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Kicks

Local students look toward future

Area teams compete at NLC tournament

Grads/A-5

Sports/B-1

CLARION

Sunny 61/36 More weather on Page A-2

P E N I N S U L A

Friday-Saturday, MAy 22-23 Soldotna-Kenai, Alaska

Vol. 44, Issue 200

50 cents newsstands daily/$1.00 Sunday

Pebble sues the EPA

Question Are you planning to do any traveling this summer? n Yes, we’ll be visiting other places in Alaska; n Yes, we’ll be traveling Outside; n No, there’s no reason to leave the Kenai Peninsula in the summertime. To place your vote and comment, visit our Web site at www. peninsulaclarion. com. Results and selected comments will be posted each Tuesday in the Clarion, and a new question will be asked. Suggested questions may be submitted online or e-mailed to news@peninsulaclarion.com.

In the news C Y

N. Korean shelling M a likely warning, not K attack HYUNG-JIN KIM Associated Press

SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea’s artillery shelling near a South Korean warship patrolling disputed waters was likely a warning, not an attack attempt, Seoul officials and analysts said Friday. On Thursday, the two Koreas exchanged artillery fire along the poorly marked western sea boundary. South Korean officials say the exchange started after two North Korean artillery shells fell in waters near a South Korean navy ship on a routine patrol of the area. The South Korean ship wasn’t hit but fired several artillery rounds into waters near one of several North Korean warships near the sea boundary, South Korean defense officials said. The North Korean ship also wasn’t hit. The North doesn’t recognize the Yellow Sea boundary, which was unilaterally drawn by the U.S.-led U.N. Command at the end of the 1950-53 Korean War. Defense Ministry spokesman Kim Min-seok said Friday that South Korean officials suspect the North Korean shells came from a land-based artillery system, but they haven’t officially pinpointed the origin.

Index Opinion.................. A-4 Nation.................... A-6 World..................... A-8 Sports.....................B-1 Classifieds............ C-3 Comics.................. C-9

Check us out online at www.peninsulaclarion.com To subscribe, call 283-3584.

Court case centers on attempts to veto the mine By ELWOOD BREHMER Morris News Service/Alaska Journal of Commerce

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion

Above: Josh Thompson, firefighter with Central Emergency Services on the Kenai Peninsula, throws brush into a fire along Funny River Road Thursday as the group works to control the burning Funny River wildfire which has consumed more than 63,000 acres of Kenai National Wildlife Refuge land. Bottom right: Suwannee Chapman, 8, watches one of her family’s goats eat at the Soldotna Rodeo Grounds where the animals are being temporarily housed as crews fight the Funny River Wildfire which threaten’s Chapman’s home.

Planning the escape As Funny River wildfire grows to 63,425 acres, residents look for exit options By RASHAH MCCHESNEY and DAN BALMER Peninsula Clarion

Did you know?

One by one, planes arrived Thursday to fight the Funny River Horse Trail wildfire that inched closer to homes in Kasilof. As the threat looms, residents on the Kenai Peninsula have watched warily as the fire grew from its initial reported size of 5 acres to a 63,425-acre behemoth according to the interagency team that has moved into the area to manage the blaze. As firefighting crews from Delta, the Mat-Su Valley and Fairbanks have joined in efforts to keep the fire away from homes, residents have evacuated animals, prepared contingency plans and stayed with friends and relatives to keep away from the heat. Now, more than 170 crew mem-

The Funny River Horse Trail fire has burned more than 99 square miles, or just over 3 percent, of the 1.92 million acre Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. bers are on the ground, most camped at Skyview High School in Soldotna where the Alaska Interagency Incident Management Team has set up its operation headquarters. State and federal agencies including State Parks, Alaska Department of Natural Resources, Central Emergency Services and the Alaska State Troopers have helped keep an eye on stray burn-

ing slash piles, directed traffic on Funny River Road and the Sterling Highway and giving information to news-hungry locals.

Funny River News travels fast in Funny River where word of an informational meeting had spread to many of the residents who were out and about early Thursday, though the official notice had been put up just a few hours previous. The community, which sits just to the east of the horse trail where the Funny River wildfire was sparked, is at the north end of the massive blaze. It is one of the two residential areas firefighters have labeled as priority areas to protect since the fire began. In the community center, tucked away on a gravel road shooting off from main See FIRE, page A-12

The Pebble Limited Partnership took the Environmental Protection Agency to court May 21 and claimed the agency is illegally overstepping its bounds by attempting to block a mine before the permitting process begins. In a statement released in conjunction with Pebble’s complaint filed in U.S. District Court of Alaska, company CEO Tom Collier said the suit is not an intent to strip EPA of its regulatory authority under the Clean Water Act, but rather an attempt to ensure guidelines set by Congress are followed. “Simply put, EPA has repeatedly ignored detailed comments that we, the State of Alaska, and others have made about this massive federal overreach and continues to advance an unprecedented pre-emptive regulatory action against the Pebble project that vastly exceeds its Clean Water Act authority,” Collier said. “If EPA ultimately vetoes Pebble before a development plan is proposed or evaluated through the comprehensive federal and state permitting processes, the precedent established will have significant, long-term effects on business investment in this state and throughout the country. Litigation is necessary in order to get the agency’s attention and bring some rational perspective back to the U.S. permitting process.” In February, the EPA said it would initiate a seldom-used Clean Water Act process to block large-scale surface mining in the Bristol Bay region to protect the region’s robust salmon fishery. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy referenced the 1,000-plus page Bristol Bay watershed assessment released a month before as reason to block Pebble, stating a large, open-pit mine in the reSee PEBBLE, page A-5

Celebrating those who served Last class of grads Memorial Day events: at Skyview cope Monday noon Saturday 9 a.m. Remembrance conwith loss of school Memorial Day proference at the First By KAYLEE OSOWSKI Peninsula Clarion

A handful of events are happening on the Kenai Peninsula this Memorial Day weekend to honor U.S. troops, veterans and fallen heroes. For those planning to head out of town for the weekend, there is a morning event on Saturday. At the end of the long weekend, all day Monday, veterans organizations will be hosting programs.

Marine, wife to share experiences Beginning Saturday at 9 a.m. the public is invited to the First Baptist Church of Kenai for free conference. The conference kicks off with breakfast and two simultaneous presentations, which will

Baptist Church of Kenai, 2815 Kenai Spur Hwy.

Monday 10:30 a.m.

gram at Leif Hansen Memorial Park, 10959 Kenai Spur Highway. Monday 2 p.m.

Memorial Day proAvenue of Flags at the gram at Soldotna Kenai City Cemetery, Memorial Park, 600 1st Avenue and Coral West Redoubt Ave. Street. begin at 10 a.m. Lt. Col. Gerald Murphy, U.S. Marine Corps, who has served multiple tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, will share experiences and challenges he has faced during his years of

service. His wife, Robyn Murphy, will be speaking about overcoming brokenness. Pastor Al Week said she will answer questions and talk about See EVENTS, page A-5 C

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By KELLY SULLIVAN Peninsula Clarion

At Skyview High School’s final graduation ceremony, every student crossing the stage was cheered for. But students say that is just how Skyview operates. Kierstyn Mathews said she entered Skyview as one of the shiest students, and came out with confidence. Anyone should have the opportunity to graduate from Skyview, Mathews said. While getting to graduation was easy, for her the next step is still up in the air.

“I am extremely scared,” Mathews said following the ceremony. “I have no idea what I am going to do.” Nerves weren’t uncommon that evening. “I am happy, I am sad, I am terrified,” Matthew Ryan McDowell said. However, his future is slightly more defined. Throughout the last two years, McDowell has been completing college level prerequisites at Kenai Peninsula College. Next fall he is slated to enter the nationally recognized Emergency Medical See GRADS, page A-5


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A-2 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014

AccuWeather 5-day forecast for Kenai-Soldotna

Barrow 25/18

®

Today

Saturday

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Tides Today High(ft.)

Prudhoe Bay 27/9

First Second

12:26 a.m. (18.5) 12:53 p.m. (16.4)

7:43 a.m. (2.5) 7:56 p.m. (2.3)

11:40 a.m. (15.7) --- (---)

5:52 a.m. (2.6) 6:05 p.m. (2.4)

First Second

10:59 a.m. (14.5) 11:32 p.m. (17.3)

4:48 a.m. (2.6) 5:01 p.m. (2.4)

First Second

9:45 a.m. (8.0) 10:17 p.m. (10.3)

3:28 a.m. (2.1) 3:39 p.m. (1.4)

First Second

3:19 a.m. (28.9) 3:46 p.m. (26.8)

9:58 a.m. (2.9) 10:19 p.m. (2.8)

Deep Creek

First Second

Plenty of sunshine

Times of clouds and sun

A mix of clouds and sun

Clouds and some sun

Cloudy with a shower in the area

Hi: 61 Lo: 36

Hi: 61 Lo: 37

Hi: 61 Lo: 39

Hi: 61 Lo: 42

Hi: 58 Lo: 42

The patented AccuWeather.com RealFeel Temperature® is an exclusive index of the effects of temperature, wind, Sunrise humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, Sunset pressure and elevation on the human body.

10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m.

59 63 65 64

Daylight Length of Day - 17 hrs., 54 min., 4 sec. Daylight gained - 4 min., 22 sec.

Alaska Cities Yesterday Hi/Lo/W

City Adak* Anchorage Barrow Bethel Cold Bay Cordova Delta Junction Denali N. P. Dillingham Dutch Harbor Fairbanks Fort Yukon Glennallen* Gulkana Haines Homer Juneau Ketchikan Kiana King Salmon Klawock Kodiak

Seldovia

New May 28

Today 5:05 a.m. 10:59 p.m.

First June 5

Moonrise Moonset

Full June 12

Today 3:38 a.m. 4:40 p.m.

Tomorrow 5:03 a.m. 11:01 p.m.

Readings through 4 p.m. yesterday

Nome 46/33

Temperature

Unalakleet McGrath 43/33 63/30

Last June 19 Tomorrow 3:55 a.m. 6:03 p.m.

Yesterday Hi/Lo/W

City

Kotzebue 44/32/pc 45/39/c 46/38/c McGrath 59/45/pc 63/45/pc 63/46/s Metlakatla 52/46/r 30/28/sf 25/18/c Nome 45/28/pc 61/35/pc 57/35/s North Pole 58/29/pc 51/42/pc 54/36/s Northway 50/36/r 63/36/r 61/38/s Palmer 63/44/pc 53/38/pc 55/37/pc Petersburg 54/43/pc 52/30/pc 56/32/s Prudhoe Bay* 31/28/sn 63/48/s 61/40/s Saint Paul 39/32/pc 44/40/pc 48/35/s Seward 67/43/pc 58/37/c 60/37/pc Sitka 59/41/pc 48/36/pc 54/33/pc Skagway 56/42/s 58/43/pc 57/31/pc Talkeetna 62/40/pc 57/41/r 60/33/pc Tanana 56/41/pc 58/45/pc 64/44/c Tok* 51/34/c 55/36/pc 59/36/s Unalakleet 46/30/pc 58/44/pc 67/42/c Valdez 59/41/pc 50/47/r 56/44/c Wasilla 63/43/pc 33/22/pc 35/26/s Whittier 64/41/c 66/28/pc 65/34/s Willow* 64/44/pc 48/40/r 59/43/c Yakutat 54/38/pc 56/35/pc 58/41/s Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

39/28/s 63/30/s 54/45/c 46/33/s 59/34/pc 55/34/pc 64/41/s 59/42/c 27/9/c 43/34/s 60/42/s 55/44/c 62/43/c 64/39/s 58/28/s 54/35/pc 43/33/s 59/43/s 62/42/s 63/47/s 65/42/s 58/38/pc

City Albany, NY Albuquerque Amarillo Asheville Atlanta Atlantic City Austin Baltimore Billings Birmingham Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo, NY Casper Charleston, SC Charleston, WV Charlotte, NC Chicago Cheyenne Cincinnati

66/58/t 82/61/pc 88/57/t 84/62/pc 87/65/pc 71/58/t 89/68/r 84/63/t 79/51/s 88/63/s 79/41/pc 84/48/s 59/51/r 67/57/r 78/39/sh 95/70/s 82/62/pc 89/68/pc 70/57/pc 66/48/t 81/63/pc

65/52/t 78/54/c 78/59/t 84/50/t 90/65/s 71/53/pc 85/65/pc 74/52/pc 84/58/s 90/66/s 84/58/t 84/58/t 58/49/c 61/52/sh 74/48/pc 93/68/t 74/48/pc 86/56/t 70/46/s 68/51/t 74/51/s

Dillingham 61/40

From the Peninsula Clarion in Kenai

24 hours through 4 p.m. yest. 0.00" Month to date ........................... 0.40" Normal month to date ............. 0.60" Year to date .............................. 3.31" Normal year to date ................. 3.67" Record today ................. 0.69" (1995) Record for May ............. 2.77" (1966) Record for year ............ 27.09" (1963)

Juneau 67/42

National Extremes

Kodiak 58/41

Sitka 55/44

(For the 48 contiguous states)

High yesterday Low yesterday

95 at Red Bluff, Calif. 21 at Bellemont,

State Extremes High yesterday Low yesterday

Ketchikan 56/44

67 at Seward 22 at Kiana

Today’s Forecast

(Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation)

Showers and spotty thunderstorms will affect the Northeast today. Heavy rain and locally severe storms will stretch from central Texas to the central Rockies. Showers will push inland over the Northwest.

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

World Cities Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

City Cleveland Columbia, SC Columbus, OH Concord, NH Dallas Dayton Denver Des Moines Detroit Duluth El Paso Fargo Flagstaff Grand Rapids Great Falls Hartford Helena Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Jackson, MS

69/56/pc 94/70/s 79/62/pc 65/48/r 89/69/pc 77/65/pc 73/49/t 77/57/t 73/58/pc 67/46/pc 89/66/c 74/38/s 66/26/s 69/55/pc 80/43/s 61/56/t 81/45/pc 87/72/pc 87/65/pc 74/56/pc 88/68/pc

64/49/pc 94/63/t 70/51/pc 60/45/sh 87/68/pc 72/50/s 74/52/t 78/56/pc 70/50/pc 72/48/s 87/65/s 81/58/s 62/38/t 70/45/s 84/51/pc 64/51/t 83/53/t 86/74/sh 88/69/pc 72/52/s 91/64/s

City

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Jacksonville Kansas City Key West Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Midland, TX Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Norfolk Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix

E N I N S U L A

(USPS 438-410) Published daily Sunday through Friday, except Christmas and New Year’s, by: Southeastern Newspapers Corporation P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Street address: 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 1, Kenai, AK Phone: (907) 283-7551 Postmaster: Send address changes to the Peninsula Clarion, P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Periodicals postage paid at Kenai, AK Represented for national advertising by The Papert Companies, Chicago, IL Copyright 2014 Peninsula Clarion A Morris Communications Corp. newspaper

Who to call at the Peninsula Clarion News tip? Question? Main number.............................................................................................. 283-7551 Fax............................................................................................................. 283-3299 News email...................................................................news@peninsulaclarion.com General news Will Morrow, editor ............................................ will.morrow@peninsulaclarion.com Rashah McChesney, city editor.............. rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com Jeff Helminiak, sports editor........................... jeff.helminiak@peninsulaclarion.com Fisheries, photographer.............................................................................................. ............................ Rashah McChesney, rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com Kenai, courts...............................Dan Balmer, daniel.balmer@peninsulaclarion.com Borough, education ......... Kaylee Osowski, kaylee.osowski@peninsulaclarion.com Soldotna .................................. Kelly Sullivan, kelly.sullivan@peninsulaclarion.com Arts and Entertainment................................................ news@peninsulaclarion.com Community, Around the Peninsula............................... news@peninsulaclarion.com Sports............................................ Joey Klecka, joey.klecka@peninsulaclarion.com Page design........ Florence Struempler, florence.struempler@peninsulaclarion.com

91/67/s 77/57/t 85/74/pc 86/63/pc 89/63/pc 71/57/pc 88/65/pc 88/66/pc 87/72/pc 84/71/pc 62/54/pc 71/47/s 89/66/t 88/68/pc 63/60/t 86/66/c 91/64/pc 74/56/r 92/64/s 79/62/t 92/66/pc

94/69/s 79/62/t 86/75/s 86/73/s 89/66/pc 72/60/pc 78/56/pc 89/68/pc 89/75/s 83/67/t 66/47/s 77/57/s 84/60/t 88/68/s 70/56/t 78/59/pc 84/65/t 80/60/pc 95/70/s 74/55/t 88/71/s

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

City

Pittsburgh Portland, ME Portland, OR Rapid City Reno Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Santa Fe Seattle Sioux Falls, SD Spokane Syracuse Tampa Topeka Tucson Tulsa Wash., DC Wichita

78/62/pc 60/47/c 83/53/pc 77/47/pc 73/49/pc 87/54/s 84/50/pc 90/73/pc 67/64/c 70/57/pc 80/49/pc 76/53/pc 78/42/pc 79/51/pc 74/58/t 86/70/s 79/63/t 92/59/s 91/61/pc 89/65/t 88/65/t

66/47/pc 58/46/c 73/54/sh 75/55/t 83/57/pc 89/58/s 78/58/s 87/70/t 68/63/pc 68/56/pc 73/48/t 66/51/r 80/58/pc 78/51/c 63/52/t 90/75/s 80/63/t 84/61/s 85/66/t 77/56/pc 81/64/t

‘Sleepwalker’ statue vandalized WELLESLEY, Mass. (AP) — An outdoor, lifelike sculpture of a man sleepwalking in his underpants that provoked some concern on a Massachusetts college campus in February has been vandalized. The fiberglass sculpture at Wellesley College, entitled “Sleepwalker,” was defaced Tuesday night by yellow paint on its face, left arm, left leg, and a foot. It was one of several properties on campus vandalized, and campus police are investigating. Some students at the women’s college had criticized the statue as threatening and demanded that it be removed. But the statue is scheduled to stay up until July. It is part of a larger exhibit by sculptor Tony Matelli at a campus museum.

Oil Prices Wednesday’s prices

For home delivery

North Slope crude: $110.75, up from $109.48 on Tuesday West Texas Int.: $104.52, up from $102.44 on Tuesday

Order a six-day-a-week, three-month subscription for $39, a six-month subscription for $73, or a 12-month subscription for $130. Use our easy-pay plan and save on these rates. Call 283-3584 for details. Mail subscription rates are available upon request.

Thursday Stocks

Circulation problem? Call 283-3584 If you don’t receive your newspaper by 7 a.m. and you live in the Kenai-Soldotna area, call 283-3584 before 10 a.m. for redelivery of your paper. If you call after 10 a.m., you will be credited for the missed issue. Regular office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Sunday. General circulation questions can be sent via email to circulation@peninsulaclarion.com. The circulation manager is Randi Keaton.

Want to place an ad? Classified: Call 283-7551 and ask for the classified ad department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or email classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com. Display: Call 283-7551 and ask for the display advertising department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Leslie Talent is the Clarion’s advertising director. She can be reached via email at leslie.talent@peninsulaclarion.com. Contacts for other departments: Business office...................................................................................... Jane Russell Production................................................................................................ Geoff Long Online........................................................................................ Vincent Nusunginya

Visit our fishing page! Go to peninsulaclarion.com and look for the Tight Lines link.

twitter.com/pclarion

Precipitation

Valdez Kenai/ 59/43 Soldotna Homer

Cold Bay 54/36

CLARION P

High ............................................... 63 Low ................................................ 41 Normal high .................................. 58 Normal low .................................... 38 Record high ....................... 69 (2006) Record low ......................... 27 (1985)

Kenai/ Soldotna 61/36 Seward 60/42 Homer 59/36

Anchorage 63/46

Bethel 57/35

National Cities Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

From Kenai Municipal Airport

Fairbanks 60/37

Talkeetna 64/39 Glennallen 57/31

Today Hi/Lo/W

Unalaska 47/35

Anchorage

Almanac

* Indicates estimated temperatures for yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W

Seward

Anaktuvuk Pass 32/17

Kotzebue 39/28

Sun and Moon

RealFeel

Low(ft.)

Kenai City Dock

facebook.com/ peninsulaclarion

Follow the Clarion online. Go to peninsulaclarion.com and look for the Twitter, Facebook and Mobile links for breaking news, headlines and more.

Company Final Change Agrium Inc............... 90.57 -0.50 Alaska Air Group...... 96.85 +0.97 ACS...........................1.79 — Apache Corp........... 90.34 +0.05 AT&T........................ 35.38 +0.11 Baker Hughes.......... 69.70 +0.07 BP ............................51.21 -0.26 Chevron.................. 123.63 -0.53 ConocoPhillips......... 78.46 -0.07 ExxonMobil..............101.50 -0.53 1st Natl. Bank AK... 1,737.50 +2.50 GCI...........................11.23 +0.12 Halliburton............... 63.41 +0.24 Harley-Davidson.......71.64 -0.45 Home Depot............ 78.78 +0.70 McDonald’s............. 102.45 -0.11 Safeway................... 34.30 -0.07 Schlumberger..........101.60 +0.02 Tesoro...................... 54.42 +0.14 Walmart................... 75.39 -0.27 Wells Fargo.............. 49.99 +0.32 Gold closed............1,294.73 +2.74 Silver closed............ 19.50 +0.09 Dow Jones avg..... 16,543.08 +10.02 NASDAQ................ 4,154.34 +22.81 S&P 500................1,892.49 +4.46 Stock prices provided by the Kenai Peninsula Edward Jones offices. C

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City

Yesterday Hi/Lo/W

Acapulco 92/80/t Athens 84/66/s Auckland 64/55/pc Baghdad 101/75/pc Berlin 84/59/s Hong Kong 87/78/t Jerusalem 75/58/s Johannesburg63/43/pc London 64/54/r Madrid 64/44/c Magadan 48/36/c Mexico City 78/56/c Montreal 66/55/c Moscow 81/57/s Paris 68/50/pc Rome 79/54/s Seoul 81/52/pc Singapore 90/79/t Sydney 79/55/s Tokyo 72/59/sh Vancouver 68/54/pc

Today Hi/Lo/W 91/77/t 84/62/s 64/58/c 106/73/s 79/61/t 86/79/c 76/59/s 67/40/s 65/51/pc 69/46/pc 43/30/sh 79/57/t 66/54/t 80/56/s 67/50/r 72/57/r 84/57/s 90/79/t 77/59/pc 73/61/pc 65/50/r

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

-10s -0s 50s 60s

0s 70s

10s 80s

20s 90s

30s

40s

100s 110s

Cold Front Warm Front Stationary Front

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014

Obituary

Around the Peninsula

Ellen Louise (Johnson) Knackstedt

Senior softball on deck

Ellen Louise (Johnson) Knackstedt, left this world to be with her Lord Jesus on Monday, May 19, 2014. Join us for a celebration of life at 1 p.m. on June 21, at Christ Lutheran Church, in Soldotna. Having bravely battled cancer for over thirty years, she succumbed, in her dream home, attended by her husband, Darrell Reed Knackstedt. Ellen was born in Gooding, Idaho, on June 20, 1943. She moved to Whidbey Island at age 12. On her birthday in 1974, she moved to Soldotna with her first husband, Allen Johnson, and their three sons Russ, Ross and Rich. Ellen already had cancer and heart disease in 1974, but she was determined to live and thrive despite these problems. She investigated natural healing and over the years, built a successful Shaklee nutritional business. Through her knowledge of nutrition and herbs, her work, research and hands-on therapy, Ellen improved the lives of scores of people around the world and she lived in active health. She attended Christian services with Peninsula Bible Fellowship. She had a love of the outdoors. You would find her biking, hiking, flying, gardening, skiing, gathering wild herbs and edibles, scuba diving, traveling to exotic places, playing games, visiting with friends, and giving classes on health and nutrition. To Ellen, everyone was a friend. Ellen is survived by her husband Darrell (Reed) Knackstedt, sons Russ and Rich, three sisters, cousins, aunts, uncles, eight grandchildren, two great-grandchildren and many friends. Because she had overcome cancer for so many years, her passing came as a surprise to those who knew and loved her. She is already dearly missed, but those of us left behind know that she is with Jesus now. Memorial Donations can be deposited to a special account. Call 907-262-5031 for details. Arrangements were by Peninsula Memorial Chapel in Kenai. Please share special memories in her guestbook at www. alaskanfuneral.com.

Senior softball in Soldotna has started on Tuesdays at 9 a.m. at Centennial Park on the first Little League diamond. New players are welcome. It doesn’t matter how long it has been since you played. It is co-ed softball starting at age 50 and up. Call Paul at 394-6061 or show up on Tuesday between 9 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. Games last until about 11 a.m. or until players get tired. If you have a glove or bat, please bring them. If not, come anyway. It is not a league; there are no fees.

Peter E. Larson Peter Ellsworth Larson, 73, of Homer, died surrounded by his family Monday, January 20, 2014. A celebration of life will be held Saturday, May 31, 2014 at 1:30 p.m. in Homer High School Mariner Theater to commemorate Peter’s life with community and family. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Hospice of Homer, Homer K-Bay Rotary, or Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies.

John R. Midkiff Kenai resident John R. Midkiff died of natural causes Friday, April 18, 2014 at his home. He was 66. Mr. Midkiff was born May 3, 1947 in Colville, Washington. He loved riding his Harley and meeting people. He leaves many friends who miss him. Per his request, he was cremated and his ashes placed in the Pacific Ocean.

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neighbors with their instrument. A sign-up sheet and allow you to ‘show your talent,’ sometime after 3 p.m. when the music teams are done. This event is sponsored by businesses, nonprofit organizations, volunteers and churches in the community who are working together to let you know that you are worth it. For more information or donations, call or text volunteer and coordinator Melinda Briggs at 907-394-8768, food service donations and clean-up volunteer Jake Gibbs at 907-398-1337, or volunteer coordinator Richard Hamilton, 907-398-1320.

Spruce Grove Cemetery clean-up planned

The Spruce Grove Cemetery in Kasilof will have a clean-up day on Saturday from 10 a.m.-noon. Bring leaf rakes and gloves to make the cemetery look nice for Memorial Day. Lunch will Learn to row be served at the Sees’ at noon. For more information call 283Alaska Midnight Sun Rowing is sponsoring two learn-to- 9243. row workshops on Mackey Lake. The 2-day, 5-hour course includes a Friday session from 6:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m. and a Saturday session from 9:00 a.m.–noon, as well as 1 week of un- Coast Guard Auxiliary limited practices with the club. schedules vessel safety checks Two sessions to choose from: May 30 and 31 or June 13 and The Kenai Flotilla of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary will be 14. Cost for each session is $100. Special offer: Bring a teen to conducting Vessel Safety Check stations this week. the workshop for free! For more information: www.alaskamidOn Friday, a vessel safety check station will take place from nightsunrow.com. 2-7 p.m. at the River and Sea parking lot, 45015 Kalifornsky Beach Road in Soldotna. On Saturday, there will be a vessel Memorial Day Celebration planned safety check station from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Walmart parkA free Memorial Day community potluck picnic and mu- ing lot, 10096 Kenai Spur Highway, Kenai. The Vessel Safety Check is free and will provide the public sic fest is planned for May 26 at 1 p.m. on the Kenai Beach at the end of Spruce Street. Bring any ‘potluck’ type foods to an opportunity to receive information concerning Federal and share, your chairs and blankets, Frisbees, beach balls, bubbles Alaska state boating requirements. For more information or to schedule a free Vessel Exam, call for kids, your family and friends and your smiles. If you play an instrument, please bring it. Can you sing? Join some of your 907-776-8457.

