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CLARION

Partly sunny 39/18 More weather on Page A-2

P E N I N S U L A

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 2014 Soldotna-Kenai, Alaska

Vol. 44, Issue 156

Question Do you think the Legislature will complete its work by Easter Sunday? n Yes; n No, they’ll need to extend the regular session; n No, they’ll need to call a special session.

50 cents newsstands daily/$1.00 Sunday

Board to take up setnet petition Split of Kenai, Kasilof district management to be considered By MOLLY DISCHNER Morris News Service-Alaska Alaska Journal of Commerce

The Alaska Board of Fisheries will consider one of three recently submitted emergency petitions regarding Upper Cook Inlet salmon management. South K Beach Independent Fishermen’s Association and the Kenai Penin-

sula Fishermen’s Association, or KPFA, submitted three petitions asking the board to reconsider management changes it made to restrict East Side setnetters as an attempt to conserve Kenai king salmon. The board made the changes at its Upper Cook Inlet meeting held in Anchorage Jan. 31-Feb. 13. The emergency petitions were submitted March 20 in Anchorage at the

board’s statewide king and tanner crab and supplemental issues meeting. At that time, board Chairman Karl Johnstone said the board would wait for staff comments before making a decision on whether or not to add the petitions to an agenda. Paul Shadura, spokesman for South K Beach Independent Fishermen’s Association, said he was informed Tuesday

that the board would consider one of his organization’s petitions. A date for the meeting to consider that petition has not been set as of Tuesday. That petition asks the board to consider splitting up management in the Kenai and Kasilof districts when there are 36 hours of fishing available to setnetters in a week.

Happy trails

To place your vote and comment, visit our Web site at www. peninsulaclarion. com. Results and selected comments will be posted each Tuesday in the Clarion, and a new question will be asked. Suggested questions may be submitted online or e-mailed to news@peninsulaclarion.com.

Committee works to enhance school trail

In the news No tsunami threat from Chile quake

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LOS ANGELES (AP) — U.S. officials say they’ve found no threat of a tsunami along the coasts of Alaska, California, Oregon or Washington after a major earthquake near Chile, with danger to Hawaii limited to potentially strong currents at beaches. Bill Knight, a scientist at the National Tsunami Warning Center, says early data show that by the time waves generated by Tuesday night’s magnitude-8.2 quake reach the West Coast, they’ll be too small to pose any threat. Director Chip McCreery of the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center says officials don’t expect a major tsunami threat to Hawaii. But the center issued an advisory saying swimmers, boaters and others at beaches might see strong currents and sea level changes. Chilean authorities ordered an evacuation of coastal areas there in case of a tsunami.

Inside ‘What you just answered is gobbledygook.’ ... See page A-5

Index Opinion.................. A-4 Police, courts......... A-5 Nation.................... A-6 World..................... A-8 Sports...................A-10 Food...................... B-1 Classifieds............. B-3 Comics................... B-6

Check us out online at www.peninsulaclarion.com To subscribe, call 283-3584.

See BOARD, page A-12

By KAYLEE OSOWSKI Peninsula Clarion

Photo by Kelly Sulliva/Peninsula Clarion

Laone Benton sits beside the shattered window that was broken in attempt to steal money from the store she owns, Tuesday at Laone’s Kenai River Purse in the Peninsula Center Mall in Soldotna.

Soldotna businesses burglarized By DAN BALMER Peninsula Clarion

Three businesses inside the Peninsula Center Mall were burglarized overnight in Soldotna. Soldotna police received a call from a mall employee who reported the break in at approximately 7:18 a.m. Tuesday. Officer Tobin Brennan said the incident is still under investigation. Once inside the mall the suspects forced entry into three businesses, Ginger’s Restaurant, Laone’s Kenai River Purse and 27 Red Salon, Brennan said. A small amount

of cash was stolen from the restaurant, but no cash had been left on the premises of the purse store or salon, he said. By using video surveillance, police were able to follow the path the suspects took to break into the businesses. The suspects first broke into the purse store through the front door window to get to the cash register, he said. Laone Benton, who has owned the purse store for more than five years, said she does not keep money in the store at night because the mall has been burglarized before. While no merchandize was stolen, she was

shocked to see the condition of her shop when she arrived to work. “There was broken glass on the floor and everything was shoved around to get to the register,” she said. “I sure hope (police) have a good idea who did this and they don’t get away with it.” Brennan said the suspects then pried into the door of the restaurant and took a small amount of cash from the register. The back door to the salon was kicked open, but no items were stolen, he said. The suspects were inside the mall roughly 15 minutes and it wasn’t until the morn-

ing when a mall janitor called police about the intrusion, he said. The damage is estimated at less than $4,000, with most of the damage done to the broken window at the purse store, he said. “It is less about the money and more about the property damage,” Brennan said. Soldotna police are following leads in the investigation. Anyone with information is asked to contact Officer Brennan with the Soldotna Police Department at 262-4455. Reach Dan Balmer at daniel.balmer@peninsulaclarion. com.

A group of parents, teachers, administrators and representatives from local organizations are working to enhance the trail system at the Kaleidoscope School of Arts and Science in Kenai. Behind Kaleidoscope lies Kenai Peninsula Borough land with a beautiful trail, said Josselyn O’Conner, a parent volunteer with the habitat committee for the project. While O’Conner said there has been an interest in improving the area for years, the committee only came together a few months ago to propel the project forward. The project is funded through U.S. Fish and Wildlife’s Schoolyard Habitat Program, which works to connect people with nature, said Cheryl Anderson, a fish and wildlife biologist with the Kenai Fish and Wildlife Field Office. “Because we have so much more space than a lot of other schools in the Lower 48 we have a huge opportunity here to really utilize that space in a really cool way,” Anderson said. About 15 people make up the core team of the committee. Parents, teachers and school administrators are working See TRAIL, page A-12

Grease fire damages More school funding proposed Soldotna apartment By DAN BALMER Peninsula Clarion

