tim Osmar said accidents could happen at any time, which goes to show how precious life is. “We are only here for a short period of time,” he said. “(Leif) was really smart. He was different in many ways, but one of a kind. I am going to remember him forever.” Reach Dan Balmer at daniel. balmer@peninsulaclarion.com

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. . . Prop. 1 Continued from page A-1

“As a whole it’s very informative and it does a good job illustrating the nuances of the issue,” member Keith Baxter said. Mayor Nels Anderson said he felt the document was dry

When the underground National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum opened this spring, fences around the memorial plaza above it came down, making it more easily accessible to visitors and passers-through. On Thursday evening, crowds of people gathered around the reflecting pools, where the names of the dead are etched. Some took photos of the buildings, including an almost finished One World Trade Center. Diane Hartel of Chicago, in the city on a business trip, said the plaza being open to the public “lets other people share in what has happened here.” Bronx resident Craig Bunnell, 23, who said he attends college in the area, thought it was important that he be there. “I figured of all days, I should stop by and pay respects,” he said. Still, “coming down to the area is rough,” said Franklin Murray, who wore a shirt with a photo of his slain brother, Harry Glenn, to Thursday’s ceremony. Some victims’ family members view the growing sense of normalcy around ground zero as a sign of healing. “I want to see it bustling,” said Debra Burlingame, whose brother Charles Burlingame was the pilot of the hijacked

plane that crashed into the Pentagon. Others said they fear the tragedy that took place in the neighborhood is being forgotten. “Instead of a quiet place of reflection, it’s where kids are running around,” said Nancy Nee, who lost her firefighter brother, George Cain. “Some people forget this is a cemetery. I would never go to the Holocaust museum and take a selfie.” Around the country, observances were held in such places as Morrison, Colorado, where hundreds of people walked the equivalent of the twin towers’ 110 stories by going up and down stairs at the Red Rocks Amphitheatre, and Point Lookout, New York, where two 18foot, sand-covered towers were crafted in remembrance. In New York City, some relatives who read the long list of names touched on the attacks’ legacy. In one family, two boys are named for an uncle they never met, financial worker Michael Wittenstein. In another family, 17-year-old Jordan Thompson joined the Marines in memory of his uncle, Leon Bernard Heyward, a city consumer affairs worker. “In your honor,” Thompson said, “I have decided to serve our country.”

and not very readable, and wanted to reiterate that the purpose of change would be to encourage more eligible candidates to apply for local government positions. The number of applicants for local commissions and those looking to involve themselves in the public process has diminished, Dixson said in a previous Clarion interview. He attributes

this to the overwhelming availability of financial records. “Quite frankly I think it has a chilling effect on people wanting to get involved,” Dixson said in a previous Clarion interview. “It can have a detrimental effect on those people who do get involved.” Kelly Sullivan can be reached at kelly.sullivan@peninsulaclarion.com

No devices found after bomb threat ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Anchorage police say two courthouses have been cleared of any possible threat following a bomb threat early Thursday afternoon. Police spokeswoman Jennifer Castro says authorities received a report of a bomb threat at the Nesbett Courthouse downtown around 1:15 p.m. The building was evacuated. She says the Boney (bon-NEE’) Court-

house also was evacuated as a precautionary measure. Some streets were closed. Castro says no devices were found in either building and both were cleared shortly after 3 p.m. She says the investigation continues into determining who made the threat. C

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Prep football coaches issue midterm grades By JOEY KLECKA Peninsula Clarion

The prep football season reached its midpoint this week, with four games down and four to go for teams across the state. Although the academic year is still in its early stages, the midterm report cards have come out for football teams. So where does each team stand among its rivals? Wasilla (2-2) at Kenai (2-2), 6 p.m. Friday Kenai coach John Marquez said he would grade his team at a “solid B.” “That’s just being honest to my kids and what I see on film,” Marquez said.

“We’ve come from a high ‘D’ status on execution, to now being a solid ‘B’ due to practice.” After an 0-2 start to the year, the Kardinals have gotten back on track with wins over Kodiak and Palmer, the latter being the first of a twogame series with large-school Railbelt Conference teams. Tonight’s matchup with the Warriors may be the bigger of the two challenges from the Railbelt. “Wasilla is a very good team, as good or better than Palmer,” Marquez said. “Athletewise, they’re about the same as Palmer, if their running back gets outside (of the defensive formation), they can take it to the house. “But I think Wasilla is executing better, and that can be tough. We need

to do our jobs.” Palmer’s biggest threat was senior Chase Ferris, who ran for 130 yards against Kenai. However, the Kards did better, as senior Chase Logan had 292 yards on 29 carries. Logan has 674 overall rushing yards in 2014, tops among Peninsula athletes. Wasilla amassed 343 rushing yards in a 49-25 win last week against West Valley in Fairbanks, and running back Devin Otto led the way with 220 yards and four touchdowns. If Kenai can key in on Otto and leave him to the fearsome Kardinal defensive line, another win is in the cards. “It’s the little things we need to do,” Marquez said. “The biggest thing is sticking together through adversity. Every game we’ve had adversity and

the last two games we’ve learned how to deal with it.” Marquez said Wasilla likes to run a wing-T trap option style offense, which means there could be one of three backfield players with the ball on any given play. Kenai will have its hands full. “We’ve got to come out and play four quarters, like we did the first, third and fourth quarters against Palmer,” Marquez said. “They’ve got big guys, speed, but if we do our jobs and execute, it’ll be fun. It’ll be a dogfight.” Tonight’s game will also be the last for Kenai until Sept. 27, since all Northern Lights Conference teams get a bye week due to Houston dropping out of the conference.

Soldotna (3-0) at Kodiak (1-3), 2 p.m. Saturday After sitting out on a rare bye week, Soldotna gets back to action Saturday afternoon with its first conference game of the year in Kodiak. SoHi coach Galen Brantley Jr. says after three dominating wins to start the year, he would give his team a “C+.” “We’ve not progressed from an execution standpoint,” Brantley Jr. said. “We still have some silly errors, but we spent a lot of this time off polishing those up.” The last bye week that the Stars had was 2008, when Juneau-Douglas — still a large-schools opponent — canSee PREP, page B-3

Ravens cruise past Steelers DAVID GINSBURG AP Sports Writer

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion

The Kenai River Brown Bears practice Thursday at the Soldotna Regional Sports Complex in advance of their seasonopening game, which will be today at 7:30 p.m. at the sports complex against the Fairbanks Ice Dogs. C

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Bears seek playoff series win Kenai River opens season tonight with eye on taking next step as an organization By JEFF HELMINIAK Peninsula Clarion

As the Kenai River Brown Bears enter their eighth season today with a 7:30 p.m. tilt with the Fairbanks Ice Dogs at the Soldotna Regional Sports Complex, the coaching staff has used the process of elimination to come up with the major goal for the campaign. “We need to advance past the first-round hurdle we haven’t been able to overcome,” said head coach Geoff Beauparlant, who enters his second season at the helm. “As a staff, we’ve set that as a bare minimum.” Beauparlant pointed out that there are not many other firsts for the franchise to achieve. Put a player in the NHL? Check. Andrej Sustr of the Tampa Bay Lightning. Have a Brown Bears player be the MVP of the North American Hockey League? Alec Butcher pulled it off last season, the same season the Bears also went 4-0 at the NAHL Showcase for the first time. Become a regular presence in the playoffs? The Bears have made the postseason the past six years, and since finishing at least

BALTIMORE — The dismissal of Ray Rice wasn’t a distraction for the Baltimore Ravens. Ultimately, it served as inspiration. Playing a pivotal divisional game three days after the release of the star running back, Baltimore got a pair of touchdown passes from Joe Flacco and rolled past the rival Pittsburgh Steelers 26-6 on Thursday night. Rice was reaching the end of a two-game suspension for domestic violence when a video of him striking his then-fiancee surfaced Monday. By the end of the day, the three-time Pro Bowler had been cut by Baltimore and suspended indefinitely by the NFL. “We had a tough family situation this week,” coach John Harbaugh said. “I thought our guys handled it tremendously

— with class, with character. They responded.” Coming off a season-opening loss to AFC North foe Cincinnati, the Ravens (1-1) held Pittsburgh to two field goals and forced three turnovers. “We was all about getting the win. We wanted to kind of give that to Ray,” rookie linebacker C.J. Mosley said. “We all wish the best for him. Even though he messed up, every man got to go through their mistakes to get better. We wish him the best, but as a team we’ve just got to keep moving forward.” Bernard Pierce took over for Rice to gain 96 yards on 22 carries as part of a ground game that finished with 157 yards. Flacco went 21 for 29 for 166 yards and two TD throws to tight end Owen Daniels, and Justin Tucker kicked four field goals. Asked if he was curious how the team would fare after the tumultuous short work week, See NFL, Page B-4

Pistorius avoids murder verdict Judge could still convict Olympian of negligent killing GERALD IMRAY Associated Press

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion

Manfred Ehlers, 18, works during a drill with the Kenai River Brown Bears on Thursday at the Soldotna Regional Sports Complex in Soldotna.

22 games under .500 in the franchise’s first three years, Kenai River has been above .500 for the past four. Move players to college hockey and the Tier I United States Hockey League? Last season, three current or former Bears got Division I scholarships. Five Kenai River players from last year are with USHL clubs, and five more will play Division III hockey. Win a playoff game? The Bears won their first playoff

game in 2013, eventually losing in five games to the Ice Dogs. Kenai River also was a five-game victim of the Fairbanks march to the Roberston Cup title last season, losing the fifth game in overtime. “We’ve pushed as far as we can push the last couple of years without winning a series,” Beauparlant said. “It’s time to take the next step.” If the Bears are going to take that next step, they must do it with a team that features

just five returners. But the three returners interviewed for this story, Tyler Andrews, Matt Rudin and Zach Quinn, all said the team is deeper and more talented than last season. Moving players on to the next level means less returners, but it also means Kenai River is more attractive to talent. “This organization moves guys on and that’s good for incoming players, players on the See BEARS, page B-4

PRETORIA, South Africa — During his trial, Oscar Pistorius sometimes retched and sobbed. The double-amputee Olympian sobbed again on Thursday, this time in apparent relief as a judge said the evidence did not support a murder conviction for killing girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp. The judge could still convict Pistorius of a negligent killing — a crime that can carry a lengthy jail term or just a suspended sentence and fine — when she likely finishes reading her lengthy conclusions in court on Friday. Some legal analysts were surprised, saying the runner could at least have been convicted of a lesser murder charge, rather than the premeditated murder charge leveled by the state. The Pretoria courtroom was packed for the ruling in the case against 27-year-old Pistorius, once a globally ad-

mired celebrity who competed against able-bodied athletes at the 2012 Olympics in London. His brother, Carl, was there in a wheelchair because of injuries suffered in a recent car crash. So were Steenkamp’s parents, June and Barry. Steenkamp, a 29-year-old model, had been seeing the star athlete for only a few months before he killed her by shooting four times through a closed toilet door in his home in the pre-dawn hours of Valentine’s Day last year. Pistorius said he thought an intruder was in the toilet and about to attack him; the prosecution said he intentionally killed her after an argument. Judge Thokozile Masipa, wearing a red robe, unveiled her analysis of the case after saying little throughout the sensational six-month trial as lawyers argued and witnesses testified about the shocking killing. South Africa does not have a jury system, and judges See TRIAL, Page B-3

As Cold Weather Classic looms, columnist roots for November golf

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here’s just one tournament left on the 2014 calendar. Sad! The Cold Weather Classic is set for Sept. 20. The two-person event pairs a man and woman in an epic golf showdown to determine who will be crowned “Ice Queen and Servant” for the year. OK, I totally made that up, The Cold Weather Classic actually a fun golf event. No one is harmed during the course of play, I promise. You can join the fun by signing up to participate at the golf course and then arriving for your scheduled tee time on the 20th. It’s that simple. Who said golf was hard?! Be there or be square!

Despite the increasingly depressing weather the golf course will remain open for as long as possible. There is no set closing date. I’m rooting for November! Don’t laugh. It’s happened before! Old Folks Golf Nine brave warriors of golf ventured out to battle the elements and themselves for the final time Monday morning. Sid Cox won the hearts of many women with a daring 31 net. Sid’s score bested Pat McElroy by a single swing of the golf club. Earl “The Pearl” Matthis hit a groovy shot at the sixth for closest-to recognition. Tom “The Lovable Lefty”

turns throwing darts at the pins. Startling indeed. Georgia Bentley was the irch idge mystery golfer. What does that mean? It’s a mystery. olf eport Thursday Night Couples The couples’ poor luck with N olan Rose weather continued as yet another Hodel rolled in the longest putt at the Couples Night was rained out. Next Thursday will be the final Couples finishing hole. Steve Hammarstrom Night of the year! participated. Non-Golf Joke of the Week Tuesday Morning Ladies League Three old Alaska homesteaders Chiya Bazan, Beth Roseberry, Sally Tachick and Cheryl Hammarstrom were sitting around a blazing campfire exchanging tall tales about how crushed the other women and let them know about it with a resounding tough they once were. “I was hiking through some performance Tuesday morning. It was willows,” began the first old-timer, like a fireworks display as each took

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“when 10-foot-tall bull moose with a 90-inch rack stormed out of a thicket and charged me. I grabbed him by the antlers and wrestled him to the ground and beat him senseless.” “That’s nothing,” said the second. “I was fishing in the Yukon River when a 2,000-pound grizzly bear came after me and my catch. I ducked as he swiped at me, jumped on his back, and strangled him with my bare hands.” They both turned to their friend, the oldest of the group, waiting for his story. Still he said nothing — he just sat there stirring the coals with his bare hand.


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B-2 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014

Kirk, Horschel share Tour lead DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer

ATLANTA — Chris Kirk and Billy Horschel have little in common except a clean card of 4-under 66 at the Tour Championship and their chances at the biggest payoff in golf. Kirk and Horschel, the top two seeds going into the FedEx Cup finale at East Lake, played in the final group and traded birdies — neither of them made a bo-

gey — over four hours in steamy weather to share the lead. They need only to win the Tour Championship to claim the FedEx Cup and its $10 million bonus. “Billy has obviously been playing some pretty incredible golf with winning last week and finishing second the week before,” Kirk said. “And I’ve been doing all right myself.” Kirk is a 29-year-old who went to Georgia and plays golf

without a pulse. Even when he chipped in from 80 feet on the 17th hole, he simply smiled and bowed his head before slapping hands with his caddie. Horschel is a 27-year-old who went to Florida, brash enough to wear octopus prints on his pants in the final round at a U.S. Open, to flip his cap around backward and to pump his fist for routine pars. They grew up playing amateur golf against each other. They

were teammates in the Walker Cup. And they are leading the race to the FedEx Cup. “We’re probably two completely opposite people in the sense that he just looks like he’s moving very slow and nothing affects him,” Horschel said. “I look like I’m running around the golf course — literally last Sunday. But Chris and I get along very well. We seem to always play well when we’re paired together.”

Earnhardt Jr. has a big chance

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ale Earnhardt Jr. turns 40 in a month, and much of his adult life is still a blur. It’s just one more reminder there isn’t much time for reflection inside a race car. “I’ve always wondered what happens to a person as they age, physically and mentally, that changes their performance,” Earnhardt said. “Mark Martin, into his 50s, was still as quick as Day 1. Harry Gant, guys like that ... there’s something inside, a passion to do the details, the extra work. I’ve often wanted to talk to other drivers about what the experience is like. “It would be cool,” he added, “to have that kind of conversation someday.” But Thursday was not that time. Instead, Earnhardt flitted from interview to interview as part of a whirlwind launch for NASCAR’s playoff series, which is loosely modeled on the NCAA’s basketball tourney — including a bracket — and begins Sunday at Chicagoland Speedway. Most of the questions, not surprisingly, were some variation of whether this would be the year Earnhardt finally breaks through and claims the Sprint Cup championship that plenty of people once assumed was his birthright. Junior inherited plenty from the old man: fast reflexes, fear-

heavy weight for me personally,” is how he put it — to be in ports iews contention at the end. Now that he’s here, it’s begun ratcheting up again. “I’ve been reading all year J im L itke long, ‘This is your year,’” he said, glancing down at his lessness and the biggest tribe phone. “I can definitely sense in NASCAR. But along with the urgency.” those came outsized expectaEarnhardt also knows good tions and, so far, too little of counsel is easier to come by the staying power Dale Sr. showed while plowing his way these days than it was when he first joined Hendrick Motorto a record-tying seven series sports. Teammates Jimmie titles. Junior had plenty of success early but basically fell Johnson, a six-time champion, and Jeff Gordon, who’s won off the grid in 2005. His three wins this year, beginning with four, had already carved out sizeable pieces of turf. Earnthe season-opening Daytona hardt is close in age to his 500, are only one fewer than friendly rivals, if not quite in he totaled the previous nine accomplishments, and after combined. his rocky start in the Hendrick There’s no denying NASCAR is a different place when garage, he usually names those two as models for any young Earnhardt is relevant. CEO driver to emulate. Brian France once compared Johnson, 38, acknowledged him to the Los Angeles Lakers, because he’s one of the few guys Thursday that he, too, finds on the circuit who can move the himself in quiet moments wondering how long a driver TV ratings needle by himself. can stay at the top of his game. There are more than a few Asked what quality he worries theories circulating about what sparked this latest resurgence — most about losing, he didn’t maturity has become a recurring hesitate. “Bravery,” Johnson said. theme — but Earnhardt argues it was simply his win in the opener “Then probably commitment. We’re lucky in the sense that at Daytona. That amounted to automatic our bodies don’t pile up the same kind of wear and tear that qualification for the playoffs, athletes do in other sports. ... easing what had been the But somewhere in the back of season-long pressure — “a

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your mind, you know the window won’t stay open forever.” Gordon, who’s also won three times this season and is enjoying a late career resurgence of his own, thought seriously about retiring eight years ago because of a bad back. Now 43, he regrets even broaching the topic. “If somebody had asked me to pick the ... age where your body and your experience as a driver peak, I probably would have said 35,” Gordon recalled. “But because we’re dealing with a machine in our sport, being adaptable, being willing to learn plays at least as big a role as any in how long you can be competitive.” The last thing Earnhardt wants to do is get caught looking too far ahead or behind. Where he is at the moment feels like the sweet spot. “I’m running great. I feel like I’m as competitive as ever,” he said. “I’m not too concerned about it right now. “But there will come a day,” he added, “when you’ve got to make some pretty serious decisions about what you want to do.” Jim Litke is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at jlitke@ap.org and follow him at Twitter.com/JimLitke.