Community Calendar Today 8 a.m. • Alcoholics Anonymous As Bill Sees It Group, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway Unit 71 (Old Carrs Mall). Call 398-9440. 9:45 a.m. • TOPS #AK 196 meets at The Grace Lutheran Church, in Soldotna. Call Dorothy at 262-1303. Noon • Alcoholics Anonymous recovery group at 11312 Kenai Spur Highway, Suite 71 in the old Carrs Mall in Kenai. Call 262-1917. 12:30 p.m. • Well Elders Live Longer exercise (W.E.L.L.) will meet at the Nikiski Senior Center. Call instructor

Mary Olson at 907-776-3745. 8 p.m. • Narcotics Anonymous Support Group “It Works” at URS Club, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway, Unit 71, Kenai. • AA 12 by 12 at the United Methodist Church, 607 Frontage Road, Kenai. • Twin City Al-Anon Family group, United Methodist Church, 607 Frontage Road in Kenai. Call 907-953-4655.

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The Peninsula Clarion strives to report the deaths of all current and former Peninsula residents. Pending service/Death notices are brief notices listing full name, age, date and place of death; and time, date and place of service. These are published at no charge. Obituaries are prepared by families, funeral homes, crematoriums, and are edited by our staff according to newspaper guidelines. The fee for obituaries up to 500 words with one black and white photo ranges from $50 to $100. Obituaries outside these guidelines are handled by the Clarion advertising department. For more information, call the Clarion at 907-283-7551.

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Saturday 8 a.m. • Alcoholics Anonymous As Bill Sees It Group, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway Unit 71 (Old Carrs Mall). Call 398-9440. 9 a.m. • Al-Anon book study, Central Peninsula Hospital’s Augustine Room, Soldotna. Call 907-9534655. 10 a.m. • Narcotics Anonymous PJ Meeting, URS Club, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway, Unit 71, Kenai. Noon • Homemade soup, Funny River Community Center. 7 p.m. • Narcotics Anonymous sup-

port group “Dopeless Hope Fiends,” URS Club, 11312 Kenai Spur Highway, Unit 71, Kenai. 8 p.m. • AA North Roaders Group at North Star Methodist Church, Mile 25.5 Kenai Spur Highway. Call 242-9477. The Community Calendar lists recurring events and meetings of local organizations. To have your event listed, email organization name, day or days of meeting, time of meeting, place, and a contact phone number to news@ peninsulaclarion.com.


A-4 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014

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Opinion

CLARION P

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Serving the Kenai Peninsula since 1970 STAN PITLO Publisher

WILL MORROW������������������������������������������������������������������������ Editor Jane Russell...................... Controller/Human Resources Director LESLIE TALENT................................................... Advertising Director GEOFF LONG.................................................... Production Manager VINCENT NUSUNGINYA.................................... New Media Director Daryl Palmer.................................... IT and Composition Director RANDI KEATON................................................. Circulation Manager A Morris Communications Corp. Newspaper

To the Class of 2014, never stop learning Congratulations to the Class of 2014.

Whether you’ve just completed high school, college, a technical training program or apprenticeship, enjoy the moment. You deserve to celebrate your accomplishment. But remember this: while you’ve completed your course of study and collected your certificate or diploma, you haven’t stopped learning. If you’re headed to college or technical school, you’ve got the next step in your personal and professional development mapped out. If you’re looking for entry into the workforce, you may not realize it at the moment, but you will spend your career constantly developing new skills — because if you don’t, you’ll quickly find that you won’t have much of a career. In today’s economy, employers value not just well trained employees who can fill a current opening, but also employees with the potential for growth to meet future needs. A new hire is an investment; companies small and large would like to see that investment pay dividends down the road. So, again, congratulations on what you’ve accomplished so far. Now it’s time to put that education to work — by going out and learning even more.

Think safety this holiday weekend Memorial Day weekend is here and

with it, Kenai Peninsula residents and visitors will be hitting the roads, trails, lakes, streams, beaches and anywhere else we can think of for some quality recreation. First and foremost, a look at the smoke plumes on the horizon should be more than enough of a reminder that wildfire danger is high, and a burn suspension remains in place. Before you head out, please take a moment to make sure you’re prepared to enjoy the Peninsula safely. While it’s tempting to rush out to the next adventure, midstream is not the time to find out that the life jackets are missing; miles from the trail head is not the place to discover that the first-aid kit has not been restocked. If you’re headed out on the roads, make sure you bring a healthy dose of patience, too. Add emergency vehicles handling the Funny River Horse Trail fire to the usual holiday traffic and construction delays, and it’s going to take a few minutes longer to get where you’re going. Common sense and courtesy will go a long way toward making the weekend a pleasant one. One last thing — if you’re going to drink, don’t drive. Stay the night, designate a driver, call a friend, call a cab — any of those options are better than the potential consequences of driving drunk.

VA woes become campaign issue By MATTHEW DALY Associated Press

AP News Extra

WASHINGTON — The growing furor over veterans’ health care moved to the political campaigns Thursday as congressional candidates from both parties called for Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki to be fired. Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes, who is challenging Republican Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell in Kentucky, was among those calling for Shinseki’s removal amid investigations of VA patients dying while awaiting treatment and falsified appoint records. Democrat Rick Weiland, who is running for South Dakota’s open Senate seat, also called for Shinseki’s ouster, as did a Democrat running for an open House seat in New Jersey and two Republicans challenging vulnerable Democrats in northern Minnesota House districts. House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., added to the calls for Shinseki’s resignation, saying the VA crisis was “a national embarrassment” that requires new leadership. Shinseki, 71, said Thursday that he intends to remain on the job. “I serve at the pleasure of the president,” he told reporters at the Capitol. The former Army general and chief of staff added that “this is not the first time” he has faced controversy in his career. Grimes, the Kentucky Senate candidate, said the government had defaulted on a “solemn obligation to our veterans. I don’t see how that breach of trust with our veterans can be repaired if the current leadership stays in place,” she said. Grimes has tried to distance herself at times from President Barack Obama, who is largely unpopular in her state, and she demonstrated her independence by calling for a cabinet member’s removal. McConnell said earlier this week that the predicament at the VA was “a management problem, not a money problem,” adding, “it’s obvious that the management team needs to be changed.” The inspector general at the Veterans Affairs Department says 26 VA facilities

E-mail: news@peninsulaclarion.com

Write: Peninsula Clarion P.O. Box 3009 Kenai, AK 99611

nationwide are under investigation, including the Phoenix hospital at the center of allegations about treatment delays and secret waiting lists intended to hide delays in care. The allegations have raised fresh concerns about the Obama administration’s management of a department that has been struggling to keep up with the influx of veterans returning home from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and Vietnam veterans needing more care as they age. McConnell campaign spokeswoman Allison Moore said the campaign was pleased Grimes had joined in calling for a change in VA management. Moore criticized Senate Democrats for blocking a House-passed bill that would have made it easier to fire or demote senior VA executives. Senate Democrats said they are working on their own legislation to make it easier to fire or demote executives at VA. “I think what the House has done is not unreasonable,” Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid told reporters Thursday, adding that he is confident the Senate will act quickly on a measure being pushed by Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, chairman of the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee. The political maneuvering came as the Senate Appropriations Committee added language to a military construction spending bill that, like the House proposal, would give the VA secretary broader authority to remove low-performing officials. “The veterans are not getting the medical care they need,” said Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee “Some heads need to roll.” White House spokesman Jay Carney, meanwhile, said Thursday the Obama administration supports the goal of the House bill, but added, “We do have some concerns that some provisions could result in signifiAssociated Press writers Brian Bakst in cant litigation.” The administration is working with Minneapolis and Jim Kuhnhenn and Erica Congress on better language, Carney told Werner in Washington contributed to this report. reporters.

Classic Doonesbury, 1974

Letters to the Editor: Fax: 907-283-3299 Questions? Call: 907-283-7551

The Peninsula Clarion welcomes letters and attempts to publish all those received, subject to a few guidelines: n All letters must include the writer’s name, phone number and address. n Letters are limited to 500 words and may be edited to fit available space. Letters are run in the order they are received. n Letters addressed specifically to another person will not be printed. n Letters that, in the editor’s judgment, are libelous will not be printed. n The editor also may exclude letters that are untimely or irrelevant to the public interest. n Short, topical poetry should be submitted to Poet’s Corner and will not be printed on the Opinion page. n Submissions from other publications will not be printed. n Applause letters should recognize public-spirited service and contributions. Personal thank-you notes will not be published. C

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House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, said Thursday that reports of “horrors” at the VA were “appalling.” His voice cracking, Boehner said veterans “are men and women who served our country, and we’ve not just let them down, we’ve let them die. This is awful stuff, and someone ought to be held accountable for it.” Boehner has not called for Shinseki to resign, but he said, “I have to admit that I am getting a little closer” to doing so. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, meanwhile, called allegations of misconduct at the VA “completely and utterly unacceptable” and urged a broad review of services for veterans. Pelosi, D-Calif., said she was open to an idea advanced by Sen. John McCain, RAriz., to allow veterans to receive medical care at private hospitals. “We can’t have another backlog of people waiting for permission to go to a federally qualified clinic in a region,” she said. “We have to think in a big way because this is a very big challenge.” Obama’s deputy chief of staff, Rob Nabors, was in Phoenix Thursday to meet with hospital staff. The director of the Phoenix VA Health Care System has been placed on leave while the inspector general investigates claims that up to 40 people died while awaiting treatment in Phoenix. In the South Dakota Senate campaign, Weiland forcefully called for Shinseki to step down. But he also criticized House Republicans for temporarily shutting down much of the government last year. “Anyone who does not understand that it is the penny-pinching stupidity and arrogance of the ‘shut it down’ politicians in Congress that is the real problem is either blind or willfully ignorant,” Weiland said in a statement Thursday. Among the Republicans calling for Shinseki’s resignation is Mike McFadden, who hopes to take on Sen. Al Franken, DMinn.

By GARRY TRUDEAU

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014

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River City grads a ‘diverse’ group River City Academy Principal Dawn Edwards-Smith adjusted students’ stoles and honor cords. “This is like the third time she’s done this,” said graduate Shelby Fletcher. Edwards-Smith asked if the graduates needed to be reminded to turn their cellphones off. “Because that would be embarrassing,” Edwards-Smith said.

Although a phone call during the ceremony would have added final funny story to the group’s large collection they have accumulated during their years at RCA. Forest Henry said the group had many laughs during his years at the school. For Kiowa Richardson one of the most vivid memories from her time at RCA was when a

on fish, wildlife, or water supplies. Pebble’s complaint states that Congress limited the EPA’s authority in the permitting process to reviewing applications after they have been evaluated by the Corps of Engineers. Additionally, Pebble claims the mine’s impact on such areas cannot be judged because it has not released a formal mine plan or applied for wetlands permits. The EPA Inspector General’s office notified the agency May 2 that it would review the information gathering and science behind the watershed assessment at the request of Pebble, the State of Alaska, and members of Congress. Pebble has claimed intraEPA communications prove the three-year assessment process was biased against mine development from the get-go. Region 10 EPA spokeswoman Hanady Kader has said the agency followed all prescribed public involvement guidelines in forming the assessment and that the 404(c) process, which usually takes about a year, will continue during the Inspector General’s review.

Early May 22, Trout Unlimited responded to Pebble’s litigation by demanding the group release a complete mine plan. The national coldwater fisheries nonprofit has been at the forefront of the fight against Bristol Bay mine development for years. “Clearly, this is a last ditch effort from a company which now has no major mining experience on its team and has lost at every step of the way. It’s ridiculous that PLP is using resources to file a lawsuit but continues to refuse to apply for official permits after promising to do so for nearly a decade,” TU Alaska Executive Director Tim Bristol said in a formal statement. “The fact is, (Pebble Limited Partnership) can apply for a permit today, but they refuse to do so because they will have to reveal to the public once again that they will build a colossal open pit mine, impact wetlands and waterways, destroy salmon habitat and threaten thousands of jobs and unique way of life.”

said. “We figured it’s in honor of Memorial Day and trying to lift up and remember the fallen Continued from page A-1 and defense of freedom.” After the talks, snacks will be available and childcare will what it’s like to be a spouse of be provided throughout the day. someone serving in the mili- The conference is expected to tary. wrap up by noon. “Marines … don’t go for long deployments but they go for quick ones and usually it’s Veterans organizations the kind that some don’t come to host three events back from,” Weeks said. “So After a few weeks of prepait’s a challenge as a wife. Evrations and choosing speakers, ery time her husband would leave, she wouldn’t be sure if local veterans groups are ready he would actually come back.” for Memorial Day. Monday ceremonies and The Murphys currently live events begin at 10:30 a.m. with in Pennsylvania with their four children. Gerald Murphy heads the Avenue of Flags at the Kerecruiting for the Northeast nai City Cemetery hosted by the American Legion. U.S. At noon locals can gather Weeks met Gerald Murphy when he worked with military at Leif Hansen Memorial Park in Kenai for a program hosted as a missionary in Belgium. “This is the first time we’ve by the AMVETS. Seating will done anything like this,” Weeks be available for a comfortable view of speaker Col. John Pol-

lock. In Soldotna at the Memorial Park a service will begin at 2 p.m. and Col. Jim Halliday is the guest speaker. “They’re going have flags on the poles and the (Veterans of Foreign Wars) is going over to put flags on the graves of the veterans,” said Herb Stettler, Korean War Veteran with the VFW said. “Yes, we are ready this year.” Stettler said Madeline Micciche will be singing the Na-

By KAYLEE OSOWSKI Peninsula Clarion

In the darkened arena of the Soldotna Regional Sports Complex, six soon-to-be River City Academy high school graduates-to-be gathered. They waited there for the 6 p.m. graduation ceremony to begin on Wednesday as their family, friends and teachers filled the chairs in the conference room.

. . . Pebble Continued from page A-1

gion would cause “irreversible negative impacts on the Bristol Bay watershed and its abundant salmon fisheries.” If developed, an Iliamnaarea Pebble copper and gold mine would likely be one of the largest of its kind in the world. All of the company’s mineral claims are on state land. While the EPA has vetoed wetlands permit applications 13 times since the inception of the Clean Water Act in 1972, it has never used the power to deny a permit before an application was submitted, as is the case currently with Pebble. The regional Army Corps of Engineers handles wetlands permit applications under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act for all projects, public or private, that could impact wetlands. Subsection 404(c) of the act gives the EPA the power to deny permits to projects that will use a defined area as a material disposal site and “have an unacceptable adverse effect”

. . . Events

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See RCA, page A-11

Photo by Kelly Sullivan/ Peninsula Clarion

Elizabeth McGlothen chose to give her mother a yellow rose for help getting the grad through her high school years, Tuesday, at the Soldotna Regional Sports Complex.

. . . Grads Continued from page A-1

Services program, at KPC. McDowell said until he attended Skyview, he didn’t think he would enjoy his high school years. “High School didn’t go as planned,” McDowell said. He left with great friends he will sorely miss. Sarah Jayne Pearson explained this was because of Skyview’s unflinching social acceptance. People could be whomever they wanted, and no one had a problem with it, she Elwood Brehmer can be said. reached at elwood.brehmer@ “I’m in tears about it,” Pearalaskajournal.com. tional Anthem at both the Kenai and Soldotna programs. The VFW will also put American flags the veterans’ graves in Kasilof this weekend, Stettler said. “There must be almost 100 graves out in Kasilof,” he said. The American Legion puts flags on the veterans’ graves in Kenai. Kaylee Osowski can be reached at kaylee.osowski@ peninsulaclarion.com

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son said. “It’s the best school.” Walter Baxter said being the last graduating class didn’t necessarily feel good. Not even being able to revisit the hallways in the future make it more difficult. Baxter will be attending the University Alaska Fairbanks computer science in the fall with his friend, Tiffany Allen, who will be studying mechanical engineering. Allen said her time at Skyview taught her to look at situations with new eyes. Baxter and Allen recall teachers and brothers Rob Sparks and Randy Sparks, whose approach in the classroom wasn’t cramming facts, but teaching how to think and learn for oneself. For Carlos Casares graduating from Skyview meant the last 12 years of his life had paid

off. Casares said he had the opportuniy to become who the person he wanted to be. Next fall he will be attending KPC to study process technology or fisheries technology with friend Lars Russell, who will be going for creative writing. Russell was joined in the hallways of Skyview with an entire generation of his family. He will remember the back and forth he had with teachers- people who had become more like family than instructors. However, after running on five hours of sleep for the last three years, Russell said he is looking forward to some time to relax. Kelly Sullivan can be reached at kelly.sullivan@peninsulaclarion.com


A-6 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014

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Nation

House passes curbs on NSA phone surveillance By KEN DILANIAN AP Intelligence Writer

WASHINGTON — In an overwhelming vote, the House moved the U.S. closer to ending the National Security Agency’s bulk collection of Americans’ phone records Thursday, the most significant demonstration to date of leaker Edward Snowden’s impact on the debate over privacy versus security. But the final version of the legislation, “watered down” in the words of one supporter, also showed the limits of that impact. The bill was severely weakened to mollify U.S. intelligence agencies, which insisted that the surveillance programs that shocked many Americans are a critical bulwark against terror plots. The bill was approved 303 to 121, which means that most

House members can now say they voted to end what many critics consider the most troubling practice Snowden disclosed — the collection and storage of U.S. calling data by the secretive intelligence agency. But almost no other major provision designed to restrict NSA surveillance — including limits on the secret court that grants warrants to search the data — survived the negotiations to get the bill to the House floor. And even the prohibition on bulk collection of Americans’ communications records has been called into question by some activists who say a last-minute change in wording diminished what was sold as a ban. “People will say, ‘We did something, and isn’t something enough,’” said Steven After-

good, who tracks intelligence issues for the Federation of American Scientists. “But this bill doesn’t fundamentally resolve the uncertainties that generated the whole controversy.” Though some privacy activists continued to back the bill, others withdrew support, as did technology companies such as Google and Facebook. Michigan Rep. Mike Rogers, the Republican Intelligence Committee chairman, said, “II believe this is a workable compromise that protects the core function of a counterterrorism program we know has saved lives around the world.” The measure now heads to the Senate, where Majority Leader Harry Reid told reporters Thursday that “we must do something.” The USA Freedom Act would codify a proposal made

‘People will say, ‘We did something, and isn’t something enough. But this bill doesn’t fundamentally resolve the uncertainties that generated the whole controversy.’ — Steven Aftergood, Federation of American Scientists

in January by President Barack Obama, who said he wanted to end the NSA’s practice of collecting and storing the “to and from” records of nearly every American landline telephone call under a program that searched the data for connections to terrorist plots abroad. The phone records program was revealed though the leaks last year by Snowden, who used his job as a computer network administrator to remove tens of thousands of secret documents from an NSA facility in Hawaii.

Mother convinced kidnapped woman to go to police By GILLIAN FLACCUS and TAMI ABDOLLAH Associated Press

SANTA ANA, Calif. — A California woman who says she was kidnapped a decade ago by her mother’s boyfriend lived a seemingly ordinary life with her alleged captor year after year, but was too scared to go to authorities until she recently reunited with her mother, police said Thursday. The woman, who disappeared when she was 15, eventually married the man and started a family with him. Neighbors said she worked for a nearby janitorial service, took Zumba classes and went on trips to the beach and Disneyland. Orange County prosecutors on Thursday filed five felony charges against the alleged abductor, Isidro Garcia, including rape and kidnapping to commit a sexual offense. He did not enter a plea, and his arraignment was continued until June 9. He was jailed on $1 million bail. Garcia’s attorney said the woman’s claims of physical and sexual abuse are

lies made up because the couple is separating. Neighbors in a working-class city south of Los Angeles described an outwardly happy family, while authorities and psychologists cautioned that both could be true — Garcia could have been a doting husband who controlled his wife without physically restraining her through years of abuse. The case began to emerge Monday, when the woman went two blocks from her apartment complex to the police department in working-class Bell Gardens and accused Garcia of domestic violence. During that conversation, officers learned of her connection to a 2004 missing-persons case in Santa Ana, about 20 miles away. Santa Ana police interviewed both Garcia and the woman and concluded that the husband had been sexually abusing her a decade ago and kidnapped her after a fight with her mother, who was his girlfriend at the time. After holding her captive, Garcia moved at least four times and gave her multiple fake identities to hide her from family and authorities, Santa Ana Police

Cpl. Anthony Bertagna said. The woman, who police did not identify, told investigators she often thought about escaping but fear paralyzed her. She came to the United States illegally in 2004 and said Garcia used that to isolate her, telling her that her mother had given up searching and that if she contacted authorities, she would be deported. Police said Garcia forced the woman to marry in 2007 and fathered a daughter with her who is now 3. In April, the woman got in touch with her mother after finding her sister on Facebook to wish her a happy birthday, according to Bertagna. The mother showed the daughter old news articles to prove that she had gone to the police and filed a missing-persons report, Bertagna said. “The mother was able to show her that she was, in fact, looking for her,” Bertagna said. About three weeks ago, neighbor Ernesto Rios had a conversation with Garcia, who told him that his wife’s mother had come from Mexico and was causing problems.

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Snowden fled first to China, then Russia where he is avoiding an extradition order to face criminal charges for revealing classified information. The phone companies create and store those billing records, and the legislation still would give the NSA authority to request batches of data from the companies to search in terrorism investigations in response to a judicial order. Law enforcement agents routinely obtain such records in criminal investigations. The USA Freedom Act started its life as the idea of those who wanted to clamp down on NSA surveillance, but it was “watered down,” as Rep. Jan Schakowsky, D-Ill., acknowledged, shedding a series of provisions favored by civil liberties activists. Some activists continued to back the bill, including the ACLU, whose Washington legislative director, Laura Murphy, called it an imperfect but “unambiguous statement of congressional intent to rein in the out-of-control NSA.” Other privacy groups withdrew their support, as did technology companies such as Google and Facebook. They said they were most concerned with a last-minute definition change that they fear will allow the government to collect huge volumes of records — including, for example, records of all the phone calls made from a particular U.S. city during a certain period, or all the internet data associated with a par-

ticular commercial router. The bill’s original text limited the government’s data requests to those associated with specific people, entities or accounts. The approved version says the government may use any “specific selection term” to set the parameters of its search, including a type of device or an address. The new language appears to allow much broader data requests. “The new version deliberately contains ambiguity in a very critical area,” said Harley Geiger, senior counsel for the Center for Democracy and Technology. “We’ve learned about the government track record of exploiting ambiguity in the law to broaden its surveillance activity.” Rep. Adam Schiff, an Intelligence Committee Democrat from California, said the vagueness was designed to protect the government’s surveillance methods, not to facilitate secret bulk collection. Other provisions that were dropped from the bill included requirements to estimate the number of Americans whose records were captured under the program, and the creation of a public advocate to challenge the government’s legal arguments before the secret surveillance court. NSA officials were pleased with the bill for another reason: The new arrangement will give them access to mobile calling records they did not have under the old program, officials say. C

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014

House defies Pentagon on defense spending

Around the World Bungled nuke silo security drill prompted more training for nightmare scenarios WASHINGTON — An Air Force security team’s botched response to a simulated assault on a nuclear missile silo has prompted a blistering review followed by expanded training to deal with the nightmare scenario of a real attack. The Air Force recognized the possibility of such an intrusion as more worrisome after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. But an internal review of the exercise held last summer at Malmstrom Air Force Base in Montana said the security forces were unable to speedily regain control of the captured silo, and called this a “critical deficiency.” The Associated Press obtained a copy of the report through a Freedom of Information Act request. The previously unreported misstep was the reason the 341st Missile Wing flunked a broader safety and security inspection. The unit, which has been beset with other problems in recent months, including an exam-cheating scandal that led its commander to resign in March, passed a do-over of the security portion of the inspection last October. The failure was one of a string of nuclear missile corps setbacks revealed by the AP over the past year. The force has suffered embarrassing security, leadership and training lapses, discipline breakdowns and morale problems. Earlier this year, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ordered two reviews, still underway, to address his concern that the lapses could erode public trust in the security of the nation’s nuclear weapons.

Deaths of 2 mentally ill inmates put New York’s jail system under scrutiny NEW YORK — The grisly deaths of two inmates — one who “baked to death” in his overheated cell, another who sexually mutilated himself while locked up alone for seven days — have raised new questions about the New York City jail system’s ability to deal with a burgeoning number of mentally ill people. The two cases — both exposed by The Associated Press — have prompted a city lawmaker to schedule oversight hearings next month. “No inmate should be treated that way, especially those with mental health needs. The city has to do more to protect them,” City Councilwoman Elizabeth Crowley said Thursday. “A lot of people who are in Rikers Island should be in a hospital, in a clinical setting, not in a jail.” Bradley Ballard, a 39-year-old inmate who family members said had been diagnosed as schizophrenic, died in September after he was confined to his cell in a mental observation unit at Rikers for seven days for making a lewd gesture at a female guard, according to interviews and documents obtained by the AP. Denied some of his medication, the agitated inmate tied a rubber band tightly around his genitals. During that period, guards repeatedly peered through the window in his cell but didn’t venture inside until it was too late, according to corrections officials’ account.

