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Crash

Baseball

Malaysian plane wreck kills hundreds

Twins take two games from West

World/A-8

Sports/B-1

CLARION

Partly sunny 64/52 More weather on Page A-2

P E N I N S U L A

Friday-Saturday, July 18-19 Soldotna-Kenai, Alaska

Vol. 44, Issue 248

Question Should the City of Kenai regulate electronic cigarettes in restaurants and healthcare facilities the same as smoking tobacco? n Yes, they release toxins in the air; n No, the vapor is less harmful than smoke; n The city should wait until more conclusive studies are complete. To place your vote and comment, visit our Web site at www. peninsulaclarion. com. Results and selected comments will be posted each Tuesday in the Clarion, and a new question will be asked. Suggested questions may be submitted online or e-mailed to news@peninsulaclarion.com. C

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50 cents newsstands daily/$1.00 Sunday

2 injured in ATV accident

Midnight ‘netters

By DAN BALMER Peninsula Clarion

Two people were injured in an all-terrain vehicle accident shortly after midnight Thursday in Kenai. A man and woman riding an ATV crashed into a large rock on the south beach toward Rocky Point, which caused the ATV to flip and throw both riders off, said Kenai Police Lt. David Ross. The two suffered serious but not life-threatening injuries and were transported to Central Peninsula Hospital for treatment, Ross said. Their names were not available as of Thursday night. Alcohol is believed to be a factor in the crash. Ross said people on the beach need to be cautious of their surroundings and should not operate an ATV while intoxicated.

Photos by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion

Above: Karl Kircher and Steven Bishop pitch setnet caught fish from a skiff near the mouth of the Kasilof River at 1 a.m. Thursday morning during an overnight commercial fishing period in Kasilof, Alaska. Right: A commercial drift gillnetting boat leaves the mouth of the Kasilof River. Below: A commercial set gillnetting skiff runs out of the mouth of the Kasilof River as a crewmember lights the way with a flashlight

Reach Dan Balmer at daniel. balmer@peninsulaclarion.com

Boat accident kills dog

In the news Sterling fire kills 2 cats, 11 puppies ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Fire officials say 11 boxer puppies and two cats were killed in a residential fire in Sterling that apparently started while the owners were away. The fire was discovered by neighbors Wednesday morning, about 2 ½ hours after the owners had departed. Firefighters responded in about five minutes and found smoke rising from the home. The fire was extinguished within 30 minutes. The dead pets were found during a sweep of the building. Central Emergency Services Brad Nelson says the deaths of the animals, particularly the puppies, hit firefighters hard. He says firefighters unsuccessfully tried to resuscitate one of the puppies. The fire caused an estimated $60,000 in damages. Nelson says the homeowners’ insurers are planning an investigation after responders said the blaze started in the kitchen.

By DAN BALMER Peninsula Clarion

Soldotna to overhaul city website By KELLY SULLIVAN Peninsula Clarion

Soldotna is in the process of re-designing it’s city website, slated to launch this fall. The overhaul will result in a more

Opinion.................. A-4 Nation.................... A-6 World..................... A-8 Sports.....................B-1 Classifieds............ C-3 Comics.................. C-9

Check us out online at www.peninsulaclarion.com To subscribe, call 283-3584.

want information to be current and to make navigation easier and more intuitive.” The company Vision Internet Providers, Inc., was contracted last fall to develop the new site, Dukowitz said. Governmental

departments are currently in the process of determining final content, she said. Vision Internet was selected for their experience building government websites, Dukowitz said. See WEB, page A-5

Catch-and-release for Kenai kings Managers say they may close the river if numbers don’t improve By RASHAH McCHESNEY Peninsula Clarion

Index

dynamic, interactive online database. “The current website has been a static placeholder that hasn’t changed much since the beginning,” said Project Manager Heather Dukowitz. “We

After a slow start and declining return projections, the Kenai River king salmon fishery will move to catch-and-release fishing beginning Saturday through the season’s July 31 ending. For the first time in Alaska’s history, the catch-and-release fishery will be accompanied by a restriction to using barbless hooks. Starting Saturday, king salmon caught in the Kenai River cannot be retained or in possession and cannot be removed from the water — they must be released immediately, according to a Thursday emergency order. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game defines a barbless hook as one that is either manufactured without a barb or has a barb that has been completely removed or compressed so the barb is in complete con-

tact with the shaft of the hook. While there have been studies showing that barbless hooks reduce the efficiency of anglers, there have yet to be conclusive results showing that a barbless hook reduces the chance that a fish will die after it has been caught, said Fish and Game area management biologist Robert Begich. “We will still be using an 8.25 percent mortality rate in our calculations,” he said. During the 2013 fishing season when Fish and Game moved to catch-and-release fishing on the early run of king salmon, fewer than 80 fish were caught and Fish and Game managers estimated that of those, five fish died, according to data Begich presented to Alaska’s Board of Fisheries in February. Though catch-and-release fishing sharply reduces the number of king salmon killed in the sport fishery, Begich said the restriction alone would

not be enough to help managers make the fish’s escapement goal. “This is a step down measure that’s going to give us some time … to see if the fish are going to come in,” Begich said.

A boat capsized on the Kenai River sending three people and a dog overboard Wednesday night. Nearby boats pulled all three people out of the water but the dog didn’t survive, said Kenai Police Lt. David Ross. The incident occurred at about 9:46 p.m. when a wave went over the bow of the boat, causing it to flip over. Police did not release the names of the boaters, but all three were wearing life jackets, Ross said. While all boats in the water may have contributed to the waves that caused the boat to flip, having so many boats close by made for a quick recovery, he said. “It’s a lot easier to rescue people that are floating,” he said. The Kenai rescue boat arrived shortly afterward and transported two people back to land while the other person received a ride from a fellow boater. The three people did not suffer any injuries. The capsized boat was recovered from the river, Ross said.

If the king salmon passage rate, or number of fish that make it upriver past the sonar, does not improve managers will further restrict the fishery. Reach Dan Balmer at daniel. “Then the next step is to balmer@peninsulaclarion.com close,” he said. See KINGS, page A-12

King restrictions impact sockeye By RASHAH McCHESNEY Peninsula Clarion

The announcement of a catch-and-release fishery for Kenai River king salmon, a severe reduction in harvest opportunity for sport anglers — triggered an equally severe restriction on hours in the East Side Setnet Fishery, one of the two commercial fishing groups in the Cook Inlet tasked with harvesting sockeye, or red salmon. Alaska Department of Fish and Game managers said the proscriptive measures reducing the time and area available to commercial fishers in the Cook Inlet would make it difficult, C

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if not impossible, to meet sockeye salmon escapement goals on the Kenai and Kasilof Rivers. Sockeye salmon are returning to the Kasilof River in record numbers while the Kenai River’s sockeye run is building. Typically, the set and drift gillnetters would be reaching the peak of their fishing time and area during the third week of July — but the setnetters will now be operating within the confines of a 12-hourper week cap on their fishing time while the drift fleet is regulated by a new management plan that restricts them to three corridors on the east side of the Cook Inlet. See REDS, page A-12


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A-2 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014

AccuWeather 5-day forecast for Kenai-Soldotna

Barrow 38/31

®

Today

Saturday

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Tides Today High(ft.)

Prudhoe Bay 50/40

First Second

9:36 a.m. (18.1) 10:07 p.m. (19.8)

4:27 a.m. (0.8) 4:38 p.m. (1.1)

8:23 a.m. (17.4) 8:54 p.m. (19.1)

2:36 a.m. (0.9) 2:47 p.m. (1.2)

First Second

7:42 a.m. (16.2) 8:13 p.m. (17.9)

1:32 a.m. (0.9) 1:43 p.m. (1.2)

First Second

6:29 a.m. (8.6) 7:09 p.m. (10.4)

12:20 a.m. (0.9) 12:31 p.m. (0.5)

First Second

12:13 a.m. (30.9) 12:42 p.m. (28.0)

6:58 a.m. (1.3) 7:13 p.m. (2.2)

Deep Creek

Partly sunny

Showers, mainly late in the day

Intervals of clouds and sunshine

Mostly cloudy, a shower possible

Cloudy with a couple of showers

Hi: 63 Lo: 49

Hi: 66 Lo: 50

Hi: 68 Lo: 51

Hi: 63 Lo: 51

Hi: 64 Lo: 52

The patented AccuWeather.com RealFeel Temperature® is an exclusive index of the effects of temperature, wind, Sunrise humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, Sunset pressure and elevation on the human body.

10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m.

60 64 66 65

Daylight Length of Day - 18 hrs., 2 min., 28 sec. Daylight lost - 4 min., 5 sec.

Alaska Cities Yesterday Hi/Lo/W

City Adak* Anchorage Barrow Bethel Cold Bay Cordova Delta Junction Denali N. P. Dillingham Dutch Harbor Fairbanks Fort Yukon Glennallen* Gulkana Haines Homer Juneau Ketchikan Kiana King Salmon Klawock Kodiak

First Second

Seldovia

Last July 18

Today 5:09 a.m. 11:11 p.m.

New July 26

Moonrise Moonset

First Aug 3

Today 12:31 a.m. 2:58 p.m.

Tomorrow 5:11 a.m. 11:09 p.m.

Yesterday Hi/Lo/W

City

Kotzebue 53/45/sh 52/46/c 55/47/c McGrath 67/51/c 67/56/pc 67/55/pc Metlakatla 65/55/r 46/36/sh 38/31/c Nome 55/46/r 59/50/sh 57/44/r North Pole 71/53/pc 65/43/pc 59/52/sh Northway 70/48/pc 59/49/c 62/45/pc Palmer 67/53/pc 69/51/c 70/51/pc Petersburg 63/46/sh 64/52/c 65/46/sh Prudhoe Bay* 63/55/sh 66/45/s 58/47/sh Saint Paul 53/49/c 60/48/c 56/49/sh Seward 59/54/c 72/57/c 70/52/sh Sitka 59/51/sh 64/55/c 69/50/pc Skagway 60/51/c 75/52/pc 64/41/pc Talkeetna 67/47/pc 72/50/s 70/46/pc Tanana 66/54/sh 62/53/c 66/50/pc Tok* 70/46/c 66/54/pc 61/51/pc Unalakleet 55/52/r 60/52/c 66/50/pc Valdez 60/47/c 68/51/pc 65/56/r Wasilla 66/52/pc 45/37/c 47/43/r Whittier 61/52/pc 73/36/pc 62/51/sh Willow* 70/53/pc 63/54/c 65/53/c Yakutat 60/44/c 62/48/pc 62/53/pc Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Readings through 4 p.m. yesterday

Nome 51/44

Temperature

Unalakleet McGrath 52/45 59/44

Full Aug 10 Tomorrow 12:50 a.m. 4:17 p.m.

51/46/sh 59/44/r 64/56/r 51/44/pc 69/49/sh 72/50/pc 67/49/pc 63/53/c 50/40/sh 55/45/c 62/49/pc 62/53/pc 65/50/pc 67/52/pc 60/43/r 74/48/pc 52/45/c 63/45/pc 67/50/pc 62/50/pc 67/51/pc 60/48/pc

City Albany, NY Albuquerque Amarillo Asheville Atlanta Atlantic City Austin Baltimore Billings Birmingham Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo, NY Casper Charleston, SC Charleston, WV Charlotte, NC Chicago Cheyenne Cincinnati

78/55/pc 89/63/pc 73/59/c 77/60/pc 86/61/pc 84/61/pc 92/77/c 81/61/pc 93/65/pc 84/60/c 86/53/s 98/71/pc 81/67/pc 72/56/pc 85/48/s 89/73/pc 79/56/pc 84/63/pc 78/54/pc 74/50/pc 77/52/s

81/57/s 92/67/t 79/61/pc 74/63/pc 85/68/pc 82/61/s 86/72/t 84/65/pc 91/63/pc 80/67/c 92/58/t 96/63/s 80/62/s 79/60/s 90/55/s 89/71/pc 81/63/pc 85/68/pc 79/61/pc 85/56/t 80/61/pc

Dillingham 58/47

From the Peninsula Clarion in Kenai

24 hours through 4 p.m. yest. 0.00" Month to date ............................ 1.82" Normal month to date ............. 0.88" Year to date ............................... 7.99" Normal year to date ................. 5.93" Record today ................. 0.63" (2002) Record for July ............. 5.02" (1958) Record for year ............ 27.09" (1963)

Juneau 66/50

National Extremes

Kodiak 62/53

Sitka 62/53

(For the 48 contiguous states)

High yesterday Low yesterday

119 at Death Valley, Calif. 34 at Leadville,

State Extremes High yesterday Low yesterday

Ketchikan 65/56

75 at Glennallen 36 at Barrow and King Salmon

Today’s Forecast

(Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation)

Drenching showers and thunderstorms will affect areas from Texas to the lower Mississippi Valley today. Spotty storms will also drench Florida. Afternoon storms will dot the interior West.

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

World Cities Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

City Cleveland Columbia, SC Columbus, OH Concord, NH Dallas Dayton Denver Des Moines Detroit Duluth El Paso Fargo Flagstaff Grand Rapids Great Falls Hartford Helena Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Jackson, MS

74/57/pc 90/68/pc 79/54/pc 81/58/pc 78/71/r 76/51/pc 77/55/pc 80/59/pc 78/56/pc 77/55/pc 98/74/t 83/59/pc 84/52/pc 76/51/pc 91/59/s 84/61/pc 94/57/s 88/75/pc 89/76/t 77/53/pc 85/68/pc

79/62/s 90/71/pc 81/64/pc 80/52/s 84/70/t 80/61/pc 89/61/t 79/62/pc 79/61/s 79/61/pc 96/74/t 86/64/pc 81/54/s 79/59/s 88/58/pc 84/58/s 92/60/pc 88/74/pc 84/74/t 78/60/pc 78/70/t

City

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Jacksonville 89/69/pc Kansas City 77/59/c Key West 92/83/pc Las Vegas 109/86/pc Little Rock 72/69/r Los Angeles 80/65/pc Louisville 80/57/s Memphis 78/67/c Miami 89/77/t Midland, TX 83/71/t Milwaukee 75/58/pc Minneapolis 79/59/pc Nashville 83/57/pc New Orleans 89/73/c New York 81/67/pc Norfolk 82/69/s Oklahoma City 68/62/r Omaha 79/60/pc Orlando 91/75/pc Philadelphia 84/65/s Phoenix 105/86/pc

E N I N S U L A

(USPS 438-410) Published daily Sunday through Friday, except Christmas and New Year’s, by: Southeastern Newspapers Corporation P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Street address: 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 1, Kenai, AK Phone: (907) 283-7551 Postmaster: Send address changes to the Peninsula Clarion, P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Periodicals postage paid at Kenai, AK Represented for national advertising by The Papert Companies, Chicago, IL Copyright 2014 Peninsula Clarion A Morris Communications Corp. newspaper

Who to call at the Peninsula Clarion News tip? Question? Main number.............................................................................................. 283-7551 Fax............................................................................................................. 283-3299 News email...................................................................news@peninsulaclarion.com General news Will Morrow, editor ............................................ will.morrow@peninsulaclarion.com Rashah McChesney, city editor.............. rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com Jeff Helminiak, sports editor........................... jeff.helminiak@peninsulaclarion.com Fisheries, photographer.............................................................................................. ............................ Rashah McChesney, rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com Kenai, courts...............................Dan Balmer, daniel.balmer@peninsulaclarion.com Borough, education ......... Kaylee Osowski, kaylee.osowski@peninsulaclarion.com Soldotna .................................. Kelly Sullivan, kelly.sullivan@peninsulaclarion.com Arts and Entertainment................................................ news@peninsulaclarion.com Community, Around the Peninsula............................... news@peninsulaclarion.com Sports............................................ Joey Klecka, joey.klecka@peninsulaclarion.com Page design........ Florence Struempler, florence.struempler@peninsulaclarion.com

Circulation problem? Call 283-3584 If you don’t receive your newspaper by 7 a.m. and you live in the Kenai-Soldotna area, call 283-3584 before 10 a.m. for redelivery of your paper. If you call after 10 a.m., you will be credited for the missed issue. Regular office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Sunday. General circulation questions can be sent via email to circulation@peninsulaclarion.com. The circulation manager is Randi Keaton.

For home delivery Order a six-day-a-week, three-month subscription for $39, a six-month subscription for $73, or a 12-month subscription for $130. Use our easy-pay plan and save on these rates. Call 283-3584 for details. Mail subscription rates are available upon request.

Want to place an ad? Classified: Call 283-7551 and ask for the classified ad department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or email classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com. Display: Call 283-7551 and ask for the display advertising department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Leslie Talent is the Clarion’s advertising director. She can be reached via email at leslie.talent@peninsulaclarion.com. Contacts for other departments: Business office...................................................................................... Jane Russell Production................................................................................................ Geoff Long Online........................................................................................ Vincent Nusunginya

Visit our fishing page! Go to peninsulaclarion.com and look for the Tight Lines link.

twitter.com/pclarion

Precipitation

Valdez Kenai/ 63/45 Soldotna Homer

Cold Bay 59/52

CLARION P

High ............................................... 61 Low ................................................ 52 Normal high .................................. 64 Normal low .................................... 49 Record high ........................ 75 (1960) Record low ......................... 36 (1986)

Kenai/ Soldotna 64/52 Seward 62/49 Homer 61/51

Anchorage 67/55

Bethel 57/44

National Cities Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

From Kenai Municipal Airport

Fairbanks 70/52

Talkeetna 67/52 Glennallen 64/41

Today Hi/Lo/W

Unalaska 55/49

Anchorage

Almanac

* Indicates estimated temperatures for yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W

Seward

Anaktuvuk Pass 45/35

Kotzebue 51/46

Sun and Moon

RealFeel

Low(ft.)

Kenai City Dock

facebook.com/ peninsulaclarion

Follow the Clarion online. Go to peninsulaclarion.com and look for the Twitter, Facebook and Mobile links for breaking news, headlines and more.

88/70/pc 79/62/pc 91/82/pc 104/83/s 74/65/r 77/64/pc 83/64/pc 74/67/r 90/76/pc 88/71/pc 76/60/pc 80/65/s 79/62/c 85/74/t 82/66/s 84/69/pc 75/63/sh 80/64/s 92/73/t 85/67/s 104/85/s

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

City

Pittsburgh Portland, ME Portland, OR Rapid City Reno Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Santa Fe Seattle Sioux Falls, SD Spokane Syracuse Tampa Topeka Tucson Tulsa Wash., DC Wichita

75/52/pc 77/64/pc 83/58/s 82/52/s 94/69/pc 84/61/s 93/64/pc 96/78/pc 77/70/pc 74/63/pc 84/58/s 78/57/pc 77/58/pc 90/65/pc 72/57/sh 90/74/pc 79/59/c 96/78/pc 68/63/r 83/66/pc 67/60/r

78/63/pc 78/55/s 78/63/s 90/60/t 95/67/t 86/60/s 95/72/s 91/78/t 73/68/pc 72/59/pc 88/59/t 77/61/pc 80/64/s 86/64/s 79/56/s 90/75/pc 82/63/pc 99/74/s 75/63/sh 85/70/pc 76/61/pc

Scientists name water mite after J.Lo SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — Pop singer Jennifer Lopez may be thinking life is funny after a group of scientists named a water mite in her honor after discovering a new species near Puerto Rico. The music of the Bronx, New York-born entertainer who has Puerto Rican roots was a hit with the group while they wrote about their findings, biologist Vladimir Pesic said in an email Wednesday. “The reason behind the unusual choice of name for the new species is ... simple: J.Lo’s songs and videos kept the team in a continuous good mood when writing the manuscript and watching World Cup Soccer 2014,” said Pesic, who works at the University of Montenegro. Pesic and other scientists collected the newly baptized Litarachna lopezae mite from a coral reef in Mona Passage, a treacherous body of water that separates Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.

Oil Prices Wednesday’s prices not available

Thursday Stocks Company Final Change Agrium Inc................91.24 +0.70 Alaska Air Group...... 48.16 -1.28 ACS...........................1.73 — Apache Corp........... 98.91 -0.96 AT&T........................ 36.03 -0.42 Baker Hughes.......... 72.54 -1.85 BP ........................... 50.87 -1.41 Chevron.................. 130.08 -0.81 ConocoPhillips......... 84.68 -1.28 ExxonMobil............. 102.31 -1.46 1st Natl. Bank AK...1,730.00 -10.00 GCI.......................... 10.87 -0.14 Halliburton............... 70.35 -1.51 Harley-Davidson...... 65.85 -0.80 Home Depot............ 79.55 -0.11 McDonald’s.............. 98.37 -0.90 Safeway....................34.74 +0.09 Schlumberger..........114.64 -1.24 Tesoro...................... 58.43 -1.07 Walmart................... 76.61 -0.25 Wells Fargo.............. 50.68 -0.49 Gold closed............ 1,318.83 +19.63 Silver closed.............21.15 +0.38 Dow Jones avg..... 16,976.81 -161.39 NASDAQ................4,363.45 -62.52 S&P 500................ 1,958.12 -23.45 Stock prices provided by the Kenai Peninsula Edward Jones offices. C

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City

Yesterday Hi/Lo/W

Acapulco 95/78/t Athens 88/68/pc Auckland 50/42/s Baghdad 111/88/s Berlin 82/63/s Hong Kong 91/83/t Jerusalem 81/63/s Johannesburg 66/46/s London 84/64/s Madrid 100/70/s Magadan 60/47/c Mexico City 76/56/t Montreal 73/57/pc Moscow 81/63/pc Paris 90/64/s Rome 84/66/s Seoul 82/72/c Singapore 85/82/t Sydney 63/40/s Tokyo 86/75/c Vancouver 72/63/pc

Today Hi/Lo/W 91/79/t 90/74/s 52/39/s 109/80/s 84/62/s 89/82/r 79/62/s 68/36/s 86/67/pc 98/66/pc 59/45/c 72/56/t 79/57/s 77/55/pc 92/69/pc 88/69/s 84/74/r 89/79/t 61/46/pc 80/73/t 71/61/pc

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

-10s -0s 50s 60s

0s 70s

10s 80s

20s 90s

30s

40s

100s 110s

Cold Front Warm Front Stationary Front

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014

Obituary

Masons host fish fry

Longtime Sterling resident, Mr. Spencer Earl Bass, 67, died Tuesday, July 15, 2014 at his home in Sterling. Memorial services will be held 3 p.m. Saturday, July 19, 2014 at the Sterling Pentecostal Church on the corner of Swanson River Road and Entrada Drive in Sterling. Pastor Mitch Glover will be officiating. Spencer was born August 22, 1946 in Amhurst, Texas. He graduated High School in Tucumcari, New Mexico. In 1969 he moved to Alaska where he became a member of the Sterling Baptist Church and the Sterling Pentecostal Church. The family wrote, “He enjoyed hunting, fishing, gardening, and raising his chickens. He was a hard worker and an honest man who was loved and will be missed by many.” He was preceded in death by his parents, Edna Earl and Virgil Louis Bass; sister and her husband, Doris and Sparky Sparks. He is survived by his daughters, Leslie Hackett, Chaixlynn Roden, and Shannon Roden; girlfriend, Cheryl West; sister and brother in-law, Joyce and Ray Polson; niece Debbie Sparks and Nephew Hank and Kevin Sparks and many other nieces and nephews; best friends, Johnny Z, Janice, Gene Riley, and Murphy; and his little girl Rosie. Memorial donations may be made in memory of Spencer to 502 Kellum Street – Fairbanks, Alaska 99701 C/O Chaixlynn Roden. Arrangements made by Peninsula Memorial Chapel & Crematory. Please sign Spencer’s online guestbook at AlaskanFuneral.com.

Sterling Masonic Lodge #22 is sponsoring a Fish Fry at the Sterling Senior Center on Saturday, July 19 from 4:00-6:00 Soldotna Library Friends plan book sale p.m. The dinner will include all-you-can-eat beer-batter halibut The Soldotna Library Friends will hold a book sale from 1 to and cod, baked beans, french fries, hush puppies, cheesy bis- 5 p.m. on Progress Days, July 26, at the Soldotna City Library cuits, coleslaw, salad and dessert. A donation of $20 for adults Basement Booksale Room. All proceeds fund special events at and $8 for children under 12 is requested. For more info, call the Soldotna City Library. 262-3866.

The Peninsula Clarion strives to report the deaths of all current and former Peninsula residents. Notices should be received within three months of the death. Pending service/Death notices are brief notices listing full name, age, date and place of death; and time, date and place of service. These are published at no charge. Obituaries are prepared by families, funeral homes, crematoriums, and are edited by our staff according to newspaper guidelines. The fee for obituaries up to 500 words with one black and white photo ranges from $50 to $100. Funeral homes and crematoriums routinely submit completed obituaries to the newspaper. Obituaries may also be submitted directly to the Clarion with prepayment, online at www.peninsulaclarion.com, or by mail to: Peninsula Clarion, P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, Alaska, 99611. The deadline for Tuesday – Friday editions is 2 p.m. the previous day. Submissions for Sunday and Monday editions must be received by 3 p.m. Friday. For more information, call the Clarion at 907-283-7551.

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July 22 at 7:00 p.m. This general joint meeting will be to discuss potential upcoming events and for information on the new building. All members are asked to attend. Additional information 262-3540.

Spencer Earl Bass

Peninsula Clarion death notice and obituary guidelines:

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Summer bazaar bake sale and quilt show

Football camp kicks off The Kenai Peninsula Youth Football Camp will begin July 21 and run through July 23 from 9 a.m. to noon. The cost of camp is $50. The camp is open to all youth football players through eighth grade. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. at the Soldotna High School pool entrance. Contact Galen Brantley Jr. for more information at gbrantley@kpbsd.k12.ak.us or 3988862.

Soldotna Senior Center’s Summer Bazaar Bake Sale and Robin’s Place Quilt Show will be Friday, July 25 and Saturday, July 26 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be many vendors with beautiful items to choose from, a bake sale, and beautiful Quilt display hosted by Robin’s Place. A festive menu will be available. For more information call 262-2322.

Community Garage Sale in Niksiki

Anchorage High 1954 class reunion scheduled

The Nikiski Community Garage Sale will be held July 26 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Nikiski Community Recreation Classmates and friends from other classes are invited to join Center. Space available available to vendors. Register at the Anchorage High School’s Class of 1954 for an impromptu Nikiski Community Recreation Center. For more information no-host luncheon reunion at noon, Monday, July 21 at China call 776-8800. Lights restaurant, 9220 Old Seward Highway in Anchorage. For more information call Arlene, 907-892-6894.

Fun run added to Progress Days

Workshop shares tips to maximize your garden harvest

Progress Days has added a new event this year. On July 27, there will be a free 5K Fun Run. Registration is at noon at the Soldotna Regional Sports Complex. The route will include “Increase Your Harvest: Crop Rotation and Succession Centennial Park and the new trail. After the run, the City of Planting” is the topic of a free gardening class July 22, 5:30-7 Soldotna will host its annual free hot dog lunch and there will p.m. at the Kenai Peninsula Food Bank high tunnel and garden. be live entertainment and booths at Gherke Field. The instructors are Lark Ticen, certified Square Foot Gardening instructor, and Janice Chumley, IPM tech for the Coopera- Donations sought for Imagine No Malaria tive Extension Service. Space is limited, so registration is required. To register, call 262-5824. This class is offered through basement sale a partnership that includes UAF-Cooperative Extension, Kenai Donations are being accepted for a Basement Sale to be held Soil & Water Conservation District, USDA-NRCS and the Ke- at the Kenai United Methodist Church on July 25-26. 100 pernai Peninsula Food Bank for the benefit of growers across the cent of the proceeds will be donated to Imagine No Malaria, a Kenai. focus of the United Methodist Church and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Donations of housewares, sports equipment, guy stuff, toys, clothes, linens, pet items and books may be AmVets to hold special meeting brought to the Kenai United Methodist Church at 607 Frontage Amvets Post 4 the AmVets Auxiliary and the AmVets Sons Road across from Wells Fargo Bank on July 20 between the will be holding a special joint meeting of all members Tuesday, hours of 9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.