Scoreboard Baseball AL Standings

East Division W Baltimore 86 Toronto 76 New York 75 Tampa Bay 70 Boston 64 Central Division Kansas City 80 Detroit 80 Cleveland 76 Chicago 66 Minnesota 62 West Division Los Angeles 91 Oakland 81 Seattle 79 Houston 65 Texas 54

L 59 69 69 77 83

Pct GB .593 — .524 10 .521 10½ .476 17 .435 23

65 66 69 80 84

.552 — .548 ½ .524 4 .452 14½ .425 18½

55 65 66 81 92

.623 — .555 10 .545 11½ .445 26 .370 37

Thursday’s Games Cleveland 8, Minnesota 2, 1st game Chicago White Sox 1, Oakland 0 Cleveland 2, Minnesota 0, 2nd game N.Y. Yankees 5, Tampa Bay 4 L.A. Angels 7, Texas 3 Boston 6, Kansas City 3 Friday’s Games N.Y. Yankees (McCarthy 6-4) at Baltimore (Gausman 7-7), 9:05 a.m., 1st game N.Y. Yankees (Mitchell 0-0) at Baltimore (B.Norris 12-8), 3:05 p.m., 2nd game Tampa Bay (Karns 0-0) at Toronto (Happ 9-9), 3:07 p.m. Cleveland (Carrasco 7-4) at Detroit (D.Price 13-11), 3:08 p.m. Atlanta (A.Wood 10-10) at Texas (D.Holland 1-0), 4:05 p.m. Boston (Webster 3-3) at Kansas City (Ventura 12-9), 4:10 p.m. Minnesota (P.Hughes 15-9) at Chicago White Sox (Quintana 7-10), 4:10 p.m. Houston (Oberholtzer 5-10) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 11-9), 6:05 p.m. Oakland (Hammel 2-5) at Seattle (Paxton 5-2), 6:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Atlanta at Texas, 9:05 a.m. N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 9:05 a.m. Tampa Bay at Toronto, 9:07 a.m. Cleveland at Detroit, 3:08 p.m. Boston at Kansas City, 3:10 p.m. Minnesota at Chicago White Sox, 3:10 p.m. Houston at L.A. Angels, 5:05 p.m. Oakland at Seattle, 5:10 p.m. All Times ADT

NL Standings

East Division W Washington 83 Atlanta 75 Miami 71 New York 71 Philadelphia 67 Central Division St. Louis 80 Pittsburgh 77 Milwaukee 76 Cincinnati 70 Chicago 64 West Division Los Angeles 83 San Francisco 81 San Diego 67 Arizona 59 Colorado 59

L 62 71 74 76 79

Pct GB .572 — .514 8½ .490 12 .483 13 .459 16½

67 69 71 77 82

.544 — .527 2½ .517 4 .476 10 .438 15½

63 65 78 87 87

.568 — .555 2 .462 15½ .404 24 .404 24

Thursday’s Games Cincinnati 1, St. Louis 0 San Francisco 6, Arizona 2 Pittsburgh 4, Philadelphia 1 Washington 6, N.Y. Mets 2 Milwaukee 4, Miami 2 Friday’s Games

Chicago Cubs (Wada 4-2) at Pittsburgh (Cole 8-5), 3:05 p.m. Miami (H.Alvarez 10-6) at Philadelphia (Hamels 8-7), 3:05 p.m. Washington (G.Gonzalez 8-9) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 6-7), 3:10 p.m. Atlanta (A.Wood 10-10) at Texas (D.Holland 1-0), 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati (Latos 5-5) at Milwaukee (Lohse 12-9), 4:10 p.m. Colorado (J.De La Rosa 13-10) at St. Louis (Wainwright 17-9), 4:15 p.m. San Diego (Stults 6-16) at Arizona (Nuno 0-5), 5:40 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 14-6) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 17-9), 6:15 p.m. Saturday’s Games Atlanta at Texas, 9:05 a.m. Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 3:05 p.m. Miami at Philadelphia, 3:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 3:10 p.m. Washington at N.Y. Mets, 3:10 p.m. Colorado at St. Louis, 3:15 p.m. San Diego at Arizona, 4:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, 5:05 p.m. All Times ADT

Indians 8, Twins 2, 1st game Min. 100 000 001—2 8 Cle. 214 001 00x—8 10

1 0

Gibson, Swarzak (4), Achter (6), Oliveros (8) and K.Suzuki; Kluber, Crockett (9) and Y.Gomes. W_Kluber 15-9. L_Gibson 11-11. HRs_Cleveland, C.Santana (26), Y.Gomes (18).

White Sox 1, Athletics 0 Oak. 000 000 000—0 Chi. 000 001 00x—1

3 4

1 0

Kazmir and G.Soto; Sale, Petricka (9) and Flowers. W_Sale 12-3. L_Kazmir 14-8. Sv_Petricka (13). HRs_Chicago, Semien (4).

Indians 2, Twins 0, 2nd game Min. 000 000 000—0 Cle. 000 100 01x—2

4 8

Yankees 5, Rays 4 2 0

Cobb, Boxberger (8), McGee (9) and Casali; Pineda, R.Hill (8), Roe (9), Outman (9), Kelley (9) and B.McCann, J.Murphy. W_Kelley 3-5. L_McGee 4-2. HRs_Tampa Bay, Y.Escobar 2 (6). New York, Prado (6), C.Young (2).

Angels 7, Rangers 3 LA 022 000 120—7 Tex. 100 000 110—3

7 7

0 2

Cor.Rasmus, Pestano (4), Y.Herrera (5), Roth (5), Morin (5), Salas (7), Grilli (8), J.Smith (9) and Conger, Iannetta; N.Martinez, Ross Jr. (7), S.Patton (7), Claudio (8), Feliz (9) and Telis. W_Morin 4-3. L_N.Martinez 3-11. HRs_ Los Angeles, Aybar (7). Texas, L.Martin (7), Arencibia (9).

Red Sox 6, Royals 3 Bos. 012 100 020—6

9

6

3

Buchholz, Layne (7), Tazawa (7), Mujica (9) and Vazquez; Hendriks, C.Coleman (3), L.Coleman (6), Finnegan (7), Crow (8), Bueno (9) and S.Perez. W_Buchholz 8-8. L_Hendriks 1-2. Sv_Mujica (5).

Reds 1, Cardinals 0 SL 000 000 000—0 Cin. 000 000 01x—1

3 3

1 0

Lynn and Pierzynski; Cueto, A.Chapman (9) and Mesoraco. W_Cueto 18-8. L_Lynn 15-9. Sv_A.Chapman (33).

Giants 6, Diamondbacks 2 Ari. 000 001 001—2 9 SF 101 103 00x—6 12

2 0

Delgado, Harris (5), Stites (6), E.Marshall (6), E.De La Rosa (7) and Gosewisch; Peavy, Machi (6), Kontos (7), J.Lopez (8), Strickland (8), Casilla (9) and Posey. W_Peavy 5-4. L_Delgado 3-4. HRs_Arizona, Lamb (3).

Pirates 4, Phillies 1 Pit. 010 003 000—4 Phi. 000 000 001—1

8 6

0 0

F.Liriano, J.Hughes (9), Melancon (9) and R.Martin; A.Burnett, Lu.Garcia (7), Bastardo (8), Miguel Alfredo.Gonzalez (9) and Ruiz. W_F.Liriano 5-10. L_A.Burnett 8-16. Sv_Melancon (29).

Nationals 6, Mets 2 Was. 202 200 000—6 NY 000 010 100—2

8 9

1 1

Roark, Stammen (7), Thornton (8), Clippard (8), Detwiler (9) and W.Ramos; B.Colon, Matsuzaka (4), Goeddel (7), D.Alvarez (8), Germen (9) and T.d’Arnaud, Recker. W_Roark 13-10. L_B. Colon 13-12. HRs_Washington, LaRoche (24), Rendon (19). New York, Recker (7).

Brewers 4, Marlins 2 0 1

Nolasco, Thielbar (8), Tonkin (8) and Pinto; House, Shaw (8), Allen (9) and R.Perez. W_House 3-3. L_Nolasco 5-11. Sv_Allen (20). HRs_Cleveland, C.Santana (27).

TB 000 300 100—4 10 NY 000 000 023—5 4

KC 020 001 000—3

1

Mia. 000 000 020—2 Mil. 011 200 00x—4

4 9

1 1

Eovaldi, DeSclafani (5), Da.Jennings (6), S.Dyson (7), M.Dunn (8) and Mathis; Fiers, Jeffress (6), Kintzler (7), W.Smith (7), Fr.Rodriguez (9) and Lucroy. W_Fiers 6-2. L_Eovaldi 6-11. Sv_ Fr.Rodriguez (41). HRs_Miami, Ozuna (23). Milwaukee, Braun (19), Clark (2).

Football NFL Standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East Miami N.Y. Jets Buffalo New England South Tennessee Houston Jacksonville Indianapolis North Cincinnati Baltimore Pittsburgh Cleveland West Denver San Diego Oakland Kansas City

W 1 1 1 0

L 0 0 0 1

T Pct PF 0 1.000 33 0 1.000 19 0 1.000 23 0 .000 20

PA 20 14 20 33

1 1 0 0

0 0 1 1

0 1.000 0 1.000 0 .000 0 .000

26 17 17 24

10 6 34 31

1 1 1 0

0 1 1 1

0 1.000 0 .500 0 .500 0 .000

23 42 36 27

16 29 53 30

1 0 0 0

0 1 1 1

0 1.000 0 .000 0 .000 0 .000

31 17 14 10

24 18 19 26

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East Philadelphia Washington Dallas N.Y. Giants South Carolina Atlanta New Orleans Tampa Bay North Minnesota Detroit Chicago Green Bay West Seattle San Francisco Arizona St. Louis

MISSED FIELD GOALS_None.

1 0 0 0

0 1 1 1

0 1.000 0 .000 0 .000 0 .000

34 6 17 14

17 17 28 35

1 1 0 0

0 0 1 1

0 1.000 0 1.000 0 .000 0 .000

20 37 34 14

14 34 37 20

1 1 0 0

0 0 1 1

0 1.000 0 1.000 0 .000 0 .000

34 35 20 16

6 14 23 36

1 1 1 0

0 0 0 1

0 1.000 0 1.000 0 1.000 0 .000

36 28 18 6

16 17 17 34

Thursday’s Game Baltimore 26, Pittsburgh 6 Sunday’s Games Dallas at Tennessee, 9 a.m. New England at Minnesota, 9 a.m. Miami at Buffalo, 9 a.m. Jacksonville at Washington, 9 a.m. Arizona at N.Y. Giants, 9 a.m. New Orleans at Cleveland, 9 a.m. Atlanta at Cincinnati, 9 a.m. Detroit at Carolina, 9 a.m. Seattle at San Diego, 12:05 p.m. St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 12:05 p.m. Houston at Oakland, 12:25 p.m. Kansas City at Denver, 12:25 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Green Bay, 12:25 p.m. Chicago at San Francisco, 4:30 p.m. Monday’s Game Philadelphia at Indianapolis, 4:30 p.m. All Times ADT

Ravens 26, Steelers 6 Pit. Bal.

0 7

3 3

3 0— 6 7 9—26

First Quarter Bal_Daniels 2 pass from Flacco (Tucker kick), :27. Second Quarter Bal_FG Tucker 30, 8:01. Pit_FG Suisham 25, 2:50. Third Quarter Pit_FG Suisham 43, 10:30. Bal_Daniels 1 pass from Flacco (Tucker kick), 3:58. Fourth Quarter Bal_FG Tucker 23, 14:11. Bal_FG Tucker 22, 11:14. Bal_FG Tucker 20, 4:31. A_71,181. Pit Bal First downs 17 25 Total Net Yards 301 323 Rushes-yards 18-99 36-157 Passing 202 166 Punt Returns 2-13 2-47 Kickoff Returns 1-11 0-0 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-13 Comp-Att-Int 22-37-1 21-29-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-15 0-0 Punts 4-45.8 2-55.0 Fumbles-Lost 2-2 0-0 Penalties-Yards 9-75 4-35 Time of Possession 24:52 35:08 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING_Pittsburgh, Bell 1159, Wheaton 2-22, A.Brown 2-10, Blount 3-8. Baltimore, Pierce 22-96, Forsett 8-56, Flacco 5-3, Jones 1-2. PASSING_Pittsburgh, Roethlisberger 22-37-1-217. Baltimore, Flacco 21-29-0-166. RECEIVING_Pittsburgh, A.Brown 7-90, Bell 5-48, Wheaton 5-38, Miller 4-35, J.Brown 1-6. Baltimore, Smith Sr. 6-71, Daniels 5-28, Forsett 4-16, Pitta 3-30, T.Smith 1-10, Pierce 1-7, Jones 1-4.

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College Scores EAST NY Maritime 31, Mass. Maritime 30 SOUTH Charleston Southern 34, Campbell 10 Samford 52, Stillman 0 UT-Martin 63, Cumberland (Tenn.) 7 MIDWEST Cent. Missouri 50, Emporia St. 31 NW Missouri St. 40, Missouri Southern 14 Pittsburg St. 38, Lindenwood (Mo.) 7 Washburn 10, Nebraska-Kearney 7 SOUTHWEST Louisiana Tech 42, North Texas 21 FAR WEST BYU 33, Houston 25

Transactions BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB — Suspended Tampa Bay minor league RHP Lenny Linsky (Montgomery-SL) and free agent minor league RHP Aaron Gonzales 50 games each following a second positive test for a drug of abuse, a violation of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. FOOTBALL National Football League CHICAGO BEARS — Signed WR Chris Williams to the practice squad. Terminated the practice squad contract of LB DeDe Lattimore. NEW YORK JETS — Waived CB Leon McFadden. HOCKEY National Hockey League COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Signed F Sonny Milano to a threeyear, entry-level contract. MINNESOTA WILD — Signed RW Nino Niederreiter to a threeyear contract. NEW YORK RANGERS — Agreed to terms with F Ryan Malone and D John Moore on one-year contracts. Major League Soccer MLS — Extended the contract of commissioner Don Garber through December 2018. COLLEGE CHARLESTON SOUTHERN — Named Adam Ward associate head baseball coach and Jimmy Holton assistant baseball coach. CULVER-STOCKTON — Announced the resignation of athletic director Greg McVey. DELAWARE — Named Kevin Cataldo women’s assistant cross country and track and field coach. FELICIAN — Named Mike Mobbs assistant baseball coach. NYU — Named Erison Hurtault assistant cross country and track and field coach. PRESBYTERIAN — Named Tristan Toorie assistant baseball coach. RUTGERS — Signed football coach Kyle Flood a two-year contract extension through 2019. SHAW — Named DiShondra Goree women’s volleyball and softball coach.

Sports Briefs Prep volleyball roundup Seward held on to beat the Hawks 3-1 Thursday evening at Houston with game scores of 25-13, 25-13, 19-25 and 25-16, and improved to 2-1 in the Southcentral Conference with the win. Seahawks coach Jamie Frederickson said Carri Anderson led with nine kills. “I think they really found something within them, they’ve been working hard all week,” Frederickson said. “They just went out and played hard, hit hard and talked. That’s what won us the game.”

ACS 3, Nikiski 1 Anchorage Christian Schools turned the tables on Nikiski with a 3-1 win Thursday night in Anchorage, avenging a identical 3-1 loss to the Bulldogs earlier in the season in Nikiski. Nikiski dropped to 1-2 overall, excluding tournament play.

