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Summer A silver fishing adventure and more in Homer Community/C-1

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Sunday

Active Events flourish at Soldotna’s Tsalteshi Sports/B-1

CLARION P E N I N S U L A

AUGUST 3, 2014 Soldotna-Kenai, Alaska

Vol. 44, Issue 260

50 cents newsstands daily/$1.00 Sunday

Mini

ANTHC receives EPA grant

Salmonstock festival offers fun for the whole family

Group to study climate change, contaminants

By KAYLEE OSOWSKI and RASHAH MCCHESNEY Peninsula Clarion

MOLLY DISCHNER Morris News Service- Alaska

music

Lovers

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Colorful paint butterflies flitted over the wide smiles on the faces of cousins Miah Anthony, 5, of Kodiak and Abby Samaniego, 4, of Fairbanks Friday evening as they played with hula hoops in front of the Ocean Stage at Salmonstock in Ninilchik. With a blowup slide, face painting and the “Small Fry Play Area,” the four-year-old Salmonstock has attractions for the whole family, and with kids 12 and younger getting in for free the Kenai Peninsula Fairgrounds are typically swarming with miniature music lovers during the daylight hours of the music festival. The event, designed by a group called the Renewable Resources Foundation and Coalition to bring awareness to Alaskan salmon and potential threats to the environment, has attracted several thousand people since its inception in 2011. Both the number and prestige of musicians has grown along with the amount of food and merchandise vendors — several with toys and costumes for the younger audience. See FEST, page A-2

Alaska Journal of Commerce

A grant from the Environmental Protection Agency will enable the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium to study climate change and contaminant shifts in the Bering Strait region. The researchers will look at how contaminant shifts could affect human health in rural communities, and develop an adaptation plan. Much of the Photo by Kaylee Osowski/Peninsula Clarion focus is on traditional foods. Miah Anthony, 5, of Kodiak, and her cousin Abby Samaniego, 4, of Fairbanks, play with hula hoops at Salmonstock on Friday The health consortium, or in Ninilchik. ANTHC, will receive $888,282 as one of six organizations to Photo by Rashah receive an EPA grant for enviMcChesney/Peninsula ronmental health research, the Clarion agency announced July 23. Jayme Carr hugs The grants were focused on Meadow Carr, 6, supporting health and sustainas the two dance able tribal communities by foduring a show cusing on two areas — climate at Salmonstock. change impacts and air qualAs the festival ity issues — according to EPA evolves, so do its Project Grants Officer Cynthia offerings for famiMcOliver. lies. “The purpose is to support Tribal communities to understand and address different environmental health issues that face them,” McOliver said. The six grants total about $5 million, and were awarded Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion through a competitive grant Samson Henneous, 13, watches a band during the second day of process, McOliver said, that the Salmonstock music festival. looked at whether the proposal was technically sound and fit the EPA’s mission. Tribal governments, universities, environmental groups and others were all eligible to apply. ANTHC’s application fell into the climate change category. made stick and rubber band na- seek out the tiny rodent among “Their application was found ture journals. the thick layers of brush. His to be very strong by the reviewThe walk was the second to mother Stephanie Hunt stood ers,” McOliver said. last of the refuge’s Family Ex- in the back with their family She noted that the project plorer Program walks. Begin- friends Rob Carson and Rinna had an integrated approach to ning in the lobby of the visitor’s Carson. the issue, and looked not only center the quarter-mile stretch Rinna Carson said the two at the contaminant shift, but through sun-touched black families decided to wrangle also what the change could spruce, with stops to check out their kids for the weekend promean for human health, and Devil’s Club, lichen and a red- gram after seeing a listing on how to adapt. backed vole. the refuge’s Facebook page. Reviewers “felt like this was “You see it?” Eskelin asked Eskelin said the family proa very critical approach to adpointing at the furry creature, grams are held at the refuge dressing the needs in Alaska,” sitting only meters from the every summer. This year they she said. trail. “It’s unusual for them to decided to add a hands-on eleWork on the project will stay this close. This one I guess ment to each activity. likely begin in the next several lives near the trail and has beThe walks are catered for all months, McOliver said. ANPhoto by Kelly Sullivan/ Peninsula Clarion come slightly used to humans.” ages, Eskelin said. From todTHC has three years to use the Hunt and his two sisters dlers who can’t write yet, but Kenai Wildlife Refuge Park Ranger Leah Eskelin points out a funding. clustered with the other young- are able to draw, to parents tak- red-backed vole to the group of 15 in the Family Explorer ProResearchers will use previgram, Saturday, on the Keen-Eye Nature Trail in Soldotna. er walkers around Eskelin to See CLASS, page A-2 See GRANT, page A-2

Refuge programs take hands-on approach By KELLY SULLIVAN Peninsula Clarion

In the dense forest behind the Kenai Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center, standing beside one of the 11 cabins erected by Andrew Berg, Hamilton Hunt helped Park Ranger Leah Eskelin read the data on a small black device she held in her hand. The two were able to determine that the partly cloudy day’s temperature was 63 degrees with 86 percent humidity, Saturday on the Keen-Eye Nature Trail. The group of fifteen children and parents surrounding Eskelin and her assistant wrote the findings down in their hand-

Today’s Clarion Cloudy, showers 63/49 More weather on page A-12

Opinion......................... A-4 Alaska........................... A-5 Nation........................... A-6 World............................ A-8 Cops/courts................ A-10 Sports........................... B-1 Community................... C-1 Weddings...................... C-1 Dear Abby..................... C-2 Crossword..................... C-2 Horoscope.................... C-2 Classifieds................... C-3 Mini Page...................... C-8 TV...................... Clarion TV

Question Do you think additional Inside enforcement in area ‘I hope that our understandable fear of the un- fisheries this season familiar does not trump has been our compassion when ill effective? Americans return to the n Yes U.S. for care.’ n No ... See pageA-6 Check us out online at www.peninsulaclarion.com To subscribe, call 283-3584.

Correction Due to an editing error, the Clarion ran an announcement on Friday’s Religion page that the Peninsula Christian Center would be holding a Kid’s Crusade during the upcoming week. The event was held last week.

To place your vote and comment on a poll question visit our website at www. peninsulaclarion.com. Results and selected comments will be posted each Tuesday in the Clarion, and a new question will be asked. Suggested questions may be submitted online or emailed to news@peninsulaclarion.com C

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Alaska Housing Finance list opened in Homer, Soldotna Alaska Housing Finance list opened in Homer, Soldotna The Alaska Housing Finance Corporation has opened its Housing Choice Voucher program waiting list in Homer and Soldotna. Applicants to the program will get their vouchers based on the date and time they submit applications. The voucher program helps low-income Alaskans lease from participating landlords.

To qualify for assistance families have to have an income at least or below 50 percent of the median income of the area where they live. According to a media release in the Soldotna and Homer areas, a family of four can make $38,050 or less to be eligible. Participants in the program find their own housing. See LIST, page A-2


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A-2 Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion

Several dozen danced during the Blackwater Railroad Company’s set on the River Stage at Salmonstock on Saturday in Ninilchik.

. . . Fest Continued from page A-1

“Everyone is more kidfriendly,” said Sasha Samaniego, Abby’s mom. More than 60 bands in-state and Outside gathered to play on three stages during the threeday festival. For Samaniego and her sister Ivy Anthony, this is the first music festival they have brought their girls too. The sister’s father plays drums and guitar, so they were introduced to music at a young age, as were their daughters. They said their parents are frequent music festival followers. Megan Murphy, whose husband Steve Collins plays in the Holy Santos Gang and The Barroom Roses, brought their 16-month-old daughter Olivine Collins to the festival. Collins played Friday and Saturday night at the festival. With her dad in two bands, Olivine has been exposed to an array of music, Murphy said. Murphy plays piano, percussion and the harmonica. She

. . . Class Continued from page A-1

ing their kids out into the wild. She said it also works for all kinds of learners. “Some people learn visually, some are kinesthetic,” Eskelin said. “It’s also just more fun to learn through hands on activities.” Randy Lightfoot attended Saturday’s walk with his mother Kristi Lightfoot and his sister Taylor Lightfoot. He said he enjoys attending refuge activities because they take him into

said Olivine plays a little bit as well, and likes to dance. “We leave instruments out for everyone to play with,” Murphy said. The family lives in Homer and Olivine saw her dad perform at Concert on the Lawn in the town earlier this summer, but Murphy said Salmonstock is “way more of a festival.” The Holy Santos Gang performed at 8 p.m. on Friday, which Murphy said is past Olivine’s bedtime. “We’re going crazy — staying up, having ice cream,” she said with a laugh. The three day festival opened at noon Friday and runs through 9 p.m. Sunday. Ninilchik is swarmed with people for the weekend. Traffic backs up for miles as many park along the Sterling Highway and the narrow side roads in the small fishing town on the Kenai Peninsula. Around the Kenai Peninsula Fairgrounds, a sea of tents pops up Friday night. Among the tents are RV’s and larger campsites where children and pets run among the campfires and chrome Salmonstock Klean Kanteens. the wilderness. The Lightfoots often take walks around the refuge together, and attend movie screenings at the visitor center. Randy Lightfoot said during the family explorer program he learned the names of several plants. Kristi Lightfoot said she takes her two homeschooled children to the Refuge programs because it is another method she found that they enjoy learning. Eskelin said the programs are never cancelled due to bad weather. She said some of the best walks she has been on this summer were during or right

CLARION P

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(USPS 438-410) Published daily Sunday through Friday, except Christmas and New Year’s, by: Southeastern Newspapers Corporation P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Street address: 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 1, Kenai, AK Phone: (907) 283-7551 Postmaster: Send address changes to the Peninsula Clarion, P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Periodicals postage paid at Kenai, AK Represented for national advertising by The Papert Companies, Chicago, IL Copyright 2014 Peninsula Clarion A Morris Communications Corp. newspaper

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion

Tony Furtado plays an acoustic banjo set on the Ocean Stage during Salmonstock.

On Saturday, Samson Henneous, 13, sat on a blanket in front of the Ocean Stage soaking in the sun and music. His 6-inch rainbow-colored mohawk stood out in a sea of dreadlocks and hats meant to shield the bright noon sun. The Bend, Oregon youth said his family makes the trip to Alaska every summer to run a lodge in Willow. This year was the family’s first time travelling to Salmonstock and they’re camping in Ninilchik for the weekend. “The music is great, the food is good, the people are cool,” Henneous said. In front of the main stage, the area was awash in odors — most of it wafting over from

a row of food vendors parked nearby. Henneous said the best food he ate at the festival came from the Bombay Thai curry cart which had a long line for most of the day Saturday. As he watched the show, a steady parade of people walked in front of him, some elaborately costumed, others nearly nude; yet Henneous remained focused on the music and didn’t spend much time peoplewatching. “I’m used to all this,” he said. “I’ve been to so many concerts.” Eric and Becky Engman and their kids, Elias, 9, and Ella, 7, of Fairbanks, made their first trek to Salmonstock this year.

after rain. The refuge has a set of 30 digital cameras used for teaching purposes, Eskelin said. A handful of the explorer programs used digital photography as a way of teaching about the area, she said. Once after an early morning rain, with all the undergrowth covered in dewdrops, it made for beautiful photographs, and turned the walk into a lesson

on how the forest uses rain to grow. Eskelin said this summer the number of participants in the family programs vary from 7-33. Each activity is completely free and requires no preregistration. The final Family Explorer program will be held Saturday, August 8 at 2 p.m. Randy Lightfoot said he will be sure to be there.

During the first year they pay a percent of the adjusted income in rent while the remainder is paid by the AHFC, according to the release. More information on eligibility and rules for renters

. . . Grant

there are any animal-related infections that can be tested or measured based on climate and winter shifts in pathogens over time. The water aspect of the project looks for tundra water sources where warmer seasons could result in a bacterial impact of mercury that is transported by air from Asia, according to the project proposal. Village water treatment systems don’t measure or treat the bacteria, but the researchers wrote that it could be found in village water sources due to changes. The project looks at PSP because shellfish are a common subsistence harvest, and there could be increasing PSP levels

due to more algae blooms from environmental changes. The team will also look at some data on contaminants that already exists, as well as information about animal movements, to gauge future changes. Eventually, the research will include an adaptation plan “That will be heavily driven by communities,” McOliver said. The researchers plan to work with Tribal councils and community members to identify top concerns and develop strategies to handle changes in foods, water supply. ANTHC researchers have had two previous projects funded through similar EPA tribal

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ously collected data to look at contaminant shifts, work with communities to gauge the potential impacts and collect more data. The fieldwork component of the project includes water sampling, looking at tissue of subsistence-harvested animals, and sampling shellfish for the presence of paralytic shellfish poisoning, or PSP. The researchers are interested in macrobiological pathogens that can move between animals and humans, McOliver said. The idea is to see if

Who to call at the Peninsula Clarion News tip? Question? Main number.............................................................................................. 283-7551 Fax............................................................................................................. 283-3299 News email...................................................................news@peninsulaclarion.com General news Will Morrow, editor ............................................ will.morrow@peninsulaclarion.com Rashah McChesney, city editor.............. rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com Jeff Helminiak, sports editor........................... jeff.helminiak@peninsulaclarion.com Fisheries, photographer.............................................................................................. ............................ Rashah McChesney, rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com Kenai, courts...............................Dan Balmer, daniel.balmer@peninsulaclarion.com Borough, education ......... Kaylee Osowski, kaylee.osowski@peninsulaclarion.com Soldotna .................................. Kelly Sullivan, kelly.sullivan@peninsulaclarion.com Arts and Entertainment................................................ news@peninsulaclarion.com Community, Around the Peninsula............................... news@peninsulaclarion.com Sports............................................ Joey Klecka, joey.klecka@peninsulaclarion.com Page design........ Florence Struempler, florence.struempler@peninsulaclarion.com

Circulation problem? Call 283-3584 If you don’t receive your newspaper by 7 a.m. and you live in the Kenai-Soldotna area, call 283-3584 before 10 a.m. for redelivery of your paper. If you call after 10 a.m., you will be credited for the missed issue. Regular office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Sunday. General circulation questions can be sent via email to circulation@peninsulaclarion.com. The circulation manager is Randi Keaton.

For home delivery Order a six-day-a-week, three-month subscription for $39, a six-month subscription for $73, or a 12-month subscription for $130. Use our easy-pay plan and save on these rates. Call 283-3584 for details. Mail subscription rates are available upon request.

Want to place an ad? Classified: Call 283-7551 and ask for the classified ad department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or email classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com. Display: Call 283-7551 and ask for the display advertising department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Leslie Talent is the Clarion’s advertising director. She can be reached via email at leslie.talent@peninsulaclarion.com. Contacts for other departments: Business office...................................................................................... Jane Russell Production................................................................................................ Geoff Long Online........................................................................................ Vincent Nusunginya

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They try to attend a music festival every year; usually they go to Forest Faire in Girdwood. When they realized they had a scheduling conflict, this year they opted for tickets for Salmonstock. The Engmans have been taking their kids to music festivals since the children were babies. Becky Engman said Elias was only a few days old when he was taken to an outdoor music event. She said parents have to make small sacrifices when going to music festivals with their kids and shift the focus to make it fun for them. Eric Engman said even flexibility and openness, even when a band is playing that you want to see, is required when going

. . . List Continued from page A-1

to festivals with kids. Along with eating festival food like soft pretzels with cheese, the Engmans have a few family festival traditions. Ella likes to get her face painted, and Elias likes to buy useful items — wooden swords, PVC pipe marshmallow shooters and stilts are a few interesting festival finds he has brought home. The Engmans are making a week-long family trip around the festival. Becky Engman said while she doesn’t like fishing the rest of the family will enjoy some time casting into the water after Salmonstock. Reach Kaylee Osowski at Kaylee.Osowski@peninsulaclarion.com

can be found at www.ahfc. us/rent/applying. Applications are available at www.ahfc.us or in the AHFC’s public housing locations. Completed applications are accepted online, in person or by mail. -Staff Report

health grant programs, McOliver said. “They’ve been very successful as applicants,” she said. A past project, which ends this year, was focused on environmental justice and climate change, particularly maternal and child health. That project also looked at the human health impacts of different contaminants, and focused on Alaska Natives in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta Region. ANTHC worked with the Center for Disease Control, or CDC, on that project, McOliver said. Molly Dischner can be reached at molly.dischner@alaskajournal.com

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Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

Around the Peninsula Cardiac Support Group meeting The monthly Cardiac Support Group meeting will be Monday Aug. 4 from 5:30-7 p.m. in the Redoubt Room at CPH. Our topic will be atrial fibrillation which is the most common heart arrhythmia. I have new information from Womenheart to share with you on this topic. I hope you can come and look forward to seeing you there- Jeanette Rodgers, Womenheart Support Network Coordinator.

Obituary Diana Hackney Kenai resident, Ms. Diana Jean (Anderson) Hackney, 54, died Friday, Feb. 28, 2014 at her home in Kenai. Memorial services will be held 2:00 p.m. Tuesday, August 5, 2014 at Peninsula Memorial Chapel & Crematory, 5839 Kenai Spur Hwy. between Kenai and Soldotna at mile 6 on the Spur Hwy. A potluck will follow the services at The Family Moose Center in Kenai. Diana was born August 5, 1959 in Kermit, Texas. She was a loving mother, who raised her son, Graham in Kenai. She later moved to Texas, but returned to Kenai later in life. She worked at the fish canneries in the summer for many years. She graduated from Kenai Central High School and attended classes at KPC. The family wrote, “She loved her father and Marie, and her step sister and nieces. She suffered bravely through her many serious health problems. She was a skilled quilt maker and seamstress.” Diana was preceded in death by her son, Graham. She is survived by her father, Doug Anderson of Kenai; step-mother, Marie of Kenai; Colorado; sisters, Cheryl Fortaliza and Darlene Garvais both of San Diego, California; step-sister, Tia Holley of Soldotna and numerous nieces and nephews. Arrangements made by Peninsula Memorial Chapel & Crematory. Please visit Diana’s obituary and online guestbook at AlaskanFuneral.com.

Check out the trunk show The Kenai Peninsula Quilting Guild is sponsoring a trunk show by Connie Sue Haidle of Apple Blossom Quilts. The Trunk Show will be at Christ Lutheran Church in Soldotna on Saturday, Aug. 2 at 1 p.m. Connie Sue is know for her special applique technique and will have many examples to share during the show. The show is open to the public and we hope that you will take advantage of seeing examples of a different applique technique. For information call Barbara Steckel 907-262-2407.

Sign up for the Sterling Triathlon

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to “Wrap Up a Rainbow” with gluten-free veggie wraps. The free demonstrations take place at Tuesday, 3:30 – 5 pm, at the Farmers Fresh Market, located at Kenai Peninsula Food Bank, and on Saturday, 11 am – 1 pm, at the Central Peninsula Farmers Market at the corner of Kenai Spur Highway and Corral Avenue in Soldotna. Kenai Soil & Water Conservation District will have reusable grocery totes on sale at all four markets. Look for the bright green bags with a “Support Local Farmers” message at the Chef in the Market or Valley Bounty booths. Farmers markets are held Tuesday, 3-6 pm, at the Kenai Peninsula Food Bank; Wednesday, 10 am – 4 pm at Peninsula Center Mall; Saturday, 10 am – 2 pm, at Soldotna Elementary; and Saturday 10 am – 5 pm, at Kenai Visitors Center. For more local food information, see www.kenailocalfood. org.

Can you canoe, bike, and run? Grab a friend and participate in the Sterling Triathlon on Saturday, Aug. 9. Race includes running 1.7 miles, biking 5.6 miles, and canoeing 0.5 miles on the Moose River. Teams of two must register by Thursday, Aug. 7. Divisions are ages 14-30, and 31 and older. Cash prizes. Sat- North Peninsula Recreation Service Area ofurday check in 8:30 a.m., race starts at 9 a.m. Cost: $50 per fers football team. Participants must provide their own gear. Chili feed folYouth Flag Football for boys and girls in 4th through 8th lowing the event. grade. Flag Football Games are Monday and Thursday nights at Call the Sterling Community Center at 262-7224 or email the Nikiski Pool Fields. sterlingcommunityclub@live.com for more information and a Register now; practices start August 18. Season runs through registration form. September. For more information call 776-8800.

Superhero run scheduled The Kenai Peninsula CASA program is staging the Superhero 5-kilometer Run/Walk on Saturday, Aug. 16, at 11 a.m. Costumes are encouraged, but not required. Awards are planned for the best costumed heroes. The course will start at the Kenai park strip and will wind through downtown Kenai. The event, sponsored by the Kenaitze Indian Tribe, is a fundraiser for Kenai Peninsula Court Appointed Special Advocates. CASA volunteers advocate for abused and neglected children in both tribal and state courts. Register for the race online at www.active.com (search for Superhero 5k) or visit the Kenaitze Indian Tribe’s office at 150 N. Willow St. in Kenai for a printed entry form. For more information about the run or the Kenai Peninsula CASA program, contact Joy Petrie at 335-7219 or at jpetrie@ kenaitze.org.

Celebrate National Farmers Market Week

Central Kenai Peninsula Hospital Service Board Meeting The Central Kenai Peninsula Hospital Service Area Board will hold its regularly scheduled meeting on Monday, August 11th, at 5:30 p.m. in the Redoubt-Spur conference room downstairs at Central Peninsula Hospital in Soldotna.

Caregiver support program plans tea time A caregiver support program meeting is planned for Tuesday from 1:00-3:00 p.m. at the Soldotna Senior Center. Enjoy tea time with Shelley and Judy. Come take a break, share with others about the ups and downs of family caregiving. Laugh, cry, complain, share, and care. For more information on assistance, counseling, supplies, or respite call 907-262-1280 or visit www.kpnfcsp.org.

Mountain View Elementary holding open reg-

National Farmers Market Week, Aug. 3-9, is a great time to visit one of the four Central Peninsula markets. Vendor tables istration for new students and tailgates will be piled high with the colorful bounty of the Thursday & Friday, August 7 & 8, from 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM. season. Special events this week include two family-friendly Kindergarten students must be 5 years old by September 1, Chef at the Market cooking demonstrations. 2014. Please bring a birth certificate and immunization records. Teacher Susan Nabholz will be showing kids and adults how

Peninsula Clarion death notice and obituary guidelines:

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The Peninsula Clarion strives to report the deaths of all current and former Peninsula residents. Notices should be received within three months of the death. Pending service/Death notices are brief notices listing full name, age, date and place of death; and time, date and place of service. These are published at no charge. Obituaries are prepared by families, funeral homes, crematoriums, and are edited by our staff according to newspaper guidelines. The fee for obituaries up to 500 words with one black and white photo ranges from $50 to $100. Obituaries outside these guidelines are handled by the Clarion advertising department. Funeral homes and crematoriums routinely submit completed obituaries to the newspaper. Obituaries may also be submitted directly to the Clarion with prepayment, online at www.peninsulaclarion.com, or by mail to: Peninsula Clarion, P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, Alaska, 99611. The deadline for Tuesday – Friday editions is 2 p.m. the previous day. Submissions for Sunday and Monday editions must be received by 3 p.m. Friday. We do not process obituaries on Saturdays or Sundays unless submitted by funeral homes or crematoriums. Obituaries are placed on a space-available basis, prioritized by dates of local services. For more information, call the Clarion at 907-283-7551.

Community Calendar Today 8 a.m. • Alcoholics Anonymous As Bill Sees It Group, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway Unit 71 (Old Carrs Mall). Call 398-9440. Noon

• Alcoholics Anonymous recovery group, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway, Suite 71 in the old

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Carrs Mall in Kenai. 4 p.m. • Narcotics Anonymous support group “Twisted Sisters” (women’s meeting) at URS Club, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway, Unit 71, Kenai. 7 p.m. • Alcoholics Anonymous Freedom Group meets at the Soldotna United Methodist Church, 158 S. Binkley, Soldotna. 8 p.m.

• Narcotics Anonymous support group “This One” (men’s meeting) at URS Club, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway, Unit 71, Kenai. The Community Calendar lists recurring events and meetings of local organizations. To have your event listed, email organization name, day or days of meeting, time of meeting, place, and a contact phone number to news@peninsulaclarion.com.


A-4 Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

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Opinion

CLARION P

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Serving the Kenai Peninsula since 1970 VITTO KLEINSCHMIDT Publisher

WILL MORROW������������������������������������������������������������������������ Editor Jane Russell...................... Controller/Human Resources Director LESLIE TALENT................................................... Advertising Director GEOFF LONG.................................................... Production Manager VINCENT NUSUNGINYA.................................... New Media Director Daryl Palmer.................................... IT and Composition Director RANDI KEATON................................................. Circulation Manager A Morris Communications Corp. Newspaper

On the shadows and aftermath of the 9/11 attacks The tragic incidents of 9/11 may be history but its aftermath is still haunting the Americans. A recent report commissioned to inquire into the unexplored details of the trauma, which changed the United States for times to come, says that terror is still around, and it has rather taken a more dangerous and sophisticated turn. The 9/11 Commission Report categorically says that Americans need to do more to protect themselves. This conclusion after almost 14 years of warfare and worldwide surveillance speaks high of the missed targets as Washington went on to attack two sovereign countries and spent more than four trillion dollars to make the shores across the Atlantic safe and secure. The report said the ‘general struggle’ against terrorism is far from over, and rather it is entering a more dangerous phase of its existence. With the caution line of America cannot afford to lower the guard, the report has called for stringent measures in all walks of life from cyber terror to human bomb to tackle the menace of terrorism. It is hoped that these new findings and recommendations will go a long in beefing up policy measures as the Homeland Security Department ups the vigil. The report has come at a time when the world is witnessing new upheavals and the rise of the ‘Islamic State’ militants in Iraq is a case in point. It needs to be debated that the new insurgents in Iraq who had established a socalled caliphate after being battered down from Syria at the hands of President Bashar Al Assad are considered to be more serious than the dreaded Al Qaeda. If that is the case then Americans and especially its intelligence sleuths have to do some soul-searching as to why these extremists were not nailed down in Syria itself, and as to why militants on the loose from across the region <0x2014> and that too in affiliation with Al Qaeda <0x2014> were allowed to successfully regroup against the lesser evil in Damascus. Had they been exterminated on the plains of Syria itself, this revulsion would not have taken place, which now directly threatens the entire region including Saudi Arabia. With the report calling for stringent efforts to fight the invisible enemy, Washington has to recast its security priorities and realign geopolitical realities. The opening up with Tehran and a broad-based understanding with Riyadh as was evident from the consensus that emerged between King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz and Secretary of State John Kerry earlier this month is epoch-making. America cannot continue to fight proxies in the Middle East and it is time for it to get real. The bottom line assessment of the 9/11 Commission says: “strenuous counterterrorism efforts will remain a fact of our national life for the foreseeable future.” This notion applies to both home and abroad. The fine print of the report simply reads that America and the world is still not a safe place to live in.