Nigerians protest inaction over kidnappings of schoolgirls; bomb victims sought

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ABUJA, Nigeria — Scores of protesters chanting “Bring Back Our Girls!” marched Thursday to Nigeria’s presidential villa to demand more action to find and free nearly 300 schoolgirls abducted by Islamic militants, but President Goodluck Jonathan did not meet with them, leaving an aide to deliver a lecture that further angered the demonstrators. “Another small window for Jonathan and he refuses to use it!” one protester yelled. “What a stupid move!” The protesters complained of the insensitivity of Jonathan, who did not even meet parents of some of the abducted children when they came to Nigeria’s capital earlier this month. — The Associated Press

By DONNA CASSATA Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The House defied the Pentagon on Thursday, overwhelmingly backing a $601 billion defense authorization bill that saves the Cold War-era U-2 spy plane, military bases and Navy cruisers despites warnings that it will undercut military readiness. A White House veto threat — reiterated just hours before the vote — had little impact in an election year as lawmakers embraced the popular measure that includes a 1.8 percent pay raise for the troops and adds up to hundreds of thousands of jobs back home. The vote was 325-98 for the legislation, with 216 Republicans and 109 Democrats backing the bill. Hours later, the leaders of the Senate Armed Services Committee announced the completion of its version of the bill that backs several of the Pentagon proposals while breaking with the administration on some weapons. Most notably, the Senate panel “created a path to close Guantanamo,” said the committee’s chairman, Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., a long-sought goal of President Barack Obama. Under a provision of the bill, the administration would have to produce a comprehensive plan for transferring terror suspects

from the U.S. naval facility in Cuba that would be subject to a congressional vote. The Senate panel backed the administration on some personnel benefits and a 1 percent pay raise for the military, while breaking with the administration by sparing the A-10 Warthog close-support plane and an aircraft carrier. Certain to frustrate the administration was a provision that would authorize the military to train and equip vetted Syrian rebels battling forces loyal to President Bashar Assad. The Senate bill must be reconciled with the House version. Rep. Howard “Buck” McKeon, R-Calif., chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, defended his House bill and rejected the suggestion that the measure was a “sop to parochial interests,” arguing it makes “the tough decisions that put the troops first.” But the panel’s top Democrat, Rep. Adam Smith of Washington state, complained that the House rejected the Pentagon’s cost-saving proposals and came up with no alternatives. “We ducked every difficult decision,” Smith said. With the ending of two wars and diminishing budgets, the Pentagon had proposed retiring

the U-2 and the A-10, taking 11 Navy cruisers out of the normal rotation for modernization and increasing out-of-pocket costs for housing and health care. Republicans, even tea partyers who came to Congress demanding deep cuts in federal spending, and Democrats rejected the Pentagon budget, sparing the aircraft, ships and troop benefits. An increasingly antagonistic White House issued a veto threat on Monday, and Chief of Staff Denis McDonough reinforced that message in a private meeting with House Democrats on Tuesday morning. Late Wednesday, the White House issued another veto threat over restrictions in the bill on President Barack Obama’s ability to transfer terror suspects from the prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The full-throated message had little influence. Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, DAriz., highlighted her vote for the bill and its importance to her home state, where more than 150,000 have defense or defense-related jobs. Her colleague, Rep. Ron Barber, DAriz., praised the A-10 Warthog, which trains in Tucson. In committee, Rep. Jim Bridenstine, R-Okla., a former pilot and tea party favorite elected in 2012, spared three of seven AWACS aircraft based

at Tinker Air Force Base in his home state. The House engaged in a spirited debate over post-Sept. 11 laws and practices, and whether they are overly broad and still viable nearly 13 years after the terror attacks. Lawmakers pressed to sunset the authorization given to the president to use military force, to end the indefinite detention of terror suspects captured on U.S. soil and to close the U.S. naval facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The House rejected all three amendments to change current law. To address the pervasive problem of sexual assault in the military, the bill would change the military rules of evidence to prohibit the accused from using good military character as defense in court-martial proceedings unless it was directly relevant to the alleged crime. The “good soldier defense” could encompass a defendant’s military record of reliability, dependability, professionalism and reputation as an individual who could be counted on in war and peacetime. Overall, the legislation would provide $495.8 billion for the core defense budget, $17.9 billion for energy programs within Pentagon spending and $79.4 billion for the war in Afghanistan and other overseas operations.

Couple: Philly mayor set to perform gay weddings By MARYCLAIRE DALE Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — Catherine Hennessy and Kristin Keith rushed to get a marriage license in Philadelphia this week, even though they didn’t plan to marry right away. Those plans have now changed. Thanks to an unexpected offer from City Hall, they have moved up their wedding to be married Friday by Mayor Michael Nutter, Hennessy said. “When the mayor calls you and says he wants to marry you, you don’t say no,” Hennessy said Thursday. U.S. District Judge John E. Jones III sent the state’s samesex marriage ban to “the ash heap of history” Tuesday, making Pennsylvania the 19th state to legalize gay marriage. Couples who got licenses that day will be eligible to marry Friday

under the state’s three-day waiting period. Several Philadelphia judges have announced plans to be at City Hall both Friday and Saturday to officiate weddings. Nutter’s office would not confirm his plans, and said he has no public appearances scheduled. However, spokesman Mark McDonald said his schedule could change. Hennessy and Keith are among the 18 gay or lesbian couples who got licenses before City Hall closed on Tuesday. They had their own ceremony 10 years ago, with more than 100 friends and relatives, in the converted church where they lived. Hennessy, 51, runs a photography business, while

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the 42-year-old Keith works in sales for a publishing firm. “We already had decided years ago we were going to be in a committed relationship, but it’s nice to get recognition,” Hennessy said. Despite their new wedding date, they won’t be the first same-sex couple married in Pennsylvania. Allegheny County Judge Lawrence O’Toole has issued two waivers this week, allowing couples to skip the three-day wait. The county fielded 290 marriage license applications Tuesday and Wednesday, after averaging 10 a day in recent weeks, county spokeswoman Amie Downs said. A number of same-sex couples have asked Pittsburgh

Mayor Bill Peduto to perform their ceremony, spokesman Timothy McNulty said. None are scheduled for May, but some are expected to be scheduled next month. Joe Parisi and Steven Seminelli were among the couples receiving the first licenses Tuesday in Philadelphia. They, too, got a call about being married by the mayor. But they decided to stick with their original plan, to be married at the city’s historic Christ Church — where some of the nation’s founders also wed. “We are very honored and flattered for the (mayor’s) invitation,” Seminelli said. “However, we prefer a more intimate and celebration, which will be at our church.”


A-8 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014

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World

Deadliest day for Ukraine troops: 16 slain in raid By IVAN SEKRETAREV and PETER LEONARD Associated Press

BLAHODATNE, Ukraine — In the deadliest raid yet on Ukrainian troops, pro-Russia insurgents attacked a military checkpoint Thursday, killing 16 soldiers, and the interim prime minister accused Moscow of trying to disrupt the upcoming election for a new president to lead the divided country out of its crisis. A rebel commander said one of his fighters also died in the raid in eastern Ukraine, which left a gruesome scene of charred military vehicles and scorched bodies near the town of Volnovakha, 30 kilometers (20 miles) south of the city of Donetsk. Witnesses, including a medical worker, said more than 30 Ukrainian troops were wounded, with some in grave condition. Fighting also raged in at least two other villages. The armed uprising and the government’s offensive to put it down have cast a shadow over Sunday’s election, with Kiev acknowledging it will be impossible to hold the vote in some areas. In the eastern regions of Donetsk and Luhansk, where separatists have declared independence and pledged to derail the vote, election workers reported threats and interference from gunmen. Interim Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk accused Russia of escalating the conflict and trying to disrupt the election. In a post on Facebook, he called for an urgent session of the U.N. Security Council and said Ukraine would present evidence of Moscow’s involvement. In the attack on the checkpoint, residents said the rebels arrived in an armored bank truck, which the unsuspecting Ukrainian soldiers waved through. The rebels opened fire with automatic weapons and rocket-propelled grenades, acting President Oleksandr Turchynov said. The Donetsk regional administration and a Health Ministry official said 16 soldiers were

AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko

Zinaida Patskan, 80, stands in her destroyed house following a shelling from Ukrainian government forces in Semyonovka village near the major highway which links Kharkiv, outside Slovyansk, Ukraine, Thursday.

killed. Associated Press journalists saw 11 dead soldiers in the field near the village of Blahodatne, outside Volnovakha. Ukraine’s Defense Ministry said the attackers hit an ammunition section in one of the military vehicles, which exploded in a fireball. Three blackened armored infantry vehicles, their turrets blown away, and several burned trucks stood at the site. Bodies apparently burned by the explosion and fire were scattered nearby. A leading rebel commander claimed responsibility for the raid. In the courtyard of the occupied police headquarters of the town of Horlivka, he displayed seized Ukrainian weapons and the passports of what he said were two of the dead soldiers. He also provided coordinates about the location of the attack shortly after it had occurred. There was no way to confirm his claim independently. “We destroyed a checkpoint of the fascist Ukrainian army deployed on the land of the Donetsk Republic,” said the commander, who wore a balaclava and insisted he be identified by his nom de guerre, “Bes” — Russian for “demon.” He said one of his men also was killed. Pavel Gubarev, a representative of the separatist Donetsk People’s Republic, denied its men had carried out the attack, however. Gubarev, who does

not appear to have much influence with the separatist group, appeared on Russian TV and accused Ukrainian nationalists from the group Right Sector of firing on Ukrainian soldiers because they had refused to attack civilians. Many in the east resent the government in Kiev, seeing

it as led by nationalists bent on repressing the Russianspeaking minority. The interim government came to power in February after months of street protests chased pro-Russian President Viktor Yanukovych from power. But many in the rebellious regions also have grown increasingly exasperated with the insurgents, whom they blame for putting civilians in the crossfire. In the village of Semenovka on the outskirts of Slovyansk, shelling badly damaged several houses. Zinaida Patskan had her roof torn away by an explosion that also shattered a wall. She said she hid under a kitchen table with her cat, Timofey, in the shelling. “Why they are hitting us?” the 80-year-old said, bursting into tears. “We are peaceful people!” About 100 Semenovka residents later vented their anger against the central government, demanding Ukrainian forces end the offensive and withdraw.

Speakers at a rally also urged a boycott of the presidential vote. In the Luhansk region, sustained gunfire and mortar fire rocked the town of Lysychansk. One shell hit a house, which burst into flames. A police duty officer at the town hospital said one fighter had died and five were wounded. In the evening, a convoy of at least 200 Ukrainian soldiers was seen traveling to Slovyansk from the north. The soldiers were in two armored vehicles and eight military trucks, one of the larger concentrations seen in recent weeks. While the fighting raged, Russia’s Defense Ministry said its forces were leaving the regions near Ukraine as part of a military pullout ordered by President Vladimir Putin. It said four trainloads of weapons and 15 Il-76 heavy-lift transport planes had already left the Belgorod, Bryansk and Rostov regions. NATO had estimated Russia had 40,000 troops along the border. Gen. Philip Breedlove,

NATO’s supreme commander in Europe, said in Brussels that some Russian military movements had been detected but it was too early to assess their size or importance. He said a very large and capable Russian force still remained close to Ukraine. In Kiev, Yatsenyuk described Russia’s announcement as a bluff. “Even if the troops are withdrawing, Russian authorities are still assisting the armed terrorists who were trained in Russia,” he said. Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman Alexander Lukashevich rejected Yatsenyuk’s claims of Russian interference as unfounded and denounced his call for a U.N. meeting as “propaganda.” Putin’s pullout order and his remarks welcoming Ukraine’s election reflected an attempt to ease tensions with the West over Ukraine and avoid a new round of U.S. and Europea Union sanctions. He has ignored the plea of some of the rebels to join Russia.

Koreas exchange fire near sea boundary By HYUNG-JIN KIM Associated Press

SEOUL, South Korea — North and South Korean warships exchanged artillery fire Thursday in disputed waters off the western coast, South Korean military officials said, in the latest sign of rising animosity between the bitter rivals in recent weeks. Officials from the South’s Joint Chiefs of Staff and Defense Ministry said a South Korean navy ship was engaged in a routine patrol near the countries’ disputed maritime boundary in the Yellow Sea when a North Korean navy ship fired two artillery shells. The shells did not hit the South Korean ship and fell in waters near it, they said. The South Korean ship then fired several artillery rounds in waters near the North Korean ship which also did not hit it, said the officials, who spoke on con-

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dition of anonymity because of office rules. South Korea was trying to determine if the North Korean ship had attempted to hit the South Korean vessel but missed, or if the shells were not meant to hit the ship. Officials said that residents on the frontline Yeonpyeong Island were evacuated to shelters, and fishing ships in the area were ordered to return to ports. In 2010, North Korea fired artillery at the island, killing two civilians and two marines. Kang Myeong-sung, a Yeonpyeong resident, said in a phone interview that hundreds of residents were in underground shelters after loudspeakers ordered them there. He heard the sound of artillery fire and said many people felt uneasy at first but later began to stop worrying. Both Koreas regularly conduct artil-

lery drills in the disputed waters. The sea boundary is not clearly marked, and the area has been the scene of three bloody naval skirmishes between the rival Koreas since 1999. In Washington, State Department spokeswoman said Thursday the United States was closely monitoring the situation on the Korean Peninsula in coordination with allied South Korea. She urged North Korea “to refrain from provocative actions that aggravate tensions” and exercise restraint. North Korea has in recent weeks conducted a string of artillery drills and missile tests and has unleashed a torrent of racist and sexist rhetoric at the leaders of the U.S. and South Korea. On Tuesday, South Korean navy ships fired warning shots to repel three North Korean warships that briefly violated the disputed sea boundary. On Wednesday, North Korea’s military vowed to retaliate.

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014

A-9

Thai military seizes power in bloodless coup By TODD PITMAN and THANYARAT DOKSONE Associated Press

BANGKOK — Without firing a shot, Thailand’s powerful military seized control of this volatile Southeast Asian nation Thursday, suspending the constitution and detaining Cabinet ministers in a risky bid to end half a year of political upheaval that many fear will only deepen the nation’s crisis. The coup, the second in eight years, accomplished in a few minutes what anti-government protesters backed by the nation’s traditional elite and staunch royalists had failed to achieve on the street: the overthrow of a democratically elected government they had accused of corruption. The new junta leader, army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha, announced he was taking power almost immediately after talks between the nation’s bitter political rivals — which lasted a mere four hours over the last two days — ended in deadlock and the government refused to resign. Prayuth claimed he had to act to restore stability and “quickly bring the situation back to normal” amid increasing spasms of violence that together with controversial court rulings had rendered the government powerless and the country profoundly divided. But troubles for Thailand, a regional economic hub whose idyllic white-sand beaches and elephant-filled jungles draw millions of tourists a year, could

be just beginning. “We’re likely to see dark days ahead,” said Thitinan Pongsudhirak, a political analyst at Bangkok’s Chulalongkorn University, referring to the possibility of violent resistance from the ousted government’s supporters. The deposed administration of acting Prime Minister Niwattumrong Boonsongpaisan, which was summoned to appear before the junta Thursday night, seemed to have gone into hiding and made no statement condemning the coup. Four of its ministers, ordered to an army compound for talks earlier in the day, were in custody, along with top protest leaders. “The rest of us who are outside are still fine and in safe places,” said the ex-premier’s adviser, Paradorn Pattanathabutr. “The situation is very worrying. We ... don’t know what else can happen.” The army, which imposed martial law in a surprise move Tuesday that many sensed was a prelude to taking full power, imposed a nationwide curfew that began at 10 p.m. — a clear sign it is concerned about potential unrest. During the last coup, in 2006, Bangkok residents moved freely and wrapped yellow ribbons and flowers around tank turrets until dawn. Prayuth called on the public not to panic this time, either. But the vast capital’s elevated train, subway and bus stations shut down early, filling with long queues as anxious office workers rushed home along increasingly empty streets.

‘The rest of us who are outside are still fine and in safe places. The situation is very worrying. We ... don’t know what else can happen.’ — Paradorn Pattanathabutr, ex-premier’s adviser After nightfall, troops deployed armored personnel carriers to block main roads, including one in front of the U.S. Embassy, and diverted traffic at key intersections. Major highways were virtually devoid of traffic, extraordinary for the normally bustling metropolis of 10 million. International cable news channels, including CNN and BBC, were taken off air. Earlier, armed troops dispersed demonstrators from protest sites where competing groups were camped out — one filled with thousands of Red Shirts who support the nowousted elected government, the other with those who had struggled for seven months to unseat it. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry condemned the takeover and warned it would “have negative implications for the U.S.Thai relationship,” but did not announce immediate punitive steps. The State Department said it was reviewing millions in aid. “There is no justification for this military coup,” Kerry said in a statement that also called for the release of detained political leaders and a return of press freedom.

The day’s dramatic events were the culmination of a societal schism laid bare after the 2006 coup deposed former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, a billionaire tycoon whose populist movement has won every national election since 2001. The conflict pits a majority rural poor in the north and northeast, who benefited from Thaksin’s populist policies, against an urban-based elite based in Bangkok and the south that is concerned it is losing power. It is a divide that has led to upheaval multiple times in recent years, and sometimes death. The latest crisis alone has claimed 28 lives and left more than 800 wounded since November. Thailand’s political tensions have played out against a backdrop of fears about the future of its monarchy. Thaksin’s critics have accused him of disrespecting ailing King Bhumibol Adulyadej and trying to gain influence with Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn, the heir to the throne. On Wednesday, a day after Prayuth declared martial law — and insisted a coup was not un-

Exit poll shows shock loss for the Dutch euroskeptic By MIKE CORDER Associated Press

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THE HAGUE, Netherlands — Prominent Euroskeptic Geert Wilders expressed disappointment Thursday after a Dutch exit poll showed his party losing support on the first day of voting in European Parliament elections. The shock slide for Wilders’ Party for Freedom bucked the expected trend of anti-EU parties winning support across the continent. Only the Netherlands and Britain voted on the first day of elections whose official results will not be known until Sunday night when all 28 nations in the bloc have gone to the polls. But an exit poll by Ipsos published by broadcaster NOS showed Wilders’ Party for Freedom, known by its Dutch

acronym PVV, slipping from 17 percent of the Dutch vote five years ago to 12.2 percent. “We fought like lions,” Wilders told supporters at an election night party that was plunged into silence by the unofficial results. “The truth is that the exit polls are disappointing.” He blamed PVV supporters who did not vote for his party’s poor result, but said the low turnout showed Dutch people’s “aversion and disinterest” in Europe. Reinier Heutink of Ipsos told NOS the agency’s exit poll was at more than 40 locations across the Netherlands and expected to get responses from some 20,000 voters. He did not give a margin of error. Euroskeptic parties like Wilders’ had been the expected beneficiaries of a disillusioned

and apathetic electorate. The Dutch Socialist Party, which also is strongly skeptical of the EU, got 10 percent of the vote, up from 7.1 percent at the 2009 elections, Ipsos said. Instead, the Dutch pro-Europe D66 party appeared to be heading for victory with 15.6 percent of the vote. Ipsos said there was a 37 percent turnout. “It looks like our clear proEurope message has got us more support,” the party’s leader in Europe Sophie in ‘t Veld told NOS. Some 400 million Europeans are eligible to vote, with national polls being held through Sunday. Results will be announced late Sunday. More than 16,000 candidates from 953 parties or lists — from greens to feminists to the far-right — are vying for the legislature’s 751 seats.

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derway — he summoned protest leader Suthep Thaugsuban to talks with rival Red Shirt leader Jatuporn Prompan and senior government ministers at an army complex in Bangkok. They met again Thursday, but the impasse was unresolved. After just two hours, Prayuth left the meeting, and the situation quickly deteriorated. The power grab appeared to be well-orchestrated. Armed troops swiftly entered the conference room, and olivegreen military trucks blocked the building’s entrance, sealing everyone else inside. Troops with automatic weapons drawn fanned out and took positions, waving journalists away. Suthep and Jatuporn were escorted out by soldiers and taken into custody, as were the four Cabinet ministers. Regular TV programming was suspended, and half an hour later, Prayuth appeared, flanked by the heads of the armed forces and police. The National Peace and Order Maintaining Council was duty-bound to “take over the governing of the country,” he said, adding that the aim was “to let the people have love and unity as in the past, and to reform the political and economic systems, and to grant equality to every side.” “We ask the public not to panic and carry on their lives normally,” Prayuth said, adding that the military would “provide protection” for foreigners in Thailand. Although Prayuth had tried to cast himself as a neutral me-

diator, shutting down partisan TV stations and summoning leaders from both sides, analysts say he had a simple goal. “I think the intention was to get the government to resign, and when that didn’t happen, they took over power,” Thitinan said. In the hours following the takeover, TV stations broadcast only decades-old military and patriotic music, interrupted periodically by edicts from the junta, including one announcing the government’s dissolution and the suspension of the 2007 constitution — a charter the military had drawn up itself after the last coup. The junta, however, said the Senate would remain in place. Ominously, it also ordered 18 Cabinet ministers, including the premier, to report immediately to the country’s new rulers. A similar order was issued after midnight to Thaksin’s sister, former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, who came to power in a landslide vote in 2011 and was removed by the Constitutional Court this month for alleged abuse of power. The anti-government protesters have declared the destruction of the Shinawatra political machine as one of their major goals, and the announcement seemed to indicate the army was pursuing a similar agenda. Although there remains profound anxiety about Thailand’s fate — the pro-government Red Shirt supporters have warned they would not tolerate the unconstitutional installation of an unelected leader.


A-10 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014

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Religion

There are times when it helps to remember

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uring a former memorial season, my column carried readers back to a country cemetery where I reminisced about family members who were no longer with us. My title that week was “When It Hurts to Remember;” a fitting title, I believe, because remembering the passing of people who have been dear to us can sometimes cause the pain we felt at their loss to return. The shortest verse in the Bible describes our Lord’s broken heart as He stood at the grave of His friend, Lazarus: “Jesus wept,” wrote John (11:35). But, though memories may sometimes open fountains of tears, they can also mend broken hearts and allow us to relive moments of joy with those we remember. My wise wife has memory places

Voices of R eligion Roger C ampbell arranged throughout our home that help us revisit our roots and in memory relive happy moments with loved ones at different stages of their lives and ours. Visit our living room and you’ll see pictures of our grandparents and parents in youth among those of their children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Climb our stairs and in the hall between bedrooms get in on the action of busy lives in a panorama of growing up, vacationing and enjoying life. At the end of the hall, look back through

Church Briefs Church of Christ hosts gospel meeting The Church of Christ on mile 1/4 Funny River Road in Soldotna will be hosting a gospel meeting with guest speaker Ron Halbrook from Shepherdsville, Kentucky, starting May 25 to June 1. Sunday services are 10 a.m. and again Sunday night at 6 p.m. Services start at 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday. All are welcome to attend!

Youth group holds garage sale The Star of the North Lutheran Church Youth Group is having its annual garage sale on June 6-7 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Bring donations to the church at 216 N. Forest Drive in Kenai, Tuesday-Friday or Sunday. For more information call 283-4153.

SALT Youth Group plans hike The Apostolic Assembly of Jesus Christ, SALT Youth Group, for Jr. High and High School age students, will meet at 1:00 p.m. June 7 at the AAJC church and then head outdoors for an afternoon of hiking and light snacks. Register by June 4, please call Jeremiah Bergevin, 907-398-1184 for permission slip information. This activity is free.

Vacation Bible school n Birch Ridge Community Church will have Vacation Bible School on August 4-8 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Our theme is Flight School, and kids ages 4-5th grades are welcome. Call 260-6705 for more information. n An International Spy Academy Vacation Bible School will be held at First Baptist Church of Kenai. Grab your secret decoder ring and put on your

generations. Do these photos ever invoke a touch of sadness over those we remember but who have left for heaven? Of course. But we’re glad they once lived among us and that we now know where they are. These are the positives of faith that make memories more than sad movies. When Jesus neared the end of His time with His disciples, He met with them in an upper room to share a final meal and let them know what was ahead. “Let not your heart be troubled,” He said (John 14). Then, assuring them that better things awaited them, added: “In my Father’s house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told

rearview mirror glasses because this summer, your kids are heading to the International Spy Academy where they’ll train to become special agents for the one true God! Bible school is June 2-6, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. for ages 4 through 6th grade. For more information, call 907-283-7672, visit http://www.firstbaptistkenai.net or email fbck@alaska.net. n The Midnight Son Seventh Day Adventist Church proudly presents Son of Treasure Island VBS, June 23-27 at 10 a.m. Open to ages 3 and up. It is free. Church is located at Mile 8.4 Kenai Spur Highway in Kenai. For more information contact Charce Dunn at 260-9331. n Ninilchik Community Vacation Bible (non-denominational) Camp will be held July 7-11 (MonFri), 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Kenai Peninsula Fair grounds. Ages 4-15 years. Snacks provided. Call Grace Huhndorf at 907-394-3714 to register or for information.

Food Pantry open weekly The Soldotna Food Pantry is open every Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. for residents in our community who may be experiencing food shortages. The Food Pantry is located at the Soldotna United Methodist Church at 158 South Binkley Street. Nonperishable food items or monetary donations may be dropped off at the church Tuesdays 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. or 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. and Sundays 9 a.m. to 12 noon. Thank you for your support.

you. I go to prepare a place for you.” These words of comfort have entered hospital rooms, been whispered on battlefields and spoken in cemeteries to grieving families over the background sounds of bugles and bagpipes while grateful and grieving people have gathered for words of hope while honoring and remembering those who have given their lives in the cause of freedom. Dale Johnson was a helicopter pilot in Vietnam. When he was considering a return to battle, he seemed confident he’d make it home. “This bird shoots back,” he told me. But Dale didn’t make it back, going instead to his heavenly home. For his memorial service, I wrote a poem titled “My Pilot,” that ends as fol-

lows: “I HAVE A PILOT IN THE SKY, And I shall meet Him by and by; I’ll walk beside Him on that shore, And stay with Him forevermore.” Taking time to remember can hurt. We’re not made of wood or stone and like our Lord may find tears flowing out of memories. But remembering a life of faith well lived, culminating in the assurance of heaven, will create its own memorial; one that dries all tears and rests in confident expectation that the best is yet to come. Roger Campbell is an author, a broadcaster and columnist who was a pastor for 22 years. He can be reached at rcministry@ameritech.net.

Club. The entrance to the Food Pantry is through the side door. The Pantry closes for holidays. For more information contact the church office at 283-7868 or email kumcalaska@gmail.com.

Clothes 4 U at First Baptist Church First Baptist Church Soldotna, located at 159 S. Binkley Street, is re-opening its Clothes 4 U program. It is open on the second and fourth Saturday of each month from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. All clothing and shoes are free to the public.

Clothes Quarters open weekly Clothes Quarters at Our Lady of the Angels Church is open every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., and the first Saturday of every month from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, call 907-2834555.

Apostolic Assembly of Jesus Christ plans Sunday School Carnival

Apostolic Assembly of Jesus Christ Sunday School is hosting a free end of the summer Carnival 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. August 24 where kids can participate in fun activities like a cupcake walk, face painting, build your own picture frames, and also enjoy hot dogs, chips and ice cream. Register by August 22. The carnival will be at Apostolic Assembly of Jesus Christ Sunday School (Mile Post 89 on Sterling Highway – turn right on Murray Lane by Zimco Construction). For more information, contact United Methodist Church Tracey at 262-1423 or Sherry at 262-0853 for regisprovides food pantry tration. If kids need a ride to AAJC Sunday School, The Kenai United Methodist Church provides a please call Jeremiah at 398-1184. food pantry for those in need every Monday from Submit church announcements to news@peninsunoon to 3:00 p.m. The Methodist Church is located on the Kenai Spur Highway next to the Boys and Girls laclarion.com.

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Pope: Holy Land trip is ‘strictly religious’ VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis says his upcoming trip to Jordan, Israel and the West Bank is “strictly religious” and aimed at praying for peace in the region. Francis sought to temper expectations for his trip during his weekly Wednesday general audience. The Argentine Jesuit leaves Saturday for a three-day visit to the Holy Land, where he will meet with Syrian and Palestinian refugees, the Jordanian, Israeli and Palestinian leaders and the chief rabbis of Israel and the mufti of Jerusalem. The main reason for the visit is to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the meeting between Pope Paul VI and the spiritual leader of the world’s Orthodox Christians. Francis will meet in Jerusalem with the current Orthodox leader, Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I, whom he called his brother. — The Associated Press

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014

A-11

Kaylee Osowski/Peninsula Clarion

Left: Jordan Fletcher, River City Academy graduate laughs during a speech at the school’s graduation ceremony at the Soldotna Regional Sports Complex on Wednesday. Right: River City Academy Principal Dawn Edwards-Smith adjusts graduate Shelby Fletcher’s mortarboard one last time after knocking it off during a hug at the school’s graduation ceremony.