Grace 3, Homer 0 The Mariners were swept by Grace Christian Thursday night in Anchorage. Game scores were not available when the Clarion went to press.

Surgery ends season for Pedroia KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Boston Red Sox second baseman Dustin Pedroia had season-ending surgery on his left wrist Thursday to repair a tendon, clean out scar tissue and reduce some inflammation. The surgery was performed by Dr. Matt Liebman at NewtonWellesley Surgery Center near Boston. Red Sox manager John Farrell said before Thursday night’s game in Kansas City that Pedroia should be 100 percent in about six weeks, allowing him to have a normal offseason. The four-time All-Star had been bothered by the wrist for weeks, and an MRI exam Tuesday showed increased inflammation, resulting in the surgery. Pedroia, who also had surgery in the offseason to repair a torn ligament in his left thumb, hit just .278 with seven homers and 53 RBIs in 135 games this season.

Judge pares back Penn State case HARRISBURG, Pa. — A Pennsylvania judge on Thursday removed three Penn State trustees as well as some university faculty and former Nittany Lions players from a lawsuit by Joe Paterno’s estate against the school and the NCAA. Judge John Leete denied the bid by Penn State and the NCAA to throw out the civil case, but he pared it back and gave the remaining plaintiffs a month to amend their claims to be more specific. The plaintiffs he removed were only involved in parts of the complaint that alleged conspiracy, wrote Leete. The remaining plaintiffs are Paterno’s estate, former assistant coaches Jay Paterno and Bill Kenney, and ex-trustee Al Clemens. The parties are suing over the consent decree imposed over the handling of the Jerry Sandusky child molestation scandal. This week the NCAA reduced those penalties, making Penn State eligible for a bowl game this season. The lawsuit also claims intentional interference with contractual relations regarding Jay Paterno and Kenney, who argue their ability to find new jobs was improperly hampered; commercial disparagement regarding Joe Paterno; defamation regarding Jay Paterno, Kenney and Clemens; and civil conspiracy. The NCAA said it was pleased that the court found no violation of any contractual or procedural protections owed to Joe Paterno when entering into the consent decree. “Based on the court’s prior rulings, we expected that the lawsuit would continue. However, today’s ruling represents an important narrowing of the claims remaining in the lawsuit,” said Donald Remy, the association’s chief legal officer. Joe Paterno’s son, Scott, said in an emailed statement that the family was encouraged by the ruling. “With this ruling, the path is now clear for a full, fair review of the underlying facts,” he wrote. Anthony Lubrano, one of the three trustees dismissed from the case, said the NCAA’s action loosening the sanctions — Penn State will also get its full complement of football scholarships next year — does not make the claim moot. “This complaint seeks to have the consent decree declared null and void,” Lubrano said. “And the last time I checked, the consent decree encompassed a whole host of issues.” Penn State still must pay the balance of a $60 million fine and remains under the review of an athletics integrity monitor. A university spokesman declined comment on the judge’s ruling.

Jones-Drew may be out Sunday ALAMEDA, Calif. — Oakland Raiders running back Maurice Jones-Drew missed his second straight practice with a right hand injury, putting his status for Sunday’s home opener against Houston in doubt. With Jones-Drew sitting out once again on Thursday, Darren McFadden and Latavius Murray shared the running back duties in practice. Jones-Drew said he had a “minor procedure” done on his hand and does not consider the injury serious. Jones-Drew hurt a finger in a preseason game against Detroit last month and says the injury has lingered the past few weeks before getting worse in the season opener against the New York Jets.

— Staff report

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014

. . . Prep

Peninsula high school football standings Through Sept. 6 Reported games only

Continued from page B-1

Northern Lights Conference W Kenai 1 Kodiak 1 Soldotna 0 Homer 0

League Overall L Pct. W L 0 1.000 2 2 1 .500 1 3 0 .000 3 0 1 .000 2 2

Pct. .500 .250 1.000 .500

Week 4

Kenai 44, Palmer 20 Homer 55, Valdez 0 Colony 37, Kodiak 0 Wasilla at Kenai, 6 p.m. Friday Ketchikan at Homer, noon Saturday Soldotna at Kodiak, 2 p.m. Saturday

Week 5

Greatland Conference W Eielson 3 Barrow 3 Nikiski 1 Seward 1 Valdez 1 Voznesenka 0 Monroe 0

League Overall L Pct. W L 0 1.000 4 0 0 1.000 3 1 1 .500 2 1 1 .500 2 2 1 .500 1 3 3 .000 0 3 3 .000 0 4

Pct. 1.000 .750 .667 .500 .250 .000 .000

Week 4

Barrow 62, Voznesenka 0 Seward 56, Monroe 0 Homer 55, Valdez 0 Eielson 52, Nikiski 34

Week 5

Valdez at Nikiski, 2 p.m. Saturday Seward at Barrow, 2 p.m. Saturday Monroe at Voznesenka, Saturday

Peninsula high school football stats Through Sept. 6 Reported games only

Cooper, Nik 1 Hollinger, Nik 1 Anderson, Nik 3

TEAM OFFENSE Team G 1. Nikiski 3 2. Soldotna 3 3. Kenai 4 4. Homer 2

Pts Rsh 116 947 148 1068 121 1196 36 235

Pas Tot 435 1382 250 1318 109 1305 148 383

TEAM DEFENSE Team 1. Soldotna 2. Homer 3. Kenai 4. Nikiski

G Pts Rsh Pas Tot 3 6 358 154 512 2 63 605 19 624 4 63 410 422 832 3 71 731 171 902

PASSING YARDAGE LEADERS Name, school G Com Att Yds TD 1. Anderson, Nik 3 23 44 435 6 2. Furlong, Sol 3 16 27 250 7 3. Hutt, Hom 2 10 23 148 1 4. Baker, Ken 4 11 44 109 3 5. Johnson, Nik 2 0 2 0 0 6. Blumentritt, Sol 1 0 1 0 0

Int 1 0 0 1 0 0

RUSHING YARDAGE LEADERS

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Name, school G Logan, Ken 4 Gibbs, Sol 3 Foree, Ken 4 Fenton, Sol 3 Riddall, Nik 3 Castro, Nik 3 Broussard, Nik 2 Blumentritt, Sol 3 Fisk, Hom 2 Chavez, Sol 3 Johnson, Nik 1 Prior, Sol 2 Hutt, Hom 2 Welborn, Ken 4 Carstens, Nik 2 Jackson, Nik 3 Gillies, Ken 2 Baker, Ken 3 Holloway, Nik 1 Furlong, Sol 3 Seay, Hom 1 Winter, Sol 1 Jones, Sol 1 Tuttle, Ken 1 Streiff, Ken 1 Perry, Nik 1 Swoboda, Hom 1 Lowe, Hom 1 Randall, Ken 1 Lueth, Hom 1 Ackerman, Sol 1

Att Yds 79 674 28 355 52 325 25 311 35 292 25 275 13 144 14 135 24 134 12 115 10 108 4 88 28 72 22 58 7 53 5 47 8 47 13 33 3 26 20 23 3 19 2 16 3 16 3 14 3 12 2 11 5 9 2 5 1 3 1 2 1 0

Avg TD 8.5 6 12.7 6 6.3 4 12.4 2 8.3 5 11.0 4 11.1 1 9.6 4 5.6 3 9.6 0 10.8 0 22.0 1 2.6 0 2.6 2 7.6 1 9.4 0 5.9 0 2.5 0 8.7 0 1.1 1 6.3 0 8.0 0 5.3 0 4.7 0 4.0 1 5.5 0 1.8 0 2.5 0 3.0 0 2.0 0 0.0 0

. . . Trial Continued from page B-1

customarily issue verdicts only after explaining their reasoning. “The accused cannot be found guilty of murder,” the judge said, noting there were “just not enough facts” to support the finding of guilt for premeditated murder, which carries a sentence of 25 years to life in prison, or an unplanned murder, considered a less severe crime. To support her view that the state had not proved its case beyond a reasonable doubt, the judge said some neighbors’ accounts of hearing a woman’s screams on the night

1 1 5

-2 -2.0 0 -2 -2.0 0 -5 -1.0 0

RECEIVING YARDAGE LEADERS Name, school G Rec Yds Holloway, Nik 3 10 246 Broussard, Nik 3 4 116 Duke, Sol 2 4 78 Gillies, Ken 3 4 52 Walden, Sol 3 4 45 Seay, Hom 2 2 42 Fowler, Sol 2 4 42 Cotney, Hom 1 2 34 Gibbs, Sol 1 1 31 McKenna, Hom 1 1 29 Riddall, Nik 2 3 28 Logan, Ken 3 3 25 Blumentritt, Sol 1 2 25 Fenton, Sol 1 1 24 Fisk, Hom 1 1 23 Lowe, Hom 2 2 21 Johnson, Nik 1 1 20 Carstens, Nik 1 3 19 Foree, Ken 2 3 18 Randall, Ken 1 1 14 Swoboda, Hom 1 1 7 Castro, Nik 2 2 6 Alborn, Hom 1 1 -8

Avg TD 24.6 3 29.0 3 19.5 1 13.0 2 11.2 2 21.0 1 10.5 2 17.0 0 31.0 1 29.0 0 9.3 0 8.3 0 12.5 0 24.0 1 23.0 0 10.5 0 20.0 0 6.3 0 6.0 1 14.0 0 7.0 0 3.0 0 -8.0 0

SCORING LEADERS Player, school TD FG PAT2 PAT1 Gibbs, Sol 7 0 0 0 Logan, Ken 6 0 0 0 Foree, Ken 5 0 1 0 Riddall, Nik 5 0 1 0 Blumentritt, Sol 4 0 1 0 Castro, Nik 4 0 0 0 Broussard, Nik 4 0 0 0 Holloway, Nik 3 0 0 0 Fisk, Hom 3 0 0 0 Fenton, Sol 3 0 0 0 Vest, Ken 0 1 0 13 Walden, Sol 2 0 1 0 Fowler, Sol 2 0 1 0 Duke, Sol 2 0 0 0 Seay, Hom 2 0 0 0 Welborn, Ken 2 0 0 0 Gillies, Ken 2 0 0 0 Carstens, Nik 1 0 2 0 Ackerman, Sol 0 0 0 10 Furlong, Sol 1 0 0 0 Jackson, Nik 0 0 0 6 Streiff, Ken 1 0 0 0 Prior, Sol 1 0 0 0 Baker, Ken 1 0 0 0 Hutt, Hom 0 0 2 0 Swoboda, Hom 0 0 1 0 Jackman, Ken 0 0 0 1

Pts 42 36 32 32 26 24 24 18 18 18 16 14 14 12 12 12 12 10 10 6 6 6 6 6 4 2 1

of Steenkamp’s death — a key part of the prosecution’s case — were unreliable. The defense had argued that it was Pistorius who was screaming in horror in a highpitched voice after discovering he had fatally shot Steenkamp. Masipa cited what she called an “objective” timeline of telephone calls made after the shooting, some involving Pistorius, that the defense had compiled in an attempt to discredit witness accounts about the sequence of purported screams and gunshots. She noted that Pistorius was reported to be in genuine distress in the immediate aftermath of the shooting, and that he could not have been “playacting.”

celed its meeting with Soldotna. “We’re excited to get back to football, it feels weird to sit around,” Brantley Jr. said. Brantley Jr. said Soldotna spent the off week focusing on correcting small errors, mostly blocking and tackling mistakes. The Bears are primarily a run-based offense, with running back Jay-Ar Small and Isagani Galindez getting most of the carries. But if Kodiak wishes to fool the stout SoHi defense, quarterback Melvin Javier will need to step up as a third playmaker. “They have an athletic quarterback that runs their system very well,” Brantley Jr. said. “When a team runs the option, it takes time to develop it throughout the season to get their reads down. For them to hold Colony to a single offensive touchdown in one half is good.” Brantley Jr. added that, like any week, the Stars are not looking past Kodiak, even as SoHi continued to stand as one of the dominating forces in the Northern Lights Conference. “I think they’ve done positive things,” he said about Kodiak. “They were beating Kenai after one quarter, and against Colony last week gave up one offensive touchdown in the second half. Maybe they’re not as deep or athletic as past Kodiak teams, but they can certainly hang around if you let them.” The veteran coach also said that game film of opponents has helped SoHi prepare better than any other method. Looking at common opponents does not truly give the Stars an idea of what to expect. “I think that’s the worse trap people can get into,” Brantley Jr. said. “You don’t know how teams will match up and you never wanna look at that. The best thing you can do is keep your nose down and prep as much as you can for the next team.” Ketchikan (3-1) at Homer (2-2), noon Saturday The Mariners thus far in 2014 have bounced back with two straight wins, but one of the big tests of the season lies ahead of them. “I expect a great game because they’re a team we don’t see often,” said Homer coach Josh Fraley. “I think we’ve maybe played them three times in the last 10 years. It may be a shootout game.” After getting the first win of the year in Barrow in Week 3, Homer continued the streak with a 55-0 shut out of Valdez on Saturday. Fraley said once his squad established an early lead, he substituted his varsity players out with several of the JV players.

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“We went in trying not to look past them, but knowing it was probably gonna be a short game,” Fraley said. “I liked that we were able to score 30 points quickly in the first quarter, but then we got our varsity players out of there.” Fraley said Homer is also glad to be getting back home after a three-week stint on the road, which consisted of trips to Kodiak (on the ferry), Barrow and Valdez. Not necessarily a dream vacation. Against Ketchikan, Fraley said the advantage his Mariners hold is defense. “Right now, we’re looking good,” Fraley said. “We’ve only allowed 12 points in the last few games, but more importantly we’re getting turnovers.” With a defensive line consisting of defensive end Patrick Rainwater and tackle Ben Knisley — two players that coach Fraley said have been difference makers — Homer faces an entertaining matchup with the Kings. Ketchikan beat Thunder Mountain 40-35 last week. “Ketchikan has some good running backs, and it’s a pretty balanced attack,” Fraley said. “Hopefully our defense keeps us going, and our offense can put some points on the board.” Fraley explained that with Josh Fisk and Connor Seay providing a deeper running threat each and every week, it has allowed quarterback Sheldon Hutt to make bigger passing plays when the opposing defense keys in on an expected running play. “Sheldon has been throwing the ball 15 to 20 times each game, and last year we were unable to run the ball,” he said. “This year we have a few big sophomores on the offensive line that have added so much more depth, and they’ve been stacking the box to allow Sheldon some good looks.”

also means he was stopped on the 34 other plays he made with the ball. “(Griffith) is the same kid on those touches as he is with the others,” Riddall said. “It wasn’t like we didn’t have somebody there, he wasn’t running free.” Having allowed a running back to take the state single-game rushing record for the second straight year (after Kenai’s Jace Daniels broke the previous mark in August 2013 against Nikiski), the Bulldogs more than doubled their defensive yards allowed this season. But Riddall pointed out that not only was Nikiski within six points of Eielson with 7 1-2 minutes left in the game, the situation that presented itself allowed Griffith to rack up the yards that he did. Including the 16 receiving yards he had, Griffith held 532 of Eielson’s 577 total offensive yards. Without him, the Ravens would not have beaten Nikiski. “If you’re around small-schools football enough, one or two kids can make a huge difference,” Riddall said. “You lose one kid and it makes a big difference. “We lost our fullback and outside linebacker to injury in the Kenai game (in 2013) with us leading 16-15 at halftime. Once we put our JV kids in there, they weren’t able to do what our starting linebacker was doing.” With a matchup against a Valdez team that holds one win in 2014, Nikiski will make use of its Wing-T option attack early and often, but Riddall said once they are sitting comfortably, he’ll pull his starters. “Valdez is scrappy, defensively,” Riddall said. “They’re going to make it difficult. They sometimes do things that are unexpected, but if we don’t take a step and get better this week, then our focus is off. “I can’t control how good they play, I Valdez (1-3) can’t control the football, the passes, fumat Nikiski (2-1), 2 p.m. Saturday bles that they have, but they can. The focus Nikiski coach Ted Riddall said he would has to be that.” grade his team with a “B.” “We don’t just look at wins and losses,” Seward (2-2) Riddall said. “I look and see is the team at Barrow (3-1), 2 p.m. Saturday getting better? Are they showing the same signs as teams in the past?” The Seahawks have come out of the The Bulldogs were hurting after Eielson gate swinging with a pair of Greatland senior Anthony Griffith posted a new state Conference wins, including a 56-0 shut single-game record of 516 rushing yards out against Monroe Catholic — last year’s against them Saturday afternoon. But in state runner-ups — last weekend. The true Bulldog fashion, Riddall had the team Seward offense has averaged 25 points a up and running again at full capacity in game in 2014, while the Seahawks defense practice. has averaged 29.75 points a game. “It’s been with a little more purpose in the way our kids are practicing,” Riddall Monroe (0-4) at Voznesenka (0-3), said. “We’ve challenged them, watched Saturday film, laid it out for them, and it was a great The two schools at the bottom of the opportunity for them to get better. It’s in Greatland Conference standings meet up their hands for them to get better.” Riddall said he was able to provide Saturday to decide who will remain winan optimistic perspective on the Eielson less. The Cougars have averaged a losing game. He explained that while Griffith deficit of 58.33 points this season, and scored eight touchdowns on 42 touches, it have only scored eight points all year.