-Khaleej Times, Dubai July 30

Letters to the Editor: E-mail: news@peninsulaclarion.com

Write: Peninsula Clarion P.O. Box 3009 Kenai, AK 99611

Fax: 907-283-3299 Questions? Call: 907-283-7551

The Peninsula Clarion welcomes letters and attempts to publish all those received, subject to a few guidelines: n All letters must include the writer’s name, phone number and address. n Letters are limited to 500 words and may be edited to fit available space. Letters are run in the order they are received. n Letters addressed specifically to another person will not be printed. n Letters that, in the editor’s judgment, are libelous will not be printed. n The editor also may exclude letters that are untimely or irrelevant to the public interest. n Short, topical poetry should be submitted to Poet’s Corner and will not be printed on the Opinion page. n Submissions from other publications will not be printed. n Applause letters should recognize public-spirited service and contributions. Personal thank-you notes will not be published.

Plenty of rhyme but no reason Now the extremists have a lesson to teach, To their Satan, Obama, whom they want to impeach. But some in their party -- the ones who are saner, Like Gingrich and Rove and notably Boehner, Say that tactically this is a gross overreach. Or how about this? Instead of folding or running away, White House folks taunt them into making their play, Their base has been quiet, their voters quite lazy, Impeachment could rile them, make them turn out like crazy, So, they’re telling the wingnuts, “go ahead make our day.” Silly, yes, but nowhere near as silly as the idiotic clamor from the leading intellectual lights of the far right, the Sarah Palins and Allan Wests of this world who say that the time has come to end Barack Obama’s presidency, without waiting for a replacement to be chosen in the orderly way. Their shrill rallying cry has caused a clamor. Unfortunately for them, most of the ruckus has come not from the conservative spectrum, but from those on the left, who can’t seem to talk about it enough. And why not? We have a midterm election coming up, and most of us in the biz believe the GOP is going to walk all over the D’s. In large part, that’s because this year, “D” stands for “Dispirited.” There is a real lack of enthusiasm on the left, no fervor to match the anti-Obama intensity on the right. Those who are anti anti-Obama need

A response to questions on borough-wide animal control In regard to Nancy Whiting’s questions in her letter in the Clarion concerning the borough-wide animal control resolution: I have answered the questions you asked about the upcoming vote on animal welfare. • “Who came up with the start-up costs?” In 2008 the borough agreed upon the amount of $100,000.00 for the cities with animal control to handle animals brought to their shelters • To whom and to what would that amount apply: The amount covers all costs of the program’s operation. • Who came up with the .02% mill rate? The borough tax department. The .02 generates $95,000 a year: $3 dollars a year on property assessed at $150,000, $20 on property valued at one million dollars. • Is this scheme going to go up for bid? The program will follow the established RFT (request for proposal) process for the KPB. • “…or is it “understood” that someone in particular will be in charge: The contract to operate Domestic Animal Rescue and Care will be awarded via the established RFP process. • Have those assembly members…considered the cost to cover the geographical area involved? Yes. • What about equipment? The retained contractor must provide the equipment and vehicles needed. The volunteers – which the program relies heavily upon – will use their own vehicles. Volunteers can be paid a per “call out” stipends – just like the volunteer firefighters. This is an issue for the retained contractor to establish. One dedicated investigation vehicle will be needed. It will be equipped with the same video C

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to wake up their supporters, to get them off their lethargic apathies and rile them up so much that they’ll bother to go to the polls and prevent a Republican takeover of the Senate, which for the moment is their Bob Franken last shield against the constant bombardment from the militants in the House. So is it any wonder that they’re the ones publicizing the enemy’s talk of impeachment every chance they get? White House adviser Dan Pfeiffer talks of the “possibility”; even Michelle Obama is quoted about it. Many Republicans are cringing. Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, who knows a thing or two about overplaying his hand, cautions that the Democrats are bringing it up every chance they can because “they want to raise money off it.” No doubt about that. The current Speaker John Boehner calls it a “Democratic scam.” Of course, many Democrats contend Boehner is running a bit of a scam himself with the suit his House Republicans are pursuing against President Obama for failure to fulfill his constitutional responsibility and “faithfully execute” the laws precisely as passed by Congress. Specifically the litigation would fault the president’s

decision to delay the employer mandate in the Affordable Care Act. Never mind that Boehner and his merry gang have tried to repeal ACA about every time they’ve convened, and never mind that presidents routinely take such executive actions, Boehner is proceeding with the litigation. Even though there’s a question whether a judge would even accept it, the speaker would like it to be perceived as a rational alternative to the more draconian impeachment campaign. And it’s certainly a distraction from the embarrassing performance of Congress. Blame for that one can be placed on both parties. It’s not just the House that’s a hotbed of rabble rousing. The Senate, that bastion of phony good manners, has gone bonkers with its nasty partisanship. Most people complain that it’s impossible to get anything done. There are some, though, who argue that is a good thing, because at least with gridlock our fearless leaders aren’t able to make things worse. For this cast of characters, paralysis is the best we can hope for. Washington’s truly an ugly place, Good government here leaves hardly a trace. Next year, you say, there’ll be new direction? After all, we’ll be done with the midterm election. But it gets even worse with the president race.

Letters to the Editor

mals during any court proceedings. Note* the statutes lay out the time period as well as the policies an owner has available to contest any seizure/confiscation action. • Will there be adequate insurance coverage…”Yes. A minimum of a 1 million dollar liability policy naming both the retained contractor as well as the borough is necessary. A One million dollar policy costs about $1700 a year. • Define “limited: It means the program is nothing like conventional ‘animal control’ that people automatically think of. The program is “limited” to enforcing the existing state statutes governing the minimum standards of care for domestic animals. There are no leash or restraint laws, licensing, registration, or vaccination requirements (beyond existing state and federal laws governing rabies vaccination.) The program creates no new regulations or restrictions of any kind for domestic animal owners! Ms. Whiting called the borough assembly members lazy and cowardly. What some view as cowardice – others view as courage. The assembly members that voted to put this to the vote of the people are doing their jobs, courageously. Nothing like this has been voted on in over 16 years. They are allowing people to vote on a ‘controversial’ topic, not dictating what the majority of the voters want. “Lazy” – does not enter into this program. Hundreds of hours have been put into the design of this program! The only ‘train wreck’ here is the misunderstanding of the proposed program. The overwhelming statement we are hearing from people concerning this program is: “Thank you all for doing this for the animals; it has been much needed for many years”. Peg Snyder Domestic Animal Protection League Kenai

equipment as the Troopers utilize for evidence collection. • How many people will have to be hired to cover the peninsula? It will be up to the contractor retained to determine. At lease one NACA certified ACO will be required. The rest of the program will be manned by volunteers. The Troopers will handle all “criminal law enforcement” as well as serve warrants and provide protection for the contractor during rescue operations – as needed. • Has any cap on costs been put in place” Yes. It is capped at the yearly .02 mill rate. any proposed increase in the program’s funding and/or program expansion would have to be approved by a separate vote of the people. Barbara Romine, Domestic Animal Prtection League Nikiski A continued response to Nancy Whiting’s questions in the CLARION concerning the borough-wide animal control resolution… • Where will rescued/confiscated animals be housed…? When first started the animals will be handled by the contractor and volunteers. The borough administration has identified several buildings that are currently “mothballed”. That means that the borough is paying for maintenance and utilities on property that is currently not being used of is being under utilized. The retained contractor will work with the borough’s grant department to procure funding for the conversion/renovation of the building provided by the borough. Once converted the borough’s building will be the primary location of the rescued ani-

Bob Franken is a longtime broadcast journalist, including 20 years at CNN.

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Alaska

Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

A-5

Famous Alaska totem pole damaged by carpenter ants AP Photo/Ketchikan Daily News, Hall

KETCHIKAN, Alaska (AP) — Carpenter ants have damaged one of Ketchikan’s most recognizable totem poles. The Seward totem pole is a famous example of a Tlingit ridicule or shame pole. The top part of the pole was removed Friday after a resident of Saxman totem park noticed that it was beginning to fall. A loose facial piece was removed and then a chain saw was used to take off the rest of the pole’s top. Saxman Mayor Harvey Shields says there is money available to replace the pole. The damaged pole is actually a replica of the original. The Civilian Conservation Corps moved totem poles from villages and set up totem parks, such as the one in Saxman, during the Great Depression. The Saxman park was created in 1938. Ridicule poles were raised to shame a person or clan. In this case, the person was William H. Seward, the secretary of state under President Abraham Lincoln.

Anderson

In this Aug. 1, 2014 photo, city of Saxman employees Matt Calves, left, and Lloyd Jackson, right carry a rotten chunk cut off from the top of the Seward’s Pole at the Saxman totem park in Ketchikan, Alaska. The poles in Saxman were created as part of the Civilian Conservation Corps beginning in 1938 according to the Ketchikan Daily News.

Recycling program gains popularity in Allakaket MATT BUXTON Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

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ALLAKAKET — It was a cool, overcast day in the Koyokuk River village of Allakaket and Evelyn Esmailka was running errands in one of the community’s handful of pickup trucks. She had mail to drop off, visitors to shuttle from the school to the tribal hall, a gift to drop off at a friend’s home and a giant bag of plastic bottles and aluminum cans to drop off at the village’s recycling center. Esmailka, like nearly every other household in the village of just more than 100 people, recycles, diverting thousands of pounds of waste and toxic ma-

terials from the community’s landfill or one of the many burn barrels. For that they — and future generations — have to thank the efforts of Allakaket Tribal Council Environmental Coordinator Jonathan Henzie, who helps promote and organize the community’s recycling, waste management and clean-up efforts with the help of environmental assistant Crystal Bergman. “The main concern is just getting all these items that we can out of the community,” Henzie said. “We have a 20-year life expectancy on our dump and we recycle 100 pounds of aluminum a month. That’s a lot that would be piling up every month.”

Many cans and bottles are dropped off, but Henzie and Bergman often will go out into the community to pick up recycling bins. They also help collect electronic waste, used batteries, broken appliances and the occasional barrel with unknown contents. Much of the recyclables are flown out in the spare room of the daily Wright Air flights, a service that the airline, along with many throughout the state, offer to villages. The aluminum is recycled in Fairbanks, paying 35 cents per pound to the community. The e-waste and other toxics are particularly critical to collect, he said, because the community’s little landfill was never

lined. That means any battery, plastic or oils could leach out into the ground, polluting the community. Henzie has promoted the program through word of mouth, annual village clean-up events, a newsletter and is working on new ways to promote it all the time. But the 23 year old admits that recycling or what he did with trash wasn’t much more than an afterthought when growing up. “Honestly, I didn’t have much interest in recycling when I moved back here last year,” he said. “Growing up I didn’t remember doing anything for the environment. We learned traditional values, but I wasn’t

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running around to pick up trash in my free time and we never recycled.” Henzie had been studying at the University of Alaska Fairbanks for two years but returned to Allakaket to help his grandfather after his grandmother died. He took the job coordinating the Allakaket Tribal Council’s environmental department, a program that is made possible through the Environmental Protection Agency’s Indian Environmental General Assistance Program. “And now I’m always thinking of new projects and writing budgets in my spare time,” he said. “I enjoy coming up with ideas and projects to help preserve the environment.”

Henzie said his dream is to overhaul the community’s landfill, bringing in waste handling similar to the village of Bettles, where trash is bailed, some is incinerated and crushed glass is used to layer the landfill. “My goal for it is less stuff coming in and less stuff coming out,” he said. With an improved landfill, he said he hopes that could lead to an end of the ubiquitous burn barrels that sit at the end of most homes’ driveways. “Currently, we burn a lot of trash outside our homes, about five feet from the road and 30 feet from the house,” he said. “That’s unsafe and Crystal and I are going to attack that with our program.”


A-6 Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

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Nation

US doctor with Ebola in Atlanta By RAY HENRY Associated Press

ATLANTA — The first Ebola victim to be brought to the United States from Africa was safely escorted into a specialized isolation unit Saturday at one of the nation’s best hospitals, where doctors said they are confident the deadly virus won’t escape. Fear that the outbreak killing more than 700 people in Africa could spread in the U.S. has generated considerable anxiety among some Americans. But infectious disease experts said the public faces zero risk as Emory University Hospital treats a critically ill missionary doctor and a charity worker who were infected in Liberia. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has received “nasty emails” and at least 100 calls from people saying “How dare you bring Ebola into the country!?” CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden told The Associated Press Saturday. “I hope that our understandable fear of the unfamiliar does not trump our compassion when ill Americans return to the U.S. for care,” Frieden said.

By JOHN SEEWER Associated Press

AP Photo/WSB-TV Atlanta

An ambulance arrives with Ebola victim Dr. Kent Brantly, right, to Emory University Hospital, Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014, in Atlanta. Brantly, infected with the Ebola virus in Africa arrived in Atlanta for treatment Saturday, landing in a specially equipped plane at a military base, then being whisked away to one of the most sophisticated hospital isolation units in the country, officials say.

Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol, who will arrive in several days, will be treated in Emory’s isolation unit for infectious diseases, created 12 years ago to handle doctors who get sick at the CDC, just up the hill. It is one of about

four in the country, equipped with everything necessary to test and treat people exposed to very dangerous viruses. In 2005, it handled patients with SARS, which unlike Ebola can spread when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

In fact, the nature of Ebola — which is spread by close contact with bodily fluids and blood — means that any modern hospital using standard, rigorous, infection-control measures should be able to handle it.

Slain soldier’s son to get medal, answers By DON BABWIN Associated Press

CHICAGO — John Trinca couldn’t remember the name of the soldier who died right next to him minutes after they met during World War II, and all Thomas Bateman Jr. knew of his father’s death was that it happened in 1945 in the Philippines. The two will meet for the first time Sunday thanks largely to Tom McAvoy, who made good on a quest to return a lost war medal he found as a child in Chicago that only had the recipient’s engraved name as a clue: Thomas Bateman.

Don’t drink the water, says Ohio city

This year — 69 years after a bullet from a Japanese machine gun killed Pvt. Thomas Bateman — their stories intersected for the first time, giving them answers to questions that tugged at them for years. At this weekend’s ceremony, the slain soldier’s son will receive the lost Purple Heart his father paid for with his life. “I had a newspaper article that my grandmother kept that said he was killed and that’s about all I knew,” said Bateman, 69, who was just shy of his first birthday when his father was killed. The men learned of one another thanks to Purple Hearts

Reunited, a foundation that works to return the medals to their recipients or their recipients’ families. Zachariah Fike, a Vermont National Guard captain who was awarded the medal after he was wounded in Afghanistan in 2010, has managed to reunite about 100 Purple Hearts with their rightful owners since starting the foundation. There’s a story behind each

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of the medals that have been returned, but none quite like that of Bateman, who was an infantryman with the 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. “To find the guy who found the medal, the guy with (Bateman) when he died and the son,” said Fike, who will present the medal to Bateman on Sunday. “This one sends chills.”

TOLEDO, Ohio— Toxins possibly from algae on Lake Erie fouled the water supply of the state’s fourth-largest city Saturday, forcing officials to issue warnings not to drink the water and the governor to declare a state of emergency as worried residents descended on stores, quickly clearing shelves of bottled water. “It looked like Black Friday,” said Aundrea Simmons, who stood in a line of about 50 people at a pharmacy before buying four cases of water. “I have children and elderly parents. They take their medication with water.” The city advised about 400,000 residents in Toledo, most of its suburbs and a few areas in southeastern Michigan not to brush their teeth with or boil the water because that would only increase the toxin’s concentration. The mayor also warned that children should not shower or bathe in the water and that it shouldn’t be given to pets. Toledo issued the warning just after midnight after tests at one treatment plant showed two sample readings for microsystin above the standard for consumption. Gov. John Kasich said it was too early to say how long the advisory will last or what caused toxins to spike suddenly in the drinking water. Officials were waiting on test results on water samples. “We don’t really want to

speculate on this,” he told The Associated Press. “When it comes to this water, we’ve got be very careful.” Toledo Mayor D. Michael Collins said it would probably be Sunday morning before all the results are in and officials could consider after that whether to lift the advisory. The governor and his staff said state agencies were working to bring water and other supplies to areas around Toledo while also assisting hospitals and other affected businesses. “What’s more important than water? Water’s about life,” Kasich said. “We know it’s difficult. We know it’s frustrating.” Algae blooms during the summer have become more frequent and troublesome around the western end of Lake Erie, the shallowest of the five Great Lakes. The algae growth is fed by phosphorus mainly from farm fertilizer runoff and sewage treatment plants, leaving behind toxins that have contributed to oxygen-deprived dead zones where fish can’t survive. The toxins can kill animals and sicken humans. Scientists had predicted a significant bloom of the bluegreen algae this year, but they didn’t expect it to peak until early September. Kasich’s emergency order issued Saturday allowed the state to begin bringing water into the Toledo area. Large containers were being filled with water at a prison near Columbus and trucked about 130 miles north to Toledo.

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Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

Hate crime case opens racial wounds

Around the Nation McConnell, Grimes trade jabs in Kentucky’s Senate race FANCY FARM, Ky. — For a church picnic, the congregation at Fancy Farm is anything but reverent. Hundreds of people flocked to this small western Kentucky town on Saturday to cheer and jeer their way through speeches from Republican Mitch McConnell and Democratic challenger Alison Lundergan Grimes at a church fundraiser that doubles as the official start of Kentucky’s campaign season. Some Republican supporters carried signs touting “Alison’s dilemma ... be a devout Democrat or a real Catholic.” On the Democratic side, a supporter held a sign asking “What would Jesus do? Vote 4 Grimes.”

Mom said ‘Thank you, Jesus’ after medical examiner ruled police chokehold caused man’s death NEW YORK — After her son was placed in a police chokehold and died saying, “I can’t breathe,” Gwen Carr would wake up screaming, “Let him go! Give him air!” she said Saturday. When she heard his death had been ruled a homicide, she said, her first words were, “Thank you, Jesus!” Carr and eight other relatives of the late Eric Garner attended a rally in Manhattan led by the Rev. Al Sharpton that celebrated the homicide ruling issued Friday by the city medical examiner. Sharpton said the ruling is “probable cause” for the quick arrest of Officer Daniel Pantaleo, the white police officer who used the chokehold on Garner, who is black, on July 17 on Staten Island.

Robert Kennedy Jr., actress Cheryl Hines wed at Kennedy family compound on Cape Cod HYANNIS, Mass. — Robert Kennedy Jr. and “Curb Your Enthusiasm” actress Cheryl Hines are now husband and wife. The couple married Saturday before family and friends gathered at the Kennedy compound in Hyannis Port on Cape Cod. The 60-year-old Robert Kennedy is an environmental lawyer and activist who lives in New York. He is son of the late Sen. Robert F. Kennedy and nephew of President John F. Kennedy and the late Sen. Edward Kennedy. It is his third marriage.The 48-year-old Hines has been nominated twice for Emmys for her role playing Larry David’s wife on HBO’s “Curb Your Enthusiasm.” -Associated Press

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A-7

By TOM HAYS Associated Press

NEW YORK — Yitzhak Shuchat, a white member of a civilian patrol group, and Andrew Charles, the black son of a police officer, came face to face in 2008 in a neighborhood with a history of racial strife — that much is certain. But six years later, the circumstances of the encounter in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn remain murky, even as prosecutors pursue charges against 28-year-old Shuchat alleging he attacked Charles because of his race. Shuchat’s supporters in the neighborhood’s Orthodox Jewish community have reacted with dismay over what they call a hate crime investigation gone awry. Authorities “took a minor incident and made it into a very serious situation,” said state Assemblyman Dov Hikind, who is Jewish. “This could have

been resolved a long time ago. It makes absolutely no sense.” The case received renewed attention last month when deputy U.S. Marshals retrieved Shuchat from Israel after he lost a lengthy extradition fight. He pleaded not guilty July 18 in a Brooklyn court to seconddegree assault as a hate crime, attempted assault and other charges and was released on $300,000 bail put up by Jewish benefactors. Prosecutors have yet to explain why they’re treating the case as a racial incident, said Shuchat’s attorney, Paul Batista. In other hate crime cases, there are typically racial slurs or other clear evidence of bias. “I don’t know where the hate element came in,” Batista said. “Yitzy has no racial animus toward anyone.” Asked in a recent television interview to describe their encounter, Charles responded,

“They attacked us, and that’s about it.” He didn’t elaborate. The Brooklyn district attorney’s office declined to comment. The case resurrected old wounds in Crown Heights, where violence exploded in 1991 after a black child, Gavin Cato, was accidentally hit and killed by a car in a Jewish motorcade. A group of blacks responded by stabbing to death a rabbinical student from Australia who was walking down the street. Over the years the tensions in Crown Heights have dissipated as the neighborhood has become more gentrified. But occasional violence linked to race or religion has persisted — and can still stir up old fears. In 2008, the New York Police Department increased patrols in Crown Heights after the incident with Charles and a report that a Jewish teenager was robbed and beaten by black

kids. According to police, Charles was walking with a black friend when they were confronted by a white man who peppersprayed Charles. Then an SUV pulled up and a white passenger — later identified by police as Shuchat — jumped out and hit him with a nightstick. Authorities concluded Shuchat and the other man were volunteers with the civilian patrol, Shmira, and convened a grand jury to look into the matter — a move criticized by the Jewish community but welcomed by black leaders. “You can’t have a group, whether it’s the Bloods, Crips or Shmira, acting like vigilantes,” then-District Attorney Charles Hynes told a local Jewish newspaper. After learning he was wanted as a suspect, Shuchat fled to Israel through Canada amid claims he couldn’t get a fair trial.

West’s wildfires forces residents to evacuate ALTURAS, Calif. — Thousands of federal, state and local firefighters on Saturday were feverishly attacking at least six major wildfires in central and far northern California that prompted evacuations, while blazes in the Pacific Northwest destroyed a handful of homes. A freshly sparked wildfire in Washington state burned down six to eight homes. Dramatic scenes played out overnight as residents tried to keep the flames at bay, Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers said. “Some great saves were made. Unfortunately, not all the homes were saved,” he said. The scope and intensity of

the California blazes, three of them sparked by dry lightning as the state copes with a severe drought, was comparable to the fire activity the state doesn’t usually see until September, California Department of Forestry and Fire protection Dennis Mathisen said. The fires were burning as far south as the Sierra National Forest, about 70 miles from where another blaze sparked evacuations in and around Yosemite National Park earlier in the week, and as far north as the state border, where a blaze that began in southern Oregon had consumed 5.5 square miles and threatened about two dozen homes in California’s Siskiyou

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County. “When we pop one or two fires at a time, that’s one thing, but when you get dry lightning strikes that pop up all over the place, that’s when things become a challenge,” Mathisen said. One of the most dangerous California blazes was burning in Modoc County near the community of Day, where about 150 homes were under a mandatory evacuation order.

Just across the border in Oregon, a lightning-sparked fire destroyed three homes and threatened 270 structures. Residents near the flames were being asked to prepare to evacuate. Hot, dry weather is in the forecast as crews work to corral the 33-square-mile blaze. Thirty fires were reported in Oregon over 24 hours, the Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center said Saturday. -Associated Press


A-8 Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

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World

Syria rebels raid Lebanese town By BASSEM MROUE Associated Press

BEIRUT — Rebels fighting in Syria’s civil war crossed into Lebanon and raided a border town Saturday, killing and capturing security force members in the most serious incursion into the tiny country during its neighbor’s 3-year-old conflict. The rebels, who included foreign fighters, demanded to trade soldiers and police officers it captured in Arsal for some of the “most dangerous detainees,” the Lebanese army said in a statement. Masked gunmen roamed the streets as Lebanese helicopter gunships flew over the town, about 90 kilometers (55 miles) from the capital, Beirut. A Lebanese army general told The Associated Press that the gunmen attacked army positions near Arsal and troops returned fire. Another official said the gunmen also took control of the main police station in the town. Lebanon’s state-run National News Agency reported that Arsal residents later freed police officers at the station, though rebels captured some weapons and released several detainees. It said gunmen killed two residents near the police station. A picture posted online allegedly showed gunmen in Arsal driving away with about a dozen men, two of them in police uniforms. The photograph corresponded to other AP reporting about the attack.

Remains still being uncovered in Ukraine By TOBY STERLING Associated Press

AP Photo/Bilal Hussein, File

In this Wednesday, file photo, Lebanese army soldiers take their positions outside the Duroy hotel where a suicide bomber blew himself up in his room, in Beirut, as Lebanese security forces raided the premises.