Central Emergency Services extinguished a kitchen fire minutes after the call came from a Soldotna apartment complex Monday evening. CES responded to a 911 call from a female resident who reported the fire in her unit at Redoubt View Apartments on West Redoubt Street shortly after 7 p.m. Firefighters evacuated the building and put out the fire in six minutes, before it had a chance to spread from the bottom floor apartment through the three-story complex, said Brad Nelson, CES health and safety officer. An investigation determined the fire was started by a resident who was cooking at the stove when grease caught fire

and spread to the cabinets, up the hood fan system and ceiling, he said. The apartment’s smoke alarm did not work, but the woman quickly called 911 and informed other residents to evacuate, he said. Nelson said if firefighters arrived only a couple minutes later, the blaze would have been a completely different story. “We would have been chasing the fire for hours if it spread into the walls,” he said. “It could have been catastrophic.” After putting out the fire, crews removed sheetrock from the walls and used a thermal imaging camera to make sure the fire didn’t spread any further, he said. CES remained on scene for an hour to ventilate the building and ensure it was safe for See FIRE, page A-12

By BECKY BOHRER Associated Press

JUNEAU — A House committee’s rewrite of Gov. Sean Parnell’s education bill includes additional money for schools but also a plan for addressing the teachers’ retirement system that has raised concerns with Parnell administration officials. Revenue Commissioner Angela Rodell said she was very concerned with the direction of the proposed “pay as you go” plan, which could exhaust the retirement trust fund over a period of decades and require contributions, potentially from state general funds, to pay future benefits. Legislative Finance Division Director David Teal said the plan, included within HB278, was designed to draw down the trust fund, but not C

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prematurely. He said benefits would not be at risk. He said both House Finance Committee’s proposal and one put forth by Parnell would work. “Your choice is which one’s more affordable?” he said. Parnell in December proposed taking $3 billion from the constitutional budget reserve to address the unfunded pension liability for the teachers’ and public employees’ retirement systems and to help ease pressure on the state’s budget. Currently, the state is on a payment plan that calls for rising payments on pace to exceed $1 billion over the next 15 years before falling.

Parnell has said his proposal, which called for putting about $1.9 billion toward the public employees’ system and the rest to the teachers’ system, would allow for flat, predictable annual payments of $500 million. The teachers’ retirement portion of that would be about $340 million. The House Finance proposal calls for a $1.5 billion cash infusion, also likely from the budget reserve, with $1.4 billion going toward the retirement trust fund and $100 million into a new pension reserve fund from which transfers could be made if the trust fund got too low, Teal said. Annual payments would start out at about $160 million. At the start of the current fiscal year, the constitutional budget reserve fund — which requires a three-fourths vote

See SCHOOL, page A-12


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A-2 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, April 2, 2014

CLARION P

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(USPS 438-410) Published daily Sunday through Friday, except Christmas and New Year’s, by: Southeastern Newspapers Corporation P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Street address: 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 1, Kenai, AK Phone: (907) 283-7551 Postmaster: Send address changes to the Peninsula Clarion, P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Periodicals postage paid at Kenai, AK Represented for national advertising by The Papert Companies, Chicago, IL Copyright 2014 Peninsula Clarion A Morris Communications Corp. newspaper

Company Final Change ACS...........................1.98 +0.05 Agrium Inc................97.52 — Alaska Air Group...... 94.10 +0.79 AT&T........................ 35.09 +0.02 BP ........................... 48.44 +0.34 Chevron...................119.00 +0.09 ConocoPhillips......... 70.31 -0.04 1st Natl. Bank AK... 1,760.00 ­— Forest Oil...................1.94 +0.03 Fred Meyer.............. 43.62 -0.03 GCI...........................11.49 +0.08 Harley-Davidson...... 68.23 +1.62 Home Depot............ 79.38 +0.25 Key Bank................. 14.37 +0.13

Who to call at the Peninsula Clarion News tip? Question? Main number.............................................................................................. 283-7551 Fax............................................................................................................. 283-3299 News email...................................................................news@peninsulaclarion.com General news Will Morrow, editor ............................................ will.morrow@peninsulaclarion.com Rashah McChesney, city editor.............. rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com Jeff Helminiak, sports editor........................... jeff.helminiak@peninsulaclarion.com Fisheries, photographer.............................................................................................. ............................ Rashah McChesney, rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com Kenai, courts...............................Dan Balmer, daniel.balmer@peninsulaclarion.com Borough, education ......... Kaylee Osowski, kaylee.osowski@peninsulaclarion.com Soldotna .................................. Kelly Sullivan, kelly.sullivan@peninsulaclarion.com Arts and Entertainment................................................ news@peninsulaclarion.com Community, Around the Peninsula............................... news@peninsulaclarion.com Sports............................................ Joey Klecka, joey.klecka@peninsulaclarion.com Page design........ Florence Struempler, florence.struempler@peninsulaclarion.com

Circulation problem? Call 283-3584 If you don’t receive your newspaper by 7 a.m. and you live in the Kenai-Soldotna area, call 283-3584 before 10 a.m. for redelivery of your paper. If you call after 10 a.m., you will be credited for the missed issue. Regular office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Sunday. General circulation questions can be sent via email to circulation@peninsulaclarion.com. The circulation manager is Randi Keaton.

For home delivery Order a six-day-a-week, three-month subscription for $39, a six-month subscription for $73, or a 12-month subscription for $130. Use our easy-pay plan and save on these rates. Call 283-3584 for details. Mail subscription rates are available upon request.

Want to place an ad? Classified: Call 283-7551 and ask for the classified ad department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or email classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com. Display: Call 283-7551 and ask for the display advertising department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Leslie Talent is the Clarion’s advertising director. She can be reached via email at leslie.talent@peninsulaclarion.com. Contacts for other departments: Business office...................................................................................... Jane Russell Production................................................................................................ Geoff Long Online........................................................................................ Vincent Nusunginya

Visit our fishing page! Go to peninsulaclarion.com and look for the Tight Lines link.

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Oil Prices

Tuesday Stocks

Follow the Clarion online. Go to peninsulaclarion.com and look for the Twitter, Facebook and Mobile links for breaking news, headlines and more. C

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McDonald’s...............97.90 -0.13 National Oilwell........ 78.06 +0.19 Shell Oil................... 73.23 +0.17 Safeway....................37.79 +0.85 Tesoro.......................51.76 +1.17 Walmart................... 76.77 +0.34 Wells Fargo.............. 49.77 +0.03 Gold closed............1,280.07 -3.94 Silver closed............ 19.80 +0.02 Dow Jones avg..... 16,532.61 +74.95 NASDAQ................4,268.04 +69.04 S&P 500................1,885.52 +13.18 Stock prices provided by the Kenai Peninsula Edward Jones offices.