Team USA moves to Cup finals BRIAN MAHONEY AP Basketball Writer

BARCELONA, Spain — Madrid awaits. Spain doesn’t. The gold-medal matchup seemingly everyone wanted in the Basketball World Cup — maybe even some U.S. players — won’t be happening. The Spanish were upset in the quarterfinals, ending the predicted No. 1 vs. No. 2 game Sunday on Spain’s home court. “I think that’s one of the reasons why we came over here, was to play them,” U.S. guard Derrick Rose said. “Too bad we’re not playing them and hopefully we go out there in our next game and play hard and just know that we’re there for a reason.” The Americans held up their end, moving within a victory of repeating as world champions for the first time with a 9668 victory over Lithuania on Thursday night. James Harden scored all of

his 16 points in the lopsided third quarter of a near carbon copy of the Americans’ quarterfinal victory over Slovenia, when he awoke from a scoreless first half to help turn a close game into a blowout. The Americans will face France or Serbia, believing either could provide the test that was expected from Spain. “Obviously they’re playing there for a reason,” Harden said. “We’re not going to take anyone lightly, which we haven’t thus far.” They will arrive as even heavier favorites after Spain’s stunning loss to France on Wednesday. With their veteran experience and near misses against the U.S. in the last two Olympic gold-medal games, the Spanish were considered the team with the best chance — perhaps the only one — to beat the Americans. Harden was told that forward Kenneth Faried said he’d wanted to play Spain.

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“Kenneth’s crazy,” Harden said. Some U.S. players watched the game Wednesday, while others learned the result afterward. Talk of a U.S.-Spain final had lasted as long as the tournament, and though the Americans tried to ignore it, guard Stephen Curry acknowledged that was impossible. “I don’t think we’re disappointed, or wished we played a certain team,” Curry said. “We’re happy to take care of our business.” Their opponent will have to show it can hang with the Americans for more than a half, which nobody in Barcelona did. This one was an eight-point game at the break before the U.S. made 14 of 19 shots in the third quarter and outscored Lithuania 33-14. Kyrie Irving had 18 points and Klay Thompson added 16 for the Americans in a rematch of the 2010 world basketball

championship semifinals, also played on Sept. 11, the date of the terrorist attacks on the U.S. in 2001. Kevin Durant scored a U.S.-record 38 points in that one, an 89-74 victory. That was a rare comfortable margin in this series where close games have been the norm. That includes the 2012 Olympics, where the Americans’ 99-94 win was their tightest in London. The physical play nearly turned ugly when DeMarcus Cousins reacted angrily after appearing to be elbowed in the neck by center Jonas Valanciunas of the Toronto Raptors while battling for a rebound. He wound up as if he were going to punch Valanciunas in the back of the head, drawing a technical foul. The Americans then threw the knockout blow, coming out of the locker room with an 18-2 run — emphasis on run, because they turned this semifinal game into a fast-break drill.


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B-4 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014

Stanton hit in face, out for season By The Associated Press

MILWAUKEE — Miami slugger Giancarlo Stanton was hit under the left eye by a fastball and bleeding from the face as he was driven off the field in an ambulance Thursday night in a 4-2 loss to Milwaukee. Marlins manager Mike Redmond said he expected Stanton would miss the rest of the season. The Marlins said Stanton, the major league RBI leader and a top candidate for the NL MVP award, was being treated at a hospital for a facial cut. He also was undergoing X-rays and a CT scan after being hit by Brewers starter Mike Fiers. Stanton’s father was at the game and came on the field while his son was treated, and left with him in the ambulance. It was ruled that Stanton swung trying to get out of the way of the 88 mph pitch from Fiers. Reed Johnson batted for Stanton and was hit in the hand by Fiers’ next pitch, triggering a benchclearing brawl. The All-Star outfielder tops the NL with 37 home runs and has 105 RBIs, and is batting .288. Miami has 17 games left this year. Miami reliever Anthony Desclafani hit Carlos Gomez in the sixth with a pitch and was ejected by plate umpire Jeff Kellogg. Ryan Braun and rookie Matt Clark homered for Milwaukee. The Brewers are 1 1/2 games behind Pittsburgh for the second NL wild-card spot. Marcell Ozuna homered in his fourth straight game for the Marlins, tying a team record. Fiers (6-2) pitched five innings and Francisco Rodriguez got his 41st

Kazmir in a brilliant pitchers’ duel, light- for their 12th straight win at Citi Field. three runs and seven hits in four innings. save. The Nationals increased their NL East Nathan Eovaldi (6-11) lasted only hitting Marcus Semien homered for the only run and the Chicago White Sox edged lead to 8 1/2 games over second-place Atfour innings. PIRATES 4, PHILLIES 1 rapidly fading Oakland. lanta and lowered their magic number to

RED SOX 6, ROYALS 3

The A’s lost for the 11th time in 14 games. Their lead in the AL wild-card race dwindled to one game over Detroit and 1 1-2 over Seattle, both of which were idle. Sale (12-3) gave up two hits in eight innings, allowing a pair of singles to Jed Lowrie. Between the hits, the left-hander retired 17 batters in order. Sale lowered his ERA to an AL-best 1.99, striking out nine. Jake Petricka yielded one hit and got his 13th save. Kazmir (14-8) went the distance, giving up four hits and striking out seven. Semien hit a leadoff homer in the sixth.

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The last-place Boston Red Sox took advantage of three critical errors by the first-place Kansas City Royals and ended a four-game losing streak. Clay Buchholz (8-8) beat the Royals for the sixth straight time. Edward Mujica handled a perfect ninth for his fifth save. Kansas City’s advantage in the AL Central dropped to a half-game over idle Detroit. Liam Hendriks (1-2) failed to last three innings while making a spot start for lefthander Danny Duffy, who is shelved with REDS 1, CARDINALS 0 shoulder soreness. The Royals’ defense CINCINNATI — Johnny Cueto pitched didn’t do Hendriks any favors, making all eight scoreless innings to beat Lance Lynn three errors in the first four innings. and send the St. Louis Cardinals to their third consecutive loss. YANKEES 5, RAYS 4 Aroldis Chapman pitched the ninth for his 33rd save and third in the last three NEW YORK — Chris Young broke up games. Alex Cobb’s no-hit bid in the eighth inCueto (18-8) allowed just three hits ning and then launched a three-run homer and hit a batter to help the Reds win their in the bottom of the ninth that rallied the second series in the last 13 against Central New York Yankees over Tampa Bay. Division-leading St. Louis. Pinch-hitter Martin Prado connected Lynn (15-9) retired 15 straight before for a two-run shot immediately after Cobb Brandon Phillips led off the eighth inning was pulled in the eighth. Young homered with the Reds’ first walk. He went to third off closer Jake McGee (4-2) with one out on Jay Bruce’s single and scored on Ramon to win it. Santiago’s sinking liner to short center that Clinging to slim playoff hopes, New John Jay got a glove on but couldn’t hold. York finished 5-4 on its penultimate home- Bruce had to hold up to see if the ball was stand. caught and was forced at second. Yunel Escobar homered twice and drove in four runs for Tampa Bay. NATIONALS 6, METS 2 Shawn Kelley (3-5) got two outs for the win. NEW YORK — Adam LaRoche and Anthony Rendon had two-run homers off Bartolo Colon, who was ejected after hitting the following batter both times, and CHICAGO — Chris Sale bested Scott the Washington Nationals beat the Mets

WHITE SOX 1, ATHLETICS 0

nine for clinching their second division title in three seasons. New York had won four in a row. Tanner Roark (13-10) improved to 4-0 in four career starts against the Mets. Rendon homered in the fourth and Colon (13-12) hit Jayson Werth above the left elbow with the next pitch.

PHILADELPHIA — Francisco Liriano struck out a season-high 12 in eight dominant innings, and the Pittsburgh Pirates beat Philadelphia. Liriano (5-10) pitched the Pirates to their seventh win in eight games, strengthening their hold on the second NL wildcard spot. Mark Melancon allowed one of two runners left by Jared Hughes to score in ANGELS 7, RANGERS 3 the ninth, but earned his 29th save in 33 ARLINGTON, Texas — Erick Aybar opportunities. hit an early two-run homer and eight AnPhiladelphia starter A.J. Burnett (8-16) gels pitchers combined to beat Texas, the allowed four runs and six hits in six ineighth straight win for Los Angeles. nings. Los Angeles won for the 14th time in 16 games and moved 10 games ahead of INDIANS 8, TWINS 2; second-place Oakland in the AL West. INDIANS 2, TWINS 0 Aybar homered off Nick Martinez (3CLEVELAND — Rookie T.J. House 11) in the second inning. Mike Morin (4-3), the Angels’ fifth pitched seven sharp innings, Carlos Santana homered and drove in both runs and pitcher, got the win. the Cleveland Indians completed a doubleGIANTS 6, DIAMONDBACKS 2 header sweep over Minnesota. Santana also homered in the first game, SAN FRANCISCO — Jake Peavy backing another strong performance by struck out eight and didn’t walk a batter Corey Kluber (15-9). to win his third start in a row and the San Cleveland moved closer in the races for Francisco Giants beat Arizona for their both the AL Central title and the wild card. ninth straight home victory. The Indians trail Detroit by 3 1-2 games Hunter Pence put the Giants ahead on a for the second wild-card spot, and visit the quirky RBI single in the first. Pence liter- Tigers for a three-game series starting Frially threw his bat at the ball, which hit the day night. front corner of second base and skipped House (3-3) held Minnesota to four into shallow right-center. Pence also drew hits, struck out eight and didn’t walk a bata bases-loaded walk. ter. Cody Allen worked the ninth for his San Francisco, which leads the NL 20th save. wild-card standings, pulled within two Santana has 27 home runs, matching games of the idle Dodgers a day before a his career high. His leadoff homer on a key weekend series against the NL West 1-2 pitch in the fourth was the only misleaders at AT&T Park. take Ricky Nolasco (5-11) made in seven Peavy (5-4) walked off to a standing innings. ovation in the sixth. Kyle Gibson (11-11) lost in the openRandall Delgado (3-4) was tagged for er.

NFL under fire for Rice case By The Associated Press

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion

Assistant captain Ben Campbell of the Kenai River Brown Bears sketches out a play during practice Thursday in Soldotna.

. . . Bears Continued from page B-1

team and future players on the team,” Quinn said. “This year we have more team talent than last year — a lot more depth.” Kenai River also has been able to assemble depth by taking what could have been a weakness — being stationed in a small town in Alaska — and turning it into a strength. Beauparlant said players have come to appreciate being able to focus on hockey, school and community service, and nothing else. “A wise man once told me you can only do two things really well in your life,” he said. “When it comes time to choose, it’s hockey and school. If you add a third thing, like a social life, that can come back and bite you.” The Bears had extended hot and cold snaps last season. Andrews, the second-year defenseman who will captain the team, said that streakiness was due to getting so much scoring from departed forwards Butcher, Albin Karls-

son and Sebastian Fuchs and 19 percent of the goals from the defense. “We have a lot more depth and that should control the ups and downs,” Andrews said. In addition to returning Andrews, Quinn at goalie and 30-point forward Rudin, defensemen Ben Campbell and Gustav Berglund return for a second year. “We have five young men that believe in the program and know how good they have it here,” Beauparlant said. “I think they have a passion for taking this program and getting it over the hurdle we spoke of earlier.” The Bears also added veteran presences in West Valley product Logan Wendling, who has at least 16 points in each of his three seasons in the league, and Maurin Bouvet, a French player who had 25 points for the Corpus Christi (Texas) IceRays last season. “We have a nice veteran presence, and we’re also expecting some of the young guys to step right in,” Beauparlant said. The culture of the Bears has been a team that, in the

past, didn’t have the most talent, but overcame that with hard work on the ice. The veterans said the five returners will have no problem instilling that culture in the team. “The vets did a very good job of teaching us the background of the organization last year,” Quinn said. “There will be a transition this year, and now it’s our turn to teach the rookies.” A big part of being a Brown Bear is the unique rivalry with the Ice Dogs. “It may be the best rivalry in the North American Hockey League,” Beauparlant said. Once again, the two squads will face off 16 times this season for the Ravn Cup. The NAHL does not have a balanced division schedule, so the two squads play frequently to limit travel costs. That means that if the Bears want to do anything, they must first have success against a team that has been to the Robertson Cup finals in three of the past four years, winning in 2011 and 2014. Kenai River has faced Fairbanks five times in the playoffs, and lost each

series. Enriching the rivalry, Campbell and Wendling have played for Fairbanks, while Beauparlant is a former assistant. “You want to play the best and beat the best to become the best,” Beauparlant said. “Fairbanks has shown over time they are one of the league’s top teams.” Beauparlant said the Brown Bears showed far too much respect for the Ice Dogs last season in losing the first seven games to their rival, then going 3-6 after that. “We played Fairbanks 16 times last year, but we didn’t really compete with them until the playoffs,” Quinn said. “This year we have to compete with them right from the start.” Fairbanks has nine returners from the championship squad, and Beauparlant said it is an excellent test of his side. “We can only control what we’re working on preparing for, and the intensity level we bring Friday,” Beauparlant said. “I want to see us compete from the drop of the puck.”

No. 25 BYU rolls past Houston PROVO, Utah — Taysom Hill threw for 200 yards and a touchdown while running for 160 yards and another score, and No. 25 BYU beat Houston 33-25 on Thursday night. Jamaal Williams rushed for 139 yards and two TDs for

BYU, which has won its opening three games for the first time since 2008. BYU moved into the rankings after a 41-7 victory over Texas last weekend. BYU jumped out to an early 23-0 lead, but the Cougars (1-2)

scored 15 straight points before halftime. Houston’s John O’Korn passed for 307 yards and three touchdowns, including a 45yard desperation heave to Daniel Spencer as time ran out in the first half. Deontay GreenC

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berry caught a pair of O’Korn’s touchdowns. The teams met last season with BYU pulling out the win on Hill’s 11-yard touchdown pass to Skyler Ridley with less than two minutes to go for a 4746 win.

NEW YORK — The NFL called in a former FBI director to examine how it pursued and handled evidence in the Ray Rice domestic violence case as pressure increased for the league to be more transparent about its original investigation. The move late Wednesday came hours after The Associated Press reported that a law enforcement officer said he sent an NFL executive a video in April that showed Rice striking his then-fiancee at a casino. Goodell has maintained that no one in the NFL saw the video until it was released by TMZ Sports Monday. Women’s organizations, members of Congress and players have called for more detail about the NFL’s handling of the Rice case. The criticism intensified after the law enforcement official’s account. Goodell turned to Robert S. Mueller III, who was the director of the FBI for 12 years, to lead the inquiry. The probe will be overseen by owners John Mara of the New York Giants and Art Rooney of the Pittsburgh Steelers, two of Goodell’s strongest supporters. Both are members of key NFL committees and have closely advised Goodell throughout his tenure. The NFL called the probe independent, and did not discuss how the owners will work with Mueller. But there could be an appearance of conflict: Mara has already indicated he doesn’t think Goodell’s job should be in jeopardy. Hardy back at practice for Panthers CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Panthers defensive end Greg Hardy returned to practice Thursday, one day after being excused from work to meet with his attorney.

. . . NFL Continued from page B-1

Baltimore defensive lineman Chris Canty shouted, “We weren’t curious at all. We knew how this was going to go. This was going to go one way, our way, tonight. No question about it.” Pittsburgh (1-1) finished with only 22 fewer yards than Baltimore, but the turnovers made the difference. One Steelers miscue halted their opening drive, another set up a fourth-quarter field goal by Tucker, and an interception thrown by Ben Roethlisberger with 1:51 remaining ended

Hardy practiced in full pads, joking with teammates during warmups as Eminem’s “Lose Yourself” blared in the background from a portable speaker on the field. Hardy didn’t not speak to the media following the two-hour workout. The team’s franchise player was convicted on two domestic violence charges July 15 following an altercation with his ex-girlfriend at his apartment in March. Hardy has appealed and a jury trial is set for Nov. 17. Colts lose Mathis for season INDIANAPOLIS — Robert Mathis’ season is over before it even began. Less than two weeks after leaving the Colts to start serving a four-game suspension for violating the league’s performance-enhancing substance policy, coach Chuck Pagano said team doctors confirmed their worst fears: The 2013 NFL sacks champion tore his Achilles tendon during a private workout in Atlanta. Pagano said he believed Mathis was scheduled to have surgery Thursday. Lacy returns from concussion GREEN BAY, Wis. — Eddie Lacy is back after another concussion, and he is pondering a couple of changes. The bruising Green Bay Packers running back returned to practice Thursday as a full participant after getting knocked out of last week’s loss to Seattle in the season opener. He appears ready to assume his normal workload in Sunday’s home opener against the New York Jets. It was Lacy’s second concussion in nearly a year, enough to get him thinking about adjusting his running style. any hope. “Obviously, a disappointing effort for us,” coach Mike Tomlin said. “A lot of the selfinflicted wounds are going to prevent you from being in a football game like that. We turned the ball over too often (and) were highly penalized. Those two things are a lethal combination.” It was only the second time in the last 11 regular-season meetings between the teams that the outcome was decided by more than three points. Roethlisberger completed 22 of 37 passes for 217 yards. It was the first time since Nov. 26, 2006, that Baltimore held Pittsburgh without a touchdown.