Community Calendar Today 8 a.m. • Alcoholics Anonymous As Bill Sees It Group, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway Unit 71 (Old Carrs Mall). Call 398-9440. 9:45 a.m. • TOPS #AK 196 meets at The Grace Lutheran Church, in Soldotna. Call Dorothy at 262-1303. Noon • Alcoholics Anonymous recovery group at 11312 Kenai Spur Highway, Suite 71 in the old Carrs Mall in Kenai. Call 262-1917. 12:30 p.m. • Well Elders Live Longer exercise (W.E.L.L.) will meet at the Nikiski Senior Center. Call instructor Mary Olson at 907-776-3745. 8 p.m.

• Narcotics Anonymous Support Group “It Works” at URS Club, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway, Unit 71, Kenai. • AA 12 by 12 at the United Methodist Church, 607 Frontage Road, Kenai. • Twin City Al-Anon Family group, United Methodist Church, 607 Frontage Road in Kenai. Call 907-953-4655. Saturday 8 a.m.

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• Alcoholics Anonymous As Bill Sees It Group, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway Unit 71 (Old Carrs Mall). Call 398-9440. 9 a.m. • Al-Anon book study, Central Peninsula Hospital’s Augustine Room, Soldotna. Call 907-9534655. 10 a.m. • Narcotics Anonymous PJ Meeting, URS Club, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway, Unit 71, Kenai. 7 p.m. • Narcotics Anonymous support group “Dopeless Hope Fiends,” URS Club, 11312 Kenai

Spur Highway, Unit 71, Kenai. 8 p.m. • AA North Roaders Group at North Star Methodist Church, Mile 25.5 Kenai Spur Highway. Call 242-9477. The Community Calendar lists recurring events and meetings of local organizations.To have your event listed, email organization name, day or days of meeting, time of meeting, place, and a contact number to news@peninsulaclarion.com.


A-4 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014

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Opinion

CLARION P

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Serving the Kenai Peninsula since 1970 VITTO KLEINSCHMIDT Publisher

WILL MORROW������������������������������������������������������������������������ Editor Jane Russell...................... Controller/Human Resources Director LESLIE TALENT................................................... Advertising Director GEOFF LONG.................................................... Production Manager VINCENT NUSUNGINYA.................................... New Media Director Daryl Palmer.................................... IT and Composition Director RANDI KEATON................................................. Circulation Manager A Morris Communications Corp. Newspaper

Voter registration deadline is this weekend While the primary election is still a

month away, there’s an important election season deadline looming: Sunday is the last day to register to vote, update your voter registration or make changes to political party affiliation before the August 19 primary election. Changes made after Sunday will not be effective for the primary. According to the state Division of Elections, voter registration applications are available at any Division of Elections regional office, at municipal clerks’ offices, at the Division of Motor Vehicles, and at many public libraries. Registration applications are also available on the Division of Elections website at www.elections.alaska.gov. The Division of Elections regional offices in Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, Mat-Su, and Nome will be open this weekend to assist voters. Offices will open on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Sunday from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. for voter registration. Those locations aren’t necessarily convenient for Kenai Peninsula residents, but the division also accepts voter registration applications submitted by mail, fax, or e-mail. Noting your party affiliation is important because it will determine which ballot you will receive in Alaska’s closed primary. When voters arrive at polling places or request absentee ballots next month, a choice of three ballots will be available: Any registered voter may vote on the Alaska Democratic Party, Alaska Libertarian Party and Alaskan Independence Party Candidate with Ballot Measures ballot; voters registered as Republican, Nonpartisan or Undeclared may vote on the Alaska Republican Party Candidate with Ballot Measures ballot; and any registered voter may choose the Ballot Measures Only ballot. That means, for example, that if you want to vote for one of the candidates seeking the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate, make sure you’re registered as a Republican, Nonpartisan or Undeclared voter. Otherwise, you’ll need to pick another ballot. Speaking of ballot measures, there is just one on the primary ballot, but it’s a big one — the referendum on oil taxes. A yes vote repeals oil tax changes passed by the Legislature in 2013 in Senate Bill 21; a no vote leaves those changes in place. The full text of the ballot measure is available at http://www. elections.alaska.gov/ei_primary_bm.php. There’s certainly a great deal to consider between now and August 19, but take a moment today to make sure you’re eligible to weigh in on election day.

Letters to the Editor Ninilchik church reaches milestone An amazing mile stone is going to be reached this coming Sunday at the Calvary Baptist Church in Ninilchik. Over 24 years ago in December of 1989 the new pastor Ron Blough started reading through the Bible one chapter per week on Sunday mornings. Pastor Blough remained in Ninilchik for over 15 years and when the now current Pastor Kit Pherson took over in 2005 he continued the tradition. Well, you probably guessed it. This coming Sunday they will be reading Revelation 22, the last chapter of the Bible. Although I am no longer a member of the church, my dad is Ron Blough, and I come to visit every summer and attend services. I think it would be awesome if those reading this could come and experience this special occasion with us. Calvary Baptist, which was founded in the late 1930s, has kept a light shining for Christ for over 70 years. Pastor Ron Blough now resides in Hoonah, but will be phoning in the last reading from his home. The service starts at 10:30 and we would love to see you there. A couple of the verses that will be read from the last chapter kinda say it all. Revelation 22:17 & 21: “And the Spirit and the bride say, Come. And let him that heareth say, Come. And let him that is athirst come. And whosoever will, let him

Start with restrictions, then liberalize fishery In the last few days, I’ve heard a lot of noise about commercial fisherman getting all the dipnetters fish. And of course, as usual, the sport anglers are pointing the finger too! Really? Who gets the fish ... age old question. I guess some things never change! It’s sad, because all this rant sounds a lot like “Me, me, me!” to me! It’s all allocative, which I understand, but what gets lost in all this, with sport vs. personal-use vs. setnets vs. driftnets vs. private angler vs. guide vs. resident angler vs. non-resident angler, etc., is the mighty Kenai king, a critter that currently is a lot like a unicorn. They just are not there, not in any sustainable numbers anyway. Quite frankly, they are on the verge of being gone forever. Seriously folks, what about conservation, as in sustainable fisheries? But, “they” are killing them at such a high rate — but it’s not just “them” in this case, it’s us. Standard openings, as if nothing is wrong, then emergency openings, and then cries for extra time, and then, “What about the personal-use fishermen?” followed by gluttonous river guides and private anglers, and meanwhile, in-river sport anglers are allowed to catch and keep any Kenai king they happen to get, should a minor miracle occur and they actually get one. I’ve guided full-time here for 25 years and know a thing or two about king fishing, yet this year my guests and I have caught and released only 6 Kenai kings, from 3-25 pounds, no less. Yes, I said three pounds! And yes, 25 pounds is our largest so far this year. Where are the world famous giant kings of the Kenai? Virtually gone! So sad that it makes me physically ill. Question: Why isn’t this late run Kenai king fishery total “catch-and-release” from the get-go? Why don’t our managers start sport fishing for kings with next to zero mortality on the front side of the run, until we know we will make our escapement goal, at which time they can implement a

Voices of the

P eninsula G reg B rush

E-mail: news@peninsulaclarion.com

Fax: 907-283-3299 Questions? Call: 907-283-7551

The Peninsula Clarion welcomes letters and attempts to publish all those received, subject to a few guidelines: n All letters must include the writer’s name, phone number and address. n Letters are limited to 500 words and may be edited to fit available space. Letters are run in the order they are received. n Letters addressed specifically to another person will not be printed. n Letters that, in the editor’s judgment, are libelous will not be printed. n The editor also may exclude letters that are untimely or irrelevant to the public interest. n Short, topical poetry should be submitted to Poet’s Corner and will not be printed on the Opinion page. n Submissions from other publications will not be printed. n Applause letters should recognize public-spirited service and contributions. Personal thank-you notes will not be published. C

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and bait. With today’s single hook, no bait, illegal-to-remove-from-the-water restrictions, it is clearly much lower than that. I can honestly say, that not one Kenai king that my guided anglers have caught since 2012, when I voluntarily opted to go to total catch-and-release for all Kenai kings, has died. Proper catch-and-release, done by knowledgeable and caring conservationists, is that effective. But catch-and-release isn’t the end-all/ fix-all; rather, it’s just another tool, one to at least be considered as a way to minimize mortality but still allow opportunity. It’s a viable option. Sadly, sometimes a fishery just needs to be closed. But only if it is for everyone. Before anyone attacks me as being selfserving, me, my family, and my small business are fully prepared and willing to support a full closure, if and when it actually achieves something. It’s got to save some fish to be worth the hardship, otherwise it is simple “feel-good” politics that achieve nothing. In order for me and other knowledgeable sport anglers to buy into a full closure, it has to be coupled with paired restrictions for all users. You can’t close a sport fishery totally and then continue commercial fishing. Nor can you close the early run of Kenai kings to sport fishing and then do little or nothing about the harvest of the same salmon in the open ocean. It is apparent that ADF&G is again throwing conservation of one species aside, in favor of harvest of another which simply translates to the Department, and our politicians, putting allocation, money and votes as priority one. So very sad. So please, if you simply must point your finger at someone, point it at ADF&G. And when crying for more fish for “me,” don’t forget to put conservation of the resource first, before your own personal needs. Our kids deserve it!

‘step up plan’ and liberalize restrictions to where they can then allow some harvest of what would be an actual harvestable surplus? By the third or fourth week of July, when we see that the late run of Kenai kings is ultra-weak, it is impossible to go back and “un-harvest” fish that we’ve already killed. This common sense, non-allocative, conservation-based idea was proposed in writing to the Board of Fish this past winter, by Yours Truly. But of course, given your Board’s makeup and the fact that the process is totally broken, it was defeated. Sad. And so, ADF&G is setting us up for the same scenario as in other years: allow sport king anglers to harvest early as if we have a healthy, sustainable fishery, as if there isn’t a problem, so that commercial fisherman can fish, then suddenly declare that we might not make king escapement, and the department goes from full harvest to total closure, rather than a more conservative and reasonable approach to allow some opportunity but minimize harvest by going to catch-and-release. Before anyone says that in the last week in July, the run shaped up so dire that killing even one king through catch-and-release mortality would be wrong, need I remind you, sport anglers already had harvested kings for over three weeks prior? And netters did their share of damage too. And before someone spews misinformation about the evils of catch-and-release, don’t forget, ADF&G’s very own catch-and-release study cites Kenai king mortality at 5-8 perGreg Brush is a concerned local angler cent, and this was done with multiple hooks and small business owner.

Classic Doonesbury, 1976

Letters to the Editor: Write: Peninsula Clarion P.O. Box 3009 Kenai, AK 99611

the purpose in stealing the sign was to somehow hurt the Begich campaign be assured that it will have just the opposite effect. The theft has inspired us to work even harder for the reelection of Senator Begich. Marilyn Kay Johnson, Sign theft leaves candidate’s Women for Begich supporters undeterred Ralph Van Dusseldorp, Last night someone stole our BeVeterans for Begich gich for Senate sign from our yard. If take the water of life freely. 21 The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you all. Amen.” Paton Blough Greenville, South Carolina

By GARRY TRUDEAU

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Alaska

Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014

A-5

Lawmaker fined $14K for mismanaging campaign funds JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — The minority leader of the Alaska House has agreed to a fine of $14,000 for mismanaging campaign funds. Rep. Chris Tuck, D-Anchorage, acknowledged mixing up campaign contributions with personal savings and not making accurate, timely disclosures. He said it was the result of sloppy accounting — not anything intentional — and said he wishes he’d been more careful. He plans to have an accountant manage his books in the

future. Tuck, who is running unopposed as he seeks a fourth term, signed a consent agreement with the Alaska Public Offices Commission. However, Tuck said he thought the fine was too high. The maximum penalty he faced for the violations was $700,000, but the commission agreed to the lower amount in an effort to match the proportionate harm to the public. The agreement details a tangle of accounting problems,, starting with a 2012 fundraiser

that Tuck didn’t report as a contribution. The commission found Tuck managed campaign funds as a section of his personal banking account and that over the past two election cycles, over $16,000 “flowed” through his personal account and over $11,000 in campaign funds were used for personal expenses. There were so many errors, it was “beyond the expertise of APOC staff” to untangle them, the agreement said. Besides the fine, Tuck must forfeit $6,000 in leftover cam-

paign funds and correct past disclosures. The commission said Tuck took “great efforts” to address the problems once they were raised. Tuck said the campaign funds went toward personal expenditures because he mixed up his debit cards. He said he tried to repay that money immediately. “There was some mistakes there that, yes, they did happen,” says Tuck. “And I regret that they happened. I understand what I did. I’m sorry for

Treadwell joins call to abolish IRS JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Republican U.S. Senate hopeful Mead Treadwell says the IRS should be abolished. Treadwell, who is also Alaska’s lieutenant governor, said the agency has lost the trust of the American people. He said he supports a “fair tax” instead, and would provide a more detailed statement on what that would entail. Treadwell said the Republican candidates were asked about tax policy at a debate in Homer this week. Republican rival Joe Miller also has called for abolishing the IRS and changing the tax code. A spokesman for Republican Dan Sullivan said it’s important to put forth viable solutions to changing the tax code, rather than abolishing entire agencies “for political purposes.”

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Making the leap

AP Photo/Juneau Empire, Michael Penn

In this Wednesday, July 9, 2014 photo, an adult humpback whale breaches in Lynn Canal near Juneau, Alaska. Humpback whale numbers are increasing, although the animal is still listed as endangered as part of the Endangered Species Act.

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making those mistakes.” He said he brought some of the errors mentioned in the agreement to the commission’s attention and that the public wouldn’t have known about them if he hadn’t been cooperative. He said he’s concerned a fine of the size he’s facing could prevent candidates from selfreporting if they make mistakes

in their record keeping. He said it also might discourage people from running for public office. If he had the time and money, he would have taken the case to court, he said. “This is one of the toughest things I have ever gone through,” Tuck said. “I’ve gone through divorce and a custody battle, and this is right up there with that.”

. . . Web

The City’s website is not currently meeting the needs of the community, Queen said. It is challenging for businesses and residents to interact with the city online or get information about the government. The new site will better highlight this information and make it easier to find, she said. The Soldotna City Council appropriated $35,000 for the website re-design project one year ago, as part of last year’s capital budget, Dukowitz said. Development began immediately and the city received 19 proposals from web designers interested in working on the project, Queen said. The city is open to hearing ideas from the public, about information or functions that should be included in the new website, Queen said. While the city has a long wish list of new functions to include, the design team is not yet at the point to make any final decisions. For public inquiries email Dukowitz at hdukowitz@ ci.soldotna.ak.us

Continued from page A-1

In conjunction with the overhaul, the city is working with Soldotna based web designer, Inger Deede of Agnew Beck, to develop a style guide that will be used for all city projects, and eventually incorporated in the final design of the website, Dukowitz said. The style guide will contain elements such as fonts and colors to maintain consistency. “Our goal is that the new site will streamline business operations, provide greater accessibility to city services, and improve transparency and communication,” Dukowitz said. “Part of this is to generate interest among residents, visitors, and investors in the resources and attractions of our area.” Director of Economic Development and Planning Stephanie Queen said attendees at this year’s chamber member appreciation breakfast overwhelmingly identified the city’s webKelly Sullivan can be site as an important resource reached at kelly.sullivan@penfor information about official insulaclarion.com City business.


A-6 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014

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Nation

Fast-growing Washington wildfire burns 2 homes By NICHOLAS K. GERANIOS Associated Press

SPOKANE, Wash. — A fast-growing cluster of wildfires scorching north-central Washington state’s scenic Methow Valley burned at least two homes Thursday, authorities said. The Carlton Complex of fires covers 28 square miles of the valley near the town of Twisp, and is being pushed by high temperatures and strong winds. Fire spokesman Jacob McCann also said there have been unconfirmed reports that eight other homes have burned in the four blazes that make up the complex and noted that “we have extreme fire behavior and rapid growth.” The fires have prompted the closure of Highway 20 at Loup Loup Pass, he said. Meanwhile, another wildfire about 100 miles south chased people from nearly 900 homes as it burned near the Bavarian-themed village of Leavenworth. The Chiwaukum Creek Fire sent a light dusting of ash over Leavenworth, where the German-style motif provides a backdrop to Oktoberfest and a Christmas tree lighting festival. The fire’s smoke plume rose 25,000 feet into the air. The

blaze closed 35 miles of U.S. Highway 2, stretching from Leavenworth to Stevens Pass in the Cascade Mountains. “There’s a huge cloud of smoke above us,” Don Hurst, a retired firefighter who lives just outside of Leavenworth, said Thursday morning. “The winds started to pick up a little. It’s just like snowfall here with the ash coming down. It’s fine ash. We’re getting all this ash fall.” Residents of 860 homes have been told they should leave immediately, fire officials said. Another 800 homes were less seriously threatened. Authorities said Thursday morning that the Chiwaukum Creek Fire has grown to more than 10 square miles. It was first detected Tuesday. “The weather and winds are not in our favor,” said fire spokeswoman Mary Bean. She said temperatures were expected to top 100 degrees with winds gusting to 30 mph in the area Thursday. She said the cause of the fire is under investigation. About 1,000 firefighters were fighting blazes around the state that included the Mills Canyon Fire, the state’s largest at 35 square miles. Worsening wildfire activity has prompted the governor’s offices in both Washington

and Oregon to declare states of emergency, a move that allows state officials to call up the National Guard. Elsewhere across the West: — OREGON: A fire that started Wednesday afternoon in a northeast Oregon field raced quickly across as much as 20,000 acres, or some 30 square miles, before firefighters stopped its advance, the Morrow County sheriff’s office said. Undersheriff Steven Myren said no homes or other buildings were lost, “although the fire did get uncomfortably close to some.” Several other fires have blackened parts of the state. — UTAH: A wildfire encroaching on homes in the Tooele County town of Stockton had burned about 200 acres. Utah Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands spokesman Jason Curry said the fire burned part of a water tower but it’s believed no homes have been destroyed. A 27-year-old Tooele man has been arrested on charges that he ignited the fire with matches. Police said the suspect, Timothy West, was a volunteer firefighter for the town several years ago, Utah Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands spokesman Jason Curry told The Salt Lake Tribune. — IDAHO: In central Idaho, the lightning-caused Preacher

AP Photo/The Seattle Times, Mike Siegel

Plumes of smoke from the Leavenworth wildfire arc in the sky as seen from Highway 2 at Highway 207, west of Leavenworth, Wash. on Thursday. Worsening wildfire activity has prompted the governor’s offices in both Washington and Oregon to declare states of emergency.

Fire has scorched more than 50 square miles, burning quickly through grass and brush. More than 300 personnel have been called in to suppress a wildfire inside the Boise National Forest that tripled in size overnight and is steadily spreading. The lightning-caused Whiskey Complex Fire consumed 7 square miles of forest land as

of Thursday. — CALIFORNIA: Evacuation orders have been called off for several rural homes in Northern California as firefighters took advantage of cool, moist conditions. Some residents near the destructive fire in Shasta County have been advised they may need to evacuate again. The blaze has

burned more than 10,000 acres, or nearly 17 square miles. Marijuana-growing activity led to the fire starting Friday, authorities have said. California fire officials say a body has been found in the area. Authorities say it looks like the victim was trying to flee the fire. No other details about the victim were immediately available.

FedEx charged with assisting illegal pharmacies By PAUL ELIAS Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — Federal authorities on Thursday charged FedEx with assisting illegal pharmacies by knowingly delivering painkillers and dangerous drugs to customers without prescriptions. The indictment filed in federal court in San Francisco alleges that FedEx Corp. conspired with two related online pharmacies for 10 years ending in 2010. The Department of Justice announced the charges in Washington, D.C. It wants FedEx to forfeit $820 million it says the cargo company earned by assisting the illicit pharmacies. The Memphis, Tennesseebased delivery company is accused of shipping powerful sleeping aid Ambien, anti-anx-

iety medications Valium and Xanax, and other drugs to customers who had no legitimate medical need and lacked valid prescriptions. FedEx insists it did nothing wrong. The world’s largest cargo company says it handles 10 million packages a day and shouldn’t be in charge of “assuming criminal responsibility” for every delivery. “We will plead not guilty. We will defend against this attack on the integrity and good name of FedEx and its employees,” company spokesman Patrick Fitzgerald said in a written statement. Fitzgerald said the Drug Enforcement Agency has refused FedEx’s request for a list of online pharmacies under investigation. Without such a list, Fitzgerald said it’s impossible to know which companies are operating

illegally. The Justice Department alleges that federal officials have been telling FedEx since 2004 that it was shipping dangerous drug without a prescription. The indictment also alleges that FedEx couriers in Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia warned executives about suspicious drug deliveries. FedEx first disclosed the federal investigation in a regulatory filing in November 2012. Rival shipping company UPS Inc. paid $40 million last year to resolve similar allegations, and the Atlanta-based company said it would “take steps” to block illicit online drug dealers from using its delivery service. Both companies said in regulatory filings that they were served with grand jury subpoe-

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nas between 2007 and 2009 The investigation of the country’s two largest shippers stems from a blitz against the proliferation of online pharmacies launched in 2005 in San Francisco. Since then, dozens of arrests have been made, thousands of websites shuttered, and tens of millions of dollars and

pills seized worldwide as investigators continue to broaden the probe beyond the operators. The executive director of Express Association of America, a trade group created by FedEx, UPS and three other delivery services, said there is no industry-wide effort to address the policing of prescription drug

deliveries. “It’s not the kind of issue we deal with as an association,” association chief Mike Mullen said. In 2011, Google Inc. agreed to pay $500 million to settle allegations by the Justice Department that it profited from ads for illegal online pharmacies.

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014

A-7

Ruling sparks debate on retroactive gay rights By DAVE COLLINS Associated Press

HARTFORD, Conn. — A new Connecticut Supreme Court ruling is adding to the debate on whether gay marriage rights should be applied retroactively and qualify same-sex couples for rights and benefits for which they weren’t entitled before state laws allowed them to marry. Although no states that allow gay marriage have made their laws retroactive, many same-sex partners believe they should have received Social Security survivor payments, tax breaks, inheritances and other benefits that were afforded only to heterosexual married couples before gay marriage laws were passed. The Connecticut high court ruled unanimously Wednesday that a woman whose wife died amid a medical malpractice case may sue a doctor over the

loss of her wife’s companionship and income, even though that right to sue was limited to heterosexual married couples at the time. Legal experts called the decision the first of its kind in the country. John Thomas, a professor at the Quinnipiac University School of Law, believes the ruling opened a door to all kinds of new legal claims by same-sex couples seeking benefits and rights they weren’t entitled to before gay marriage laws were passed. If the U.S. Supreme Court ever declares gay marriage constitutional, he said, the legal floodgates would open. “I think what the court recognized is that constitutional rights don’t spring into existence in one moment of time,” Thomas said. “I would expect to see a number of similar lawsuits in other states.” Thomas and gay rights lawyers say the issue of retroac-

tive gay marriage rights hasn’t made it to the nation’s courts yet for the most part, but they expect to see it spring up in the not-so-distant future in states across the country. While the Connecticut court did not make its 2008 approval of gay marriage retroactive, it expanded common law to give gays and lesbians the right to sue over the death of a partner. “Because there was a time when many same-sex couples couldn’t marry, they were subjected to a whole range of unfair treatment under the law and this decision is really a great step forward,” said Ben Klein, a lawyer for Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders in Boston. “We have these remnants from the past that the court, at least in this one instance, has rectified.” Groups that oppose gay marriage, including the Family Research Council in Washington, D.C., are against making gay

‘This decision could open the floodgates to claims for retroactive benefits in an almost unlimited number of areas.’ — Peter Sprigg, Family Research Council marriage rights retroactive. “This decision could open the floodgates to claims for retroactive benefits in an almost unlimited number of areas,” said Peter Sprigg, senior fellow for policy studies at the Family Research Council. “Connecticut has no obligation to pay reparations to homosexuals for having maintained the natural definition of marriage until 2008.” Same-sex marriage is now legal in 19 states and the District of Columbia, while gay marriage bans that have been overturned in some other states continue to make their way through the courts.

The Connecticut case involved Margaret Mueller and Charlotte Stacey, insurance industry workers who lived in Stamford and Norwalk. They had a civil union in Connecticut in 2005 and got married in Massachusetts in 2008 after 23 years together under that state’s gay marriage law, shortly before Connecticut approved gay marriage. Mueller was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2001. In 2005, however, Mueller and Stacey learned the diagnosis was wrong and she actually had appendix cancer. Mueller died in 2009 at age 62. Stacey said her death could have been pre-

vented if the original diagnosis had been correct. Mueller sued for malpractice. After her death, a jury issued a $2.4 million verdict in her favor against one of her doctors, while another doctor settled for an undisclosed amount. The trial court and the state Appellate Court, however, ruled against Stacey in her effort to sue a doctor for loss of spousal “consortium,” saying Stacey and Mueller weren’t married as required under the law at the time of the malpractice. Massachusetts is the only other state where such a case was debated, legal experts say. That state’s highest court ruled in 2008 against a lesbian widow seeking to sue for loss of consortium, saying Massachusetts’ gay marriage law wasn’t retroactive and that a ruling in her favor “could open numbers of cases in all areas of law to the same argument.”

Deal reached, strike by NY commuter rail workers averted By FRANK ELTMAN Associated Press

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NEW YORK — After four years of negotiations — and weeks of fretting by 300,000 daily riders about a possible strike — unions and management at the nation’s largest commuter railroad reached a tentative contract agreement Thursday. The deal announced by Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who personally got involved in the final hours of the negotiations, gives Long Island Rail Road workers a 17 percent pay raise over six and a half years but requires them to contribute to their health care costs for the first time. Cuomo, who is running for a second term in November, hailed the deal as a compromise that protects workers and riders because it calls for no additional fare hikes. “There was a high degree of agita,” the governor said of nervousness over the negotiations. “The good news is there could have been a lot more agita next week” if there had been a strike. Eight unions representing 5,400 Long Island Rail Road workers had threatened to walk off the job at 12:01 a.m. Sunday. The workers had been seeking a

‘All riders feel relief at the announcement of this settlement.’ — Mark Epstein, community advocacy group chairman new deal since 2010. Commuters at Penn Station in Manhattan expressed relief that they would not have to seek transportation alternatives. “I was really concerned,” said Sibel Aras of Port Washington. “It’s really good news. I’m happy for them. They deserve it.” Manhattan attorney Douglas Bartner said he was pleased Cuomo stepped in. “His taking last minute efforts to avert what could be a crisis is good, whatever it takes,” Bartner said. “It got done. I hope the terms are fair to employees.” According to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, the LIRR’s parent organization, the typical salary for a Long Island Rail Road worker is $65,000, and with overtime annual earnings average $85,000. A round-trip peak ticket from central Nassau County to Manhattan currently costs $25 a day; an unlimited

trip monthly ticket is $276. “Both sides have compromised to reach an agreement that gives our employees the raises they deserve while also providing for the MTA’s long-term financial stability,” said Thomas Prendergast, the MTA chairman. Chief union negotiator Anthony Simon said his membership was reluctant to strike, but a tough stance was necessary in order to get an agreement. “This was definitely about the riders,” Simon said. “We cared about the financial stability of the railroad as well as the members and their financial stability.” Officials in New York City and Long Island had predicted dire consequences if workers walked off the job. “All riders feel relief at the announcement of this settle-

ment,” said Mark Epstein, chairman of a commuter advocacy group. “We are encouraged by Gov. Cuomo’s assurances on fares and the MTA’s ability to fund its capital program and look forward to reviewing additional details on the settlement and the way in which it will be funded.” Earlier this week it appeared a strike was imminent when union negotiators and MTA officials said that they had reached an impasse. Commuters fretted over contingency plans that would have had many riding school buses from LIRR stations to subway stops in New York City, or spending hours on clogged New York area roadways. Cuomo, a Democrat who is running for re-election, jumpstarted the talks on Wednesday when he appealed to both sides to resume negotiating. The governor held discussions with the sides later that day and on Thursday morning summoned them to his office. The state comptroller, Thomas DiNapoli, had estimated a

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strike would be a “devastating blow” to a region causing economic losses of $50 million a day. While commuters were relieved by the deal, few were likely as happy as Mayor Bill de Blasio. The mayor had been criticized for planning to be out of town on a vacation in Italy starting Friday.

Before the agreement was announced Thursday, de Blasio said at event in Brooklyn that he thought the contingency plan for a possible strike was strong and that the impact would have been felt strongest outside the city limit. “He can take his vacation to Italy,” Cuomo said. “I hope he enjoys it. I’m a tad envious.”