Monday’s prices North Slope crude: $110.36, down from

$110.41 on Friday West Texas Int.: $101.58, down from $101.67 on Friday

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Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Community Calendar Today 10:30 a.m. • Pre-School Storytime at the Soldotna Public Library. Call 262-4227. 11 a.m. • Wee Read at the Kenai Community Library Noon • Alcoholics Anonymous recovery group at 11312 Kenai Spur Highway Suite 71 in the old Carrs Mall in Kenai. Call 262-1917. 5:30 p.m. • Weight loss and health support group, Christ Lutheran Church. Call 362-1340. • Kenai Soil & Water Conservation District’s Board of Supervisors meeting at 110 Trading Bay, Suite 160. For information, call 283-8732 x 5 7 p.m. • Card games, Funny River Community Center. • Narcotics Anonymous support group “Clean Machine” at Central Peninsula Hospital’s Redoubt Room, 250 Hospital Place, Soldotna. Call 907-335-9456. • Alcoholics Anonymous “Into Action” group, 12X12 study meeting, VFW basement Birch Street, Soldotna, 907-262-0995. 8 p.m. • Al-Anon Support Group at Central Peninsula Hospital in the Augustine Room, Soldotna. Call 252-0558. The Community Calendar lists recurring events and meetings of local organizations.To have your event listed, email organization name, day or days of meeting, time of meeting, place, and a contact phone number to news@peninsulaclarion.com.

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Trap, skeet shooting clinics planned Beginners can learn how shoot the games of Trap and Skeet at clinics held from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. on the first Sunday of the month in April, May and June at the Snowshoe Gun Club. Clinics will introduce gun safety, gun fit and handling, explain the games of Trap and Skeet and then shoot a round of each. This is a good way for new shooters to learn and get comfortable on the fields. For more information call Alice Kerkvliet at 398-3693.

Garden club studies up on garden pests Entomologist Bruce King will discuss how to identify and fight persistent and destructive garden pests such as aphids, root maggots, cut worms, slugs and more. Bring your bug and insect questions for Bruce to answer. The workshop is April 8 at 7 p.m. in the Cook Inlet Aquaculture Building. It is free and open to the public. For membership and general club information visit http://www.cenpengardenclub.org/, Facebook, or contact Marion Nelson at 283-4632, or mmkn@ptialaska.net.

Garage sale to benefit efforts to fight malaria On Friday 8 a.m.-4 p.m. and Saturday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., a fundraiser garage sale will be held at at Soldotna United Methodist Church on Binkley Street in Soldotna. It’s a modest garage sale for a ginormous purpose. All proceeds from this sale will go to Imagine No Malaria, an ongoing and successful commitment by the United Methodist Church to end malaria deaths though the development of an affordable vaccine and bed nets. For more information, call Susie at 283-7469.

Fly-tying demonstration on tap The Kenai Peninsula Chapter of Trout Unlimited and Sportsman’s Warehouse present Bar Flies, Tie One On: An Evening of Free Fly tying Instruction and Demonstration. The presentation will be hosted by Mark Wackler, KPTU Board member and Kenai Guide at the Mainstreet Grill in Kenai, April 15, 6:30 p.m.

Community mural in the works in Nikiski

North Peninsula Recreation is inviting everyone to be a part of the Nikiski Community Mural project. Community paint workshops will be offered April 11, 12 and 14 at the Nikiski College Goal events help with Community Recreation Center. Come one come all — help is needed to paint this large mural for the community! Morning student financial aid application and afternoon painting sessions will be offered. Call 776-8800 College Goal Alaska is a statewide initiative to encourage for more details. FAFSA completions. Anyone who is planning to attend any type of postsecondary education next year should complete Soldotna Historical Society board to meet their FAFSA. Upcoming events include: Thursday at 6 p.m. at SoHi The Board of Directors for the Soldotna Historical Society Saturday at 10 a.m. at SoHi will meet on Saturday at 9 a.m. at the Fine Thyme Cafe in River More information can be found at http://collegegoalak.org/. City Books. For more information call 262-4157.

Maine man delivers baby porcupine

Student art show opens

Kids’ activities sought

LISBON, Maine (AP) — A Maine man in search of a valuable mineral cut open a dead porcupine on the side of the road and unexpectedly pulled out its baby. Jared Buzzell, of Lisbon, says he was searching for wild mushrooms Thursday when he saw a porcupine get hit by a car in Minot. Buzzell says he’d heard that a valuable mineral deposit used in Chinese medicine formed in the stomachs of porcupines. He then cut open the dead porcupine to search for the mineral and instead found the baby. He tells WMTW-TV he cut the umbilical cord and thought the baby porcupine was dead until he started massaging it and it began breathing. Buzzell is caring for the baby at home and plans to give it to a licensed wildlife rehabilitator.

An opening reception for the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District High School and Middle School Student Group Showis planned for Friday from 6-8 p.m. at the Kenai Fine Art Center. The exhibition, which includes more than 150 student art pieces, will be on display through April 19. This public is invited to this free event. Refreshments provided.

The Clarion is seeking information for its annual Just Kidding section with listings of summer events for youth. Organizations, businesses, individuals or churches planning summer events open to area youth May through August may submit activities. Information needed: Name or group or organization; age of youth who may attend; time of activity; date of activity and deadline for registration; place activity will be held including address; cost of activity and/or fees; contact name and phone number for people to call; email address (optional); Web address (optional); and a brief description of the activity. The deadline to submit information is April 30. Emailed submissions are required. Email Just Kidding information to news@peninsulaclarion.com. In the subject line write Just Kidding. For more information, call Will Morrow at 907-335-1251 or email will.morrow@peninsulaclarion.com.

Peninsula Clarion death notice and obituary guidelines:

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The Peninsula Clarion strives to report the deaths of all current and former Peninsula residents. Notices should be received within three months of the death. We offer two types of death reports: Pending service/Death notices: Brief notices listing full name, age, date and place of death; and time, date and place of service. These are published at no charge. Obituaries: The Clarion charges a fee to publish obituaries. Obituaries are prepared by families, funeral homes, crematoriums, and are edited by our staff according to newspaper guidelines. Obituaries up to 300 words are charged $50, which includes a one-year online guest book memoriam to on Legacy. com. Obituaries up to 500 words are charged $100, which also includes the one-year online guest book memoriam. Tax is not included. All charges include publication of a black and white photo. Obituaries outside these guidelines are handled by the Clarion advertising department. How to submit: Funeral homes and crematoriums routinely submit completed obituaries to the newspaper. Obituaries may also be submitted directly to the Clarion, online at www.peninsulaclarion.com, or by mail to: Peninsula Clarion, P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, Alaska, 99611. Pre-payment must accompany all submissions not already handled by a funeral home or crematorium. Deadlines: Submissions for Tuesday – Friday editions must be received by 2 p.m. the previous day. Submissions for Sunday and Monday editions must be received by 3 p.m. Friday. We do not process obituaries on Saturdays or Sundays unless submitted by funeral homes or crematoriums. Obituaries are placed on a space-available basis, prioritized by dates of local services. Copyright: All death notices and obituaries become property of the Clarion and may not be republished in any format. For more information, call the Clarion at 907-283-7551.