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O utdoor V iew L es Palmer

Long Live the King

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n Aug. 8, I attended the Wild and Scenic Film Festival in Kenai. One of the films really raised my hackles. “Long Live the King,” a Fly Out Media video, is sponsored by makers of high-end gear and apparel, among them Orvis, Patagonia, and Smith Optics. The “stars” are mainly lodge owners and fishing guides, bemoaning the fact that Alaska’s king salmon runs have been declining for several years. Half of the film is something-has-to-be-done whining that has little or nothing to do with the likely cause of the poor runs, which is some unknown change in the ocean. The other half is anglers catching king salmon with fly-fishing gear and releasing them with a backdrop of Alaskan wilderness. I’ve caught king salmon on fly tackle and light tackle in the past, so I’m not without some knowledge and experience on the subject. What galls me about this film is that it encourages fishing for kings while Alaska’s king runs are at a historical low. Worse, it encourages catch-and-release fishing for them with fly-fishing tackle. Studies have found that blood lactic acid levels increase in fish due to the stress of being captured, and that these levels increase for up to four hours after the event. If critical levels are reached, the fish die. In other words, that salmon you catch and release “unharmed” can die of lactic acid poisoning hours after you hooked it. It has been known for decades that quickly bringing in a hooked fish minimizes the build-up of lactic acid. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game’s brochure, “How To Be An Ethical Angler,” urges anglers to “Use strong fishing line to bring fish in quickly.” That may be true, but strong fishing line doesn’t bring a fish in very quickly if one end is attached to a 9-weight fly rod and the other end to a 30-pound salmon. The International Federation of Fly Fishers’ “Tips for Catch & Release” brochure advises anglers to “Use tackle and line strong enough to bring fish in quickly.” This tip presents Federation members with a quandary. With the occasional exception, large salmon can’t be brought in very quickly with fly fishing or other light tackle. To me, knowingly using tackle that increases the stress during the capture, thereby risking the fish’s life, seems more than a little unethical. Even more than the risk of killing the occasional king salmon by “playing” it too long, it irks me that these guides and lodge owners waving the conservation banner are encouraging anglers to come to Alaska and have fun with fish that are right on the edge of sustainability as a species. They aren’t doing it for the fish, but to keep people fishing. If people don’t fish, they don’t buy gear, go on guided trips or stay at lodges. Profit, not conservation, was the reason for making See PALMER, page C-2

AP Photos/Juneau Empire, Mary Catharine Martin

In this July, 2013, photo, a mother brown bear nurses her yearling cub at Admiralty Island’s Pack Creek near Windfall Harbor, Alaska. The area around Pack Creek, a bear-viewing area on Admiralty Island, offers some amazing sights not too far from Juneau.

Welcome to the bear show

Kayaking Windfall Harbor and visiting Pack Creek By MARY CATHARINE MARTIN Morris News Service-Alaska/Juneau Empire

Last summer, my boyfriend Bjorn and I went for a three-day sun-drenched kayak trip at Admiralty Island’s Windfall Harbor. We squinted into the merciless horizon to see an orca with a hooked fin swimming slowly past us. Two brown bear cubs played in the water like they were auditioning for a Disney movie while their overheated mother lay on her back in the shallows with her paws up in the air. The area around Pack Creek, a bearviewing area on Admiralty Island — not to mention Pack Creek itself — offers some amazing sights not too far from Juneau, so for the final multi-day trip of my brother Chip’s visit from the East Coast, and the undertaking known as Operation Convince Chip and his girlfriend, Carrie, to Move to Alaska, Chip, Bjorn and I, Bjorn’s mom and dad, Nils and Lynnette, and Nils’ always-up-foran-adventure cousin Robin took a float plane to Admiralty. But it wasn’t all sunshine and

squinting this time around. It was a bit more, well, Southeast. Rain. Bears. Fog drifting in the gaps between mountains and trees. Chip was excited about the possibility of spending more Alaskan nights in a tent than under a roof, so we already knew he was up for it. Robin was flying in from Washington, so when her plane touched down a scant 10 minutes after Chip’s, we were ready with our ambush. “Want to camp out at Admiralty and see some brown bears, Robin?” “Sure!” she said, suitcase in hand. “Sounds great!” We’d neglected to bring up the possibility before the trip, so she had no sleeping bag, no mat, no headlamp — but she wasn’t daunted. When she committed, she committed Nils and Lynnette, too. Muahaha ... We flew out in two Cessna 206’s on a Sunday evening. About 30 minutes later, we landed at Windfall Island, about a half mile into Windfall Harbor, off Admiralty Island, and set up our tents. “Want to paddle to Middle Creek?”

In this July, 2013, photo, Admiralty Island’s Middle Creek area, located near Windfall Harbor, Alaska, is packed with male brown bears feeding on salmon during an evening low tide. The area around Pack Creek, a bear-viewing area on Admiralty Island, offers some amazing sights not too far from Juneau.

Bjorn asked. along the beach. He’d stood up, sniffed Middle Creek is a drainage about the wind coming from our direction, two miles south of Pack Creek. Last and kept walking. summer, that’s where Bjorn and I saw In all the times Bjorn had been to See BEAR, page C-2 a medium-sized brown bear walking

We were motivated by people flying past us By RICH LANDERS The Spokesman-Review

SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Anyone can move a canoe, kayak or stand-up paddleboard over the water, but precious few have savored the joy of paddling efficiently. When you see paddlers zigzagging up the Thorofare to Upper Priest Lake, bumping into logs and frittering away calories, they probably don’t have a clue that there’s a better way. Most of us figure we learned everything about paddling at summer camp when we were 9. Even Brook Swanson had that mindset, to some degree. “My parents were canoeists and I’ve paddled all my life, but I didn’t realize how much I did not know until I started hanging out with really good paddlers,” said Swanson, who’s been

dipping into competitive paddling in recent years. It’s no accident that Swanson and his wife, Lisa, were the top tandem team in the recent Spokane River Classic. They’ve become students in the art of muscle-powering a boat. “I don’t consider myself a great paddler, but I’ve improved enormously by joining up with members of the (Spokane Canoe & Kayak) Club,” he said. Brook teaches biology at Gonzaga University and has special interest in physiology and biomechanics. Lisa is a physical therapist. They’ve been married and boating together for 14 years but were spurred into another level of enjoyment when they noticed AP Photo/The Spokesman-Review, Rich Landers other canoes blowing past them eight years ago in a Spokane River Canoe In this Aug. 23 photo, Brook and Lisa Swanson are in perfect synch as they See RACE, page C-2 paddle their racing canoe in the Spokane River Classic in Spokane, Wash.

Assess avian productivity of Kenai Flats R efuge N otebook Toby B urke

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y favorite place to birdwatch, or “bird,” on the Kenai Peninsula is the Kenai Flats. “The Flats” are not merely the wetlands you see from Bridge Access Road or from the bluff near the Kenai Senior Center. In its entirety, it encompasses 7,500 acres of intertidal mudflats, sand and gravel bars, dunes, tidal sloughs, creeks, river, grasslands, riparian shrub and forest. As the estuary of the Kenai River, the Photo courtesy Kenai National Wildlife Refuge Flats extend a mile beyond its Aerial view of the Kenai Flats, where 187 bird species have been documented over the past mouth into Cook Inlet and upstream to River Mile 12 near five decades. C

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the Pillars. By definition an estuary is the tidally influenced, broad lower course of a large river and embayment at its terminus where salt and fresh waters meet and mix. Here, nutrientladen river waters combine with shallow coastal waters and the upwelling of nutrient-rich deeper ocean waters, generating exceptional primary productivity that supports vigorous marine food chains. They are areas of concentrated productivity, measured as abundance of individual organisms and species, as well as biomass and energy. The wealth of plant life and invertebrates directly or indirectly provide nourishment for resident and migratory fish, marine mammals, and birds. Estuaries are renowned for their prodigious biological productivity and, along with tropical

rainforests and coral reefs, rank as the world’s most productive ecosystems. Accordingly, a few local biologists and a handful of dedicated birders from the Keen Eye Bird Club decided it was finally time to formally assess the avian productivity of the Kenai River estuary. Combing through thousands of records of bird sightings over the last 50 years, a checklist of species and their relative abundances through the four seasons was compiled. The effort delineated 187 bird species that have been seen on the Flats, of which a remarkable 81 species are known to breed there annually or at least occasionally. The “Checklist of the Birds of the Kenai Flats” serves as the See REFUGE, page C-2


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C-2 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014

. . . Palmer

another life-or-death struggle before they spawn. Hell, we’ll even mess with ‘em right while Continued from page C-1 they’re spawning. By using fly rods and barbless hooks, we’ll make it more sporting, give ‘em “Long Live the King.” more of a chance to get away. When salmon aren’t abunSure, it’ll take a little longer to dant, when they’re having trouble just sustaining, no ethi- bring ‘em in to where we can cal angler can possibly justify get a good trophy video, and the injury and stress of the fight making their survival even more difficult. And no business kills a few, but it’s less than 10 or organization, no matter how percent. What the hell, you have conservation-oriented it claims to break a few eggs to make to be, can justify heaping even an omelet. We can’t just quit fishing.” more pressure on salmon by If this were children throwattracting even more anglers to “conserve” them by fishing for ing stones at spawning salmon in a creek, I wouldn’t approve them. of it, but at least I could underIt wouldn’t bother me as much if these people with mon- stand the urge, the ignorance and the lack of a sense of ey in the fishing game weren’t responsibility. But these people so hypocritical. I wish they’d are mature, intelligent adults. just come right out and say, Or are they? “To conserve these salmon that are having trouble surviving, Les Palmer can be reached we’re going to have some fun at les.palmer@rocketmail.com. with ‘em, put ‘em through yet

. . . Race Continued from page C-1

Classic. “Part of going faster is getting a better boat,” Swanson said. “But we were motivated by people flying past us. “Jim Bauer, Tim Ahern, Stan Mrzygod,” he said, listing some local paddling gurus. “I’ve spent a ridiculous amount of time watching them or being in a canoe with them to learn,” Swanson said. Bauer, one of the local deans of marathon paddling, is an elite canoeist who doesn’t worry about car shuttles because he paddles up and down the Spokane and Little Spokane when he works out. “Jim always emphasizes the mechanics of the paddle stroke, rotating the torso, reaching with the lower hand. Even after decades of paddling, he strives to be better,” Swanson said. Megan and John Roland say they realized how much more they had to learn when they enrolled years ago in one of the Spokane Canoe & Kayak Club’s annual spring classes. The Rolands, who won the citizens division of the Spokane River Classic, went on to become paddling instructors. Looking at photos of them paddling in the Classic, the Rolands and Swansons had a common response: Instead of beauty in motion, they all saw flaws in the 1/1000th of a second of paddling technique captured in the frames. “My elbow is bent,” Megan said, reacting to the photo of her applying a stationary crossbow draw to go around a U-turn buoy in the race. “Note that she used that stroke only briefly to get the turn started to avoid losing our momentum,” said, John, who was applying a sweep stroke from the stern to aid the turn while applying power. The Rolands say they have at least 10 different strokes in their tool box, “and we probably use them all every time we go out,” John said. “The top elbow should be straight,” continued Megan, a physical therapist. “A bend loses energy that you absorb in your arms rather than in your torso.” The Rolands say they’ve enjoyed teaching and watching people get the feel of efficient paddling. Open-mindedness is the

most important thing a student can bring to a paddling class, John said. “Most folks are so comfortable that they can propel their craft over the water. They’re so happy with that; they don’t get around to appreciating there’s so much more they can do with their craft.” “The forward stroke is the last thing we teach in a class,” Megan said. “We spend most of the time on turning strokes like the draw and pry. There’s so much joy in being able to maneuver efficiently.” “That’s the fun part of canoeing,” John said. “Getting your boat to go in circles, sideway, backward and off at any angle you want to go.” “The hardest thing to teach is an upright paddle,” Megan said. “When it’s in the water, it should be perpendicular. People want to do a long stroke from their feet back past their bottom. We teach a more efficient short stroke, with the paddle shaft perpendicular in the water so it’s not pushing down or up.” “Another tendency is to follow the hull of the boat with the paddle stroke,” John said. “But rather than following the line of the boat (which curves), you want to paddle a straight line forward to where you want to go. “Those little things can add up to make a big difference.” Good paddlers have an appreciation for subtlety. The Swansons take turns in the bow and stern, although Brook takes the bow in races because his heavier body weight trims the canoe more efficiently. Once underway, the Swansons switch sides every few strokes to keep the canoe going straight rather than having the stern paddler apply a J-stroke. “We do it even when we’re just cruising,” he said. “It seems natural to us now to do as little with the paddle as possible that isn’t pushing the boat forward.” Their fascination with paddling has propelled the Swansons into good showings in races from Spokane to Sacramento. They joined a six-person team that won the voyageur canoe category in the 444-mile Yukon River Quest endurance race last summer. They’ve learned to recognize a stroke of genius and apply it, whether it’s in the old 80-pound Royalex boat Brook has kept since childhood or the daggerlike 24-foot OC2 canoe that’s so sleek it sports an outrigger for stability.

. . . Bear Continued from page C-1

Middle Creek, he’d never seen more than one bear at a time in that area. We had no idea of the bear show that was in store. We dragged out three of Above and Beyond Alaska’s double kayaks (the guide company regularly takes clients on Windfall Harbor kayaking trips to Pack Creek and other places; one of the benefits of Bjorn being a part-time guide for ABAK is that they’re nice enough to let us occasionally use their equipment.) When we showed up at Middle Creek, not expecting much, there were three bears fishing in the drainage, one after another. Another bear appeared farther up the creek. The six of us gestured furiously to one another. Chip whispered “There’s another!” And another. Two more bears approached from a cove to Middle Creek’s left. One disappeared into the forest. The other lumbered closer along the shore. He disappeared into the high grasses along the riverbanks, still walking our way. The bear fishing closest to us froze, watching the grass. The big bear emerged over the hill, lumbering closer until the first bear turned away, ceding his prime fishing spot. Nils paddled closer from the back seat of a kayak; Lynnette, her face serene, paddled backward from the front. (Once, years ago — restrained by Nils — she attempted to clobber a flour-stealing black bear out of her pantry with a broom; perhaps a paddle doesn’t inspire as

. . . Refuge Continued from page C-1

most current and complete inventory of bird species for this area. It is long overdue considering the Flats is one of the foremost bird watching destinations on the Kenai Peninsula. Two other local birding “Meccas,” Kachemak and Resurrection bays, have had formal bird checklists for decades. The new checklist proves that the Flats deserve its weighty reputation — though considerably smaller in size than the other two areas, the number of bird species documented on the Flats rivals them. While the checklist is a compilation of all species recorded over five decades, the relative abundance is essentially a snapshot in time (2014). This latter attribute is invaluable to biologists. Bird populations are dynamic, so periodic snapshots allow biologists to track changes in abundance (and occasionally species) over time. For example, Rusty Blackbirds and Red-necked Phalaropes were once common breeders and migrants on the Kenai Flats but have become increasingly scarce, reflecting not merely local but continentwide declines. Conversely, Northern Saw-whet Owls, Red-breasted Nuthatches, and Brown Creepers, now common in the Flat’s riparian forests, were not known to occur there prior to 1970 before these species experienced dramatic continental expansions northward

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much confidence.) The big bear now stood in the stream where the other bear had been. One after another, five bears, as far as we could tell boars, fished the creek. The big bear put his head down and squared his shoulders at us. Now we all paddled backwards. We were a ways out, but the banks at Middle Creek decline very gradually. Even where we were, it was only a few feet deep. The big bear appeared mollified to have all cede ground to him as the alpha, and he took up fishing. He caught a fish almost immediately and dropped it on the bank. He left it there, certain no bear would dare to steal it, until he’d caught another. Then he ate both. Behind him, other bears kept fishing. We watched this bear show for around two hours as the tide, and the mist, rolled in. Then we paddled back to the island, cooked dinner, and prepared for Pack Creek the next day. Pack Creek, which is jointly managed by the U.S. Forest Service and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, is one of Admiralty Island’s biggest draws. Every day during the summer season, which runs from June 1 to Sept. 10, an average of 12 guided permits and 12 non-guided permits are available to tourists, Southeast residents, or whoever would like to see some bears. We’d purchased non-guided permits for $50 each. We paddled up to the designated area, where Forest Service crew supervisor Harry Tullis and ADF&G Wildlife Technician Carl Koch met us. We attached our kayaks to a rope system that pulled them out about 100 feet into the cove and put anything remotely food-like in a bear box.