. . . Rca Continued from page A-5

large amount of red dye spilled in during an art project. “It looked like a murder scene,” she said. Richardson and twins Shelby Fletcher and Jordan Fletcher have attended the school since

Skyview High School Class of 2014 Valedictorian Tiffany Allen Salutatorian Dylan Webb

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Justin Lee Alexie Tiffany Jolynn Allen* Randy Craig Bass Walter Hokuto Baxter* Dakota Nicole Bittick

eighth grade, when RCA expanded to enroll middle school students as well as high school. Henry and Mac Wynkoop joined the three shortly after. Sheilyn Pogue started at RCA as a senior; RCA had never accepted a student as a senior before. During the process of building a large story collection, the six have become close and know each other well. Richardson described the

group as diverse. “We all have different intelligences,” she said. She said some students are creative, like Jordan Fletcher, who wants to be a tattoo artist. Jordan Fletcher said she’s always been interested and good at art and has worked with many different mediums. Henry also has creative interests. He plans to attend the Culinary Academy at the Alaska

Vocational Technical Center in Seward. Wynkoop has a knack for technology. He has been working in the information technology department for the Kenai Peninsula School District for the past year. He plans to attend Kenai Peninsula College for computer science. “I’m more than ready for it,” he said about moving onto the

next phase of his life. Shelby Fletcher also said she feels ready for her post high school life. Having just finished a pharmacy class through distance learning, she plans to continue working toward becoming a pharmacist. Pogue plans to attend KPC and work toward becoming an occupational therapist. Richardson said she’d be cra-

zy if she wasn’t nervous about the future, but she’s excited too. She will attend the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado. She wants to become a translator. “That’s my current plan, but you know how things change,” she said.

Cody Benjamin Burow Carlos Craig Casares Delora Morgan Chesley Christopher Dallas Cook Abby Nicolle Cook Haley Kapri Cunningham Sara Elizabeth Daigle Cheyenne Rachel Marie Evan Emma Jo Everett Taylor Vernon Ferguson Eden DeRena Bea Flake Demery Ann Garrant Charles David Gibbons Hannah Marie Glaves* Michelle Cheyanne Hall

Chadley Jonathan Harley Demri Nichole Healy Jeremy Lee Hinz Brittany Nicole Hollers* Maryflo Annmarie Horan Amanda Jo Hudson* Molly A Hughes Thomas Wayne Johnson Cheyanne Nicole Laber* Breanna Joy Lahndt Jessica Faith Lester Carissa Lee Lingle Derrick Shawnel Linthicum Jacob Wayne Malone Eric Alexander Marlowe

Kierstyn Alyse Mathews Kristen Haylee May Matthew Ryan McDowell Elizabeth Lorene McGlothen* Khelbie Aaron Miller Cody Wayne Miller Cajewl Luram Musgrave Casey Joy Neill* Victoria Marie Oberts* Iisha Andre Oftedal Joann Nicole Padgett Sarah Jayne Pearson Jonathan Martin Pedginski*

Christopher Lee Petrovich Meghan Emily Powers Samantha Anne Reynolds* Brandon David Rice Laura Lyn Ritter Aubrina Jean Rodriguez Lars Richard Russell Mykaela Karae Anne Rybak* Sky E.J. Schlung* Catherine Liandra Schoessler* Jesus Bakkar Silves Kaitlyn Neva Sipes Bradford K Swanson

Bradyn James Tanner Grant Raymond Valiquette Dylan Wayne Webb* Madison Christine White Ethan Con Williams John Quincy Wilson Dawnrae Karina Wysong Tyla Chi Ann Young Sydney Rayne Zoubek

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Kaylee Osowski can be reached at kaylee.osowski@ peninsulaclarion.com

* National Honor Society


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A-12 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014

. . . Fire Continued from page A-1

route through the community — Funny River Road — a group of women worked on quilts as a blackened column of smoke loomed over the light blue building. When asked, they were quick to point out that information about the fire was being posted at the liquor store. “That’s basically the community center,” one joked as several others burst into laughter. Log Cabin Liquor, 37133 Funny River Road, is on the largest road in town. Ken Bulf and Pat Skuza kicked up a cloud of gravel and dust as they pulled into the liquor store parking lot midmorning Thursday. The two headed straight for a large A-frame wooden stand where printed updates about the Funny River wildfire have been intermittently stapled to the board since Wednesday afternoon. Though they had already seen a map of the fire’s position online; Skuza said he wanted to see if the sign had an updated copy. Both said the winds, forecasted to pick up Thursday evening to about 15-20 miles per hour, would change course Friday evening and blow southwest. That would push the fire to the southeast, threatening properties both own near the end of Funny River Road. “I went out yesterday and built myself a hillybilly fire engine,” Skuza said. The makeshift fire engine includes a 300-gallon water tank, 50 feet of hose, a water pump and a fire nozzle. “We’re concerned, but not worried yet,” Skuza said. “(Crews) are jumping on it, but right now they’re still playing catch up. It might take them two days to get control of the thing and it only took two days for it to get as big as it is.” As Bulf and Skuza speculated about changing wind directions and where the fire would likely burn, Leah Eskelin, park ranger with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, stopped to post an updated map.

The three recalled the behavior of the Shanta Creek Fire, a 2009 lightning-caused fire, that burned more than 13,000 acres of Kenai National Wildlife Refuge land. As the Funny River wildfire moves to the east, it has reached the area where the Shanta Creek fire burned and the main body of the fire is arcing in a large “C” shape around the old burn. The 2009 burned land is creating a natural firebreak, firefighters said. “It’s kind of a weird phenomenon where, sometimes you get to an old burn and it actually speeds it up, sometimes you get to an old burn and it actually slows it down,” said Brad Nelson, Central Emergency Services health and safety information officer. “But, in this case it is slowing it down.” Terri Kunz, who lives near Mile 9 of Funny River Road, stopped to check the sign as well. Kunz has already moved many of her animals out of harm’s way — 10 goats, four alpacas, two cats, numerous rabbits and chinchillas are currently housed at the Soldotna Rodeo Grounds on Kalifornsky Beach Road. As Kunz and her daughters Suwannee Chapman, 8, and Sierra Chapman, 11, fed the animals Thursday, the three said they had a plan for leaving their property quickly if the wildfire changed directions. The family’s 10 dogs will fit into the boat with everyone who needs to cross the Kenai River to leave, Sierra Chapman said. “Eight of them are dachshunds,” Kunz said, with a grin. The animals housed at the rodeo grounds will have to leave soon, but Kunz said she has a home for them in Nikiski if needed.

A wildfire information line has been set up at 907-714-2484. So far, Kunz said she is the only person she knows of who has evacuated their animals to the rodeo grounds. She looked down at one of her goats as she scratched his head. “I’d rather they were home, but I’d rather they were safe,” she said. Nelson said the wildfire is 5 percent contained and crews built a defensive line and backburned along Funny River Road to keep the fire from hopping it to advance toward the Kenai River.

Kasilof For Kasilof residents, the Funny River wildfire has been a looming threat since it sparked in Funny River and spread more than 10 miles south to Tustumena Lake in less than 24 hours. The community sits directly west of the main portion of the fire and residents have been blanketed in smoke and ash since late Monday evening. At night, the dark purple sky is illuminated by flashes of orange and yellow as the fire burns through the densely packed wilderness nearby. Kasilof is the other community firefighters have labeled as priority areas to keep safe from the wildfire. For days, Kasilof resident Angie Christian has watched as the fire creeps closer to her family’s 20-acre property, which borders the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. Christian lives in the Pollard Loop area in Kasilof, the subdivision closest to the fire. She knows crews have been working hard to prevent flames from reaching the homes, but she

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cannot help be fearful of what could happen. “I hear people joking about homes burning in the Funny River fire on the radio,” she said. “I don’t think it’s funny. We are living this. It’s pretty terrifying.” Since Tuesday morning the smoke has been so thick her dogs and horses have had difficulty breathing outside. From her house, Christian can see the orange glow of the flames, feel the heat, smell the smoke. Her fiancé called her from work at noon Tuesday and said she needed to come back home to pack and leave. She packed up family photos and went down the road and stayed at her friend’s house. Wednesday morning Christian returned home and the smoke was so thick she could not breath outside and needed to wear a mask. Her dogs coughed from the smoke. The air was yellow and burned debris and ash rained down from the sky. “Something hit me on the head, it was raining flaming, burnt pine needles,” Christian said. Next door, a family has a partially built home. They’re mid-construction and the structure has no roof. That family sprayed their half-built home with flame retardant foam. That evening, Christian said she could hear the firefighters working to build a fire break. Then, on Wednesday morning, Christian said she and several of the neighbors met to come up with a plan. Ten families are ready to leave. All of them are packed, some said they would consider

taking a canoe and paddling down the Kasilof River if the fire got too close, she said. “It seems like the fire is coming toward the middle of the road, two miles from where we live. We could get trapped,” she said. As the fire burns, animals have been running down the road — travelling away from the fire. Christian said she has seen hares, porcupines and moose running from the fire. Her own horses have been moved to her sister’s house and Christian stayed with a friend Tuesday night. If the fire gets closer, family in Nikiski will take the horses, she said. “We’ve been sleeping in shifts at my house,” she said. More than 200 people, including area Sen. Peter Micciche, R-Soldotna, and Rep. Mike Chenault, R-Nikiski, attended a meeting at Tustumena Elementary School in Kasilof where firefighting officials were presenting information about the rapidly growing blaze. While the meeting started off cordially, people began to speak out of turn quickly — asking how close the fire could get before homes would be evacuated and wanting a timeline for when the fire would be put out. Rob Allen, incident commander, said wished he would have had more people on the ground fighting the fire during the first few hours that it burned — but, he said, he is more comfortable now with more than 170 crew and air support on the fire.

to slow Friday morning to about 5-10 miles an hour, they’re forecasted to change direction and will be moving from the southwest, that could push the fire to the southeast threatening the Funny River community. In the north near the origin of the fire, crews have made progress in corralling the fire and keeping it from crossing Funny River Road by creating a bulldozer line, Nelson said. On the southeast perimeter, the fire is 3 miles from Bear Creek where a group of remoteaccess cabins sit on Tustumena Lake. Fire crews are working to protect those cabins. Homer Electric Association spokesperson Joe Gallagher said HEA personnel went up in a helicopter Thursday morning to check out the transmission lines along the Sterling Highway in Kasilof. He said at the closest point south of Reflection Lake, the fire is about two miles east from the lines that run parallel to the highway. Gallagher said at this point in time, there is no disruption to service operations. “We are monitoring the situation hour-by-hour and have been in constant communication with the incident management team,” he said. “Right now we have normal operations and will rely on information from the fire agencies and at that point make a decision.” Residents who have cleaned the areas around their houses can drop loose brush piles at all Kenai Peninsula Borough solid waste sites. No evacuations have been issued.

Looking ahead

Reach Rashah McChesney at rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaThe wind was forecasted to clarion.com and Dan Balmer at pick up Thursday evening to dan.balmer@peninsulaclarion. 15-20 miles an hour, according com. to National Weather Service data. While winds are supposed

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Area tracksters ready for state meet Kenai Central’s Ostrander ready to take aim at records in 3,200, 1,600 and 800 By JOEY KLECKA Peninsula Clarion

The final meet of the year is here. The 2014 Alaska School Activities Association state track and field meet. This year’s state clash will feature the best tracksters, throwers and jumpers at Dimond High School in Anchorage. In all, 62 of those athletes hail from the Kenai Peninsula. Here is how is all breaks down between schools: Kenai Central qualified 14 athletes (seven boys and seven girls) and two relays, Soldotna is bringing 11 athletes (two boys and nine girls) and three relays, Skyview is taking six athletes (two boys and four girls) and seven relays, Nikiski is bringing five athletes (three boys and two girls) and two relays, Homer qualified nine

athletes (three boys and six girls) and seven relays, Cook Inlet Academy is taking four athletes (two boys and two girls), and Seward is bringing 11 athletes (eight boys and three girls) and six relays. Additionally, Seldovia is taking two athletes (two boys) and one relay. The running events all hold preliminary races today with the exception of the girls and boys 3,200 meter races. The Class 1-2-3A girls begin first at noon today, followed by the Class 4A girls at 12:25 p.m. The 1-2-3A boys take off at 12:50 p.m. and the 4A boys begin at 1:15 p.m. The field events begin with the high jump at 9 a.m., the discus (girls only) at 9:15 a.m., the shot put (boys only) at 9:30 a.m., and the triple jump at 2:15 p.m. The finals for the long jump take place Saturday at 9 a.m., the discus

(boys only) at 9:15 a.m. and the shot put (girls only) at 9:30 a.m. Saturday will see all final running races, starting with the 4A girls 3,200-meter relay at 11 a.m. and ending at 5:21 p.m. with the 4A boys 1,600-meter relay. Each discipline holds a few stars from the Kenai Peninsula, and the following is a closer look at what can be expected from each race. DISTANCE RUNNING When it comes to Kenai’s Allie Ostrander, it’s hard not to overstate the obvious. The junior distance ace is gunning for victories in three events — the 800, 1,600 and 3,200 — and will be shooting for a state record in at least the two longer ones.

“With the 3,200 on Friday, she’ll be running that on fresh legs for once,” said Kenai coach Joe Trujillo. Ostrander has eclipsed the current state record of 10 minutes, 37.7 seconds (held by Kodiak’s Kristi Klinnert from 1986) multiple times, but records can only be set at the state meet. She has also broken Kris Smith’s 2003 state record in the 1,600 of 4:55.89 on two separate occasions, including at last week’s region meet. Trujillo said while Ostrander looks destined to set new highs in those two races, it remains to be seen whether she can threaten the state record in the girls 800 — or even win the race. “That will prove to be the biggest test of her,” Trujillo said. “The fastest runners in the state will be within seconds of her, but she has yet to put the hammer down.

“With state, anything can happen. When you’re surrounded by the best athletes in state, you can go after records.” Kenai holds two distance threats on the boys side — the Theisen brothers. Both qualified for four events each; the 800, 1,600, 3,200 and 3,200-meter relay races. Both also seemingly stand the greatest chance of upsetting Kodiak distance king Levi Thomet in one of those three individual runs. Thomet holds the current state best in 2014 for top three distance races, but the Theisens aren’t far behind. Jonah ran a 9:46.0 to finish second to Thomet at last week’s region meet, and Jordan a 9:48.8. “It’s within their reach,” coach Trujillo said. “They’re unpredictable. See TRACK, page B-4

Photo by Jeremiah Bartz/Mat-Su Valley Frontiersman

Wasilla sophomore Daija Doughty fights past Nikiski’s Molly Cason during a 3-0 win over the Bulldogs. The Warriors moved into the Northern Lights Conference semis with the Thursday win. C

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Homer, Kenai, SoHi girls win Photo by Jeremiah Bartz/Mat-Su Valley Frontiersman

10 a.m. Saturday.

By JOEY KLECKA and JEREMIAH BARTZ Frontiersman, Clarion

Soldotna girls 3, Palmer 0

Homer’s Mario Glosser, left, prepares to pass the ball to teammate Filip Ruetov during a 3-0 win over the Palmer Moose on The game started two hours The Northern Lights ConferThursday on the first day of the Northern Lights Conference tournament in Wasilla. ence Southern Division picked later than scheduled and a thin

Homer, Kenai boys move on By JOEY KLECKA and JEREMIAH BARTZ Clarion, Frontiersman

The top two seeds from the Northern Lights Conference Southern and Northern Divisions advanced on the first day of the NLC tournament in the Valley. At Colony, Kenai, the No. 2 seed from the south, notched a 2-1 victory over Grace Christian in overtime. Colony, the top seed from the north, defeated Nikiski 9-2 earlier in the day. At Wasilla, Homer, the top seed from the South, bested

Palmer 3-0. Wasilla, the north’s No. 2, toppled Soldotna 7-1. In today’s semifinals at Wasilla, Homer plays Wasilla at 6 p.m. and Kenai plays Colony at 1 p.m. The winners earn state berths and move to Saturday’s 4 p.m. championship. The losers play at noon on Saturday for third place and a berth at state. Kenai 2, Grace 1, OT A penalty kick in the dying minutes of the second overtime period against Grace Christian sent the Kenai boys team on to the semifinals. All that stands between the Kar-

dinals and a state tournament bid is 80 minutes of hard work. “Ever since day one of the season, this is our goal,” said Kenai coach John Morton. “We don’t have a plan or anything at that point, but it’s just to get to regions and win the first game, and go from there.” In a match that featured spectacular goaltending from both sides, and two goals in the first ten minutes that weren’t enough to decide a thriller, two 10-minute overtime periods were needed. In the fourth minute of the second period, T.J. Wagoner was fouled in the goalie box and Kenai was awarded a penalty kick. “I had a few guys coming at me

in the box, and one came a little harder than I was expecting so it kind of tripped my legs up there,” Wagoner said. “I got back up and almost had the ball again.” Once Wagoner was put head-tohead against Grace Christian goalkeeper Ryan Merriner, the fate of Kenai came down to him. His shot ripped past Merriner’s right side and hit netting. The win leaves Kenai with a 1 p.m. Friday matchup with one of the strongest teams in the state, Colony. “We had a great game with them last time, and they’re a tough team,” Morton said. Morton said even before ThursSee BOYS, page B-4

up victories in three of the four girls games Thursday in the opening day of the NLC tourney in the Valley. At Colony, top-seed Soldotna defeated Palmer 3-0, while second-seeded Kenai notched a 5-0 win over Colony, the defending conference champs. At Wasilla, Homer, seeded No. 3 out of the south, upset Northern Division No. 2 seed Grace Christian 3-2. Wasilla, the north’s top seed, got by Nikiski by a 3-0 score. Today’s semifinals will both be at Wasilla. SoHi and Homer play at 11 a.m., while Kenai and Wasilla play at 3 p.m. The winners move to Saturday’s 2 p.m. championship and earn a state berth. The losers play for third place and a state berth at

haze hung in the air from the Funny River fire over 100 miles away. But even with the adverse circumstances, the Soldotna girls still advanced. “Oh, it’s a big relief,” said Soldotna coach Jimmy Love. “If you don’t win, you’re going home. So winning the first game is big, and it’s a big boost for the girls.” The Stars held control early and often, leading the stats sheet in shots on goal (25) as the Moose struggled to keep the ball out of their defensive zone. Palmer managed only two shots on goal (unofficially). “We were moving the ball fairly well, but it came down to finishing,” Love said. “Their goalie made some nice saves, See GIRLS, page B-4

Improving conditions at Birch Ridge see 8th green open to play

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irch Ridge Golf Course has had an ominous vibe for the past few days. The views from the fifth hole overlooking the Kenai River and Funny River Road have been at times both spectacular and terrifying. I’ve never seen anything quite like it. We’re certainly thankful for all the fire crews and emergency response teams that have contributed to the firefighting efforts. Hopefully conditions turn for the better over the weekend. Speaking of conditions turning for the better. Early season efforts from our grass aficionados have the greens in wonderful shape by May standards. To the delight of our golfers, the eighth green will be opened for play this weekend! I know “The Exhausted Ruler” Jim Bennett will be pleased. The lovely ladies will also be happy to learn that we’re doing cosmetic work (sand and seed) on all of the women’s tee boxes. Junior Camps at Birch Ridge Golf Course The miniature duffers will be out

for Hook-a-Kid week May 27 to 31. The Birch Ridge Golf Association Junior Camp will be held June 9 to 13. Applications are available in the pro shop or you can visit www. birchridgegolf.com and download the application. The BRGA Junior Golf Championship Tournament will take place the following week on June 19. Old Folks Golf The Galloping Gertie’s came out of hibernation for another riveting round of Senior v. Senior golf action. Tom “Two Step” Boedeker deftly posted a net 31 to capture Senior glory. Pat McElroy finished second, a few shots off the lead with a net 34. Darell “Cool Hand” Jelsma gets a high-five for a third-place finish after posting a 38. Tuesday Morning Ladies League The Tuesday Morning Ladies began play with Tanya Boedeker claiming low-net honors. Tanya’s march to victory was capped by a marvelous birdie at the third that left her competitors trembling with fear.

will be hosting a demo day at Birch Ridge golf course on June 19 from 1 irch idge to 6 p.m. If you’re a golfer interested in trying the latest equipment technololf eport ogy from Callaway Golf this is the perfect event for you. Not only can N olan Rose you demo Callaway drivers, fairway woods, hybrids, irons and the like, Chiya Bazan said see-ya later to the Mr. Chalmers will help you determine competition en route to low gross. which club/shaft combinations would Chiya’s play led her group along work best for your golf swing. Mr. with the “Queens of Cookies” Trena Chalmers is currently scheduling apRichardson and Irma Peterson to a pointments in 20-minute intervals and first-place team finish. time slots are filling up fast. There are Thursday Night Couples just eight spots left. Call or visit the Couples play got off to a loving pro shop to sign up. Appointments are start last Thursday. Tom Boedeker free! and his lovely bride, Tanya, masGolf Joke of the Week tered the format en route to an easy Three unmarried men were waiting victory. Golfers had to putt with nine to tee off when the starter walked up different clubs and Tom has never putted better! Gary’s Electric and his to them and said, “You see that beaupartner Lori Riggs-Bishop cruised to tiful blonde practicing her putting?” “Her? Wow, she is beautiful,” they a second-place finish. The darling duo all said. of Dan and Linda Murphy matched “She’s a good golfer,” he continDave and Sharon Keating for Love ued, “and would like to hook up with Lantern honors. a group. None of the other groups Callaway Golf Demo Day will play with a woman. Can she play Callaway Golf’s John Chalmers

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with you? She won’t hold you up, I promise.” They looked at each other and said, “Sure! She can join us.” Just as the starter said, the woman played well and kept up. It didn’t hurt that she was so easy to look at. When they reached the 18th hole, she said that if she sank her 18-footer, she’d break 80 for the first time. “Guys, I’m so excited about breaking 80 that I have to tell you something. I had a great time playing with you. I can tell you all really love golf. I want you to know that I’m single and want to be with a man who loves golf as much as I do. If one of you guys can read this putt correctly and I make it, I’ll go home with whichever of you was right!” All three jumped at the opportunity. The first one looked over the putt and said, “I see it breaking 10 inches left to right.” The second looked it over from all sides and said, “No, I see it breaking 8 inches right to left.” The third man looked at the woman, looked at the ball, and said, “Pick it up. It’s good!”


B-2 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014

Oilers Corner Oilers to host work party Sixteen days until opening day! The Oilers will be hosting a work party at the ballpark on May 31 at 10 a.m. The public is welcome to come help the Oilers board and staff put the finishing touches on the ballpark so that it is ready for play on June 8 at 2 p.m. There will be something to do for all ages, so bring the whole family! Kathy Gensel is busy securing housing for the players this season. Players will arrive around June 5. This is a very rewarding experience. You will make lifelong friendships and your kids will think you are a hero! For more information on the housing program please contact Kathy Gensel via email at dlgensel@ptialaska.net or via phone at 2629263 or 252-7504. Interested in being a part of Oilers baseball? The Oilers are looking to fill the on-field PA position at the ballpark this year. If you have an interest in this position, please contact the admin office at 283-7133 or gm@oilersbaseball.com. If you have always wanted to be a part of Oilers baseball or are just looking for a summer job, we may have what you are looking for. Our website, www.oilersbaseball.com, contains an employment application as well as contact information. Please consider adding the Peninsula Oilers to your Community Rewards program at Fred Meyer. Simply link your rewards card to the Oilers at www.fredmeyer.com/communityrewards and use our nonprofit number 93400. This is an easy way to support Oilers baseball while you shop! Follow us on Facebook at Peninsula Oilers Baseball Club for player news, raffles and other information. Please feel free to contact us here at the office with any questions, comments or concerns you may have. See you at the park! Oilers Corner is submitted by James Clark, the general manager of the Alaska Baseball League team.

Sports Briefs Tsalteshi to host weekend races Tsalteshi Trails will be home to a pair of races this weekend. Tonight at 6 p.m. will be the Caveman 5K. Runners meet at the Wolverine Trailhead off Kalifornsky Beach Road. Although runners can wear shoes, only those running barefoot will be eligible for prizes. The course covers the Wolverine, Goat and Coyote trails. The race is free for Tsalteshi Trails Association members and costs $5 for nonmembers. There is no preregistration. Saturday, Relay for Life of the Central Peninsula will hold a fundraiser fun run/walk at 11 a.m at the Wolverine Trailhead. Online registration is available through today at www. tsalteshi.org. The cost is $25 for adults and $15 for students, with a $5 discount for Tsalteshi Trails Association members. Race-day registration will be available at 10 a.m. at the trailhead for an additional $5. Bib pickup also begins at 10 a.m.

Derrick Thomas makes College Hall The late great Derrick Thomas grew up in Miami and played his entire 11-year NFL career in Kansas City. In between he spent four years at the University of Alabama, dominating on defense as few players have ever done in college football history. “Alabama meant everything to Derrick, even after he moved to Kansas City,” Edith Morgan, Thomas’ mother, said Thursday. “He still had his Alabama (license) plates and went back to Alabama whenever he could.” It took longer than Crimson Tide fans would have liked, but Thomas was elected Thursday to the College Football Hall of Fame, highlighting a class of 14 players that also includes LaDainian Tomlinson, Sterling Sharpe and Tony Boselli. Thomas, who died in 2000 at age 33 shortly after an automobile accident left him paralyzed, was one of the Hall of Fame’s most obvious omissions. Alabama fans had been growing increasingly annoyed by the wait in recent years. His credentials could not be argued against. After choosing to attend Alabama over Oklahoma, Thomas played for the Tide from 1985-88. He won the Butkus Award as the nation’s best linebacker as a senior when he had 27 sacks. He finished his career with 52 sacks, a school record. “He was really, really fond of Alabama and he loved the Crimson Tide, not only the school but the city of Tuscaloosa itself,” Morgan said.

Dustin Johnson leads Colonial

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Donovan left off Cup roster RONALD BLUM AP Sports Writer

STANFORD, Calif. — Landon Donovan, the most accomplished American player in the history of men’s soccer, won’t be going to his fourth World Cup. The 32-year-old attacker, who set the national team record for goals and assists while winning five titles in Major League Soccer, was among seven players cut Thursday when coach Jurgen Klinsmann got down to the 23-man limit well before the June 2 deadline. “I was looking forward to playing in Brazil and, as you can imagine, I am very disappointed with today’s decision,” Donovan said in a statement posted on Facebook. “Regardless, I will be cheering on my friends and teammates this

summer, and I remain committed to helping grow soccer in the U.S. in the years to come.” Defenders Brad Evans, Clarence Goodson and Michael Parkhurst also were cut along with midfielders Joe Corona and Maurice Edu, and forward Terrence Boyd. Just six players return from the 2010 team: goalkeepers Tim Howard and Brad Guzan; midfielder Michael Bradley; forwards Jozy Altidore and Clint Dempsey; and defender DaMarcus Beasley, bidding to become the first American to play in his fourth World Cup. Beasley and Donovan were teammates on the U.S. team that finished fourth in the 1999 FIFA Under-17 World Championship. “Landon is my brother. I’ve known Landon since I was 15. We’ve been through a lot to-

gether,” Beasley said. “To not have him there is difficult.” Klinsmann had announced a preliminary 30-man roster May 12, and training began two days later at Stanford University’s football and soccer stadiums. When they arrived for Thursday’s practice, players had no idea this would be cutdown day. Having already watched his team in scrimmages against Stanford last Saturday and the L.A. Galaxy II three days later, Klinsmann felt the impetus to make decisions well before upcoming exhibitions against Azerbaijan, Turkey and Nigeria. “We discussed it every day, when is a good time and how we felt since we go into another scrimmage tomorrow morning,” he said in a golf cart outside the locker room, looking ahead to a practice session Saturday against the San Jose

Earthquakes’ reserves. He put off discussing the Donovan decision until a Friday news conference. Asked whether he agonized over it, he said “a little bit of time.” The U.S. Soccer Federation quoted Klinsmann as saying “this is certainly one of the toughest decisions in my coaching career, to tell a player like him, with everything he has done and what he represents, to tell him that he’s not part of that 23 right now.” “I just see some other players slightly ahead of him,” Klinsmann said, “He took it the best way possible. His disappointment is huge, which I totally understand. He took it very professionally. He knows I have the highest respect for him, but I have to make the decisions as of today for this group going to Brazil.”