Learn about wolves at KPC

The KPC Showcase and River City Books welcomes Alaskan author Marybeth Holleman, author of the recently published “Among Wolves,” Wednesday at 7 p.m. in Kenai Peninsula College’s McLane Commons in Soldotna. Holleman will present the experiences and insights of Dr. Gordon Haber’s 43 years of on-the-ground research into Denali National Park’s famous wolf groups. She will share Dr. Haber’s essential findings and show his unique photo series of wolf behaviors. She will be joined by retired local biologist Ted Bailey, who will present “A Brief History of Wolves on the Submit community announcements to news@peninsulaclarKenai Peninsula.” ion.com.

DNA from Alaska polar bears used in study ANCHORAGE (AP) — Genetic variation in more than 300 polar bears from Alaska was analyzed in a recent study that looked at genetic elements not used in earlier studies. The study was conducted by University of Alaska Fairbanks Professor Matthew Cronin, who worked with colleagues at the University of California Davis and Montclair State University in New Jersey, the Anchorage Daily News reported this week. The study, published online in the Journal of Heredity in January, concludes that polar bears diverged as a separate species from brown bears 1.2 million years ago. Other studies have marked the separation at 600,000 to 4.5 million years ago. The oldest known polar bear

fossil dates back only 120,000 years. Scientists today can look at full genomes and billions of nucleotides that lead to estimates far beyond information reflected in the fossil record. Researchers can use a “molecular clock” technique to determine when species diverged based on the number of mutations in DNA sequences. That technique places polar bears as an independent species far longer ago than previously believed. Cronin said the “molecular clock” measures do not offer absolute certainty. If the DNA measures are correct, however, it means bears have survived past warming cycles, he said. That should have implications for policy decisions surrounding the listing of polar bears as an endangered

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species, said Cronin, who has been a vocal critic of the Endangered Species Act. “It seems logical that if polar bears survived previous warm, ice-free periods, they could survive another,” he said in a University of Alaska Fairbanks news release. “This is of course speculation, but so is predicting they will not survive, as the proponents of the Endangered Species Act listing of polar bears have done.” Cronin said he doesn’t believe endangered species should be based on predictions and models. They should be focused on “real-world problems,” he said. Other scientists agree polar bears have survived past warm-

ing and glaciation periods. But they diverge on whether past warming trends can be compared to the current one. Cronin’s arguments are misleading and “incautious,” said Steven Amstrup, a U.S. Geological Survey scientist emeritus who wrote a report recommending polar bears be federally listed as threatened. The current warming period is occurring much faster than past cycles of glacial and interglacial periods and it includes human effects, said Amstrup, now a senior scientist at Polar Bears International.


A-4 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, April 2, 2014

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Serving the Kenai Peninsula since 1970 STAN PITLO Publisher

WILL MORROW������������������������������������������������������������������������ Editor Jane Russell...................... Controller/Human Resources Director LESLIE TALENT................................................... Advertising Director GEOFF LONG.................................................... Production Manager VINCENT NUSUNGINYA.................................... New Media Director Daryl Palmer.................................... IT and Composition Director RANDI KEATON................................................. Circulation Manager A Morris Communications Corp. Newspaper

What Others Say

Economies, like species, must evolve or die The Tongass National Forest is once

again exempt from the Roadless Rule. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled 2-1 this week to reinstate exempt status for the 19 million acres that make up the Tongass. The Clinton-era Roadless Rule is a once-size-fitsall approach to wildlife and resource management that doesn’t make sense in Alaska. Without the exemption, which Alaska had from 2003 to 2011, the state has been unable to build new roads in areas where they’re crucial for economic development and industry. Nearly a dozen groups, mostly environmental, filed the lawsuit in 2009 because they believed the Tongass needed to be protected from Alaskans. They operate under the pretense that Alaskans aren’t willing or capable of protecting their own backyard; that the state will decimate its fisheries and wildlife for the sake of timber. Most Alaskans live here because they love the outdoors and beauty the landscape provides. We don’t want it destroyed, but we still need a strong economy to ensure there are enough jobs that residents are able to live in the Last Frontier. Ketchikan had a booming timber industry for decades, yet it still has fisheries, wildlife and natural forests for residents and tourists to enjoy. Alaska can have its cake and eat it too (within reason), but there needs to be options on the table. The Roadless Rule until this week eliminated some of those options for growth. Alaska needs a diversified economy now more than ever. Oil alone isn’t enough to balance the state’s budget these days; that’s why there’s more effort than ever to get a gasline built in the next 10 years. Even then, Alaska will need to continue finding ways to keep its economy strong. Without industry and exportable goods, whether that’s fish, timber, oil or gas, Alaskans will struggle to pay the ever-increasing costs of living in the state. When residents finally tire of never-ending lawsuits that stunt development and growth, they’ll pack up and head elsewhere. Proponents of the Roadless Rule aren’t likely to let the court’s ruling go unchallenged. They’ve been fighting this battle for 13 years and will fight it another 30 if needed. The issue will now head back to District Court so a judge can decide if further environmental reviews are necessary. We don’t know what the District Court will do, but the fact the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals returned it is a positive sign. It’s not unheard of for a lower court to disagree with a higher one, but the court of appeals ruling should hold some weight. Conservationists know the primary rule to evolution: That which doesn’t evolve, dies. The same applies to communities. For Alaska’s economy to thrive it must evolve, and to do that it needs the Tongass to remain exempt of the Roadless Rule. — Juneau Empire, March 30

Letters to the Editor: E-mail: news@peninsulaclarion.com

Write: Peninsula Clarion P.O. Box 3009 Kenai, AK 99611

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Fax: 907-283-3299 Questions? Call: 907-283-7551