Fifty to 80 percent of Pack Creek bears also use nearby Middle Creek (where we’d seen bears the night before) or Swan Creek, though, Tullis said, Pack Creek tends to draw more sows, and, subsequently, cubs, than some of the other non-habituated areas around Admiralty Island. Boars tend to avoid people — perhaps because they know they’re targeted during hunting season; perhaps because they just want more space. Pack Creek is a different sort of place to see bears than Middle Creek. Here, they’re habituated, and the rangers and wildlife technicians are there to make sure you don’t inadvertently do something (like stand on the logs in the viewing area) that might get construed as a threat. If you’re lucky, bears gambol to within feet of you. Cubs nurse as their mothers watch you like a harmless illusion in which they don’t quite believe. Bears lie down, scratch themselves, eat grass, chase fish — all without really acknowledging you, but also without getting too close. There are two places to see bears at Pack Creek: in the estuary, which is best at low tide, and in an elevated observatory a mile or so back in the woods, which is best at high tide. It all started with a man named Stan Price and his homestead; the remains of his time there are still visible just off the estuary. The sanctuary is actually named for him; Pack Creek’s official name is Stan Price State Wildlife Sanctuary. The bears were more “ornery” with each other this year than normal, perhaps because of a low chum and pink run, Koch told us. Indeed, for the first few hours we watched the fishing at Pack Creek, we saw a

lot of work and no fish. A mother bear charged one of her (now grown and independent) cubs for fishing to close to her. “The bears are on edge,” Tullis told us. “They’re stressed out.” Flood conditions due to heavy rain this summer haven’t helped, either, he said; deeper water makes it easier for fish to get away. That might be why we had such an unexpectedly good show at Middle Creek at low tide the night before. The oldest bear Koch knows of at Pack Creek was 27, he said; in the 1990s, Admiralty Island was estimated to have between 1,200 and 1,800 brown bears. Those estimates hold today. One biologist Koch knows calls this “bear utopia,” he said, adding that Chichigof and Baranof are comparable. As most Southeast Alaskans know, the Tlingit name for Admiralty is Kootznoowoo — Fortress of the Bear. At Pack Creek, the rangers’ primary job is to mitigate any negative interaction between bears and human beings, Koch said. If the bears keep acting natural and everyone goes home safe, it’s a successful day. It’s a fine art doing enough bear management to keep people safe and little enough to keep bears unafraid of people, Tullis said. Pack Creek managers learned by going to McNeil River, a wildlife sanctuary in Cook Inlet. They react with as small a dissuasion as they can, gradually escalating should they need to. On our day, we saw nothing at all threatening to people, though I’ve heard stories of guides having to falsecharge bears that accidentally (while being chased by another bear) stray onto the area where people stand.

and westward. Aleutian Terns commonly bred on the Flats decades ago but now only occasionally feed there in modest numbers. In contrast, Northwestern Crows and Steller’s Jays first appeared on the Flats little more than a decade ago but now breed along its wooded margins. The colony of hybrid Herring Gull-Glaucouswinged Gulls has grown substantially, their status changing from common to (super) abundant, likely due to increasing local food sources (especially from human waste). Bald Eagles are also far more numerous on the Flats, benefiting from the same waste sources, opportunity to prey on the colossal gull colony, and the end of the Bald Eagle bounty in 1952. I would be remiss if I did not

discuss the dramatic decline of Snow Geese on the Kenai Flats. In years past, 10,000 Snow Geese could be seen during peak staging in late April. But over the past ten years you’d be fortunate to see even 300 at their peak. This does not reflect a continental or flyway-wide decline as their populations are robust, but rather their abandonment of the Flats for estuaries on the west side of Cook Inlet. Species that typically garner disproportionate attention on checklists are the one-time rarities such as the Ruff in 2003, Ivory Gull in 2006, and Lesser Black-backed Gull and Willet in 2012. Notably, the Willet sighting was the first and only substantiated record of this species in Alaska. Avid birders from all

over the state converged on the Flats to view this mega-rarity. “Checklist of the Birds of the Kenai Flats” should be available soon at the Kenai and Soldotna visitor centers, as well as the Kenai Refuge headquarters. Also, contact the Kenai Refuge (262-7021) or the Keen Eye Bird Club (262-7767) if you’re interested in counting birds during the fifth annual BIG SIT on Saturday, October 11 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Lower Skilak Lake Boat Launch Campground. Toby Burke is a Biological Technician at the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. You can find more information about the Refuge at http://kenai.fws.gov or http://www.facebook.com/ kenainationalwildliferefuge.

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Beautiful 3375sq.ft. home on 1.5 acres with an attached 2-car garage, a 1200sq.ft., heated, insulated shop, and a greenhouse. 4-bedrooms, 3-bathrooms, including a large master suite (15 x 25) with a jetted tub, 2-large bedrooms and one average size bedroom. The kitchen and dining areas have been updated with granite counter tops, laminate floors, lots of cabinets, and two pantries. French doors lead from the kitchen/ dining to the deck. Unfinished basement with water treatment system, boiler, on demand hot water, laundry, and lots of room for storage, a gym, or additional living space. Oversize garage has a 10' counter with a built in utility sink which is great for processing fish and game. Located in Soldotna. $350,000. Contact Steve (907)299-0461 or Nancy (907)953-0495 to make an appointment to see this home.

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3-Bedroom, 2-bath, K-beach area home, over 2200ft, 1.23 acres. 2200+ square foot home with 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 car garage,shed, two story addition with second living room and downstairs family room. Located just off K-beach in a desirable, K-beach elementary school location. Energy upgrades made from 3 star to 4 star. Motivated sellers. (907)252-1960

Manufactured Mobile Homes For Sale by Owner.

Single family residential mobile home, 1268sqft, on 1.06 acres. Property includes a well-maintained, partially fenced yard, along with an untouched treed area. Very private setting with wooded views on all sides. Conveniently located 4 miles from Nikiski High School and 8.5 miles from Captain Cook State Park. Includes a 12 x 12 shed with additional overhead storage, a large fenced dog pen, and is wired for your generator. 100 gallon propane tank, and an above ground 300 fuel tank, private well and septic. All appliances stay. Wonderful investment opportunity. Owners are highly motivated. $65,000. OBO (907)776-7641 call anytime.

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C-4 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014 Real Estate For Sale

Homes

Commercial Property Condominiums/Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

Homes HOME FOR SALE.

Multiple Dwelling

K-Beach (W. Poppy) Duplex for Sale or Rent. Spacious 1100sqft. (x2), 3-Bedroom, 1-bath Garage, laundry. New bathrooms. One COMPLETELY REMODELED... paint, flooring, kitchen. Exterior to be painted this month. Excellent rental history. Currently rented one side month-to-month; remodeled side not rented. Perfect place to live and have other side pay most of your mortgage! $1,450. to rent remodeled side. Purchase for $268,000. OBO. (907)252-9153.

Retail/Commercial Space NIKISKI 3-Bedroom, 2 1/2-baths, large kitchen with island, wood burning stove, 2-car garage. approximately 2000sqft., on 2 acres. Very peaceful, a lot of wildlife. $310,000. (907)776-8487, (907)394-1122.

SOLDOTNA HOME for Sale. Two story 3-bedroom, 2.5-bath on a quiet cul-de-sac. Garage and carport. fireplace. New roof & paint. Close to schools. Approximately 1,500sqft. 273 Arlington Ct. $220,000. Paul (907)398-4773

Rentals Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

Apartments, Unfurnished Homes

3-BEDROOM 2-bath, fireplace, washer/dryer, 1-car garage. Soldotna, clean 4-plex, near schools. $950. plus utilities. No smoking/ pets. (907)260-5870. EXCELLENT OCEAN VIEW! Bay Arm Apartments, Kenai. Accepting applications for studio apartment, utilities included. $25. nonrefundable application fee. No pets. (907)283-4405. NEAR VIP Sunny 2-bedroom, 1,100sqft., $1,250. washer/dryer, Dish TV. carport, utilities included. No Smoking/ No Pets. (907)398-0027. NEWLY REMODELED Brunswick Apts. Soldotna. 1-bedroom, storage, $580. Washer/dryer on premises. (907)252-9634, (907)262-7986. No AHFC. Application outside 340 Apt. 5. REDOUBT VIEW Soldotna’s best value! Quiet, freshly painted, close to schools. 1-Bedroom from $625. 2-Bedroom from $725. 3-Bedroom, 2-bath, from $825. No pets. (907)262-4359.

PRIME KENAI RETAIL/ OFFICE SPACE 1,832SqFt to 20,000SqFt. Rates start @ $.50SqFt. Call Carr Gottstein Properties, (907)564-2424 or visit www.carrgottstein.com

Apartments, Furnished KENAI 1-Bedroom, furnished, $700., plus electric. No animals/ smoking. (907)398-1300. KENAI 1-Bedroom, furnished, heat, cable included. No pets. $700. month. (907)283-5203, (907)398-1642.

FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE IN PLACING ADS YOU MAY USE YOUR VISA OR MASTER CARD

Seasonal TOWNHOUSE Condominium On the River in Soldotna Fully furnished 1-bedroom, cable, from $880. Utilities included. No smoking/ pets. (907)262-7835 SOLDOTNA Furnished 1-Bedroom. Shady Lane Apartments. $725. Heat & cable included. No pets. (907)398-1642, (907)283-5203.

Cabins CABIN Furnished, Sterling, 1-bedroom, quiet, utilities included. No Pets/ smoking. $715. month. (907)262-5325 PRIVATE CABIN In Kasilof, 1-bedroom with carport, washer/dryer hookups. $700. month. (907)252-1325

Homes 3-BEDROOM, 2-BATH Home. Roommate wanted. Sterling. Fully furnished. No pets. $600. month includes utilities/ dish. References required. Available immediately. (907)229-2648 WHY RENT ????? Why rent when you can own, many low down & zero down payment programs available. Let me help you achieve the dream of home ownership. Call Now !!! Ken Scott, #AK203469. (907)395-4527 or cellular, (907)690-0220. Alaska USA Mortgage Company, #AK157293.

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes NIKISKI 3-Bedroom, 2.-bath, $990. per month. Pets allowed, includes utilities. Call (907)776-6563.

Retail/ Commercial Space WAREHOUSE K-Beach, 2,000Sqft., 14ft.-door, bathroom, heat included/ Deposit. $1,110. (907)283-7430.

All real estate advertising in this publication is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this publication are available on an equal opportunity basis.

Every Friday in the Peninsula Clarion

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C-6 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014

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FINE VIEW Well built custom home with a wonderful view toward the Kenai River and mountains, fronts a small pond with lots of wildlife. Great location near town, but private, near City boat launch, nice landscaping, very pleasing design with good sized bedrooms. Great SW facing upstairs deck. MLS 14-10434 $352,000

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INLET FRONT LOT! Beautiful view lot fronting Inlet far enough off the highway to be private and quiet - electricity on site too! Good but sparse trees on level top of bluff - great vistas! 1.3 acres on upland. Massive mountain views, large field behind this lot. Correia Bend area. 14-10160 $72,000 LITTLE SKIMO BUILDING Commercial-retail building for sale. Has been an established burger and brew spot in the heart of Kenai right across from the Kenai visitors center. Can be sold with or without restaurant equipment and Beer and Wine license...A great location for any business in the heart of Kenai. MLS 11-3701 $125,000

www.peninsulaclarion.com

283-7551 150 Trading Bay Rd, Kenai, AK 99611

POACHERS COVE Small 1 Bthrm cabin for your summer fun in Poachers Cove on the Kenai river! Located right near the boat launch and entrance. Fenced and Gated seasonal community. MLS 14-10387 $59,000 WEST MACKEY LAKEFRONT HOME BRING YOUR AIRPLANE! Summer and winter fun with 2744 sf 3 BR home and hangar w hydraulic lift door. Dock for boat. Home has private views of the lake, open vaulted living room & kitchen. Wonderful big deck. Fireplace, hot tub room, family room, huge greenhouse. Underground sprinkler system. No covenants. A must see! MLS 13-6642 $550,000

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SOLDOTNA Nice 2142 sf 4 BR 2 BA home in the heart of Soldotna – great neighborhood off Kobuk. Paved drive. RV parking, landscaped. Large deck, 2 car attchd garage. MLS 14-636 $250,000

NICE REMODELED HOME! COMPLETE REMODEL 2013. NEW CABINETS, CARPETING, flooring. 2000+ SF, 3 BR 2 Ba. Great open floor plan. Everything move in ready. This large family home has large deck for gettogethers. Shed with attached carport. Nice private location with beautiful trees and yard. New septic 2007. MLS 13-13472 $198,000

LOCATION-LOCATION In the heart of Soldotna with convenience to stores,etc this immaculate one owner ranch house is 3 bd. 2 bath with real mahogany flooring in hallway, dining, kitchen. White cabinets with glass fronts in some. Large wide hallway. Lots of windows. Lovely home MLS 14-8691 $215,000

VIEW OF MOUNTAINS Unfinished cabin with view and extra foundation for your new home. View of mountains. Sterling near Longmere Lake. MLS 14-7286 $55,000

ONE GREAT BUSINESS! LOTS of options - Bing’s in Sterling includes 3497sf retail/4 BR motel, 1832sf 3BR 2BA house w/ hottub, 560sf 2BR 1BA apt. w/ fplc. 4 rm motel @ with bathroom; liquor store & license, sport tackle store. Laundry/shower facilities. 17RV spaces w/ electr. hkups & a wastewater dump station. 500+ft of highway frontage & 6.79 acres. MLS 14-12432 $ 499,000

Mark White

Linda McLane

Donna Miller

260-1609

252-4212

398-4274

Associate Broker

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C-8 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014

Keep a Sharp Eye on the Classifieds

Multiple Dwelling

Each week, our Classified section features hundreds of new listings for everything from pre-owned merchandise to real estate and even employment opportunities. So chances are, no matter what you’re looking for, the Classifieds are the best place to start your search.

Land

283-7551 www.peninsulaclarion.com

Looking for a companion? Check out the Peninsula Clarion Classifieds! 283-7551 C

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Contact us

www.peninsulaclarion.com classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com

Classified Index EMPLOYMENT Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/ Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Commercial Property Condominiums/ Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

REAL ESTATE RENTALS Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums/ Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

FINANCIAL Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgage/Loans

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

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Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn & Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

CLASSIFIEDS

General Employment

TRANSPORTATION Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

PETS & LIVESTOCK Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

SERVICES Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

NOTICES/ ANNOUNCEMENTS Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

PUBLIC NOTICES/ LEGAL ADS Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

Garage Sales

ConocoPhillips Alaska is Recruiting for the following positions: HSE&T SPECIALIST

To perform this job successfully, an individual must be able to perform each essential duty satisfactorily. These requirements are representative of the knowledge, skill, and/or ability required. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions. DUTIES Responsible for providing job site supervision and management with the information and support required to run all operations at an optimal safety level, train employees and analyze job hazards on a continuing basis. Responsible for • Formal Loss Control Program Performance • Safety Surveillance Program Performance • Code Evaluation and Compliance • Industrial hygiene Services • Safety Training and Orientation • Incident Information System MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS Bachelor's Degree (BA or BS) and five years Health, Safety and Environmental (HSE) related experience; or equivalent combination of education and experience to complete the tasks of the position. Arctic experience is preferred. A valid driver's license is required. The successful candidate must be highly organized, detail oriented and have the ability to multi-task. Peak is an equal opportunity employer and offers a competitive salary and benefits package. Post offer/Pre-employment screening including drug testing, functional capacity testing and other pre-employment tests are required. Submit resumes to peakhr@peakalaska.com or fax to (907) 263-7041. Include the phrase “Nikiski HSE&T Specialist” in your email subject line and on your resume. Peak is a wholly owned subsidiary of Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC) and as such extends preference to BBNC Shareholders, Shareholder Spouses, and BBNC Descendants. If you fit into one of these categories, please indicate this on your resume.

General Employment

RECREATION Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boat Charters Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snowmobiles Sporting Goods

Oil & Refinery

General Employment

CITY OF KENAI, ALASKA Position Vacancy Temporary Equipment Operator. Pay $ 25.81 per hour. Position responsible for snow and ice removal at the Kenai Municipal Airport and hours are worked on a call-out, as-needed basis. Position announcement, job description and application are available through the Alaska Job Center Network, (907) 335-3010. Submit resume and City of Kenai application form by September 19, 2014 to the Peninsula Job Service, 11312 Kenai Spur Hwy., Kenai, AK 99611. The City of Kenai is an equal opportunity employer. For more information about the City of Kenai, visit our homepage at www.ci.kenai.ak.us

General Employment

Forget-Me-Not Activity Aide

Tyonek Platform Electrician & Instrument Specialist Location: Tyonek Platform

Do you enjoy working with older Alaskans? FCS is currently looking to hire an Activity Aide at the Forget-Me-Not Adult Day Center. This position assists with providing an active living program which meets the individual goals and interests while encouraging independence, including but not limited to toileting, ambulation and meal service. Develops daily activity plans including goals, supplies, and method of presentation while adhering to the philosophy of the Forget-Me-Not Center. QUALIFICATIONS, EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE REQUIRED: High School Diploma or equivalent. Experience working with and knowledge of older adults. Experience with individual's with Alzheimer's or age related dementia preferred. For a complete job description please visit fcsonline.org Please return application packet to Frontier Community Services 43335 K-Beach Rd Suite #36, Soldotna, AK 99669 or email to work@fcsonline.org

Qualified applicants must apply online by September 23, 2014 For more information on this opening and to apply, please visit our website: www.conocophillips.com/careers ConocoPhillips Alaska is an equal opportunity employer

Sales & Marketing OUTSIDE SALES REPRESENTATIVE

The Peninsula Clarion is accepting applications for an additional outside sales representative. Sales experience is a must. This position requires a dependable vehicle & an Alaskan drivers license. Position offers excellent earning potential. Benefits available.