Gunmen killed two soldiers and wounded several others, the National News Agency reported. A U.S. State Department statement strongly condemned the attack in Arsal and said “reportedly at least seven soldiers were killed.” “What is happening today is among the most dangerous of what Lebanon and the Lebanese are being subjected to,” the army statement said. “The gunmen kidnapped several soldiers and policemen who were spending the weekend with their families ... and demanded the release of some of the most dangerous detainees held by the army.

“The Lebanese army will The general and the official not accept that its members be spoke on condition of anonymhostages and will not stay silent ity as they weren’t authorized about targeting the army and to speak publicly. Arsal residents.” The statement said the Lebanese army “will not allow any side to move the battle from Syria” into Lebanon. It added that the army “will not allow any foreign gunman to endanger the security of Lebanon or to harm its soldiers or policemen.” The Lebanese army general said earlier in the day that gunmen took two soldiers who were driving an army tanker truck. The army’s later statement said the two soldiers were later freed in an army operation.

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AMSTERDAM — Investigators using sniffer dogs recovered more human remains and personal belongings at the Malaysia Airlines wreckage site in eastern Ukraine on Saturday, the head of an international recovery mission said. Speaking from the Ukrainian capital Kiev, Pieter-Jaap Aalbersberg said 70 Dutch and Australian investigators were able to reach the site for the second consecutive day, despite clashes between pro-Russia separatist rebels and Ukrainian forces nearby. Flight 17 was shot down above the village of Hrabove July 17 with what the West says was a Russian-made missile fired by the rebels, killing all 298 passengers and crew, most of them Dutch. Aalbersberg did not give de-

tails of the remains recovered. His team is searching for decomposing remains of approximately 80 victims spread over an area of 8 square miles (20 square kilometers) — a process expected to take weeks. He thanked the warring sides for allowing the mission to proceed, after being delayed most of the week by fighting. “This is of great importance to the international police officers, the experts and, especially, the victims’ families,” he said. Remains are being transferred by refrigerated truck to a facility in Kharkiv, where they can be examined by Dutch, Malaysian and Australian forensic experts. They will then be sent on to the Netherlands, to join more than 200 bodies that were collected and transferred in an initial haphazard effort overseen by the rebels.

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Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

Israeli soldier thought captured, now dead

Around the World 100 likely dead as slide blocks Nepal river KATMANDU, Nepal — Fresh rainfall was hampering a search Sunday for scores of villagers believed to be buried by a massive landslide in northern Nepal, where army troops used explosives to blast a river blockage in an attempt to release a dangerous water buildup. Police said eight bodies have been recovered so far, but villagers say more than 100 people were thought to have been crushed by the landslide that engulfed houses in Mankha village, about 120 kilometers (75 miles) east of Katmandu, on Saturday. Fresh rain Sunday was making it difficult for police and army rescuers to sift through the piles of mud and rocks in search of survivors, said police official Laxman Singh. Controlled explosions by the army were able to knock down part of the earth wall that had blocked a river and created a temporary dam, allowing some water to flow out but much of it still remained trapped, posing an immediate threat to downstream villages as far as India.

Korean bishop sees hope in pope’s visit VATICAN CITY — Vatican radio has quoted the head of the Korean Catholic Bishops’ Conference as expressing hope that Pope Francis’ visit to the peninsula will help relaunch the reconciliation process between the two Koreas. Bishop Peter Kang U-il was quoted Saturday as saying that there have been “sporadic but important signs of rebellion against the regime” in Pyongyang, which he said were motivated the difficult living conditions. Kang said that “hunger is a stronger motor of rebellion than the ideals of democracy and justice.” Pope Francis will participate in a Catholic youth festival during his trip to South Korea later this month, the first by a pope in 25 years.

Fighting in Nagorno-Karabakh kills 15 BAKU, Azerbaijan — A sharp escalation in fighting between Azerbaijan and Armenia over the disputed territory of Nagorno-Karabakh has left 15 soldiers dead and prompted Russia to issue an urgent call for calm. Azerbaijan’s Defense Ministry said Saturday that 12 of its troops have been killed in the past four days, including four overnight. Nagorno-Karabakh’s armed forces said one of its soldiers was killed early Saturday, the third in recent days. Azerbaijan’s Nagorno-Karabakh region and some adjacent territory have been under the control of Armenian soldiers and ethnic Armenian local troops since the end of a six-year separatist war in 1994. -Associated Press

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A-9

By IAN DEITCH Associated Press

JERUSALEM — The Israeli military said Sunday that an Israeli soldier it previously believed had been captured by Hamas fighters in a Gaza ambush had in fact been killed in battle that day. The soldier’s purported capture Friday had helped shatter an internationally brokered cease-fire, drawn global condemnation and triggered a military assault on the area of his disappearance in southern Gaza that left dozens of Palestinians dead and scores of homes destroyed. The military did not explain how it reached the conclusion

that Hadar Goldin, a 23-yearold infantry lieutenant, was killed in battle Friday. The announcement of his death came amid signs that Israel is scaling back its 27-dayold ground operation in Gaza. In a televised address late Saturday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu suggested troops would reassess the operation after completing the demolition of Hamas military tunnels under the Gaza-Israel border. Security officials said the tunnel mission was winding down. At the same time, Netanyahu warned that Hamas would pay an “intolerable price” if it continued to fire rockets at Israel and that all options remain on

the table. Hamas said it would not halt its fire if Israel withdraws unilaterally. “We will continue to resist until we achieve our goals,” Hamas spokesman Fawzi Barhoum said after Netanyahu’s speech, dismissing the Israeli leader’s remarks as “confused.” Hamas has said it will not halt hostilities until Israel and Egypt lift their blockade of Gaza, imposed after Hamas overran the territory in 2007. Egypt was to have hosted indirect talks between Israel and Hamas on a sustainable ceasefire, including new border arrangements for Gaza. The talks were to begin as an internationally brokered three-day truce

took hold, starting Friday. Instead, the arrangement broke down over Goldin’s purported capture and the ensuing violence, and Israel said it won’t attend such talks, at least for the time being. Cabinet minister Yuval Steinitz said Saturday that Israel won’t send a delegation to Cairo for now, alleging Hamas has repeatedly broken cease-fire arrangements and that there was “no point” negotiating with the Islamic militant group. From an Israeli perspective, the advantage of a unilateral pullout or troop redeployment to the strip’s fringes is that it can do so on its own terms, rather than becoming entangled in negotiations with Hamas.

Elected Libyan officials meet amid chaos By OMAR ALMOSMARI Associated Press

BENGHAZI, Libya — More than three-quarters of Libya’s newly elected parliament met for the first time Saturday in a city chosen by a prominent anti-Islamist politician, likely signaling a swing against Islamists and extremist militias amid violence unseen since the 2011 civil war that toppled dictator Moammar Gadhafi. The lawmakers met in Tobrouk as rival militias battled for control over the international airport in the capital, Tripoli, with their fire setting more oil depots ablaze. Meanwhile in Libya’s second-largest city of Benghazi, forces loyal to a renegade general were dealt heavy blow after the Islamist militias overran several army bases and took control of the city.

The violence, which has killed more than 200 people and wounded almost 900 in weeks of fighting, has sent diplomats, thousands of foreign workers and Libyans fleeing for their lives and presents the greatest challenge for a country still largely at war with itself. The meeting Saturday saw 152 lawmakers gather in To-

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brouk, a city in eastern Libya near the Egyptian border, according to the official Facebook page of Libya’s House of Representatives. Abu Bakr Baiera, the anti-Islamist lawmaker who presided over Saturday’s session, decided to postpone the official opening until more lawmakers arrive. The presence of that many members of parliament — all

elected as independents — suggests most lawmakers are not affiliated to the Islamist factions that dominated Libya’s outgoing interim parliament or support the Islamic extremistled militia campaigns in Tripoli or Benghazi. The last session suffered from political infighting, as well as violent attacks that saw lawmakers kidnapped and parliament itself besieged.


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A-10 Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

Court reports The following judgements were recently handed down in district court. n Cheryle K. Fitzpatrick, 52, address unknown, pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of no valid operatorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license, committed March 19, 2013. She was fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to pay cost of appointed counsel and placed on probation for one year. n Nancy Leah Fleming, 27, of Kasilof, pleaded guilty to violating condition of release, committed June 25. She was fined a $50 court surcharge and $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended and placed on probation for two years. n Joseph A. Freel, 26, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to one count of violating condition of release for a felony and one count of false information or report, committed April 28. On each count, he was sentenced to 30 days in jail and fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Kelsy Paul Gilbert, 36, of Springfield, Oregon, pleaded guilty to driving under the influence, committed June 12. He was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, fined $2,000 with $500 suspended, a $75 court surcharge, $330 cost of imprisonment and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, had his license revoked for 90 days, ordered ignition interlock for six months and placed on probation for one year. n Richard Hoglin, 311, of Anchorage, pleaded guilty to driving under the influence, committed June 18. He was sentenced to 120 days in jail with 100 days suspended, fined $4,000 with $1,000 suspended, a $75 court surcharge, $1,467 cost of imprisonment and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, had his license revoked for one year, ordered ig-

nition interlock for 12 months and placed on probation for two years. n Kevin Lee Jones-Jackson, 44, of Sterling, pleaded guilty to violating conditions of release for a misdemeanor, committed Feb. 18. He was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 70 days suspended, fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, forfeited items seized, ordered to have no contact with victim and placed on probation for two years. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Kevin G. Kempf, 61, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to an amended charge of violating condition of release for a felony, committed May 5. He was fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended and placed on probation for two years. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Edward Frederick Michael III, 35, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct, committed July 2. He was sentenced to 10 days in jail with five days suspended, may perform 40 hours of community work service in lieu of jail time, was fined $500 with $250 suspended, a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended and placed on probation for one year. n Kyle L. Michitsch, 34, address unknown, pleaded guilty to driving while license cancelled, suspended, revoked or limited, committed April 30. He was sentenced to 60 days in jail with 50 days suspended, fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, had his license revoked for 90 days and placed on probation for three years. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Colter W. Odell, 21, address unknown, pleaded guilty to one count of driving while license suspended and one count of violating conditions of release, committed April 28, 2013. On the count of driving while license suspended, he was sentenced to 20 days in jail with 10 days suspended, may perform 80 hours of community work service in lieu of jail time, was fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail sur-

charge with $100 suspended, had his license revoked for 90 days, ordered to pay cost of appointed counsel and placed on probation for one year. On the count of violating conditions of release, he was fined a $50 court surcharge and placed on probation for one year. n Christopher L. Payton, 30, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of driving without a valid license and one count of improper use of registration, title or plates, committed July 29, 2013. On count one, he was sentenced to 20 days in jail with 15 days suspended, may perform 40 hours of community work service in lieu of jail time was fined a $50 court surcharge and placed on probation for one year. On count two, he was fined a $50 court surcharge and placed on probation for one year. n Paxton G. Quint, 18, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to an amended charge of fourth-degree criminal mischief, committed Jan. 15. He was sentenced to 120 days in jail with 115 days suspended, may perform 40 hours of community work service in lieu of jail time, was fined a $50 court surcharge and a $50 jail surcharge, ordered to pay restitution, forfeited all items seized, ordered to have no contact with victim or a specific Soldotna address and was placed on probation for two years. n Jared G. Radford, 38, of Idaho Falls, Idaho, pleaded guilty to fourth-degree assault, committed June 30. He was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended, fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment and placed on probation for one year. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Kimberly Dianne Rodgers, 43, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to driving under the influence, committed Jan. 17. She was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, fined $3,000 with $1,500 suspended, a $75 court surcharge, $330 cost of imprisonment and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, had her license re-

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voked for 90 days, ordered ignition interlock for six months and placed on probation for two years. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Carol J. Schaffer, 53, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to thirddegree theft, committed May. 9. She was sentenced to 60 days in jail with 50 days suspended, fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to pay restitution, ordered to have no contact with Safeway or a specifically named individual and placed on probation for one year. n Shad Jeslie Sizemore, 29, of Ninilchik, pleaded guilty to one count of driving under the influence and one count of first-degree endangering the welfare of a minor, committed June 17. On count one, he was sentenced to 200 days in jail with 150 days suspended, fined $2,000 with $500 suspended, a $75 court surcharge, $330 cost of imprisonment and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action program treatment, had his license revoked for 90 days, ordered ignition interlock for six months and placed on probation for two years. On count two, he was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended, fined a $50 court surcharge and, concurrent with count one, a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment and placed on probation for two years. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Christina J. Smith, 53, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to driving while license cancelled, suspended, revoked or limited, committed May 12, 2006. She was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 60 days suspended, fined $1,000, a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to pay cost of appointed counsel and

placed on probation for two years. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Anamilok Aurora Spickard, 29, of Nikiski, pleaded guilty to an amended charge of criminal mischief â&#x20AC;&#x201C; property damage, committed June 6. She was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, may perform 24 hours of community work service in lieu of jail time, was fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended and placed on probation for one year. n William Stem, 56, of Kasilof, pleaded guilty to fourthdegree misconduct involving weapons (possessing while intoxicated), committed April 19. He was sentenced to 30 days in jail with 20 days suspended, may perform 80 hours of community work service in lieu of jail time, was fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment and placed on probation for one year. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Steven D. Stewart, 54, of Wasilla, pleaded guilty to driving under the influence, committed Nov. 26. He was sentenced to 120 days in jail with 100 days suspended, fined $4,000 with $1,000 suspended, a $75 court surcharge, $1,467 cost of imprisonment and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, had his license revoked for one year, ordered ignition interlock for 12 months and placed on probation for one year. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Nereid M. Wells, 37, of Kenai, pleaded guilty to fourthdegree assault, committed Jan. 1. Wells was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 150 days suspended, fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with 100 suspended, ordered to

complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment and placed on probation for three years. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Sarah Jean Whitaker, 20, of Sterling, pleaded guilty to underage consuming, committed May 26. She was fined $500 with $400 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, forfeited items seized and placed on probation for one year. n Vanessa Denise Wilkes, 48, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of seconddegree criminal trespass, committed June 15. She was sentenced to five days in jail and fined a $50 court surcharge and a $50 jail surcharge. n Nichole S. Woodward, 23, of Kasilof, pleaded guilty to fourth-degree assault, committed July 14. She was fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, ordered to have no contact with victim without written permission filed with the court and placed on probation for one year.

Police reports n On July 23, Alaska State Troopers responded to 53780 Aleutian Court in Nikiski for a structure fire. Investigation revealed that a generator had backfired, causing the house to start on fire. The home became fully engulfed in flames and was a total loss. No injuries were reported. n On July 22 at about 6:00 p.m., Alaska Wildlife Troopers contacted Bradford Rinckey, 50, of Eagle River. Investigation revealed that he had failed to log his salmon as required on his permit. He was issued a citation, with bail set at $110 in Kenai District Court.

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Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

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n On July 22 at 10:15 p.m., wildlife troopers contacted Cleo Durr, 64, of Anchorage. Investigation revealed that Durr failed to record 38 salmon as required on his permit. Durr was issued a citation, with bail set at $110 in Kenai District Court. n On July 22 at about 10:40 p.m., wildlife troopers contacted Eric Spofford, 29, of Nikiski, and Dylan Bellew, 20, of Nikiski, at Cunningham Park on the Kenai River. Investigation revealed that Spofford had made a false statement of a material fact on his application for his 2014 Alaska sportfish license. He was issued a citation, with bail set at $310 in Kenai District Court. Additionally, Bellew was found to have two active arrest warrants outstanding for thirddegree criminal mischief and a failure to appear on a separate case. Total bail was $5,100. He was arrested on the warrants and taken to Wildwood Pretrial with the assistance of the Kenai Police Department. n On July 20 at 4:43 p.m., the Alaska Bureau of Highway Patrol, Kenai Peninsula Team, responded to a single vehicle crash near Mile of the 118.5 Sterling Highway. Investigation revealed that Roger Vallon, 70, of California, was driving northbound in a red 2014 Chevrolet car, when he fell asleep, left the roadway and crashed into a ditch. He and his passenger reported wearing seat belts and were uninjured. Alcohol was not a factor. The vehicle sustained substantial damage and was towed. Vallon was issued a minor offense citation for negligent driving. n On July 18 at 2:56 p.m., troopers responded to a twovehicle collision at Mile 90 of the Seward Highway. Investigation revealed that Gloria Cho, 29, of Soldotna, failed to yield right of way when turning left onto the Seward Highway from the Girdwood Tesoro parking lot. No injuries were sustained. Cho was issued a citation for a moving violation. n On July 17, troopers responded to a Gaswell Road residence in Soldotna for a domestic disturbance. Investigation revealed that a 17-year-old female had assaulted a female family member. The 17-yearold was arrested and taken to juvenile detention, charged with fourth-degree assault (domestic violence). n On July 15 at 2:38 p.m., troopers responded to a motor vehicle collision near Mile 63 of the Sterling Highway. Investigation revealed that Anton Antonovich, 40, of Anchorage, had crossed the centerline of the Sterling Highway while driving northbound and sideswiped a southbound motorhome. No injuries were sustained. Antonovich was issued a citation for a moving violation. n On July 22, Alaska Wildlife Troopers, Soldotna Post, cited Jeffrey A. Deacon, 46, of Anchorage, for failing to mark personal use salmon as required by regulation. Bail was set at $85. n On July 22, wildlife troopers, Soldotna Post, cited Brian K. Carter, 44, of Anchorage, for failing to log personal use salmon before leaving the fishing site. Bail was set at $110. n On July 22, wildlife troopers, Soldotna Post, cited Kenneth R. Withrow, 43, of Anchorage, for failing to log personal use salmon before leaving the fishing site. Bail was set at $110. n On July 22, wildlife troopers, Soldotna Post, cited Tom G. Dougherty, 53, of Anchorage, for failing to log personal use salmon before leaving the fishing site. Bail was set at $110. n On July 22, Soldotna wildlife troopers cited Doug Schilling, 53, of Moose Pass, for failing to record his personal use caught salmon on his personal use permit prior to leaving the fishing site. Bail for this offense is $110. n On July 22, Justin Yragui, 31, of Kenai, was cited by Soldotna wildlife troopers for failing to register his powerboat before operating the vessel in the Kenai River. Bail for this offense is $60. n On July 22, John Johnson, 78, of Wasilla, was cited by Soldotna wildlife troopers for failing to record his personal use caught salmon on his personal use permit prior to leaving the fishing site. Bail for this offense is $110. n On July 22, Donna Rumley, 62, of Soldotna, was cited by Soldotna wildlife troopers for retaining one Dolly Varden Trout while personal use dip-

netting in the Kenai River. Bail for this offense is $130. n On July 19 at 1:53 p.m., the Alaska State Troopers Bureau of Highway Patrol, South Central Team, responded to a motor vehicle collision involving injuries at the intersection of Island Lake Road and the Kenai Spur Highway in Nikiski. Investigation revealed that Ann Whitemore-Painter, 57, of Moose Pass, was operating a 2003 Subaru Forester, traveling westbound on Island Lake Road. Whitemore-Painter failed to stop at the intersection of the Kenai Spur Highway and collided with a 1989 Ford F-150, driven by a 17-yearold male, of Nikiski, traveling northbound on the Kenai Spur Highway. Whitemore-Painter was cited for not stopping at a stop sign and was taken to Central Peninsula Hospital for non-life-threatening injuries.

The 17-year-old was issued a summons to appear in Kenai Court for operating a motor vehicle without a valid operator’s license. n On July 16 at 4:45 p.m., the Highway Patrol, South Central Team, responded to a commercial motor vehicle collision near Mile 69 of the Sterling Highway. Investigation revealed that Patrick Parker, 25, of Kenai, was operating a 2014 Freightliner owned by the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District, traveling southbound on the Sterling Highway. Parker attempted to avoid a motorhome that was stopped across both lanes of traffic, attempting to turn into Kelly Petersen Lakes. Parker’s truck was struck by Kyle Blomquist, 22, of Kenai, driving a 2006 Ford F550, towing at gooseneck trailer owned by Wirtanen Construction. Parker and Blomquist

were both uninjured. The 2006 F550 was towed by the owner, due to disabling damage. The Freightliner was driven away with minor cosmetic damage. n On July 25 at 12:26 a.m., Soldotna Alaska State Troopers responded to a report of a sexual assault that had occurred in the Kenai area. Subsequent investigation resulted in the arrest of Rosendo Pallones, 39, of Palmer, for two counts of firstdegree sexual assault. Pallones was taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility, where he was held without bail. n On July 23 at 2:33 p.m., Alaska Wildlife Troopers contacted Nathan Anderson, 61, of Condon, Montana, at the Soldotna Visitor’s center on the Kenai River. Investigation revealed that Anderson had failed to release a salmon hooked elsewhere than in the mouth. The fish was seized and Ander-

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son was issued a citation, with bail set at $130 in Kenai District Court n On July 23 at 5:05 p.m., wildlife troopers contacted Wayne VanDamme, 42, of Veneta, Oregon, at Soldotna Creek Park on the Kenai River. Investigation revealed that VanDamme had failed to release a salmon hooked elsewhere than in the mouth. The fish was seized and VanDamme was issued a citation, with bail set at $130 in Kenai District Court. n On July 23 at 11:11 p.m., wildlife troopers contacted Faatauvaia Unutoa, 28, of Barrow. Investigation revealed that Unutoa had failed to record his salmon as required on his persona use permit. Unutoa was issued a citation, with bail set at $110 in Kenai District Court. n On July 24, Alaska State Troopers received a report of a

A-11

sexual Assault in Tyonek. Investigation resulted in the arrest of Emil McCord-Ketzler, 22, of Tyonek, for first-degree, second-degree and third-degree sexual assault, first-degree burglary and fourth-degree assault. He was taken to Kenai and Wildwood Pretrial Facility. n On July 23, Alaska Wildlife Troopers, Soldotna Post, cited Ramon David, 66, of Anchorage, for personal use fishing during a closed period, after being observed dipnetting prior to the 6:00 a.m. opening of the Kenai River personal use dipnet fishery. Bail was set at $110 in Kenai District Court. n On July 24, Soldotna Alaska Wildlife Troopers cited Cheryl P. Stevenson, 57, of Palmer, at the Kenai River City Dock for personal use fishing during a closed period. Bail for this offense is $310.


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A-12 Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

AccuWeather 5-day forecast for Kenai-Soldotna

Barrow 40/33

®

Today

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Tides Today High(ft.)

Prudhoe Bay 46/37

First Second

9:46 a.m. (15.3) 9:56 p.m. (17.7)

4:36 a.m. (3.4) 4:38 p.m. (4.3)

8:33 a.m. (14.6) 8:43 p.m. (17.0)

2:45 a.m. (3.5) 2:47 p.m. (4.4)

First Second

7:52 a.m. (13.4) 8:02 p.m. (15.8)

1:41 a.m. (3.5) 1:43 p.m. (4.4)

First Second

6:28 a.m. (7.0) 6:50 p.m. (9.2)

12:35 a.m. (2.3) 12:31 p.m. (2.7)

First Second

1:05 p.m. (24.2) --- (---)

7:09 a.m. (4.2) 7:03 p.m. (6.5)

Deep Creek

Mostly cloudy with showers around

Mostly cloudy with showers around

Mostly cloudy with a little rain

A couple of showers possible

Chance for a couple of showers

Hi: 63 Lo: 49

Hi: 66 Lo: 51

Hi: 66 Lo: 51

Hi: 64 Lo: 52

Hi: 67 Lo: 50

The patented AccuWeather.com RealFeel Temperature® is an exclusive index of the effects of temperature, wind, Sunrise humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, Sunset pressure and elevation on the human body.

10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m.

58 63 61 64

First Aug 3

Today 5:46 a.m. 10:34 p.m.

Full Aug 10

Daylight

Length of Day - 16 hrs., 47 min., 46 sec. Moonrise Moonset Daylight lost - 5 min., 2 sec.

Alaska Cities Yesterday Hi/Lo/W

City Adak* Anchorage Barrow Bethel Cold Bay Cordova Delta Junction Denali N. P. Dillingham Dutch Harbor Fairbanks Fort Yukon Glennallen* Gulkana Haines Homer Juneau Ketchikan Kiana King Salmon Klawock Kodiak

First Second

Seldovia

Last Aug 17

Today 3:32 p.m. none

Tomorrow 5:49 a.m. 10:31 p.m.

Readings through 4 p.m. yesterday

Nome 63/51

Temperature

Unalakleet McGrath 64/52 69/55

New Aug 25 Tomorrow 4:47 p.m. 12:18 a.m.