A-8 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014

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World

Disaster strikes again for airline Afghan ballot Malaysia Airlines flight shot down over Ukraine

By CHRIS BRUMMITT Associated Press

HANOI, Vietnam — Two Boeing 777s. Two incredibly rare aviation disasters. And one airline. In what appears to be a mind-boggling coincidence, Malaysia is reeling from the second tragedy to hit its national airline in less than five months. On March 8, a Malaysia Airlines jetliner vanished about an hour after taking off from Kuala Lumpur, spawning an international mystery that remains unsolved. On Thursday, the airline — and the nation — were pitched into another crisis after the same type of aircraft was reported shot down over Ukraine. Ukraine said the plane was brought down by a missile over the violence-wracked eastern part of the country. Other details were only just beginning to emerge. But what’s certain is that the struggling airline and the nation must now prepare for another agonizing encounter with grief, recriminations, international scrutiny and serious legal and diplomatic implications. “This is a tragic day in what has already been a tragic year for Malaysia,” Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak said. Amid it all, a question: Just how could disaster strike the airline twice in such a short space of time? “Either one of these events has an unbelievably low probability,” said John Cox, president and CEO of Safety Operating Systems and a former airline pilot and accident investigator. “To have two in a just a few months of each other is certainly unprecedented.” The first disaster deeply scarred Malaysia and left the world dumbstruck. How could a Boeing 777-200ER, a modern jumbo jet, simply disappear? Flight 370 had veered off course during a flight to Beijing and is believed to have crashed in the Indian Ocean far off the western Australian coast. The search area has changed several times, but no sign of the aircraft, or the 239 people aboard, has been found. Until

audit starts By AMIR SHAH Associated Press

AP Photo/Joshua Paul

A woman reacts to news regarding a Malaysia Airlines plane that crashed in eastern Ukraine at Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang, Malaysia, Friday. Malaysia Airlines said it lost contact with Flight 17 over Ukrainian airspace Thursday. It was flying from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

then, how the plane got there is likely to remain a mystery. On Thursday, there was no mystery over the whereabouts of the Boeing 777200ER, which went down on a flight from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur with 283 passengers and 15 crew members. Its wreckage was found in Ukraine, and there were no survivors. Officials said the plane was shot down at an altitude of 10,000 meters (33,000 feet.) The region has seen severe fighting between Ukrainian forces and pro-Russia separatists in recent days. “If it transpires that the plane was indeed shot down, we insist that the perpetrators must swiftly be brought to justice,” Malaysia’s prime minister said. Malaysia Airlines was widely criticized for the way it handled the Flight 370 hunt and investigation. Some relatives of those on board accused the airline of engaging in a cover-up, and there have been persistent conspiracy theories over the fate of the plane, including that it might have been shot down. There was no immediate reason to think the two disasters to befall the airline were in any way linked. Najib said the plane’s flight

‘Either one of these events has an unbelievably low probability.’ — John Cox, Safety Operating Systems route had been declared safe by the global civil aviation body. And Cox said that to his knowledge, there was no prohibition against flying over eastern Ukraine despite the fighting on the ground. Charles Oman, a lecturer at the department of aeronautics and astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said it was too early to draw conclusions. “Given the military conflict in the region, one has to be concerned that identities could have been mistaken,” he said in an email. Malaysia Airlines was especially criticized for the way it handled the communications around the missing jetliner, which presented unique challenges because of the uncertainty facing the relatives of those on board. With the plane crashing Thursday over land and its wreckage already located, there will be no such uncertainty. But the investigation will be just as sensitive. There will be legal and diplomatic im-

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plications depending on who was responsible. “The airline and the Malaysian transport ministry took a lot of hits for the way they handled MH370, due to their inexperience,” Oman said. “Hopefully they will do better this time.” The accident will surely inflict more financial damage on Malaysia Airlines. Even before the March disaster, it reported losses because of stiff competition from budget airlines. Afterward, passengers canceled flights, and even though the airline is insured, it faces uncertainty over payouts to the victims’ families. Chris Brummitt is the AP’s Southeast Asia news editor and directed the coverage of Flight 370 disaster from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

KABUL, Afghanistan — Afghanistan’s election commission began auditing ballots Thursday following a U.S.-brokered deal between the two presidential contenders while a brazen attack on the Kabul airport underscored the dangers the country still faces in its troubled democracy. The pre-dawn rocket attack on Kabul International Airport temporarily shut down the facility and set off a gunbattle with security forces in which four attackers were killed, officials said. The militants occupied two buildings that were under construction some 700 meters (yards) north of the facility and used them to direct rockets and gunfire toward the airport and international jet fighters flying over Kabul, said Afghan army Gen. Afzal Aman. Several rockets hit the airport but no planes were damaged, he added. Kabul Police Chief Mohammed Zahir Zahir said four of the attackers were killed and that the attack was halted without any civilian or police casualties. The airport later reopened and operations returned to normal, Zahir said. Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid claimed responsibility for the pre-dawn assault in a call to The Associated Press. The airport hosts civilian traffic and serves as a base for NATO-led forces that have been fighting the Taliban and other insurgents for more than a decade. Rocket attacks near the airport are not rare, but are not usually this close. The attack comes at a tense time in Afghanistan in the aftermath of the disputed second round of a presidential election seen as key to insuring a peaceful transfer of power ahead of the with-

drawal of most foreign troops by the end of the year. Unofficial and disputed preliminary results showed former Finance Minister Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai well ahead of his rival, former Foreign Minister Abdullah Abdullah. But since fraud was alleged on both sides, the deal negotiated over the weekend by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry provides that every one of the 8 million ballots will be audited under national and international supervision over the next three or four weeks. “At today’s kickoff, 33 boxes were audited, each in the presence of international and domestic observers,” State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki told reporters in Washington. “And the first day of audits proceeded professionally, sending a good tone for the process.” The prolonged uncertainty about the outcome of the election, along with a Taliban spring offensive seeking to undermine the Westernbacked government, had jeopardized a central plank of President Barack Obama’s strategy to leave behind a stable state after the withdrawal of most U.S. troops at year’s end. There has been increased urgency for the Afghan government to sign a security pact with the United States that would allow nearly 10,000 American forces to stay in the country for two more years. Outgoing President Hamid Karzai, who was constitutionally barred from seeking a third term has refused to sign the deal, saying he would leave it to his successor. Both Abdullah and Ahmadzai have promised to sign the pact, known as the Bilateral Security Agreement. “We still feel comfortable with the timeline to sign the BSA,” said Psaki.

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014

Bolivia legalizes child labor at age 10

Around the World First wolf pups born in Mexico wilderness MEXICO CITY — The first known litter of Mexican gray wolves has been born in the wild as part of a threeyear effort to re-introduce the subspecies to a habitat where it disappeared three decades ago, Mexican officials reported Thursday. Mexico’s National Commission for Natural Protected Areas said the wolf pups were sighted in June by a team of researchers in the western Sierra Madre mountains. “This first litter represents an important step in the recovery program, because these will be individuals that have never had contact with human beings, as wolves bred in captivity inevitably do,” the commission said in a statement. It said the pups appeared to be doing well.

United Nations to hold meeting on Ukraine UNITED NATIONS — The U.N. Security Council will hold an emergency meeting Friday morning on Ukraine. Britain’s U.N. Mission said Thursday it requested the meeting and later tweeted that it is set for 10 a.m. Friday. The request follows Wednesday’s downing of a Ukrainian air force fighter and Thursday’s downing of a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane carrying 295 people over eastern Ukraine. Britain has proposed a Security Council press statement calling for “a full, thorough and independent international investigation into the incident.” The statement, obtained by The Associated Press, was circulated to all 15 council members, who must approve it before it can be issued.

French train collision leaves 25 injured PARIS — French authorities say that two trains carrying a total of 238 passengers have collided near the southwestern French city of Pau, injuring 25. A national TGV train bound for Paris collided head-on with a regional train Thursday during the evening commute in the town of Deguin, said Pyrenees-Atlantiques prefectural spokesman Patrice Abbadie. It was not immediately clear what caused the collision. Emergency services including ambulances, helicopters and fire engines were dispatched to the scene.

Hearings to begin in Guam stabbing case HAGATNA, Guam — Jurors are expected to begin deliberating Friday in a murder trial against a man accused of killing three Japanese tourists in a crash and stabbing rampage in Guam. Closing arguments ended Thursday with Chad Ryan DeSoto’s public defender reiterating his client’s mental illness defense. DeSoto has pleaded not guilty by reason of mental disease or defect to charges of aggravated murder and attempted murder. Prosecutors say the 22-year-old knew what he was doing when he barreled his car down a sidewalk, crashed into a convenience store, then got out and stabbed bystanders. Eleven others, including two children, were injured in last year’s attack in a busy tourist spot. — Associated Press

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A-9

By PAOLA FLORES Associated Press

EL ALTO, Bolivia — Alicia weaves through El Alto’s stalled traffic under a blazing sun, hawking colorful woven flowers to grumpy drivers and lovers. With luck, the 12-year-old and her mother will together muster $18 by day’s end, all the while keeping watch over her younger brother and sister, ages 8 and 6. “It is difficult for my mother to sell alone because she has to look after my siblings,” said Alicia, who normally goes to school in the afternoon but is using her vacation to help her mother by working the entire day. As her siblings sleep, her mother knits the flowers that Alicia sells. While most of the world is trying to diminish child labor, Bolivia has become the first nation to legalize it from age 10. Congress approved the legislation early this month, and Vice President Alvaro Garcia signed it into law Thursday in the absence of President Evo Morales, who was traveling. The bill’s sponsors say lowering the minimum work age from 14 simply acknowledges

a reality: Many poor families in Bolivia have no other choice than for their kids to work. The bill offers working children safeguards, they say. “Child labor already exists in Bolivia and it’s difficult to fight it. Rather than persecute it, we want to protect the rights and guarantee the labor security of children,” said Sen. Adolfo Mendoza, one of the bill’s sponsors. Under the legislation, 10-year-olds will be able to work as long as they are under parental supervision and also attend school. It sets 12 as the minimum age for a child to work under contract. They also would have to attend school. “To eliminate work for boys and girls would be like eliminating people’s social conscience,” Morales said in December in support of unionized young workers who marched on Congress to prevent it from ratifying a bottom-end work age of 14. “The president gave us his support. He also worked as a boy, herding llamas,” Rodrigo Medrano, head of the Union of Boy, Girl and Adolescent Workers, told The Associated Press. He said there is no alternative in a society where half the population is poor.

Jo Becker, the children’s rights advocacy director at New York-based Human Rights Watch, disagrees. “Bolivia’s move is out of step with the rest of the world,” she said. “Child labor may be seen as a short-term solution to economic hardship, but is actually a cause of poverty.” Becker said people who start work as children end up with less education and lower earnings as adults. They are then more likely to send their own children to work, perpetuating the cycle of poverty. Bolivia should instead invest in ways to lift families out of poverty, she said. It already does in a limited way, paying a per-child subsidy of $28 a year to families whose children attend school. Carmen Moreno, an International Labor Organization official working to reduce child labor, said Bolivia’s law contravenes a U.N. convention designating 14 as the minimum work age. It also runs against the regional current. Mexico has set age 15 as the minimum and Chile age 16, Moreno said. The U.N. agency says child labor is down one-third globally since 2000, with Latin America and the Caribbean together ac-

counting now for just 13 million of the planet’s estimated 168 million working children. A 2008 study done by the ILO and Bolivian government found that 850,000 children ages 5 to 17 were working in Bolivia, roughly half in the countryside and half in the cities. Nearly nine in 10 were in the worst kinds of jobs, including sugar cane harvesting and underground mining, a proven life-shortener. More recent statistics are lacking, but it’s estimated that 1 million Bolivian children work regularly, accounting for 15 percent of the workforce. They toil in textiles, on farms and as street vendors, coca leaf pickers and porters at markets. One in three don’t attend school, studies show. For Alicia, a childhood of play and leisure is not an option, especially since her father died two years ago. She says some days she is so tired from standing constantly that studying is difficult. “There are days when I want to go out and have fun like those children I see go to the movie theater, but I see the effort my mother makes and I forget about all that,” she said. “How can I rest when she doesn’t?”

Ex-Colombia minister jailed on corruption By JOSHUA GOODMAN Associated Press

BOGOTA, Colombia — A close ally of former President Alvaro Uribe was sentenced in absentia Thursday to more than 17 years in prison for diverting farm subsidies in one of the most prominent corruption cases tied to Uribe’s conservative administration. Colombia’s Supreme Court handed down the sentence against former Agriculture Minister Andres Felipe Arias, who was found guilty taking money intended for small-scale farmers and channeling it to some of the country’s richest landowners. Arias, who is believed to be in

the United States, has denied any wrongdoing. The case is just one of a number of investigations against former officials that Uribe says are being urged on by President Juan Manuel Santos. The claim underscores the bitter feuding between the two former allies that dominated last month’s presidential election and that is likely to continue when the still-powerful Uribe takes up a seat in the Senate on Sunday. Among Uribe allies facing charges are the former president’s top legal adviser and a former peace commissioner in his 2002-10 U.S.-backed administration. The former head of Colombia’s disbanded secret intelli-

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gence agency is serving a 25-year sentence for ties to paramilitary groups and Santos’ government is also seeking the extradition of another Uribe spy chief, Maria del PIlar Hurtado, who fled to Panama after being charged with deploying illegal wiretaps on Supreme Court justices, journalists and human rights activists. Uribe said in a statement that Arias is the victim of “political persecution” by the Santos administration. Legal experts have also questioned the stiff sentencing, pointing out that there was no evidence Arias benefited financially from the bogus land deals. Arias has long been a divisive figure, earning the nickname

“Uribito,” or “little Uribe,” for his loyalty to his political boss, who tried to promote him as a successor before throwing his support behind Santos. Arias already served two years in jail as a result of the investigation but he was paroled last year. Colombia’s government said that Arias recently visited Colombia’s consulate in Miami, where they believe he is residing, and that officials would request his deportation if he failed to turn himself in. Kevin Whitaker, the U.S. ambassador to Colombia, declined to comment, telling reporters in Bogota that an extradition such request would be evaluated in accordance with U.S. law.


A-10 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014

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Religion

Needed: People to help carry the load V I R

n his helpful book, “Strength of Soul,” W. Phillip Keller says one of the most compelling invitations ever extended by God to man came when the Lord said quietly, “Come unto Me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest,” (Matthew 11:28). He then explains that we don’t have to go far to find those laboring along with profound personal problems, carrying heavy loads which weigh them down in despair, frustration and grief. Our responsibility is to be alert to their needs and respond to them. I once received a call from someone facing an urgent financial need. I was glad for the opportunity to help. Let me tell you why: Preceding the call for help I had read Proverbs 3:26-27: “Do not withhold

Church Briefs Soldotna Church of God hosts Destiny Conference

earlier. September 18, 1957, found us oices of serving our first church. We had three eligion children and were awaiting the birth of another but had no health insurance and didn’t know how we would Roger C ampbell pay the hospital expenses for the birth of this fourth child. On that very day, good from those to whom it is due, a letter arrived from people in another when it is in the power of your hand community, who knew nothing about to do so. Do not say to your neighthe soon arrival of another child, bor, ‘Go and come back and tomor- saying they had sold their farm and row I will give it,’ when you have it that God had let them know we had with you.” a special need. These caring ones This clear Biblical text reminded had thoughtfully enclosed a generous me of my responsibility to be a check. load lifter, loosening my grip on The baby was born that night and funds that could help and allowing the check sent was within five dollars me to be part of a miracle; actually of the amount of the hospital bill; two of them: later in the day a man making them our heaven-sent load placed a check in my hand amount- lifters. ing to nearly the amount I had given When concluding a telephone

conversation with a customer service representative of a bank, I said, “Have a wonderful day and remember God loves you!” “Thank you for saying that,” she replied, her voice trembling. “Are you going through a tough time?” I asked. She was. And within moments we were praying together. I mailed a helpful book to her; one intended to replace loads with love. Tired and troubled people are everywhere. We meet them every day. Some are standing in checkout lines or at cash registers. Others deliver mail or drive fire trucks. Some show their sorrows or stresses in their appearance and others are in happy disguises, choosing to keep their problems to themselves.

We’re deputized by our loving Lord to always be looking for these weary ones so we can personally pass on His load-lifting invitation to come and find rest. When we have no money to give, we can pray for those in need and simply say, “Have a wonderful day and remember God loves you!” He does and will likely send a miracle their way through another able messenger. Even then, you’ll have helped lift a load through your love and prayers. Roger Campbell is an author, a broadcaster and columnist who was a pastor for 22 years. He can be reached at rcministry@ameritech. net.

For more information contact the church office at 283-7868 A Blue Grass jam will follow the Kenai service beginning at or email kumcalaska@gmail.com. about 1:00 p.m.

Free snow boots available

Clothes 4 U at First Baptist Church

Peninsula Christian Center at 161 Farnsworth, Soldotna, will First Baptist Church Soldotna, located at 159 S. Binkley be giving away free snow boots for kids kindergarten through Street, is re-opening its Clothes 4 U program. It is open on the Soldotna Church of God’s annual Destiny Conference high school at 1 p.m. on July 26 on a first come, first served second and fourth Saturday of each month from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. runs through Sunday. Come listen to speakers from across All clothing and shoes are free to the public. the country, including Rick Benjamin, Stan Holder, Kent basis. Redfearn, Kevin Goff, Shon Burchett and Worship music with Frank Montgomery from Christian Faith Center in Se- Vacation Bible schools Clothes Quarters open weekly attle. Learn about Loving God, Loving Others and Loving Clothes Quarters at Our Lady of the Angels Church is open n Birch Ridge Community Church will have Vacation Bible Life. The church will be hosting its Weird Animals VBS during this time, so bring your kids and let them have some wild School on August 4-8 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Our theme is Flight every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., and the first Saturday and wacky Weird Animals fun while you Invest in yourself. School, and kids ages 4-5th grades are welcome. Call 260-6705 of every month from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, call 907-283-4555. The Soldotna Church of God is located at the corner of Re- for more information. doubt and Binkley. Conference and VBS events are Sunday evenings at 6 p.m. and weekdays at 10:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. Food Pantry open weekly Apostolic Assembly of Call 262-4729 for more information or visit ahopeforthefuThe Soldotna Food Pantry is open every Wednesday from Jesus Christ plans carnival ture.org. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. for residents in our community who may be Apostolic Assembly of Jesus Christ Sunday School is hostexperiencing food shortages. The Food Pantry is located at the ing a free end of the summer Carnival 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Feeding of the 5,000 updated Soldotna United Methodist Church at 158 South Binkley Street. August 24 where kids can participate in fun activities like a cupJanice Nightingale and Kathy Kane Lobell will leading the Non-perishable food items or monetary donations may be cake walk, face painting, build your own picture frames, and worship service, along with other United Methodist Women, at dropped off at the church Tuesdays 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednes- also enjoy hot dogs, chips and ice cream. Register by August the North Star United Methodist Church and the Kenai United days 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. or 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. and Sundays 9 a.m. to 22. The carnival will be at Apostolic Assembly of Jesus Christ Methodist Church Sunday. The service will focus on a modern 12 noon. Thank you for your support. Sunday School (Mile Post 89 on Sterling Highway – turn right day version of the Feeding of the 5,000 based on Mark 6:38on Murray Lane by Zimco Construction). 44. For more information, contact Tracey at 262-1423 or Sherry United Methodist Church provides food pantry North Star United Methodist Church is located at mile 25.5 at 262-0853 for registration. If kids need a ride to AAJC Sunday on the Kenai Spur Highway in Nikiski. Their Sunday worship The Kenai United Methodist Church provides a food pantry School, please call Jeremiah at 398-1184. begins at 9:30 a.m. Kenai United Methodist Church is located at for those in need every Monday from noon to 3 p.m. The Meth607 Frontage Road across from Wells Fargo Bank in Kenai. The odist Church is located on the Kenai Spur Highway next to the Submit church announcements to news@peninsulaclarion. Kenai United Methodists begin their worship service at 11:30 Boys and Girls Club. The entrance to the Food Pantry is through com. a.m. the side door. The Pantry closes for holidays.

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014

Police reports

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n On June 20 at 7:12 p.m., the Alaska State Troopers Bureau of Highway Patrol, South Central Team, stopped a 2014 Nissan Rogue at Mile 66.5 Sterling Highway, near Sterling, after the driver was observed speeding. Investigation revealed that Robert Darnell, 66, of Georgia, was driving without a valid license. Darnell was issued a misdemeanor citation for no valid operator’s license and released on scene. n On June 21 at 7:57 p.m., the Alaska State Troopers Bureau of Highway Patrol, South Central Team, stopped a 1988 Chevy Blazer at the intersection of the Sterling Highway and the Kenai Spur Highway in Soldotna, after the vehicle was observed displaying expired registration. Investigation revealed that Amanda Warren, 46, of Kasilof, was driving under the influence of a controlled substance. Warren was arrested for driving under the influence and held on $500 bail at Wildwood Pretrial Facility. n On July 1, Soldotna wildlife troopers contacted Courtney Edwards, 53, of Anchorage, at the Kasilof River. Investigation showed that Edwards had taken personal use salmon and had failed to mark the fish by cutting the tails prior to leaving the fishing site or concealing the fish from view. Edwards was cited into Kenai Court, with bail of $85. n On July 2, wildlife troopers in Soldotna issued a citation to Troy Hines, 52, of Ninilchik, for failing to log his harvest of sockeye salmon from the Kasilof River on his Upper Cook Inlet personal use salmon fishery permit. Hines received a $110 fine. n On July 2, Soldotna wildlife troopers contacted Calvin Thomas, 59, of Anchorage, at the Kasilof River. Investigation showed that Thomas had taken personal use salmon and had failed to record the fish on his permit prior to leaving the fishing site or concealing the fish from view. Thomas was cited into Kenai Court, with bail of $110. n On July 2 at 2:43 p.m. the Alaska State Troopers Bureau of Highway Patrol, South Central Team, stopped a 1998 Jeep Cherokee at Mile 73 of the Sterling Highway, near Sterling, after the vehicle was observed speeding while traveling southbound. Investigation revealed that Robert Poggas, 77, of Anchorage, was in possession of marijuana. Poggas was issued a summons to appear in Kenai Court for sixthdegree misconduct involving a controlled substance. n On July 2 at 4:25 p.m., troopers took a report of a theft of a purse from a vehicle parked at the Rainbow Trailhead near Mile 112 of the Seward Highway. Anyone with information about the theft is asked to contact the Alaska State Troopers in Girdwood at 783-0970. n On July 4 at 2:34 p.m., troopers stopped a blue Chevrolet Blazer at Thurmond’s Auto in Anchor Point for having been called in as a REDDI Report Every Dangerous Driver Immediately vehicle. Investigation revealed that Sharlene Crumley, 43, of Anchor Point, was operating the motor vehicle while under the influence of drugs. Further investigation revealed that Crumley was acting in violation of prior release conditions. Crumley was arrested for driving under the influence and violating conditions of release and taken to the Homer Police Department. The vehicle was released to a licensed driver. n On July 4 at about 1:10 p.m., the Alaska State Troopers Bureau of Highway Patrol, South Central Team, stopped a

1999 Saturn Sedan at the intersection of the Seward Highway and the Old Seward Highway in Seward, after the vehicle was observed speeding. Investigation revealed that William Spiers, 50, of Seward had a warrant for his arrest for failing to appear for failure to maintain liability insurance. Spiers was arrested and held on $250 bail at the Seward Jail. n On July 4, Soldotna wildlife troopers issued a citation to Michael Kim, 29, of Anchorage, for personal use fishing in the closed waters of the Kasilof River below the Alaska Department of Fish and Game regulatory markers. Bail was set at $210 in Kenai District Court. n On July 4, Soldotna wildlife troopers issued a citation to Maynard P. Wilson, 49, of Anchorage, for personal use fishing in the closed waters of the Kasilof River below the Alaska Department of Fish and Game regulatory markers. Bail was set at $210 in Kenai District Court. n On July 4, Soldotna wildlife troopers issued a citation to Vue Xiong, 57, of Anchorage, for personal use fishing in the closed waters of the Kasilof River below the Alaska Department of Fish and Game regulatory markers. Bail was set at $210 in Kenai District Court. n On July 4, Soldotna wild-

life troopers issued a citation to David W. Roberts, 29, of Eagle River, for personal use fishing in the closed waters of the Kasilof River below the Alaska Department of Fish and Game regulatory markers. Bail was set at $210 in Kenai District Court. n On July 4, Soldotna wildlife troopers issued a citation to Robert Terzioski, 28, of Barrow, for personal use fishing in the closed waters of the Kasilof River below the Alaska Department of Fish and Game regulatory markers. Bail was set at $210 in Kenai District Court. n On July 4, Soldotna wildlife troopers issued a citation to John C. Tubon, 47, of Eagle River, for personal use fishing in the closed waters of the Kasilof River below the Alaska Department of Fish and Game regulatory markers. Bail was set at $210 in Kenai District Court. n On July 4, Soldotna wildlife troopers issued a citation to Clifford M. Michael, 29, of Wasilla, for personal use fishing in the closed waters of the Kasilof River below the Alaska Department of Fish and Game regulatory markers. Bail was set at $210 in Kenai District Court. n On July 4, Alaska Wildlife Troopers contacted Dwight Mackley, 45, of Anchorage, dipnetting near the mouth of the Kasilof River in closed waters.

He was issued a citation for personal use fishing in closed waters, with the bail set at $210. n On July 4, wildlife troopers in Soldotna issued a citation to Robert Avezac, 41, of Anchorage, for dipnetting on the Kasilof River in a closed area. Avezac received a $210 fine. n On July 4, wildlife troopers in Soldotna issued a citation to Dadang Kurina, 40, of Anchorage, for dipnetting on the Kasilof River in a closed area. Kurina received a $210 fine. n On July 4, wildlife troopers in Soldotna issued a citation to Teisina Huakau, 30, of Anchorage, for dipnetting on the Kasilof River in a closed area. Huakau received a $210 fine. n On July 4, wildlife troopers in Soldotna issued a citation to Mary Lang, 49, of Anchorage, for dipnetting on the Kasilof River in a closed area. Lang received a $210 fine. n On July 4, wildlife troopers in Soldotna issued a citation to Michael Anagick, 25, of Anchorage, for dipnetting on the Kasilof River in a closed area. Anagick received a $210 fine. n On July 5 at 12:13 a.m., Alaska State Troopers conducted a traffic stop for a moving violation near Fourth Avenue in Seward. Investigation revealed that Bradley Hulen, 44, of Sterling, was impaired by alcoholic

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beverages. He was arrested for driving under the influence and taken to the Seward Jail on $500 bail. n On July 5 at 4:22 p.m., the Alaska State Troopers Bureau of Highway Patrol, South Central Team, stopped a 2007 Chevy Silverado at Mile 11 of the Seward Highway, near Seward, after the vehicle was observed speeding. Investigation revealed that Danny Parsons 63, of Anchorage, was driving with a cancelled license. He was issued a summons to appear in Seward Court for driving while license cancelled. n On July 5 at 6:53 p.m., the Alaska State Troopers Bureau of Highway Patrol, South Central Team, stopped a 2008 Chevy Trailblazer at Mile 37 of the Seward Highway, near Cooper Landing, after the vehicle was observed speeding. Investigation revealed that Ashaki Rutledge, 38, of Anchorage was driving with a suspended license. Rutledge was issued a summons to appear in Seward Court for driving while license suspended. n On July 5, Soldotna wildlife troopers issued a citation to Lori R. Kennedy, 47, of Anchorage, for personal use fishing in the closed waters of the Kasilof River below the Alaska Department of Fish and Game regulatory markers. Bail was set at

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$210 in Kenai District Court. n On July 5, Soldotna wildlife troopers issued a citation to Nicholas Perry, 31, of Eagle River, for personal use fishing in the closed waters of the Kasilof River below the Alaska Department of Fish and Game regulatory markers. Bail was set at $210 in Kenai District Court. n On July 5, Soldotna wildlife troopers issued a citation to Lorenzo A. Lazaro, 40, of Anchorage, for personal use fishing in the closed waters of the Kasilof River below the Alaska Department of Fish and Game regulatory markers. Bail was set at $210 in Kenai District Court. n On July 6, Soldotna Alaska Wildlife Troopers issued a citation to Gerardosantos Hernandez, 31, of Anchorage, for failing to record personal use caught salmon. Bail was set at $110 in Kenai District Court. n On July 6, Soldotna wildlife troopers issued a citation to Daniel Angel, 37, of Anchorage, for failing to mark personal use caught salmon. Bail was set at $85 in Kenai District Court. n On July 6, Soldotna wildlife troopers issued a citation to John Yang, 24, of Anchorage, for unlawful methods and means/ dipnetting Dolly Varden. Bail was set at $130 in Kenai District Court. The fish was seized and donated to a local charity.