Scoreboard Basketball NBA Playoffs CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Sunday, May 18 Indiana 107, Miami 96 Monday, May 19 San Antonio 122, Oklahoma City 105 Tuesday, May 20 Miami 87, Indiana 83, series tied 1-1 Wednesday, May 21 San Antonio 112, Oklahoma City 77, San Antonio leads series 2-0 Saturday, May 24 Indiana at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Sunday, May 25 San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 4:30 p.m. All Times ADT

Hockey NHL Playoffs

NL Standings

CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Saturday, May 17 N.Y. Rangers 7, Montreal 2 Sunday, May 18 Chicago 3, Los Angeles 1 Monday, May 19 NY Rangers 3, Montreal 1 Wednesday, May 21 Los Angeles 6, Chicago 2, series tied 1-1 Thursday, May 22 Montreal 3, NY Rangers 2, OT, N.Y. Rangers lead series 2-1 Saturday, May 24 Chicago at Los Angeles, 4 p.m. Sunday, May 25 Montreal at NY Rangers, 4 p.m. All Times ADT

Baseball AL Standings

East Division W Toronto 26 New York 24 Baltimore 23 Boston 20 Tampa Bay 20 Central Division Detroit 27 Minnesota 23 Kansas City 23 Chicago 24 Cleveland 23 West Division Oakland 30 Los Angeles 26 Seattle 23 Texas 23 Houston 17

L 22 22 22 26 28

Pct .542 .522 .511 .435 .417

(Hendriks 0-0), 3:07 p.m. Texas (S.Baker 0-0) at Detroit (A.Sanchez 1-2), 3:08 p.m. Boston (Lackey 5-3) at Tampa Bay (Archer 3-2), 3:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 3-3) at Chicago White Sox (Noesi 0-4), 4:10 p.m. Kansas City (Duffy 2-3) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 5-3), 6:05 p.m. Houston (Peacock 1-4) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 5-1), 6:10 p.m. Minnesota (Gibson 4-3) at San Francisco (Lincecum 3-3), 6:15 p.m. Saturday’s Games Cleveland at Baltimore, 8:35 a.m. Oakland at Toronto, 9:07 a.m. N.Y. Yankees at Chicago White Sox, 10:10 a.m. Texas at Detroit, 12:08 p.m. Boston at Tampa Bay, 12:10 p.m. Kansas City at L.A. Angels, 3:15 p.m. Minnesota at San Francisco, 6:05 p.m. Houston at Seattle, 6:10 p.m. All Times ADT

GB — 1 1½ 5 6

16 21 23 25 25

.628 .523 .500 .490 .479

— 4½ 5½ 6 6½

17 20 23 24 31

.638 — .565 3½ .500 6½ .489 7 .354 13½

Thursday’s Games Texas 9, Detroit 2 Toronto 7, Boston 2 Tampa Bay 5, Oakland 2, 11 innings Cleveland 8, Baltimore 7, 13 innings Chicago White Sox 3, N.Y. Yankees 2 Seattle 3, Houston 1 Friday’s Games Cleveland (House 0-0) at Baltimore (B.Norris 2-4), 3:05 p.m. Oakland (Kazmir 5-1) at Toronto

FORT WORTH, Texas — Dustin Johnson had played Colonial only once before, six years ago when he didn’t even make it to the final round. In his return to Hogan’s Alley, Johnson took a one-stroke lead after the first round. Johnson shot a bogey-free 5-under 65 on Thursday, driving a lot of 3-irons off the tees into the fairways and hitting 16 of 18 greens in regulation. His only birdie on the back nine was a 2-footer at the 177yard 16th hole. That was enough to lead after his front-side 31 that included a 45-foot birdie putt on the difficult par-4 fifth hole. SENIOR PGA CHAMPIONSHIP BENTON HARBOR, Mich. — Joe Durant birdied his final hole for a 6-under 65 and a one-stroke lead after the first round of the Senior PGA Championship. Making his third Champions Tour start after turning 50 in April 7, the four-time PGA Tour winner had seven birdies and a bogey at Harbor Shores. Dan Forsman, fighting an arthritic left hip, opened with a 66, and Brad Faxon had a 67. Mark Brooks and P.H. Horgan III shot 68, and two-time Senior PGA winner Jay Haas and Colin Montgomerie were in the group at 69.

UConn’s Ollie gets new contract STORRS, Conn. — Connecticut basketball coach Kevin Ollie has agreed to a $15 million, five-year contract with the national champion Huskies, the university announced Thursday. “It’s a humbling experience to be around the UConn fans and the UConn family and to know that I am their basketball coach for the foreseeable future,” Ollie said. University President Susan Herbst said Ollie is the “right person” to lead the team. — Staff and wire reports

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East Division W Atlanta 26 Miami 25 Washington 24 New York 21 Philadelphia 20 Central Division Milwaukee 28 St. Louis 26 Cincinnati 21 Pittsburgh 20 Chicago 17 West Division San Francisco 29 Colorado 26 Los Angeles 25 San Diego 21 Arizona 18

L 20 23 23 25 24

Pct .565 .521 .511 .457 .455

GB — 2 2½ 5 5

20 21 24 26 28

.583 .553 .467 .435 .378

— 1½ 5½ 7 9½

18 21 23 27 31

.617 .553 .521 .438 .367

— 3 4½ 8½ 12

Thursday’s Games Miami 4, Philadelphia 3 Colorado 2, San Francisco 2, tie, 6 innings, susp., rain Pittsburgh 3, Washington 1 N.Y. Mets 5, L.A. Dodgers 3 Atlanta 5, Milwaukee 4 St. Louis 4, Arizona 2 Chicago Cubs 5, San Diego 1 Friday’s Games L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 2-1) at Philadelphia (R.Hernandez 2-1), 3:05 p.m. Washington (Zimmermann 3-1) at Pittsburgh (Morton 0-6), 3:05 p.m. Arizona (C.Anderson 2-0) at N.Y. Mets (Colon 3-5), 3:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Estrada 3-2) at Miami (Koehler 4-3), 3:10 p.m. St. Louis (S.Miller 6-2) at Cincinnati (Bailey 3-3), 3:10 p.m. Colorado (Lyles 5-1) at Atlanta (Floyd 0-1), 3:35 p.m. Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 3-3) at San Diego (Stauffer 1-0), 6:10 p.m. Minnesota (Gibson 4-3) at San Francisco (Lincecum 3-3), 6:15 p.m. Saturday’s Games L.A. Dodgers at Philadelphia, 11:05 a.m. Arizona at N.Y. Mets, 12:10 p.m. Colorado at Atlanta, 12:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Miami, 12:10 p.m. St. Louis at Cincinnati, 3:15 p.m. Washington at Pittsburgh, 3:15 p.m.

Minnesota at San Francisco, 6:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at San Diego, 6:10 p.m. All Times ADT

Rangers 9, Tigers 2 Tex. 023 400 000—9 14 Det. 000 002 000—2 7

0 2

Darvish, Frasor (8), Sh.Tolleson (9) and Gimenez; Ray, E.Reed (4), Coke (5), Smyly (7), Alburquerque (8), Worth (9) and Avila, Holaday. W_Darvish 4-2. L_Ray 1-1. HRs_Texas, Choo (6).

Blue Jays 7, Red Sox 2 Tor. 250 000 000—7 14 Bos. 110 000 000—2 7

0 0

Buehrle, McGowan (8) and D.Navarro; Lester, Badenhop (7), Breslow (7), Tazawa (9) and Pierzynski. W_Buehrle 8-1. L_Lester 4-6. HRs_Toronto, Me.Cabrera (8), Bautista (12). Boston, Bogaerts (3).

Rays 5, Athletics 2, 11 inn. Oak. 000 000 001 01—2 6 TB 000 000 100 04—5 10

0 0

Gray, Abad (9), Otero (9), Gregerson (11) and Jaso, D.Norris; Cobb, McGee (7), Jo.Peralta (8), Balfour (9), Oviedo (10), Lueke (11) and J.Molina. W_Lueke 1-2. L_Otero 4-1. HRs_Tampa Bay, S.Rodriguez (5).

Indians 8, Orioles 7, 13 inn. Cle. 012 000 210 000 2—8 14 Ba. 000 005 100 000 1—7 13

2 0

Masterson, Lowe (6), Rzepczynski (7), Allen (8), Axford (10), Outman (11), Atchison (13) and Y.Gomes; W.Chen, Matusz (7), O’Day (8), Z.Britton (9), Guilmet (11), Patton (13) and Clevenger. W_Outman 4-0. L_Patton 0-1. Sv_Atchison (1). HRs_Cleveland, Raburn (1), Chisenhall (2). Baltimore, Flaherty (1), Markakis (3).

White Sox 3, Yankees 2 NY 000 000 002—2 Chi. 020 000 01x—3

3 8

0 0

Phelps, Aceves (8) and J.Murphy, McCann; Sale, Putnam (7), D.Webb (8), Belisario (9) and Flowers. W_Sale 4-0. L_Phelps 1-1. Sv_Belisario (2).

Marlins 4, Phillies 3 Ph. 000 000 030—3 8 Mia. 000 001 201—4 10

0 2

Hamels, Mi.Adams (8), Diekman (9) and Nieves; H.Alvarez, A.Ramos (8), M.Dunn (8), Cishek (9) and Mathis. W_Cishek 4-1. L_ Diekman 2-2. HRs_Philadelphia, Byrd (6). Miami, Ozuna (8).

Giants 2, Rockies 2, susp., 6 inn. SF 000 200—2 Col. 010 010—2

5 10

0 0

T.Hudson, Huff (4) and Posey; J.De La Rosa, Kahnle (4), Masset (5) and Rosario. HRs_San Francisco, Pence (5).

Pirates 3, Nationals 1 Was. 000 100 000—1 Pit. 001 010 01x—3

5 7

1 1

Treinen, Barrett (6), Detwiler (8) and W.Ramos; Volquez, J.Gomez (7), Watson (8), Melancon (9) and C.Stewart. W_Volquez 2-4. L_Treinen 0-2. Sv_Melancon (8). HRs_Washington, Desmond (8).

Mets 5, Dodgers 3 LA 100 000 200—3 NY 010 020 11x—5

5 8

2 1

Greinke, J.Wright (6), C.Perez (7), Maholm (8) and A.Ellis; Niese, Matsuzaka (8), Mejia (9) and Recker. W_Niese 3-3. L_C.Perez 0-2. Sv_Mejia (2). HRs_Los Angeles, Ju.Turner (1).

Braves 5, Brewers 4 Mil. 101 101 000—4 10 Atl. 001 001 30x—5 9

0 0

Garza, Kintzler (7), W.Smith (7), Wooten (7) and Lucroy; Harang, Thomas (6), A.Wood (7), D.Carpenter (8), Kimbrel (9) and Laird. W_A.Wood 4-5. L_Kintzler 1-2. Sv_Kimbrel (12). HRs_Atlanta, B.Upton (4).

Cardinals 4, Diamondbacks 2 Ari. 200 000 000—2 SL 000 002 11x—4

8 9

0 0

Miley, Delgado (7), Thatcher (8) and Gosewisch; Lynn, Neshek (7), Rosenthal (9) and Y.Molina. W_Neshek 1-0. L_Miley 3-5. Sv_ Rosenthal (14).

Mariners 3, Astros 1 Ho. 100 000 000—1 Se. 100 000 20x—3

4 6

0 0

Cosart, Sipp (7), Fields (8) and J.Castro; Elias, Leone (6), Medina (8), Rodney (9) and Zunino. W_Leone 1-0. L_Cosart 3-4. Sv_Rodney (12). HRs_Houston, Altuve (2).

Cubs 5, Padres 1 Chi. 000 230 000—5 SD 100 000 000—1

7 7

0 1

Arrieta, Villanueva (7) and Castillo; Stults, Vincent (5), A.Torres (7), Boyer (8) and Hundley. W_Arrieta 1-0. L_Stults 2-5. Sv_Villanueva (1). HRs_Chicago, Rizzo (8). San Diego, S.Smith (6).

Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORLIOLES — Placed RHP Tommy Hunter on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 21. Recalled RHP Preston Guilmet from Norfolk (IL). CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Reinstated LHP Chris Sale from the 15-day DL. Designated RHP Frank Francisco for assignment. CLEVELAND INDIANS — Recalled LHP T.J. House from AAA Columbus (IL). Selected the contract of RHP Mark Lowe from Co-

lumbus. Placed RHP Zach McAllister on the 15-day DL. Optioned LHP Kyle Crockett to Columbus. Transferred OF Nyjer Morgan from the 15- to the 60-day DL. KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Optioned 3B Mike Moustakas to Omaha (PCL). TAMPA BAY RAYS — Activated RHP Alex Cobb from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF Kevin Kiermaier to Durham (IL). National League LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Released C Miguel Olivo. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Reinstated C Russell Martin from the 15-day DL. Claimed RHP Josh Wall off waivers from the Los Angeles Angels and optioned him to Indianapolis (IL). Designated RHP Phil Irwin and LHP Wandy Rodriguez for assignment. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Placed RHP Santiago Casilla on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP George Kontos from Fresno (PCL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Recalled RHP Blake Treinen from Syracuse (IL). FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS — Agreed to terms with RB Devonta Freeman. CINCINNATI BENGALS — Signed QB A.J. McCarron and CB Lavelle Westbrooks. DALLAS COWBOYS — Waived/ injured G Jarrod Pughsley. Signed G Darius Morris. DETROIT LIONS — Signed C Travis Swanson. MIAMI DOLPHINS — Signed TE Arthur Lynch. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Signed C DE Scott Crichton, S Antone Exum and LB Anthony Barr. Y NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Signed DB Daxton Swanson and DL L.T. Tuipulotu. Released S Jeremy Deering and WR Greg Orton. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS — Signed OL Craig Watts. HOCKEY National Hockey League NEW YORK ISLANDERS — Agreed to terms with G Jaroslav Halak on a four-year contract. OTTAWA SENATORS — Resigned D Patrick Mullen to a oneyear contract. COLLEGE AMERICAN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE — Named Dan Leibovitz associate commissioner for men’s basketball. AIR FORCE — Announced the retirement of athletic director Hans Mueh, effective at the end of the upcoming academic year. CHARLOTTE — Announced the resignation of assistant baseball Kris Rochelle. FLORIDA — Announced men’s freshman basketball C John Egbunu has transferred from South Florida. UCONN — Agreed to terms with men’s basketball coach Kevin Ollie on a five-year contract through 2019. WESTERN NEW ENGLAND — Named Judy Strong field hockey coach.

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014

Habs top Rangers, climb back into series IRA PODELL AP Sports Writer

NEW YORK — Alex Galchenyuk tipped in a pass at the right post 1:12 into overtime, and the Montreal Canadiens overcame a late tying goal and beat the New York Rangers 3-2 in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference finals Thursday night. Montreal cut New York’s series lead to 2-1, and can tie it Sunday night at Madison Square Garden before heading home for Game 5. Galchenyuk, playing only his second game of these playoffs after returning from an injury Monday, deflected Tomas Plekanec’s feed to win it. “To be honest, I have no idea what happened,” Galchenyuk said. “I was going to the net and (Plekanec) hit the puck. He put it on net and it bounced off my stick or hit me. It went in, and the celebration started from there.” The Rangers tied it with 28.1

seconds left in regulation on Chris Kreider’s goal. Dustin Tokarski was sharp throughout in his second NHL playoff game in place of injured goalie Carey Price, making 35 saves. New York had its five-game winning streak snapped, and its run of six straight victories over the Canadiens also ended. The Rangers fell to 1-1 in overtime in these playoffs. The Canadiens are 3-1. “We played really well, but we just have to forget about it, move on, and get ready for the next one,” Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist said. Montreal was poised to win it in regulation after Danny Briere scored with 3:02 left in the third, but Kreider matched him when his shot hit the sliding right skate of Canadiens defenseman Alexei Emelin in the crease and caromed past Tokarski, who thrust his head upward in disgust as Madison Square Garden shook. “It was a real tough game,” Galchenyuk said. “They tied it with 20

seconds left and it was an emotional game. It was tough coming back in the locker room, but we focused. We have a character team, and we bounced back.” Tokarski was playing in his second straight game because of a series-ending injury sustained by Price, who was barreled into by Kreider in Game 1. Briere’s goal was also aided by an opposing defenseman, as Ryan McDonagh nudged the puck past Lundqvist. Canadiens defenseman Andrei Markov tied it at 1 for the Canadiens in the second period after Carl Hagelin staked New York to the lead in the first. Tokarski, in his second career playoff game, was sharp throughout. He protected the lead with 55 seconds left, denying Martin St. Louis’ drive from the right side with a lunging save, but couldn’t close it out then. He stopped 27 shots in a 3-1 loss on Monday in Game 2. Lundqvist made 22 saves, but

couldn’t pull out this win. The Rangers grabbed the lead in the first period that featured only one goal but hardly lacked for action. By the time Hagelin put New York in front with a batted shot, there had already been one injury as the result of a questionable open-ice hit by Brandon Prust, and an ejection after Daniel Carcillo sought revenge on Prust — a former Rangers fan favorite — for his earlier leveling of Derek Stepan. Prust landed a blindsided shot to Stepan’s chest with his shoulder just 4:48 in, knocking down Stepan, who remained on the ice for several moments before skating off. Stepan returned later in the period. Prust heard boos the rest of the game. Carcillo’s night ended about three minutes later when he rammed Prust from behind in back of the Canadiens net. Carcillo earned a penalty for charging, and Prust ended up in a fight with Derek Dorsett. At some point, Carcillo had an altercation with linesman Scott Driscoll and was ejected.

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The Rangers killed off the penalty, and soon after got on the board. Hagelin raced up ice on a 2-on-1 with St. Louis and sent a pass to him on the right. St. Louis fired a quick shot that was blocked in the crease by defenseman Josh Gorges, but the puck popped up in the air. Hagelin deftly batted it in for his fifth of the playoffs — tied for the team lead — with 4:42 left in the first. New York used its speed to build a 14-4 shots edge in the opening period. Max Pacioretty set up Markov’s goal when he sent a pass from the leftwing boards across the Rangers zone into the right circle to Markov, who ripped his first of the postseason past Lundqvist at 3:21. The Rangers were outscored in a period for the first time in the series but were again firmly in favor in shots — registering 13 on Tokarski in the second and 27 overall through 40 minutes. Montreal had 13 total heading into the third.

Marlins top Phillies with 5th walkoff of season By The Associated Press

MIAMI — Christian Yelich hit a two-out, bases-loaded RBI single in the ninth inning Thursday to give the Miami Marlins their fifth walkoff win of the year, and they beat the Philadelphia Phillies 4-3. The Marlins won despite squandering a 3-0 eighth-inning lead. They took the series and improved to 19-6 at home, best in majors. Miami is 6-17 on road, worst in majors.

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doubled Yasiel Puig off second starts. base after making a spectacular San Diego lost its fourth straight diving catch in the eighth to pre- game. It was the 15th time in 48 serve the Mets’ lead. games the Padres scored one or no runs.

PIRATES 3, NATIONALS 1

PITTSBURGH — Edinson Volquez allowed one run in six sharp innings and Pittsburgh edged Washington. Volquez (2-4) ended a threegame losing streak by limiting the Nationals to three hits, walking two and striking out four. Mark Melancon worked the ninth for his eighth save. Andrew McCutchen drove in two runs for the Pirates and made METS 5, DODGERS 3 a sliding grab with two on in the NEW YORK — Jonathon Niese ninth to end the game. Josh Harrihit an RBI double to provide him- son added two hits for Pittsburgh. self some much-needed run support, and the New York Mets took CUBS 5, PADRES 1 advantage of two Dodgers miscues to end Zack Greinke’s remarkable SAN DIEGO — Anthony Rizzo runs-allowed streak and beat Los hit a two-run home run against his Angeles 5-3 Thursday night. old team and Jake Arrieta pitched Juan Lagares had a go-ahead seven strong innings to lead ChicaRBI single in the seventh off Chris go to a victory against San Diego. Perez (0-2) and Niese (3-3) pitched Arrieta (1-0) held San Diego to seven sharp innings for New York, one run and four hits, struck out which won for just the sixth time in seven and walked one. He was ac20 games this month and avoided a tivated May 3 after beginning the three-game sweep. season on the disabled list with Rookie Eric Campbell, playing tightness in his right shoulder and M his first career game in left field, came in with a 2.70 ERA in three

GIANTS 2, ROCKIES 2, SUSP. DENVER — The game between the Colorado Rockies and San Francisco Giants was suspended after the second rain delay, with the score tied 2-2 in the bottom of the sixth inning. A makeup date was still being determined. The Giants next visit Coors Field on Sept. 1-3. The game was interrupted for 82 minutes before the fourth. The rain moved back in two innings later, delaying the game for another 84 minutes and leading the umpires to suspend action. Although the weather cleared up, the field was saturated. The grounds crew dumped bags and bags of diamond dry on the infield just to try and make it playable.

RANGERS 9, TIGERS 2 DETROIT — Shin-Soo Choo homered, Chris Gimenez had four hits and the Texas Rangers rolled to a victory over the slumping De-

troit Tigers. Texas was without Prince Fielder, who stayed home when the Rangers left for Detroit to face the big first baseman’s former team. Fielder has been out because of a herniated disk in his neck. Yu Darvish (4-2) allowed two runs and six hits in seven innings, striking out six and walking three. The Rangers broke through quickly against Detroit rookie Robbie Ray (1-1), who lasted only 3 1-3 innings.

INDIANS 8, ORIOLES 7 BLUE JAYS 7, RED SOX 2 BOSTON — Mark Buehrle won his major league-leading eighth game, Melky Cabrera and Jose Bautista homered on consecutive pitches as Toronto completed a three-game sweep. Toronto improved to 8-2 in its last 10 games, while Boston lost its seventh straight. The Red Sox went 0-6 on their home stand, the first time since June 1994, when they also lost six in a row at Fenway Park, that they were winless on a homestand of at least six games.

RAYS 5, ATHLETICS 2 ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. —

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Senators urge name change ALAN FRAM Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Half the U.S. Senate urged NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell on Thursday to change the Washington Redskins’ name, saying it is a racist slur and the time is ripe to replace it. In one letter, 49 senators cited the NBA’s quick action recently to ban Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling for life after he was heard on an audio recording making offensive comments about blacks. They said Goodell should formally push to rename the Redskins. “We urge you and the National Football League to send the same clear message as the NBA did: that racism and bigotry have no place in professional sports,” read the letter, which did not use the word “Redskins.” Sen. Bill Nelson, a Florida Democrat, wrote his own letter saying he doesn’t believe that retaining the Redskin name

“is appropriate in this day and age.” He described himself as “one of your great fans for both the game and you personally.” The letters come at a time of growing pressure to change the team name, with statements in recent months from President Barack Obama, lawmakers of both parties and civil rights groups. Redskins owner Daniel Snyder has refused to change the name, citing tradition. The franchise has been known as the Redskins since 1933, when it played in Boston. Last month, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., took to the Senate floor to say Snyder should “do what is morally right” and change the name. Thursday’s letters were aimed directly at Goodell. In a written response, NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy said “diversity and inclusion” have long been a focus of the NFL. “The intent of the team’s name has always been to present a strong, positive and respectful

Sean Rodriguez hit a three-run home run with two out in the 11th inning to lift Tampa Bay. Rodriguez’s team-leading fifth homer came off Luke Gregerson after Desmond Jennings’ two-out single had tied it against Dan Otero (4-1). Yeonis Cespedes’ sacrifice fly had given the A’s a 2-1 lead in the top of the 11th after tying the game with an RBI double in the ninth of Rays closer Grant Balfour.

image,” McCarthy said. “The name is not used by the team or the NFL in any other context, though we respect those that view it differently.” Reid and Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., led the letter-writing effort. All senators on the letter are Democrats. Cantwell spokesman Jared Leopold said Republicans were not asked to participate. Cantwell later said on the Senate floor that she was inviting Republicans to sign the letter or write their own. “I’m convinced that if each member of this body speaks on this issue and is forceful in their resolve, that we can help initiate change,” she said. Democrats not signing the letter were Tim Kaine and Mark Warner of nearby Virginia, where the team’s headquarters are; Mark Pryor of Arkansas, in a tight re-election race this year; and Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Joe Donnelly of Indiana, two of their party’s more moderate lawmakers.

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BALTIMORE — Carlos Santana doubled in two runs with two outs in the 13th inning, and Cleveland won its second straight 13-inning game and fourth straight overall. Ryan Rayburn and Lonnie Chisenhall homered for the Indians, whose winning streak ties a season high. Three of Cleveland’s last four games have gone extra innings, including a 13-inning win over Detroit on Wednesday night. After two hits and a walk loaded the bases in the 13th, Santana came to plate against Troy Patton (0-1) with a .148 batting average. He pulled a sharp grounder inside the third-base line, only his third hit in 32 at-bats with two outs and

runners on.

WHITE SOX 3, YANKEES 2 CHICAGO — Chris Sale retired 18 of 19 batters over six scoreless innings in his return from an arm injury for Chicago. The left-hander retired the first 17 hitters after missing more than a month because of a flexor strain in his pitching arm, and Chicago hung on after Mark Teixeira singled in two runs against Ronald Belisario in the ninth. An All-Star the past two seasons, Sale (4-0) struck out 10 and didn’t even come close to allowing a runner until Zoilo Almonte — a .167 hitter entering the game — lined a single to center with two out in the sixth.

MARINERS 3, ASTROS 1 SEATTLE — Michael Saunders hit a two-run infield single in the seventh inning to lift Seattle over Houston. With the game tied at 1, the bases loaded, two outs and a full count, Saunders hit a chopper to first and narrowly outraced pitcher Tony Sipp, who was covering the bag. The batters were running on the pitch, allowing two runs to score.