Yesterday Hi/Lo/W

City

Kotzebue 61/56/pc 61/54/c 59/51/r McGrath 61/58/c 67/51/pc 67/55/sh Metlakatla 71/54/pc 35/32/c 40/33/c Nome 60/48/pc 61/56/c 69/55/sh North Pole 63/55/sh 59/55/c 63/52/sh Northway 71/52/pc 65/45/pc 59/49/sh Palmer 71/52/pc 64/53/c 70/51/sh Petersburg 70/48/s 57/50/c 69/45/pc Prudhoe Bay* 51/37/sh 63/54/pc 67/52/sh Saint Paul 56/51/c 58/52/c 57/51/sh Seward 67/44/pc 62/58/c 72/55/pc Sitka 67/52/s 72/57/sh 70/52/pc Skagway 67/49/s 74/52/pc 61/42/sh Talkeetna 66/53/pc 72/50/pc 68/46/sh Tanana 70/60/c 72/47/s 67/54/pc Tok* 68/50/pc 70/46/s 62/48/sh Unalakleet 55/55/c 74/45/s 69/53/pc Valdez 66/47/pc 75/56/s 72/56/s Wasilla 70/54/pc 64/52/pc 55/50/pc Whittier 66/53/pc 73/49/pc 69/51/sh Willow* 71/53/pc 71/49/pc 71/55/s Yakutat 62/49/pc 65/56/c 60/53/sh Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

64/56/pc 69/55/sh 71/54/s 63/51/c 71/50/pc 72/49/pc 65/50/sh 69/54/s 46/37/c 57/48/c 59/49/sh 63/56/pc 66/52/pc 66/50/sh 73/51/sh 75/46/pc 64/52/sh 58/46/sh 65/50/c 57/50/sh 68/48/sh 62/50/sh

City Albany, NY Albuquerque Amarillo Asheville Atlanta Atlantic City Austin Baltimore Billings Birmingham Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo, NY Casper Charleston, SC Charleston, WV Charlotte, NC Chicago Cheyenne Cincinnati

81/67/c 79/61/pc 89/60/pc 75/63/c 84/67/pc 73/66/sh 90/65/pc 79/65/r 92/60/pc 91/72/t 88/58/t 99/72/pc 72/62/r 82/65/t 88/50/pc 80/75/r 82/59/c 72/65/c 86/59/s 80/52/s 83/64/pc

80/63/t 79/62/c 86/61/s 79/60/t 86/69/pc 77/63/t 91/69/pc 81/65/t 93/63/pc 91/69/pc 86/61/pc 98/71/pc 72/62/c 78/62/t 89/56/pc 85/74/t 80/61/t 83/65/t 83/64/pc 82/57/pc 82/60/pc

High ............................................... 65 Low ................................................ 49 Normal high .................................. 65 Normal low .................................... 49 Record high ........................ 80 (1978) Record low ......................... 34 (1956)

Kenai/ Soldotna 63/49 Seward 59/49 Homer 62/48

Precipitation

From the Peninsula Clarion in Kenai

24 hours through 4 p.m. yest. 0.00" Month to date ........................... 0.00" Normal month to date ............. 0.16" Year to date ............................... 9.11" Normal year to date .................. 7.05" Record today ................. 0.44" (1950) Record for August ........ 5.39" (1966) Record for year ............ 27.09" (1963)

Anchorage 67/55

Bethel 69/55

Valdez Kenai/ 58/46 Soldotna Homer

Dillingham 67/52

Juneau 69/53

National Extremes

Kodiak 60/53

Sitka 63/56

(For the 48 contiguous states)

High yesterday Low yesterday

114 at Death Valley, Calif. 18 at Bodie State Park,

State Extremes

Ketchikan 72/56

High yesterday 92 at San Antonio and Victoria Low yesterday/ at Midland/Odessa, Paris, San Angelo, San Antonio, Temple, Texarkana, Tyler, Victoria, Waco and Wichita Falls

Cold Bay 63/52

Today’s Forecast

(Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation)

Showers and thunderstorms, some heavy, will encompass the East Coast today. Locally severe thunderstorms will threaten the Upper Midwest as flooding downpours once again target the Desert Southwest.

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

National Cities Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

From Kenai Municipal Airport

Fairbanks 72/55

Talkeetna 66/50 Glennallen 61/42

Today Hi/Lo/W

Unalaska 57/51

Anchorage

Almanac

* Indicates estimated temperatures for yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W

Seward

Anaktuvuk Pass 54/37

Kotzebue 64/56

Sun and Moon

RealFeel

Low(ft.)

Kenai City Dock

World Cities

City Cleveland Columbia, SC Columbus, OH Concord, NH Dallas Dayton Denver Des Moines Detroit Duluth El Paso Fargo Flagstaff Grand Rapids Great Falls Hartford Helena Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Jackson, MS

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W 77/63/t 76/72/t 77/68/t 76/64/r 90/67/pc 80/63/pc 84/53/pc 87/61/pc 76/64/c 83/54/s 80/64/sh 86/57/s 76/49/t 86/57/pc 87/60/pc 75/67/r 85/64/pc 90/78/sh 82/71/c 82/63/pc 86/72/c

78/59/pc 87/72/t 84/63/pc 77/57/c 89/70/s 82/60/pc 87/62/pc 86/66/s 83/62/pc 76/55/t 83/67/c 83/58/pc 69/50/t 83/61/pc 88/56/s 80/62/c 91/59/pc 90/78/pc 89/73/pc 82/62/s 88/69/pc

City Jacksonville Kansas City Key West Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Midland, TX Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Norfolk Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W 91/73/t 88/63/pc 91/80/c 98/83/t 88/70/pc 90/65/pc 85/65/pc 91/71/pc 90/77/t 87/71/c 79/56/s 87/67/t 91/67/pc 92/77/t 74/64/c 74/70/t 89/65/pc 88/62/pc 94/76/pc 77/68/c 102/83/c

89/72/t 88/68/s 90/82/t 84/73/t 87/65/s 87/68/c 87/65/pc 89/69/s 89/77/t 89/68/pc 80/63/pc 86/66/pc 89/65/pc 87/74/t 77/67/c 80/69/t 89/65/s 88/65/s 92/75/t 81/68/t 99/84/t

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

City

Pittsburgh Portland, ME Portland, OR Rapid City Reno Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Santa Fe Seattle Sioux Falls, SD Spokane Syracuse Tampa Topeka Tucson Tulsa Wash., DC Wichita

80/65/pc 76/64/c 87/64/pc 88/61/s 99/62/pc 94/63/s 94/67/pc 92/72/pc 78/70/c 69/59/pc 74/58/pc 85/60/pc 82/57/pc 94/67/pc 85/64/pc 92/78/t 92/66/pc 88/73/t 89/64/pc 84/68/c 90/65/s

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B Sunday, August 3, 2014

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Wolverines greats set to enter Hall Dan Leman, daughter Whitney get rewarded for success on hardwood By JOEY KLECKA Peninsula Clarion

For years, the Leman family of Ninilchik lived basketball. They played, breathed and slept basketball. And that love of the sport translated to great success on the court. Dan Leman coached the Ninilchik School girls team to unprecedented heights and his daughter Whitney backed up the family name as a player with a dominant court presence. While that passion for the sport continues to shine, the Lemans eventually stepped down from their perch at the top level of the game. Dan retired as a coach in 2009, and Whitney played her last competitive college game in 2007 before a torn Achilles

injury sidelined her. Today, however, the Lemans will be front and center once again. Dan Leman will be inducted today into the Alaska High School Hall of Fame in Anchorage, along with his 29-year-old daughter, Whitney Schollenberg. The pair is among nine other inductees into this year’s Hall of Fame class, which also includes former Kenai Central Kardinals football coach Bruce Shearer. “We’re both super honored,” Whitney said. “I think it’s kind of like a justification of a lot of hard work and a big chunk of our lives. We just want to share this with everybody that was a part of it.” A big chunk of their lives may be an understatement. Dan, who still

‘We’re both super honored. I think it’s kind of like a justification of a lot of hard work and a big chunk of our lives. We just want to share this with everybody that was a part of it.’ — Whitney Schollenberg commercial fishes out of Ninilchik, said his family would rabidly await the beginning of each high school basketball season, and during the winter

would analyze their playing style and try to improve. “We would videotape the games and come home, watch the tapes and look at things we need to work on,” he said. “It was a very special time as a family to spend time with kids and my wife. During those years, she was a full-time teacher, mother, wife and a full-time fan.” Leman’s wife, Jamie, and daughters Tasha Boin and Krista Sutton will be in attendance tonight at the Redington Ballroom in the Millennium Alaskan Hotel. “I have no idea what to expect,” Whitney said. “I’m excited but I have no idea what it’s gonna be like. “The coolest part is I’m going in with my dad. That’s how I’m thinking

of the whole thing, we’re doing it together. I don’t know how it would feel if it was just myself.” The ceremony will mark the first time two family members will join the Hall. “On one hand, I think I’ll be a little nervous anyway, but with Whitney there, I’ll put that aside and enjoy the role of being her father,” Dan said. “It’s gonna take us back, I think,” Whitney added. “I’ve been out of high school 11 years, dad hasn’t coached in a while, and this is bringing all that back.” Admitting that he was never someone to place high importance on individual awards, Dan deflected much of the credit to the players. See HALL, page B-4

Mets topple San Francisco By The Associated Press

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NEW YORK — Jacob deGrom outpitched Jake Peavy in a tantalizing hitless duel that carried into the seventh inning Saturday night before the New York Mets broke loose and beat the San Francisco Giants 4-2. Pablo Sandoval doubled off deGrom with two outs in the top of the seventh for the game’s first hit. Peavy was perfect until Daniel Murphy hit a one-out double into the bottom of the seventh on a ball that left fielder Michael Morse misjudged. The Mets went on to score four runs to back deGrom (6-5), and the rookie won win his fifth straight start. Peavy (1-11) lost his 11th decision in a row, a streak that started with Boston. This was the second time this season that a game didn’t have any hits until there were two outs in the top of the seventh inning. Milwaukee’s Matt Garza and Atlanta’s Aaron Harang each had their no-hit bids broken up in the seventh on April 2. ATHLETICS 8, ROYALS 3 OAKLAND, Calif. — Jon Lester won his Oakland debut while pitching into the seventh inning and Jonny Gomes got two hits during an eight-run burst in his return to the Athletics as they beat Kansas City. Two days after being traded from the sagging World Series champion Boston Red Sox, Lester (11-7) and Gomes teamed up to boost the club with the best record in baseball. Lester gave up three runs and nine hits in 6 2-3 innings.

CARDINALS 9, BREWERS 7 ST. LOUIS — Kolten Wong broke out of a slump with a home run and three RBIs and Justin Masterson won his St. Louis debut as the Cardinals beat Milwaukee.

St. Louis, which had lost three of its previous four, moved two games behind first-place Milwaukee in the NL Central. Wong, who entered the contest mired in a 6 for 36 skid, went 3 for 5. Masterson (1-0) gave up five runs on seven hits over six innings. He was acquired from Cleveland on Wednesday for minor league outfielder James Ramsey. Trevor Rosenthal recorded his 33rd save in 37 opportunities. Former Cardinals starter Kyle Lohse (11-6) took the loss.

NATIONALS 11, PHILLIES 0 WASHINGTON — Anthony Rendon homered and drove in four runs, Jordan Zimmermann pitched seven strong innings and the Washington Nationals routed Philadelphia. Philadelphia starter A.J. Burnett (6-11) and manager Ryne Sandberg didn’t last long. Both were ultimately ejected when Burnett motioned and yelled toward plate umpire Chris Guccione after a ball call during Washington’s four-run second inning. Zimmermann (7-5) held the Phillies to five singles and struck eight without a walk for his 50th career win, and first since June 30th.

MARLINS 2, REDS 1 MIAMI — Christian Yelich’s RBI single in the 10th inning lifted the Miami Marlins over Cincinnati. The Marlins snapped a threegame losing streak overall and a seven-game skid to the Reds. Jeff Mathis hit a leadoff double in the 10th against Sam LeCure (13), advanced on a sacrifice by Reed Johnson and scored on Yelich’s hit. Mike Dunn (9-5) struck out two batters in the top of the 10th after Chris Heisey delivered a pinch-hit triple.

PIRATES 8, DIAMONDBACKS 3 PHOENIX — Andrew Mc-

Contributed photo by Tsalteshi Trails Association

Tsalteshi Trails were packed during the fourth Salmon Cycle Series race Thursday.

Events boom at Tsalteshi By JOEY KLECKA Peninsula Clarion

Skyview High School as we know it may be gone, but the adjacent Tsalteshi Trails are still thriving. The trail system is experiencing a boom with a growing community of active runners and bikers in the summer and cross-country skiers and snowshoers in the winter. With over 15.5 miles of trails, local athletes and weekend warriors are taking advantage of an increasing number of events to showcase their skills and enjoy good competition. The trails have been there since 1990, but the dif-

ference now is how many members of the community are taking advantage of them not just in the winter, but in the summer as well. “I always ran around town in the summers in high school, but the trails weren’t really here,” said Rex Shields, 25, winner of Wednesday night’s Salmon Run Series 5K. “The last five years have been huge here, and it’s nice to have them.” Shields is perfect in road and trail races this summer, winning all five that he has entered, including three of the four Salmon Run Series races. Contributed photo by Tsalteshi Trails Association The final race of the series is Bikers cruise down the trail during the fourth Salmon Cycle See BOOM, page B-4 Series race Thursday.

See MLB, Page B-4

New Hall class gets its day in sun JOHN WAWROW AP Sports Writer

CANTON, Ohio — Defensive back Aeneas Williams had the fans and fellow Hall of Famers chanting in the stands to give it their all. Linebacker Derrick Brooks delivered what he called a 24-minute “Thank you letter.” And defensive end Claude Humphrey called the 28-year wait to hear his name called as being worth it. The Pro Football Hall of Fame induction ceremony kicked off with numerous extremes to reflect the varied background of the seven-member class on Saturday night. It began with Brooks, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers star, who was selected for induction in his first year of eligibility, and followed by the 70-year-old Humphrey, who retired after the 1981 AP Photo/David Richard season. “Now they tell me I only had Inductee Michael Strahan talks during the Pro Football Hall of 10 minutes up here, but let me Fame enshrinement ceremony Saturday in Canton, Ohio.

start off by telling you that I’ve waited 30 years to get to this podium, so don’t rush me guys,” said Humphrey, a six-time Pro Bowl selection who split 13 NFL seasons between the Atlanta Falcons and Philadelphia Eagles. Williams livened up the mood late in his speech during which he had one side of Fawcett Stadium chanting: “Begin with the end in mind,” to remind people how important it is to set goals. And he had the other side chanting: “Die empty,” to remind people to give their all. It was a fitting message from an eight-time Pro Bowl selection. He was an accounting major at Southern University, who walked on to the football team a week before the start of his junior season. Selected in third round of the 1991 draft, he proceeded to split 14 seasons between the Phoenix/ Arizona Cardinals and St. Louis Rams. Williams retired after the 2004 season and was selected for induction in his fifth year of eliC

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gibility. “If you would have told me, ‘Aeneas, you have to the potential to be one of the best cornerbacks,’ I would have thought you were crazy and hit you with my right hand,” Williams said. “I’ll just take a moment to soak this all in.” Rounding out the class are defensive end Michael Strahan, receiver Andre Reed, offensive tackle Walter Jones and Ray Guy, the first full-time punter to enter the Hall of Fame. Brooks, an 11-time Pro Bowl selection, paid tribute to family members, teammates and coaches, from his Pee-Wee playing days to his 14 NFL seasons in Tampa Bay. He thanked his late mother Geraldine Brooks-Mitchell for instilling humility in him. He referred to former Buccaneers coach Tony Dungy as his mentor. And Brooks thanked Dungy’s successor, Jon Gruden, for helping the Buccaneers believe they could be champions.

It was under Gruden when the Bucs blossomed into Super Bowl winners during the 2002 season in which Brooks earned NFL Defensive Player of the Year honors. Brooks even thanked Buccaneers kicker Martin Gramatica for his right foot, because of the number of tight games Tampa Bay won by field goals. A persistent drizzle fell for much of the afternoon before finally letting up at about 4 p.m., about three hours before the start of the induction ceremony. As expected, there were numerous fans on hand wearing Bills jerseys in support of Reed. Officials actually moved the ceremony from the front steps of the Hall of Fame building to the stadium in 2002 to make room for the number of Bills fans that traveled to Canton for quarterback Jim Kelly’s induction. The ceremony has been held inside the stadium ever since.


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B-2 Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

George undergoes successful surgery W.G. RAMIREZ Associated Press

LAS VEGAS — Indiana Pacers All-Star Paul George has undergone successful surgery on his broken right leg and is expected to remain in the hospital for about three days. The 6-foot-9 George had an operation at Sunrise Hospital to repair the open tibia-fibula fracture, USA Basketball said in a statement early Saturday morning. Dr. David Silverberg, Dr. Joseph Yu and USA Basketball team physician Riley Williams, were present for the surgery, the release said. George suffered the gruesome right leg injury late in the U.S. national team’s intrasquad scrimmage Friday night. He leaped to contest a fastbreak layup by James Harden with 9:33 left in the fourth quarter and his leg smashed against the bottom of the backboard stanchion and crumpled. Trainers immediately ran onto the floor and after roughly 10 minutes of stoppage, George was taken out of the arena on a stretcher. With players looking visibly upset, coach Mike Krzyzewski then announced to the crowd that the scrimmage would not

be finished out of respect to George and his family. On Saturday morning, Larry Bird, the Pacers president of basketball operations, issued an updated statement saying it’s too early to start talking about George’s expected return. “We are hopeful at some point next week Paul will return to Indianapolis to continue his recovery,” Bird said. “There is no question about the impact on our team but our goal is to be as strong-willed and determined as Paul will be in coming back. Our franchise has had setbacks in its history but has demonstrated the abilities to recover. Paul will provide the example of that off the court and it is up to the rest of us to provide that example on the court. Any discussion regarding the future of our team would be inappropriate at this time. Our focus is solely on Paul and doing whatever we can to help.” Bird also said the Pacers are committed to helping the national team give basketball a global reach. “This is a first for us in USA Basketball, to have something like this take place,” USA Basketball chairman Jerry Colangelo said. “It’s a tough situation for our entire organization,

the coaches, the players. Very, very emotional. There’s no way the game could have gone on under the circumstances.” Doctors estimate a full recovery could take as much as 18 months. Dr. Patrick Kersey, who treated Louisville guard Kevin Ware when he sustained a similar injury during the NCAA tournament regional finals in 2013, said George will likely need 6 to 12 weeks to recover from surgery and another 6 to 10 weeks to get back to a normal walking gait. Kersey is not treating George. A complete recovery, Kersey said, normally takes 12 to 18 months, though the fact he is an elite athlete in top shape could speed up that timeframe. The hardest part for the Pacers might be keeping George off the court once he thinks he’s ready. “It’s a challenge because (athletes) want to push the envelope always,” Kersey said. “The question that is already being asked this morning is how quickly can he get back. He needs to heal. First, he has to get back to a normal life, then his body needs to work in an efficient way and once those pieces are in place, he can start training.”

George was considered a lock to make the final 12-man roster for the World Cup of Basketball that starts later this month in Spain. “Thanks everybody for the love and support,” he wrote on Twitter. “I’ll be ok and be back better than ever!!! Love y’all!!” The Americans planned to reduce the 20-player pool to 14 or 15 players Saturday, but put off those plans after George’s injury. “Everything’s on hold right and it should be,” Krzyzewski said. “It would be so inappropriate for us to talk about anything else when there’s a serious injury like this.” The defending champion U.S. team had already been weakened by player losses. Forwards Kevin Love, Blake Griffin, LaMarcus Aldridge and NBA Finals MVP Kawhi Leonard had all pulled out in recent weeks. Krzyzewski and Colangelo refused to discuss the roster after the game, saying they didn’t even know when they would make roster reductions. “As an organization, we’re just going to let a little bit of time go by here before we address anything like rosters, all that stuff,” Colangelo said. “It seems so unimportant in the

big scheme of things when you have something like this take place. It puts things in perspective.” George would have been a candidate to start for the Americans alongside Kevin Durant. The two, along with Harden, spent the week playing in 1-on-1 competitions after practice, pushing one another while building chemistry leading up to Friday night’s game. George led the Pacers to the best record in the Eastern Conference before they were eliminated by Miami in the Eastern Conference finals. The Americans have to be down to 12 players before they open the tournament on Aug. 30. They are scheduled to take the next week off before reconvening in Chicago for their next practice on Aug. 14. Some NBA executives have long been concerned about injuries to players during summer competitions. Pau Gasol, then playing for the Memphis Grizzlies, broke his foot while leading Spain to the 2006 world title, and Manu Ginobili injured his ankle while playing for Argentina in the 2008 Olympics. He is sitting out the World Cup while recovering from a stress fracture in his right leg.

McIlroy gives chase to Garcia at Bridgestone By The Associated Press

AKRON, Ohio — Sergio Garcia was in the trees left of the 18th fairway, looking through a gap in the branches to find a way out. Ahead of him was Rory McIlroy, giving his 35-foot birdie putt a little body English before it fell for birdie. Garcia never lost command of the Bridgestone Invitational on Saturday, even after a storm delay of just over three hours. He started with a three-shot lead, stretched it to six shots at one point and closed with three good pars for a 3-under 67, three shots ahead of McIlroy. The Spaniard just lost a small measure of comfort. McIlroy, coming off a wireto-wire win in the British Open, might be the last player anyone wants to see right behind. “I’ve got to keep doing the same thing, make sure that I have

good confidence in myself, that I play nicely, and then see what happens,” Garcia said. “If Rory comes out, or whoever is behind us comes out, and get crazy like I did on Friday, then it is what it is. But hopefully, I’ll be able to play well again and be all the way up there tomorrow.” Garcia, who seized control with a career-best 61 on Friday, was at 14-under 196. McIlroy birdied his last two holes for the second straight day for a 66, and he got his wish — a spot in the final group. Sunday is set up as a replay of The Open — only with the roles reversed. McIlroy had a six-shot lead going into the final round at Hoylake. Garcia, playing in the group ahead, made a spirited run at McIlroy and got within two shots late in the round until he faltered and Boy Wonder

pulled away. “Obviously, Rory is playing great, and we get along nicely as of right now,” Garcia said. “I think we’re both excited about it. We’re definitely going to play hard. It will be nice to see if I can do the same thing he did to me a couple of weeks ago. So we’ll see.” This time, it’s McIlroy who has to chase. “My goal today was to try and get in the final group,” McIlroy said. “Sergio didn’t quite have that luxury of seeing what I was doing on the last. It will be nice to play alongside him tomorrow and at least keep an eye on what’s going on. Try to apply a bit of pressure when I can, but just really looking forward to getting in there and having another chance to win a tournament so soon after what happened at Hoylake.”

109,318 watch soccer ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — Manchester United thrilled a record crowd with a brilliant opening goal — and even Cristiano Ronaldo’s unexpected entrance proved futile for Real Madrid. Ashley Young scored twice in the first half, and United beat Madrid 3-1 on Saturday in front of 109,318 fans at Michigan Stadium. It was the largest crowd to see a soccer game in the United States, breaking the mark of 101,799 set at the Rose Bowl for the 1984 Olympic final. Ronaldo has been recovering from the left leg injury that limited him in the World Cup, but the world player of the year came on surprisingly as a 74th-minute substitute, although he didn’t have much impact. “His condition is improving,” manager Carlo Ancelotti said. “I think that he needs another week to train with the teammates, and then I think he will be ready for the first game of the season.” United remained unbeaten this year in the International Champions Cup, advancing to the final of the preseason tournament under new manager Louis van Gaal. Javier Hernandez added a goal in the second half for the English power. Gareth Bale scored for Real Madrid, but the European champions finished winless in three matches in the event. Although United will play Liverpool in Monday night’s final in Miami, this was probably the tournament’s marquee match, with two of the game’s most storied clubs playing at one of the largest and most iconic venues in the U.S. “That was incredible,” United’s Michael Keane said. “Obviously, it is the biggest crowd I’ve ever played in front of, and it is for a friendly in the States. I’ve always heard they don’t care for our football, but there were 109,000 people out there. That’s pretty crazy anywhere in the world.” C

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Rickie Fowler also was in the hunt at Hoylake, though he took himself out of the picture on the final hole. He went from the left trees to a plugged lie in the bunker, having to brace his right good against the side of a hill. He left it in the bunker and wound up with a double bogey for a 72, putting him 10 shots behind. This isn’t a two-man race for a World Golf Championship title. Marc Leishman had a 68 and was five shots behind, while Adam Scott returned from the rain delay carrying only his long putter, the only weapon he needed to convert one last birdie for a 65 that at least left him with a slim chance. He was six shots behind, along with Keegan Bradley (68) and Justin Rose (70). The race won’t feature defending champion Tiger Woods. The eight-time winner at Firestone made only one birdie on

Saturday — he failed to birdie a par 5 for the second straight day — and shot 72. He was 15 shots behind. Garcia, who won the Qatar Masters this year, has been building toward moments like this. Two weeks after his runner-up finish to McIlroy at Hoylake, the Spaniard has performed so solidly at Firestone that he went 37 consecutive holes without a bogey. Along with four birdies in 11 holes to start his third round, he built a six-shot lead for a brief moment until missing the 14th green long and failing to convert a 5-foot par putt. Three pars at the end helped keep in front. He pulled his lay-up shot on the par-5 16th into deep rough, which felt even thicker after the rain delay. Garcia managed to judge it perfectly to clear the water. He

hooked his tee shot on the 17th hole and hit 8-iron safely onto the green. The biggest challenge was the 18th, where he had to clear trees with a shot from the rough. He opened up the face of a 7-iron to play a big cut with such elevation, and it cleared the back bunker, leaving him 75 feet away. BARRACUDA CHAMPIONSHIP RENO, Nev. — Geoff Ogilvy got up-and-down for birdie from a greenside bunker on the par-5 closing hole to take a three-stroke lead in the Barracuda Championship. In the modified Stableford event, players receive eight points for double eagle, five for eagle, two for birdie, zero for par, minus-one for bogey and minus-three for double bogey or worse. C

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Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

Bolt anchors relay victory ROB HARRIS AP Sports Writer

GLASGOW, Scotland — On a wet track following torrential rain, Usain Bolt gave the Commonwealth Games a display of showmanship and speed as he anchored Jamaica’s 4x100-meter relay team to gold and glory on Saturday. Jamaica raced ahead of England in a games-record 37.58 seconds as the six-time Olympic gold medalist became a Commonwealth champion for the first time, enhancing the status of an event that can appear an anachronism in the modern world. “Even though it was cold, the energy was warm,” Bolt said. Many doubted whether Bolt would turn up in Glasgow, having skipped the last two editions and being sidelined with a left foot injury earlier in 2014. The individual sprints were avoided, but the world’s fastest man made it clear that he craved a Commonwealth gold in his already illustrious medal haul. Now Bolt has that gold from a Hampden Park experience he undoubtedly savored following a week when he was forced to deny making disparaging com-

ments about Glasgow. “The only bad thing about this place is the weather,” Bolt said. “But I expected it.” There was, however, a pause in the showers when the biggest star of these games appeared on a track scattered with puddles and produced theatrics even more exuberant than usual. Before running 100 meters, Bolt danced along to the lyrics of Scottish pop anthem “500 Miles.” “It kind of helped me keep hyped up for the race,” Bolt said. After legs by Jason Livermore, Kemar Bailey-Cole and Nickel Ashmeade, Bolt continued running beyond his 100 meters, draping himself in a Jamaican flag, a Scottish Saltire and tartan hat as he entertained the crowd and posed for pictures. “This new thing about selfies is really making these laps of honors really long,” Bolt said. “It used to be autographs, now everyone wants a selfie.” But it is likely to be the last one at a Commonwealth Games for Bolt, who plans to retire after the 2017 world championships — before Australia’s Gold Coast hosts the games in 2018.