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A-12 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014

. . . Kings Continued from page A-1

Begich said managers were hopeful that the passage rate would “come up quite a bit.” Fishing with barbed hooks is still permissible with other species on the Kenai River including red salmon, rainbow trout and Dolly Varden. The barbless hook regulation, a new one for the Kenai River and for the state, was

. . . Reds Continued from page A-1

For the setnetters, who fish from the beach, this means that they’ll likely get their nets in the water for one 12-hour period or two 6-hour periods a week. For the drifters, who fish from boats, the corridors reduce their efficiency at catching sockeye to about a quarter of what it would be if they were let loose in their former fishing area. “It will be difficult if the run returns as forecasted,” said commercial area management biologist Pat Shields. Whether the commercial fleet can be fished enough to be a useful tool in controlling salmon escapement depends on

passed during the final day of the Alaska Board of Fisheries meeting on the Upper Cook Inlet. The seven-member board considered, modified and ultimately approved a proposal originally submitted by the president of the United Cook Inlet Drift Association, Dave Martin. “I believe it’s the only time we’ve ever adopted a regulation that talks about barbless hooks in the state,” said Board of Fisheries chairman Karl Johnstone

during the meeting. Johnstone said that he considers the barbless hook regulation, which applies only to catch-and-release king fishing on the Kenai River, a conservation measure that reduces the handling time of the fish. Moving to barbless hooks was discussed extensively during the meeting. Fish and Game regional fisheries management coordinator Matt Miller told board members that using barbless hooks didn’t reduce the number of hooked fish that

were killed — rather that the gear was inefficient and caused fewer fish to be caught. Fish and Game staff comments on Martin’s proposal estimated that angler efficiency with barbless hooks was reduced between 11-24 percent while young and inexperienced anglers were disproportionately affected. It may be difficult to find hooks that are manufactured barbless in the area. Scott Miller, co-owner of Trustworthy Hardware in Soldotna, said the store would not

be stocking barbless hooks and would instead provide the tools to crimp a hook into being legal. “We tried that about 15 years ago and no one bought them,” Miller said. “We sell a lot more files.” Miller said he didn’t think moving to catch-and-release fishing would be too significant as the king salmon fishery was already struggling this season. “I was out there last night and I was the only boat,” he said. “I saw two fish caught and

they were small.” Stuart Cridge, of New Zealand, stopped into the hardware store and said he would still fish for king salmon even with the catch-and-release regulation. Cridge, who said he had been fishing the Kenai River for 11 years has already practiced the method at least once this year when he caught a 66-pound king salmon Tuesday evening and let it go. “My biggest one before that was 72-pounds,” he said with a grin. “But that was in ’06.”

several factors. One that managers consider is run timing, typically biologist classify the salmon runs as on-time, early or late; another is the actual number of fish returning and whether or not it tracks with the number of fish predicted to return; finally, the number of Kenai River king salmon returning and whether it improves or continues poorly, both options could impact the hours available for commercial setnet fishing. On the Kasilof, setnetters play a vital role in catching sockeye bound for the river as the fish tend to be “beach-oriented” later in the season and are usually too close to shore for drifters to catch, said Aaron Dupuis, assistant area management biologist in the commercial fisheries division of Fish and Game during a

Wednesday interview. Managers believe the Kasilof sockeye run is about halfway over and just about 280,000 fish have already made it up the river — meaning the final escapement could be projected at about 560,000 — well above the biological escapement goal range on the river of 160,000340,000. “It will be very difficult, I’m not saying impossible, very difficult to keep the final escapement in the Kasilof River below (the top end of its goal),” he said. “With the number of sockeye that we believe are yet to come to the Kasilof River, we would harvest at a rate that we can’t attain with the minimal number of hours that we have in the setnet fishery.” About 310,000 sockeye have returned to the Kenai River.

While managers have multiple goals they can aim for, Shields focused on the inriver goal of 1 million-1.2 million fish. Run timing models of the sockeye run on the river have predicted that it could go over the inriver goal, Shields said. “We stand a better chance of meeting that goal,” he said. “That said, with the limited number of hours again in the setnet fishery and the restricted drift fishery, I guess I have to say it would be — if the runs returns as expected — it would be difficult to keep the final passage in the Kenai River within in the inriver goal.” The east side setnets and drifters fished Thursday. An Emergency Order released Thursday opened drift gillnetting in the expanded Kenai, Kasilof and Anchor Point sec-

tions for a 12-hour period Friday — the three areas confine the drift fleet to a narrow band of fishing between the east beaches of the Cook Inlet and Kalgin Island. The setnetters could fish again on Saturday. Under the new management restrictions they would be allowed 12 hours this week when the Kenai River goes to catch-and-release fishing — then one Sunday when the new stat-week begins, they would be given 12 more hours. Shields said there had been no decision made on whether to fish the setnetters on Saturday. He also is not sure how to manage 12 hours of fishing time per week, though he said the two best options seemed to be one 12-hour period or two 6-hour periods. A six hour period carries a risk.

“It would require many fishermen in the fishery to be able to move their gear while the tide is running,” he said. “That would be very difficult to do. They can plan for it somewhat but even planning for it still makes it somewhat difficult for them to do.” Fishing one 12-hour period could mean that managers choose a day to fish that would be a good one for harvesting sockeye salmon, or cause the entire setnet fleet to stay out of the water when the salmon hit the beach. “We’ll do our best to catch as many sockeye as we can with the hours that have been provided,” he said.

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Rashah McChesney can be reached at rashah.mcchesney@ peninsulaclarion.com

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B Friday, July 18, 2014

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McIlroy takes lead Now he must back it up Friday at British Open DOUG FERGUSON AP Sports Writer

HOYLAKE, England — Rory McIlroy had everything go his way Thursday in the British Open. A lovely summer day in England with abundant sunshine and minimal wind allowed him to attack Royal Liverpool. He made half his six birdies on the par 5s and kept bogeys off his card. And on the day Tiger Woods made a promising return, McIlroy took the lead with a 6-under 66, his best score in nearly two years at a major. Now if he can only find a way to get to the weekend.

McIlroy either set himself up for a good run at the claret jug or another dose of Friday failures. In what already has been an unusual year for golf, no trend is more mysterious than Boy Wonder going from awesome to awful overnight. Six times in his last eight tournaments, he has had a ninehole score of 40 or higher on Friday that has taken him out of the mix. “It’s not like I’ve shot good scores in first rounds and haven’t backed them up before,” McIlroy said. “I’m used to doing that. I just haven’t done it recently. We’ll see what tomorrow brings and what weather it

is and try and handle it as best I can. “Hopefully,” he said, “it’s just one of those things and I’m able to turn it around tomorrow.” Woods also would like to keep moving in the right direction. He got off to a troubling start with two quick bogeys, nearly made another one on the fourth hole, and then looked like a 14-time major champion when he ran off five birdies in six holes toward the end of his round for a 69. Not bad for guy who had back surgery March 31, who AP Photo/Peter Morrison started taking full swings Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland plays out of a bunker on the 16th hole during the first day of the See GOLF, Page B-4 British Open Golf championship at the Royal Liverpool golf club, Hoylake, England, Thursday.

Oilers drop 3rd straight Staff report

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Photos by Kelly Sullivan/Peninsula Clarion

Twins catcher Tommy Bowe helps West’s Mike Miller up Thursday at Coral Seymour Memorial Park in Kenai. Miller was out at home plate on the play. The Twins swept two from West.

Twins take 2 games from West By JOEY KLECKA Peninsula Clarion

With the Alaska Legion National Division baseball standings so tight for the three state slots allotted to the division, Post 20 Twins coach Hector Rivera on Thursday decided to rest his star pitcher Dallas Pierren for a crucial Saturday division game against Bartlett. Rivera opted to start SoHi junior Calvin Hills against West at Coral Seymour Memorial Park, and Hills made the most of his first division start in 2014 to help the Twins to a 4-1 win. Coming into the day, the Twins were sitting fifth in the standings, but the victory jumped Post 20 (9-5 league, 13-9 overall) ahead of Kodiak and Bartlett to third place in the National Division stand-

ings with 41 points. Bartlett lost its game against Palmer later in the day to keep the Twins in third. “This is very important,” Rivera said. “We still have four games with back-to-back doubleheaders this weekend. Those are must-win games for us. “The guys are very relaxed and doing their job.” Hills, who got the win with a tidy 74 pitches, said his sharp curveball proved to be most effective against West. “I was throwing them off a lot with that,” Hills said. “I went to the bullpen a few days ago and practiced, and I was just trying to stick to my windup.” Hills went five innings on the mound, giving up no runs on four hits, three walks (including a hit by pitch) and five strikeouts.

The Scouting Showcase Alaska Baseball League Standings and All-Star weekend in the W L Pct. GB Overall Alaska Baseball League could American League not come soon enough for the Goldpanners 14 6 .700 -- 24-7 Bucs 17 10 .630 1-2 24-13 Peninsula Oilers, who lost their Oilers 9 17 .346 8 18-18-2 third-straight game, falling to National League the Chugiak-Eagle River ChiMiners 17 10 .630 -- 21-11-1 Pilots 14 15 .483 4 17-17 nooks at Loretta French Field Chinooks 7 20 .231 10 9-22 in Eagle River on Thursday. Thursday, July 17 With big hitting from JackGoldpanners 7, Miners 4 son Cramer, the Chinooks shut Chinooks 4, Oilers 0 out the Oilers 4-0 for their Friday, July 18 (ABL Showcase) third-straight win and bumping Oilers at Chinooks, 1 p.m. their season mark to 7-20 in the Goldpanners at Miners, 4 p.m. National League. The Oilers Pilots at Bucs, 7 p.m. Saturday, July 19 dropped to 9-17 in the Ameri(ABL Showcase) can League and are eight games Chinooks at Pilots, 1 p.m. Oilers at Goldpanners, 4 p.m. back of the leading Alaska Miners at Bucs, 7 p.m. Goldpanners (14-6) in the division. Cramer belted a leadoff homer in the second inning for to a 2-for-3 batting day that inSee OILERS, page B-4 his first run of the game en route

Bears’ Wolter signs with UW-Eau Claire By JEFF HELMINIAK Peninsula Clarion

Calvin Hills pitches at Coral Seymour Memorial Park in Kenai at Thursday. Hills picked up the win on the mound in a key league game.

In the second, nonleague game, the Twins beat West 7-2, with Mathew Daugherty getting the start on the mound. Daugherty went four innings with two earned runs on two

hits, two walks and one strikeout. But the work by Hills in the first game kept the Twins’ postseason hopes running strong. See TWINS, page B-4

This Christmas, former Brown Bears forward Jacob Wolter was shocked to hear a team thought he belonged in the North American Hockey League. At the beginning of this hockey season, Wolter, born and raised in Fairbanks, thought there was no way he would be signing with a top Division III hockey program at the end of the season. And when the 5-foot-9 forward was a sophomore at Lathrop? He weighed 235 pounds and knew if he continued to be that weight he would be hanging up the skates after high school. Yet last week, Jacob and his twin brother, Colton, made verbal commitments to attend the University of Wisconsin-

Eau Claire. The Blugolds won the NCAA Division III title in 2013 and have been Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference champions the past two years. Former Brown Bears defenseman Jake Davidson has committed to play there, and former Brown Bears forward Chris Nuth just completed his freshman season there. Jacob, who graduated from Lathrop in 2012, credits parents Jordan Wolter and Judy Justice with the journey from being a 235-pound sophomore to signing with the Blugolds. “Work ethic is something that was built in through my mom and dad,” Wolter said. “It was built in growing up. “I wouldn’t feel right if I didn’t have work ethic on my side. Without work ethic, I wouldn’t be where I am.” See BEAR, page B-4

Initial offering of Wine Wednesday a hit at Birch Ridge

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hat a week at Birch Ridge Golf Course! The Wells Fargo All Alaska Pro-Am and Skins Game got things started on Monday. Aaron “Baby Dex” Dexheimer posted a wonderful 67 on a challenging track for a first-place finish. George “Jorge” Collum rock and rolled his ball around the course in 68 quick strokes as the runner-up. Rich Lundahl and I finished T-3 with a pair of 69s. Josh Lansing backed his way into a 74, still well enough for low amateur honors. Dave Matthews, out of Palmer, had the band back together taking the net division with a groovy 62, one shot ahead of local hero and wine aficionado Darell Jelsma. Brandon Kaiser, a golf professional out of Anchorage, paired with his amateurs for a team triumph. With the Pro-Am a distant memory, the professionals from around the state headed out for the evening alternate-shot skins game.

Dexheimer again emerged on top, with the help of his playing partner Chris Wright. Perhaps, the highlight of the evening belonged to Bill “The Thrill” Engberg, who rolled in a 15-footer in spite of an incredible amount of adversity at the 10th. The putt netted Engberg and his partner, Brandon Kaiser, a handsome sum! A special thank you goes out to the crew at Wells Fargo for their sponsorship and for hosting the awards ceremony barbecue. The golf course and the Birch Ridge Golf Association couldn’t have a better partner for this event. The Pro-Am was followed up by our first rendition of Wine Wednesday. Both golfers and instructors had a blast! Participants sampled five varieties of wine from Washington State and received full swing and putting group lessons. Gene “A Girls Best Friend” Diamond, our wonderful wine host, is bringing in varieties from Spain

time with other competitors in the event. First-round scores will pair irch idge golfers for Sunday morning’s final round. olf eport If you have been on the Earth for a long time and wish to participate N olan Rose in this event give Birch Ridge a call! for next week’s outing. That doesn’t The golf course will remain open sound like a bad time does it? At the end of the evening golfers putted for a for play to all golfers during the Senior Amateur and there’s no better chance to take home a bottle of their time to play than right now. When favorite wine. Kurt “Cuffy” Nelson Bill Engberg isn’t rolling in putts for rolled in the lengthy attempt earning dollars during the Skins game, he is the admiration of all. out making the golf course look beauIf you think Wine Wednesday tiful with a ton of help from Mike sounds like a great way to have fun Rose and our youthful band of grass and receive quality golf instruction growing groupies. in a low-pressure environment visit Old Folks Golf the Birch Ridge Facebook page and Seniors play was moved to Tuescheck out the Wine Wednesday phoday to accommodate the Wells Fargo tos and videos. All Alaska Pro-Am and Skins Game Call the pro shop to sign up for on Monday. The change of routine next week! rattled our extremely experienced This upcoming weekend hosts the 30th Peninsula Senior Amateur. golfers. So much so that they forgot The two-day event begins Saturday to leave the author of this column a with golfers choosing their own tee recap. Oops.

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Tuesday Morning Ladies League The mystery tour continues with the lovable ladies failing to leave a recap for the column. Golfers typically refer to these type of mistakes as triple bogies. Thursday Night Couples Couples Night was postponed due to inclement weather. Golf Joke of the Week A young man and a priest are playing together. At a short par-3 the priest asks, “What are you going to use on this hole my son?” The young man says, “An 8-iron, father. How about you?” The priest says, “I’m going to hit a soft 7 and pray.” The young man hits his 8-iron and puts the ball on the green. The priest tops his 7-iron and dribbles the ball out a few yards. The young man says, “I don’t know about you father, but in my church when we pray, we keep our head down.”


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B-2 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014

Sports Briefs Circle track races set for Saturday The Kenai Peninsula Racing Lions - Circle Track Division will hold races Saturday at Twin Cities Raceway. Races start at 6 p.m., while qualifying is at 4 p.m. and gates open at 3 p.m. Races will be in stock cars, legends, late models, trucks and sprint cars depending on participants. General admission is $10, while seniors, students and youths are $5. Military veterans get in free. GCI account holders can bring their bill and also get in free. Twin Cities Raceway is at Mile 6.5 of the Kenai Spur Highway, across from Beaver Loop Road.

Salmon Run Series results posted Derek Gibson and Taylor Ostrander won Salmon Run Series #2, held Wednesday at Tsalteshi Trails behind Skyview High School. Gibson won the five-kilometer event at 16 minutes, 48 seconds, while Sam Tilly was second at 17:10. Ostrander was fourth overall at 19:46, while Daisy Nelson was the next woman across at 22:27. Salmon Run Series #3 will be Wednesday. Online registration is at www.tsalteshi.org. The cost online is $10 per race for Tsalteshi Trails Association members, and $15 for nonmembers. Before each 5K race, there will be a 1K race for children 6 and under, costing $5 online or the day of the race. Races start at 6 p.m. Salmon Run Series #2

Wednesday at Tsalteshi Trails 1. Derek Gibson, 16 minutes, 48 seconds; 2. Sam Tilly, 17:10; 3. Jordan Theisen, 18:10; 4. Taylor Ostrander, 19:46; 5. Travis Semmens, 20:50; 6. Mike Crawford, 21:11; 7. Tony Eskelin, 21:29; 8. Paul Ostrander, 22:08; 9. Chad Anderson, 22:21; 10. Scott Huff, 22:23; 11. Daisy Nelson, 22:27; 12. John Mohorcich, 22:37; 13. Gabe Juliussen, 23:03; 14. Carl Kincaid, 23:07; 15. Noah Perry, 23:25; 16. Jacob Sundberg, 23:48; 17. Ryan Nelson, 24:14; 18. Becca Ford, 24:26; 19. Lauren Bauder, 24:27; 20. Rustin Hitchcock, 24:35; 21. Matt Dammeyer, 24:39; 22. Jeffrey Helminiak, 24:52; 23. John Hedges, 25:20; 24. Kevin Lauver, 25:40; 25. Ben Hanson, 25:42. 26. John-Mark Pothast, 25:44; 27. Jode Sparks, 26:00; 28. Bob Miller, 26:30; 29. Jane Fuerstenau, 26:51; 30. Julie Litchfield, 27:18; 31. Doug Hogue, 27:26; 32. Loren Hollers, 27:40; 33. Lindsay Fagrelius, 27:41; 34. Connie Ferguson, 27:53; 35. Dave Litchfield, 28:01; 36. Sondra Stonecipher, 28:12; 37. Roy Stuckey, 28:17; 38. Pete Mauro, 28:18; 39. Dan Pascucci, 28:23; 40. Tracy Pitts, 29:08; 41. Sarah Riley, 29:17; 42. Morgan Aldridge, 29:20; 43. Sarah Hollers, 29:40; 44. Patrice Kohl, 29:44; 45. Viorica Thompson, 29:52; 46. Jodi Hanson, 29:58; 47. Josh Overturf, 30:02; 48. Jake Sanders, 30:42; 49. Kimberly Pelo, 30:49; 50. Holly Kjostad, 31:08. 51. Sonja Kjostad, 31:12; 52. Terri Cowart, 31:37; 53. Dana McDonald, 31:42; 54. John-Paul Dammeyer, 31:45; 55. Dylan Hogue, 31:46; 56. Jeff Perschbacher, 31:48; 57. Patrick Mize, 31:52; 58. Sarah Callaway, 31:54; 59. Paul Knight, 31:55; 60. Brittany Hollers, 32:17; 61. Haddasah Udelhoven, 32:28; 62. Joseph Dammeyer, 32:45; 63. Naomi Barker, 32:46; 64. Isabella Dammeyer, 33:08; 65. Elizabeth Knippling, 33:27; 66. Emily Wranger, 33:28; 67. Gauge Berkhahn, 33:32; 68. Patti Berkhahn, 33:33; 69. Jack Maryott, 33:41; 70. Markie Shiflea, 34:01; 71. Lauren Fraser, 34:07; 72. Amy Hogue, 34:45; 73. George Stein, 34:48; 74. Debby Burwen, 35:05; 75. Suzanne Maxwell, 35:06. 76. Kari Weston, 35:33; 77. Maria Sweppy, 36:13; 78. Bobbi Lay, 36:30; 79. June Stuckey, 36:34; 80. Stephanie Lambe-Musgrove, 37:39; 81. Rinna Carson, 37:48; 82. Jami Wight, 37:51; 83. Kate Swaby, 37:52; 84. Maria Dammeyer, 38:40; 85. Mary Rhyner, 39:11; 86. Landon Showalter, 39:14; 87. Jen Showalter, 39:14; 88. Tony Oliver, 39:37; 89. Marly Perschbacher, 41:02; 90. Brian Kuhr, 42:56; 91. Melanny Lauver, 43:01; 92. Ali Callaway, 44:02; 93. Karen Von Breyman, 47:01; 94. Nicole Egholm, 47:27; 95. Diane Webb, 47:50; 96. Seane Oglesbee, 47:57; 97. Shaylon Cochran, 48:05; 98. Jill Schaefer, 48:57; 99. Sara Moore, 48:59; 100. Jennifer Harrington, 49:00. 101. Linda Loranger, 49:01; 102. Robert Carson, 49:07; 103. Rob Carson, 49:10; 104. Nancy Carver, 49:44; 105. Michelle Glaves, 50:20; 106. Kathy Hammer, 50:21; 107. Johna Beech, 50:22.

Ref says Kramer was disoriented ROME — Germany midfielder Christoph Kramer was disoriented and confused after taking a heavy blow to the head early in the World Cup final, according to the match’s referee. “Shortly after the blow, Kramer came to me asking ‘Ref, is this the final?’” Nicola Rizzoli told the Gazzetta dello Sport on Thursday. “I thought he was joking and made him repeat the question and then he said, ‘I need to know if this is really the final.’ When I said, ‘Yes,’ he concluded, ‘Thanks, it was important to know that.’” Rizzoli said he let Germany midfielder Bastian Schweinsteiger know about the exchange during Sunday’s game but Kramer continued playing for 14 minutes following the collision with Argen— Staff and wire reports tina defender Ezequiel Garay.

Scoreboard Baseball AL Standings

East Division W Baltimore 52 Toronto 49 New York 47 Tampa Bay 44 Boston 43 Central Division Detroit 53 Kansas City 48 Cleveland 47 Chicago 45 Minnesota 44 West Division Oakland 59 Los Angeles 57 Seattle 51 Houston 40 Texas 38

L 42 47 47 53 52

Pct .553 .510 .500 .454 .453

GB — 4 5 9½ 9½

38 46 47 51 50

.582 — .511 6½ .500 7½ .469 10½ .468 10½

36 37 44 56 57

.621 — .606 1½ .537 8 .417 19½ .400 21

Thursday’s Games No games scheduled Friday’s Games Cincinnati (Leake 7-7) at N.Y. Yankees (Phelps 3-4), 3:05 p.m. Texas (Darvish 8-5) at Toronto (Dickey 7-9), 3:07 p.m. Cleveland (Bauer 3-4) at Detroit (A.Sanchez 6-3), 3:08 p.m. Kansas City (Shields 9-5) at Boston (Buchholz 4-5), 3:10 p.m. Houston (Feldman 4-6) at Chicago White Sox (Quintana 5-7), 4:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Cobb 4-6) at Minnesota (Gibson 8-7), 4:10 p.m. Baltimore (Tillman 7-5) at Oakland (Samardzija 1-1), 6:05 p.m. Seattle (Iwakuma 8-4) at L.A. Angels (Weaver 10-6), 6:05 p.m. Saturday’s Games Cincinnati at N.Y. Yankees, 9:05 a.m. Texas at Toronto, 9:07 a.m. Cleveland at Detroit, 9:08 a.m., 1st game Cleveland at Detroit, 3:08 p.m., 2nd game

Houston at Chicago White Sox, 3:10 p.m. Kansas City at Boston, 3:10 p.m. Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 3:10 p.m. Baltimore at Oakland, 5:05 p.m. Seattle at L.A. Angels, 5:05 p.m. All Times ADT

NL Standings

East Division W Washington 51 Atlanta 52 New York 45 Miami 44 Philadelphia 42 Central Division Milwaukee 53 St. Louis 52 Cincinnati 51 Pittsburgh 49 Chicago 40 West Division Los Angeles 54 San Francisco 52 San Diego 41 Colorado 40 Arizona 40

L 42 43 50 50 53

Pct .548 .547 .474 .468 .442

GB — — 7 7½ 10

43 44 44 46 54

.552 .542 .537 .516 .426

— 1 1½ 3½ 12

43 43 54 55 56

.557 — .547 1 .432 12 .421 13 .417 13½

Thursday’s Games No games scheduled Friday’s Games Cincinnati (Leake 7-7) at N.Y. Yankees (Phelps 3-4), 3:05 p.m. Colorado (J.De La Rosa 10-6) at Pittsburgh (Liriano 1-7), 3:05 p.m. Milwaukee (Lohse 9-4) at Washington (Strasburg 7-6), 3:05 p.m. San Francisco (Bumgarner 10-7) at Miami (Eovaldi 5-4), 3:10 p.m. Philadelphia (A.Burnett 6-8) at Atlanta (E.Santana 7-6), 3:35 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Haren 8-6) at St. Louis (Lynn 10-6), 4:15 p.m. Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 5-10) at Arizona (Cahill 1-6), 5:40 p.m. N.Y. Mets (B.Colon 8-8) at San Diego (Kennedy 7-9), 6:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Cincinnati at N.Y. Yankees, 9:05 a.m.

L.A. Dodgers at St. Louis, 12:05 p.m. Colorado at Pittsburgh, 3:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Washington, 3:05 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 3:10 p.m. San Francisco at Miami, 3:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Arizona, 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at San Diego, 4:40 p.m. All Times ADT

Basketball WNBA Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlanta Indiana Washington Connecticut New York Chicago

W 15 11 10 10 8 8

L 6 12 13 14 13 14

Pct .714 .478 .435 .417 .381 .364

GB — 5 6 6½ 7 7½

WESTERN CONFERENCE Phoenix Minnesota San Antonio Los Angeles Seattle Tulsa

18 17 11 10 9 8

3 6 12 12 15 15

.857 — .739 2 .478 8 .455 8½ .375 10½ .348 11

Thursday’s Games Tulsa 95, San Antonio 90 Indiana 82, Chicago 64 Phoenix 101, Connecticut 85 Washington 79, Los Angeles 75 Friday’s Games No games scheduled Saturday’s Games East vs. West at Phoenix, AZ, 11:30 a.m. All Times ADT

Transactions BASEBALL Major League Baseball

MLB — Suspended free agent minor league 2B Ryan Adams 100 games after testing positive for an amphetamine in violation of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League TEXAS RANGERS — Activated C Geovany Soto from the 60-day DL. Purchased the contract of C-1B J.P. Arencibia from Round Rock (PCL). Designated 1B Carlos Pena for assignment. Sent OF-1B Jim Adduci on rehab assignment to Round Rock. Signed LHP Chad James to minor league contract. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Claimed LHP Brad Mills off waivers from Oakland. Designated RHP Deck McGuire for assignment. National League MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Placed INF Jeff Bianchi on the 15-day DL. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Reinstated OF Starling Marte from the bereavement list. Optioned OF Jaff Decker to Indianapolis (IL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association WASHINGTON WIZARDS — Signed G-F Paul Pierce. FOOTBALL National Football League NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Released WR Jeremy Johnson and WR Reese Wiggins. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — Signed OT Joe Staley to a twoyear contract extension through the 2019 season. Placed WR Bruce Ellington, RB Marcus Lattimore, C Marcus Martin, FB Trey Millard, CB Keith Reaser and G Brandon Thomas on the Active/ Non-Football Injury List. Placed LB Aaron Lynch and DT Kaleb Ramsey have been placed on the

Active/Physically Unable to Perform List. HOCKEY National Hockey League DETROIT RED WINGS — Resigned Fs Mitch Callahan and Andrej Nestrasil to one-year contracts. MINNESOTA WILD — Agreed to terms with G John Curry on a one-year contract. COLLEGE NCAA — Announced the retirement of coordinator of men’s basketball officials John Adams, effective April 2015. BIG EAST CONFERENCE — Named Briana Weiss director of conference operations. CALDWELL — Named David Erdos women’s tennis coach. CASTLETON — Announced the resignation of women’s hockey coach Bill Bowes to take an assistant coaching position with New Hampshire. CONNECTICUT COLLEGE — Named Matt Anderson men’s and women’s water polo coach. DELAWARE — Named Byron Collins associate head coach and offensive coordinator for men’s lacrosse. GEORGIA SOUTHERN — Named Kelly Carter cross country and track and field coach. ILLINOIS-CHICAGO — Announced fifth-year senior men’s basketball G Jay Harris has transferred from Wagner. MACALESTER — Announced the resignation of women’s basketball coach Ellen Thompson. SPRING HILL — Named Justin Goonan men’s and women’s club rugby coach. THIEL — Named Killian Riley men’s soccer coach.