The obsession agenda

Much is being made of the various cable news networks’ coverage saturation of one story or another and the reasons for their television tunnel vision. We have MSNBC, with its fetish about Chris Christie’s “Bridgegate” problems (liberal agenda); Fox is crazed about anything, real or imagined, that might embarrass Barack Obama (conservative agenda); and, of course, CNN is obsessed with the disappearance of Malaysian Airlines 370 (ratings agenda). Truth be told, I am not one to talk. In my checkered career, I’ve been a principal reporter in chronicling every minute move connected to the various Clinton scandals, based on flimsy evidence or no evidence, the Gary Condit affair and assorted other flimsy shreds of dirty linen (getting-onthe-air agenda). In fact, one could argue that I’m in a similar fixate with the name of Washington’s NFL team, a racist term that owner Dan Snyder refuses to change. I just wrote about Snyder’s latest move to publicly announce that he’s sent a few thousand coats and some sneakers to America’s reservations to show his newfound concern for Native Americans’ desperate circumstances and show solidarity with those he feels he honors with the hateful R-word. What causes me to bring up the subject still again is the man he has chosen to head the foundation he created to do his good works. Gary Edwards is a former deputy assistant director of the Secret Service and,

Letters to the Editor Permitting should be thorough, fair, transparent I supported Peter Micciche when he ran for Soldotna mayor in 2008 and when he ran for state senate. When Senator Micciche ran for mayor he said one of the reasons he was running was because of a controversial permitting issue. After some apartments in Soldotna were built without public input, then-Mayor Micciche voiced his concern that the permitting process was not thorough enough. Now, we face a similar issue with House Bill 77, a bill that makes the permitting process for various “activities” less thorough. It allows the Alaska Department of Natural Resources to issue Water Use Permits for “significant” amounts of water without providing public notice or comment periods. And it gives the state complete discretion whether or not to process water reservations that would keep water in our salmon streams. Senator Micciche was right to be concerned about the apartment complex six years ago, and he’s right to be pushing back on HB77. Our permitting process should be thorough, fair, and inclusive with public input. If HB77 does not achieve those ends,

more importantly as far as Dan Snyder is concerned, a Cherokee Indian. It’s fair to say that Snyder is not the region’s most popular guy. In fact, even among those who don’t want to get rid Bob Franken of the current R-word epithet, there is a substantial sentiment that the franchise would be much better off if it changed owners. That isn’t about to happen. In spite of a dismal win-loss record since he took over, the operation is a huge moneymaker. But even his harshest critics are shaking their heads after disclosures in The Washington Post that Edwards, after he left the Secret Service, became chief executive of the National Native American Law Enforcement Association. In 2012, the Bureau of Indian Affairs canceled a contract with the company, which was supposed to recruit Native Americans as reservation police. BIA called the work Gary Edwards’ company produced “unusable.” The most charitable conclusion some might get about Dan Snyder’s role in bringing Edwards onboard is that he didn’t perform due diligence. I won’t go into the least charitable one. Whichever, no one is surprised by this newest revelation.

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Bob Franken is a longtime broadcast journalist, including 20 years at CNN.

workplaces. For the sake of full disclosure, let’s make a bill that does. Tom Seggerman I have to say that I will personally gain Sterling nothing from this legislation. As a cancer survivor and retired person, I can avoid this health threat. For me, it is enough that emPush for smoke-free ployment opportunities for my friends and workplaces appreciated neighbors won’t have to include breathing Thank you to Mayor Pat Porter for her toxins as a part of their job description. Susan Smalley support of Alaska Smoke-free Workplaces Kenai in your paper and on the radio. I agree with her that all employees deserve to breathe healthy air. And thank you to Senator Mic- City’s support helps ciche and Representative Lindsey Holmes middle school clubs for introducing the bill in their respective Kenai Middle School and their Shinny bodies on our behalf. I am having a little disconnect howev- Hockey Club would like to thank Rick er when I see that in Senator Micciche’s Koch, Bob Frates, Dave Essert and the City newsletter it says that one of the changes of Kenai for their continued support and will be, or might be, that municipalities use of the skating rink. Each year during could opt out of the “statewide” legisla- the dark of winter, Kenai Middle School tion. The point of a statewide law is just offers many unique club opportunities to that! It’s statewide and protects the health their students. For six Fridays during third quarter, students are able to choose from a of all employees around the state. It’s a little like having a statewide speed menu of club offerings. The menu includes limit, determined by safety standards and the following: hockey, rock wall climbing, then having opt out provisions — or how arts/crafts, robotics, dodge ball and many about just letting each place decide the le- other interesting offerings. Kenai Middle would also like to thank gal alcohol limit? I’m hoping I misunderstood this new ca- all the parents who helped transport kids veat. So many people have worked so hard to the rink. Vaughn Dosko on this health issue. More than 400 organiKMS Principal zations and businesses support smoke-free

Classic Doonesbury, 1972

The Peninsula Clarion welcomes letters and attempts to publish all those received, subject to a few guidelines: n All letters must include the writer’s name, phone number and address. n Letters are limited to 500 words and may be edited to fit available space. Letters are run in the order they are received. n Letters that, in the editor’s judgment, are libelous will not be printed. n The editor also may exclude letters that are untimely or irrelevant to the public interest. n Short, topical poetry should be submitted to Poet’s Corner and will not be printed on the Opinion page. n Submissions from other publications will not be printed.

It just adds to the widespread pile of disgust about him. However, it should be pointed out that the majority of the fans still don’t want the name changed. That said, little by little, that is changing. There’s not necessarily much love lost for Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid either, but he sure knows how to gauge public opinion. He predicts that within “the next three years,” the team will have a new name: “[Snyder’s] going to throw a few blankets to the Indians, and get a tax deduction for it,” he said, “I can’t imagine why the man doesn’t realize that the name is going to change.” Snyder did get some support from NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, who commended him for his new foundation and for “listening and recognizing that people have differing views.” He hastened to point out that the majority of fans want to keep the current name, hateful or not, and “the general population also supports it overwhelmingly.” It wasn’t so long ago that in much of our country, a large chunk of citizens saw nothing wrong with the N-word. There is no difference. It is true that the media are obsessively focusing on other stories right now. But if Harry Reid is correct, it won’t be long until they’re covering a new name for the Washington Slurs.