“I want to be there but maybe not as an athlete,” he said. In other news from the penultimate day of the 2014 games: JAMAICAN DOUBLE: Jamaica’s women also won their sprint relay, with Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce running the final leg as the women’s team won in 41.83 seconds. DOPING: A former 400-meter world champion has become the second Commonwealth Games athlete to fail a doping test in Glasgow. Amantle Montsho of Botswana tested positive for the banned stimulant methylhexaneamine after surrendering her Commonwealth title on Tuesday by coming fourth in the women’s 400-meter final. The Commonwealth Games Federation announced that Montsho had been suspended at a hearing on Saturday in Glasgow. Montsho requested that her backup sample be tested, which will happen on Monday in London. The CGF announcement came a day after 16-yearold weightlifter Chika Amalaha was stripped of her gold medal after a doping hearing. HISTORY-MAKER: Two years after winning the inaugural Olympic title, Nicola Adams on Saturday also become

the first female Commonwealth Games boxing champion. The 31-year-old Adams from England beat Northern Ireland’s Michaela Walsh in the fourround flyweight contest via a split decision. “Again I’ve managed to create history,” Adams said. “It’s on to Rio (2016 Olympics). It’s the next step. I’ve been thinking of this since the London 2012 Olympics. To think I’ve finally got it is unbelievable. It’s a massive sigh of relief and now I can relax a bit.” It was England’s 50th gold in Glasgow, and the country ended Saturday with 56, which guarantees top place in the medal standings for the first time since 1986 and also ends Australia’s 20-year Commonwealth dominance. REPEAT FINAL: India will have a chance on Sunday to avenge its loss to Australia in the men’s hockey final at the New Delhi Games in 2010. While Australia eased past England 4-1 in the semifinals, India had to come from two goals down to beat New Zealand 3-2. “We will look at the (2010) video and analyze our mistakes and do better this time,” India captain Rupinder Singh said.

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Jamaica’s Usain Bolt crosses the finish line to anchor the Jamaican team to the gold medal in the Men’s 4x100m relay at Hampden Park Stadium during the Commonwealth Games 2014 in Glasgow, Scotland, Saturday.

Fans get to watch Manziel scrimmage in Akron TOM WITHERS, AP Sports Writer

AKRON, Ohio — Johnny Manziel was back in his element: on campus, in a stadium on a Saturday. And on the field, Manziel may have tightened the competition to be Cleveland’s starter. Cleveland’s rookie quarterback, whose electrifying scrambles and how-did-he-do-that passes made him a college football superstar, showed off some of those dazzling and daring skills as the Browns took a short trip south of their training camp to scrimmage at the University of Akron’s InfoCision Stadium. Manziel and Brian Hoyer took their C

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quarterback battle into the public and in front of 20,673 fans, who didn’t see much offensive scoring — there were two field goals and two defensive touchdowns — but got a chance to see Johnny Football in the flesh. Manziel made some plays with his legs and rocket arm. Shaking off a sloppy start on his first series, he scrambled from trouble and completed two passes by firing completions into tight windows. He had a touchdown pass dropped and had another TD ruled out of bounds on a play that may have been reversed by instant replay. Nothing spectacular, but steady. “Some good, some bad,” Manziel said of his performance. “I thought we moved the ball after the first drive

pretty well and then I was told we had a 16-play drive on the second drive, which is good. We’re keeping the chains moving. It was nice.” Manziel worked exclusively with Cleveland’s second-team offense, but it’s possible he’ll get some reps with the starters next week as the Browns prepare for their exhibition opener Saturday in Detroit. Hoyer entered training camp with a lead over Manziel, but after one week of practice and the unscripted scrimmage, the gap between the two QBs appears to have narrowed. On three drives that began at the 30-yard line, Hoyer completed 7 of 11 passes for 56 yards and led the Browns to one field goal.

Manziel went 3 of 7 for 14 yards, and had two carries for 18 yards. Browns coach Mike Pettine didn’t want to analyze every pass until he watches videotape, but he felt both QBs were efficient in moving their respective units. Pettine was asked if he would characterize the QB competition as being closer than when camp opened. “I wouldn’t say that,” he said. “When camp began, Brian was the No. 1 because we had to have someone out there with the ones, but they were truly competing against each other. At some point, we will mix the units. It’s all part of our evaluation process.” Hoyer is doing all he can to hold off Manziel, but without Pro Bowl wide

receiver Josh Gordon on the field, he doesn’t have a dependable first option. Also, when tight end Jordan Cameron “banged” his shoulder and was removed from the scrimmage, Hoyer found himself without another primary target. Hoyer left somewhat satisfied with a day dominated by Cleveland’s defense. “I think you’re always evaluating yourself, and you’re always trying to get better,” he said. “It will be good to get back, watch the film, grade it out, see what I can improve on. The things we do good, we’ve got to keep doing them well. The things we’re not doing so well, we’ve really got to improve on.”

Scoreboard

Sports Briefs Goldpanners fall in NBC opener The Alaska Goldpanners of Fairbanks fell 4-2 to the St. Joseph Mustangs of Missouri in the Panners’ opening game at the National Baseball Congress World Series in Wichita, Kansas. The Goldpanners cannot afford one more loss at the doubleelimination tournament. The Panners face the Sedalia Bombers of Missouri today.

Subban signs with Habs for 8 years MONTREAL — The Canadiens have agreed to terms with defenseman P.K. Subban on an eight-year deal. A day after an arbitration hearing that would have led to a oneyear contract, the team and Subban reached accord Saturday on a long-term arrangement. Subban, who already has a Norris Trophy and Olympic gold medal, would be under contract through the age of 33. He had 10 goals and 43 assists last season, and has 42 goals and 125 assists in his NHL career. “We are very pleased to have reached a long term agreement with P.K. Subban,” general manager Marc Bergevin said in a statement. “This agreement helps consolidate the future of our team. A key element of our group of young veterans, P.K. plays with a high level of intensity every time he steps onto the ice.”

49ers’ Dorsey has torn biceps SAN FRANCISCO — San Francisco 49ers nose tackle Glenn Dorsey has a torn left biceps muscle and will undergo surgery, a person with knowledge of the injury said Saturday. It’s unclear how long he might be sidelined. Dorsey left Friday’s practice with the injury. The source said Saturday that Dorsey had torn his biceps and would need an operation, speaking on condition of anonymity because the team had not announced anything about Dorsey’s injury or the severity. More tests and details are expected post-surgery, the source said. Another source, also speaking on condition of anonymity, said it would be premature to speculate that Dorsey will miss the entire 2014 season as more evaluations still must be done. The Niners had a day off from training camp Saturday. Losing Dorsey would be a huge blow 11 months after 2013 starting nose tackle Ian Williams went down with a seasonending ankle injury in a Week 2 loss at Seattle. Dorsey quickly emerged as a reliable replacement and stabilizing force for the defensive line.

Goldschmidt has fractured left hand PHOENIX — The Arizona Diamondbacks’ dismal season got worse Saturday with the news that All-Star first baseman Paul Goldschmidt has a fractured left hand. Goldschmidt, runner-up in National League MVP voting last season, was hurt when he was hit above his ring finger by a pitch from Ernesto Frieri in the ninth inning of Friday night’s 9-4 loss to the Pittsburgh Pirates. The Diamondbacks have placed Goldschmidt on the 15-day disabled list and there was no word before Saturday’s game on how long he is expected to be sidelined. “I was holding out hope. Wasn’t trying to think about it being broken,” said Goldschmidt, who stayed in the game after being hit and advanced to second base before the final out was made. Goldschmidt was to be examined further on Saturday after getting X-rays late Friday. He broke a bone in his left hand, the hamate, while in college and had it removed, but had not had any other injuries of that sort since. “I was trying to make a fist, which I can do,” said Goldschmidt, who had no protective cast, splint or bandage over his hand as of Saturday afternoon. “After the game there was some swelling. I knew there was something. I was just hoping just a bad bruise or something like that. But unfortunately it wasn’t.” — Staff and wire reports

Baseball AL Standings

East Division W Baltimore 61 Toronto 60 New York 56 Tampa Bay 54 Boston 49 Central Division Detroit 60 Kansas City 56 Cleveland 55 Chicago 54 Minnesota 49 West Division Oakland 67 Los Angeles 65 Seattle 57 Houston 46 Texas 43

L 48 52 53 56 61

Pct GB .560 — .536 2½ .514 5 .491 7½ .445 12½

47 53 55 57 60

.561 .514 .500 .486 .450

42 44 53 65 67

.615 — .596 2 .518 10½ .414 22 .391 24½

— 5 6½ 8 12

Friday’s Games Baltimore 2, Seattle 1 Cleveland 12, Texas 2 Detroit 4, Colorado 2 L.A. Angels 5, Tampa Bay 3 Boston 4, N.Y. Yankees 3 Chicago White Sox 10, Minnesota 8 Houston 3, Toronto 1 Kansas City 1, Oakland 0 Saturday’s Games Oakland 8, Kansas City 3 N.Y. Yankees 6, Boston 4 Seattle 6, Baltimore 3 Cleveland 2, Texas 0 Detroit 11, Colorado 5 Tampa Bay 10, L.A. Angels 3 Minnesota 8, Chicago White Sox 6 Houston 8, Toronto 2 Sunday’s Games Texas (Darvish 10-6) at Cleveland (Bauer 4-6), 9:05 a.m. Colorado (J.De La Rosa 11-6) at Detroit (An.Sanchez 7-5), 9:08 a.m. Seattle (Iwakuma 9-5) at Baltimore (Tillman 7-5), 9:35 a.m. L.A. Angels (Weaver 11-6) at Tampa Bay (Odorizzi 7-8), 9:40 a.m. Minnesota (Gibson 9-8) at Chicago White Sox (Quintana 6-7), 10:10 a.m. Toronto (Stroman 7-2) at Houston (Feldman 4-8), 10:10 a.m. Kansas City (Shields 9-6) at Oakland (Kazmir 12-3), 12:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Phelps 5-5) at Boston (Buchholz 5-7), 4 p.m. All Times ADT

NL Standings

East Division W Washington 59 Atlanta 58 Miami 54 New York 53 Philadelphia 49 Central Division Milwaukee 61 Pittsburgh 59 St. Louis 58 Cincinnati 55 Chicago 46 West Division Los Angeles 63 San Francisco 59 San Diego 50 Arizona 48 Colorado 44

L 49 53 56 57 62

Pct GB .546 — .523 2½ .491 6 .482 7 .441 11½

50 51 51 55 63

.550 .536 .532 .500 .422

48 51 60 63 66

.568 — .536 3½ .455 12½ .432 15 .400 18½

Friday’s Games Philadelphia 2, Washington 1 Detroit 4, Colorado 2 Cincinnati 5, Miami 2 San Francisco 5, N.Y. Mets 1 Milwaukee 7, St. Louis 4 Pittsburgh 9, Arizona 4 San Diego 10, Atlanta 1

— 1½ 2 5½ 14

Chicago Cubs 8, L.A. Dodgers 2 Saturday’s Games Washington 11, Philadelphia 0 Detroit 11, Colorado 5 Miami 2, Cincinnati 1, 10 innings N.Y. Mets 4, San Francisco 2 St. Louis 9, Milwaukee 7 Pittsburgh 8, Arizona 3 San Diego 3, Atlanta 2, 12 innings L.A. Dodgers 5, Chicago Cubs 2, 12 innings Sunday’s Games Colorado (J.De La Rosa 11-6) at Detroit (An.Sanchez 7-5), 9:08 a.m. Cincinnati (Leake 8-9) at Miami (Ja.Turner 4-6), 9:10 a.m. San Francisco (Bumgarner 12-8) at N.Y. Mets (B.Colon 10-8), 9:10 a.m. Philadelphia (Hamels 6-5) at Washington (Strasburg 7-9), 9:35 a.m. Milwaukee (Garza 7-7) at St. Louis (Lackey 0-0), 10:15 a.m. Atlanta (Harang 9-6) at San Diego (T.Ross 10-10), 12:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 5-11) at L.A. Dodgers (Beckett 6-5), 12:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Liriano 3-7) at Arizona (Cahill 1-8), 12:10 p.m. All Times ADT

Yankees 6, Red Sox 4 NY 004 010 100—6 10 Bos. 030 000 100—4 8

0 1

Greene, Kelley (5), Warren (7), Betances (7), Dav.Robertson (9) and Cervelli; Webster, Badenhop (3), Breslow (5), A.Wilson (6), Layne (8), Mujica (9) and Vazquez. W_Kelley 2-3. L_Webster 1-1. Sv_Dav.Robertson (28). HRs_New York, Teixeira (19). Boston, Napoli (13).

Rays 10, Angels 3 LA TB

001 000 200—3 10 000 080 00x—8 9

Twins 8, White Sox 6 Min. Chi.

1 0

2 0

Paxton, Leone (5), Maurer (7), Medina (8), Furbush (8), Rodney (9) and Sucre; M.Gonzalez, Brach (6), Matusz (7), Tom.Hunter (8), McFarland (9) and C.Joseph. W_Leone 4-2. L_M.Gonzalez 5-6. HRs_Seattle, Ackley (6), Cano (8). Baltimore, C.Joseph (4).

Indians 2, Rangers 0 000 000 000—0 000 002 00x—2

5 5

0 2

Mikolas, Mendez (8) and Gimenez; House, Atchison (6), Hagadone (7), Shaw (8), Allen (9) and R.Perez. W_Atchison 4-0. L_Mikolas 1-4. Sv_Allen (14).

Astros 8, Blue Jays 2 Tor. 101 000 000—2 6 Hou. 200 020 04x—8 13

2 1

Dickey, Cecil (8), Jenkins (8) and Thole; Oberholtzer, Foltynewicz (8), Sipp (8), Clemens (9) and J.Castro. W_Oberholtzer 4-7. L_ Dickey 9-11. HRs_Houston, Carter (22), J.Castro (11), Singleton (10).

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Atl. SD

100 000 010 000—2 11 0 000 000 200 001—3 9 0

E.Santana, J.Walden (7), Varvaro (8), Russell (9), D.Carpenter (9), Kimbrel (11) and Gattis; Kennedy, Boyer (6), A.Torres (7), Quackenbush (8), Benoit (8), Thayer (10), Stauffer (11) and Rivera. W_ Stauffer 3-2. L_Kimbrel 0-3.

Dodgers 5, Cubs 2, 12 inn. 0 1

Chi. 100 000 100 000—2 13 0 LA 000 200 000 003—5 11 0

Pino, Duensing (7), Burton (7), Pressly (7), Fien (8), Perkins (9) and K.Suzuki; Carroll, Belisario (8), Petricka (8), D.Webb (9) and Nieto, Flowers. W_Pressly 1-0. L_Belisario 4-8. Sv_Perkins (27). HRs_Minnesota, Da.Santana (5). Chicago, Al.Ramirez (11).

Wada, Villanueva (6), Schlitter (7), Strop (8), W.Wright (9), Grimm (10), B.Parker (11) and Castillo; Ryu, League (8), Howell (8), Jansen (9), B.Wilson (10), J.Wright (11) and Butera. W_J.Wright 4-2. L_B. Parker 1-1. HRs_Los Angeles, Kemp (12), H.Ramirez (12).

Tigers 11, Rockies 5

Basketball

Col. 020 000 003—5 8 Det. 111 231 11x—11 16

1 1

Matzek, Belisle (5), Brothers (7), Hawkins (8) and McKenry; Porcello, McCoy (9), Coke (9) and Avila. W_Porcello 13-5. L_Matzek 2-6. HRs_Detroit, Mi.Cabrera (17), V.Martinez (22), J.Martinez (15).

Nationals 11, Phillies 0 Ph. 000 000 000—0 7 Was. 141 500 00x—11 14

1 0

A.Burnett, Aumont (2), C.Jimenez (4), Hollands (7), Bastardo (8) and Ruiz; Zimmermann, Blevins (8), Treinen (9) and W.Ramos. W_Zimmermann 7-5. L_A.Burnett 6-11. HRs_Washington, Rendon (14).

SF NY

000 000 020—2 000 000 40x—4

6 4

0 0

Peavy, J.Lopez (8) and Posey; deGrom, Familia (8), Mejia (9) and d’Arnaud. W_deGrom 6-5. L_Peavy 0-2. Sv_Mejia (16).

Marlins 10, Reds 1, 10 inn.

Mariners 6, Orioles 3

Tex. Cle.

201 100 031—8 12 001 100 400—6 12

Mets 4, Giants 2

J.Vargas, Crow (5), S.Downs (5), B.Chen (7) and Kratz; Lester, Cook (7), J.Chavez (9) and D.Norris. W_Lester 11-7. L_J.Vargas 8-5.

Sea. 001 030 002—6 11 Bal. 100 010 001—3 8

1 0

C.Wilson, Cor.Rasmus (2), Thatcher (4), Roth (4) and Conger; Archer, Jo.Peralta (7), Boxberger (8), C.Ramos (9) and Casali. W_Archer 7-6. L_C.Wilson 8-7. HRs_Tampa Bay, Longoria (13), Forsythe (4).

Athletics 8, Royals 3 KC Oa.

000 300 000—3 8 240 000 04x—10 16

Padres 3, Braves 2, 12 inn.

Cin. 000 000 010 0—1 6 Mia. 001 000 000 1—2 7

0 0

Bailey, M.Parra (8), Ju.Diaz (8), LeCure (10) and Mesoraco; Eovaldi, Morris (8), Cishek (9), M.Dunn (10) and Mathis. W_M. Dunn 9-5. L_LeCure 1-3.

Cardinals 9, Brewers 7 Mil. SL

100 310 200—7 10 150 120 00x—9 12

2 0

Lohse, Kintzler (5), Estrada (6), Gorzelanny (8) and Lucroy; Masterson, Siegrist (7), Neshek (8), Rosenthal (9) and T.Cruz. W_Masterson 1-0. L_Lohse 11-6. Sv_Rosenthal (33). HRs_St. Louis, Wong (7), Jh.Peralta (15).

Pirates 8, Diamondbacks 3 Pit. Ari.

001 000 043—8 11 000 010 002—3 9

2 2

Worley, J.Hughes (7), Watson (8), Frieri (9) and R.Martin; C.Anderson, O.Perez (7), Ziegler (8), Stites (8), Delgado (9), E.De La Rosa (9) and M.Montero. W_J.Hughes 6-2. L_Ziegler 4-2. HRs_Pittsburgh, J.Harrison (10). Arizona, D.Peralta (4).

WNBA Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlanta Washington Indiana New York Chicago Connecticut

W 17 13 13 11 11 11

L 9 14 15 15 16 17

Pct .654 .481 .464 .423 .407 .393

GB — 4½ 5 6 6½ 7

WESTERN CONFERENCE x-Phoenix 23 4 .852 — x-Minnesota 22 6 .786 1½ San Antonio 13 15 .464 10½ Los Angeles 12 15 .444 11 Tulsa 10 19 .345 14 Seattle 9 20 .310 15 x-clinched playoff spot Friday’s Games Connecticut 89, San Antonio 79 Saturday’s Games Minnesota 84, Tulsa 75 Phoenix 79, Indiana 69 Sunday’s Games New York at Atlanta, 11 a.m. Connecticut at Los Angeles, 11:30 a.m. Washington at Chicago, 2 p.m. San Antonio at Seattle, 5 p.m. All Times ADT

Soccer MLS Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA S. Kansas City 11 5 6 39 32 20 D.C. 11 5 4 37 32 20 Toronto FC 8 7 5 29 29 28 New York 6 6 10 28 35 33 Columbus 6 7 9 27 26 28 New England 8 12 2 26 29 35 Philadelphia 5 8 9 24 34 36 Chicago 3 5 13 22 28 34 Houston 5 11 4 19 22 40 Montreal 3 13 5 14 21 39

WESTERN CONFERENCE Seattle 12 6 2 38 Real Salt Lake 9 4 9 36 Los Angeles 9 4 6 33 FC Dallas 8 7 6 30 Colorado 8 8 6 30 Vancouver 6 4 11 29 Portland 6 7 9 27 San Jose 6 8 5 23 Chivas USA 6 9 5 23 NOTE: Three points for victory, for tie. Friday’s Games

35 28 33 27 32 17 34 31 31 28 31 29 36 38 23 20 21 33 one point

Sporting Kansas City 1, Philadelphia 1, tie Saturday’s Games Los Angeles 3, Portland 1 Toronto FC 2, Montreal 0 New York 2, New England 1 Chicago 1, Columbus 1, tie Real Salt Lake 1, Colorado 0 San Jose 1, Seattle FC 0 Sunday’s Games D.C. United at Houston, 4 p.m. FC Dallas at Chivas USA, 6 p.m. All Times ADT

Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Activated RHP Joe Kelly. Optioned RHP Anthony Ranaudo to Pawtucket (IL). Placed C David Ross on the 15-day DL. Recalled C Dan Butler from Pawtucket. CLEVELAND INDIANS — Recalled LHP T.J. House from Columbus (IL). Optioned RHP Austin Adams to Columbus. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Activated LHP C.J. Wilson from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF J.B. Shuck to Salt Lake (PCL). SEATTLE MARINERS — Placed DH Corey Hart on the 15-day DL. Activated LHP James Paxton from the 60-day DL. Sent RHP Blake Beavan outright to Tacoma (PCL). National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Placed 1B Paul Goldschmidt on the 15-day DL. Recalled OF Alfredo Marte from Reno (PCL). LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Placed LHP Paul Maholm on the 15-day DL. Recalled LHP Paco Rodriguez from Albuquerque (PCL). SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Activated 1B Brandon Belt from the 7-day concussion list. Optioned INF Jarett Parker to Fresno (PCL). FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS — Claimed LB Trevardo Williams off waivers from Houston. Released CB Todd Washington. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — Signed WR Kenny Shaw, DT David Carter and LB Josh Hull. Waived/injured DT Jordan Miller, LB John Lotulelei and WR Damian Copeland. MIAMI DOLPHINS — Signed C Samson Satele. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Released WR Cole Stanford. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS — Signed LW Patrick Maroon to a three-year contract extension. Signed LW Nick Ritchie. MONTREAL CANADIENS — Agreed to terms with D P.K. Subban on an eight-year contract. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Signed G Ben Bishop to a twoyear contract extension. COLLEGE CARTHAGE — Named Seth Weidmann men’s swimming coach. PRESBYTERIAN — Promoted Britne Stubbs to softball coach. WINTHROP — Signed men’s basketball coach Pat Kelsey and women’s basketball coach Kevin Cook to two-year contract extensions.