Sabres re-sign center Ennis JOHN WAWROW AP Sports Writer

BUFFALO, N.Y. — The Sabres re-signed center Tyler Ennis on Thursday to a fiveyear contract worth $23 million, addressing one of the final pieces of their offseason rebuilding plan. Two people familiar with the agreement revealed the terms to The Associated Press. They spoke on the condition of anonymity because the Sabres referred to the contract only as a multiyear deal. Ennis will make $7.3 million this season, $4.75 million

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in 2015-16, and $3.65 million in each of the final three seasons of the contract, one of the people said. Ennis was a restricted free agent after the Sabres retained his rights by tendering him an offer last month. Buffalo has re-signed four of its five restricted free agents. Only forward Luke Adam remains unsigned. Ennis is a speedy, playmaking forward who led the Sabres with a career-best 21 goals and added 22 assists in 80 games last season. Last month, general manager Tim Murray spoke highly of

Ennis and how he might help revive the team. Last season, the Sabres (21-51-10) finished last, set a franchise record for losses, and established a postNHL-expansion-era low by scoring just 150 goals. “I like his approach to the game. I like his compete level. I like his speed,” Murray said. “There’s a lot of things I like about him, and if we can do a long-term deal with him, then obviously the decision we’ve made is we’d go forward with him.” Ennis was the second of Buffalo’s two 2008 first-round draft picks.

He is a two-time 20-goal scorer and has 69 goals and 97 assists in 267 games over four-plus seasons with the Sabres. Murray has already been busy restocking the Sabres this summer. Buffalo made a splash in free agency by signing forwards Matt Moulson and Brian Gionta and defensemen Josh Gorges and Andrej Meszaros. Center Sam Reinhart, selected with the No. 2 pick in the draft last month, will also have a shot at making the team.

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014

B-3

Nibali says doping theme belongs to past JAMEY KEATEN Associated Press

SAINT-ETIENNE, France — Because of doping’s ravages on cycling, it’s natural for suspicion to fall on Vincenzo Nibali, who led the Tour de France on Thursday for a 10th time in 12 stages. But Nibali says the sport has changed, doping cases have become rare, and “this theme belongs to the past.” The Italian has had a praiseworthy, almost unbreakable lock on the yellow jersey, yet he will be looking over his shoulder more on Friday. The great race enters two days in the Alps that feature uphill finishes, starting with the hardest climb that the peloton has faced so far. Off the roads, Nibali said he expected questions about doping, a scourge of much of the last generation, for whom performanceenhancers such as blood-booster EPO or human growth hormone, and methods like blood-doping were common. Many cycling experts say the sport has greatly cleaned up its act. On Thursday, the Sky team, which has won the last two Tours, sacked British cyclist Jonathan Tiernan-Locke after he was banned for an irregular biological passport. He was not a Tour rider, but few would say the Tour peloton was totally clean. Doping’s shadow remains at the Tour, among team staffers, and even a rider or two. Nibali’s team, Astana, was kicked out of the 2007 Tour after its star rider Alexandre Vinokourov tested positive for banned blood transfusions. He

served his ban, returned to racing, and won gold at the London Olympics. Vinokourov is now Astana’s general manager. Rider Michele Scarponi who, like Nibali, won the Giro d’Italia and was racing in this Tour, was given a three-month ban in 2012 for seeing banned physician Michele Ferrari, a longtime adviser of Lance Armstrong. Nibali says Astana has changed. “I’ve chosen Astana for the possibility to build a group that I can trust to bring me at a competitive level for important races like the Giro, the Tour and the (Spanish) Vuelta,” he said. “There have been many mistakes in cycling in the past, by many riders, but they belong to the past,” Nibali said. “We now have a biological passport, outof-competition controls, controls at home ... “Nobody can say that cycling hasn’t changed. Nowadays, there is an isolated case. There’s always the possibility that an idiot does something stupid ...” Nibali, a native of Messina, Sicily, nicknamed the “Shark of the Strait” after the Strait of Messina, is trying to become only the sixth rider in history to win all three Grand Tours of France, Italy and Spain. He would also be the first Italian to win the Tour since Marco Pantani in 1998. The late Pantani was convicted in Italy of doping offenses during his career. Giuseppe Martinelli, a cycling guru who worked with Pantani for years before they fell out, is an Astana manager. “Thanks to him,” Nibali said

AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani

China’s Cheng Ji, front, nicknamed the “breakaway killer” sets the pace of the pack as they chase after a breakaway during the 12th stage of the Tour de France cycling race over 115.3 miles with start in Bourg-en-Bresse and finish in Saint-Etienne, France, Thursday. Cheng is the first Chinese rider to take part in the Tour de France.

of Martinelli through a translator, “I became closer to the Astana team that has invested a lot in an Italian group in order to regain credibility.”

To succeed Pantani, Nibali is keeping an eye out on other race contenders: Richie Porte of Australia trails by 2 minutes, 23 seconds, and Alejandro

Valverde of Spain was third, 2:47 back. The mostly flat 115.5-mile course from Bourg-en-Bresse to Saint-Etienne in southeast-

ern France was well suited for a possible sprint finish and that’s how it was won by Alexander Kristoff, a Norwegian specialist with Katusha.

Lakers make highest bid for Boozer; Harris to Mavs By The Associated Press

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Carlos Boozer is headed to the Lakers’ crowded frontcourt after Los Angeles made the winning bid for the veteran forward waived by the Chicago Bulls via the amnesty clause. The Lakers made the highest bid under the NBA’s modified waiver process for players who were amnestied, a person with knowledge of the details told The Associated Press on condition of

anonymity Thursday because no official announcement was made. According to NBA rules, teams with room under the salary cap had to bid at least $1.4 million, the amount of the minimum salary for veterans next season. The person did not say how much the Lakers bid, though ESPN.com reported that it was $3.25 million. The amnesty clause allows teams to waive one

player in the first five years of the current collective The Mavericks didn’t reveal contract terms in bargaining agreement without his salary counting their announcement Thursday night. for cap and tax purposes. Boozer will still be paid ESPN reported Harris got a $16.5 million, fourthe $16.8 million he is due next season in the final year deal. season of a contract he signed in 2010. Harris played for Dallas on a one-year, $3 million deal last season. He originally had a $9 milMavs sign Harris lion, three-year deal, but that was scuttled by a toe DALLAS — The Dallas Mavericks have re- injury that forced him to miss the first half of the signed guard Devin Harris. season

California dreaming Baseball’s 2nd half could have West Coast bias JAY COHEN AP Sports Writer

Sure, it was great for a couple days. The cheers for Derek Jeter. The power of Giancarlo Stanton. The excellence of Mike Trout in the American League’s 5-3 victory. Baseball’s All-Star party in the Twin Cities was a long series of smiles for players and fans. But the break is over now, and the real fun begins Friday night. Heading into the second half of the season, there are all sorts of compelling stories from coast to coast. It could be one fun summer in California, where Oakland begins the weekend with the best record in the majors, and the Giants, Angels and Dodgers are in prime playoff position. The trade deadline is in two weeks, and the recovery of several key injured players could dramatically affect a couple of divisions. The A’s bearded collection of shaggy misfits and stars is looking for the franchise’s first World Series title in 25 years. Sensing an opportunity, general manager Billy Beane got an early jump on the deadline when he acquired pitchers Jeff Samardzija and Jason Hammel in a deal with the Chicago Cubs on July 4. The blockbuster trade created an awkward scene at the AllStar game, where Samardzija was introduced with the NL reserves and then joined his new teammates in the AL dugout. “I’m really excited to just put all this to rest now and the sideshow that’s happened right in the middle of all this,” Samardzija said. “It was a great opportunity to get to know these guys more. I flew out here with them. I’m excited.” There will be no such problem for any other players on the move this month. Boston pitcher Jake Peavy, Philadelphia second baseman Chase Utley, San Diego closer Huston Street and New York

‘I’m really excited to just put all this to rest now and the sideshow that’s happened right in the middle of all this.’ — Jeff Samardzija, Athletics pitcher Mets right-hander Bartolo Colon are thought to be on the market as contenders shop for that missing piece that could pay off into October. “I guess there’s a possibility for anything, but at this point I love playing in Philadelphia,” said Utley, who could veto any deal. Jeter was warmly greeted everywhere he went this week, and the Yankee captain contributed two hits to the AL All-Star win. Any chance of his final season ending in the playoffs likely depends on the return of rookie ace Masahiro Tanaka, who is out with a partially torn ligament in his right elbow. He is going through a six-week rehab program but season-ending surgery is an option. Michael Pineda also could return from a back injury to New York’s battered rotation. The Bronx is one of many spots where health is an issue for the stretch run. The recovery of Reds sluggers Joey Votto (strained muscle above left knee) and Brandon Phillips (left thumb) and indispensable Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina (right thumb) could affect the bunched NL Central. The Pirates could get starting pitcher Gerrit Cole (tight lat muscle) in the first few weeks after the break. “We know what we’re capable of doing, and we’re going to play like we’ve been there before, like we’ve done it before,” said slugger Andrew McCutchen, hoping to lead Pittsburgh back to the playoffs for the second straight year. “That’s what we’ve got to look forward to.” The strained right quadri-

ceps of Toronto’s Edwin Encarnacion and ailing back of Detroit’s Victor Martinez also bears watching. Atlanta, which is battling Washington for the top spot in the NL East, could get a lift from the return of Evan Gattis after the catcher was sidelined by a bulging disk in his back. Beyond the standings, the races for the individual honors will come into focus. Trout could add the AL MVP award to his one from the All-Star game, especially if the Angels can run down the A’s in the competitive AL West. Shortstop Troy Tulowitzki is among the favorites for the NL award, but he could be hurt by the Rockies’ poor play. The NL Cy Young Award features an interesting duel between Clayton Kershaw of the Dodgers and Adam Wainwright of the Cardinals. Trying for a repeat, Kershaw had a 41-inning scoreless streak that ended last week and carried a 1.78 ERA into the break. But Wainwright is 12-4 with a 1.83 ERA in 138 innings, compared to 96 1-3 for Kershaw, who missed all of April with a back problem. White Sox first baseman Jose Abreu, the overwhelming favorite for AL Rookie of the Year with Tanaka on the shelf, could become baseball’s first rookie home run king since Mark McGwire with the Athletics in 1987. “He’s continuing to make adjustments with what other teams are trying to do to him,” White Sox manager Robin Ventura said last month, “and when he hits it on the barrel it goes a long way.” C

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B-4 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014

. . . Twins Continued from page B-1

“He did a good job for us,” Rivera said. “I wanted to give him an opportunity to get him a ‘W’ on his record, and he did a good job.” Josh Darrow relieved Hills in the sixth inning, giving up no runs on one hit, no walks and three strikeouts. Rivera’s son, Hector, led the Twins at the plate with a 2-for-3 day with two runs, while teammates JJ Sonnen and Pierren each added a hit. Pierren and Darrow each also had two RBIs.

“We’re having trouble hitting the slow pitch,” coach Rivera said. “We get anybody that can throw hard, and we do very darn good. When we get a slower pitcher, we have trouble hitting the ball.” West pitcher Dillon Oberly tossed a complete game for the Eagles, giving up four runs (two earned) on four hits and five walks (including a hit by pitch) in six innings of work. “It’s hard for us to score,” Rivera said. “This game should’ve been 2-1, but we got some breaks.” The Twins had a few chances early on, leaving two runners stranded on second and third base in the first in-

ning, but made up for it on defense, turning a 4-3 double play in the top of the second with quick work from Sonnen and Klayton Justice. With two outs in the bottom of the second, Pierren knocked out a single to center field that scored Rivera for the Twins’ first run of the game. West nearly tied it up in the top of the fifth beginning with a walk from Mike Miller. Miller then stole second and third, but was ultimately caught stealing home to end the inning. In the bottom of the fifth, Pierren belted a hit to left field that brought Rivera in to score again, but Pierren was tagged out while going for a tri-

. . . Golf

. . . Oilers

lead. The two teams will play again today at 1 p.m. at Mulcahy Continued from page B-1 Stadium in Anchorage, the first Continued from page B-1 game in the Scouting Showonly a month ago and who had cluded three RBIs. Teammate case. not played in a major in 11 Steve Karkenny also came up Thursday months. big, hitting 3 for 4 with a run. Chinooks 4, Oilers 0 “It felt good to be back out Jake Sandlin and Mylz Jones Oilers AB R H BI Chinooks AB R H BI cf 4 0 2 0 Arnt 2b 3 0 0 0 there competing again,” Woods each hit 2 for 4 to lead the Oil- Snld Snfd 3b 3 0 0 0 Ppdc ss 4 1 1 0 said. Rbnz 2b 4 0 0 0 Cnkl dh 3 0 0 0 ers. ss 4 0 2 0 Cllns dh 1 0 0 0 Such pristine weather — how On the mound, Sean Mason Jones Zrte dh 1 0 0 0 Krkn lf 4 1 3 0 picked up the loss in five in- McGl 1b 3 0 0 0 Pllx cf 3 0 0 0 long it lasts is the big unknown nings of work, giving up two Thmn c 3 0 0 0 Crmr 1b 3 1 2 3 — gave just about everyone a rf 3 0 0 0 Nvnt rf 3 1 1 0 chance to score. Matteo Maearned runs on five hits, six Rose Rgwki lf 3 0 1 0 Derr c 2 0 1 0 nassero broke par in The Open walks and four strikeouts. It --- Lnsy c 2 0 0 0 took Mason 110 pitches to get --- Altm 2b 1 0 1 1 for the first time since he was a --- Rork 3b 2 0 0 0 16-year-old amateur. He began through the stint. Totals 28 0 5 0 Totals 31 4 9 4 his round by hitting into a pot Kyle McDorman recorded Oilers 000 000 000 —0 the win for the Chinooks in 2 Chinooks 020 000 20x — 4 bunker, blasting out to the fair2-3 innings, with one hit, one 2B — Sandlin. HR — Cramer. HP — Cra- way and holing out from 160 walk and one strikeout, and mer. SH — Sanford, McGill. SB — Zarate, yards for birdie. He made five Nevant, Altmann. LOB — Oilers 6, birdies on the back nine, three Shane Armstrong had the save Pollex, Chinooks 10. on the par 5s. with no runs and no hits in 2 Oilers IP H R ER BB SO That made him low Italian 1-3 innings of work. Mason, L 5.0 5 2 2 6 4 After two runs in the second Richey 1.0 0 0 0 0 0 — barely. 2.0 4 2 2 0 2 Francesco Molinari and inning, which was highlighted Sheridan Chinooks by Cramer’s home run and Josh Altimont 2.0 1 0 0 0 1 Edoardo Molinari have games Altmann’s RBI single, the Chi- Harris 2.0 3 0 0 1 0 that are nothing alike, though W 2.2 1 0 0 1 they shot the same score. They nooks added two more in the McDorman, 1 seventh. Cramer hit a single Armstrong, S 2.1 0 0 0 1 1 were in a large group at 68 with two outs on the board that HB — Mason. P-S — Mason 110-58, Richey along with Jim Furyk, Sergio Sheridan 32-24, Altimont 20-14, HarGarcia, Brooks Koepka, Shane scored Jonathan Popadics and 17-8, ris 26-14, McDorman 37-23, Armstrong 32Lowry and Adam Scott. Steve Karkenny to extend the 19. T — 2:33.

ple. Fortunately, Rivera’s run counted since it occurred before Pierren’s out was recorded. West scored its lone run in the sixth inning on a passed ball by Twins catcher Tommy Bowe. Billy Ballantine made it to home plate safely. The Twins added two runs in the bottom of the sixth on a sacrifice fly ball by Darrow, which led to errors by West’s catcher and third baseman, which allowed Tyler Covey and Hills to score. “I was getting a little angry honestly,” Hills said about the late innings. “We had runners on base and I didn’t want to lose the game, so I use that to take a deep breath and step on the

Scott stands out as the No. 1 player in the world, and because he was the only player in the top 10 who played in the afternoon when the wind made Hoylake tougher. Scott went out in 31 and was slowed only by two bogeys on the back nine. Even in tame conditions, the British Open can mete out punishment — to players, to spectators and even a golf club. Phil Mickelson was trying to get back to even par when he hooked his approach to the 18th beyond the out-ofbounds stakes down the right side of the hole and had to scramble for a bogey and a 74. He hasn’t broken par at a major since winning at Muirfield last summer. That still doesn’t top the bad day of Ernie Els. His opening tee shot hit a spectator in the face, and the sight of so much blood shook the Big Easy. When he got to the green, he missed a 1-foot putt, and then carelessly tried to back-hand the next one into the hole and missed that one. The triple bogey sent him to

mound.” In the second game of the day, Joey Becher relieved Daugharty on the mound and was impressive, pitching a hitless final three innings with two walks and seven strikeouts. The Twins scored five runs in the second inning, highlighted by a triple and a steal of home from Pierren. Justice Miller and Rivera contributed two RBIs each as well. The Twins face Bartlett in a doubleheader Saturday at 12:30 p.m. at Seymour Park, and Eagle River Sunday at the same time and place. “We need Dallas for Bartlett,” Rivera said.

a 79. Henrik Stenson knocked a 30-foot birdie putt off the 12th green and made double bogey, and then took two hacks out of the shin-high grass left of the 17th fairway. Walking to his next shot, he snapped his gap wedge over his thigh like a baseball player — Bo Jackson comes to mind — who had just struck out with the bases loaded. Through all this activity, two names came to the forefront — McIlroy and Woods, both trying to restore their games from different circumstances. McIlroy’s only victory this year was at the BMW PGA Championship, where he started his week by breaking off his engagement with Caroline Wozniacki. He could have had more chances to win except for that 40 on the front nine at Quail Hollow, the 42 on the front nine at The Players Championship and the 43 on the back nine at the Memorial. He met with Jack Nicklaus, and the topic of his freaky Fridays came up. “I didn’t mention it to him,”

McIlroy said. “He mentioned it to me — ‘How the hell can you shoot 63 and then 78?’ No, I think what we talked about was just holding a round together. And he was never afraid to make a change in the middle of the round ... to get it back on track.” The trick for McIlroy is to not get derailed in the second round. For the year, he is 55-under par in the first round and 15-over par in the second round. Woods gave a light fist pump when he rolled in a 30-foot putt from just off the green on No. 11. He then hit a beautiful approach to 6 feet for birdie on the 12th. That put him under par in a tournament for the first time since March 9, the final round of Doral. OK, the sample size is small — that was the last tournament he played until returning to Congressional three weeks ago after back surgery. Even so, he was playing with such rhythm late in his round that he might have wanted to keep going. That makes Friday a big day for Woods, too.

SEC players downplay possible benefits DAVID BRANDT AP Sports Writers

HOOVER, Ala. — Southeastern Conference players have mostly been content to let league administrators and coaches take up the drumbeat for NCAA reform — not that they’re complaining. SEC commissioner Mike Slive has even said the Big Five conferences could break away from the NCAA if players aren’t compensated more properly. South Carolina coach Steve Spurrier has advocated that players should be getting a bigger piece of college athletics’ substantial monetary pie for years. Maybe the most ambivalent group in the whole process? The players. “We’re not starving,” Florida quarterback Jeff Driskel said. “But at the end of the day it would be nice to receive a little more compensation.” The life of major college football players and coaches could change drastically in upcoming years once the NCAA and Big Five conferences are done revamping the current system. Players at SEC Media Days were mostly

pleased about the trend toward a few more perks — including scholarships that would offer full cost of attendance — but also admit they’ve already got it pretty good. The fact that most of those upperclassmen might not be around to benefit might make it easier to downplay. “I think that shouldn’t be a deterrent, the fact that it might not change while you’re here,” said Georgia receiver Chris Conley, a member of the NCAA’s Student-Athlete Advisory Council. “You’ve got to think about others. When you don’t think selfishly, you realize that the people behind you are going to have the same problems that you did, so you need to change those things. “As long as the NCAA keeps evolving and growing, it can’t become stagnant because the country is evolving and growing. As long as it keeps moving forward, that’s all we can ask.” The NCAA’s board of directors will vote on the Big Five’s push for more autonomy in August and if it’s approved a cascade of changes could come quickly. Slive said the first item on the agenda would be scholarships that included full cost of attendance, which would allow players a little more

financial flexibility. “There is some angst on the part of many, but I think many realize we’re moving into the 21st century, things are different and expectations of student-athletes are different,” Slive said. Some players say they’re paying attention to the proposed changes. Others say they’re too busy concentrating on football. “If it happens, it’s going to be great for the players. I know that,” Tennessee senior linebacker A.J. Johnson said. “But I won’t be here for that. The main thing for me is I will be here for this season.” Arkansas offensive lineman Brey Cook lives with his family in Fayetteville, so he can get home-cooked meals, free laundry and other comforts of home. “But that’s not the case for most of the guys,” Cook said. “A lot of guys are from all over the country. Some have children they have to take care of, and sometimes (the current situation) doesn’t cut it.” Florida cornerback Vernon Hargreaves III said he thinks players should get paid. “I think we all do. I think it’s a job to play college football,” Hargreaves said. “But I can’t

really concern myself with it because I can’t do anything about it.” Auburn center Reese Dismukes and Georgia coach Mark Richt pointed out that high-profile athletes get plenty of perks. That includes playing on national television, of course, tutors and academic counselors, nutritionists, sports psychologists and up to five years of coaching. Not to mention tuition, room and board. “I don’t think that’s that big of a deal,” Dismukes said. “We get a lot of intangibles right now. We’ve got school and all that stuff paid for. You get food and that kind of stuff. Obviously there’s a big push for that these days with all those guys, but we get a lot right now. We’re doing pretty good for ourselves.” For Richt, there’s also the nurturing received by young men from ages 18-22, who can use college connections as a way to build a professional career if football doesn’t work out. Richt said Georgia has specific programs in place that can help football players adjust to life after football. “You can’t always put a price on that,” he said.

49ers officially open new, $1.2 billion stadium ANTONIO GONZALEZ AP Sports Writer

SANTA CLARA, Calif. — San Francisco 49ers CEO Jed York got a little teary on his drive to Levi’s Stadium on Thursday. His voice cracked while talking about taking his young son to games at the stadium for years to come.

Others had a different reaction upon walking into the building: Wow! With confetti streaming down under a blue sky, the 49ers officially opened the $1.2 billion stadium in Santa Clara with a ribbon-cutting ceremony complete with all the opulence of their new home. NFL Commissioner Roger

. . . Bear Continued from page B-1

Wolter said his transformation began when he was a sophomore and realized if he didn’t change his ways, his last real competitive games would be for the Malemutes. “I thought to myself, ‘There’s no way I can play hockey at the next level at this weight,’” said Wolter, whose dad played professionally for the Alaska Gold Kings of Fairbanks. “It all came down to how bad I didn’t want to hang ’em up after high school. “Men’s league, a lot of games are pretty heated, but it’s never the same as playing in an actual game.” The weight started to come off in earnest when Wolter was a senior. He credits trainer Eric Cooper with putting him on the right track. But it was too little, too late to make good on his dream of making the Fairbanks Ice Dogs and playing with Colton, an identical twin who started playing for the Ice Dogs of the Big Dipper Ice Arena in the 2010-11 season. “Growing up as a little kid and seeing the Dipper full on Fridays and Saturdays, I wanted to be an Ice Dog,” Wolter said. “I wanted it so bad.

Goodell, 49ers coach Jim Harbaugh, linebacker Patrick Willis and left tackle Joe Staley joined York and others on stage to cut the ribbons. They used oversized red scissors with gold-colored blades in keeping with team colors. Hard-hat wearing construction workers lined the steps in fluorescent yellow jackets as team

“Unfortunately it didn’t work out. I went and tried out at a couple other NAHL camps in the summer of 2012, and that didn’t work out either.” The NAHL is Tier II. Wolter was forced to find a home in Tier III hockey with the Helena (Montana) Bighorns of the American West Hockey League. He doesn’t regret a minute of it. “It gave me memories I’ll never forget,” he said. “It was the highlight of my life. I got to meet new people and see another part of the country.” He also continued to get in better and better shape. He took a job working four-hour shifts with a concrete company in Montana. “That was like working out in itself,” he said. “Two hours in on the first day, I was ready to quit and it was a four-hour shift.” After getting off at noon, he would head to the rink in an effort to be the first one there. After skating for 2 or 2 1-2 hours, he would travel to the gym for more workouts. The only time he did not hit the gym was on game day. Even with all that work, and even with what he called the excellent coaching he received from Scott Cunningham, Wolter figured his NAHL ship had sailed.

employees cheered and a fog horn blared. “This is a long time in the making,” York said. The stadium’s opening put one of the NFL’s flagship franchises on firm footing and planted the country’s most popular sports league in technology-rich Silicon Valley for the first time.

He was at a Christmas party with Bighorns teammates playing video games and secret Santa when Cunningham called with news from Brown Bears head coach Geoff Beauparlant. “At first, I thought he was calling for curfew and I was in trouble. Then I thought, ‘That doesn’t make sense, the whole team is here,’” Wolter said. “He asked how the party was going, then he threw the bombshell news that coach Geoff wanted to call me up. “Honestly, I thought it was a joke. I thought he was pulling a fast one.” Wolter remained convinced of that the next day in practice, when he again went to Cunningham and asked if he was playing a joke. Cunningham responded by calling Wolter into his office and telling him what it would take to be successful at the NAHL level. Beauparlant, a former assistant with the Ice Dogs, had known Wolter since high school. The coach thought the Bears needed some more speed, grit and versatility up front, so he gave Wolter a shot. The coach said the shot never would have come without Wolter’s dedication to fitness. “He always had the talent and grit, and he has a scoring touch,” Beauparlant said. “But when you can’t get around the ice, it doesn’t matter how C

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Goodell called it a milestone for the league. He also added a twist to the ceremony by addressing the looming stadium issue just up the road in Oakland, where the Raiders have long been searching for a replacement to the outdated Coliseum. Goodell said it’s up to the Raiders to decide whether they

well you put the puck in the net if you can never physically get to the spot.” Wolter played in 26 games for the Bears, with five goals and two assists, and a plus-3. He knew he was doing it for the Ice Dogs’ rival, but he also knew beggars can’t be choosers. “What happened to me doesn’t happen in the last year of juniors,” said Wolter, whose billet parents were Ryan and Lauri Kapp of Soldotna, a family Wolter is effusive in praising. “I don’t want to be rude to anybody in Fairbanks, but I was pretty happy.” Things got really interesting when the Bears played the Ice Dogs in the regular season and playoffs. During one game, Wolter tried to line up Ice Dogs forward Kyle Lee for a shoulder to shoulder hit and missed, going knee to knee and injuring Lee. “When he went to the ice, I instantly knew it was bad,” Wolter said. “I was almost in tears because I didn’t grow up around the guy, but I knew of him. “I have a lot of respect for the program. (Ice Dogs general manager) Rob Proffitt is like a father figure to me.” But as the season progressed, something else strange was happening, something Wolter found almost as strange as facing off against the Ice Dogs. He was contemplating a career at a good Division III school. He found out

want to try to build a stadium in Oakland or share the facility at Levi’s Stadium with the 49ers — an idea York has never dismissed. Raiders owner Mark Davis has said he doesn’t want to be a renter in the 49ers’ facility, which is now fitted with red seats and posters of past and present San Francisco greats.

the Brown Bears’ goal to get players to college is anything but lip service. All four of the Bears’ aged-out players are going to college this year, as well as three that left junior hockey early for college. “Without coach Geoff’s help I never would have gotten where I am,” Wolter said. “He was always calling schools and talking to them about me. “He’s a players’ coach. That’s the only way to put it. He’s a great guy.” So now Wolter faces a new challenge in Division III hockey, a place he never thought he would be at the beginning of the 2013-14 season. “In true honesty, I never thought I stood a chance,” Wolter said. “I’m still a little nervous about it. It wouldn’t feel right if I wasn’t nervous. I don’t want things handed to me. I want to go to work. “At one point, I thought I might go to school and hang ’em up and play (University of Alaska Fairbanks) intramural hockey. I didn’t know how to handle it once I showed up in Kenai and schools started calling.” Bears notes: The 2014 Stanley Ford Brown Bear Classic is Sunday at the Kenai Golf Course. Tee time is 9 a.m. Participants can sign up at Kenai Golf Course, Stanley Ford or the Bears’ Den.