By GARRY TRUDEAU

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Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Trial of man charged in Coast Guard shooting begins By DAN JOLING Associated Press

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ANCHORAGE — The attorney for the man charged with killing two co-workers at a Kodiak Island Coast Guard communications facility offered a medical explanation Tuesday for his client’s whereabouts during the shooting. Federal defender Rich Curtner said complications from gall bladder surgery left James Michael Wells suffering from intestinal issues. On his way to work on the morning of the deaths, Curtner said, Wells detected a soft tire on his truck but delayed changing it to spend 20 minutes in a bathroom at the Kodiak airport because of chronic diarrhea. The timing is crucial. Federal prosecutors say there’s a 34-minute period between security-camera recordings of Wells’ truck driving toward and away from the Communications Station, giving him time to reach the facility, shoot Richard Belisle, 51, and Petty Officer 1st Class James Hopkins, 41, and return home, where he concocted the flat tire alibi. Wells is charged with two counts of first-degree murder, two counts of murder of an officer or employee of the United States, and possession of a firearm in a crime of violence. If he is convicted, prosecutors will not seek the death penalty. U.S. Attorney for Alaska Karen Loeffler said in her opening statement that no other person had the means of escaping detection from security cameras at the Coast Guard Communications Station where the men worked. No robbery or other disturbance took place, she said. “This murder was personal and intentional,” Loeffler said. The motive, according to prosecutors, was unhappiness by a disgruntled employee. The Coast Guard was attempting to exert more control over Wells, a nationally recognized antenna technician who for years had called the shots at the shop. The bodies were found in Building T2, known as the Rigger Shop, an L-shape building about 100 yards from the main facility, Building T1, which is staffed at all hours to monitor messages from mariners. The morning of the shootings, Belisle’s security card opened the Rigger Shop at 7 a.m. Hopkins’ truck pulled in about 7:08 a.m. Within minutes, they would be dead, Lo-

effler said. Belisle was shot in a small office he shared with Wells, Hopkins and supervisor Scott Reckner. Hopkins died in the building’s break room. Wells’ white pickup truck showed up on security footage passing the main gate of the Coast Guard Air Station two miles away at 6:48 a.m. The same camera recorded the pickup 34 minutes later heading in the opposite direction toward Wells’ home, at 7:22 a.m. When Wells claimed to have been checking his tire and spending time in a bathroom at commuter airline Servant Air, prosecutors contend he stopped at the airport, switched into his wife’s blue Honda CRV, drove to the Communications Station and shot his co-workers. He was back on the road within five minutes and drove back to the airport, switched to his truck and drove home. A security camera on Building T1 shows a blurry image of a blue SUV driving by the Rigger Shop at 7:09 a.m. and heading in the opposite direction at 7:14 a.m. Expert testimony will link the image to the SUV belonging to Wells’ wife, Loeffler said, undercutting Wells’ alibi and revealing his murder plot. “It was well planned, it was well thought out, but it was not perfect,” she said. Curtner said the image is not conclusive. The blue blur on which the government case hangs could have been an SUV manufactured by any of nine car companies, he said. “That’s their identification evidence,” Curtner said. Prosecutors steadfastly refused to consider other suspects, he said, Investigators should have looked into acquaintances of the victims’ families that had issues with illegal drugs. They instead took their cue from Wells’ Coast Guard supervisor, Scott Reckner, who immediately suggested that Wells had committed the murders. “He poisoned everybody else to think that,” Curtner said. Wells is a devoted family man with no criminal record, Curtner said. After serving 20 years in the Navy and Coast Guard, Wells vowed to never again wear a tie or shave and played Santa Claus on occasion with his long beard. The government case is built on a stack of assumptions, he said. “The facts you will hear will not prove otherwise,” Curtner said. The trial is expected to go three to four weeks.

n On March 23 at 6:48 p.m., Soldotna police responded to a residence on Tyee Street for a disturbance. Derek B. Burns, 27, of Soldotna, was arrested for fourth-degree assault (domestic violence) and interfering with the report of domestic violence taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility without bail. n On March 22 at 1:41 a.m., Soldotna police contacted Lisa Hileman, 19, of Soldotna, at Safeway. Investigation showed that Hileman had been previously trespassed from the store. She was arrested for second-degree criminal trespass and taken to Wildwood Pretrial on $250 bail. n On March 21 at 10:05 p.m., Soldotna police contacted Theodore Cooper, 42, of Soldotna, at the Soldotna Sports Center. Investigation showed that Cooper had been consuming alcohol, in violation of his felony probation, and had also been previously trespassed from the sports center. Cooper was arrested for a probation violation and second-degree criminal trespass and taken to Wildwood Pretrial without bail. n On March 20 at 4:22 a.m., Soldotna police stopped a vehicle on Endicott Drive near Kalifornsky Beach Road. Lola Fallon, 28, of Soldotna, was issued a criminal citation for The following dismissals were recently handed down in District Court in Kenai: n Charges of one count of fourth-degree assault (domestic violence) and one count of interfering with report of domestic violence against Neil H. Sutton, 54, of Kenai, were dismissed. Date of the charges was Jan. 11, 2013. The following judgments were recently handed down in District Court in Kenai: n James O. Fidler, 21, of Nikiski, pleaded guilty to fourthdegree criminal mischief, committed Aug. 6. He was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended, ordered to pay restitution and placed on probation for one year. n Melinda L. Larion, 24, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to an amended charge of first-degree criminal mischief, committed Aug. 17, 2010. She was sentenced to 12 months in jail with 10 months suspended, fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to have no contact with three specifically named individuals and placed on probation for four years. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Raelynn B. Sackett, 39, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of seconddegree harassment, committed April 11, 2013. She was placed on probation for one year. n Trena M. Scott, 25, of Lacey, Washington, pleaded no contest to failure to appear in court to answer citation. Imposition of sentence was suspended and she was placed on probation for one year and