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B-4 Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

. . . Hall Continued from page B-1

“I’m just really proud to accept this on behalf of all the players I’ve coached,” Leman said. For 18 seasons, Leman dominated the central Kenai Peninsula small-schools basketball coaching landscape, guiding Ninilchik to 373 wins in 409 games and eight state championships, including five in a row from 2000 to 2004. Leman also led the Wolverines through two amazing winning streaks — a 57-game run and a 98-game run. “I can look back and kinda laugh now, it was kind of like, keep on chugging along,” Leman said. “It was keep looking ahead, don’t look back.” Should it be brought up in tonight’s Hall of Fame ceremony, perhaps the incredible numbers that helped build Leman’s enduring legacy can be explained by his systematic coaching methods. “It was pretty rough when I started out,” Leman admitted. “The kids did a lot of sports throughout the years, starting at the elementary level, and I knew them because I was an assistant coach on the boys team, then the lead coach with the girls. “We kept things simple, worked on the basics, then when they got older, they knew me and knew what to expect.” Leman’s method of starting players early and teaching them the fundamentals of the sport has caught on. He may not have been the first coach to do so, but others, such as Nikolaevsk coaches Steve and Bea Klaich, have duplicated Leman’s style with similar, successful results. “I don’t think I was the first to do it, but that’s worked best for me,” Leman said. “In the end it worked out best for the kids too. As time went on, just having a successful program, the kids were eager to be a part of that.” Leman said another effective routine involved traveling to scrimmage with other schools, such as Homer, Nikiski, Soldotna and Kenai Central. Leman said the added exposure to game situations improved his team, and their opponents liked the fact that they didn’t have to travel. “We were on bigger floors, the kids traveled together, it was kind of a bonding thing for them,” Leman said. “In the end, we always felt we had great support from the whole Peninsula.” That type of practice and competitive atmosphere led to 13 Peninsula Conference crowns and a state berth in 17 of the 18 years that Leman coached the girls squad. The only year the team didn’t make it? Leman’s inaugural season in 1990-91, and the first year the team did make it was the only time they failed to finish third or higher at the state tournament. But one of the memories that sticks out the most for Leman came in his first game ever as a coach. “We went to Seward for a tournament and got beat eightynine to eleven,” he recalled. “It was a loss by seventy-eight points, and that stuck with me for a while and not in a good way. But it was enough to motivate me, and I realized I had to learn a few things.” Leman’s star daughter, Whitney, also recounted a loss that stuck with her. In an endowment game her junior year, the Ninilchik girls were faced with the Homer varsity squad, which was a Class 4A team then. The Class 2A Wolverines battled hard but were handed a close loss. “I didn’t know what it was like to lose,” she said. “But maybe I needed that, and that stuck with me. “Afterward, one of the Homer’s girls dads came up to me and said, just think how they feel, and how happy must they feel. I had never seen it that way.” Schollenberg led the Wolverines to a Class 2A state championship all four years of her high school career, and was named Player of the Year three times, a first for small-schools athletes. She also received MVP in every tournament Ninilchik competed in for the duration of her sophomore, junior and senior years. Schollenberg recalled that winning tournament MVP was

‘We started building this house in 1986. We’re still here, and we couldn’t imagine going anywhere else. It’s a good time for me in wintertime, instead of coaching I get to be a fan. We’re just getting started.’ — Dan Leman not a personal goal then. But at the Yakutat Invitational her sophomore year, Schollenberg said she received some inspiring words from her father. “After the game, my dad was treating my ankle and he said there’s an MVP trophy and you can get it if you step up and be a leader,” she said. “That’s when I thought, ‘Oh if he thinks I can do it, I must be able to do it’. “It was a really cool looking trophy, and then on the plane home, they announced it that we won.” The 2003 high school graduate then took her talents to UAA for her freshman year. That season’s highlights included providing the assist on a game-winning basket at the Great Alaska Shootout tournament, as well as icing a 61-58 victory over Clemson in the championship game with a pair of free throws. Schollenberg said she stopped playing after one year to save her eligibility and finish school. She eventually transferred to Eastern Oregon, where she played for two years before tearing her Achilles tendon in early 2008. “One of the hardest things I had to do was being injured and helping from the sidelines,” Schollenberg recounted. Graduating from Eastern Oregon in 2008 landed Schollenberg back in Anchorage, where she continued playing basketball on city league teams and at the YMCA, allowing her to revisit old UAA teammates. Since returning home to Ninilchik last year with husband, Jason Schollenberg, Whitney has kept busy as a stay-at-home mother with 2-year-old son, Parker, and a photography business on the side. She also collaborates with current Ninilchik boys coach (and former Eastern Oregon player) Nickolas Finley on hosting open gyms. Looking back at her father’s success, Schollenberg believes the root of it all comes from the many hours he put into the Ninilchik basketball program, which likely translated to an innate ability to relate to players in game situations. “I think my dad’s stats speak for themselves,” Schollenberg said. “It’s not like he was just handed phenomenal high school girls basketball players and athletes. It just doesn’t happen in Ninilchik, Alaska. I think that speaks to the kind of coach and man he was. “He just knew how to communicate with women. All the teams I was on and the teams I saw from the sidelines, the girls just respect him. It was never an issue.” As the hands of time are certain to do, Dan had to retire in 2009 with lingering health issues, but he still can be seen out on the water, getting in a hard day’s work on the fishing vessels. Of course, that doesn’t mean he and wife Jamie haven’t had time to enjoy themselves. “In the past year we’ve done some musical tours,” he said. With trips to Nashville, Tennessee; Oklahoma; New Orleans; Arizona; Reno, Nevada; and Las Vegas, the couple has enjoyed such acts as Fleetwood Mac and Elton John, as well as annual rendezvouses with youngest daughter Krista in Disneyland. Additionally, the family now has welcomed grandchildren into the mix, which Leman described as a special time in his life. “We started building this house in 1986,” Leman said. “We’re still here, and we couldn’t imagine going anywhere else. It’s a good time for me in wintertime, instead of coaching I get to be a fan. “We’re just getting started.”

. . . MLB

Seattle Mariners got an effective outing from their bullpen to beat Baltimore. Continued from page B-1 Cano was 2 for 23 lifetime against Miguel Gonzalez (5-6) before connecting in the fifth inning Cutchen drove in the go-ahead run to put the Mariners up 4-1. It was with an infield single in the eighth his eighth home run of the year. inning, then was hit by a pitch in the ninth as the Pittsburgh Pirates TWINS 8, WHITE SOX 6 beat Arizona.

TIGERS 11, ROCKIES 5 DETROIT — Miguel Cabrera, Victor Martinez and J.D. Martinez homered and the Detroit Tigers beat Colorado.

MARINERS 6, ORIOLES 3 BALTIMORE — Robinson Cano hit a three-run homer, Dustin Ackley had a solo shot and the

two-run double, Mark Teixeira hit back throwing errors by Toronto. a solo homer and New York’s bullpen worked 4 1-3 solid innings, INDIANS 2, RANGERS 0 leading the Yankees over Boston. CLEVELAND — Lonnie Chisenhall and Nick Swisher deRAYS 10, ANGELS 3 livered run-scoring singles in the sixth inning, and five pitchers ST.PETERSBURG, Fla. — Evan combined on a five-hitter, leading Longoria hit a two-run homer, Ben the Cleveland Indians past Texas. Zobrist got four hits and the Tampa Bay Rays roughed up C.J. Wilson DODGERS 5, CUBS 2 CHICAGO — Trevor Plouffe and the Los Angeles Angels. got four hits and the Minnesota LOS ANGELES — Hanley Twins stopped Jose Abreu, rallying ASTROS 8, BLUE JAYS 2 Ramirez hit a three-run homer in past the Chicago White Sox to end HOUSTON — Jon Singleton the 12th inning to lift the Dodgers a three-game skid. wound up with an inside-the-park to a victory over the Cubs. Abreu’s hitting streak ended at 21 games, longest in the AL this home run after a call was reversed PADRES 3, BRAVES 2 season. He went 0 for 3 with two on video replay, Chris Carter and Jason Castro also homered, and the SAN DIEGO — Will Venable walks, one of them intentional. Houston Astros beat Toronto. hit a game-winning single in the Brett Oberholtzer (4-7) pitched bottom of the 12th inning off closYANKEES 6, RED SOX 4 seven strong innings and Jose Altuve er Craig Kimbrel to give the Padres BOSTON — Derek Jeter had a scored the go-ahead run on back-to- a victory over the Braves.

Contributed photo by Tsalteshi Trails Association

Several bikers make their way downhill during the fourth Salmon Cycle Series race Thursday on the Tsalteshi Trails.

. . . Boom Continued from page B-1

this Wednesday. Shields was born in Soldotna but was raised in Utah, where he ran track at Brigham Young University. Every summer, Shields returns to Alaska and regularly contends in races. “Trail running is fun. It’s fun to just get back there and run,” he said. In its third year of existence, the Salmon Run Series has seen exponential growth since Kenai Central senior Allie Ostrander came up with the idea her freshman year. It began as her Caring For the Kenai project, which challenges Kenai freshmen with the question, “What can I do, invent or create to better care for the environment of the Kenai Peninsula or help prepare for a natural disaster?” After seeing initial attendance figures of 50 or lower, the series brought out 150 runners Wednesday evening. “I never thought I’d see it this big,” said Paul Ostrander, Allie’s father. “We had, like, 50 people the first time, and now it’s over 100, both last year and this year.” Perhaps the best way to gauge the success of an event is not just the pure number of competitors, but the number of competitors that have never run a 5K before and would otherwise have no motivation to get out and sign up for races. Dan Pascucci, 35, is a Kenai Watershed Forum employee, and said this is the second year for he and wife Amy, 36, competing in the races. “The year before that, I laughed at everyone doing it,” Pascucci said. “Why would you spend a Wednesday night running a 5K? Then I did it, and I realized that it’s so much fun to see everyone come out and know you can run 5K. “It’s a good way to make sure we get out and do it,” Amy added. The Pascuccis acknowledged that one of the perks of the series is the variety of courses. Each of the five races tasks racers with a different course layout. “It’s nice to see the diversity,” Dan said. “All levels represented, and it’s not super competitive, it’s very friendly, C

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you say, ‘Hi,’ to people you haven’t seen in a long time on the trail.” In addition to the Salmon Run series, the Salmon Cycle series has also taken off in popularity, drawing 43 riders Thursday. Mike Crawford, board member of the Tsalteshi Trails Association, said the increase in events and usage of the trails is exactly what he envisioned when he joined the board. “We basically had three community events; the Everything But the Red Run, the Ski for Women, and Spook Night in October,” Crawford said. “Now we have about 24 events year-round.” Included on the list is the Caveman 5K — a race in which footwear is optional — the Relay for Life 5K, the PsychoCross bike race, and the Fountain of Youth 5K, a race scheduled for Aug. 13 that features a staggered start seeded by age and gender. “That’s what the organization is for,” Crawford continued. “We have a lot of race experience.” The experience that Crawford has for organizing intriguing and popular events has no doubt been a factor in Tsalteshi’s boom in popularity, which is also impressive considering the various weather conditions that the first half of 2014 brought. “This year was a difficult season early on, with poor snow conditions and then the smoke, but we’ve subsequently had some good runs,” he said. Jordan Theisen, a racer on the Kenai Central crosscountry running and track teams, teamed up with Allie Ostrander in the week leading up to the fourth race of the Salmon Run Series to form a summer running camp for up-and-coming runners ages 7 to 11. Starting July 24, the group met every morning at the Skyview track, and utilized the trails to introduce new runners to the sport and expand on experienced runners’ repertoire. With six practices in a seven-day span leading up to Wednesday night’s race, Theisen and Ostrander led a group of at least 30 kids, many of whom were new to the Tsalteshi Trails, and in the kids 1K race, a crowd of enthusiastic faces took off into

Contributed photo by Tsalteshi Trails Association

Tony Eskelin finished fourth with a time of 28:05 during the fourth Salmon Cycle Series race Thursday.

Theisen, Kiviat win cycle race Jordan Theisen and Leah Kiviat won the fourth race in the Salmon Cycle Series on Thursday at Tsalteshi Trails. Theisen was the top finisher in the 10-kilometer race at 26 minutes, 34 seconds, while Ian Horton was second at 27:04 and John-Mark Pothast was third at 27:55. Kiviat finished at 30:16, while Sadie Fox was next at 32:55 and Hannah Pothast was third at 33:58. The Salmon Cycle Series continues Thursday at 6 p.m. at Tsalteshi Trails. Races are $5 each, or free for Tsalteshi Trails Association members. There is no online registration. Just pay before the race. Salmon Cycle Series 2014

Race 4 results, 10 kilometers 1. Jordan Theisen, 26 minutes, 34 seconds; 2. Ian Horton, 27:04; 3.

the woods with Theisen in tow. Theisen said when he and Ostrander were organizing the camp, the question of a venue never came up. “We really didn’t need to talk about where we wanted to go, it was pretty obvious,” Theisen said. “Where else are we gonna take 30 kids? “We knew it was gonna be Tsalteshi, it was just about which entrance to meet at. The Skyview entrance was the most well known.” Theisen, like Ostrander and Shields, is a regular contender for overall victories in summertime races, and so his and Ostrander’s visibility in the community was a natural quality to have in leading a group of future athletes. His involvement in hosting the

John-Mark Pothast, 27:55; 4. Tony Eskelin, 28:05; 5. Tanner Best, 29:02; 6. Leah Kiviat (1st female), 30:16; 7. Colton Diehl, 30:32; 8. Mike Bergholtz, 32:47; 9. Jeff Williams, 32:53; 10. John Mohorcich, 32:54; 11. Sadie Fox (2nd female), 32:55; 12. Ryan Nelson, 33:17; 13. Peter DiCarlo, 33:22; 14. Rob Carson, 33:26; 15. Matt Pyhala, 33:35; 16. Julius Adolfsson, 33:54; 17. Hannah Pothast (3rd female), 33:58; 18. Scott Huff, 34:11; 19. Jamie Nelson, 34:14; 20. John Pothast, 34:20; 21. Ben Gardner, 34:26; 22. Bechler Metcalf, 36:44; 23. Jen Tabor, 36:47; 24. John Tabor, 37:14; 25. Laura Pillifant, 37:36; 26. Laura Mohorcich, 38:35; 27. Jack Maryott, 39:22; 28. Heather Schramm, 39:54; 29. Sheryl Nelson, 41:27; 30. Aldyn Brudie, 41:50; 31. Gavin Hart, 43:58; 32. Rob Moore, 45:13; 33. Sheila Best, 46:50; 34. Joanna Watts, 54:29; 35. Melody Niichel, 54:50; DNF: Derek Schramm, Katrina Cannava. Single Lap — 1. Charlene Spiers; 2. Landen Showalter; 3. Jen Showalter; 4. Chris Bergholtz; 5. Ithaca Bergholtz; 6. Katelynn Best.

camp on the trails only served to heighten the appeal of trail running. “There’s really nowhere else we could’ve done it,” Theisen said. “These are just fantastic trails.” Theisen applauded the effort of Tsalteshi head trail groomer Bill Holt, who has put in countless hours of work on the trails over the years, both in summer and winter seasons. “Bill Holt should be super proud of this, and I feel really happy for him,” Theisen said. “It’s really cool that people are getting into this stuff, and it makes me feel kind of special to take part in it because I know I’m helping him out. He works really hard, and the more attention we bring to it, the better.”

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Sunday, August 3, 2014

U nhinged A laska N ick Varney

You’ve got to be kidding

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t has been a classic summer so far with stunning sunscreen weather blanketing the peninsula encouraging a significant surge of visitors. Even the few stretches of rain episodes have been a boon to the local economy. Once they dissipate, cumulus storm clouds of mosquitoes explode into the atmosphere sending thundering herds of residents and tourists diving onto stores in a panic search for insect repellants so saturated with Deet that their skins morph into something translucent enough to qualify as an internal anatomy display. Weather aside, even the silver fishing at the Nick Dudiak Fishing Lagoon on the Homer Spit made a spectacular comeback during July after a so, so, king return earlier in May and June. Unfortunately, my wife and I had a rough start trying to nail the flashy torpedoes because of initial egregious ensemble indiscretions. Once they were rectified, the slaughter was on. I know, I know, what apparel problems could possibly have dire consequences during a typical angling outing unless we were auditioning for an episode of Naked and Afraid on the Discovery Channel? Trust me that would never happen. At my age the au naturel trial video would be startling enough to set off seizures and hysterical blindness in the test audience along with lifetime flashbacks and nightmares for the film crew. What basically transpired was that we relearned an old lesson during the embarrassing angling sojourn and it wasn’t pretty. Since The Fishing Hole has been handing out silvers like a short circuited slot machine in Reno, we decide that we’d slip out there and pick up a couple of the high flying fighters for the bar-b-queue. Over the years we have developed a super secret, decoder ring encrypted, unique angling technique that hasn’t failed to fill the freezer. We were convinced that we would saunter home after an early morning frontal assault on the multitude of ravenous Cohos with a cooler stuffed with fresh fillets. Not a chance. Things didn’t go well and our egos took a hit so hard they regained consciousness in Kodiak. As the tide meandered up the rock banks, the submerged fleets of silvers were soaring out of the water like they were being goosed by highly annoyed spiny bullheads disgusted by the rowdy interlopers above them. The hits were vicious and our floats continued to shoot down like the bait had been snatched by a starved mutant squid that would be coming for us next. It didn’t matter what system we tried, we couldn’t get solid hook sets. On the gloomy way home for a dinner of day old chicken salad with a side of humble pie, I discovered that I hadn’t worn my ancient, lucky, and appallingly debris encrusted boots that have been known to walk on their own and stalk helpless woodland creatures. It was no wonder I got skunked. Jane, on the other hand, had forgotten to layer on her, “never go fishing without it,” #13 talisman Seahawks jersey so we both were liable for the doomed expedition. Needless to say, we now have a pescador ensemble checklist that would stun a commercial pilot and it’s meticulously scoured before we launch from the driveway armed with enough fishing gear to supply a party boat. Yeah, I know there is a drove of naysayers out there snorting “Nick, you’re full of gull guano. Fishing superstitions are feckless and ludicrous and other big words we need to look up.” Well, maybe so, but lately our grill has been smoking with fillets like a salmon bake early bird special at a seasoned seniors center so we’ll stick with what works for us. Oh yeah, before I wander off for another month, I’d like to lay something a bit disquieting on you. My buddy Turk called yesterday to announce that his mules have stopped shedding. He claims it portends an early and possibly a rip roaring winter. He also solemnly noted he has observed the early ripening of wild raspberries, premature browning of Pushki, fast topping of fireweed, heavy conning of the pine trees and shrews storing their stashes faster than Justin Bieber loading up on tokables before his next tweeny tour. I told him to lay off the home brew and that he was full of muleshed. He grumbled something intelligible and hung up. Yesterday when pulled into the driveway, I discovered an old snow shovel on the deck with a note on it. All it said was “Better safe than an idiot”. Come to think of it, our Pushki patch was a lot greener around this time last year and there are all of those ripe wild berries in the gulley. Nah. Nick can be reached at ncvarney@gmail. com if he isn’t in the basement organizing his foul weather gear.

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News and Notes The winners of Soldotna’s Progress Days Parade

n Also inside Crossword Classifieds Mini Page

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Kenai student on Dean’s List at Minn.University

Benjamin D. Gilman, of Kenai, has been named to the Dean’s List of the University of St. Thomas. Students must post grade point averages of at Business: 1st- Credit Union One, 2nd- Jumpin Junction least 3.5 on a 4.0 scale to be named to the Dean’s List. St. Thomas, foundOrganization: 1st- State Forestry, 2nd- Operation Christmas ed in 1885, is a Catholic, independent, liberal arts university. With a coMarching: 1st- Soldotna Community Marching Band, 2nd- Weinies on educational student body numbering more than 10,000, it is Minnesota’s Parade largest independent college or university. Nearly 2,000 of the university’s Automobile: 1st- Blast from the Past, 2nd- North Star Paving undergraduates were named to the spring semester Dean’s List. Bicycle: 1st- Jonas Martin, 2nd- Kenai Neon Horse: 1st- Soldotna Equestrians, 2nd- 4-H Juniors Winners announced in Nikiski Raffle Individual: 1st- Bill Walker, 2nd- Mead Treadwell Grand Overall Winner: Soldotna Equestrian Society The Nikiski Firefighters Association held the drawing Friday, August 1st for the 2014 raffle, and the winners are:

Kenai native gets degree from the University of Iowa

1st Prize winner of the Polaris Ranger 570 Pursuit Camo is....Clint Stokes from Soldotna.

IOWA CITY, IA (07/29/2014)(readMedia)-- David Haynes, a native of Kenai, AK, received a PHD-Geography degree from the University of 2nd Prize winner of the Polaris Outlaw 90 is...Rod Peterkin from Kenai. Iowa at the close of the 2014 spring semester. Approximately 5,000 de- 3rd Prize winner of the Husqvarna 455 Rancher 20” Chain saw is...Angie grees were awarded at the end of the semester. Parrish from Nikiski.

Teens love vacation selfies; adults, not as enthusiastic BETH J. HARPAZ, AP Travel Editor

NEW YORK (AP) — Jacquie Whitt’s trip to the Galapagos with a group of teenagers was memorable not just for the scenery and wildlife, but also for the way the kids preserved their memories. It was, said Whitt, a “selfie fest.” For this generation, “digital devices are now part of the interpretive experience,” said Whitt, co-founder of Adios Adventure Travel. Indeed, many parents love seeing their kids taking selfies and posting to social media when they travel. It shows “they are engaged and excited about where they are and what they are doing,” said Susan Austin, a photographer and Iowa mom. “To some, it might be bragging, but I think it’s more about a way today’s teens connect with and feel part of a group.” But some adults think there’s a downside to vacation selfies. They see them as narcissistic distractions that can detract from the travel experience. And they point to controversial examples — like a smiling selfie from Auschwitz posted to Twitter — as proof of the potential for poor judgment when young travelers use social media. In addition, when traveling teens spend time taking selfies, “they’re so busy documenting, I wonder whether they’re actually experiencing it,” said Peg Streep, who writes about psychology and millennials. “What should be an experience of learning and growth instead just says, ‘Look at me.’ It’s a narcissistic moment that’s really about getting likes.” Streep pointed to a study by Linda Henkel of Fairfield University in Connecticut that found museum visitors remember more about what they’ve seen if they don’t take photos of the objects they’re viewing. That suggests that any type of picture-taking can take “you out of the moment of the experience and shifts your attention.” Another concern is practical. A real-time selfie from a far-off place tells the world you’re not home. Leora Halpern Lanz, of Long Island, New York, loves it when her three kids take vacation selfies because it’s their way “of validating where they were.” But they’re not allowed to post images until the trip is over: “I don’t need their friends or friends of friends knowing the house is empty.”

Lanz says the widely criticized Auschwitz selfie also shows “the risks of kids posting on social media” when they don’t know what’s appropriate. Breanna Mitchell, the young woman who took the smiling Auschwitz selfie, received death threats and messages urging her to kill herself after the image went viral. In a video interview with TakePart Live, Mitchell said the selfie was misinterpreted. She’d studied World War II history with her father and they’d planned to visit historic sites together, but he died before they could make the trip. Her selfie from the grounds of the concentration camp was her way of saying, “I finally made it here. I finally got where me and my daddy had always said we were going to go,” she told TakePart Live. Looking back now on the selfie, she says, “I just went so wrong with that.” Still, most travel selfies are innocent and purely celebratory — as well as being a way for teens to keep in touch with peers. Taylor Garcia, 17, who traveled to Texas this summer on a family road trip from Oklahoma, says selfies are a fun way to remember places like Disney, SeaWorld and the Caribbean, but she also takes them “because I want to show my friends what I’m doing.” Her mom, Melissa Garcia, who posts her own family trip photos on her blog, ConsumerQueen. com, encourages the selfies. “It’s a great way to preserve memories,” she said, adding that other families have contacted her after seeing the photos to get advice for their trips. Austin’s daughter Abigail, 18, who shared selfies from a trip to Portugal, doesn’t see the point of posting travel pictures without familiar faces in them. She wants a photo that shows, “Hey, I’m having fun! And I like seeing them of other people, too.” But at least one tour company, Tauck, has a written policy discouraging digital devices. For Tauck’s Bridges program, which specializes in multi-generational family trips, guests are asked to “turn off and stow their smart phones, tablets and other portable electronic devices during shared group time.” Tauck spokesman Tom Armstrong says the company understands that digital devices can help teens pass the time during long car rides, flights or other downtime, “and we have no issue with that.” But “when the tour director is giving

• Thursday, August 28 ~ Cooper Landing Raft Trip – Leave Center at 11:30a (bring sack lunch), raft from 2-5p, stop for dinner at Sackets, back to KSC by 7:30p(ish) - $66 What’s happening at the Kenai Senior Center for • Friday, August 29 ~ Fifth Friday Classic Movie the month of August 2014 Night “The Comancheros) starring John Wyane. $3 (all activities are held at the Kenai Senior Center for the movie all items in concessions $1 each. unless otherwise stated): Body/Mind/Soul: Special Activities: • Conversational Spanish: Mondays ~ 1p • General Exercise: Monday/Wednesday/Friday ~ • Wednesday, August 6 ~ Russian Falls Hike Leave Center at 10a returning around 5p - $7 + a sack 9a • Growing Strong Strength Training Class: Monlunch • Tuesday, August 12 ~ Flightseeing Lottery Draw- day/Wednesday/Friday ~ 10a • Line Dancing: Monday/Thursday ~ 10a - at the ing (Call Carol 907-283-8214) for additional inforKenai Recreation Center (Please stop by the KSC to mation. • Tuesday, August 12 ~ Mystery Drive with Steve sign up for Beginning Line Dancing) • Water Walking at Nikiski Pool: Tuesday/Thursday @ 1:30p Take a drive and discover the Alaska just ~ 7:30a $3 van ride, $2 pool usage around the corner. Ice cream stops highly likely. • Tai-Chi: Tuesday/Thursday ~ 10a • Wednesday, August 13 ~ No-Host Dinner to The • Zumba Gold: Tuesday/Thursday ~ 2p ~ donation Flats Bistro $3 van ride Leave Center at 5p • Each Friday at 11:30a ~ Sing Along Time before suggested lunch Arts/Crafts Opportunities: • Thursday, August 14 ~ KPB Assessing Department will be here to discuss Senior Exemptions - 11:30a • Knitting ~ 1p Fridays • Friday, August 15 ~ Forget-Me-Not Band/Nation• Ceramics ~ 1p Mondays al Tell a Joke Day ~ Enter to win prizes in our Joke Telling Contest - 11:30a Game Schedule: • Tuesday, August 19~ Kenai Peninsula Care Givers Support Group – 1p • Mondays & Fridays @ 12:30p ~ Pinochle • Tuesday, August 19 ~ Just for Fun Event for adults • Tuesdays @ 12:35p ~ Bridge with disabilities - This event is designed to provide a • Wednesdays @ 1p ~ Dominos project for the adults who are cared for by the attend• Thursdays @ 12:30p ~ Tripoly & 12:30 ees of the Family Caregiver Support Group. Other: • Saturday, August 16 ~ Ninilchik State Fair; Leave • Wednesday, August 6 & 20 ~ Social Security virCenter at 10a returning around 3p - $7 van ride - Sign tual office: 9a-Noon up at the front desk. [The Kenai Senior is the venue to talk to the An• Wednesday, August 20 ~ Birthday Lunch @ chorage Social Security Office. This is a first come 11:30a first serve service. A signup sheet will be available • Thursday, August 21 ~ All on-campus activities when you arrive at the KSC. No appointments and no canceled for the day. Line Dancing and Bluegrass will age limits] still meet. • Council on Aging ~ Thursday, August 14 @ • Thursday, August 21 ~ Old Timers Luncheon – 4:30p 11:30a, $6 lunch. We are not able to accept reserva• Kenai Senior Connection Board Meeting ~ Friday, tions, but please let us know if you have a walker or August 22 @ 9:30a wheelchair. Presented by The Homesteader’s Group • Friday, August 22 ~ 2014 Juried Art Show RecepCommunity Meals are served Monday – Friday tion – 4:30-6p at the Kenai Senior Center from 11:30 – 1p unless otherwise noted. Our mission

Senior Centers Events

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Job Center workshops Monday, 08/04/14 9:30am: ALEXsys Job Leads 10:30am: Introduction to ALEXsys and the Job Center 2:30pm: Interviewing Skills Workshop Tuesday, 08/05/14 10:30am: CareerReady 101 Lab Wednesday, 08/06/14 1:30pm: WorkKeys® Testing Thursday, 08/07/14 9:30am: Resume Writing Workshop 3:30pm: Vocational Rehabilitation Orientation Friday, 08/08/14 No workshops offered ***All workshop are free of charge to the public*** Those interested in attending any workshops offered at the Peninsula Job Center can reserve space by clicking on the “Schedule Workshops” option located on the main screen in your ALEXsys account (www. jobs.alaska.gov <http://www.jobs.alaska. gov> ), call 335-3010, or visit the job center located in Kenai at 11312 Kenai Spur Hwy., Suite #2. Business hours are Monday – Friday, 8:00am to 5:00pm excluding state and federal holidays.