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B-4 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014

. . . Girls Continued from page B-1

but there were some spots where there shouldn’t have been a save. “I think we did what we had to do to get past this game.” SoHi was scheduled to play at 11 a.m. Thursday, but the day’s events were all pushed back two hours in hopes that the haze from the Funny River fire on the Peninsula would blow through, and sure enough, the skies cleared enough to safely hold soccer matches. By the end of the day, the skyline was once again dominated by famous Pioneer Peak. “I understand why they did what they did, but you have your plans set on an 11 a.m. game time,” Love said. “Well that goes out the window, and I was upset we didn’t get here until 12:30.” The Stars didn’t roll into the stadium until 30 minutes from kickoff, which Love said was due to traffic and bussing issues. But all was right with SoHi once the match got underway. Soldotna scored in the eighth minute on a penalty kick taken by Julie Litchfield. After a SoHi player was tackled in the penalty box, Litchfield was chosen to take the kick, and even though her initial shot was swiftly blocked by Palmer goalie Katarina Godden, Litchfield caught the rebound and netted it for a SoHi lead. Just two minutes later, Alyssa Wolfe beat a Palmer defender and charged to the goal to take a shot. Her kick was de-

. . . Boys Continued from page B-1

day’s match started, there was some concern about how fierce his squad would come out against the Grizzlies, as the seniors on the team had just traveled up from Kenai after a night of graduation festivities. “They were sleeping on the bus, and it made me nervous,” Morton said. “I think mentally they were prepared, but physically there was some deficit there because of the lack of sleep.” Kenai didn’t look sleepy out on the field. The Kards took the first lead with an arcing shot from Wagoner in the fourth minute to score his first goal. It didn’t last long, though. Grace’s Dylan Sanders equalized for the Grizzlies in the ninth minute, getting to a corner kick first and knocking in a header past Kenai goalkeeper Wren Norwood, who mistimed his jump. As the first half wound down, Kenai saw a couple of scoring chances slip away. Wagoner directed a free kick that Merriner blocked in the 33rd minute, and Trevor Shirnberg missed just wide to the left on a shot that he was able to beat Merriner on.

flected by Godden but the ball spun backward and into the net for a second goal. Once the Stars were holding a 2-0 lead, the play on field ramped up as Palmer attempted to fight back. In the 32nd minute, SoHi’s Taryn McCubbins was charged with a yellow card for shoving an opponent, and 15 minutes into the second half, Kylee Wolfe was carded for rough play. It didn’t matter for SoHi, however, as the Stars added a third goal in the 51st minute from Olivia Conradi, who received the ball on a rebound shot off the crossbar. Kelci Benson had the original shot. Perhaps the lone area of concern for SoHi was in the 68th minute, when Kylee Wolfe tripped and fell to the turf clutching her leg. She needed to be helped off by coaches, but Love said her ailment was a simple muscle cramp. For now, though, the Soldotna girls are sitting in the driver’s seat. Kenai girls 5, Colony 0 The Kardinals made sure they were playing through Saturday by shutting out the Knights. “This was big, we’re not one and done,” said Kenai coach Dan Verkuilen. “We’re excited Cori Holmes got cleared and got some time playing, that’s the first time she’s been on the field in weeks.” Holmes was injured in a match against Grace Christian earlier in the season, and Verkuilen said Holmes’ presence in the game helped to alleviate midfield weaknesses After halftime, the second half minutes wore on and the desperation began to kick in. “The intensity definitely picked up when it was getting later in the game,” Wagoner said. “It was the realization that we might end up going to PKs, which it’s anybody’s game at that point. Taking control when you have control is good.” A big moment with five minutes left nearly ended the game on time. Bill Ashwell got his head on an airborne pass and headed in what looked to be the game-winner, but the referee called it offsides. In the two overtime periods, Kenai continued to press hard and found more chances than Grace, but none were successful until the penalty kick.

Colony boys 9, Nikiski 2 The Bulldogs saw their season end after one day at the NLC tournament in a blowout to state powerhouse Colony. Nikiski was able to sustain the Knights’ attacks in the early minutes, but once Colony started scoring, they came often. Kyle Bolam scored with an assist from Ben Atkinson in the eighth minute, which was followed by a goal from Arty Fonov just one minute later, with help from Bolam. By the 12th minute, Colony had

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Whichever one is feeling the pulse of the race more will get it.” The Soldotna duo of Olivia Hutchings and Dani McCormick are primed for a run in the girls 800, and both may be peaking at just the right time to claim a state crown. Hutchings chopped off over three seconds from her personal best in the event at last week’s region meet, and McCormick knocked almost five seconds off her personal best. “That really gave them some confidence at the right time,” said SoHi coach Phil Leck. Homer’s Molly Mitchell has shown considerable strength as well in the late weeks of the 2014 season. Mitchell won both the girls 1,600 and 3,200 races at the 3A region meet last week, with times of 5:26.6 and 11:45.0, respectively, and has been a top contender among girls on the Peninsula all season. Michael Marshall, a junior on the Seward boys team, qualified in all three distance events (as an alternate in the 3,200), with a 2:06.84 in the 800 meters standing as his best. SPRINT EVENTS Josh Jackman, a Kenai freshman, has turned heads this year, and qualified for state in the boys 200 meter dash and 110-meter hurdles. “He had some really good practices this week, and there’s no pressure on his back,” Trujillo said. “He doesn’t have anything to prove, he’s going to get after it and get it done.” Jackman’s teammate Kyla Whannell is also a speed demon, and has proven it by qualifying to state in the

left by Allie Ostrander, who is skipping the tournament to run the state track meet. “We weren’t putting the ball in against better teams,” Verkuilen said. “That was my biggest fear, and it’s nice to get that breakaway goal early.” The Kards struck first in the seventh minute, getting a goal from Taylor Sheldon, who brought home the strike on assists from Rebecca Miller and Abi Tuttle. At the 15th minute, Lara Creighton received a through ball from Kylie Morse and was able to handily beat the defenders to slot in a second Kenai goal past Colony goalkeeper Peyton Shaw. Even between Kenai goals, the Knights managed to make few attempts on goal. “(Colony) made a couple runs at us, and we started figuring out what plays they were making and we were able to put the girls in the right spots,” Verkuilen said. Tuttle scored in the 31st minute after receiving a throwin to put the Kards up 3-0 at the halftime break. Colony coach Lorie Miner said it was a challenge of battling against tougher competition with a team that doesn’t harbor a single comp player. Add in the fact that Shaw is a first-year goalkeeper, and Colony’s season ending early is not much of a surprise, even one year after winning the region title. “It’s been a rough year, it’s been frustrating,” Miner said. “We have a lot of fresh, young players, and we’re just still trying to figure out the nuts and bolts of where we belong.”

Creighton added a second goal eight minutes into the second half with help from Cassie Holmes, and Samantha Morse wrapped the scoring up in the 70th minute with help from Jacey Ross. Unofficially, Kenai outshot Colony 10-7, but now are faced with the task of beating a Wasilla girls team that is quite strict with ball possession. “It’s exciting knowing that if they do well tomorrow, we’ll be going to state,” Verkuilen said.

a third goal, this one from Atkinson, and when 15 minutes were up, a fourth goal was on the board from Ben Sande. Unofficially, Colony had a 23-3 shots on goal advantage, and had eight corner kick opportunities to Nikiski’s zero. Colony held a 5-0 lead at halftime, and extended it to six early in the second half with a goal from Arty Fonov, but the Bulldogs soon broke through for a rare goal on the Knights. “There was only three (goals) scored on them all season, so to get two goals on them, that’s a big deal for our kids,” said Nikiski coach Jim Coburn. “I had a good time this season, and if I didn’t, I wouldn’t coach. “I told them to do what they usually do and play a better second half than they did in the first half. They’re not going to stop scoring if you stop playing, so I think we did that.” Junior Christian Riddall broke through the Colony defense and timed his shot just well enough to beat goalkeeper Sean Haley in the 56th minute. Michael Stangel added Nikiski’s second goal in the 79th minute. Colony coach Jeremy Johnson was given a yellow card with three minutes left in regulation after arguing with the referree. Johnson said he wanted senior Trevor Murray to

score a penalty kick that Colony was awarded, but the referree wouldn’t allow it, since Murray had just been subbed into the game. “He’s played defense his whole life and I wanted him to score a goal,” Johnson said. Instead of Murray, Jimmy Goyette took the penalty kick and missed. Ultimately, Murray ended up getting his goal that he wanted just three minutes later, converting on a corner kick by Jake Forstner. “They amended the rules this weekend, because of the smoke, that we could sub in anytime in case there were asthma problems and stuff like that,” Johnson said. “And then the referee came over and yelled at me.”

girls 100 and 200 dashes. Her time of 27.36 seconds in the 200 is 10thquickest in the state in 2014. Soldotna sophomore Daisy Nelson is coming off a runner-up finish in the girls 400 at the region meet, and currently holds the seventh-fastest time in the state this year in 1:01.67. Skyview senior Micah Hilbish qualified for state in the boys 400- and 800-meter runs, and although the latter one may not be a sprint, Hilbish has shown that perfect blend of speed and endurance all his years competing on the track team. Hilbish ranks in the top-10 in both events; seventh in the 400 with a time of 52.28 seconds, and third in the 800 with a time of 2 minutes flat. Skyview may be shutting down for good in a few weeks, but Hilbish has made sure the school finishes in a blaze of glory. HURDLING EVENTS Perhaps the spotlight shines the brightest on Cook Inlet Academy’s Madison Orth, who has shed the small-school limitations to become one of the state’s premier hurdling (and jumping) athletes. The junior qualified to state in four events; both girls hurdling events, and the long and triple jumps. In the 100-meter hurdles, Orth ranks seventh in the state with a time of 16.37 seconds. Homer teammates Tayla Cabana and Lauren Evarts mirrored each other in their state qualification bids in the two hurdling events on the girls side. Cabana holds the edge over Evarts in the 100-meter hurdles and the 300-meter hurdles. Jackman, the freshman from Kenai, is currently ranked 12th in the state in the 110 hurdles with a time of 16.75 seconds. Coach Trujillo said the 110 hurdles

Homer 3, Grace 2 The Mariners, chasing their first state berth since 2007, took a big step forward by besting Grace. The Grizzlies had beaten Homer in the first round last year, and also beat Homer earlier this season by a 6-0 score, but the Mariners are the team moving on to today’s action. “This actually started four years ago when Wendy and I got back into coaching the soccer program,” Homer coach Mickey Todd said. “We wanted to make sure the program moved in the right direction, and the seniors stuck with us. “We were able to take the next step and make the tourney last year, and this year we were able to beat Grace after they beat us handily a few weeks ago.” Nikiski took a 2-0 lead on goals from seniors Mady Gerard and Maggie Koplin, but Grace cut the lead to 2-1 shortly before half. Gerard pushed the lead to 3-1 just eight minutes into the second half, and Grace scored with 10 minutes left. Todd said senior goalie Ra-

Wasilla 7, Soldotna 1 The Wasilla Warriors weren’t only interested in getting off to a good start in their first-round match. They wanted to get their weekend off to a good start. What’s a good way to do that? How about scoring a goal less than a minute into the game. Ethan Keenan sent a cross from the right side of the field, and Oleg Lozko crashed the far post and knocked a shot into the net during the first minute of play. “That was huge for us to come out and score a goal in the first minute. I think it really set the tone

are Jackman’s best event, but the leading time of 14.76 seconds from West’s Leroy Elliott may be a stretch to beat. The third-best time of 15.69 from Skyview’s Tim Duke could be within reach, plus, Duke is not competing due to injury. RELAY EVENTS In an impressive feat of versatility, Skyview qualified all four of its girls relay squads and all but one of the boys. The lone group that missed the cut was the boys 400-meter relay. The Homer Mariners pulled off the same stunt, getting all but the boys 3,200-meter relay to state. The Kenai boys hold a good shot to grab a state title in the boys 3,200 relay. The Theisen brothers are running along with senior Mac Lee and Travis Cooper in the race, and coach Trujillo said he hopes they can surprise some people. “I’m hoping they can surprise Kodiak,” Trujillo said. “Just a fraction of an inch in our exchanges, maybe half a second per lap will be all the difference. “We’re very hopeful we can end up medaling or even catching Kodiak.” The Kards’ top time of 8:15.97 is only surpassed this year by Kodiak’s 8:10.87. The Soldotna girls did well last week at regions. The 800, 1,600 and 3,200-meter relays all qualified for state. “They did a good job those relays,” coach Leck said. “Our 3,200 relay is our best shot. They gotta run well because there’s a few other good teams, but they have a shot to win that one.” Not only do they have a shot to win, but a possible state record is on the line. Three weeks ago at the Anchorage Invite, the team of Hutchings, C

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chael Doan only had to make four or five saves due to great defense, especially by junior sweeper Aspen Daigle. “She played the game of her life,” Todd said. “It was awesome.” Wasilla 3, Nikiski 0 As the Wasilla Warriors put on a shooter’s display, Nikiski junior Rachel Thompson was busy putting on a goalkeeper’s clinic. Despite finishing with about 30 shots on net, Wasilla had to settle for only three goals. Alia Donnely, Alexa Starr and Ally Hull each scored to help Wasilla earn the win. But the goals didn’t come easy for the Warriors. “We had about a dozen shots that would have probably scored on other goalies,” Wasilla head coach Patrick O’Neill said after the win. “We knew coming in she’s the top goalie, in maybe the state. She’s phenomenal.” O’Neill, happy to get the win and move ahead, said he’s certainly not surprised by the 3-0 score. “I had a feeling it was going to be a lower scoring game that most people thought based on the seeds and the records,” O’Neill said. Nikiski entered the tournament as the No. 4 seed from the South Division. Knowing Nikiski was the opponent, O’Neill said the Warriors worked throughout the week on a game plan to have success against Thompson, a past NLC Player of the Year. “We talked about it before the game, about keeping shots on her, keeping shots low, try to

get in the box on her,” O’Neill said. “She’s so good from outside, you’re not going to beat her from a distance. The goal was to get in deep, work the ball around and make it hard on her.” O’Neill said the Warriors’ possession style of play helped Wasilla’s cause. “We knew possessing the ball is kind of our style,” O’Neill said. Wasilla was able to strike early. Donnely, in the center of the box, took a feed from Lydia Phillips from the left side of the field. Donnely was able to beat Thompson to give Wasilla the 1-0 lead. During the 24th minute, Wasilla’s leading scorer, junior Alexa Starr, scored a highlight reel worthy goal to give the Warriors the 2-0 lead. Starr dribbled inside the left side of the box, and ripped a shot high, just underneath the crossbar, over the reach of Thompson. “That was a matchup I was personally looking forward to, a big-time goal scorer against a big-time goalkeeper,” O’Neill said of the Thompson versus Starr matchup. “That’s a top one or two field player in the region going up against definitely the top goalie.” Hull gave the Warriors a 3-0 lead with a goal in the 53rd minute. With the win, Wasilla moves forward to play Kenai in the NLC semifinals. Kenai advanced with a 5-0 win over Colony Thursday. O’Neill said Wasilla is looking forward to playing Kenai, a team that edged Wasilla 1-0 on the Warriors’ recent road trip to the Peninsula.

for us,” Wasilla head coach Blake Livingston said. Lozko, Keenan and Alex Fonov each recorded a pair of goals for Wasilla. Kyle Broach also scored for the Warriors. Livingston said he hopes the momentum created by the win will help power the Warriors through the weekend. “You always want to peak at the right time. Our goal is to be in the championship game,” Livingston said. Wasilla scored three times during the first 22 minutes, and held a 4-1 lead at halftime. “We were opportunistic. We scored some nice goals,” Livingston said. Livingston said he also felt Soldotna played better than the score indicated. “I thought Soldotna also played hard, though,” Livingston said. “Even though the score might not have shown it, especially in the first half, they were right there. We definitely didn’t want to loose the momentum.” Soldotna netted its lone goal in the 27th minute. Charalambos Asimakopoulo scored to cut Wasilla’s lead to 3-1.

time indoors earlier this week, forced inside by the smoke that continues to fill the Southcentral Alaska sky, the Homer Mariners were happy to be outside Thursday afternoon. The Mariners are also thrilled to be moving forward in the Northern Lights Conference tourney. “It’s always nice to get through the first game,” Homer head coach Warren Waldorf said. “(Palmer) had a pretty good season, but now they go home and that’s hard. Their kids fought well today, and now they’re going home.” Drew Brown, Filip Reutov and Max Mangue each scored to help C Homer’s season stay alive, and move the Mariners within a win of Y the state tournament. Homer’s first two goals were set up by corner kicks. After a Homer corner kick in the 12th minute, Brown knocked in a loose ball in front of the Palmer net to give Homer the 1-0 lead. In the 42nd minute, Reutov bounced in a header of a corner kick from the right side of the field to give Homer the 2-0 lead. “That’s been working pretty well for us this year. We’ve got a few goals like that. It’s nice to see it happen today,” Waldorf said. Mangue ripped a shot high into Homer 3, Palmer 0 the net during the 57th minute to WASILLA — After spending give Homer a 3-0 lead.

McCormick, Nelson and Sadie Fox nearly took down the 2004 state mark of 9:35.21 that is held by West Valley. The foursome ran a 9:38.38 that day. But Leck indicated that even if they miss the record, a victory would still easily be enough to satisfy. “They’re gonna run as hard as they can,” Leck said. “We have some kids running some extravagant times in that 800, so anything’s possible. If the record falls, great, and if not, winning is fine.” The Seward boys 1,600-meter relay has run 3:40.94. THROWING EVENTS Makayla Wong continues to lead the Peninsula in throwing heavy objects a great distance. Wong set new bests en route to the victories in last week’s region meet, throwing for 35 feet, 2 inches, in the girls shot put and 110 feet, 8 inches, in the discus. “She is our to thrower, without a doubt,” Leck said. “There’s a girl from Lathrop (To’a Levi) that’s pretty good, but Makayla’s just going to relax and have fun. “She just likes to get out there and have fun, she’s a competitor.” Wong finished second in shot put and third in the discus at the state meet last year. Joining Wong in both throwing events is Kenai freshman Abby Beck, who currently holds the sixth-farthest toss in the girls discus this year with a distance of 105 feet, 8 inches. Beck won the Kenai Peninsula Borough title in the discus two weeks ago, and followed it up with a third place at the region meet last week. CIA senior Zach Taplin has proven being from a small school isn’t a hindrance by qualifying to state in both boys throwing events. Taplin ranks fifth in the state in both events, with

throws of 46 feet, 9-1/4 inches in the shot put, and 141 feet, 1 inch, in the discus. A pair of sophomores from Nikiski made the cut to state in both throwing events. Luke Johnson and Asa Quimby are heading up that list, and both hold top-10 throwing efforts in the state. Johnson ranks ninth in the shot put with a throw of 44 feet, 8-1/2 inches, and Quimby holds 10th with a heave of 44 feet, 8 inches. JUMPING EVENTS SoHi’s Daisy Nelson will complete the other half of her individual event performance in the girls triple jump. Nelson currently ranks eighth in the state with a leap of 33 feet, 3-1/2 inches, which was good enough to win the borough meet two weeks ago. Last week at the region meet, Nelson finished second. Nikiski senior Seth Carstens qualified in both the boys high and long jumps. Carstens is undefeated in 2014 in the high jump, and had won the long jump in all meets until last week’s region competition, when he finished third. Carstens is ranked sixth in the state in the high jump with a mark of 6—0. SoHi teammates Lindsey Wong and Claire McElroy both got in to the girls high jump, and Wong is currently ranked seventh in the state with a leap of 4 feet, 10 inches. Wong won the high jump at the borough championships. CIA’s Madison Orth is competing in the girls long and triple jumps, to go along with her hurdling events. Zach Martin of Seward qualified for the triple jump with a distance of 38 feet, 5-1/4 inches, which puts him on the edge of contention. The current state high mark is 42 feet, 2-1/2 inches.

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The state of the Kenai Author’s note: Part 2 in a series of two columns.

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ver the years, fish habitat and the quality of the fishing experience have deteriorated on the Kenai River. If we keep doing what we’ve been doing — fishing more and enjoying it less — we’re setting ourselves up for what happened in the Pacific Northwest, where salmon increasingly face extinction. When I ask people what they think ought to be done to improve the Kenai River’s fish habitat or its fishing, I get a lot of “we need fishboard members and politicians who will make some positive changes.” That’s true enough, but it’s not the whole story. While members of the Board of Fisheries, state legislators and various members of local governments do have the authority to affect change, the real power to change things comes from the people. Nothing significant will be done for Kenai River fish or fishing until people want it to be done. How many people will it take? It’ll take enough to over-ride the nay-sayers, the dooms-day prophets and the commercial interests that can’t see beyond their bottom lines. Enough to sway votes in favor of fish and fishing. Enough to get the right people appointed and elected. Enough to accomplish the things that must be done, such as: n To ensure healthy salmon runs and to provide a quality fishing experience, fishing pressure must be reduced on Cook Inlet and the Kenai River. All use must be reduced and limited, with commercial use first. Far too many people now rely on this fragile, finite resource for a living. Commercial users shouldn’t be depended upon to “self limit.” n To make the river a more productive place for spawning and rearing salmon, a 15-year moratorium should be placed on the use of power boats on the Kenai. This would help to restore the Kenai to quieter, more natural state, as well as improving fish habitat and reducing turbidity and erosion due to boat wakes. n Sanctuaries should be created to ensure the sustainability of the various groups of salmon with discrete life histories. For example, at least some early-run king salmon

Photos by Dan Balmer/Peninsula Clarion

Hunter Sundberg, 11, looks to get his footing on a rock wall built in the garage of Natalie and Nic Larson in Soldotna. The Larson’s started teaching rock climbing sessions to several kids in March and are accepting new students for summer sessions beginning June 9.

Rock climbers build confidence By DAN BALMER Peninsula Clarion

Above: Nic Larson watches as his step-daughters, Madison, Mia and Lexi, climb across the rock wall he built in his garage. Left: Mia Gridley, 9, holds onto the sloped rock wall built in her family’s garage. Her mom, Natalie Larson, teaches rock climbing for kids with onehour sessions and is available from noon to 7 p.m. Monday Thursday.

See PALMER, page C-2

Hunter Sundberg held on to a sloped rock wall trying to figure out his next move. With gravity working against him and his arms tiring from holding himself up, he moved to the next hold. Before he could reach for a grip he lost his balance and jumped down. “(The sloped corner) is the tricky part,” said the 11 year old from Soldotna. “It wears me out fast, but I will figure it out.” For two days a week the past two months, Hunter has taken rock-climbing lessons from Natalie and Nic Larson, who built a boulder wall in their garage over the winter. The climbing wall is 8 feet tall, 25 feet long with geometric shapes and different sized holds made out of real rocks. Since moving to Soldotna from Fairbanks one year ago, the two avid rock climbers built the rock wall not only for their three daughters, Lexi, Mia and Madison, but also to share the sport with other kids in the

neighborhood. The Larson’s have started Redoubt Rock Climbing, a class for children between the ages of 6-12 to teach students the basics of the sport. Summer sessions begin June 9 with flexible time slots for one-hour lessons on the indoor rock wall Monday through Thursday. The cost is $25 a student per session. Natalie Larson, originally from California, started rock climbing at the age of six. She said it is a great individual sport that improves balance, motor skills, problem solving, disciple and patience. “I think it’s important for kids to be more active in doing something that is not only fun but tests themselves,” she said. “It is nice to have a sport where you are competing with yourself. It’s awesome to see kids get excited about it.” Tammy Sundberg said she had been looking for an activity for her son, Hunter, who is diabetic and not interested in competitive sports. While cutSee ROCK, page C-2

Polynesian voyaging canoe is traveling around the world Weather willing, the 62-foot vessel is scheduled to leave Hawaii Monday on its longest-ever ocean voyage. Relying on wind and stars to guide it, the Hokulea will chase the horizon for 47,000 miles, dropping anchor at 85 ports on six continents. “We could be sailing around the world on a high-end yacht, but we’re not,” said Chad Kalepa Baybayan, one of five master navigators who take shifts on the Hokulea. “We’re doing it on traditionally built voyaging canoes, reflective of the architecture of voyaging canoes

across the Pacific. This is a cultural project for us. It has a lot of spiritual meaning.” The three-year tour — roughHONOLULU — To take ly south and west from Hawaii the Hokulea for a spin off the past Australia, around the Cape coast of Oahu is to see the Haof Good Hope, to the Americas, waiian islands in perhaps the and back via the Panama Casame way as their discoverers nal — will make the Hokulea’s did hundreds of years ago. watershed first voyage in 1976 Those seafarers likely arlook like a light jog. rived on a boat resembling the That roundtrip to Tahiti double-hulled canoe, bridged demonstrated, for the first time by a modest deck, compelled in centuries, the efficacy of anby three sails, steered by a rudcient Polynesian way-finding der, its components held fast and boat design. The canoe bewith ropes rather than screws came an immediate icon amid or nails. an ongoing renaissance in Native Hawaiian language and culture. The boat’s first navigator, Pius “Mau” Piailug, was among the last half-dozen people in the world to practice the art of traditional navigation when he agreed to teach the Hokulea’s crew. The Hokulea endured a disastrous 1978 voyage where it capsized in a blinding storm between Hawaiian islands. Eddie Aikau, a revered surfer and lifeguard on the crew, grabbed his surfboard and paddled for help, AP Photo/Oskar Garcia but was never seen again. The pilot of a passing plane Navigator Chad Kalepa Baybayan stands aboard the deck of the Hokulea canoe April 29, off Honolulu. The Polynesian voy- spotted the wreck, saving the aging canoe is setting off on a 3-year voyage around the world crew. The crew soldiered on, and using no modern instrumentation. By SAM EIFLING Associated Press

AP Photo/Sam Eifling

The Hokulea sailing canoe is seen off Honolulu on Tuesday, April 29, 2014. The Polynesian voyaging canoe is setting off on a 3-year voyage around the world, navigating using no modern instrumentation.

over the years, the Hokulea, which today bears a plaque with Aikau’s name, has journeyed to such distant points as New Zealand, Alaska, Easter Island, Japan and Hawaii’s reC

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mote northwest islands. What the Hokulea once sought to tell Polynesians about themselves, it now wants to tell the world. The latest voyage — called Malama Honua, or “To

Care for Our Earth” — seeks to bring the promise and raw charm of the boat itself to ports around the world. The trip will also help train See SAIL, page C-2


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C-2 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014

Community gardens are more than neighboring plots By DEAN FOSDICK Associated Press

Community gardens are much more than neighboring plots. Given enough energy and enthusiasm, they morph into support groups, horticulture classes, swap meets or modest profit centers for low- and fixed-income growers. Small wonder there often is more demand than availability. Many have waiting lists. In the Los Angeles area, for example, it can be a year or more before people are able to acquire garden plots, said Yvonne Savio of the University of California Cooperative Extension in Los Angeles County. “Sometimes, people drive clear across town because that’s where their plot opened up first,” Savio said. “Some people bring their tools with them on the bus.” Locations are advertised in newspapers, on the Internet and on neighborhood bulletin

. . . Rock Continued from page C-1

AP Photo/Dean Fosdick

This May 14 photo shows the South Whidbey Good Cheer Food Bank Garden near Langley, Wash. This communal garden run by the Good Cheer Food Bank and Thrift Stores made available more than 7,000 pounds of fresh fruits and vegetables to its clients last year. Volunteers make up the bulk of the work force.