Healthcare

Send resume and/or application to: Peninsula Clarion. Attn.: Leslie Talent PO Box 3009 Kenai AK 99611 NO PHONE CALLS leslie.talent@peninsulaclarion.com or deliver to: 150 Trading Bay, Kenai.

Employment Opportunities Kenai Peninsula Borough School District

School Nurses

Employment

KPBSD is seeking experienced nurses at several sites. Nurses provide care for illness, accidents and injuries during the school day. They assist in control and prevention of communicable disease and monitor chronic health problems. Vision, hearing and growth screening, as well as ensuring immunization status are completed by the nurse. Teaching, counseling, and maintenance of records are the nurse's role. The nurse works as a team member with school staff, parents, and community members to facilitate effective learning. Current open positions are posted on-line at the KPBSD website: www.kpbsd.k12.ak.us. Click Employment tab > Current Openings > Nurse. *WE ARE AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER*

Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

Healthcare

General Employment BUILDING MAINTENANCE PERSON 15hr/ wk. Maintain grounds, repairs, janitorial tasks, painting units, $12- $15. DOE. Apply in Person Monday- Thursday 8am- noon. Northwood Apts. 190 W. Park Ave. Soldotna

By bringing together medical, dental, and behavioral health services, PCHS offers highquality, coordinated care for the entire family. PCHS has Full-time hire position for

Financial Aid Clerk

• • • • •

Care Coordinator Charge Nurse Health information Manager Certified Medical Assistant Clerical Assistant

Financial Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgages/Loans

PCHS has Part-time hire position for

This fulltime, 12 month, level 75 position will begin October 2014 at $16.33/hourly. Responsibilities include but are not limited to customer service and support, data entry, creating various types of documents and record maintenance and review. Employment package includes benefits and tuition waivers. The review date is 9/19/2014 but applications will be accepted until the position is closed. For more information and to apply for this position go to KPC's employment page at www.kpc.alaska.edu

Positions will be open until filled. Job description and application available online at www.pchsak.org Careers Please send cover letter, resume & application to: Human Resources, 230 E. Marydale Ave., Suite 3, Soldotna, AK, 99669 or fax to 907/260-7358. PCHS is an equal opportunity employer.

UAA is an AA/EO Employer and Ed. Institution.

Office & Clerical

• Individual Service Provider

Financial Opportunities CAPITALIZE on CANNABIS Discover tips & tricks from industry experts. 2-day seminar Oct 11- 12 at the Egan Center. $420/seat. RESERVE YOUR SEAT @ AlaskaCannabisInstitute.com or call for more info 907-331-0506

General Employment CITY OF SOLDOTNA EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Regular Full Time Account Clerk III Wage Range 13 $25.07-$32.43 Non-Exempt The City of Soldotna has an immediate opening for an Account Clerk III in the Finance Department. A complete job description is available on the City's website at http://ci.soldotna.ak.us/jobs.html. Must submit City application, resume and cover letter to Human Resources at 177 N. Birch Street, Soldotna, by email tcollier@ci.soldotna.ak.us, or fax 866-596-2994 by 4:30 p.m., September 19, 2014. The City of Soldotna is an EEO employer.

www.peninsulaclarion.com

Advertising Assistant

To place an ad call 907-283-7551

Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery MK-14inch Walk behind concrete/ asphalt cutter. 10hp Honda. $850. (907)262-1817

Recreation Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boats Charter Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snow Mobiles Sporting Goods

MOVING SALE, INDOORS! Thursday, Friday, noon-8pm. Saturday morning. Deville off Sterling Hwy. Follow signs. (907)262-8341 Furniture, electronics, books & home school education material, fishing equipment, sporting- hockey/skiing, toys, household etc.!

Garage Sales

9/12- 13- 14/2014 Silvertip Lodge Guest Cabins Huge Yard Sale. Over 20 Years of Accumulation... Mile 90.9 Sterling Highway. 35930 Janota Circle. Turn on Isbell Street then left on Bowman. (907)394-1338/ (907)262-4450. 10am to 4pm.

Garage Sales HUGE GARAGE SALE Sterling Senior Center Multi-ventor garage sale. Friday, Saturday, Sept. 12 & 13, 10am- 4pm. Lunch available. Baked goods, Rada knives, Mile 83 Sterling Hwy.

Garage Sales MOVING SALE! Saturday 10am- 6pm. 1077 Walnut: Woodland Subdivision, N. Forest/ Elm/ Walnut/ Right 3-blocks. Studded tires, brake buddy with Falcon-2-Hitch, computer desk, furniture, dishes, Cuisinart cookware, bedding skis/boots, clothes.

Garage Sales MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE Aircraft parts, lots of fishing gear, electric bear fence, dishes, clothes, Lots of men stuff! 37866 Rainbow Dr./ off Mackey Lake. Friday/ Saturday 9am- 5pm.

Garage Sales Sporting Goods FULL SET- NEW Men’s Wilson clubs/ bag, $300. (907)690-4168 (907)690-4169

MOVING SALE Bandsaw sawmill, furniture- big & small, shop stuff, fishing, hunting, lots of miscellaneous. Friday/ Saturday 9am- 5pm. S. Spruce Haven St. follow signs. Nikiski.

Transportation Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

Trucks 2001 CHEVY. S10 Pickup 4x4 143k miles, good maintenance record, 2 sets of tires on rims. $3300. OBO (907)776-5898

Garage Sales ESTATE SALE Friday/ Saturday 9am-5pm Kingery Rd off Island Lake, Nikiski, follow signs. Household goods, furniture, TV’s piano, organ, PA system, Bass & amp, garden items, lawn furniture. Pets & Livestock Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

Dogs

Trucks: Commercial

Merchandise For Sale

Proficiency with both Mac and PC computer using Word/ Excel and Outlook, as well as experience with other software programs desirable. Exceptional customer service and telephone skills, accuracy in data entry with a high attention to detail. Professional appearance. Ability to meet deadlines and complete multiple tasks, this individual will support the Advertising Department with office related tasks, may work directly with customers in a receptionist capacity, perform data entry on a daily basis, and learn to answer phones. Hours are Monday – Friday, 8am- 5pm. Salary DOE. Benefits available. Submit completed application attention: Leslie Talent Peninsula Clarion PO Box 3009 Kenai, AK 99611 No Phone Calls. The Peninsula Clarion is an EOE. Applications are available at our offices on 150 Trading Bay Road in Kenai, Suite 1.

Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn/Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

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99’ INTERNATIONAL Model 4900 Straight truck. Aluminum rack strong diesel, new injectors, well maintained. $14,000. OBO (907)262-1809

KENAI KENNEL CLUB

Pawsitive training for all dogs & puppies. Agility, Conformation, Obedience, Privates & Rally. www.kenaikennelclub.com (907)335-2552

Put your ad here....for just peanuts a day!

Looking for a new pet? Check out the classifieds. Every day, you’ll discover listings for all sorts of merchandise from kittens to kites. It’s a fast and easy way to find exactly what you’re looking for, for a lot less. 283-7551


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C-10 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014 Services

Keep a Sharp Eye on the Classifieds

Lost & Found

Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Services Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

Health

Bids

FOUND BOW Soldotna area Call Sue to identify. (907)262-4455

Personals/ Notices SINGLE WOMEN looking MR. RIGHT. POBox 163 Sterling, AK 99672

Public Notices/ Legal Ads Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

Public Notices/ Legal Ads Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

Builders/ Contractors SAVAGE LLC. Custom Framer Decks, trims, design & consulting. 35 years experience. License & Bonded. (907)854-4971

Bids INVITATION TO BID MANN ROAD GRAVEL PROJECT

Each week, our Classified section features hundreds of new listings for everything from pre-owned merchandise to real estate and even employment opportunities. So chances are, no matter what you’re looking for, the Classifieds are the best place to start your search.

283-7551 www.peninsulaclarion.com

**ASIAN MASSAGE** Grand opening Happy Summer, enjoy hospitality anytime. (907)398-8896

Health

**ASIAN MASSAGE** The right touch, wonderful, relaxing. Call anytime. (907)398-8874.

Health

The Kenai Peninsula Borough Road Service Area hereby invites qualified firms to submit a firm price for acceptance by the Borough for the Mann Road Gravel Project. Projects consist of furnishing all labor, materials, and equipment to upgrade Mann Road at milepost 3.5 Funny River Road in Soldotna. Pre-bid conference will be held at the Kenai Peninsula Borough Road Service Area office, 47140 East Poppy Lane, Soldotna, Alaska September 15, 2014 @ 10:00 AM. Attendance at pre-bid conferences is recommended but not mandatory. Contract is subject to the provision of State of Alaska, Title 36, Minimum Wage Rates. Contract will require certificates of insurance and may require performance and payment bonds. Bid documents may be obtained beginning September 9, 2014 at the Kenai Peninsula Borough Road Service Area office, 47140 East Poppy Lane, Soldotna, Alaska 99669 (907) 262-4427, for a non-refundable fee of $5.00 per set, $10.00 additional for mailing. Bid documents may also be downloaded from the web at: http://purchasing.borough.kenai.ak.us/ Opportunities.aspx One (1) complete set of the bid package is to be submitted to the Kenai Peninsula Borough, Purchasing and Contracting Department, 144 N. Binkley Street, Soldotna, Alaska 99669. These forms must be enclosed in a sealed envelope with the bidder's name on the outside and clearly marked: BID: MANN ROAD GRAVEL PROJECT DUE DATE: September 23, 2014, no later than 2:00 PM PUBLISH; 9/9, 12, 15, 2014

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Health **ASIAN MASSAGE** Please make the phone ring. Call anytime. (907)741-1644

Notices/ Announcements Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

***GRAND OPENING*** A Summer Massage open everyday call, texts. (907)252-3985

BEEP! BEEP! YOUR NEW RIDE IS WAITING IN THE CLASSIFIEDS

Find your new vehicle today in the Classifieds!

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6 PM

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6:30

Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune ‘G’

The Dr. Oz Show ‘PG’ Wild Kratts ‘Y’ Wild Kratts “Gecko Effect” ‘Y’

Channel 2 News 5:00 Report (N) BBC World News America ‘PG’

NBC Nightly Channel 2 Newshour (N) News (N) ‘G’ Alaska Weather ‘G’

PBS NewsHour (N)

7:30

7 Deadly Sins ‘MA’ 5 SHOW 319 546 329 554

8 PM

SEPTEMBER 12, 2014

8:30

Last Man Last Man Shark Tank Mobile fitness Standing ‘PG’ Standing ‘PG’ company for kids. ‘PG’

9 PM

9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30

(:01) 20/20 ‘PG’

Monk “Mr. Monk and the Red American Herring” Break-in. ‘PG’ Dad ‘14’

ABC News at (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live ‘14’ (:37) Nightline 10 (N) (N) ‘G’ OK! TV (N) ‘PG’

30 Rock How I Met The Office ‘14’ It’s Always “Black Tie” ‘14’ Your Mother Sunny in “Milk” ‘PG’ Philadelphia Hawaii Five-0 “Akanahe” ‘14’ Blue Bloods “Above and KTVA Night- (:35) Late Show With David Late Late Beyond” ‘14’ cast Letterman (N) ‘PG’ Show/Craig Kitchen Nightmares Ramsay Fox 4 News at 9 (N) To Be Announced Two and a TMZ (N) ‘PG’ revisits restaurants he’s Half Men helped. (N) ‘14’ “Pilot” ‘PG’ Running Wild With Bear Dateline NBC (N) ‘PG’ Channel 2 (:34) The Tonight Show Star- (:36) Late Grylls Tamron Hall faces the News: Late ring Jimmy Fallon ‘14’ Night With Utah desert. ‘PG’ Edition (N) Seth Meyers Celtic Woman: Home for Christmas Celtic Celtic Woman: Emerald Emerald Isles’ musical heritage. ‘G’ Celtic Woman: Songs From the Heart Woman performs in Dublin. ‘G’ Music. ‘G’

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS. How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother The Lisa Robertson Show “Season Finale” Season finale. (N) ‘G’ Movie ‘MA’

How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Rules of En- Rules of En- Parks and Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother gagement gagement Recreation Friday Night Beauty ‘G’ Dooney & Bourke ‘G’

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

(3:45) “King Kong” (2005, Adventure) Naomi Watts, Jack Black, Adrien Brody. A beauty HBO 303 504 tames a savage beast. ‘PG-13’ !

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30 Rock ‘14’ It’s Always Futurama ‘PG’ Sunny Accessorize Your Fall “Dooney & Bourke” ‘G’ “The Brittany Murphy Story” (2014, Docudrama) Amanda “28 Days” (2000, Comedy-Drama) Sandra Bullock, Viggo (:02) “The Brittany Murphy Fuller, Sherilyn Fenn, Amy Davidson. Brittany Murphy rises to Mortensen, Dominic West. A writer is forced to come to terms Story” (2014) Amanda Fuller, stardom to become an actress. ‘PG’ with her addictions. Sherilyn Fenn. ‘PG’ Law & Order: Special Vic- Law & Order: Special Vic- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Law & Order: Special Victims Unit “Sacrifice” ‘14’ tims Unit ‘14’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ tims Unit “Taboo” ‘14’ Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy “Blades of Glory” (2007, Comedy) Will Ferrell, Jon Heder, “Get Smart” (2008, Comedy) Seinfeld “The Seinfeld “The The Big Bang Mom ‘14’ ‘PG’ “Trading “Tiegs for Two” “Brothers & Will Arnett. Rival male skaters compete as a pair. Steve Carell, Anne Hathaway. Susie” ‘PG’ Pothole” ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ Places” ‘14’ ‘14’ Sisters” ‘14’ Supernatural Deaths at a Supernatural “Night Shifter” Supernatural Carrying out “The Replacements” (2000, Comedy) Keanu Reeves, Gene Hackman. Misfit (:31) Legends “Rogue” (:31) Franklin & Bash “Deep (:31) “Zomsmall Connecticut inn. ‘14’ ‘14’ God’s will. ‘14’ substitutes take the field during a football strike. Throat” ‘14’ bieland” College Football Baylor at Buffalo. The University at Buffalo Stadium in Amherst, N.Y. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) College Football Baylor at (Live) Buffalo. WNBA Basketball Finals, Game 3: Teams TBA. (N) (Live) SportsCenter NHRA Drag Racing Carolina Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) NFL Live (N) ESPN FC (N) SportsNation SportsCenter (N) (N) Nationals, Qualifying. (N) (2:00) High School Football Mariners All Mariners MLB Baseball Oakland Athletics at Seattle Mariners. From Safeco Field in Seattle. (N Subject Mariners MLB Baseball Oakland Athletics at Seattle Mariners. From Safeco Field in Eastlake at Inglemoor. Access Pregame to Blackout) (Live) Postgame Seattle. (Subject to Blackout) Cops ‘14’ Jail ‘14’ Cops ‘PG’ Cops ‘PG’ Cops ‘PG’ Cops ‘PG’ Cops ‘PG’ Cops ‘PG’ Bellator MMA Live The world’s top fighters take part in this (:15) Cops ‘14’ (:26) Cops Cops ‘14’ Jail ‘14’ tournament. (N) (Live) ‘PG’ (2:15) “Uncle “The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift” (2006, Action) Lucas Black. An “Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines” (2003) Arnold Schwarzenegger. A “Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines” (2003) Arnold Schwarzenegger. A Buck” American street racer takes on a Japanese champion. cyborg protects John Connor from a superior model. cyborg protects John Connor from a superior model. King of the King of the The Cleve- The Cleve- American American Family Guy Family Guy Robot Aqua Teen The Venture American American Family Guy Family Guy Robot Hill ‘PG’ Hill ‘PG’ land Show land Show Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Chicken Hunger Bros. ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Chicken To Be Announced To Be Announced (:01) Redwood Kings: Cut (:02) Redwood Kings (N) ‘PG’ (:03) Redwood Kings: Cut (:04) Redwood Kings ‘PG’ Masters ‘PG’ Masters ‘PG’ Dog With a Dog With a (4:55) Dog (:20) “Alvin and the Chipmunks” (2007, Dog With a Girl Meets Gravity Falls Wander Over I Didn’t Do It Liv & Mad- A.N.T. Farm Jessie ‘G’ Austin & Jessie “Toy Blog ‘G’ Blog ‘G’ With a Blog Comedy) Jason Lee, David Cross. Blog (N) ‘G’ World ‘G’ Yonder die ‘G’ ‘G’ Ally ‘G’ Con” SpongeBob SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ The Thunder- Sam & Cat ‘G’ Drake & Josh Teenage Mut. Teenage Mut. 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PREMIUM STATIONS

nts” (2002, ComMcGregor, Trent 8 TMC

7 PM

www.peninsulaclarion.com

B = DirecTV

30 Rock “The Monk “Mr. Monk Takes His Ones” ‘14’ Medicine” Medicine dulls Monk’s skills. ‘PG’ The Ellen DeGeneres Show KTVA 5 p.m. CBS Evening KTVA 6 p.m. Evening News 48 Hours: Oscar Pistorius, (N) ‘G’ First Take News (N) The Verdict (N) To Be Announced Entertainment Two and a The Big Bang The Big Bang Utopia A group works to build Tonight (N) Half Men ‘14’ Theory ‘14’ Theory ‘PG’ a civilization. (N) ‘14’ 4