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Soldotna, was issued a criminal citation for not having motor vehicle insurance and released. n On March 15 at 1:59 a.m., Soldotna police contacted Shawn Seaman, 29, of Anchorage, at the Sterling Highway Tesoro 2 Go. Investigation led to Seaman being arrested for driving without motor vehicle liability insurance and driving while license suspended. He was taken to Wildwood Pretrial. While at Wildwood Pretrial, it was discovered that Seaman had a pair of brass knuckles concealed on his person and he then introduced them into the correctional facility. Seaman was additionally charged with fourth-degree misconduct involving a weapon and promoting contraband in the first degree. He was held without bail. n On March 15 at about 3:00 a.m., Soldotna police stopped a vehicle on Kalifornsky Beach Road at College Loop Road. Michael Inman, 43, of Soldotna, was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol and taken to Wildwood Pretrial without bail. n On March 15 at 10:28 p.m., Soldotna police stopped a vehicle on the Sterling Highway at Warehouse Drive. A 17-year-old juvenile, of Soldotna, was issued a criminal citation for driving

without a driver’s license. Kalina Smith, 18, of Soldotna, was issued a criminal citation for permitting an unauthorized person to drive. Both were released. n On March 13 at 11:38 p.m., Soldotna police received a REDDI (Report Every Dangerous Driver Immediately) report and stopped the vehicle on Kobuk Avenue near Redwood Court. Richard Riddle, 47, of Soldotna, was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol, for not having any motor vehicle liability insurance and for driving in violation of his instruction permit. He was taken to Wildwood Pretrial on $1500 bail. n On March 23 at 11:02 p.m., Alaska State Troopers stopped a red Toyota sedan near Mile 90 of the Seward Highway for a traffic violation. After investigation, Donald Barger, 36, of Soldotna was arrested for driving while license suspended on the original charge of failing to maintain liability insurance. Barger was taken to the Anchorage Jail on $1,000 bail. n On March 20 at about 5:20 p.m., Alaska Wildlife Troopers, Seward Post, issued a summons to Adam Darius Pringle, 31, of Seward, for driving with a revoked operator’s license. Arraignment is scheduled in Seward District Court for April 22.

surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatordered to perform 20 hours of ment, had his license revoked for community work service 90 days, ordered ignition intern Clinton D. Starnes, 24, lock for six months and placed of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to on probation for one year. driving while license cancelled, suspended, revoked or limited, The following judgments committed March 14. He was were recently handed down in sentenced to 20 days in jail Superior Court in Kenai: with 10 days suspended, may perform 80 hours of community n Melinda L. Larion, 24, of work service in lieu of jail time, Soldotna, pleaded guilty to atwas fined a $50 court surcharge tempted second-degree misand a $150 jail surcharge with conduct involving a controlled $100 suspended, had his license substance, committed May 30, revoked for 90 days and placed 2011. She was sentenced to on probation for one year. 60 months in prison with 40 n Norman N. Sylvester, 45, months suspended, fined a $100 of Kenai, pleaded guilty to one court surcharge and a $200 jail count of failure to register as surcharge with $100 suspended, a second-degree sex offender, forfeited items seized except committed March 3, 2013. He ID and personal items, ordered, was sentenced to 285 days in jail among other conditions of prowith 200 days suspended, fined a bation, not to consume alcohol $50 court surcharge and a $150 to excess, not to use or posjail surcharge with $100 sus- sess any illegal controlled subpended and placed on probation stances, including marijuana or for three years. All other charges synthetic drugs, to complete a in this case were dismissed. substance abuse evaluation and n Brandon C. Walker, 26, of comply with treatment recomKenai, pleaded guilty to a re- mendations, to have no contact duced charge of reckless driv- with three specifically named ing, committed Aug. 25, 2012. individuals, to have no contact He was fined $2,000 with $500 with known drug users and/or suspended, a $50 court surcharge drug traffickers, and was placed and a $150 jail surcharge with on probation for four years after $100 suspended, ordered to com- serving any term of incarceraplete Alcohol Safety Action Pro- tion imposed. All other charges gram treatment, had his license revoked for 30 days and placed on probation for one year. n Sean M. Wedemeyer, 41, of Kenai, pleaded no contest to driving under the influence, committed Jan. 6, 2013. He was sentenced to 30 days in jail with 27 days suspended, fined $2,000 with $500 suspended, a $75 court surcharge, $330 cost of imprisonment and a $150 jail

in this case were dismissed. n Sophie Elizabeth Yezierski, 30, of Nikiski, pleaded guilty to attempted third-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance, committed July 21. She was sentenced to 20 months in prison with 18 months suspended, fined a $100 court surcharge and a $200 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to pay restitution, forfeited items seized, ordered, among other conditions of probation, not to consume alcohol to excess, not to use or possess any illegal controlled substances, including marijuana or synthetic drugs, not to reside where alcoholic beverages are present, not to possess, apply for or obtain a medical marijuana card or act as a caregiver while under supervision, to complete a substance abuse evaluation and comply with treatment recommendations, and was placed on probation for two years after serving any term of incarceration imposed. All other charges in this case were dismissed.

Police reports driving on a revoked license and released. n On March 19, at 9:29 p.m., Soldotna police stopped a vehicle at mile 92.5 of the Sterling Highway. Levi Erickson, 32, of Soldotna, was issued a criminal citation for driving on a revoked license and released. n On March 18 at 4:11 a.m., Soldotna police stopped a vehicle on the Sterling Highway near Riverside Drive. Aaron Fellers, 33, of Kenai, was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol and driving while license suspended and taken to Wildwood Pretrial on $1,000 bail. n On March 18 at 3:24 p.m., Soldotna police responded to a disturbance in progress on Columbine Street. Investigation led to the arrest of Penny R. VanSky, 45, of Soldotna, for second-degree assault (domestic violence), fourth-degree assault on a police officer, disorderly conduct and fourthdegree criminal mischief. She was taken to Wildwood Pretrial and held without bail. n On March 17 at 9:22 p.m., Soldotna police stopped a vehicle on Kobuk Street at Redoubt Avenue. Tyler J. Reid, 23, of

Court reports

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A-6 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Around the World 7.1 million: Obama basks in health care sign-up success ; will it save Democrats WASHINGTON — Mocking his critics, President Barack Obama boasted Tuesday that 7.1 million people have signed up for his health care law, an unexpected comeback after a disastrous rollout sent his poll numbers plummeting and stirred fears among Democrats facing re-election this fall. “The debate over repealing this law is over,” he declared. It’s “here to stay.” But the late enrollment surge may do little to change the political dynamics heading into the midterm elections, particularly for Democrats running in conservative states where the health law and the president himself remain deeply unpopular. Even Obama’s advisers acknowledge that the public’s views on the law are unlikely to shift significantly between now and November. Still, with millions of people now receiving health benefits under the law, Democrats see an opportunity to undercut Republicans still pushing to repeal “Obamacare.” And GOP lawmakers, wary of overplaying their political hand, are indeed grappling with whether to press forward with repeal or narrow their focus on replacing the law with different health measures. In a preview of his party’s midterm messaging, Obama declared Tuesday that while the health law isn’t perfect, it is “here to stay.”