. . . Palmer

need to learn to relate more closely to salmon than we have in the past. As a culture, we Continued from page C-1 need to feel more responsible for them. In a cooperative effort, we need to make whatever should be allowed to spawn sacrifices are necessary to in their traditional areas of the main-stem Kenai without being ensure that salmon spawning and rearing habitats remain caught in July, during the laterun king salmon fishery. As now healthy, and that fishing pracmanaged, some of these unique tices don’t endanger salmon sustainability. Historically, salmon groups may be in a we’ve failed spectacularly at “threatened” status. this level of caring and comIf you’re wondering, I’m mitment. Like sea gulls, we’ve well aware that something ceaselessly bickered over who in the marine environment is gets what fish. the likely cause of the dismal Minus a strong, collective statewide king salmon runs in recent years, not something in will and some changed attitudes, I fear that we’ll squabble the Kenai River. But I’m also salmon into extinction, and that aware that we —individuals, our “world-class” fishing will groups, bureaucrats, politicians, all of us — haven’t been become nothing but a cheap, world-class tourist trap. looking far enough into the In “King of Fish, the Thoufuture. We’ve put economics sand-Year Run of Salmon,” ahead of conservation. We’ve neither paid enough or pushed author David R. Montgomery wrote,“Under human influhard enough for agencies and ences the landscape gradually fishing organizations to be evolved right out from under more proactive. We should salmon.” In a more positive be doing what’s best for the vein he noted that “Salmon salmon, not what’s best for and civilization can coexist, if the “greatest good,” or for the we so choose.” Keeping these group that shows up with the points in mind will help us fomost people at meetings. cus on doing the right thing for The above proposals and the Kenai River and salmon. other similar proposals were Thinking about the multiconsidered by the Board of Fisheries at it’s meeting earlier tude of forces working against salmon can be depressing, this year, but they didn’t get but I haven’t given up hope enough support to win approval. What will it take to win that we can learn from our past mistakes. With enough that approval? Ensuring sustainable salmon persistence, enthusiasm and runs and improving the quality cooperation, we can do it, or at least I hope we can. I wouldn’t of the fishing experience will want to live in a world without require a strong, collective salmon. will. This means our attitudes toward salmon will have to Les Palmer can be reached change. As a culture, not as at les.palmer@rocketmail.com. disparate groups of users, we

ting Natalie Larson’s hair one day, they talked about hobbies. Natalie Larson mentioned her interest in rock climbing, which Sudberg thought would be perfect for her son. “This is totally for him,” she said. “How far he can go, how fast at his own pace. It has got him out moving and he loves it.” Natalie Larson said Hunter has improved drastically during the past two months. At first he wouldn’t go higher than 4 feet and now he moves along the wall with more confidence. She said they are constantly changing the holds on the wall so it is not always the same, which can become stagnant. Natalie Larson’s oldest daughter, Lexi, 11, is about the

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the next generation of young navigators to propagate the craft. “You go through the oral history and you understand all the processes and concepts about it, but when you see a voyaging canoe for the very first time manifested in reality in front of your eyes? Man, that’s incredibly powerful,” said Baybayan, who first beheld the boat at 19 in 1975. “I used to spend hours on the beach just watching her float at anchor. It was just that strong a magnet for me. And it wasn’t just for me. It was the same way for a lot of Hawaiians,” he said. The canoe is being escorted by a modern 72-foot sister vessel called Hikianalia. A flotilla of gadgetry aboard that boat will connect the voyage to classrooms via satellite uplink, giving students throughout Hawaii and around the world a chance to see math and science in action. Crew members will perform experiments and gather data throughout the trip to fuel projects and discussions around ocean health, marine

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boards. Sponsors vary from churches to hospitals, municipalities to large corporations. “One of our gardens is run by five guys from a church,” Savio said. “They literally farm. They plant what the parishioners want, then harvest the stuff and bring it to church every Sunday.” One Los Angeles-area hospital subsidizes a serenity garden. “They believe it’s healthier for people to be outside in nature rather than stuck in hospital rooms,” Savio said. “It’s not so much what they harvest as it is the occupational therapists being able to exercise their clients.” Many cities offer grants to help get gardens started, said Bill Dawson, a community garden coordinator with the Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens in Columbus, Ohio. “They recognize it’s an amenity, much like a park. Corporations are doing it, too, as a perk to employees.” Community gardens range

in size from a few 4-by-10-foot sections to several acres. They are managed either communally — the people in charge decide what needs to be done and when — or left open for individual use. Sites might be offered free, or priced from $5 to $50 and more per season. “Most gardens set fees because their expenditures in time, transportation (for gathering fertilizer, compost, mulch), water and storage are so high,” Savio said. Consider these elements of community gardening before signing up: — Know what you’re buying into. Many people join simply to work on their own in personal plots. Communal gardening, however, is a commitment — a chance to interact and share cultures with others, Dawson said. Be open to teaching or learning. — Embrace giving. Part of the harvest often is donated to food pantries or people in

need. — Engage in inter-generational gardening. “Our children come home from school telling us about composting and organic gardening,” Dawson said. “The elderly know how to preserve and put things by. Families should learn from each other and enjoy. Share stories.” — Turn surplus properties into green spaces. “Haul away the needles and trash and convert the areas into something beautiful and productive,” Dawson said. — Community gardening prompts families to make healthier food choices. “They get better at understanding the nutritional value of fresh carrots over fast foods,” he said. “And if the kids are growing it, they’re eating it.” — You can sell some or all of what you grow, Dawson said. “Gardeners can learn marketing skills, while at the same time get some seed money from their gardens.”

same size as Hunter. She said they use her to test out the wall before his next lesson to give him more challenging routes. “I never know what to expect when I come in,” Hunter said. Natalie Larson said rock climbing is great individual sport because it teaches people more about what their minds and bodies can do. “It’s about overcoming adversity,” she said. “Even the pros are not climbing the same stuff. They have their own problems and set personal goals. Other sports are so competitive with each other. It’s nice to have an activity where you still can compete, but not compare yourself to others.” On Fridays, the class will move outside to Captain Cook State Park, north of Nikiski 36 miles on the Kenai Spur Highway, for boulder climbing, depending on the weather and tide. Nic Larson said there

is one rock on the beach that is close to the parking area that is great for beginners. “When the tide is out, there is a lava rock with lots of pockets and is a great starter rock,” he said. Nic Larson said they will start with safe and easy climbs with their students and will work their way up to more challenging rocks as time allows. Friday beach sessions cost $40 a child per session. The Larson’s have been frequent visitors to Captain Cook and have found 21 routes on four boulders at the park. Natalie Larson’s favorite is Crescent Moon, a rock the size of a small house. Bouldering focuses on the technical skill rather than gaining elevation, she said. “It’s just phenomenal out there,” Natalie Larson said. “Each (boulder) has its own characteristics with different

problem areas. It never gets boring.” For new students, Natalie Larson has an evaluation form to track their progress and a liability form to fill out. She said the rocks are not very high, but requires students wear helmets and learn safety roles. Nic Larson said bouldering is great for anyone seeking a full-body outdoor workout. He said when he lived in Tok, he wasn’t as active as he is now, until he met his wife, who introduced him to rock climbing. “It’s a healthy sport to get your body in shape,” he said. “You see the change and get stronger mentally, physically and it feels good.” For more information about Redoubt Rock Climbing, contact Natalie Larson at 388-9108 or natalierose.larson@gmail.com

animals and sustainable living. “What I think she can do, in a very quiet way, is bring the idea that we are all indigenous to this earth, and we all have that ocean memory,” said Jenna Ishii, one of the apprentice navigators who will take shifts during various legs of the voyage. Those months at sea promise to be an epic adventure — if also damp, cold, itchy, salty and nauseating, Ishii said.

“I do tell kids that it seems like a beautiful, romantic thing, but most of the time it’s not,” she said. “The reality when you’re out there, when the glamour wears off, is you’re part of the ocean.” The trip is funded through local and corporate sponsors, public agencies, foundations and other donations. Several schools and colleges have partnered with the project; Kame-

hameha Schools, a private school system for Native Hawaiians, has promised $2 million. Clyde Namuo, CEO of the Polynesian Voyaging Society, which is handling the project, said he is hoping to get $30 million in cash and donated services, including crew time, to support the voyage through 2017. About half of that has already been committed, he said.

Reach Dan Balmer at daniel. balmer@peninsulaclarion.com

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014 B-3

Classified Index

Homes

EMPLOYMENT Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/ Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Commercial Property Condominiums/ Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

REAL ESTATE RENTALS Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums/ Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

FINANCIAL Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgage/Loans

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

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Homes NEW HOME ON 2.49 ACRES

Two story home has 2,576sqft. living area, 728sqft. garage; 4-bedrooms, 5-bathrooms, vaulted ceilings, radiant floor heat (both floors) & a two story fireplace/woodstove area that is the centerpiece of living/dining room. Large living room windows, southern exposure, high efficiency gas furnace keeps the heating bills down. Five star energy rating. Underground utilities, well with excellent water quality & flow. Finishing touches to be selected are flooring, cabinets, appliances, countertops, stairway hardwoods & bathroom tile/sinks/baths/toilets. Can be sold As Is, or can be finished to owners specifications for additional costs. Six miles from Soldotna, towards Sterling, on Forest Lane. Quiet subdivision with covenants. $126 per sqft. for living area, $76 per sqft. for garage. AS IS price $380,000. (907)262-1609

Homes

RECREATION

FSBO

Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boat Charters Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snowmobiles Sporting Goods

TRANSPORTATION Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

PETS & LIVESTOCK Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

Homes

CUTE HOME * MOVE-IN-READY

New Carpet, 2-bedroom, 1-bath, Bonus room, 5-Star Energy, Stainless Steel appliances, washer/dryer stays with full-price offer, K-Beach between Kenai & Soldotna, Vaulted ceiling. Must See. (907)252-7733 $155,000.

Homes NEW HOME WITH ACREAGE

SERVICES Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

NOTICES/ ANNOUNCEMENTS Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

PUBLIC NOTICES/ LEGAL ADS Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

FSBO Near Soldotna 2576sqft. living, 728sqft. garage, 4-bedroom, purchase As Is or contractor can finish to specifications As Is $380,000. (907)262-1609

Apartments, Unfurnished ALL TYPES OF RENTALS

Property Management Division 170 N. Birch Suite 101, Soldotna (907)262-2522 Mary.Parske@century21.com www.Century21FreedomRealty.com

Retail/Commercial Space PRIME KENAI RETAIL/ OFFICE SPACE 1,832SqFt to 20,000SqFt. Rates start @ $.50SqFt. Call Carr Gottstein Properties, (907)564-2424 or visit www.carrgottstein.com C

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B-4 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014 Real Estate For Sale

Homes

Commercial Property Condominiums/Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

Homes NIKISKI

3-Bedroom, 3-baths, large kitchen with island fireplace, 2-car garage. approximately 2000sqft., on 2 acres. Very peaceful, a lot of wildlife. $310,000. (907)776-8487, (907)394-1122

1.7 to 2 ACRE LOTS. Holt Lamplight & Miller Loop. GAS, ELECTRIC & borough maintain roads. Owner financed , 10% down, 8% interest, 10 years. $25,000. (907)776-5212

Rentals Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

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329 SOHI LANE 2-bedroom, carport, storage, heat, cable, tax included, $875. (907)262-5760 (907)398-0497 EXCELLENT OCEAN VIEW! Bay Arm Apartments, Kenai. Accepting applications for 1 bedroom apartment, utilities included. $25. nonrefundable application fee. No pets. (907)283-4405. REDOUBT VIEW Soldotna’s best value! Quiet, freshly painted, close to schools. 1-Bedroom from $625. 2-Bedroom from $725. 3-Bedroom, 2-bath, from $825. No pets. (907)262-4359. SOLDOTNA 2-Bedroom, 1-bath, apartment, washer/dryer No smoking/ pets. $850. plus electric & tax. (907)252-7355.

Homes

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KENAI 3-Bedroom, 3-bath, appliances. washer/dryer. No pets/ smoking. $1,400. plus utilities. (907)398-1303 WHY RENT ????? Why rent when you can own, many low down & zero down payment programs available. Let me help you achieve the dream of home ownership. Call Now !!! Ken Scott, #AK203469. (907)395-4527 or cellular, (907)690-0220. Alaska USA Mortgage Company, #AK157293.

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes NIKISKI 2-Bedroom, 1.-bath, $850. per month. Pets allowed, includes utilities. Call (907)776-6563.

When you’re looking for that special item, look in the classifieds first.

283-7551 www.peninsulaclarion.com

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Contact us

www.peninsulaclarion.com classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com

Classified Index EMPLOYMENT Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/ Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Commercial Property Condominiums/ Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

REAL ESTATE RENTALS Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums/ Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

FINANCIAL Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgage/Loans

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

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General Employment

Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014 C-5

General Employment

General Employment

DEPUTY CLERK II ALASKA COURT SYSTEM KENAI, ALASKA $2,867.00 MONTHLY

Come join a family-friendly, innovative work environment. The Kenaitze Indian Tribe has opened our Dena'ina Wellness Center, featuring an integrated model of care. Employees at Kenaitze Indian Tribe deliver health, social service, education and tribal court services to tribal members, Alaska Native/American Indian people and others. Kenaitze Indian Tribe is recruiting for the following Full Time Position:

Accounts Payable Specialist Charge Card Program

Under the direction and supervision of the Controller, is responsible for the charge card program accounts payable function of the Tribe's accounting department.

Cook - School Year

Is responsible for providing, maintaining, and serving a family style menu for Early Childhood Center children. Will ensure complete and accurate production records, food/supply purchasing, and sanitizing the kitchen per USDA inspection requirements and CACFP protocols.

Cook Aide - School Year

Assist the Cook at the Early Childhood Center by performing basic tasks in the preparation of foods or to perform food service duties.

Teacher - School Year, 37 weeks

Create a successful environment that will promote the growth and development of up to 20 preschool children and families, following the guidance of the Head Start performance standards.

The Kenai Trial Court is accepting applications for a Deputy Clerk to serve as a criminal case manager and perform duties relating to criminal cases. Complete recruitment information is available on Workplace Alaska at http://doa.alaska.gov/dop/workplace. Applicants must submit a complete application with cover letter through Workplace Alaska by 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, May 29, 2014. For further information, please contact the Alaska Court System Human Resources Department at (907) 264-8242. THE ALASKA COURT SYSTEM IS AN EEO EMPLOYER AND PROUDLY PROMOTES DIVERSITY

Homer Electric Association, Inc., is seeking a qualified individual to fill the position of Engineer II in the Kenai, Alaska office. The successful candidate will have an ABET accredited Bachelor's degree in electrical engineering or related field and preference may be given to candidates who have completed an Engineering Intern (EI) or Engineer in Training (EIT), or Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam from a state licensing board. The successful candidate shall be responsible for assisting with many aspects of the general design and maintenance of the Cooperative's overhead, underground, distribution and transmission systems. This includes compliance with various utility standards, preventative maintenance programs, and system coordination of relaying and other protective equipment.

Healthcare

Applications may be completed on line at http://homerelectric.applicantpro.com/jobs . If you are an individual with a disability and would like to request a reasonable accommodation as part of the employment selection process, please contact Human Resources at (907) 235-3369 or hr@homerelectric.com. HEA is an Equal Opportunity Employer; Minorities/Women/Veterans/Disabled. Recruiting will continue until a qualified applicant has been hired.

Teacher Aide Substitute School Year, on call

To provide support for all classrooms of up to 20 preschool children each, in all aspects of the classroom operations and activities. Benefits include Holidays, Paid Time Off, Extended Sick Leave, Medical/Dental/Life & Accidental Death Insurance, 401(k) For the job description or to apply visit our website at http://kenaitze.applicantpro.com. For questions call 907-335-7200. P.L. 93-638 applies

General Employment

Frontier Community Services is a Soldotna based non-profit agency providing in-home and group home services to people experiencing a disabling condition. We are seeking top-notch personnel for full-time and part-time positions within the agency with an interest in providing health care services for the Kenai Peninsula area.

General Employment

Current Openings • Care Coordinator • Accounts Payable /

Stanley Ford Service Department is currently hiring for a Service Advisor. We are looking for an individual that has a minimum of 1 year experience in shop setting! Prior experience with Reynolds and Reynolds a plus. Must be a team player, have good communication skills, and have excellent customer service skills. Some of the key roles for service advisor are listening to customers concerns and accurately documenting those concerns, dispatching repair orders, creating estimates for repair, reviewing repair orders with customers and light cashiering. Full benefits package including health & dental insurance, holiday & vacation pay. Pay depends on experience and is a performance base pay plus other incentives. If you are ready to join a winning team e-mail resume or application to alw@stanleyfordak.com , fax to (907)335-3367

Full job descriptions can be found on our website, www.fcsonline.org ____________________________________ Pick up and return application packet to FCS’ HR Department, 43335 K-Beach Rd. Suite #36, Soldotna, AK 99669 or email to work@fcsonline.org FCS is an Equal Opportunity Employer

General Employment

Office & Clerical

Purchasing Specialist

• Forget-Me-Not Adult Day • Support Staff

Proficiency with both Mac and PC computer using Word/ Excel and Outlook, as well as experience with other software programs desirable. Exceptional customer service and telephone skills, accuracy in data entry with a high attention to detail. Professional appearance. Ability to meet deadlines and complete multiple tasks, this individual will support the Advertising Department with office related tasks, may work directly with customers in a receptionist capacity, perform data entry on a daily basis, and learn to answer phones. Hours are Monday – Friday, 8am- 5pm. Salary DOE. Benefits available. Submit completed application attention: Leslie Talent Peninsula Clarion PO Box 3009 Kenai, AK 99611 No Phone Calls. The Peninsula Clarion is an EOE. Applications are available at our offices on 150 Trading Bay Road in Kenai, Suite 1.

General Employment

PETS & LIVESTOCK Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

PUBLIC NOTICES/ LEGAL ADS Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

GARAGE SALE FUND RAISER Friday & Saturday. 9am- 3pm. All proceeds to benefit RELAY FOR LIFE. 232 Rockwell Ave., Soldotna. Many miscellaneous items; books, clothing, games. NO early birds!

MOVING SALE Saturday/ Sunday 9am- 4pm 45438 Cessna St. off of South Miller Loop Road follow signs. NO KIDS STUFF! Household, tools, camping, building, aircraft, boating, garden.

Garage Sales SPRING CLEANING SALE Saturday, Sunday 9am- 4pm Sand St. in Kasilof, follow signs. Road next to New Life Church on K-Beach. Clothing, knick knack’s, games, books, tires, rims, electronics.

Garage Sales GARAGE SALE FRIDAY 5/23 10am- 5pm Credit cards accepted for minimum purchase $30. West Poppy, follow timeless treasure signs. Household, antiques/ collectibles, man stuff, lots of variety No early birds!

Advertising Assistant

Stanley Ford in Kenai is currently hiring for experienced flat rate technicians. We are looking for producers and offer competitive wages. Sign on bonus considered for qualified applicant. Full benefits package includes health, dental, life insurance as well as paid time off. If you are looking for good quality of life and want to be home every night then this opportunity is for you! Ford & ASE certified technicians encouraged to apply. Your application is kept confidential and will not contact references without your approval. To apply send your resume to alw@stanleyfordak.com or fax to 907-335-3367 Attn: Service Manager. For questions call 907-262-5491 ext. 1220.

TRANSPORTATION

NOTICES/ ANNOUNCEMENTS

Garage Sales

Retail

Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

SERVICES

SATURDAY ONLY 10am- 4pm 1201 Lilac Lane across from Wildwood. Serious purge- canning and smoking supplies, collectibles, Bourdo plates, Bering Sea Originals, old vinyl, rocker recliner, kitchenware’s, office supplies.

Program Mgr.

RECREATION Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boat Charters Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snowmobiles Sporting Goods

Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

Teacher Aide - School Year, 37 weeks

Support and assist the teacher in providing a positive learning experience for children and families, creating a successful environment that will promote the growth and development of up to 20 preschool children and families.

To place an ad call 907-283-7551

Professional/Management General Employment

STERLING AREA SENIOR CITIZENS 34453 Sterling Highway Sterling, Alaska 99672 (907) 262-6808 Fax (907) 262-3883

Assistant Chief Emergency Services/ Small Station, Anchor Point Fire & Emergency Service Area, Anchor Point, AK.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Employment Opportunities: Kenai Peninsula Borough School District

Accounting Specialist I KPBSD is seeking an experienced and qualified Accounting Specialist to process payment for district purchases, perform reconciliation functions, and work in all aspects of accounts payable. Requires demonstrated ability to work cooperatively with vendors and other employees processing large volumes of work and experience with computers, including Word and Excel. This position is posted on-line at the KPBSD website, www.kpbsd.k12.ak.us Employment tab, Current Openings, Accounting Specialist I Job ID 4467 *WE ARE AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

General Employment

The Sterling Area Senior Citizens, Inc.(SASCI) is accepting applications for an Executive Director to facilitate all of the programs, activities, staff, and facilities of SASCI Any combination of education and/or experience that has provided the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary for the satisfactory job performance of the position would be qualifying. A detailed job description is available at our facility or via email request to sterlingseniorcenter@alaska.net.

Under the general direction and supervision of the Chief, the Assistant Chief, Emergency Services is responsible for assisting with the development and implementation of administrative and management services as delegated, manages the emergency medical services program, and manages training of the Volunteer EMS/Fire and paid staff as delegated by the Chief. The Assistant Chief also aids the Chief with day-to-day procedures for fire department operations, with supervision of paid borough employees and with the general operations of the department. The Assistant Chief serves as a member of the management, administrative and command teams. This is a full time administrative position; salary range $61,000 to $73,000 DOE. A detailed position description, including residency requirement, and instructions for applying on-line can be found at: http://agency.governmentjobs.com/kenaiak/ default.cfm. Job closing: 5:00 p.m., Friday, May 30, 2014.

Please call 262-6808 for more information.

SIGN UP TO GET FREE AMBER ALERTS ON YOUR CELL PHONE. wirelessamberalerts.org

Find your new vehicle today in the Classifieds!

CAR WASH ATTENDANT

Soldotna/ Kenai Looking for positive & self motivated person, valid drivers lic./ dependable transportation. $9- 15/ DOE, 30- 40 hours/ week, Turn resumes into Auto Wash Express, Soldotna. Drop in Mail Drop, inside entry. Next to Fred Meyer.

Currently seeking Framing Specialists who can.. -Provide friendly and helpful customer service. -Process transactions, registers and/or custom framing sales. -Produces framing orders according to company conservation & design standards. -Supports teamwork & collaboration. Other duties as assigned. Requirements: -18 years or older and have a High School Diploma or equivalent. -Successfully pass a background check. -Work schedule includes Saturdays. -Have a willingness to learn and develop your custom framing knowledge. Experience is not required, on the job training. Full and part time permanent positions. Questions Call 262-5248 or drop off a resume at Frames & Things Inc. 44539 Sterling Hwy Ste 104 Soldotna Alaska 99669

Employment Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

Personal Care/ Beauty HAIRDRESSER With clientele wanted, P/T, F/T. Ask for Mary, (907)262-6334.

Financial Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgages/Loans

Financial Opportunities CASH 4 NOTES! Money 2 Lend! McKinley Mortgage Co. Family owned since 1989 License#100309 (907)783-2277 mckinleymortgage.com

Construction & Trades EXPERIENCED PAINTER & DRYWALL FINISHER

Full time Kenai Peninsula. (907)398-7201

www.peninsulaclarion.com

A child is calling for help.

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C-6 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014

Advertise “By the Month” or save $ with a 3, 6 or 12 month contract. Call Advertising Display 283-7551 to get started!

Scott The Handyman

TOPSOIL

RFN FLOORS Professional Installation & Repair

R ep a ir or R ep la c em en t of R oofin g, Sid in g,Sh eetroc k ,D ec k s,W in d ow s, D oors & M ost B u ild in g C om p on en ts. C lea n -u p & H a u lin g. & Insured 690-3490 776-3490 Licensed Lic.# 952948

Pick-Up or Delivery

A.D MEEKS

907-252-7148 Gravel

Lic.# 30426 • Bonded & Insured

252-8917

Notices

FREE ESTIMATES!

SAND & GRAVEL

The State of Alaska requires construction companies to be licensed, bonded and insured before submitting bids, performing work, or advertising as a construction contractor in accordance with AS 08..18.011, 08.18.071, 08.18.101, and 08.15.051. All advertisements as a construction contractor require the current registration number as issued by the Division of Occupational Licensing to appear in the advertisement. CONSUMERS MAY VERIFY REGISTRATION OF A CONTRACTOR . Contact the AK Department of Labor and Workforce Development at 907-269-4925 or The AK Division of Occupational Licensing in Juneau at 907-4653035 or at www.dced.state.ak.us/acc/home.htm

Pit Located on Beaver Loop in Kenai

Hon est & Reliable

Fax: (907) 262-2347

Roofing

Licened • Bonded • Insured

Long Distance Towing

Window Washing

Towing

Reddi Towing & Junk Car Killers

Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn/Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

Recreation Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boats Charter Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snow Mobiles Sporting Goods

Boats & Sail Boats 15' Willie Drift Boat with trailer. Comes with ors & locks seats & more. $5,600. Call (907)388-0362. 19FT. JET CRAFT Excellent condition. Extras. Anchor Point (907)238-2950 (907)435-7070

Campers/Travel Trailers ‘05 37FT. EVEREST 5th wheel, super clean 3 slides, sleeps 4, large storage, many upgrades, Arctic package. 1-owner. $29,950. (907)229-3739

Cash in on your

$$$ TRASH! $$$ The Classifieds Can Help.

283-7551

We don’t want your fingers,

just your tows!

907. 776 . 3967 Transportation

License #314902

Dogs

Parts & Accessories 4 TIRES & RIMS TOYO A/T tires, P245 70R16 065, 1yr old, plus they are on rims, I have Ford hub caps (4). ALL just $350. (907)260-5943

Suburbans/ Vans/Buses ‘02 Pontiac Montana 7 passenger Minivan, $4K OBO; Very Good condition, 114K miles, call Keith (907)283-3175 for more info.

Trucks ‘94 FORD PICKUP F350 2x4, crewcab, air, long bed, gas motor, 15-mpg, Hallmark camper cabover, will sell separately. $5,900. (719)963-5515

Pets & Livestock Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

Health

at your feet

**ASIAN MASSAGE**

Health

CRAFTSMAN ~ MTD ~ ARIENS ~ YARDMAN BRIGGS & STRATTON ~ TECUMSEH HONDA & OTHER MAKES

Lic.# 992114

Lawnmowers & Snowblowers Bought & Sold Larry Stearns • 776-3704 51710 Koala Lane, Nikiski AK

283-3584 Bids Invitation to Bid HC 14

INVITATION TO BID CITY OF SOLDOTNA 177 NORTH BIRCH STREET SOLDOTNA, ALASKA 99669 Phone 907 •262•9107 The City of Soldotna hereby invites qualified firms to submit a firm price for acceptance by the City for the Kalifornsky Beach Water Reservoir Construction. The project consists of constructing of a 1,000,000 gallon welded steel tank with appurtenances, approximately 4,200 linear feet of open trench water main, 150 linear feet of trenchless water main crossing Kalifornsky Beach Road, and a control/pump building. Major bid items are as follows: Unclassified Excavation 6,500 CY Subbase Grading “B” 3,100 Tons Furish and Install 12 Inch DIP Water Main 1,974 LF Furish and Install 16 Inch DIP Water Main 2,227 LF Construct 1,000,000 Gallon Welded Steel Tank 1 LS Construct 816 SF Pump and Control Building 1 LS 150 Foot 16 Inch HDPE Boring and Intallation 1 LS A non-mandatory pre-bid conference will be held at the City Hall, Soldotna, AK on May 21, 2014 at 10:00 AM. Attendance at the pre-bid is not required.

Livestock TULLOS FUNNY FARM

This contract is subject to the provision of State of Alaska, Title 36, Minimum Wage Rates. The subsequent contract will require certificates of insurance and performance and payment bonds.