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O utdoor V iew L es Palmer

Changing the process Author’s note: The Clarion previously published the following column on Mar. 25, 1994. Nothing has changed except the economic value of sport fishing for salmon in Cook Inlet and adjacent waters, which now exceeds the economic value of the Cook Inlet commercial salmon harvest. Twenty years have passed, and special interests continue to control how the resource is managed. — LP

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f present legislation to give more Cook Inlet red salmon to anglers does nothing else, it spotlights the seriously flawed way Alaska allocates fisheries resources. That sport fishermen felt it necessary to go to the legislature was a sure sign of big problems. The problems stem from the domination of our fisheries regulatory process by special interests. Not surprisingly, these same special interests control the legislature, and always have. In 1949, when the Territorial Legislature created the first Alaska Fisheries Board, commercial fishing interests were about the only interests in sight. All five of those early-day board members were commercially oriented. In 1957, when the legislature created the Alaska Fish and Game Commission, the seven members included one commercial fishermen from each of three regions, one fish processor, one sport fisherman, one hunter, and one trapper. Even if the fisherman, the hunter and the trapper agreed on an issue, the commercials still had them out-voted. In 1975, the legislature created the present Board of Fisheries. Instead of designating board seats by special interest groups, the new law said the seven board members “... shall be appointed without regard to political affiliation or geographical location of residence… .” Has this “improved” law brought equity to the board? No. Governors have continued to appoint candidates representing special interests to the board, and legislators have continued to confirm them. In fact, appointing special interests is now expected of politicians, who even promise in election-campaigns to “balance the board.” But what is balance? The most recent attempt at balance, by Governor Hickel, has resulted in a board of three commercial fishermen, three sport fishermen, and one subsistence fisherman who is also a commercial fisherman. This, some would say, is a balanced board. Commercial interests argue that the board should be weighted in their favor, since the importance of jobs and the monetary value of commercial catches obviously See PALMER, page C-2

Photos by Michael Armstrong/Homer News

Kim McNett kayaks around the new dock at the Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies Peterson Bay Field Station. The old dock and staircase is in the background.

Sitting on the dock of the bay

Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies gets new access By MICHAEL ARMSTRONG Morris News Service-Alaska/Homer News

Since the early days when the Peterson Bay Field Station opened in 1983, visitors to the Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies environmental education center started their trip off with a little exercise. After arriving by boat from Homer, visitors got off at a floating dock and then onto a raft. Hauling on a rope and a pulley system, they then moved the raft to shore and climbed a stairway up to the field station. As of April, that system is no more. Last Friday, the Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies — CACS — held a celebration dedicating its new metal dock and ramp. As a boatload of visitors waited at the top of the gangway, Rasmuson Foundation chief executive officer Diane Kaplan, Rep. Paul Seaton, R-Homer, and CACS executive director Beth Trowbridge cut the ribbon. “I know quite a few of you who walked up that dock ramp got quite a shock,” Trowbridge said in her celebratory remarks. “It is not the beloved raft system. Change is hard — there were a few tears, but they were not

One of the yurts at the Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies Peterson Bay Field Station.

from the staff.” The new dock and ramp is more like those in the Homer Harbor. A floating dock rises and falls with the tide on large pilings. An 80-foot ramp connects the dock to a gangway, and the

gangway links the system to boardwalks leading up to the field station. The Rasmuson Foundation and the Murdock Charitable Trust each gave $135,000 grants to help build the dock. The Sam Skaggs Foundation also gave

a $5,000 grant. The $75,000 balance of the $350,000 total cost was raised through fundraisers, donations and even “Rock the Dock” T-shirt sales. Trowbridge said the need for a new dock became obvious when the old system started going dry on low tides. A sandbar had built up from sediment pushed out by a lagoon to the west and the floating dock on pilings went dry and got jammed up against the sandbar. CACS moved the dock to the east side of the pilings. “That’s when it became very obvious this was a temporary fix,” Trowbridge said. “That sandbar continued to creep.” Other Peterson Bay neighbors also complained about the dock marring their view. CACS realized that to maintain access to the field station, they’d need a new dock. The dock now is closer to shore and a channel beyond the sandbar and doesn’t block neighbors’ views. CACS got its start in March 1982 as the China Poot Bay Society, a group formed to advance environmental education. It bought an unfinished cabin from Dr. James Wong and by 1983 had completed the building that is See DOCK, page C-2

Scientists note changes in Southeast watersheds By MARY CATHARINE MARTIN Juneau Empire

JUNEAU (AP) — Southeast Alaska’s watersheds are changing quickly, and researchers are working to figure out how, why, and what those changes mean. Sanjay Pyare, Assistant Professor of Geographic Information Systems and Landscape Ecology, Sonia Nagorski, Research Assistant Professor of Environmental Sciences, Brian Buma, Assistant Professor of Forest Ecosystem Ecology, and other researchers affili-

ated with the University of Alaska and the Alaska Coastal Rainforest Center — including graduate and undergraduate students — on a recent Friday led local residents and teachers on a rainy walk out Herbert River Trail. Along the way, researchers shared some of the questions they’re trying to answer, and the ways they’re trying to answer them. It was the second annual such walk, focusing on research funded by a program called EPSCoR. Pyare is leading Southeast Alaska’s involvement. What does glacial recession mean

for marine ecosystems, for example? What do changes in the glaciers mean for helicopter tours offered to tourists? What kind of economic impact would it have if the Herbert River became a salmon stream? How much airborne mercury is being deposited in Alaska, and what does that mean for ecosystems’ health? EPSCoR is a National Science Foundation program that stands for “Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research.” It aims, in part, to more evenly distribute research funding across the states. Usually, states with

high populations and a large number of research institutions — like California — get a disproportionate amount of funding, Pyare said. The University of Alaska system in 2012 was granted $20 million through the program, to be distributed over five years across the three branches. The state matched that, contributing $5 million. The Herbert River watershed is a microcosm of many across Southeast. In the colder months, it’s a forest-dominated system; in the warmer months, See CHANGE, page C-2

Herding geese — with airplanes?

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hat’s right! National Wildlife Refuges like to do things in style. And by style I mean using float planes to herd geese in order to place bands on them. The banding of Greater White Fronted Geese has been an annual effort at Innoko National Wildlife Refuge in interior Alaska since 1985, with the exception of three years in the 1990s. As a biological intern at the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, I was loaned out to be part of this efficient and experienced field crew. The operation focuses on failed or nonbreeding geese that become flightless as they molt on the Innoko River. This river attracts molt migrants (geese from other breeding areas) because of the abundance of vital foraging habitat, and it is here the geese initiate their molt early. Successful breeders, on the other hand, remain with their broods and molt later in the season. Greater White Fronted Geese typi-

R efuge N otebook B ri K ilbourne cally live up to 20 years in the wild and have the potential to mate every year. As with all waterfowl, there is always a proportion of the population that doesn’t breed. Geese cannot successfully breed if they are less than three years old or if their nutrition is inadequate. Predation of eggs or young by coyotes, fox, wolves, eagles, and even great horned owls is also a problem for obvious reasons. Goose banding entails capturing them and placing an aluminum ring around their leg with a unique number engraved into it. Looking somewhat like a really flashy ankle bracelet, bands are used to document propor-

Photo by Janel Mayo

tional harvest, breeding areas, and annual survival of adults. Annual survival is determined from harvest reports by subsistence and sport hunters, as well as from recaptured individuals during subsequent banding efforts. Lead by Julian Fischer from the USFWS Division of Migratory Birds in Anchorage, this operation begins with a scout plane. A pilot flies out and C

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Photo by Bri Kilbourne

Above, Greater White Fronted Geese pack into the “pot”, part of the trap into which flightless geese are herded by floatplanes on Innoko National Wildlife Refuge. Above left, biological intern Bri Kilbourne inverts a cloaca to determine sex of a Greater White Fronted Goose while banding it.

picks a group of geese to band. Ideal- ing. ly, it’ll be a flock of no more than 350 Once a flock is chosen, the crew geese, and one that can be reached by is transported in five floatplanes (two plane and is well positioned for herdSee REFUGE, page C-2


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C-2 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014

. . . Palmer Continued from page C-1

affecting commonly owned resources, the resources are in jeopardy, and we’re all losers. Imagine a not-far-off future with Big Tourism holding two or three seats on the board. Would that be any better for the resource than commercial fishing? I don’t think so. I think a better idea is to keep the present lay, volunteer status of board members, but require them to have absolutely no economic or political interest in fisheries. Commercial fishermen reading this will say board members need fishing experience before they’re smart enough to sit on the board. Nonsense, I say. What board members don’t need is the bias and conflicts of interest that come with ownership of limited-entry permits. They can get their “experience” from advisory boards, and their technical knowledge from Department of Fish and Game staff. Legislators who want to avoid future allocation battles should write laws that change the way Board of Fisheries members are chosen. The present board makeup, aside from being unconstitutional, corrupts all who use it to their advantage. Worse, it has the potential to endanger our fisheries resources. It’s high time it was changed.

exceed the importance of mere sport. Sport interests argue that the board should be weighted in their favor, because their gamefish are also their foodfish, and sport fishing is coming into its own, economically, and sport users outnumber all others. Subsistence interests argue that the board should be weighted in their favor, because subsistence has both legal and moral priority over all other uses. Which interest is most right? All of them? None of them? Unfortunately, the interest with the most money has always been “right.” Right now, that’s the commercials. But it wouldn’t surprise me to see sport interests dominating the Board of Fisheries within a year or two. The economic value of a salmon caught on hook and line already far exceeds the value of one in a gill net, and the gap grows daily. Each year, tourism puts more Alaskans to work and brings in more “outside” dollars. But while a board controlled by sport-fishing interests is pleasant to contemplate, it wouldn’t be ideal. So long as any special interest group Les Palmer can be reached makes regulatory decisions at les.palmer@rocketmail.com.

. . . Refuge Continued from page C-1

Cessna 206s, Super Cub, Top Cub, and Cessna 185) to the designated trapping spot. The 11 of us create a V-shaped trap with mist nets. One end of the “V” is longer and is called the “long lead” because this is the direction the geese will be entering; the short end is the “short lead”. Where the two leads meet at the base of the “V” is a circle called “the pot.” The pot is where the geese are temporarily held while a few individuals are banded and released. After the nets are set, the planes herd the flock towards the trap. With one plane coordinating high overhead from a bird’s-eye-view, the other four planes can be directed either in the air or on the water. The whole operation becomes a well-executed kidnapping mission. Two crew members remain to take position on the short and long lead ends of the net. I was on the long lead end where I hid behind bushes, ready to hop out in case the geese sought to run around the nets. I carried five essentials with me: a hand-held radio, shotgun, bear spray, bug jacket and, of course, beef jerky. While waiting in the shrubbery, I sat and listened to the operation over the radio. My excitement grew with the increasing roar of the planes’ engines and honking of geese. Final commands were given and I watched as the confused flock of geese walked smoothly from water to shore and into the pot. The banding itself is an assembly line. Geese are captured in the pot and handed over the ropes to a carrier. The carrier transports them to people kneeling on a tarp with pliers

This year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service crew banded more geese than during any of the previous 29 years of this program — 1,200 geese after two days! The yearly goal is 1,000 and the pot sizes are kept small to reduce stress on the geese. and bands. The sex of the goose is determined by inverting the cloaca. Substantial black coloration on the lower chest indicates that the goose is older than two years. These observations, along with the band number, are verbalized to the recorder. Lastly, the geese are released back into the water. This year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service crew banded more geese than during any of the previous 29 years of this program — 1,200 geese after two days! The yearly goal is 1,000 and the pot sizes are kept small to reduce stress on the geese. Fortunately, no geese fatalities occurred. A successful operation with more geese banded. These efforts are essential for monitoring and protecting another one of Alaska’s magnificent creatures. Brianna Kilbourne is a biological intern at the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. You can find more information about the refuge at  http://kenai.fws.gov or  http://www.facebook.com/ kenainationalwildliferefuge.

. . . Dock Continued from page C-1

now the field station. That year, the first school group, students from Paul Banks Elementary School, visited. By 1984 the society started offering day tours to the field station. Eventually the China Poot Bay Society became the Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies. It now has the Peterson Bay Field Station, the 140-acre Carl Wynn Nature Center on East Skyline Drive and its headquarters on Smoky Bay Way off Lake Street. Kaplan said she remembered the first grant application from CACS when she was on the staff with the Rasmuson Foundation. No one knew of CACS, so Ed Rasmuson, the Anchorage banker whose family started the foundation, said to call former legislator Clem Tillion in Halibut Cove. “He said, ‘Oh, they’re a little bit greenie, but they’re good people. You should fund them,’” Kaplan said she remembered Tillion saying. Over the years, along with the big grant for the dock, the Rasmuson Foundation has funded smaller projects, like yurt platforms and a kitchen remodel. Trowbridge said the upgrades have made the facility more attractive to groups. Located in a little cove at the head of Peterson Bay about 5 miles from the Homer Spit, the field station is on a peninsula separating China Poot Bay from Peterson Bay. Boat

. . . Change Continued from page C-1

with more glacial melt, it’s a glacier-dominated system. Much of the research in Southeast is focusing on Berners Bay. With an icefield, major rivers and estuaries, it supports and provides information about a vast variety of life. Graduate student Michael Winfree is attempting to tie landscape characteristics to stream temperature. He’s looking at 40 watersheds this summer, and 20 more the next, all across Southeast Alaska. Some of Nagorski’s research focuses on mercury’s aerial arrival in Southeast Alaska. “There are growing indications we have more and more mercury in Alaska, probably mostly from Asia, as it’s in coal,” Nagorski said. Buma spoke about the fluctuating health of different trees’ populations. Especially on the coast and farther south, yellow cedar trees are dying. They’re “tricked” by warm weather in the spring, leading late-season freezes to kill them by freezing their shallow roots, especially if there’s no snowpack. Alder trees are also important to deglaciated environments, as they add nitrogen to the soil. Part of graduate student Jeff Frederick’s research focuses on mountain goats in Berners Bay. Warmer summers may lead to higher mortality, he said, due in part to an abundance of low quality forage, and to temperature-regulating coping techniques that use up energy and lead to less time for foraging. Emily Whitney is researching near shore food webs, and Melissa Rhodes-Reece is researching marine iron.

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tours to the field station swing by Gull Island. The setting offers the best of the Kachemak Bay south shore: tide pooling and beach walks around the lagoon and hikes in lush rain forests. The Lost and Found Lake Trail, for example, takes hikers through stands of spruce and past blueberry bushes to a gem of a little lake. From April to October, school groups visit for day or overnight educational trips. CACS offers day tours that include a trip across the bay, guided tide pooling and forest hikes. Touch tanks and aquariums on the field station deck give a close-up view of marine life. Through St. Augustine’s Kayak and Tours, people also can take a half-day kayak adventure. Five, six-person yurts accommodate groups or people who just want to extend their stay. CACS also offers family camps on several weekends a summer. Trowbridge said the family camp is similar to what kids might experience. “It’s kind of like a combination of a low-key school program,” she said. “They can look at microscopes. We make fish printing T-shirts.” People also can book yurts for group events like family reunions. Marilyn Sigman, a former CACS executive director who also is a writer, has organized a writing retreat at the field station for later this summer. “We would love to do that more,” Trowbridge said. “It’s comfortable. It’s still remote. It’s nice to be over there. It’s The list of Southeast Alaskan climate-change research topics goes on. The U.S. Forest Service and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game also have a hand in much of that research. With the warming of Southeast Alaskan winters, and a change from a snow-dominated system to a rain-dominated system, the studies are even more important. Some watersheds can serve as a future vision of others, Pyare said. The point of EPSCoR-funded research is to help Alaskan communities figure out how to respond to social and environmental changes. The final goal, according to Alaska’s EPSCoR page, is to “establish a permanent Center for the Adaptation of Northern Social-Ecological Systems.” For information about Alaska’s EPSCoR research in Southeast and the rest of Alaska, visit this site: http://www. alaska.edu/epscor.

Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies

of sundew carnivorous plants Lost and Found Lake Trail, 1.2 miles, 1-2 hour hike; EarthInformation and reserva- quake Point Trail, 2 miles round tions: 907-235-6667; www.ak- trip, 3-4 hour hike China Poot Bay Beach Trail coastalstudies.org March 1982: Founded as the (low tide), 20-minute hike Tours: China Poot Bay Society 1982: Dr. James Wong cabin Peterson Bay Natural History purchased and finished, be- Day Tour, $140; includes boat ride, tour of Gull Island, and comes Peterson Bay 8-hour visit at the field station Field Station 1983: First school group from Peterson Bay Day Tour and Paul Banks Elementary School kayak tour, $180; includes boat ride, tour of Gull Island, and visits field station 1990: First floating dock in- kayak tour Overnight at Peterson Bay stalled 2014: Metal dock installed and in a yurt, $35/person or $120 six-person yurt (free to CACS dedicated members) Family camps Peterson Bay Field Station Features: Kitchen, eating area, Aug. 8-10, $450 includes two community space, outdoor adults and one child; $375 indeck and fire pit, composting cludes one adult and 1 child; toilets, yurt cabins, salt water each additional family member is $80. Kayaking is optional and aquarium and touch tanks. an additional $50 per person. Peterson Bay Trail System: Bog Trail, short trail with view

quiet. It’s not too difficult to get to.” Don’t expect a lush Alaska wilderness lodge with gourmet meals — unless you cook them yourself. The yurts have power and electric heaters, but the toilets are compostable privies. The kitchen has stoves, sinks and pots and pans. “We’re still rustic,” Trowbridge said. “It’s not too fancy.” User fees for the Peterson Bay Field Station tours and other CACS programs provide about 60 percent of its funding. Trowbridge said the goal is for

CACS to keep and also expand its year-round program with full-time staff. People on a limited budget who want to visit Peterson Bay can do so by volunteering at end-of-season work parties. There also are projects volunteers can do during the season, like clearing trails. Field station coordinator Katie Gavenus has a punch list for volunteers, Trowbridge said. Michael Armstrong can be reached at michael.armstrong@homernews.com.

Dog nose work demo on tap Peninsula Dog Obedience Group is sponsoring a nose work demonstration July 26 from 1-3 p.m, at Sportsman’s Warehouse in Soldotna. This is a new and growing sport for your dog that encourages it to use it’s inherent abilities to sniff and hunt. It is a low impact sport suitable for old, young and challenged dogs to participate and enjoy. For more information call 907-262-6846.

Salmon Cycle Series hits trails The Salmon Cycle Series mountain bike races are under way Thursdays at Tsalteshi Trails behind Skyview High School. The event is free for Tsalteshi members, $5 for everyone else. Registration starts at 5:30 p.m.; races at 6 p.m.

Dutch oven cooking competition registration open Register now for the Alaska State Dutch Oven Competition! Forms are available online at soldotnachamber.com or at the Soldotna Chamber of Commerce office at 44790 Sterling Highway. The competition will be held at the Progress Days festival on July 26. For more information contact the Soldotna Chamber of Commerce at 262-9814 or tami@ soldotnachamber.com.

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KENAI RIVER FRONT HOME. World-Class SALMON FISHING out your back door! 5-Bedroom, 3-Bath Ranch home, att, heated 4+ car gar. Open kitchen, dining/ living area with 5 picture windows all with views of the river! 112' RIVER frontage. 48' Aluminum dock with fish cleaning table/ sink/ water. Nat. Gas heat, Wood stove, Automatic backup generator. Landscaped yard with Fire Pit/ view of the Kenai Mtns. For MORE INFO See: KENAIRIVERDREAM.blogspot.com Call: (907)252-4671 $749,000. FSBO

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3-Bedroom, 2 1/2-bath 2466sq.ft. home for sale. Located on K-Beach between Kenai & Soldotna on the Kenai River. This home has an 1100sq.ft. attached garage and work shop area, storage shed, paved driveway and established lawn with sprinkler system. The view is gorgeous with the mountains, kenai flats, Kenai river and the city of Kenai. Enjoy watching the amazing wild life from the comfort of your home including eagles, moose, caribou, coyotes, seals and the occasional bear and beluga sightings. Asking $599,000. (907)283-5447 or (907)398-6885.

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Cute & Cozy 1-Bedroom, 1-Bath Cabin, 840sq.ft. 1.69 acres $99,900. MLS# 14-1074 Jeannie Smith Kenai Real Property Services jeannie@kenaireal.com 907-398-3729

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AND CABIN CASTAWAY COVE. Kenai River front double lot. 70 foot frontage by 100 feet deep. KNOCK EM DEAD RED SALMON HOLE right in front of cabin. electricity available. Very accessible location. Age forces me to sell this very valuable location... Lots 34 and 35 block 9, Castaway Cove, $112,000. Borough book and page map 55-253 Call me for a visit to the property (907)252-4500 or (907)283-4960

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www.KenaiRiverRealty.com LARGE HOME Lot of room & potential at a great price. Lower level is currently being used as a rental. Huge Garage and upper level including large master bedroom. Level .97 acre wooded parcel. MLS# 14-9059 $199,900

KENAI MOUNTAIN VIEWS Year round, weekend getaway, or summer home, just a minute to Brown’s Lake and close to Kenai River. Plenty of parking for your boat or RV. MLS# 14-10658 $219,900

WELL BUILT 1680 SF HOME JUST SOUTH OF NINILCHIK Big bedrooms, large utility room and bonus room for an office or small third bedroom. 2 acre lot with room for a shop or garage. Close to Anchor River, Deep Creek and Ninilchik fisheries. MLS#14-7794 $174,900

A MILLION DOLLAR VIEW! Cute 2 BR cabin on the bluff, Illiamna and Redoubt view across Inlet. Only 2 miles from the fishing mecca of Ninilchik/ Deep Creek. MLS# 13-8371 $199,000

COUNTRY LIVING! 2000+ sf home in Ninilchik with a 1500+ sf unfinished basement. Energy efficient. 2 sheds and a 40X60 gravel pad ready for a shop. MLS# 13-8343 $249,000

KENAI MAGIC LODGE is an Alaskan fishing lodge, has 6 log cabins. On the banks of the Kenai River and surrounded by forest and wildlife wonders. MLS# 13-10931 $1,100,000

THE FISHERMAN’S DREAM Very nice completely finished Duplex or family home. Canal for your boat to ease into the Kenai River. Decks overlooking the river. MLS# 11-3430 $709,500

TWO PROPERTIES IN ONE Nice modern cabin right on the beach AND huge private bluff lot with amazing views right in Ninilchik. 6.7 acres in all. MLS# 12-361 $210,000

Five Star teaM If you are interested in buying or selling your property contact a member of the Five Star team.

✩ Dorothy Cunningham ✩ ✩ Carl Lewis ✩ Sharilyn Erickson ✩ ✩ Michelle R. Medley ✩ Elaine Rainey ✩ ✩ Carey Hart ✩ Matt Davis ✩ ✩ Tiffany Foust ✩ Robyn Williams ✩ Heidi Meehan ✩ Teri Josephson ✩ Matt Letzring ✩ Jo Poindexter ✩ Diane Melton ✩ Considering listing or Buying Property alWayS reaCH For tHe StarS

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A locally owned and operated Full Service Real Estate Office 170 e. Corral, Ste 1, Soldotna

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SOUTH OF SOLDOTNA 3 br, 1 ba older 2400+ sf home on 1.76 acres. MLS# 14-3240 $130,000

STERLING 1.31 acres in Sterling with 2 br, 1 ba cabin. MLS# 13-5139 REDUCED $79,000

Waterfront Lots

WHAT A VIEW!!! 1.39 acres. Large Kenai River lot that slopes down to the river giving a great view. Fantastic trout and salmon fishing from your riverbank. Owner financing available. MLS# 13-9159 REDUCED $159,000 KBEACH BLUFF LOT 2.49 acres. Affordable bluff lot with uninhabitable structure and bluff erosion issues. This property comes with gas and mineral rights! MLS 14-10321 $44,900 KENAI RIVER LOT 1.02 acres. Mountain and river views! Close to the confluence of the Moose and Kenai Rivers. Seller will carry paper with 20% down. MLS# 13-11475 $230,000 EAST MACKEY LAKE LOT 11.95 acres of prime lake front property. Great spot for your lakefront estate, lodge or cabins! Close to town, on a float plane size lake. Owner fInancing available. Two adjacent lots also for sale. MLS# 13-5403 REDUCED $166,000

KASILOF 2 story home on a quiet street in Kasilof, close to the school & the fire station. On 1.42 acres of level, cleared land, this home comes with an additional 600 SF cabin that can be for guests or rental income. Large utility shed & plenty of parking. MLS# 14-8110 $250,000

SOLID OAK LOG HOME! Oak logs imported from Missouri were used to create this gorgeous home ON Crooked Creek. MLS# 14-10680 $320,000

Land Land Land Land HOMER .73 acres outstanding views! 3.5 miles east of Homer MLS# 12-7221 $80,000 BROWNS LAKE 6.23 acres close to Browns Lake, electric, pad, driveway MLS# 12-14531 $40,000 5 acres close to Browns Lake, electric on site. MLS# 08-1640 $35,000 .96 – 1.09 acres 3 lots w/ owner finance MLS# 11-11696 $18,000 ea NINILCHIK 1.6 – 2.4 acres Four awesome lots! MLS# 13- 12680, 81, 82, 83 $35,000 ea CLAM GULCH 1-3 acres 8 lots w/ owner finance MLS# 12-8737 starts at $11,500 ANCHOR POINT 9.39 acres 8 lots with owner financing MLS# 13-3922 starts at $9,900

STERLING 1.03 acres at the end of a very private road. Dry ground and big trees abound. Adjacent lot is also for sale (MLS 14-10390). Discount for both! MLS 14-10389 2 @ $23,900 ea. 6.4 acres partially cleared, well in & nice little creek MLS# 13-4419 $119,000 2 acres nice, level lot off Scout Lake Loop MLS# 10-15608 $50,000 FUNNY RIVER 0.94 – 1.15 acres Three beautiful residential lots with big spruce trees less than a block from the Kenai River. MLS#14-5851 Starting at $24,900 KENAI .46 acres in Kenai. MLS# 14-1914 $8,995 .34 acres in Kenai. MLS# 00-311581 $7,500

K-BEACH .96 acres Nice wooded lot in the popular Ciechanski Road area. Utilities adjacent to lot. Lots of trees and southern exposure! Owner financing available. MLS# 14-8272 $24,900 NIKISKI 1.48 acres beautiful, well treed, Barbara Lake access MLS# 13-13833 $12,500

OWN THE WHOLE SUBDIVISION! Already subdivided, 18 lots ranging from .94 to 1.9 acres each. 12 already have electricity adjacent and Enstar says natural gas in 2015. Across the street from high end Kenai River homes, 20 acres with nice trees and level, dry ground. MLS 14-8922 $250,000

Homes

Homes

Real Estate For Sale Commercial Property Condominiums/Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

Lake front home with float plane accessibility. Quiet lake home for someone with many interests --- landscaping; animal raising (barn, tack room, chicken coop) art/handicraft studio (26 X 26) that could become separate bedrooms; lake for sailing, canoeing, kayaking, swimming; float plane accessible; two bedroom apartment for B & B; two car, heated garage; many, many possibilities. This unusual home is built into a hillside. The unique house kept expanding up the hill. All three stories are at ground level,with the main floor handicapped accessible. Windows everywhere. You live with nature. Built as close as possible to 5 Star requirements and to be as maintenance free as possible. It has cement siding, vinyl windows and storm doors. Seven miles south of Soldotna. Priced for sale this summer at $367,000. For appointment to see this home call Ruth at (907)262-9619 or Sharilyn at 5 Star (907)252-3163 C

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Commercial Property BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Assisted Living business for sale. Charming log construction on leased building. Owner retiring. 8 rooms fully occupied. Could be increased to 16. Soldotna location. 12 cap rate at $578,625. MLS#14-121 McKay Investment (907)260-6675

Find your new vehicle today in the Classifieds!