Marine Safety association offers online training The Alaska Marine Safety Education Association, AMSEA, will offer its Cold Water Safety and Survival Training online beginning September 24, 2014. The semester long course is offered through the University of Alaska Southeast-Sitka campus and two continuing education credits can be awarded upon completion of the class. The course teaches youth educators who to educate children and young adults to play and work safely around cold water. At the end of the semester, students will have a ready-to-use lesson plan and templates for age-appropriate lessons. A twoday practicum will also be offered int eh spring of 2015. The spring 2014 class had a waiting list, so AMSEA organized another class for the fall. Interested educators can register with AMSEA by calling 907-747-3287.

at the Kenai Senior Center is to serve as a community focal point for senior services where adults 60+ come together to engage in opportunities for dignity and personal growth. Please call (907-283-4156) or stop by our facility (361 Senior Court, Kenai AK 99611) anytime during regular operating hours (8a-4p) – Monday – Friday. What’s happening at the Soldotona Senior Center for the month of August 2014 Art Classes Several seniors meet each Monday and Thursday from 10am-3pm in the Center’s craft room. They work on various art projects and help one another. The class is open to all seniors. For info, call the Center at 262-2322. Craft Projects Seniors meet every Wednesday at the Center from 1pm-3pm to work on various personal craft projects. You can bring in your favorite craft and enjoy working with other seniors. Crafts and socialization are both great therapy for the mind and body. Days the center will be closed for the noon meal The Senior Center closes for various holidays and events during the year. We will be closed on the following dates: Friday August 29 State Fair Monday September 1 Labor Day **Game Night at the Center ** The Center will be holding a “game night” on Friday August 8 from 5:30-8:30pm. Numerous games will be available to play such as card:games, board games, puzzles. No-Host Dinner August’s No-host will be at Ray’s Waterfront in Seward on Saturday, August August 9 at 1:00pm. Sign the list in the lobby or call 262-2322 for information and reservations. Please be sure to specify if you need a ride and be sure to list your phone number. Attending no-host dinners is a great way to have a great meal and meet many interesting seniors from the community.


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C-2 Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

For me, chemo treatment far from horror show

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hen you are about to undergo chemotherapy, you will hear horror stories about the side effects. The worst, for me, was about a man who, when the chemo took his hair, it included his nose hair, and so when his nose ran there was nothing to stem the tide. That hasn’t happened. Nor has nausea, which is apparently the biggest side effect, because my doctor prescribed three nausea pills. I haven’t even opened the bottles, though, for my first three-day session has left me feeling fine. The nausea could come next time, but I remain optimistic. Other effects? I lost a little sleep, but then regained it. My digestive system went awry, but medicine fixed that. My mouth sores were only minor, erased by baking soda. A few leg cramps were probably the result of dehydration, which was easy to reverse. You can’t listen to all those stories, anyway,

because each case is different. Cancer is scary; the treatment doesn’t have to be. Listen to my story instead. I was lucky in that I didn’t have time to ponder the upcoming chemo. At my quarterly exam on a Wednesday, we found out that, after four years of watchful waiting, my leukemia suddenly needed treatment. Two days later, a CT scan checked my lymph nodes, and three days after that, I was sedated and fitted with a port in my chest so they wouldn’t have to stab my arms each time. (I had never heard of such a port, and now I had one.) By Tuesday – only six days after the exam – I was taking chemo. It was a long, brutal day, friends: I was forced to sit or lie back in a soft recliner with my feet up, a cushy pillow behind my head,

a blanket across my body after the chemicals cooled me down while flowing from the IV bag through the port to my bloodstream. I read on my Kindle. Family and friends visited. Staffers answered my Glynn Moore endless questions, sometimes more than once. A kitchenette held water, coffee, nutritional drinks and snacks. (Peanut butter is very popular with chemo patients.) Knitted hats had been donated for anyone who lost hair and felt chilly. All around the big treatment room, other patients were being similarly tortured. Some picnicked with friends. Others listened to music or read magazines. There were first-

New York Times Crossword WHAT’S MY LINE? ACROSS 1 Sandwiches with toothpicks 5 Corner key 9 Refuse 14 Alternative to texted 18 European capital, to natives 19 Discipline 20 Jimmy ___, “They’ll Do It Every Time” cartoonist 21 “Le Roi d’Ys” composer 22 Telephone line 25 “___ Eyes” (1975 Eagles hit) 26 “Let ___” 27 Dash 28 Union gain? 29 Gut feeling? 30 Cruise line 33 Like one’s favorite radio stations, typically 34 Perfect, e.g. 35 Sarcastic retort 36 Played out 37 San ___, Calif. 40 “Double” or “triple” feat 41 Special somethings 43 Late actor Wallach 44 Vinyl-roofed car 48 Butler’s quarters? 49 Tickle Me Elmo maker 51 Like 52 Story line 56 First two words of “Dixie,” often 57 Longtime baseball union exec Donald 59 Loudmouth’s talk 60 Romance novelist Roberts 61 ___ de Champlain, founder of Quebec 63 Like the Marx Brothers 65 Pinched 69 Interprets 70 Car featured in the “Transformers” movies 72 Country with the most all-time medals in Olympic baseball 73 Pathet ___ (old revolutionary group) 75 Fit of fever 76 Capt.’s prediction 77 Finish line 82 Draft pick 83 Astronaut Slayton 85 Email virus, power outage, etc. 86 Formal confession 87 Iraq War danger, for short

Last Sunday’s Crossword Answers

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88 Maze feature 90 Shake off 92 Names hidden in Al Hirschfeld drawings 94 Gown accessory 95 Politician’s goal 96 Hunt in “Mission: Impossible” 99 Small pellets of noodle dough in Jewish cuisine 101 Fault line 106 Foreign princes 107 Hogan contemporary 108 Road shoulder 109 Stove cover 110 Old Venetian V.I.P. 111 Laugh line 114 “I Ain’t Marching Anymore” singer/ songwriter 115 Bayer brand 116 Picture problem 117 Some spinners, informally 118 Chris who played Mr. Big on “Sex and the City” 119 Lets go of 120 Gallic greeting 121 Spanish 3 + 3

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DOWN 1 Stock 2 Slow 3 Target, as a football receiver 4 Approximately 5 Cartier units 6 Throat soother 7 Name meaning “born again” 8 Trail 9 French connection? 10 Exemplar of indecision 11 How an angry dog should be kept 12 Zipped 13 Endorsing 14 Help line 15 Date line 16 A-list 17 Robert who played filmdom’s Mr. Chips 18 Trident-shaped letters 23 House ___ 24 Weeper of myth 29 Only non-Southern state won by the G.O.P. in ’64 31 College in Atherton, Calif. 32 Confusion 33 Some charity events 36 Famous Amos 37 Embarrassed

Daughter is hurt by drunken mom’s loose-lipped remark

DEAR ABBY: My husband, “Pete,” and I are at a point in our lives where we’re ready to start a family. We have already started trying. We both have college degrees, jobs and own our home. I have talked with my OB and have started making myself “baby-ready.” Friends and most of our family are happy we’re trying to start a family. The problem is my parents seem less than enthused. One night last week, my mother, dad, Pete and I were enjoying some local entertainment and drinks together. Mom got a tad sloshed and told me she wishes my older brother and his wife had a child first, “no offense to me.” They have been trying for years and have gone to fertility clinics, but due to the cost, decided to stop trying until my sister-in-law earns her degree. I have talked to her about our plans, and she was happy for us. Abby, I can’t stop thinking about what my mom said. I fear bringing it up with her because she may not remember she said anything. Is it wrong for me to hold onto this? Pete and I are financially and emotionally ready for a happy addition to our family. I know he’ll be a great dad. I wish my mother would realize this, too. — “NO OFFENSE” IN OHIO DEAR “NO OFFENSE”: You are an adult and a married woman. You should not need anyone’s “enthusiasm” beyond yours and your husband’s to bring a child into this world. You stated that your mother was “sloshed” when she made the remark. Alcohol-addled individuals often make inappropriate comments. Who knows what she meant when she said it? It may be she was thinking about the pain your brother and sister-inlaw are experiencing because of their infertility issue.

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Because her comment was hurtful, I think you should let her know so she can clarify — if she even remembers saying it. And if she doesn’t, suggest she cut back on her drinking Abigail Van Buren because memory lapses can be a symptom of a drinking problem. DEAR ABBY: My friend “Merle’s” daughter got engaged, and Merle threw an engagement party for her and the husband-to-be. The couple announced where they were registered in the Facebook invitation (which I thought was truly insensitive). People arrived for the engagement party with gifts. I did not take one. I figured I’d wait until the wedding, which is a year away. I also thought, “What if they change their minds and don’t get married?” Was I wrong not to take a gift? I guess I just don’t understand the current etiquette. — STUMPED IN SOUTH CAROLINA DEAR STUMPED: You accepted the invitation, didn’t you? Because you did, you should have given the couple a gift. You did not have to take one to the party, but you should send something within a short time. (Suggestion: A nice picture frame to hold their engagement photo.) Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

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timers like me and old pros. All looked calm, confident that treatment would trump disease. And then there was the real down side. A chemical that flowed into me to prevent nausea made me groggy and kept me from reading. I repeat: I was unable to read! I had to nap instead. That, my friends, was the worst of my chemo. Those three days were all geared toward my comfort. Nurses and the other staffers coddled me while I read in comfort. The IV bags hung on a stand next to me that I could unplug and roll to the bathroom, which came in handy. That was the first side effect I noticed, so maybe it’s a good place to end until next week. Reach Glynn Moore at glynn.moore@augustachronicle.com.

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79 Almost stop with the head facing the wind, as a ship 80 Blooming business? 81 1967 war locale 84 Subway line 89 Executes 90 Bagel toppers 91 Good to have around C 93 Pitched right over the plate 95 Work on the docks Y 96 Hottie 97 Ring leader? 98 Something to get over 99 Had for a meal 100 Discontinued gas brand 101 Signed 102 Govt. security 103 “Me, too!” 104 Law man 105 Fall setting 107 Closing act? 111 Part of a winning combination 112 Ring org. 113 Discophile’s collection

Jaqueline Bigar’s Stars A baby born today has a Sun in Leo and a Moon in Scorpio. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Sunday, Aug. 3, 2014: This year you begin a new 12-year luck cycle. The first year, which is your most fortunate, is when you will attract new people and opportunities. If you are single and ready to settle down, you could meet Mr. or Ms. Right, but you will have to sort through quite a few suitors first. Enjoy the process. If you are attached, you are unusually intense. You spend a lot of your time at home deep in reflection. Don’t close your sweetie out and cause a rift. Share your thoughts with him or her, and you will get powerful feedback. Laughter helps you relax. SCORPIO is interesting, but possessive. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You will need to make time for a partner, best friend and/or close family member. Clearly, you are working on a different plane. Even your jovial nature seems to irritate this person. You can’t turn yourself inside out for this person. Tonight: Add some spice to the night. This Week: You might encounter a hassle, but an unusual idea could result. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH A loved one finally will come out of the doldrums. You could see more of an effort from this person to drop his or her strong defenses. You can start relaxing. Dodge a controlling individual, rather than get caught up in this person’s mess! Tonight: Say “yes” to a suggestion. This Week: You might be tempted to believe everything you hear. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Get together with some pals. Don’t allow a misunderstanding or a difference of opinion to carve its way into what could be a fun day. You like being with this crowd, whether you’re at a baseball game or at the beach. Tonight: Start thinking “tomorrow.” This Week: You throw yourself into the trenches Monday. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Defer to a loved one who has a set of plans in his or her mind for a fun happening. What you might choose probably would not please this person, as he or she has certain expectations. Tonight: Make it an early night. This Week: Your mind drifts to loved ones and/or a flirtation. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH You might want to rethink a decision regarding your personal life. You might not like revealing the private aspects of your life, especially in a circle of acquaintances. Do whatever you need to do in order to feel comfortable. Tonight: Have a long-overdue chat. This Week: Take off Monday if you can and want to. C

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH You might say too much and realize it only when it is too late. Try to be more reserved, and you will be less likely to make a faux pas. A loved one or child could be throwing a tantrum just to get more attention. Tonight: Hang out. This Week: You have a lot to say. The question remains: Will anyone listen? LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH You suddenly will be aware of the costs of a domestic situation. You might want to get the situation under control, but it is unlikely you will succeed. The other party involved knows how to manipulate well. The trick will be not to get involved. Tonight: Order in. This Week: Decide how to increase your revenue. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You might want to handle a difficult situation on your own. A misunderstanding is likely to emerge, no matter what you do. Can you give this matter a timeout? If not, try to take a step back. Go where your friends are. Tonight: Stay out of complications. This Week: You peak Monday, and every day is slightly more downhill after that. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You might feel as if you have to socialize. Make it OK to create anti-social plans, and do what you want. Expect a little flak when you turn down a friend’s invitation. Know that you don’t need to explain as much as you think you do. Tonight: Get some extra R and R. This Week: Tuesday you perk up and become a powerhouse. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Even if you don’t think you’ll have plans, you will. Invitations come in from friends to join them in a fun happening, which could be a barbecue or a softball game. You and your friends tend to enjoy getting far away from the daily grind. Tonight: Only where the action is. This Week: Zero in an immediate goal Monday. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH You could be full of energy, and you might want to have a heavy discussion with someone you respect. Not everyone can debate an issue without taking it personally. You might want to tread carefully. Tonight: Get a head start on tomorrow. This Week: Pressure from someone could mar Monday, but not any other day. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Make calls in the morning to loved ones at a distance or to those you rarely speak to. Before you know it, you will have new vacation plans to get together. Use your intuition when dealing with a difficult friend or associate. Tonight: The less said the better. This Week: Detach before you act.

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Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

Careers & Jobs

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More Recruitment & Classifieds Within

To Place Ads: Call 907-283-7551

Email

classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com

Log on

ShopKenaiPeninsula.com

Post Resumes, Search More Jobs @ alaskajobnet.com

22%

of people plan to buy a new suit, shoes, and accessories for their next job interview. Source: Monster.com site poll, wk of 9/20/10

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FIND AN INTERVIEW TO GET DRESSED UP FOR AT

www.alaskajobnet.com


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C-4 Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

Commercial Property

Employment

General Employment

By bringing together medical, dental, and behavioral health services, PCHS offers highquality, coordinated care for the entire family. PCHS has Full-time hire position for

• • • • • • •

Executive Assistant Billing Clerk-Dental Care Coordinator RN Charge Nurse Health information Manager Medical Records

PCHS has Part-time hire position for

• Individual Service Provider Positions will be open until filled. Job description and application available online at www.pchsak.org Careers Please send cover letter, resume & application to: Human Resources, 230 E. Marydale Ave., Suite 3, Soldotna, AK, 99669 or fax to 907/260-7358. PCHS is an equal opportunity employer.

Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

Real Estate For Sale Commercial Property Condominiums/Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

Homes General Employment COMFORTABLE 1-Bedroom house, needs TLC but great deal at $71,500. OWC, with $3,000 down. (907)855-0649 (760)567-7369

CITY OF KENAI, ALASKA Position Vacancy Library Aide. Pay $17.36 per hour. This is a part-time year round position at 14 hours/week that will include regularly scheduled hours evenings and weekends. Position provides assistance to Library customers, staff and volunteers in basic library functions such as locating and utilizing library materials and equipment. Works at the circulation desk and provides general reference service either in person or by phone. Assists in processing of library materials and in their conservation. Aids customers in the use of computers, including database searching and the Internet. A college degree is desirable or a minimum of three years experience which would provide the employee with the knowledge, skills and abilities to perform the essential job functions. Position announcement, job description and application are available through the Alaska Job Center Network, (907) 335-3010. Submit resume and City of Kenai application form by 08/22/14 to Peninsula Job Service, 11312 Kenai Spur Hwy., Kenai, AK 99611. The City of Kenai is an equal opportunity employer. For more information about the City of Kenai, visit our home page at www.ci.kenai.ak.us

General Employment

Homes

DEPUTY CLERK II ALASKA COURT SYSTEM KENAI, ALASKA $2,896.00 MONTHLY The Kenai Trial Court is accepting applications for a Deputy Clerk to assist customers at the front counter, perform all duties associated with traffic citations, and provide relief as an in-court clerk. Complete recruitment information is available on Workplace Alaska at http://doa.alaska.gov/dop/workplace. Applicants must submit a complete application with cover letter through Workplace Alaska by 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, August 6, 2014. For further information, please contact the Alaska Court System Human Resources Department at (907) 264-8242. THE ALASKA COURT SYSTEM IS AN EEO EMPLOYER AND PROUDLY PROMOTES DIVERSITY

Any Business Any Time

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145-Ft. Kenai riverfront, mile from hospital/ businesses. Quiet, beautiful, excellent for professional or someone who loves to fish. $550,000. (907)262-4934 HOME FOR SALE.

NIKISKI 3-Bedroom, 2.5-baths, large kitchen with island, wood burning stove, 2-car garage. approximately 2000sqft., on 2 acres. Very peaceful, a lot of wildlife. $310,000. (907)776-8487, (907)394-1122 WOODLAND KENAI Family Home. 2300sqft. 3-bedroom 3-bath with 2-car garage on a large city lot with no development behind. Open floor plan, large basement, rock fireplace, remodeled bathroom, high ceilings, out building, and deck. Close to schools, town, trails, beach, and parks! --- A must see! $255,000. Call (907)394-2546

Land

Any Service

www.peninsulaclarion.com

HOME & CABIN FOR SALE

80 ACRES OFF Strawberry/ Spur HWY. Views, Private, Hayfield (907)690-1369

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Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

General Employment

Land

Land

KENAI RIVER/

Operating Engineers Apprenticeship Heavy Equipment Operators and HD Mechanics The Alaska Operating Engineers/Employers Training Trust is pleased to announce recruitment for Heavy Equipment Operator and HD Mechanics. To be eligible, applicants must submit all required documents: Completed application; HS Transcripts & Diploma or GED test scores & Certificate; Birth certificate (proof of 18 years of age); Valid AK Driver's license (Rural Alaskans without driver's license may contact our office); 5 year DMV Driving Record (showing no DUIs in the past 3 years); Background Check (minimum 5 years); Social Security card; DD214 (for veterans); Work Keys test scores (taken at Job Center) for math, reading for information and writing, each passed at a minimum of level 4. $30.00 non-refundable application fee; résumé, letters of recommendation & certificates of training (optional); Note: pre-indenture hair follicle drug testing required. Applications will be available for pick up and turn-in August 18th through August 29th, 2014 from 8:00 am - 4:30 pm at: Alaska Operating Engineers Employers Training Trust, 5400 N Cunningham Rd / PO Box 0989 Palmer, AK 99645 1-877-746-3117, www.aoeett.org The recruitment, selection, employment, and training of Apprentices during their apprenticeship shall be without discrimination because of age, disability, sex, marital status, changes in marital status, pregnancy or parenthood, race, color, religion, national origin.

Apartments, Unfurnished ALL TYPES OF RENTALS

Property Management Division 170 N. Birch Suite 101, Soldotna (907)262-2522 Mary.Parske@century21.com www.Century21FreedomRealty.com

Homes

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PRIVATE LOT. Protected slough, Castaway Cove. Castaway Cove is a gated community with 24 hour access fo property owners. $57,500. George (801)244-7285, (907)252-0946. LOT FOR SALE 2 acres on Tote Road, paved road, gas, electric, phone. level, good soil. $30,000. per lot. (907)398-1211

Rentals Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

Apartments, Unfurnished EXCELLENT OCEAN VIEW! Bay Arm Apartments, Kenai. Accepting applications for 1 bedroom apartment, utilities included. $25. nonrefundable application fee. No pets. (907)283-4405. KENAI 2-Bedroom Townhouse, 1.5-bath, washer/dryer. No pets/ smoking, $750./ month plus electric, deposit. (907)283-5484 NEAR VIP Sunny 2-bedroom, 1,100sqft., $1,250. washer/dryer, Dish TV. carport, utilities included. No Smoking/ No Pets. (907)398-0027.

Lake front home with float plane accessibility. Quiet lake home for someone with many interests --- landscaping; animal raising (barn, tack room, chicken coop) art/handicraft studio (26 X 26) that could become separate bedrooms; lake for sailing, canoeing, kayaking, swimming; float plane accessible; two bedroom apartment for B & B; two car, heated garage; many, many possibilities. This unusual home is built into a hillside. The unique house kept expanding up the hill. All three stories are at ground level,with the main floor handicapped accessible. Windows everywhere. You live with nature. Built as close as possible to 5 Star requirements and to be as maintenance free as possible. It has cement siding, vinyl windows and storm doors. Seven miles south of Soldotna. Priced for sale this summer at $367,000. For appointment to see this home call Ruth at (907)262-9619 or Sharilyn at 5 Star (907)252-3163

Homes

REDOUBT VIEW Soldotna’s best value! Quiet, freshly painted, close to schools. 1-Bedroom from $625. 2-Bedroom from $725. 3-Bedroom, 2-bath, from $825. No pets. (907)262-4359.

Apartments, Furnished 1-LARGE ROOM FULLY FURNISHED Soldotna, quiet setting, includes utilities. (907)394-2543. FURNISHED 1-bedroom, Soldotna farm setting, $875. month includes utilities. No Smoking/ no pets. Immediately available. (907)262-4122. KENAI 1-Bedroom, furnished, heat, cable included. No pets. $700. month. (907)283-5203, (907)398-1642.

KENAI RIVER FRONT HOME. World-Class SALMON FISHING out your back door! 5-Bedroom, 3-Bath Ranch home, att, heated 4+ car gar. Open kitchen, dining/ living area with 5 picture windows all with views of the river! 112' RIVER frontage. 48' Aluminum dock with fish cleaning table/ sink/ water. Nat. Gas heat, Wood stove, Automatic backup generator. Landscaped yard with Fire Pit/ view of the Kenai Mtns. For MORE INFO See: KENAIRIVERDREAM.blogspot.com Call: (907)252-4671 $749,000. FSBO

Homes KENAI RIVER HOME

** SALE PENDING ** 3-Bedroom, 2 1/2-bath 2466sq.ft. home for sale. Located on K-Beach between Kenai & Soldotna on the Kenai River. This home has an 1100sq.ft. attached garage and work shop area, storage shed, paved driveway and established lawn with sprinkler system. The view is gorgeous with the mountains, kenai flats, Kenai river and the city of Kenai. Enjoy watching the amazing wild life from the comfort of your home including eagles, moose, caribou, coyotes, seals and the occasional bear and beluga sightings. Asking $599,000. (907)283-5447 or (907)398-6885.

SOLDOTNA Furnished 1-Bedroom. Shady Lane Apartments. $725. Heat & cable included. No pets. (907)398-1642, (907)283-5203.