Taking orders. Quality Timothy Hay. $8. (907)262-4939.

Services Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Services Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

LAWNMOWER & SNOWBLOWER PARTS & REPAIRS FOR ALL BRANDS

Today’s news

Bids

Please Make the phone ring. Anytime! (907)741-1644, (907)398-8896. TEACH ALL DOGS Everything with brains, not pain. Obedience, Puppy, Nose work, Rally, Agility, Privates. K-Beach Road (907)262-6846 www.pendog.org

PARTS - SALES - SERVICE

907-398-7582

Goldendoodle Puppies. 1 Male Pup. 8 Weeks old. Sire AKC Golden Retriever. Dam AKC Standard Poodle. Great Family Dogs. (907)398-3821 Cost $1,250.

Motorcycles ‘98 HARLEY DAVIDSON Road King Classic, Hard Bags, tour package, wired for heated clothing. Over $5,000. in extras/ upgrades. $10,500. (907)690-1148

Member of the Kenai Peninsula Builders Association

Commercial • Residential ($35 min.) 10 years Experience • Free Estimates Hard Water Deposit Removal

LARRY’S SMALL ENGINE REPAIR

fax 907-262-6009

www.rainproofroofing.com

WINDOW WASHING

Slide Backs • Winch Out Services • Auto Sales Vehicle Storage • Roll Over Recoveries

Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

HEATING

907-260-roof (7663)

WILLIAMS

– Based in Kenai & Nikiski –

Merchandise For Sale

AND

No matter how old your system is we can make it more efficient. FREE Kenai: 283-1063 Text us at: ESTIMATES Nikiski: 776-8055 394-4017 email us at: linton401@gmail.com Soldotna: 262-1964 394-4018 UNLIMITED MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS License # 34609

35158 KB Drive Soldotna, aK 99669

Roofing

Rain Gutters

Phone: (907) 262-2347

24/7 PLUMBING

OF ALASKA

Raingutter Technicians with over 20 years Alaskan Experience CONTINUOUS CUSTOM ALUMINUM & STEEL GUTTERS

new Construction Remodels • Additions Licensed • Bonded • Insured 398-6000

Do you look forward to your gas bill each month? If not, you should call

Plumbing & Heating

Insulation

Notice to Consumers

RAINTECH

Terry MounT - 35 years experIence

O N E AL ASK AN H AN DYM AN SERV ICE

50/50 MIX-SCREENED

Vinyl Hardwood

All W ork G uaran teed • Referen ces

L ic.# 901 31 5 L iability In suran ce

130 S Willow Street, Suite 8 • Kenai, AK 99611

Mount ConstruCtion Construction

Licensed • Bonded • Insured

Lic.# 31053

9 07-39 4-6034

30 Years E xperien ce

?

Computer Repair, Networking Dell Business Partner Web Design & Hosting

Handyman

Residential & Commercial

Computer Problems Call Today ( 9 0 7 ) 2 8 3 - 5 1 1 6

Rain Gutters

Licensed, Bonded & Insured

252-7998

D ecks • D eck Repa ir• C a rpentry REM O D ELIN G • B a ths • Kitchens Ad d itio ns Pa inting • D ry w a ll • Sid ing • Sto ne • Ro ck C ultured Sto ne • Sta ck Sto ne • Sm a ll Jo b s • D o o rs • W ind o w s • Flo o ring • RO O F REPAIR Ho m e Repa ir& M a intena nce

Small Engine Repair

252-3965

35 Years Construction Experience

OILFIELD CERTS: Monolithic Slabs • Footings • Sidewalks Patios • Foam Block • Stonework EIFS and Traditional Stucco

Construction

ROOFING

Concrete

Construction

283-3362

CONCRETE • STUCCO • FIREPROOFING • SCAFFOLD CERTIFIED

• Carpentry • General Handyman Work • Sheetrock • Painting • Woodwork • Tree Removal • Hauling • Cleanup & Repairs • Decks • Kitchen Remodels • Bath • Siding • Remodels • Unfinished Projects?

Flooring

260-4943

LLC

Lic #39710

Carpet Laminate Floors

Licensed • Bonded • Insured •License #33430

Tim Wisniewski, owner • Residential & Commercial • Emergency Water Removal • Janitorial Contracts • Upholstery Cleaning

Handyman

HaveGENERAL ToolsCONTRACTING Will Travel

• Experienced • Trustworthy • Dependable • Attention to detail Serving the Kenai Peninsula for over 11 years

Tim’s Cleaning

Automobile Repair

Bathroom Remodeling

Full or Partial Bathroom Remodels

Computer Repair

Advertise in the Service Directory today! - Includes Dispatch. 283-7551

THAI HOUSE MASSAGE

Located in Kenai Behind Wells Fargo/ stripmall (907)741-1105,

(907)395-7306.

One (1) complete set of the bid package is to be submitted to the City of Soldotna at 177 North Birch Street, Soldotna, Alaska 99669. These forms must be enclosed in a sealed envelope with the bidder's name on the outside and clearly marked: BID: DUE DATE:

Education/ Instruction

Notices/ Announcements

RESIDENTIAL CONTRACTORS Test Prep Course. Wisdom & Associates, Inc. (907)283-0629.

Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

Health

Public Notices/ Legal Ads Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

PENINSULA THAI MASSAGE Thompsons’s/ Soldotna, next to Liberty Tax. (907)252-8053, (907)398-2073

www.peninsulaclarion.com

Kalifornsky Beach Water Reservoir Construction SOLB 14-10 June 3, 2014 at 3:00 PM

The project documents may be obtained from the City of Soldotna beginning for a non-refundable fee of $40.00 (without tax). An additional non-refundable fee of $5.00 will be required if mailing is requested. Project documents may be downloaded from the City of Soldotna web site at www.ci.soldotna.ak.us site. It is not required to be on the planholders list to bid on City of Soldotna projects. To receive project addendums, you must be on the planholders list. To be placed on the planholders list, please contact Suzanne Lagasse either by phone (714-1241) or email publicworks@ci.soldotna.ak.us. Downloading projects from the City web site does not automatically put you on the planholders list

The Ninilchik Traditional Council is seeking a General Contractor w/residential endorsement to construct a single level handicapped accessible ranch style home in Ninilchik. Indian Preference applies. Contractor must pay Tribal Wage Rate, must obtain proposal packet, do an on-site visit, and attend the Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference. Bid opens May 22, 2014 @ 9am and closes June 20, 2014 @ 5pm. Please contact Diane Reynolds, Procurement Officer for a bid packet @ (907) 567-3313. PUBLISH: 5/22, 23, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 2014

Bids Invitation to Bid HC 15 The Ninilchik Traditional Council is seeking a General Contractor w/residential endorsement to construct a single level handicapped accessible ranch style home in Anchor Point. Indian Preference applies. Contractor must pay Tribal Wage Rate, must obtain proposal packet, do an on-site visit, and attend the Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference. Bid opens May 22, 2014 @ 9am and closes June 20, 2014 @ 5pm. Please contact Diane Reynolds, Procurement Officer for a bid packet @ (907) 567-3313 PUBLISH: 5/22, 23, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 2014

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Public Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE Ramon Gonzalez, is making application for a new Restaurant / Eating Place AS 04. 11. 100 liquor license, doing business as Playa Azul located at 12498 Kenai Spur Hwy. Ste.# 1 Kenai, AK 99611 Interested persons should submit written comment to their local governing body, the applicant and to the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board at 2400 Viking Dr., Anchorage, AK 99501. PUBLISH: 5/9, 16, 23, 2014

1720/73750

PUBLISH: 5/14, 16, 18, 23, 2014 1727/319

RESOLVE TO FIND A JOB YOU LOVE

Get started with the Employment section of the Classifieds. The Classifieds are your best source for a comprehensive collection of area job opportunities. Don’t spend another year with a job that doesn’t make you happy; open your eyes to new career choices with the Classifieds.

283-7551 C

1742/561

www.peninsulaclarion.com

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014 C-7

Would you like to have your business highlighted in Yellow Advantage?

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Automotive Insurance Walters & Associates Located in the Willow Street Mall

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

Business Cards Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai

283-4977

Bathroom Remodeling AK Sourdough Enterprises Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

Computer Repair

Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD

Kenai Dental Clinic Emergency appts. available Denali Kid Care/Medicaid

605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

Family Dentistry

Need Cash Now?

Place a Classified Ad.

283-7551

Oral Surgery

alias@printers-ink.com

Oral Surgery, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai............................. 283-4977

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Remodeling AK Sourdough Enterprises

Outdoor Clothing

Walters & Associates

Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing

Located in the Willow Street Mall

35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Rack Cards Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK

Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD

Insurance

Oral Surgery, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

Oral Surgery, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

www.peninsulaclarion.com

Funeral Homes Peninsula Memorial Chapels & Crematory Kenai........................................283-3333 Soldotna ..................................260-3333 Homer...................................... 235-6861 Seward.....................................224-5201

Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Located in the Willow Street Mall

Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing

Dentistry

Dentistry

Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing

Walters & Associates

Boots

Contractor

Carhartt

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

Every Day in your Peninsula Clarion â&#x20AC;˘ www.peninsulaclarion.com

AK Sourdough Enterprises

alias@printers-ink.com

ZZZpeninsulaclarionFRP

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

Print Shops

Teeth Whitening

Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK

Kenai Dental Clinic Emergency appts. available Denali Kid Care/Medicaid

Kenai Dental Clinic Emergency appts. available Denali Kid Care/Medicaid

alias@printers-ink.com

605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai............................. 283-4977

283-7551

605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

Peninsula Clarion

www.peninsulaclarion.com â&#x20AC;˘ 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite #1, Kenai, Alaska 99611 â&#x20AC;˘ 283-7551 â&#x20AC;˘ FAX 283-3299 â&#x20AC;˘ Monday - Friday 8 A.M. - 5 P.M.

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Classified Ad Rates Number of Days Run

, 2014 FRIDAY AFTERNOON/EVENING

11:30

A

B

4 PM

4:30

5 PM

A = DISH

5:30

6 PM

7) Nightline â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (3) ABC-13 13

Alaska Daily

News & Views ABC World (N) News

Always nny in (6) MNT-5 5 ladelphia e Late ow/Craig (8) CBS-11 11 Z (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (9) FOX-4 4

The Insider (N)

Inside Edition Family Feud Family Feud Family Guy (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

The Ellen DeGeneres Show (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Bethenny Finesse Mitchell; 4 Vivica A. Fox. (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

6) Late ht With (10) NBC-2 h Meyers

2

2

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7

7

Death â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

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CABLE STATIONS

105 242

(30) TBS

139 247

(31) TNT

138 245

(34) ESPN 140 206 (35) ESPN2 144 209 (36) ROOT 426 687 (38) SPIKE 241 241

Channel 2 News 5:00 Report (N) BBC World News America â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

7:30

8 PM

8:30

Wheel of For- Shark Tank Solving a holiday What Would You Do? (N) tune (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; headache. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 30 Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Monk An amusement-park ride turns deadly. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

KTVA 6 p.m. Evening News (N) The Big Bang The Big Bang Theory â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Theory â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

NBC Nightly Channel 2 Newshour (N) News (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Alaska Weather â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

7 PM

MAY 23, 2014

PBS NewsHour (N)

Undercover Boss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Utah Jazzâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 24: Live Another Day Jack heads to the U.S. Embassy. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Dateline NBC â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Washington Alaska EdiWeek With tion Gwen Ifill

9 PM

9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30

20/20 â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

ABC News at (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; (:37) Nightline 10 (N) (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

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30 Rock â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vernaâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

How I Met The Office Your Mother â&#x20AC;&#x153;Niagaraâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; KTVA Night- (:35) Late Show With David cast Letterman (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; The Arsenio Hall Show â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Two and a Half Men â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

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SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

How I Met How I Met (8) WGN-A 239 307 Your Mother Your Mother (3:00) Laura Geller Makeup (20) QVC 137 317 Studio â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Wife Swap â&#x20AC;&#x153;Silver/Pitneyâ&#x20AC;? A (23) LIFE 108 252 self-professed psychic. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (28) USA

KTVA 5 p.m. CBS Evening First Take News Entertainment Two and a Tonight (N) Half Men â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Jeopardy! (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

6:30

B = DirecTV

How I Met How I Met Your Mother Your Mother Flatter Your Figure With Jacque â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Wife Swap â&#x20AC;&#x153;Henstein/Toulouâ&#x20AC;? Mothers swap. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at San Diego Padres. From PETCO Park in San Diego. (N) (Live) Dooney & Bourke â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Friday Night Beauty â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Computers & Tablets â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

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Futurama â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Til Death â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

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(1997) ter Squad King of the King of the The Cleve- The Cleve- American American Family Guy Family Guy Robot Aqua Teen Squidbillies American American Family Guy Family Guy Robot (46) TOON 176 296 Hill â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hill â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; land Show land Show Dad â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Dad â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Chicken Hunger â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Dad â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Dad â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Chicken ers: UnUncovering Aliens â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Uncovering Aliens Alleged Uncovering Aliens â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alien Mermaids: The Body Found: The Extended Cut Half-man, Mermaids: The New Evidence: The ExMermaids: The New Evidence: The Ex (47) ANPL 184 282 alien abductions. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Invasionâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; half-fish, all conjecture. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tended Cut â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tended Cut â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; od Luck Austin & Austin & (4:55) Austin (:20) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Judy Moody and the NOT Bummer Jessie â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jessie â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jessie â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jessie â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Austin & Ally Good Luck Jessie â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Liv & Mad- A.N.T. 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A jilted newlywed The 700 Club â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Fresh Prince Fresh Prince (51) FAM 180 311 â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; reporter receives divine powers from God. finds solace with another woman. (:01) I Found (:32) I Found Say Yes to the Say Yes to the Say Yes to the Say Yes to the Say Yes to the Say Yes to the Say Yes to the Say Yes: Say Yes to the Say Yes: I Found the (:31) I Found Say Yes to the Say Yes: (55) TLC 183 280 Dress Unveil the Gown the Gown Dress Dress Dress Dress Dress Dress Unveil Dress Unveil Gown â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; the Gown Dress Alaskan Bush People â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hu- Alaskan Bush People The Moonshiners â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Sons of Guns: Locked and Sons of Guns (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; (:01) Boss (:31) Boss (:01) Sons of Guns â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; (:01) Boss (:31) Boss (56) DISC 182 278 man Wolf Packâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Browns must hurry. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Loaded â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hog (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hog â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hog â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hog â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; s: Louvre Man v. 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Marijuana in America: Colo- Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gun: The Rise of Failure to Recall: Investigat- â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cocaine Cowboysâ&#x20AC;? (2006, Documentary) Drug lords invade Failure to Recall: Investigat- Paid Program Paid Program (65) CNBC 208 355 rado Pot Rush the AR-15 ing GM 1980s Miami. ing GM The Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reilly Factor (N) The Kelly File (N) Hannity (N) The Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reilly Factor The Kelly File Hannity On the Record With Greta (67) FNC 205 360 Van Susteren 2) Tosh.0 (3:54) Fu(:25) Fu(4:55) South (:25) Tosh.0 The Colbert Daily Show/ (6:57) South (:28) South (7:58) South Park â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (8:59) South South Park South Park (:31) South (81) COM 107 249 turama â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; turama â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Park â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Report â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jon Stewart Park â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Park â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Park â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Park â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; da Hamil(3:00) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mega Piranhaâ&#x20AC;? (2010) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Piranhaâ&#x20AC;? (2010) Elisabeth Shue. Hundreds of man-eating WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Continuum â&#x20AC;&#x153;So Do Our Min- Metal Hurlant Metal Hurlant (82) SYFY 122 244 Tiffany. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; fish converge on a popular waterside resort. utes Hastenâ&#x20AC;? (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

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REAL Sports (:45) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pacific Rimâ&#x20AC;? (2013, Science Fiction) Charlie Hunnam, Diego Klattenhoff, Idris Elba. Humans pilot giant robots to fight monstrous creatures. 504 Gumbel â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PG-13â&#x20AC;&#x2122; (3:45) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Way, Way Backâ&#x20AC;? (2013, Comâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Scary Movieâ&#x20AC;? (2000, Comedy) Shawn Way505 edy-Drama) Steve Carell, Toni Collette, Allison ans, Cheri Oteri. A masked killer terrorizes Janney. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PG-13â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and murders teens. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (3:00) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Flags of Our (:15) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spawnâ&#x20AC;? (1997, Fantasy) John Leguizamo, Michael Jai 516 Fathersâ&#x20AC;? (2006, War) Ryan White, Martin Sheen. A dead man returns from hell to take Phillippe. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122; revenge on his killer. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PG-13â&#x20AC;&#x2122; (3:05) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sleepy Hollowâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sling Bladeâ&#x20AC;? (1996, Drama) Billy Bob Thornton, Dwight 546 (1999, Horror) Johnny Depp. Yoakam, J.T. Walsh. A mentally impaired man with a violent â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122; past befriends a boy. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (3:00) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coach Carterâ&#x20AC;? (2005) Samuel L. (:20) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love and Honorâ&#x20AC;? (2012) Liam Hemsworth. A Vietnam War soldier is torn between 554 Jackson. A high-school basketball coach pushes his team to excel. passion and duty. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PG-13â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Game of Thrones Stannis and Davos set sail. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Game of Thrones â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mocking- Real Time With Bill Maher (N VICE (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Real Time With Bill Maher VICE â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; birdâ&#x20AC;? Tyrion gains an unlikely Same-day Tape) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ally. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Veep â&#x20AC;&#x153;Special Last Week To- â&#x20AC;&#x153;Prisonersâ&#x20AC;? (2013, Suspense) Hugh Jackman, Jake Gyllenhaal, Viola Davis. (:40) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bullet to the Headâ&#x20AC;? (2012, Action) Relationshipâ&#x20AC;? night-John A desperate father takes the law into his own hands. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Sylvester Stallone, Sung Kang, Sarah Shahi. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;2 Gunsâ&#x20AC;? (2013, Action) Denzel Washington, Mark Wahlâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Batman Beginsâ&#x20AC;? (2005, Action) Christian Bale, Michael Caine, Liam Nee- (:25) Life on berg, Paula Patton. Undercover agents go on the run after a son. Bruce Wayne becomes Gotham Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dark Knight. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PG-13â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Top â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; mission goes bad. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (:15) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Django Unchainedâ&#x20AC;? (2012, Western) Jamie Foxx, Christoph Waltz, Leonardo DiPenny Dreadful â&#x20AC;&#x153;Seanceâ&#x20AC;? Nurse Jackie CalifornicaCaprio. An ex-slave and a German bounty hunter roam Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s South. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Vanessa and Malcom search â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tion â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kickoffâ&#x20AC;? for answers. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Quartetâ&#x20AC;? (2012) Maggie Smith, Tom Cour- (:40) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Wordsâ&#x20AC;? (2012, Drama) Bradley Cooper, Jeremy â&#x20AC;&#x153;Requiem for a Dreamâ&#x20AC;? (2000, Drama) Ellen tenay. A diva intrudes on a trio of retired opera Irons, Dennis Quaid. A wannabe writer claims another manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Burstyn. A mother and son descend into drug singers. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PG-13â&#x20AC;&#x2122; work as his own. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PG-13â&#x20AC;&#x2122; addiction. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;NRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

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CUT OVERHANGING BRANCHES

CLEAN GUTTERS

REMOVE FIREWOOD

L E AR N

T O

RECOGNIZE

WILDFIRE HAZARDS IN

YOUR

COMMUNITY

A single ember from a wildfire can travel over a mile to your home or community. Learn how to reduce wildfire damage by spotting potential hazards at fireadapted.org.

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014

Crossword

Hardworking couple reluctant to help freeloading relative DEAR ABBY: My spouse and I, after many long years of school, advanced degrees and work in the corporate world, are now retired. We are (we hope) financially secure. Both of us have siblings who were less successful for various reasons. What obligation do hardworking people have toward their less successful siblings, especially one who has been a freeloader his entire life? “Rusty” sponged off his aging parents to keep from having to earn a decent living. We feel sorry for him, but it’s the bed he made for himself years ago when he took shortcuts. We’re afraid if we give him a hand, he’ll expect an arm next time. As far as I’m concerned, only Rusty’s laziness prevents him from getting a part-time job to help pay the bills. If we give him money, we’ll have to do it for the other siblings on both sides. I know this sounds uncharitable, but we worked for 40 years and struggled through everything life had to throw at us. We saved every penny we could and invested wisely. How do we deal with family members who can take care of themselves, but don’t? — ANONYMOUS IN AMERICA DEAR ANONYMOUS: You decide on a caseby-case basis, unless all of your family members are like Rusty. And if they are, you sympathize, but

don’t subsidize. DEAR ABBY: Most of my childhood was spent with my grandparents, who raised me until I moved out at 21. I have always regarded them as my true parents because they were always there for me. My biological parents were also a part of my life. I would visit them on weekends. I love them, too, and ap- Abigail Van Buren preciate that they allowed me to have a stable childhood with my grandparents. I am engaged to be married next summer, and I need to decide who should walk me down the aisle. I’d like my grandfather to have that honor, but I don’t want to hurt my father by not asking him to do it. What should I do when the time comes to make the decision? — NAMELESS IN THE MIDWEST DEAR NAMELESS: Consider asking both of them to walk you down the aisle. I’m sure it would touch not only their hearts, but also those of your guests to see you honor your grandfather, who was

DEAR ABBY: Organized religion has caused me many difficulties throughout my life. I would like to distance myself from it as much as possible. I consider myself a “religious independent.” I believe in God, but I don’t believe organized religion has anything to do with God. My question concerns my funeral. Since a funeral is an organized religious ceremony, is it possible to have one without clergy being present? Have you heard of anything like this, and what would you suggest? — WASHINGTON, D.C., READER DEAR READER: Instead of a funeral, many people choose to have a “celebration of life,” independent from religion. Make sure your family and friends understand your wishes, then talk to a funeral home director and make pre-planning arrangements. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Conact Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

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Rubes

By Leigh Rubin

Ziggy

Hints from Heloise SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH The Romeo or Juliet within you emerges, perhaps because it is Friday. At some point during the day, you will need to settle down and get some responsibilities cleared out. Once you are in work mode, you will accomplish a lot. Tonight: Be true to yourself. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You will move past any sluggishness by noon. You have the ability to make a difference with a problem or with difficult interactions. Use your time well this evening. Someone might want to have a long-overdue chat. Tonight: In a flirtatious mood. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Know exactly what you want from a roommate or a domestic matter. You clearly are sure of yourself, and you are unlikely to be responsive to a change in goals. As a result, others will bend to your will. Tonight: Keep your mindset, though your focus might be on something else. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You have a way of turning a difficult situation into a positive interaction. You know what you want, and you will edge someone into seeing your point of view. Return calls and stay caught up with your emails. Know what you want. Tonight: Reach out to a loved one. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Use the morning to clear up an important matter or some work responsibilities. You might want to be slightly more frivolous and indulgent in the afternoon. Be aware of what you have to offer. A family member or loved one will open up. Tonight: Let off steam.

Camp time for kids Dear Readers: Have your kids been asking to go to a SUMMER CAMP? Summer camps can be great experiences for kids. They can try new things, make new friends and create memories to last a lifetime. Here are some things to think about when choosing a camp: First, pick which type of camp you want to send your child to — a sleepaway camp, day camp, specialty camp, etc. There are many to choose from. Once you have narrowed down your choices, look into whether the camp is licensed or accredited. There are different standards for each. Ask questions! What training does the staff have? Do they go through background checks? How are medications handled? What is the ratio of campers to staff? If it’s a sleep-away camp, are campers left unsupervised? Most important, you have to feel comfortable sending your child there. So ask any questions that concern you, and find the best fit for your family. — Heloise

Send a great hint to: Heloise P.O. Box 795000 San Antonio, TX 78279-5000 Fax: 1-210-HELOISE Email: Heloise(at)Heloise.com

Travel hint Dear Heloise: Here’s my travel hint to research a destination while planning your trip. Preplanning a general outline of what you want to do is very helpful. But leave room in your schedule to try things you come across while out. Ask around, too. Locals often know the best off-the-beaten-path places to visit. — Kathy in Florida

SUDOKU

By Tom Wilson

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Friday.

1 4 3 5 9 2 8 6 7

8 7 6 4 3 1 2 9 5

2 9 5 7 6 8 3 4 1

6 2 9 1 7 5 4 3 8

3 8 7 9 2 4 1 5 6

4 5 1 3 8 6 9 7 2

9 3 2 6 1 7 5 8 4

7 1 4 8 5 3 6 2 9

Difficulty Level

5 6 8 2 4 9 7 1 3

2014 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

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tant to you. If you get tangled up in a situation that you cannot get out of, simply adapt your schedule. A meeting could spring up during the day. You will be delighted to meet up with someone you haven’t seen in a while. Tonight: Find your friends. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Use the morning for any talks. You might decide that someone is simply too difficult to speak with. In this case, postpone the talk or let someone else make the call. A boss, parent or older relative might need some of your time in the afternoon. Tonight: A must appearance. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHFinallysomeonewillsharewhat is on his or her mind. As a result, you will experience a sense of relief. Mentally, you will feel freed up to take a risk. Make calls and catch up on others’ news. Consider taking a weekend trip in the near future. Tonight: Hang out with your pals. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH You might be best off deferring to others for the moment. Though you have a lot of people in your life, one person remains your major concern. Plan a late lunch with him or her, or perhaps get together some time during the weekend. Tonight: Love the one you are with. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Dive into your work, and get as much done as possible. Consider a new offer or a different job in the proper perspective. You might have received a lot of mixed messages as of late, but others have been stressed out as well. Tonight: Go along with someone else’s suggestion.

By Eugene Sheffer

your “weekDAY father,” as well as your dad, your “weekEND father.”

Jacqueline Bigar’s Stars A baby born today has a Sun in Gemini and a Moon in Pisces if born before 12:01 p.m. (PDT). Afterward, the Moon will be in Aries. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, May 23, 2014: This year you seem to be in the right place at the right time. You are able to verbalize exactly what is on your mind and have the other person receive the message clearly. You also are capable of communicating in many different styles, when needed. If you are single, romance becomes a distinct possibility after July. You have a newfound charisma that seems to attract others like a bear to honey. If you are attached, the two of you will cruise into one of your special years together. Just let it all flow. ARIES is lucky for you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH By midday, you’ll perk up and feel as if the world is your oyster. With that drive and determination, you seem to weather any potential storms. Return calls, clear your desk and complete whatever you must to go cruising into the weekend. Tonight: Others like your ideas. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHHYoucouldbetaken aback by a domineering friend. At a certain point, you will need to establish some boundaries. You might feel limited by this situation. Use the afternoon to respond to calls and emails. Know that you are on top of your game. Tonight: A muchneeded timeout. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Take care of what is impor-

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Previous Puzzles Answer Key

B.C.

By Johnny Hart

Garfield

By Jim Davis

Take It from the Tinkersons By Bill Bettwy

Tundra

Shoe

By Chad Carpenter

By Chris Cassatt & Gary Brookins

Mother Goose and Grimm

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By Michael Peters


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C-10 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, May 23, 2014

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Profile for Sound Publishing

Peninsula Clarion, May 23, 2014  

May 23, 2014 edition of the Peninsula Clarion

Peninsula Clarion, May 23, 2014  

May 23, 2014 edition of the Peninsula Clarion