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014 C-5

Homes

Homes

Homes

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Homes FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE IN PLACING ADS YOU MAY USE YOUR VISA OR MASTER CARD

Commercial Property

Land

MIXED USE BUILDING 7 Offices, 2-bedroom apt., and pizza restaurant. Ideal for owner occupant for the offices and commercial rentals as well. Highway Frontage in Soldotna. 7200sq.ft. for $631,000. ($88. per Sq.Ft.) MLS #13-15371 McKay Investment (907)260-6675

1.7 to 2 ACRE LOTS. Holt Lamplight & Miller Loop. GAS, ELECTRIC & borough maintain roads. Owner financed , 10% down, 8% interest, 10 years. $29,500. (907)776-5212 KENAI RIVER/

Homes HOME FOR SALE.

All real estate advertising in this publication is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this publication are available on an equal opportunity basis.

NIKISKI 3-Bedroom, 2.5-baths, large kitchen with island, wood burning stove, 2-car garage.v1 supplied 127801 approximately 2000sqft., on 2 acres. Very peaceful, a lot of wildlife. $310,000. (907)776-8487, (907)394-1122 KENAI KEYS PRICE REDUCTION 4-Bedroom, 2-bath in gated community, with boat launch a stone’s throw. ABOVE the flood plain. Contemporary and scrupulously maintained 2 level home. A steal at $315,000. NOW $295,000. MLS# 12-12227 McKay Investment Co.

(907)260-6675

PRIVATE LOT. Protected slough, Castaway Cove. Castaway Cove is a gated community with 24 hour access fo property owners. $57,500. George (801)244-7285, (907)252-0946. SUB JC LOT/ 85 13:50KENAI 8/8/02 Soldotna. River access. Boat tie up, utilities in. $85,000. (907)350-3180

Iris

*127801*

LOT FOR SALE 2 acres on Tote Road, paved road, gas, electric, phone. level, good soil. $30,000. per lot. (907)398-1211 The most dangerous animals in the forest don’t live there.

ONLY YOU CAN PR E VE N T W I L D FIRE S. w w w. s m o k e y b e a r. c o m

NOTE TO PUB: DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW, FOR I.D. ONLY. NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAS. Wildfire Prevention - Newspaper (2 1/16 x 2) B&W WFPA01-N-03259-C “Animals” 85 screen Film at Schawk 212-689-8585 Reference #: 127801

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C-6 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014 Rentals

Homes

Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

Apartments, Unfurnished EXCELLENT OCEAN VIEW! Bay Arm Apartments, Kenai. Accepting applications for 1 bedroom apartment, utilities included. $25. nonrefundable application fee. No pets. (907)283-4405. NEAR VIP Sunny 2-bedroom, 1,100sqft., $1,050. washer/dryer, Dish TV. carport, utilities included. No Smoking/ No Pets. (907)398-0027. REDOUBT VIEW Soldotna’s best value! Quiet, freshly painted, close to schools. 1-Bedroom from $625. 2-Bedroom from $725. 3-Bedroom, 2-bath, from $825. No pets. (907)262-4359.

Apartments, Furnished 1-LARGE ROOM FULLY FURNISHED Soldotna, quiet setting, includes utilities. (907)394-2543. KENAI 1-Bedroom, furnished, heat, cable included. No pets. $700. month. (907)283-5203, (907)398-1642. LONGMERE AREA 2-bedroom, Available Aug 1. No smoking/ pets. Washer/dryer, WiFi, all utilities included, $850./ 1st & last month rent plus deposit. (907)262-1790 (907)398-9695 Find your new vehicle today in the Classifieds!

Apartments, Unfurnished ALL TYPES OF RENTALS

Property Management Division 170 N. Birch Suite 101, Soldotna (907)262-2522 Mary.Parske@century21.com www.Century21FreedomRealty.com

Retail/Commercial Space PRIME KENAI RETAIL/ OFFICE SPACE 1,832SqFt to 20,000SqFt. Rates start @ $.50SqFt. Call Carr Gottstein Properties, (907)564-2424 or visit www.carrgottstein.com

Apartments, Furnished SOLDOTNA Furnished 1-Bedroom. Shady Lane Apartments. $725. Heat & cable included. No pets. (907)398-1642, (907)283-5203.

Homes 3-BEDROOM, 2-BATH, washer/dryer, partially furnished. No pets/ no smoking. Quiet setting. Holt Lamplight. Deposit required. (907)776-6544 WHY RENT ????? Why rent when you can own, many low down & zero down payment programs available. Let me help you achieve the dream of home ownership. Call Now !!! Ken Scott, #AK203469. (907)395-4527 or cellular, (907)690-0220. Alaska USA Mortgage Company, #AK157293.

Misc. Rentals RV SPOTS on the Kenai River, call for details. (907)953-0141

Roommate Wanted Must have job/ transportation. Robinson Loop. $500. month, $250. deposit. (907)394-8907

Clarion Classifieds work for you!

Homes

Buy it, Sell it, Find it...

Call 283-7551

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014 C-7

Homes

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Multiple Dwelling

For more safety tips visit SmokeyBear.com

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C-8 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014

Homes

NEWSPAPERS BROADEN HORIZONS

Hunting for a new job? Let us point you in the right direction. 907-283-7551

Advertise “By the Month” or save $ with a 3, 6 or 12 month contract. Call Advertising Display 283-7551 to get started!

Lic.# 31053

Vinyl Hardwood

A.D MEEKS

Gravel

SAND & GRAVEL

252-8917

Notices

Flooring

Lic.# 30426 • Bonded & Insured

Licensed, Bonded & Insured

The State of Alaska requires construction companies to be licensed, bonded and insured before submitting bids, performing work, or advertising as a construction contractor in accordance with AS 08..18.011, 08.18.071, 08.18.101, and 08.15.051. All advertisements as a construction contractor require the current registration number as issued by the Division of Occupational Licensing to appear in the advertisement. CONSUMERS MAY VERIFY REGISTRATION OF A CONTRACTOR . Contact the AK Department of Labor and Workforce Development at 907-269-4925 or The AK Division of Occupational Licensing in Juneau at 907-4653035 or at www.dced.state.ak.us/acc/home.htm

Pit Located on Beaver Loop in Kenai

D ecks • D eck Repa ir• C a rpentry REM O D ELIN G • B a ths • Kitchens Ad d itio ns Pa inting • D ry w a ll • Sid ing • Sto ne • Ro ck C ultured Sto ne • Sta ck Sto ne • Sm a ll Jo b s • D o o rs • W ind o w s • Flo o ring • RO O F REPAIR Ho m e Repa ir& M a intena nce

9 07-39 4-6034

30 Years E xperien ce

All W ork G uaran teed • Referen ces

L ic.# 901 31 5 L iability In suran ce

Hon est & Reliable

Computer Repair

Cleaning

O N E AL ASK AN H AN DYM AN SERV ICE

Pick-Up or Delivery

907-252-7148

FREE ESTIMATES!

252-3965

35 Years Construction Experience

TOPSOIL 50/50 MIX-SCREENED

RFN FLOORS Professional Installation & Repair Carpet Laminate Floors

ROOFING

283-3362

R ep a ir or R ep la c em en t of R oofin g, Sid in g,Sh eetroc k ,D ec k s,W in d ow s, D oors & M ost B u ild in g C om p on en ts. C lea n -u p & H a u lin g. & Insured 690-3490 776-3490 Licensed Lic.# 952948

(most chimneys) Thru July Only

Window Washing

WINDOW WASHING

Commercial • Residential ($35 min.) 10 years Experience • Free Estimates Hard Water Deposit Removal License #314902

907-398-7582

Reddi Towing & Junk Car Killers

Pick-Up or Delivered

252-2276

Dwight Ross d.b.a Ross Investments

Roofing

Long Distance Towing

Slide Backs • Winch Out Services • Auto Sales Vehicle Storage • Roll Over Recoveries We don’t want your fingers,

just your tows!

907. 776 . 3967

Underground Sprinklers

Top Soil

Plumbing & Heating

Painting

– Based in Kenai & Nikiski –

50/50 Mix SHREDDED & SCREENED

CRAFTSMAN ~ MTD ~ ARIENS ~ YARDMAN BRIGGS & STRATTON ~ TECUMSEH HONDA & OTHER MAKES

WILLIAMS

Roofing

Rain Gutters

LAWNMOWER & SNOWBLOWER PARTS & REPAIRS FOR ALL BRANDS

Lic.# 992114

Fax: (907) 262-2347

262-4338

24/7 PLUMBING AND

HEATING

No matter how old your system is we can make it more efficient. FREE Kenai: 283-1063 Text us at: ESTIMATES Nikiski: 776-8055 394-4017 email us at: linton401@gmail.com Soldotna: 262-1964 394-4018 UNLIMITED MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS License # 34609

35158 KB Drive Soldotna, aK 99669

TOPSOIL

PARTS - SALES - SERVICE

Lawnmowers & Snowblowers Bought & Sold Larry Stearns • 776-3704 51710 Koala Lane, Nikiski AK

Licened • Bonded • Insured

Licensed • Bonded • Insured All Repairs Guaranteed Installation Services LLC

Do you look forward to your gas bill each month? If not, you should call

Towing

Insulation Rain Gutters Small Engine Repair

LARRY’S SMALL ENGINE REPAIR

Phone: (907) 262-2347

130 S Willow Street, Suite 8 • Kenai, AK 99611

SPECIAL PRICING $160

OF ALASKA

Raingutter Technicians with over 20 years Alaskan Experience CONTINUOUS CUSTOM ALUMINUM & STEEL GUTTERS

?

Computer Repair, Networking Dell Business Partner Web Design & Hosting

CHIMNEY SWEEPS

Notice to Consumers

RAINTECH

Computer Problems Call Today ( 9 0 7 ) 2 8 3 - 5 1 1 6

Construction

Licensed • Bonded • Insured

• Carpentry • General Handyman Work • Sheetrock • Painting • Woodwork • Tree Removal • Hauling • Cleanup & Repairs • Decks • Kitchen Remodels • Bath • Siding • Remodels • Unfinished Projects?

Tim Wisniewski, owner • Residential & Commercial • Emergency Water Removal • Janitorial Contracts • Upholstery Cleaning

Scott The Handyman

LLC

Construction

Residential & Commercial

260-4943

Lic #39710

Construction

Concrete

252-7998

Licensed • Bonded • Insured •License #33430

HaveGENERAL ToolsCONTRACTING Will Travel

CONCRETE • STUCCO • FIREPROOFING • SCAFFOLD CERTIFIED

OILFIELD CERTS: Monolithic Slabs • Footings • Sidewalks Patios • Foam Block • Stonework EIFS and Traditional Stucco

• Experienced • Trustworthy • Dependable • Attention to detail Serving the Kenai Peninsula for over 11 years

Tim’s

Handyman

Automobile Repair

Bathroom Remodeling

Full or Partial Bathroom Remodels

Installation

Advertise in the Service Directory today! - Includes Dispatch. 283-7551

fax 907-262-6009

907-260-roof (7663) Member of the Kenai Peninsula Builders Association

www.rainproofroofing.com

ifying

Simpl

Life

C E R TIF IE D IN STAL L E R S

Se r vin g Alaskan s Sin c e 19 9 9 w w w .c o lto n sp rin kle rs.c o m 2 62 - 7 168 License# 313479

service directory ADVERTISING WORKS! 283-7551 Advertising Dept. C

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Contact us

www.peninsulaclarion.com classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com

Drivers/Transportation

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CLASSIFIEDS General Employment

Education

Instructional Designer 4 Kenai Peninsula College is looking for an exceptional individual to fill the position of Educational Technology Team Lead Instructional Designer. This is a 12 month, fulltime position at level 81, step 1; $2,350.40 bi-weekly salary, beginning October, 2014. Tuition waivers included with benefits package. Applications will be accepted until the position is closed. This position leads the KPC Educational Technology Team and serves as the lead Instructional Designer for the system of KPC campuses. The successful candidate will work with faculty and staff to conduct activities enhancing campus-based, distance, and hybrid education, providing support to faculty and staff for instructional design and educational technology to enhance effectiveness, collaborating to determine best tools and provides individual and group training. For more information about the position, and to apply for this position go to KPC's employment page at www.kpc.alaska.edu UAA is an AA/EO Employer and Educational Institution.

Education

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Kenai Peninsula College is hiring for the Assistant M Professor of Process Technology position at its Anchorage Extension Site. The successful candiK date will teach freshmen and sophomore level PRT courses and work with an excellent team to advise students and advance KPC's PRT and instrumentation programs in Anchorage. This is a 9 month per year tenure track position to begin January 2015 or negotiable. Tuition waivers included with benefits package. To apply for this position go to KPC's employment page at www.kpc.alaska.edu

Employment

Central Peninsula Hospital is seeking qualified candidates for the following positions:

Certified Medical Assistant

Homer Electric Association, Inc., is seeking a highly motivated individual to fill the System Operations Supervisor position in our Kenai office. The System Operations Supervisor is responsible for preparing switching orders, directing switching activities, providing crew direction, operating SCADA and other control monitoring services, coordinating personnel for power restoration operations, maintaining progress logs, and providing system data analysis and reports as required. The successful candidate will be scheduled in accordance with operational need and must be available to work hours that will allow for 24 hour coverage. A Bachelor's Degree in mechanical/electrical engineering, or the completion of a nationally recognized apprenticeship program, or five years of utility system operations, maintenance and/or construction background is desired. Five years of progressively responsible related work experience, a demonstrated ability to learn new concepts and master multiple computer systems may be substituted for a degree. The successful candidate will be required to submit a valid Alaska Driver's License and a good driving record with no record of driving under the influence (DUI) or reckless driving during the preceding three years, and containing no information which suggests that the applicant is other than a safe driver. Applications may be completed online at http://homerelectric.applicantpro.com/jobs . If you are an individual with a disability and would like to request a reasonable accommodation as part of the employment selection process, please contact Human Resources at (907) 235-3369 or hr@homerelectric.com. HEA is an Equal Opportunity Employer; Minorities/Women/Veterans/Disabled. Recruiting will continue until a qualified applicant has been hired.

General Employment

Process Technology Faculty Position

To place an ad call 907-283-7551

Healthcare

General Employment

NOW HIRING SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS & BUS ATTENDANTS for Soldotna & Seward areas. Must be 21 years of age. First Student 36230 Pero St Soldotna, AK 99669 907-260-3557

Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014 C-9

CITY OF SOLDOTNA EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Library Page Wage Range 1 $10.01/hr Non-Exempt The City of Soldotna has an opening for a Library Page position at the Soldotna Public Library. This position will work 10 hours per week. A complete job description is available on the City's website at http://ci.soldotna.ak.us/jobs.html. Must submit City application to Human Resources at 177 N. Birch Street, Soldotna, by email tcollier@ci.soldotna.ak.us, or by fax 866-596-2994. Recruitment closes at 5 p.m., July 25, 2014. The City of Soldotna is an EEO employer.

Kenai Peninsula Borough is recruiting for a full time Administrative Assistant, Capital Projects - under the general direction and supervision of the capital projects director, the administrative assistant prepares contracts, legal documents, project documentation and correspondence, inputs data, monitors project cost accounting, assists in report preparation, schedules appointments, gives information to callers, takes meeting minutes, and otherwise relieves officials of administrative and business details. This recruitment close on 7/21/14 at 5:00 p.m., ADT. A complete job description, including salary and benefits, and instructions to apply on-line, can be found at: http://agency.governmentjobs.com/kenaiak/ default.cfm

General Employment

Candidates must have current certification/ registration as CMA/RMA and excellent computer and customer skills. Without current Certification/Registration candidates must have one year of medical assistant experience and be eligible to take the CMA/RMA exam within a specified period of time to be determined at the time of hire. Prefer medical office and E.H.R. experience. LPN - Physician Services Candidates must be a graduate of a LPN program with current Alaska licensure. Good knowledge of nursing theory and practice; skilled in use of computer, applicable software, peripheral equipment and appropriate clinical data bases. Excellent customer services skills. Prefer one year of health care experience, preferably in a physician's office/clinic setting and phlebotomy experience.

Financial Human Resources Department 250 Hospital Place, Soldotna, AK 99669 Phone (907) 714-4785 Fax (907) 714-4974 All applications must be submitted on line at www.cpgh.org

CITY OF SOLDOTNA EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Regular Full Time Librarian I Wage Range 10 $21.79/Hr.-$28.17Hr. Non-Exempt The City of Soldotna has an opening for a regular full time Librarian I at the Soldotna Public Library. A complete job description is available on the City's website at http://ci.soldotna.ak.us/jobs.html. Must submit City application, resume and cover letter to Human Resources at 177 N. Birch Street, Soldotna, by email tcollier@ci.soldotna.ak.us, or fax 866-596-2994 by 5 p.m., July 25, 2014. The City of Soldotna is an EEO employer.

Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgages/Loans

Pre-employment screens are required. We are an equal employment opportunity employer.

Office & Clerical Emerald Alaska Inc

nin

has immediate opening Vac Truck Driver. Need 40 hours HAZWOPER, Lifetime driving record. Apply: www.emeraldnw.com careers@emeraldnw.com questions- (206)832-3012

HUNGER KEEPS UP ON CURRENT EVENTS, TOO. 1 IN 6 AMERICANS STRUGGLES WITH HUNGER.

TOGETHER WE’RE

Hunger is closer than you think. Reach out to your local food bank for ways to do your part. Visit FeedingAmerica.org today.

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Go Online and go to The Peninsula Secretary/Receptionist

Ninilchik, Alaska Ninilchik Traditional Council (NTC) is seeking qualified applicants for the position of Secretary/Receptionist. Must have dynamic customer service skills, strong computer skills, and be able to interact in a positive manner with all people. Duties include receiving and directing incoming & outgoing phone calls, mail, faxes, and email. Experience required. Excellent benefits. P.L. 93-638 Applies. Interested applicants can contact NTC 15910 Sterling Hwy., Ninilchik Alaska P.O. Box 39070, Ninilchik, Alaska 99639 Phone (907) 567-3313 ~ Fax: (907) 567-3308 Email: ntc@ninilchiktribe-nsn.gov Website: www.ninilchiktribe-nsn.gov

Clarion Online... and find the savings today! Look at the Classifieds, for items to buy, sell, or

UAA is an AA/EO Employer and Educational Institution.

General Employment

Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

trade. Also

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You can find the ideal pet to match your family’s needs by searching our database of local animals based on animal type, breed, size and gender. Come see us today and save a life.

coupons, to find even more savings. The Peninsula

283-7551 • 150 Trading Bay Rd. Kenai, AK 99611 www.peninsulaclarion.com

Clarion online is your source for News, Sports, Weather, and up-to-date information about events happening right here on the Peninsula. Check us out today!

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283-7551

DecideToDrive.org

news_4column.indd 4

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C-10 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014

MOVING/ ESTATE SALE Antique cash register, player piano, furniture, 60in. TV withstand, office furniture, tools, building materials, tires, Shopsmith, ‘97 3500 Dodge dually. 48584 W. Poppy Lane. Friday- Saturday, 9am-5pm.

ESTATE SALE Friday- Sunday 9am-5pm. NO EARLY BIRDS, NO CHECKS,! Lazy boy’s, beds & frames, kitchen goods, tools, chest freezer, lots more misc. 4055 Lupine Dr. Kenai. Look for signs.

Garage Sales FRIDAY 7-FAMILY SALE Scout Lake to Camouflage Crt. Follow signs 8am- 4pm. Antiques, canoe, teachers stuff, guns, hardwood flooring, good clothes sizes kids to adults, furniture & household items.

Garage Sales

AMANA REFRIGERATOR/ FREEZER, White $250. (907)252-6452 RANKIN DELUXE 24in. GRIDDLE 2 burner, 3/4in. plate. $450. (907)235-2696

www.peninsulaclarion.com

Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

Dogs

KENAI KENNEL CLUB

Pets & Livestock Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

Pawsitive training for all dogs & puppies. Agility, Conformation, Obedience, Privates & Rally. www.kenaikennelclub.com (907)335-2552

Recreation Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boats Charter Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snow Mobiles Sporting Goods

Boats & Sail Boats 19FT. LUND Aluminum Riverboat Fully equipped 50-Horse Yamaha, 4 stroke. 3 pedestal seats. River ready, just like new. (907)598-1945

Campers/Travel Trailers 14FT. JAYCO Self contained, great shap, sleeps 4. $7,500. (907)776-5414

**ASIAN MASSAGE** Grand opening Happy Holiday, enjoy hospitality anytime. (907)398-8896

THAI HOUSE MASSAGE

Located in Kenai Behind Wells Fargo/ stripmall. (907)252-6510 (907)741-1105,

Health

(907)395-7306.

Health

Household Cleaning Services

AKC Brittany Pups Dam & sire proven hunters. Great companions. References available. Order for pick of litter based on date. $250 deposit received. Call (907)953-4816 or www.fraserbrittanys.com

$1,000.

Health

Health

LOOKING TO CLEAN Homes/ Businesses, Soldotna Call Barb (907)741-0190 or message (907)741-1332 TEACH ALL DOGS Everything with brains, not pain. Obedience, Puppy, Nose work, Rally, Agility, Privates. K-Beach Road (907)262-6846 www.pendog.org

**ASIAN MASSAGE** Grand Opening, Welcome Visitors, Fishermen, New customers. (907)741-1644.

Notices/ Announcements Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

Livestock

Personals/ Notices

TULLOS FUNNY FARM

Taking orders. Quality Timothy Hay. $8. (907)262-4939.

Meet Single right now. Just real people like you. (907)398-8874

Delivery Problems? •Did your paper not make it to your house this morning? •Did the paper carrier get the wrong house? •Going on Vacation? •Do you want to subscribe to the Peninsula Clarion? www.peninsulaclarion.com

PENINSULA THAI MASSAGE

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Thompsons’s/ Soldotna, next to Liberty Tax. (907)252-8053, (907)398-2073 News, Sports, Weather & More!

CAL TO O L D

BLT KENAI PENINSULA

SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY

Call our New Circulation Hotline! 283-3584

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Appliances

Pork's Torques & Tranny Part's.

Dogs

BIG MOVING SALE Saturday 9am til... 36345 Mayonni St. Soldotna. 5 minutes north of Fred Meyer.

Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn/Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Services Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

We Build & Sell Torques Converters and Transmission Parts for all makes & models of automatic Transmissions.foreign & Domestic, stock, modified stock, performance and sever duty. Give us a call 907-373-4401 or check us out on the Web at porkstorques.com or visit us at 491 Lucille st. in Wasilla. And like on Facebook !!!

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014 C-11

Would you like to have your business highlighted in Yellow Advantage? • Reach readers in the newspaper and online that are ready, willing and able to buy your goods and services. • Have your business stand out from the competition by creating top of mind awareness. • Ads appear EVERYDAY in the newspaper • Easy to use online search engine puts your business ahead of the competion. • Update your ads and listings frequently.

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Automotive Insurance

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130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

Located in the Willow Street Mall

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai

283-4977

AK Sourdough Enterprises Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

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Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing 35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dentistry

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

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Located in the Willow Street Mall

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

Extrations, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

Emergency appts. available Denali Kid Care/Medicaid

605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

KENAI PENINSULA BOROUGH SCHOOL DISTRICT INVITATION TO BID #101-15 Polycom Video Conference System The Kenai Peninsula Borough School District hereby invites qualified vendors to submit a proposal for acceptance by the District to purchase Polycom Video Conference System. One (1) original of the sealed bid must be submitted to the Purchasing Department, Kenai Peninsula Borough School District, 139 East Park Avenue, Soldotna, AK 99669, no later than 4:00 PM local time on August 8, 2014. Bid can be obtained by calling 907-714-8876 during normal business hours, or from the District website www.kpbsd.k12.ak.us Kenai Peninsula Borough Code requires that businesses or individuals contracting to do business with the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District be in compliance with Borough tax provisions. PUBLISH: 7/18, 2014

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IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF ALASKA THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT AT KENAI In the Matter of the Estate of BENJAMIN E. KRUSE, Deceased. Case No. 3KN-14-107

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PR/E

NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned Personal Representative of the estate, at DOLIFKA & ASSOCIATES, ATTORNEYS AT LAW, P.O. Box 498, Soldotna, Alaska, 99669. DATED this 15th day of July, 2014.

PUBLISH: 7/18, 25, 8/1, 2014

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Notice to Creditors IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF ALASKA THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT AT KENAI In the Matter of the Estate of SHIRLEY LUCILLE MORGAN, Date of Death: May 15, 2014 Deceased.

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Case No. 3KN-14-00103PR NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that James A. Arness has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to James A. Arness, Personal Representative of the Estate of Shirley Lucille Morgan, c/o Baldwin & Butler, LLC, 125 N. Willow Street, Kenai, Alaska, 99611, or filed with the Court. DATED at Kenai, Alaska this 14th day of July, 2014. BALDWIN & BUTLER, LLC James N. Butler, III AK Bar No. 9311066 Attornery for the Estate of Shirley L. Morgan The early stages of communication disorders are easier to spot when you know the signs. Early detection can improve treatment

PUBLISH: 7/18, 25, 8/1, 2014

1831/2506

and quality of life. For more info visit IdentifyTheSigns.org.

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Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notice City of Kenai, PWSID# 240448 Elevated Arsenic Levels in Drinking Water

PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF ALASKA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION HILCORP ALASKA, LLC STEELHEAD PLATFORM The Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (ADEC) proposes to renew Air Quality Control Operating Permit No. AQ0009TVP03 to the Steelhead Platform, under Alaska Statutes 46.14 and regulation 18 AAC 50. Applicant: Hilcorp Alaska, LLC Mailing Address: 3800 Centerpoint Drive, Suite 100 Anchorage, Alaska 99503 Location: Upper Cook Inlet, Alaska 60° 49' 50â&#x20AC;? North 151° 36' 0â&#x20AC;? West Activity: The significant emission units at the stationary source consist of seven turbines, six reciprocating internal combustion engines, two flares, and two dehydration units. Application: As required by 18 AAC 50, Hilcorp Alaska, LLC applied for a renewal operating permit for the Steelhead Platform. The owner or operator submitted an application on June 10, 2013. This public notice is for the draft operating permit only. Emissions: The potential annual emissions of regulated air contaminants at the facility are: 31 tons of particulate matter (PM-10), 861 tons of nitrogen oxides (NO X), 78 tons of sulfur dioxide (SO 2), 268 tons of carbon monoxide (CO), and 36 tons of volatile organic compounds (VOC). The total potential emissions of regulated air contaminants, other than greenhouse gas emissions, is 1,274 tons per year. Department Preliminary Review: Based on review of the application, ADEC has drafted a preliminary permit decision for the Steelhead Platform. Available Information: Copies of ADEC's draft operating permit and statement of basis are available at ADEC's Anchorage office, 619 E. Ship Creek, Suite 249, Anchorage, AK 99501 (907) 269-7577. The administrative record for this permit is available for review at the Anchorage office of ADEC during normal business hours, Monday through Friday from 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM. The draft operating permit and statement of basis are also available at ADEC's website at: http://dec.alaska.gov/applications/air/ airtoolsweb. Opportunity for Public Participation: Notice is also given that any interested person may present written statements relevant to the draft documents by the close of the public comment period. Written comments will be included in the record if received by close of the comment period. ADEC will consider all comments received and make any changes ADEC finds beneficial or necessary to assure compliance with 18 AAC 50 or State Law. Any person may request a public hearing and that hearing will be held if ADEC finds that good cause exists. ADEC will issue a final decision to issue or deny the permit after the close of the public comment period. ADEC complies with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. If you are a person with a disability who may need a special accommodation in order to participate in this public process, please contact Deborah Pock at (907) 269-0291 or TDD Relay Service 1-800-770-8973/TTY or dial 711 within 30 days of publication of this notice to ensure that any necessary accommodations can be provided. Please direct written statements or requests relevant to the draft operating permit to Scott Faber at ADEC's Anchorage office, by facsimile at (907) 269-7508 or send e-mail to scott.faber@alaska.gov. Comments must be received by close of public comments period at 4:30 p.m. on August 18, 2014.