Homes 2-BEDROOM 2-BATH Furnished. Heated garage. Kenai $1,200. month, plus utilities. Available 9/1/146/30/15 (907)283-5239 NIKISKI 3-bedroom, 2-bath, office, garage, woodstove, storage shed, large yard, deck. Kids play area outside. South Miller Loop $1,675. (907)776-3325 WHY RENT ????? Why rent when you can own, many low down & zero down payment programs available. Let me help you achieve the dream of home ownership. Call Now !!! Ken Scott, #AK203469. (907)395-4527 or cellular, (907)690-0220. Alaska USA Mortgage Company, #AK157293. C

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C-6 Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

Homes

Machinery & Tools

Homes

DETROIT DIESEL Engines Marine. Two 8V92 naturals no gears. One RTO about 5000 hours. The other about. 800 hours since overhaul everything good except block. (907)399-1556

NIKISKI

Miscellaneous Cute & Cozy 1-Bedroom, 1-Bath Cabin, 840sq.ft. 1.69 acres $99,900. MLS# 14-1074 Jeannie Smith Kenai Real Property Services jeannie@kenaireal.com 907-398-3729

CABIN BUILDING 12x24, plank flooring, woodstove, large windows, sliding glass door. Must move. $20,000. (907)262-1497

Recreation

Homes KENAI RIVER FRONT LOT

AND CABIN CASTAWAY COVE. Kenai River front double lot. 70 foot frontage by 100 feet deep. KNOCK EM DEAD RED SALMON HOLE right in front of cabin. electricity available. Very accessible location. Age forces me to sell this very valuable location... Lots 34 and 35 block 9, Castaway Cove, $112,000. Borough book and page map 55-253 Call me for a visit to the property (907)252-4500 or (907)283-4960

Boats & Sail Boats

Homes NIKISKI

‘08 20FTt Alumaweld 8hp & 50hp Yamaha, low hours, electric motor lift, power wash down, fish holding tank, $23,000. OBO. (907)262-1497

Duplex / B&B Good Condition 3-Car Garage, 2,129sq.ft., 2.03 acres MLS# 13-6568 $213.500 Jeannie Smith Kenai Real Property Services jeannie@kenaireal.com 907-283-7755

20FT CUSTOM BUILT CABIN CRUISER 131 Volvo 280 outdrive, kitchen, dinette, sleeps two, 6ft.-plus cabin height, self-bailing. $28,500. Soldotna. (337)772-9944

Garage Sales MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE 1517 Wedgewood Dr. Inlet Woods off Redoubt & North Forest. Friday- Sunday, Noon- 7pm. Something for everyone! Household, clothing from toddlersadults, craft/ beading items.

Retail/Commercial Space PRIME KENAI RETAIL/ OFFICE SPACE 1,832SqFt to 20,000SqFt. Rates start @ $.50SqFt. Call Carr Gottstein Properties, (907)564-2424 or visit www.carrgottstein.com

Homes

Financial Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgages/Loans

Business for Sale ASSISTED LIVING HOME FSBO 5 beds, full. Owner retiring. (907)252-3676

Classifieds

Work 283-7551 www.peninsulaclarion.com

Homes

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Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boats Charter Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snow Mobiles Sporting Goods

Merchandise For Sale Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn/Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

Appliances AMANA REFRIGERATOR/ FREEZER, White $200. (907)252-6452

Transportation Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

Keep a Sharp Eye on the Classifieds

Each week, our Classified section features hundreds of new listings for everything from pre-owned merchandise to real estate and even employment opportunities. So chances are, no matter what you’re looking for, the Classifieds are the best place to start your search.

283-7551 www.peninsulaclarion.com

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Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014 Classified Index EMPLOYMENT Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/ Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

Health

Public Notices

FRANCISCO RODRIGUEZ, is making application for a new RESTAURANT/ EATING PLACE PUBLIC CONVENIENCE AS 04.11.400(g) liquor license, doing business as SEÑOR PANCHO’S located at 44096 STERLING HWY. SUITE B SOLDOTNA. **ASIAN MASSAGE** Grand opening Happy Holiday, enjoy hospitality anytime. (907)398-8896

Health

Pets & Livestock Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

***GRAND OPENING*** A Summer massage open everyday call, texts. (907)252-3985

REAL ESTATE RENTALS

Health

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PENINSULA THAI MASSAGE

Thompsons’s/ Soldotna, next to Liberty Tax. (907)252-8053, (907)398-2073

PETS & LIVESTOCK Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

1837/73750

Services Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Services Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

select

TV Look for it Y O U R T V E N T E RTA I N M E N T M A G A Z I N E

Health **ASIAN MASSAGE** Please make the phone ring. Call anytime. (907)741-1644

Notices/ Announcements KENAI KENNEL CLUB

Pawsitive training for all dogs & puppies. Agility, Conformation, Obedience, Privates & Rally. www.kenaikennelclub.com (907)335-2552

**ASIAN MASSAGE** Grand Opening, Welcome Visitors, Fishermen, New customers. (907)398-8874.

Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

ppsssstt . .

Public Notices/ Legal Ads TEACH ALL DOGS Everything with brains, not pain. Obedience, Puppy, Nose work, Rally, Agility, Privates. K-Beach Road (907)262-6846 www.pendog.org

It’s Easier Than You Think

Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

To Place Your Ad Here

283-7551

Things Really Move In the Classifieds!

THAI HOUSE MASSAGE

Located in Kenai Behind Wells Fargo/ stripmall. (907)252-6510 (907)741-1105,

EVERY SUNDAY in your

Lost & Found FOUND 7/28/14 Fishing pole, on the bank of the Kenai River. Call to identify. (907)252-1954

Health

TRANSPORTATION Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

AKC Labrador Retriever Pups - Silvers. Silver Labs Alaska Charcoal Gray pups just arrived. AKC registered, dew claws removed, 2-yr health guarantee on hips, all initial vaccines and micro-chipped. One male and one female left. $1250. Call 907-223-1956 for additional information

Health

RECREATION Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boat Charters Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snowmobiles Sporting Goods

AKC Brittany Pups Dam & sire proven hunters. Great companions. References available. Order for pick of litter based on date. $250 deposit received. Call (907)953-4816 or $1,000.

FINANCIAL

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www.fraserbrittanys.com

Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgage/Loans

Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn & Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

Interested persons should submit written comment to their local governing body, the applicant and to the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board at 2400 Viking Drive, Anchorage, AK 99501. PUBLISH: 7/20, 27, 8/3, 2014

Commercial Property Condominiums/ Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

Public Notices

LIQUOR LICENSE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums/ Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

(907)395-7306.

SERVICES Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

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150 Trading Bay, Kenai, AK 99611 (907) 283-7551 • www.peninsulaclarion.com

Homes

NOTICES/ ANNOUNCEMENTS Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

PUBLIC NOTICES/ LEGAL ADS Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

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C-8 Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

Would you like to have your business highlighted in Yellow Advantage?

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Peninsula Clarion Display Advertising

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Automotive Insurance

Business Cards

Located in the Willow Street Mall

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

Walters & Associates Located in the Willow Street Mall

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

alias@printers-ink.com

150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai

283-4977

Bathroom Remodeling

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dentistry

Boots

Extractions, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing 35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

Insurance

Family Dentistry

Located in the Willow Street Mall

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

Extrations, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK

AK Sourdough Enterprises Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

alias@printers-ink.com

150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai............................. 283-4977

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

Rack Cards

Teeth Whitening Kenai Dental Clinic Emergency appts. available Denali Kid Care/Medicaid

alias@printers-ink.com

150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai............................. 283-4977

Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing 35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

Emergency appts. available Denali Kid Care/Medicaid

605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

Remodeling

605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

Outdoor Clothing

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Emergency appts. available Denali Kid Care/Medicaid

Print Shops

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Walters & Associates

Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Kenai Dental Clinic

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Peninsula Memorial Chapels & Crematory Kenai........................................283-3333 Soldotna ..................................260-3333 Homer...................................... 235-6861 Seward.....................................224-5201

Extractions, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

Dentistry

Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD

Funeral Homes

Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD

AK Sourdough Enterprises

Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing

Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

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AK Sourdough Enterprises

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Fish for a great deal in the classifieds! Advertise â&#x20AC;&#x153;By the Monthâ&#x20AC;? or save $ with a 3, 6 or 12 month contract. Call Advertising Display 283-7551 to get started!

Lic.# 31053

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Lic.# 30426 â&#x20AC;˘ Bonded & Insured

Licensed, Bonded & Insured

The State of Alaska requires construction companies to be licensed, bonded and insured before submitting bids, performing work, or advertising as a construction contractor in accordance with AS 08..18.011, 08.18.071, 08.18.101, and 08.15.051. All advertisements as a construction contractor require the current registration number as issued by the Division of Occupational Licensing to appear in the advertisement. CONSUMERS MAY VERIFY REGISTRATION OF A CONTRACTOR . Contact the AK Department of Labor and Workforce Development at 907-269-4925 or The AK Division of Occupational Licensing in Juneau at 907-4653035 or at www.dced.state.ak.us/acc/home.htm

Pit Located on Beaver Loop in Kenai

D ecks â&#x20AC;˘ D eck Repa irâ&#x20AC;˘ C a rpentry REM O D ELIN G â&#x20AC;˘ B a ths â&#x20AC;˘ Kitchens Ad d itio ns Pa inting â&#x20AC;˘ D ry w a ll â&#x20AC;˘ Sid ing â&#x20AC;˘ Sto ne â&#x20AC;˘ Ro ck C ultured Sto ne â&#x20AC;˘ Sta ck Sto ne â&#x20AC;˘ Sm a ll Jo b s â&#x20AC;˘ D o o rs â&#x20AC;˘ W ind o w s â&#x20AC;˘ Flo o ring â&#x20AC;˘ RO O F REPAIR Ho m e Repa ir& M a intena nce

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O N E AL ASK AN H AN DYM AN SERV ICE

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252-3965

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TOPSOIL 50/50 MIX-SCREENED

RFN FLOORS Professional Installation & Repair Carpet Laminate Floors

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R ep a ir or R ep la c em en t of R oofin g, Sid in g,Sh eetroc k ,D ec k s,W in d ow s, D oors & M ost B u ild in g C om p on en ts. C lea n -u p & H a u lin g. & Insured 690-3490 776-3490 Licensed Lic.# 952948

(most chimneys) Thru July Only

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WINDOW WASHING

Commercial â&#x20AC;˘ Residential ($35 min.) 10 years Experience â&#x20AC;˘ Free Estimates Hard Water Deposit Removal License #314902

907-398-7582

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Dwight Ross d.b.a Ross Investments

Roofing

Long Distance Towing

Slide Backs â&#x20AC;˘ Winch Out Services â&#x20AC;˘ Auto Sales Vehicle Storage â&#x20AC;˘ Roll Over Recoveries We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want your fingers,

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Rain Gutters

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Lic.# 992114

Fax: (907) 262-2347

262-4338

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35158 KB Drive Soldotna, aK 99669

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Lawnmowers & Snowblowers Bought & Sold Larry Stearns â&#x20AC;˘ 776-3704 51710 Koala Lane, Nikiski AK

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Licensed â&#x20AC;˘ Bonded â&#x20AC;˘ Insured All Repairs Guaranteed Installation Services LLC

Do you look forward to your gas bill each month? If not, you should call

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Insulation Rain Gutters Small Engine Repair

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Phone: (907) 262-2347

130 S Willow Street, Suite 8 â&#x20AC;˘ Kenai, AK 99611

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Computer Repair, Networking Dell Business Partner Web Design & Hosting

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RAINTECH

Computer Problems Call Today ( 9 0 7 ) 2 8 3 - 5 1 1 6

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â&#x20AC;˘ Carpentry â&#x20AC;˘ General Handyman Work â&#x20AC;˘ Sheetrock â&#x20AC;˘ Painting â&#x20AC;˘ Woodwork â&#x20AC;˘ Tree Removal â&#x20AC;˘ Hauling â&#x20AC;˘ Cleanup & Repairs â&#x20AC;˘ Decks â&#x20AC;˘ Kitchen Remodels â&#x20AC;˘ Bath â&#x20AC;˘ Siding â&#x20AC;˘ Remodels â&#x20AC;˘ Unfinished Projects?

Tim Wisniewski, owner â&#x20AC;˘ Residential & Commercial â&#x20AC;˘ Emergency Water Removal â&#x20AC;˘ Janitorial Contracts â&#x20AC;˘ Upholstery Cleaning

Scott The Handyman

LLC

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260-4943

Lic #39710

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252-7998

Licensed â&#x20AC;˘ Bonded â&#x20AC;˘ Insured â&#x20AC;˘License #33430

HaveGENERAL ToolsCONTRACTING Will Travel

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â&#x20AC;˘ Experienced â&#x20AC;˘ Trustworthy â&#x20AC;˘ Dependable â&#x20AC;˘ Attention to detail Serving the Kenai Peninsula for over 11 years

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Full or Partial Bathroom Remodels

Installation

Advertise in the Service Directory today! - Includes Dispatch. 283-7551

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Se r vin g Alaskan s Sin c e 19 9 9 w w w .c o lto n sp rin kle rs.c o m 2 62 - 7 168 License# 313479

service directory ADVERTISING WORKS! 283-7551 Advertising Dept. C

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Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

MAKE SOME BREAD

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EARN SOME DOUGH

See www.peninsulaclarion.com to find a job at the intersection of both. Wouldn’t you like a job that fulfills you both professionally and personally? With Monster’s new filtering tools you can quickly hone in on the job that’s right for you. So visit www.peninsulaclarion.com, and you might find yourself in the middle of the best of both worlds.

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C-10 Peninsula Clarion, Sunday, August 3, 2014

31-1 (14)

release dates: August 2-8

Mini Spy

TM

Mini Spy and Basset Brown are acting in “The Wizard of Oz”! See if you can find: q bell q lock q dragon q chicken q thimble q number 7 q frog q book q ladder q fish q star q needle © 2014 Universal Uclick from The Mini Page © 2014 Universal Uclick

A 75-Year Enchantment

Meet Judy Garland

from The Mini Page © 2014 Universal Uclick

from The Mini Page © 2014 Universal Uclick

TM

Goldie Goodsport’s Supersport

Height: 5-1 Birthdate: 10-1-2002 Hometown: Stanford, California

Lucy Li

It is often said that “good things come in small packages.” Amateur golfer Lucy Li, an 11-year-old sixthgrader, proved to be a “good thing” when she became the youngest-ever qualifier for the U.S. Women’s Open Championship — one of the five major tournaments on the Ladies Professional Golf Association Tour. Lucy was able to play in the Open after qualifying in her home state of California. She’s been participating in golf events since she began training at age 7. When she was 9, Lucy won the California Women’s Amateur Championship. When she’s not smashing 230-yard drives or ending her playing round with some ice cream, Lucy does her best to enjoy the moment on the golf course. “I just want to go out there and have fun and play the best I can, and I really don’t care about the outcome,” she said in an interview. “I can learn a lot from these great players.”

from The Mini Page © 2014 Universal Uclick

Changing the story The movie directors thought kids in 1939 would not like magical worlds, so they turned Dorothy’s adventures into a dream. In the books, Oz wasn’t a dream. It was real, and Dorothy returns to Oz in later adventures.

In the book, Dorothy’s magical slippers are silver. But the movie’s producers changed them to ruby so they would shine out in color.

Rookie Cookie’s Recipe

TM

Pineapple Cloud Pie

You’ll need:

• 1 (20-ounce) can crushed pineapple with juice • 1 (1-ounce) package instant lemon pudding (powder only) • 1 (8-ounce) carton light whipped topping • 1 (11-ounce) can mandarin oranges, drained • 9-inch prepared graham cracker pie crust

What to do:

1. Combine crushed pineapple with lemon pudding powder by beating by hand until well mixed. 2. Gently stir in whipped topping and drained oranges. Reserve 8 orange slices. 3. Pour mixture in prepared graham cracker pie crust. 4. Arrange orange slices on top as a garnish. (“Garnish” is a decoration.) 5. Chill for 8 hours. Makes 6 to 8 slices. You will need an adult’s help with this recipe. from The Mini Page © 2014 Universal Uclick

The Rainbow Dream Colors of the rainbow The bright, deep colors of “The Wizard of Oz” dazzled audiences in 1939. The movie was filmed with an advanced type of Technicolor, a process that made richer colors than ever before. Walt Disney was one of the first to use the new Technicolor process, in the cartoon movie “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.” It helped make that movie super successful. But filming live actors with the new Technicolor was still in the testing process. At that time, only about seven other full-length, liveaction movies had been made with the new process. When “The Wizard of Oz” was made, only nine Technicolor cameras existed in the world. Technicolor needed a lot of light, which made the set very hot. The costumes, especially the Cowardly Lion’s, made the actors even hotter. Filming often had to stop until the sets had cooled down.

© 2013 Warner Bros Entertainment Inc., All Rights Reserved, courtesy Warner Home Video

© 2013 Warner Bros Entertainment Inc., All Rights Reserved, courtesy Warner Home Video

Although Judy Garland was a star of many movies, she is best known for her role as Dorothy in “The Wizard of Oz.” She was 16 years old when she made the film, and by then, she had already been acting and singing for 14 years. Judy Garland was born as Frances Ethel Gumm in 1922. Her parents were both vaudeville performers. (Vaudeville (VAHDvil) was a type of live variety show that appeared throughout the U.S. in the early 1900s.) Judy and her two older sisters sang and danced in vaudeville. When she was 13, Judy was hired by the MGM movie studio. She starred in many movies, including “Meet Me in St. Louis,” “Easter Parade” and “In the Good Old Summertime.” She died in 1969.

The Scarecrow (Ray Bolger), the Cowardly Lion (Bert Lahr), Dorothy (Judy Garland) and the Tin Man (Jack Haley) eagerly approach the Wizard. Actor Buddy Ebsen was cast as the first Tin Man. He inhaled the silver aluminum crystals dusted on his face and suffered a severe reaction. He had to be in an iron lung, a machine to help him breathe, for two weeks. The role of the Tin Man was taken over by Jack Haley. The aluminum crystals were mixed with Haley’s makeup to form a paste. That way, he would not inhale the crystals.

© 2013 Warner Bros Entertainment Inc., All Rights Reserved, courtesy Warner Home Video

photo courtesy Library of Congress

Can you finish these famous movie lines? • “Toto, I’ve a feeling we’re not in ________ anymore!” • “There’s no place like _________.” • “I’ll get you, my pretty, and your little _______ , too!” • “Follow the __________ ____________ Road.” “The Wizard of Oz” movie first lit up movie screens in August 1939. Seventy-five years later, it is still one of the most beloved movies of all time. Say one of the movie lines above, and people know exactly what you mean. The Mini Page talked with an Oz American adventure historian to celebrate the lasting power “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” was of “The Wizard of Oz.” America’s first fairy tale, experts say. Until that book, most kids’ books were Magical story by European authors, and lessons were more important than the story. The magic of Oz characters are independent and “The Wizard of work to reach their dreams. Readers Oz” starts with can understand what the characters the great story. are going through. They know about The movie is caring for a pet and how scary it would based on “The be to be lost far from home. Wonderful Wizard Frank Baum wrote In the early 1900s, American girls of Oz,” written by L. 14 Oz books in all. were not usually the heroes of books. L. Frank Baum in 1900. He had written three other books But Baum believed girls could be just as strong as boys. Girls are often the for kids before that, but the Oz books heroes of his stories. made him famous.

© 2013 Warner Bros Entertainment Inc. All Rights Reserved. Courtesy Warner Home Video

‘The Wizard of Oz’

from The Mini Page © 2014 Universal Uclick

For the scenes where Emerald City shines in the distance, the city was drawn onto a large piece of cardboard and filmed separately. That film was then combined with the film of the actors. Lights shining through holes in the art made the city sparkle. For other scenes, sets of Emerald City were built. All of Munchkin Land and parts of the witch’s castle were built. In the Horse of a Different Color scene, horses were coated with different flavors of Jell-O mix. Horses kept trying to lick off the sweet powder.

Technicolor

Over the rainbow

The first Technicolor process was invented in 1916. This early system had a limited range of colors. It basically worked by mixing negative strips of green and red. In 1932, a new Technicolor process was developed that used three colors. These three colors could be used to produce every color of the rainbow. They were: cyan (SIGH-an), a greenish-blue; magenta (muh-JENtuh), a purplish-red; and yellow.

About the first 18 minutes of the movie were in sepia (SEE-pea-yuh), a soft brown color. When Dorothy opens the door to Oz, everything bursts into color. The contrast between the sepia and the rich colors really did feel like magic to the audiences of 1939. When Dorothy opened the door to the bright colors, early audiences gasped, and many stood up and applauded. from The Mini Page © 2014 Universal Uclick

TMMighty

A Magical Mixture Magical music

Funny’s

Awesome special effects

© 2013 Warner Bros Entertainment Inc., All Rights Reserved, courtesy Warner Home Video

“Over the Rainbow” was composed partly to show off Judy Garland’s lovely voice. It won the Academy Award for Best Song.

The terrifying tornado was made with a 35-foot-long muslin, or lightweight cotton, stocking hanging from the top of the soundstage. A tiny motorized car was placed below the set, at the bottom of the tornado stocking. Technicians moved the car to make it look as if the tornado were sweeping across the prairie. Margaret Hamilton, who played the Wicked Witch of the West, caught on fire They filmed the scene with lots of in the scene where she disappears from wind machines, blowing dust and a Munchkin Land. During filming, the fire started before she was safely through the miniature farm. The tornado footage floor, and she suffered serious burns. She was projected behind Dorothy as she recovered after six weeks and was able tried to run to safety. to return to the filming. In all the scenes with fire, such Making up the magic as the flames surrounding the Movie techniques were so new that Wizard’s head and the Wicked Witch disappearing in flame, movie makers experts had to invent all the special used real fire. The throne room set effects for the movie. There were no computers. Everything had to be done caught on fire, but everyone was prepared and no one was hurt. the hard way. To make the witch appear to melt, Makeup artists figured out how to the actress was lowered on an elevator make prosthetic (prahs-THEH-tik), or artificial, body pieces to turn actors platform. Technicians tacked the hem of her dress to the outside of the platform. into the scary flying monkeys. They did such a good job that about 30 years When the elevator lowered, air from the elevator shaft puffed out her dress. later, they used the same process for She wore a larger-size witch’s hat, so it the first “Planet of the Apes” movie. looked as if she were shrinking. Battery packs in the monkeys’ The Mini Page thanks John Fricke, Oz wings made them flap. The actors flew historian and author of several books hanging from thin piano wire. on “The Wizard of Oz,” including “The In the movie, it looked as if Wonderful World of Oz: An Illustrated hundreds of flying monkeys filled the History of the American Classic,” for help with this issue. sky. But there were really only 12 actors. The rest were miniature rubber Look through the TV listings of your newspaper to find showings of your puppets run by hundreds of other favorite movies. wires. Remember, it wasn’t like it is Next week, The Mini Page is about the today, when computers can just copy 100th anniversary of the Panama Canal. images. © 2013 Warner Bros Entertainment Inc., All Rights Reserved, courtesy Warner Home Video

Harold Arlen composed the music for the movie, and E.Y. Harburg wrote the lyrics (LEER-iks), or words to the songs. These artists were already known for their songs, but this movie made them famous. Many others worked on the music as well. In 1903, the first musical of “The Wizard of Oz” was a huge success on Broadway. But its music did not really help tell the story, and entirely new music was composed for the movie. A new script was written, too. The most beloved song is “Over the Rainbow.” Associate producer Arthur Freed was impressed by how well the song “Someday My Prince Will Come” showed Snow White’s dreams in that movie. He wanted a song that showed what Dorothy longed for. Today, we can’t imagine the movie without “Over the Rainbow.” But studio executives considered cutting it from the movie. They believed it slowed down the story.

The Mini Page Staff Betty Debnam - Founding Editor and Editor at Large

Lisa Tarry - Managing Editor

Lucy Lien - Associate Editor

The Mini Page®

Wendy Daley - Artist

Mini Jokes

All the following jokes have something in common. Can you guess the common theme or category? David: What should you give a dog with a fever? Danny: Mustard — it’s the best thing for a hot dog! Doris: What trick do zombies teach their dogs? Daria: To play dead! Debbie: Where are abandoned dogs sent? Dexter: To an arf-anage! from The Mini Page © 2014 Universal Uclick

‘The Wizard of Oz’

TM

Basset Brown’s

Try ’n’ Find

B B T O R N A D O

Y A O M D S K Y N

H L U O A O G N A

T R I M K G G I M

O M U O N S I T R

R V K B N L M C O

O Y M S Y D W L L

D L W R W A O U O

D D O E W O R F C

R R B P O R C R I

A A N P L K E E N

Z W I I L C R D H

I O A L E I A N C

W C R S Y R C O E

W I T C H B S W T

Words that remind us of “The Wizard of Oz” are hidden in the block above. Some words are hidden backward or diagonally. See if you can find: BAUM, BOOKS, BRICK, COWARDLY, DOG, DOROTHY, LION, MAGIC, MAN, RAINBOW, ROAD, RUBY, SCARECROW, SKY, SLIPPERS, TECHNICOLOR, TIN, TORNADO, WITCH, WIZARD, WONDERFUL, YELLOW. from The Mini Page © 2014 Universal Uclick

Ready Resources The Mini Page provides ideas for websites, books or other resources that will help you learn more about this week’s topics. On the Web: • bit.ly/1z8h5th At the library: • “The Wizard of Oz” DVD • “The Wonderful World of Oz: An Illustrated History of the American Classic” by John Fricke • “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz,” “Ozma of Oz,” “The Scarecrow of Oz” and other books by L. Frank Baum

To order, send $9.95 plus $3.50 postage and handling for each copy. Send check or money order (U.S. funds only) payable to: Andrews McMeel Universal, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206 or call toll-free 1-800-591-2097. Please send ______ copies of The Mini Page Guide to the Constitution (Item #0-7407-6511-6) at $13.45 each, total cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.) www.smartwarehousing.com Name: ________________________________________________________________________

Guide to the Constitution The popular nine-part series on the Constitution, written in collaboration with the National Archives, is now packaged as a colorful 32-page softcover book. The series covers: • the preamble, the seven articles and 27 amendments • the “big ideas” of the document • the history of its making and the signers

Address: _______________________________________________________________________ City: _________________________________________ State: _________ Zip: ________________

Please include all of the appropriate registered trademark symbols and copyright lines in any publication of The Mini Page®. C

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Profile for Sound Publishing

Peninsula Clarion, August 03, 2014  

August 03, 2014 edition of the Peninsula Clarion

Peninsula Clarion, August 03, 2014  

August 03, 2014 edition of the Peninsula Clarion