(36) ROOT 426 687

s ‘14’ (:36) Jail ‘14’

5:30

News & Views ABC World (N) News

CABLE STATIONS

(31) TNT

5 PM

A = DISH

Alaska Daily

How I Met How I Met (8) WGN-A 239 307 Your Mother Your Mother ‘G’ Judith Ripka Sterling Col (20) QVC 137 317 lection ‘G’ ect Runway Tim Wife Swap “Flynn/Orris” Strict contestants with a (23) LIFE 108 252 mother, easygoing mother trade. ‘PG’ faction “...Through Law & Order: Special Vic ( 28) USA 105 242 ” tims Unit “Tangled” ‘14’ e Conan ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ Friends ‘14’ ir (30) TBS 139 247

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Real Time With Bill Maher (N Bill Maher: Live From D.C. Real Time With Bill Maher Bill Maher: Live From D.C. Same-day Tape) ‘MA’ The comic performs. (N Same- ‘MA’ The comic performs. ‘MA’ day Tape) ‘MA’ (:15) “Transporter 2” (2005, Action) Jason Last Week To- (:15) “Kick-Ass 2” (2013, Action) Aaron Taylor-Johnson, “The Hangover Part III” (2013, Comedy) (:45) Katt Williams: Price- Cornered: “2 Guns” (2013, Action) Statham. A former soldier tries to save a kid- night-John Christopher Mintz-Plasse. Red Mist gets a new name and Bradley Cooper. All bets are off when the less: Afterlife ‘MA’ Kenny Bay- Denzel Washington, Mark napped boy. ‘PG-13’ hunts down amateur superheroes. ‘R’ Wolfpack hits the road. ‘R’ less ‘PG’ Wahlberg. ‘R’ (3:35) “Two for the Money” (2005) Al (:45) “Austin Powers: International Man of (:15) “The Legend of Hercules” (2014, Adventure) Kellan The Knick “They Capture the The Knick “They Capture the The Knick “They Capture the Pacino. Two men handicap football games for Mystery” (1997, Comedy) Mike Myers, Eliza- Lutz, Scott Adkins. Hercules is exiled and sold into slavery Heat” Barrow treats one of Heat” Barrow treats one of Heat” Barrow treats one of high-rolling gamblers. ‘R’ beth Hurley. ‘PG-13’ because of a forbidden love. ‘PG-13’ Collier’s men. ‘MA’ Collier’s men. ‘MA’ Collier’s men. ‘MA’ (3:00) “The Horse Whisperer” (1998, Drama) Robert 60 Minutes Sports ‘14’ Masters of Sex “Story of My “Adult World” (2013) Emma Roberts. An (:35) “Dark Skies” (2013, Science Fiction) (:15) Masters of Sex “Story of Redford, Sam Neill. A cowboy helps an injured girl and her Life” ‘MA’ aspiring poet has to take a job as a clerk at an Keri Russell. Aliens mark a human family for My Life” ‘MA’ traumatized horse. ‘PG-13’ adult bookstore. ‘R’ future abduction. ‘PG-13’ (3:20) “The Ghost Writer” (2010) Pierce “A Walk on the Moon” (1999, Drama) Diane Lane, Viggo (:20) “The Words” (2012) Bradley Cooper. A “The Canyons” (2013, Suspense) Lindsay (:40) “Sex Door Neighbors” (2013, Adult) Brosnan. A ghostwriter’s latest project lands Mortensen, Liev Schreiber. Dissatisfied housewife sows wild wannabe writer claims another man’s work as Lohan. A movie producer learns of his lover’s Lexi Belle. A sexy woman must choose behim in jeopardy. oats in 1969. ‘R’ his own. ‘PG-13’ infidelity. ‘R’ tween old and new love. ‘NR’

September 7 - 13, 2014

The Leftovers Mapleton is plunged into chaos. ‘MA’

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REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS HOMER ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION, INC. SNOW PLOWING/REMOVAL & SANDING SERVICES Homer Electric Association, Inc. (HEA) is seeking bids from qualified service providers to provide snow plowing, snow removal & sanding services for our facilities located in Kenai, Soldotna, Sterling, Kasilof, Bernice Lake, and Nikiski, Alaska. To qualify, responders must provide a current Alaska business license and certification of insurance as follows: • General (Public) Liability Insurance $1,000,000 • Auto Liability Insurance - $1,000,000 • Workers' Compensation / Employers' Liability Insurance - $500,000, per occurrence RFP packages are available on our website at: http://www.homerelectric.com/OnlineFormsApplications/tabid/88/Default.aspx or you may send a request for a packet to: rscudder@homerelectric.com. A mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held at HEA's Central Peninsula Service Center in Kenai on September 19th at 11:00 AM. Proposals from vendors that do not attend the pre-bid will not be considered. PDF proposals will be accepted until 3:00 PM Friday, September 26th, 2014. Please email the completed packets to the following address: rscudder@homerelectric.com. Proposals may also be hand delivered to the Central Peninsula Service Center in Kenai. PUBLISH: 9/10, 12, 14, 17, 2014 1916/02923

Public Notices PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF ALASKA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION An application for renewal of an Oil Discharge Prevention and Contingency Plan, under Alaska Statute 46.04.03 and in accordance with 18 AAC 75, has been received by the Department of Environmental Conservation. The details are as follow: Applicant: Tesoro Maritime Company P.O. Box 3369 Kenai, Alaska 99611-3369 Plan Title: Tesoro Cook Inlet Vessel Oil Discharge Prevention and Contingency Plan Supporting CISPRI Technical Manual Documents: Proposed Activity: The applicant will conduct oil transfer operations using tank vessels that will transport crude oil and petroleum products in Cook Inlet. The vessels will carry a maximum of 499,999 barrels of crude oil or products while in State waters. An oil discharge prevention and contingency plan is required that will commit adequate resources to plan for containment, control, and cleanup of crude oil or petroleum products equal to the discharge response planning standard volumes for these vessels. Location: Through Alaska waters of Cook Inlet Potential Results: A potential risk exists of oil spills entering the lands or waters of the state as a result of this operation Activity identified State Contingency as: Plan Number 14-CP-2039 Any person wishing to submit a request for additional information or provide comments regarding the application may do so in writing to the Department of Environmental Conservation, Division of Spill Prevention and Response, Marine Vessels Section, Attention John Kotula, P.O. Box 1709, Valdez, AK 99686, by facsimile to (907) 835-2429, or to john.kotula@alaska.gov. Requests for additional information must be received by October 16. 2014. Comments will be accepted until October 21, 2014, at 4:30 pm AST. It is the responsibility of commenter to verify e-mail submissions are received by the applicable deadline. The public comment period will be extended if necessary in accordance with 18 AAC 75.455(d) & (e). Copies of the application and plan are available for public review at the Department of Environmental Conservation offices located at the following addresses. Please call the associated phone numbers to schedule an appointment. 555 Cordova Street, Anchorage, Alaska; (907)269-3094 43335 Kalifornsky Beach Rd., Ste. 11, Soldotna, Alaska; (907)262-3401 213 Meals Ave., Room 17, Valdez, Alaska; (907)835-4698 The department will hold a public hearing on the plan application if it determines that good cause exists. Residents in the affected area or the governing body of an affected municipality may request a public hearing by writing to the Department of Environmental Conservation, at 555 Cordova Street, prior to October 21, 2014. The State of Alaska, Department of Environmental Conservation complies with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. If you are a person with a disability who may need a special accommodation in order to participate in this public process, please contact Deborah Pock at (907)269-0291 or TDD Relay Service 1-800-770-8973/TTY or dial 711 within 30 days of publication of this notice to ensure that any necessary accommodations can be provided. PUBLISH: 9/12, 2014

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The State of Alaska requires construction companies to be licensed, bonded and insured before submitting bids, performing work, or advertising as a construction contractor in accordance with AS 08..18.011, 08.18.071, 08.18.101, and 08.15.051. All advertisements as a construction contractor require the current registration number as issued by the Division of Occupational Licensing to appear in the advertisement. CONSUMERS MAY VERIFY REGISTRATION OF A CONTRACTOR . Contact the AK Department of Labor and Workforce Development at 907-269-4925 or The AK Division of Occupational Licensing in Juneau at 907-4653035 or at www.dced.state.ak.us/acc/home.htm

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C-12 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014

Crossword

Parents persist in thinking gay son will straighten out DEAR ABBY: I have been married to my husband for a year. We dated for four years before the wedding, and we have a son together. The child and I have never met any of my husband’s immediate family. I have never spoken to any of them over the phone, either. He has met all of my family members. I have asked repeatedly to meet his, and he Abigail Van Buren tells me he’s planning a family trip to visit. He seemed annoyed when I brought it up. What should I do? — LEFT OUT IN FLORIDA DEAR LEFT OUT: That you have had no contact with these people in the five years you’ve been in the picture is, frankly, beyond strange. It appears there may be some things your husband hasn’t told you. He may be ashamed of his family, on the outs with them, or they were never told about his involvement with you and/or the existence of their grandchild. Because you have now been a member of their

family for a year, pick up the phone, call your inlaws and introduce yourself. DEAR ABBY: Please help to settle a debate between my husband and me. Is it all right for a woman to give relationship advice to her friend? I have a friend who is struggling in her relationship, and I have tried to help with advice I feel is appropriate and positive. Is this wrong, or should I stay out of it like my husband suggests? — GOOD FRIEND IN TEXAS DEAR GOOD FRIEND: Part of female friendship is sharing experiences and advice with each other. However, remember that if your friend is “struggling” in this relationship, in the final analysis, she’s going to have to resolve the problems herself. If she is unable to do that without coming back to you again and again, then her relationship probably won’t last in spite of your best efforts. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

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Rubes

tic. Others will respond to you in a positive way. You could be taken aback by someone’s offer. Tonight: Not to be found. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Emphasize what is important to you. Know what needs to happen, and decide who you want around you. Stop and buy a token of affection for a loved one. Do not push beyond your normal limits in order to get what you want. Tonight: Be where the crowds are. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Take your time when making a decision. It might be more important than you realize. Getting past an older person’s demands could be almost impossible. You might wonder when to pull back so you can go off and do your thing. Tonight: Out and about. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Keep reaching out to someone at a distance. You might want to make last-minute weekend plans. This person often plays devil’s advocate for you. You might be tempted to take off for an adventure. Weigh the cost of proceeding as you have been. Tonight: Out late. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You might want to work through a problem quickly with a friend or loved one; otherwise, a lot of negativity could come into your life. A family member could demonstrate how resilient he or she can be when adjusting to a big change. Tonight: Make it personal. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Defer to others, and understand what is happening with a key individual in your life. By ex-

By Leigh Rubin

Ziggy

pressing your confidence in this person’s decisions, you will open up the lines of communication between you. Don’t overthink a decision too much. Tonight: Follow the leader. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHYou will want to free up some extra time just for you. You’ll remain levelheaded, even though you have a very difficult decision to make. You might want to discuss your choice with several other people for feedback. Tonight: Get physical — go to the gym, or go dancing. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH No one dares question your ideas or your appeal. You know where you are heading. You have a sense of direction that is unique, and you possess a special type of creativity. News from a distance is likely to put a smile on your face. Tonight: Ever playful. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Get down to the basics, and understand that you will need to rebuild certain areas of your life. An older friend or relative could be unintentionally demanding and not realize what you are going through. Ask for consideration and space, if need be. Tonight: Invite friends over. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Listen to news before changing plans. You could be more in limbo than you might have thought possible. Perhaps you need to work through an issue and return someone’s call. Choose to make plans that allow you to share some of your dilemma. Tonight: Love the moment.

Picture this digital organization Dear Heloise: Do you have any hints for storing digital photos? I have hundreds of pictures saved on my computer, and I have a hard time finding what I am looking for. — Isabella in Texas Welcome to the new world! Sometimes too much of something is NOT a great thing. The ease of digital photos makes it too EASY to just shoot, shoot and shoot photos! Here are a few hints to help you and others in the same situation: * When downloading pictures, change and edit the image name. A lot of photos are named “IMG_250, etc.” Change to something like “IMG_250 Chammy and birds.” NAMING photos can make them easier to find. * Try sorting your photos into different folders; they don’t all have to be in the same one. You can make a folder for “Pets,” “Family,” “2004,” etc. That way, when looking, you hopefully can narrow it down by the folder. * Go through your photos periodically and delete a lot! Why do we keep photos that we don’t like or that were taken by accident? Get rid of them! They are just wasting space and making it harder to find the ones you want. * Invest in an external hard drive. You don’t want to lose all your photos if your computer (or phone) crashes! * If you store them on DVDs, be sure to check them periodically — they will not last forever! — Heloise Send a great hint to: Heloise P.O. Box 795000 San Antonio, TX 78279-5000 Fax: 1-210-HELOISE Email: Heloise(at)Heloise.com

SUDOKU

By Tom Wilson

By Dave Green

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Friday.

8 2 3 6 5 1 7 9 4

7 9 6 4 2 3 8 5 1

4 5 1 9 8 7 2 6 3

2 1 9 8 3 4 5 7 6

3 4 8 5 7 6 1 2 9

6 7 5 2 1 9 3 4 8

1 6 2 7 9 8 4 3 5

5 8 4 3 6 2 9 1 7

Difficulty Level

9 3 7 1 4 5 6 8 2

2014 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

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A baby born today has a Sun in Virgo and a Moon in Taurus. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, Sept. 12, 2014: This year you open up to many possibilities, but you will need to eliminate some existing commitments first. You are a year away from some positive life changes. You will begin a new luck cycle at that time, and the first year is considered one of the luckiest. If you are single, someone special is right around the corner. If you are attached, the two of you love spending quality time together. You also might tend to overindulge often together. TAURUS understands you and can be a lot of fun. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Your possessive side might emerge when dealing with someone you respect. Being selfish in that way is likely to reveal your innate insecurities. Be more upbeat and deliberate. You could overthink a situation to the point of upset. Tonight: TGIF! Make it your treat. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHHYoucouldbemoreforthright than usual. Being so direct will energize you and encourage you to take a risk with a difficult person. You will want to have a long-overdue conversation. Know that you might feel uncomfortable with what you hear. Tonight: A star, wherever you are. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH Much will be going on behind the scenes. You are anchored and secure at the present moment, and you’re likely to be very optimis-

Hints from Heloise

Jacqueline Bigar’s Stars

9/10

Previous Puzzles Answer Key

B.C.

By Johnny Hart

Garfield

By Jim Davis

Take It from the Tinkersons By Bill Bettwy

Tundra

Shoe

8

1 5

6 9 1

5

9 7

3

4

2

7

4

Difficulty Level

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5

2

6 7 3

6 3

9 9/11

By Chad Carpenter

By Chris Cassatt & Gary Brookins

Mother Goose and Grimm

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8

2

By Michael Peters

2014 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

DEAR ABBY: I’m a gay male college student who is out and comfortable with who I am — 99 percent of the time. When I was in high school, I tried to come out to my parents and it didn’t go smoothly. They had an emotional crisis for a day, then shrugged it off as “just another teenage phase.” After the panic mode was over, they bought me off with an expensive car and continued believing I’m straight. I make no attempt to hide who I am because I expect to be treated the same, regardless. But it’s awkward whenever I am asked by either parent, “Do you have a girlfriend?” or, “How are you doing with the ladies?” Do you have any advice on what I should say in response, given my parents’ emotional reaction? — IT’S WHO I AM IN CALIFORNIA DEAR WHO I AM: It is obvious that your parents are in denial. If you haven’t told them again about your sexual orientation, you should. If you are unable to summon up the words to tell them what they are waiting for isn’t going to happen, then contact PFLAG (Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays — pflag.org), not only for your own sake, but also for theirs. In light of your parents’ reaction the last time you leveled with them, they may need emotional support to accept that you are gay, and PFLAG can provide it.

By Eugene Sheffer


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C-14 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, September 12, 2014

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Profile for Sound Publishing

Peninsula Clarion, September 12, 2014  

September 12, 2014 edition of the Peninsula Clarion

Peninsula Clarion, September 12, 2014  

September 12, 2014 edition of the Peninsula Clarion