The water sources used by the City of Kenai contain arsenic. Arsenic is a naturally occurring mineral in the ground that may dissolve and contaminate water supplies. It is a common contaminant found in groundwater wells located throughout the Kenai Peninsula. In 2006, the federal Environmental Protection Agency lowered the maximum contamination level (MCL) for arsenic in drinking water from 50 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 ppb. Our routine arsenic test results vary depending on what wells we are using, but have historically ranged from ND (non-detectable) to 31.10 ppb. What do these arsenic test results mean? Our arsenic levels do not represent an immediate public health risk. This is not an emergency. If it had been, you would have been notified within 24 hours. However, some people who drink water containing arsenic in excess of the MCL over years could experience skin damage or problems with their circulatory system, and may have increased risk of getting cancer. What should you do? If you have specific health concerns, please consult your doctor. If you have a severely compromised immune system, have an infant, are pregnant, or are elderly, you may be at an increased risk and should seek advice from your health care providers about drinking our water. What are we doing about it? We are currently working with the State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and will be collecting arsenic samples on a quarterly basis from any source that exceeds the arsenic MCL of 10 ppb. At the beginning of 2014 we were using water solely from well 2 which provides water that is below the arsenic MCL. Upon the completion of our newest well in April 2014 we began using well 2 and the new well 2B. Both of the wells are within regulatory limits for arsenic. Due to higher demand during summer months, and much lower than expected production from 2B, the two wells are not able to keep up with demand, and it was necessary to supplement our water production with wells 1 and 3. Both of those wells provide water that is in exceedance of the arsenic MCL. Wells 1 and 3 will be monitored for arsenic on a quarterly basis and compliance will be calculated on a running annual average at each sampling point. If we continue to exceed the MCL, we will work with the State to further address the issue. If our system was piped in such a way that we could mix the water from all four wells in a tank before delivering it to our customers, the arsenic test results from the mixed water would most probably fall below the MCL. However because the mixing occurs only in the water mains, and some of the wells test higher than the MCL, we must issue this notice. During the times of highest demand we produce only approximately 20% of our water from wells 1 and 3. During times of lower demand, we produce typically 0% and up to 20% of our water from these wells. This public health advisory is required by the State and provided to you by the City of Kenai to help ensure that your health is protected. For more information regarding this notice please contact Sean Wedemeyer, Public Works Director, with the City of Kenai at 907-283-8240. Notice Issuance Date: July 14, 2014.

PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE CANDACE M. KRUSE

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S u b s c r i b e To d a y !

283-3584

605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

Notice to Creditors

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Peninsula Memorial Chapels & Crematory Kenai........................................283-3333 Soldotna ..................................260-3333 Homer...................................... 235-6861 Seward.....................................224-5201

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PUBLISH: 7/16, 18, 22, 2014

1826/211

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Let Our House of Cards Fall Our local economy is like a house of cards...as cards are removed, the foundation crumbles. Shopping locally maintains an important part of our growth and prosperity.

PUBLISH: 7/17, 18, 2014

1828/03222

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Call our Circulation Hotline 283-3584 www.peninsulaclarion.com

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C-12 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014 Peninsula Clarion

www.peninsulaclarion.com • 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite #1, Kenai, Alaska 99611 • 283-7551 • FAX 283-3299 • Monday - Friday 8 A.M. - 5 P.M.

Classified Ad Rates Number of Days Run

2014 FRIDAY AFTERNOON/EVENING

1:30

A

B

4 PM

Nightline G’ (3) ABC-13 13

Alaska Daily

Always ny in (6) MNT-5 5 adelphia Late w/Craig (8) CBS-11 11 (N) ‘PG’ (9) FOX-4 4

The Insider (N)

Late ht With (10) NBC-2 Meyers

2

(12) PBS-7

7

Death ‘PG’

4:30

5 PM

A = DISH

5:30

News & Views ABC World (N) News

6 PM Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’

6:30 Wheel of Fortune ‘G’

7 PM

B = DirecTV

7:30

ernity” ‘14’

(31) TNT (34) ESPN

N FC (N)

(35) ESPN2 (36) ROOT

180 311

h Remini: (55) TLC 183 280 All u (56) DISC 182 278

Anthony

(57) TRAV 196 277

Pawn (58) HIST 120 269 s ‘PG’ hooting Cincin- (59) A&E 118 265 (60) HGTV 112 229

rnament: Program

9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30

20/20 ‘PG’

ABC News at (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live ‘14’ (:37) Nightline 10 (N) (N) ‘G’ 30 Rock ‘14’ How I Met The Office It’s Always Your Mother “Training Day” Sunny in ‘14’ ‘PG’ Philadelphia KTVA Night- (:35) Late Show With David Late Late cast Letterman (N) ‘PG’ Show/Craig The Arsenio Hall Show Two and a TMZ (N) ‘PG’ Aaron Eckhart; Gabourey Half Men ‘14’ Sidibe. ‘14’ Channel 2 (:34) The Tonight Show Star- (:36) Late News: Late ring Jimmy Fallon ‘14’ Night With Edition (N) Seth Meyers Anders Zorn in the Gilded Charlie Rose (N) Age Sweden’s premier painter Anders Zorn. ‘G’

Rules of En- Rules of En- Parks and 30 Rock ‘14’ 30 Rock ‘14’ It’s Always gagement gagement Recreation Sunny Gifts for Grandkids Toys. ‘G’ Electronic Gifts ‘G’

(61) FOOD 110 231

Good Luck Charlie ‘G’ iCarly ‘G’

“The Day After Tomorrow” (2004, Action) Dennis Quaid, Jake Gyllenhaal. (:31) “The Day After Tomorrow” (2004, Action) Dennis Quaid, Jake GyllenGlobal warming leads to worldwide natural disasters. haal. Global warming leads to worldwide natural disasters. Family Guy Family Guy Robot Chick- Aqua Teen The Venture American American Family Guy Family Guy Robot Chick‘14’ ‘14’ en ‘14’ Hunger Bros. ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ en ‘14’ No Limits (N) No Limits (N) The Pool Master “Ultimate Treehouse Masters Interna- The Pool Master “Ultimate Treehouse Masters Interna‘PG’ ‘PG’ Pools” (N) ‘PG’ tional “Japan” (N) ‘PG’ Pools” ‘PG’ tional “Japan” ‘PG’ Liv & Mad- Liv & Mad- Good Luck Jessie ‘G’ Dog With a Girl Meets Phineas and Wander Over I Didn’t Do Liv & Mad- Austin & A.N.T. Farm Dog With a Austin & die ‘G’ die ‘G’ Charlie ‘G’ Blog (N) ‘G’ World ‘G’ Ferb ‘G’ Yonder It ‘G’ die ‘G’ Ally ‘G’ ‘G’ Blog ‘G’ Ally ‘G’ iCarly “iQ” ‘Y’ The Thunder- Sam & Cat ‘Y’ Every Witch The Legend The Legend Kids’ Choice Sports 2014 Honoring Full House ‘G’ Friends ‘PG’ (:36) Friends (:12) Friends Ross sees his mans ‘Y’ Way (N) ‘G’ of Korra ‘Y7’ of Korra ‘Y7’ children’s favorite athletes. ‘G’ ‘PG’ son with a doll. ‘PG’ “P.S. I Love You” (2007, Romance) Hilary Swank, Gerard Butler. A widow “Sleepless in Seattle” (1993) Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan. A grieving widower The 700 Club ‘G’ Fresh Prince Fresh Prince gets messages left by her husband to help her cope. captures the heart of a recently engaged newswoman. Say Yes to the Dress: The Say Yes to the Dress: The Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes to the Dress: The Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes to the Dress: The Big Day “Kristi” ‘PG’ Big Day “Kristi” ‘PG’ Big Day ‘PG’ Big Day ‘PG’ Fat N’ Furious: Rolling Deadliest Catch A major Naked and Afraid ‘14’ Deadliest Catch The Opilio Deadliest Catch: On Deck Naked and Afraid ‘14’ Naked and Afraid ‘14’ Thunder ‘PG’ hydraulic leak. ‘PG’ season carries on. ‘PG’ “Shut-Out” (N) ‘14’ Bizarre Foods With Andrew Xtreme Waterparks: Buil.- Bizarre Foods America ‘PG’ Monumental Mysteries America Declassified ‘PG’ Mysteries at the Museum Monumental Mysteries ‘PG’ Zimmern ‘PG’ World’s Tallest (N) ‘PG’ ‘PG’ Modern Marvels “Mega Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars (:31) Pawn (:02) Pawnog- (:32) Pawnog- (:01) Pawn (:31) Pawn Meals” ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ Stars ‘PG’ raphy raphy Stars ‘PG’ Stars ‘PG’ Criminal Minds “Closing Criminal Minds “A Thin Line” Criminal Minds Pursuing two Criminal Minds “Sense Criminal Minds “Today I Do” (:02) Criminal Minds “Coda” (:01) Criminal Minds PursuTime” Bodies are found in A string of brutal home inva- lovers on a killing spree. ‘14’ Memory” Unusual murders in The team investigates disap- Reid connects with an autistic ing two lovers on a killing lifeguard towers. ‘14’ sions. ‘14’ Los Angeles. ‘14’ pearances. ‘14’ child. ‘PG’ spree. ‘14’ Love It or List It “The Cart- Love It or List It “Mishelle & Love It or List It “Lorraine & Love It or List It “Sandra & House Hunt- Hunters Int’l House Hunt- Hunters Int’l Love It or List It “Sandra & wright Family” ‘G’ Ron” ‘G’ Bob” ‘G’ Geoff” ‘G’ ers: Where? ers ‘G’ Geoff” ‘G’ Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive

Boy Meets Boy Meets World ‘PG’ World ‘PG’ Say Yes to the Dress: The Big Day ‘PG’ Fat N’ Furious: Rolling Thunder ‘PG’ Ghost Adventures “Alcatraz” ‘PG’ Modern Marvels “More Candy” ‘PG’ After the First 48 Suspected murderer claims self-defense. ‘14’ Love It or List It A couple is divided. ‘G’ Chopped Four teenaged chefs compete. ‘G’ Ultimate Factories “Harley- Ultimate Factories “NYC Davidson” ‘G’ Subway Car” ‘G’ The O’Reilly Factor (N) The Kelly File (N)

(65) CNBC 208 355

PREMIUM STATIONS ! HBO 303 504

er, Part Robert ^ HBO2 304 505

ng Kong”

+ MAX 311 516

w II” 5, Hor- 5 SHOW 319 546 R’ el L. Jackpushes 8 TMC 329 554

Paid Program Paid Program Red Eye (N) The Half Hour (:31) The Half ‘MA’ Hour The Almighty Johnsons ‘14’

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

(:15) “Gravity” (2013) Sandra Bullock. Two (:45) The Leftovers “Pilot” Tension in Maple- The Leftovers “Penguin One, The Leftovers Rev. Matt Real Time With Bill Maher (N Real Time With Bill Maher True Blood Sookie plans to astronauts become stranded in deep space. ton escalates. ‘MA’ Us Zero” Kevin goes to a Jamison struggles. ‘MA’ Same-day Tape) ‘MA’ ‘MA’ track down the H-Vamps. ‘MA’ ‘PG-13’ therapist. ‘MA’ “Cinema Verite” (2011) Diane Lane. TV “Lethal Weapon 3” (1992, Action) Mel Gibson, Danny Last Week To- “The Conjuring” (2013, Horror) Vera Farmiga, Patrick Wil- (:05) “Enough Said” (2013) Julia LouisJohn Lecameras follow the personal lives of a couple Glover, Joe Pesci. L.A. detectives and a wild woman crush a night-John son, Lili Taylor. Paranormal investigators confront a powerful Dreyfus. A divorcee is attracted to her new guizamo in the 1970s. ‘NR’ guns-to-gangs deal. ‘R’ demonic entity. ‘R’ friend’s ex-husband. ‘PG-13’ (2:50) (:45) “Lethal Weapon 2” (1989, Action) Mel Gibson, Danny (:45) “Ted” (2012, Comedy) Mark Wahlberg, Mila Kunis. Live (:40) “The Rock” (1996, Action) Sean Connery, Nicolas Cage, Ed Harris. Topless “Serena the “Ender’s Glover, Joe Pesci. Detectives nail a South African diplomat action/animated. A grown man has a live teddy bear as a Alcatraz Island terrorists threaten to gas San Francisco. ‘R’ Prophet (N) Sexplorer” Game” who is a drug-runner. ‘R’ constant companion. ‘NR’ ‘MA’ (2012) ‘NR’ (3:00) “Lord of War” (2005, (:15) “Man on a Ledge” (2012, Suspense) Sam Worthing- Masters of Sex “Parallax” ‘MA’ “Lee Daniels’ The Butler” (2013, Historical Drama) Forest (:15) Masters of Sex “Paral- (:15) Ray Donovan “Yo Soy Drama) Nicolas Cage, Jared ton, Elizabeth Banks, Jamie Bell. A disgraced ex-cop steps Whitaker, John Cusack. A White House butler serves many lax” ‘MA’ Capitan” ‘MA’ Leto. ‘R’ onto the ledge of a high-rise. ‘PG-13’ presidents over the years. ‘PG-13’ (3:30) “Margot at the (:05) “A Low Down Dirty Shame” (1994, Action) Keenen “Scary Video 5” (2005, Horror) Samantha “Barbershop 2: Back in Business” (2004, Comedy) Ice The 2014 AVN Awards The annual adult Wedding” (2007) Nicole Kid- Ivory Wayans, Jada Pinkett. A private eye goes after a drug Mumba. A teenager returns from the dead as Cube. A barbershop owner considers selling his establishmovie awards. ‘MA’ man. ‘R’ lord who was presumed dead. ‘R’ a zombie. ‘R’ ment. ‘PG-13’

July 13 - 19, 2014

Clarion TV

63¢ 44¢ 36¢ 29¢

Minimum of $6.30 per ad or 10 Word Minimum per Day Plus 6% Sales Tax • VISA & MasterCard welcome. Classified ads also run in the Dispatch and Online (except single day ads) *Ask about our recruitment ad pricing, details & deadlines

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“Hitman” (2007) Timothy Olyphant, Dougray Scott. An assassin becomes embroiled in a political conspiracy. The Cleve- The Cleve- American American land Show land Show Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’

Ultimate Factories “Frito Lay” Ultimate Factories “Bacardi” Ultimate Factories Europe’s Brew Dogs “Las Vegas” ‘PG’ Paid Program Paid Program ‘PG’ largest brewery. ‘G’ Hannity (N) The O’Reilly Factor The Kelly File Hannity On the Record With Greta (67) FNC 205 360 Van Susteren Tosh.0 (3:56) Fu(:26) Fu(4:56) South (:27) Tosh.0 The Colbert Daily Show/ Key & Peele Key & Peele Key & Peele Tosh.0 ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ South Park South Park (81) COM 107 249 turama ‘PG’ turama ‘PG’ Park ‘MA’ ‘14’ Report ‘PG’ Jon Stewart ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ the Dam(3:00) “Jeepers Creepers 2” “The Uninvited” (2009) Elizabeth Banks. A ghost warns a WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) ‘PG’ The Almighty Johnsons Dominion “Something Bor (82) SYFY 122 244 (2003) Ray Wise. young woman about her father’s fiancee. (N) ‘14’ rowed” ‘MA’

Matt MA’

Futurama ‘PG’ ’Til Death ‘PG’

Witches of East End Joanna “The Rebound” (2009, Romance-Comedy) Catherine Zeta- “Killers” (2010, Action) Ashton Kutcher, Katherine Heigl, “You Again” (2010, Romance-Comedy) Kristen Bell, Jamie (:02) “Killers” (2010, Action) Ashton Kutcher, Katherine 108 252 is happy when Frederick re- Jones, Justin Bartha, Kelly Gould. A newly single woman has Tom Selleck. A woman learns the hard way that her husband Lee Curtis, Sigourney Weaver. A woman learns that her turns. ‘14’ a fling with a much-younger man. is a hit man. brother is marrying her old nemesis. Heigl. NCIS: Los Angeles Sam NCIS: Los Angeles “Wanted” NCIS: Los Angeles Cyanide Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Covert Affairs “Silence (:01) Royal Pains ‘PG’ 105 242 helps a former friend. ‘14’ ‘14’ kills a lieutenant. ‘14’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ Kit” ‘14’ Friends Ross Friends ‘PG’ Seinfeld “The Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld “The Seinfeld “The Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy Funniest Wins “Roasted” A Funniest Wins “Roasted” A “Tower Heist” (2011, ComDealership” Cartoon” ‘PG’ Strong Box” “Peterotica” ‘14’ “Petergeist” ‘14’ comedy rap battle; a celebrity comedy rap battle; a celebrity edy) Ben Stiller, Eddie Murphy, 139 247 plays rugby. ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘14’ ‘14’ roast. (N) ‘MA’ roast. ‘MA’ Casey Affleck. ‘14’ Castle A casino owner is Castle The team searches for Castle Investigating a murder Castle The death of a famous Cold Justice (N) ‘14’ (:01) “Law Abiding Citizen” (2009, Suspense) Jamie Foxx, (:02) Cold Justice ‘14’ 138 245 murdered. ‘PG’ a sniper. ‘PG’ from 1947. ‘PG’ dog trainer. ‘PG’ Gerard Butler, Colm Meaney. (3:00) 2014 Open Championship Second Round. From the Royal Liverpool Golf Club in SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) 2014 ESPYs 140 206 Hoylake, England. Boxing Friday Night Fights. Karim Mayfield vs. Emmanuel CFL Football Hamilton Tiger-Cats at Calgary Stampeders. From McMahon Stadium in Cal- Olbermann Olbermann Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) 144 209 Taylor. From Huntington, N.Y. (N) (Live) gary. (N) (Live) (N) Mariners All The Game Graham Mariners MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. From Angel Stadium of Mariners MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. From 426 687 Access 365 Bensinger Pregame Anaheim in Anaheim, Calif. (N Subject to Blackout) (Live) Postgame Angel Stadium of Anaheim in Anaheim, Calif. Cops ‘14’ Jail ‘PG’ Cops ‘14’ Cops ‘PG’ Cops ‘14’ Cops ‘PG’ Cops ‘PG’ Cops ‘PG’ Rampage vs. King Mo (N) ‘14’ Jail ‘14’ Jail ‘14’ 241 241

d Luck Good Luck rlie ‘G’ (49) DISN 173 291 Charlie ‘G’ e hopes iCarly ‘G’ (50) NICK 171 300 (51) FAM

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SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

ice Vid (38) SPIKE 14’ coby. (2:00) “X2: X-Men United” (43) AMC 131 254 (2003) Patrick Stewart. er Squad King of the King of the (46) TOON 176 296 Hill ‘PG’ Hill ‘PG’ negades To Be Announced (47) ANPL 184 282

h Prince

8:30

Inside Edition Family Feud Family Feud Family Guy 30 Rock “Hard Monk “Mr. Monk and the Monk “Mr. Monk and the American Family Guy (N) ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ “Business Ball” ‘14’ 12th Man” Monk must stop a Paperboy” Monk’s paperboy is Dad ‘14’ “Call Girl” ‘14’ Guy” ‘14’ killer. ‘PG’ murdered. ‘PG’ The Ellen DeGeneres KTVA 5 p.m. CBS Evening KTVA 6 p.m. Evening News CSI: Crime Scene Investiga- Hawaii Five-0 The team Blue Bloods A new, deadly Show ‘G’ First Take News (N) tion ‘14’ watches Mary’s baby. ‘14’ type of heroin. ‘14’ Bethenny Kristin Cavallari; Entertainment Two and a The Big Bang The Big Bang MasterChef “Top 14 Compete” 24: Live Another Day Jack, Fox 4 News at 9 (N) Renee Graziano. ‘PG’ Tonight (N) Half Men ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ The cooks work at a busy, Kate and Mark seek their 4 iconic diner. ‘14’ target. ‘14’ The Dr. Oz Show Steven Channel 2 NBC Nightly Channel 2 Newshour (N) Dateline NBC (N) ‘PG’ (:01) Crossbones Lowe plans News 5:00 News (N) ‘G’ on kidnapping Blackbeard. 2 Tyler; Dr. Oz goes under cover. ‘PG’ Report (N) (N) ‘14’ Wild Kratts ‘Y’ Wild Kratts ‘Y’ BBC World Alaska PBS NewsHour (N) Washington Alaska Edi- Ellen DeGeneres: The Mark Twain Prize Give It All News Ameri- Weather ‘G’ Week With tion Mark Twain Prize for American Humor. ‘14’ Away: New7 ca ‘PG’ Gwen Ifill man’s Own

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JULY 18, 2014

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How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Manhattan (8) WGN-A 239 307 Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Project d “ElecThe Joy of Christmas Holiday trim; toys; gifts. ‘G’ Christmas Shoppe ‘G’ (20) QVC 137 317

e Attic” ham, Ellen (23) LIFE

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Boats & Trucks & RV’s

Oh My!

Find it all in the Clarion Classifieds! www.peninsulaclarion.com C

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, July 18, 2014

Crossword

Son decides life on the open road isn’t for him after all Because she has felt this way for some time now, she has hardly shed a tear. For me, my heart is broken. I feel lost, confused, angry, depressed and I can’t stop crying. I wish I could die, but we have children and I know I can’t leave them. We made a pact years ago that if we ever fell out of love we’d stay together for the kids until they were grown. Now I don’t Abigail Van Buren know if it was a lie or if she’ll keep her promise. I’m writing this at midnight, crying in the dark and alone. I still love her and my heart breaks every time I think about it. Please tell me what to do. — DEVASTATED IN TEMPE, ARIZ. DEAR DEVASTATED: I am sorry for the pain DEAR ABBY: My wife of 17 years just told me you are feeling. What you must do now is pull yourout of the blue that she doesn’t love me anymore and self together and find out from your wife when it hasn’t for some time. To say that this came as a shock was that the two of you stopped communicating is an understatement. We’ve had our disagreements, honestly with each other — because it seems your but we always worked through them, or so I thought. paths diverged some time ago. She owes you honest

answers, and you need to hear them. After that, you may have to decide whether you still WANT her to honor that long-ago promise to stay together until your children are adults. You might find it helpful to stage some of these conversations in the office of a licensed marriage and family counselor. Having a mediator present could make it easier for both of you. While I can’t promise counseling will save your marriage, it may provide you with the emotional support you will need in the weeks and months ahead. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Good advice for everyone — teens to seniors — is in “The Anger in All of Us and How to Deal With It.” To order, send your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $7 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby, Anger Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and handling are included in the price.)

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Focus on a get-together or a meeting involving you and others. Be careful when dealing with a new friend who could be inordinately touchy. Tonight: Where the crowds are. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Pressure builds to a new level. A loved one might be unusually stern and need some time off. Your creativity will emerge when you detach and take an overall look at what needs to happen. Loosen up and relax, no matter where you are. Tonight: A force to be dealt with. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Keep reaching out to an expert or someone in the know. Work with unexpected news. A domestic matter could be getting the best of you. You might choose to keep your feelings locked up, but don’t be surprised if you suddenly lose your temper. Tonight: Take off, if you can. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHOne-on-onerelatingmightbe harder than you had anticipated. Either the words are not coming out right or the other party is in denial. Know when to pull back. You will need to find a way to jumpstart a talk now or in the near future. Tonight: Visit and chat over munchies. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH When you least expect it, a situation could blow up in your face. A loved one or an associate might let you know that he or she has had enough. Stop and think carefully before responding. Snide remarks will not work. Tonight: The only answer is “yes.” SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH You might be wound rather

By Leigh Rubin

Ziggy

tight right now. You tend to withdraw when you’re like this. Try diving into work as a distraction. Make a point of getting some exercise to help ease the stress. A walk around the block is better than nothing. Tonight: Go dancing. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You seem to have a lot going on. Handling day-to-day matters hardly has a place in your thoughts. Nurture and encourage a friend as much as you can, as he or she might feel as if you’re too distracted and busy. Tonight: Add extra punch to whatever is going on. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You could be overwhelmed by the endless calls, emails and knocks on your door. You usually are able to screen what comes toward you, but you might not be in the mood to do so right now. Consider the many options on your plate. Tonight: Say “yes” to an invitation. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Return calls and clear your desk. You can’t avoid a phone call from a key person any longer. This person will make sure that is impossible. What might start as a tiff or a hostile conversation could resolve itself. Tonight: Hook up with a pal. Celebrate! PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Keep reaching for more information. You have a lot of assets and talents that you could use. A partner or loved one who is usually helpful might not have any suggestions for you now. This person will let you know clearly where he or she disagrees. Tonight: Treat a loved one to dinner.

Iron the whole wall of wax Dear Heloise: I blew a candle out too hard the other day and got wax on a wallpapered wall. How can I remove the wax without ruining the wallpaper? — Sylvia in Florida I have a hint that might help: Using your fingernail, a plastic credit card or another blunt object, carefully scrape off as much of the cold wax as you can. You will then need an iron and facial tissues. Turn your iron on a LOW setting, and place about six tissues on the wall over the wax. Gently put the iron on the tissues, and you should start to see the wax coming through the tissues. Replace the tissues with clean ones as needed, until no more wax comes off. This should remove all of the wax from the wall. Be careful to iron only the tissues; that way, if the iron scorches, it scorches the tissues and not the wall. Patch remembrance Dear Heloise: I wear a medication patch. I do not have to change it daily, and I often forget which day I put it on. To help keep track, I use a black permanent marker and write the date on the patch. Now all it takes is a quick glance, and I can remember when I put it on. — Y.W., via email Sock ice packs Dear Heloise: I save lone socks and use them when a family member needs an ice pack. I simply place the ice in a zippered plastic bag and then slip it into a sock. Then the person gets the benefits of the ice pack without it being too cold. When he or she is done, the ice can be put back into the freezer and used again. — Kelly in Kentucky

SUDOKU

By Tom Wilson

By Dave Green

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Friday.

5 2 8 6 1 9 7 4 3

4 1 9 3 7 5 2 8 6

7 3 6 2 8 4 9 1 5

2 7 5 8 6 3 4 9 1

9 6 1 4 5 7 3 2 8

3 8 4 9 2 1 6 5 7

8 4 2 5 3 6 1 7 9

6 9 7 1 4 8 5 3 2

Difficulty Level

1 5 3 7 9 2 8 6 4

2014 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

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A baby born today has a Sun in Cancer and a Moon in Aries. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, July 18, 2014: This year you become more challenging in whatever you are involved with, within your community or at work. You are likely to build a reputation of playing the role of devil’s advocate. If you are single, you could meet someone at a public event. Be smart, and keep business and pleasure separate. If you are attached, the two of you become far more prominent as a couple. You both might commit to a certain cause or interest. Others enjoy seeing you out and about together. ARIES knows how to light a fire under you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You’ll enjoy a certain level of excitement. You generally can be found stirring the pot in some way or another. Buy a token gift for a loved one or family member; give some thought to this item, as it will help keep the peace in the long run. Tonight: Get into weekend mode. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHYou might sense that you would be better off playing it low-key than being out there strutting your stuff. You also will have many responsibilities to handle. You might need to communicate your goals more clearly to a loved one. Tonight: Don’t overexert yourself! GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Use your energy well, and make the extra effort that will make a difference to those around you.

Hints from Heloise

Jacqueline Bigar’s Stars

By Johnny Hart

Garfield

By Jim Davis

Take It from the Tinkersons By Bill Bettwy

Tundra

Shoe

7

5 4 1

7/17

Previous Puzzles Answer Key

B.C.

9

1 1 8 9

5

2

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5 6

3

Difficulty Level

7 5

2 1

4 3 9

6 8 7/18

By Chad Carpenter

By Chris Cassatt & Gary Brookins

Mother Goose and Grimm

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By Michael Peters

2014 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

DEAR ABBY: For years, my wife and I were RV enthusiasts. We have a son who was envious about our lifestyle and expressed a desire to own an RV and travel the highways. When we decided to give up the practice, we gave our travel trailer to him as a gift. The trailer has been sitting on his property for more than a year now and has never been moved. He has kept the license and insurance fees current. He recently told us he has changed his mind and is no longer interested in traveling with it. He has offered it back to us. We have decided to sell it and wonder what, if any, moral obligation we have to share the proceeds of the sale with our son. Your thoughts? — HOMEBOUND OUT WEST DEAR HOMEBOUND: You gave your son the RV as a gift; he is returning it to you instead of selling it himself. While I think it would be generous of you to split the proceeds with your son, I don’t think there is any moral imperative that you must.

By Eugene Sheffer


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Profile for Sound Publishing

Peninsula Clarion, July 18, 2014  

July 18, 2014 edition of the Peninsula Clarion

Peninsula Clarion, July 18, 2014  

July 18, 2014 edition of the Peninsula Clarion