Global airline group: Flight 370 mystery shows need for continues tracking of jets KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia — An aviation industry group is creating a task force to make recommendations this year for continuously tracking commercial airliners because “we cannot let another aircraft simply vanish” like Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. As low clouds, rain and choppy seas off western Australia hampered Tuesday’s hunt for the missing jet, the head of the operation warned that the 25-day-old search “could drag on for a long time,” and Malaysian investigators said they were scrutinizing the last-known conversation between the plane and ground control. The search has turned up no sign of the Boeing 777, which vanished March 8 with 239 people aboard bound for Beijing from Kuala Lumpur. A multinational team of aircraft and ships are searching the southern Indian Ocean for the plane, which disappeared from radar and veered off-course for reasons that are still unexplained. The aviation mystery has highlighted the need for improvements in tracking aircraft and security, according to the International Air Transport Association, a trade association for the world’s airlines meeting in Kuala Lumpur. “In a world where our every move seems to be tracked, there is disbelief that an aircraft could simply disappear,” said Tony Tyler, the director general of the group whose 240 member airlines carry 84 percent of all passengers and cargo worldwide.

No US deaths in Afghanistan in March WASHINGTON — The Pentagon says there were no U.S. military deaths in Afghanistan in March — the first zero-fatality month there since January 2007. — The Associated Press

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Nation 13 deaths are linked to GM part By DEE-ANN DURBIN and TOM KRISHER AP Auto Writers

WASHINGTON — The fix for a faulty ignition switch linked to 13 traffic deaths would have cost just 57 cents, members of Congress said Tuesday as they demanded answers from General Motors’ new CEO on why the automaker took 10 years to recall cars with the defect. At a hearing on Capitol Hill before a House subcommittee, GM’s Mary Barra acknowledged under often testy questioning that the company took too long to act. She promised changes at GM that would prevent such a lapse from happening again. “If there’s a safety issue, we’re going to make the right change and accept that,” said Barra, who became CEO in January and almost immediately found herself thrust into one of the biggest product safety crises Detroit has ever seen. But as relatives of the crash victims looked on intently, she admitted that she didn’t know why it took years for the dangerous defect to be announced. And she deflected many questions about what went wrong, saying an internal investigation is under way. Since February, GM has recalled 2.6 million cars — mostly Chevrolet Cobalts and Saturn Ions — over the faulty switch, which can cause the engine to

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Kim Langley, far left, mother of Richard Scott Bailey, a U.S. Marine who died driving a 2007 Chevy Cobalt, Laura Christian, center left, of Harwood, Md., birth mother of Amber Marie Rose, the first reported victim of the GM safety defect, Randal Rademaker, center, father of Amy Rademaker of St. Croix County, Wis., who died when her Chevy Cobalt crashed and her air bags did not deploy, gather at the Capitol for a news conference in Washington, Tuesday.

cut off in traffic, disabling the power steering, power brakes and air bags and making it difficult to control the vehicle. The automaker said new switches should be available starting April 7. Barra was firm, calm and polite throughout the proceedings. But she struggled at times to answer lawmakers’ pointed questions, particularly about why GM used the switch when

it knew the part didn’t meet its own specifications. When she tried to draw a distinction between parts that didn’t meet specifications and those that were defective and dangerous, Rep. Joe Barton, R-Texas, shot back: “What you just answered is gobbledygook.” She also announced that GM has hired Kenneth Feinberg — who handled the fund for the victims of 9/11, the Bos-

ton Marathon bombing and the BP oil spill — to explore ways to compensate victims of accidents in the GM cars. Barra stopped short of saying GM would establish such a fund. Some of the questioners appeared surprised that Barra hadn’t reviewed the tens of thousands of pages of documents that GM submitted to the committee, and that she was unaware of some decision-making processes at the company. Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., held up a switch for one of the cars and said a small spring inside it failed to provide enough force, causing engines to turn off when they went over a bump. DeGette showed how easy it was for a light set of car keys to move the ignition out of the “run” position. GM has said that in 2005, company engineers proposed solutions to the switch problem, but the automaker concluded that none represented “an acceptable business case.” “Documents provided by GM show that this unacceptable cost increase was only 57 cents,” DeGette said. The 57 cents is just the cost of the replacement switch. The figure does not include the labor costs involved in installing the new part. Barra testified that the fix to the switch, if undertaken in 2007, would have cost GM about $100 million, compared with “substantially” more now.

$425M Powerball winner comes forward MILPITAS, Calif. (AP) — The sole winner of February’s $425 million Powerball jackpot came forward to claim his prize Tuesday. California Lottery officials said B. Raymond Buxton, a Northern California retiree, claimed the prize at the California Lottery headquarters in Sacramento. Buxton was wearing a shirt that featured a picture of Yoda and read, “Luck of the Jedi I have,” according to lottery officials. The one winning ticket for the Feb. 19 drawing was sold at

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‘Unbelievable!’ is all I could muster.’ — B. Raymond Buxton, retiree a convenience store in the San Francisco Bay Area city of Milpitas, about 10 miles north of San Jose. The $425 million jackpot is one of the largest lottery jackpots in U.S. history, though far from the record. The nation’s

biggest lottery prize was a $656 million dollar Mega Millions jackpot in 2012. The biggest Powerball jackpot was a $590.5 million last May. Lottery officials said Buxton chose to take a lump sum payment of $242.2 million before taxes. The ticket was sold at a Chevron station in Milpitas. Lottery officials said Buxton was getting lunch at a Subway restaurant at the station’s convenience store when he decided to buy another ticket since the jackpot was so large,

lottery officials said. He bought a single Quick Pick ticket for $2 that turned out to be the winner. “’Unbelievable!’ is all I could muster,” Buxton said, as he described the moment he found out he hit the jackpot, according to a news release from the state lottery. “I sat in front of the computer for hours in disbelief, frequently checking and rechecking the numbers across multiple sources. Once the initial shock passed I couldn’t sleep for days.”

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Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, April 2, 2014

A-7

It’s not too late to sign up for health care By CONNIE CASS Associated Press

WASHINGTON — It’s not too late to get covered. A few routes remain open for those who missed the health care law’s big enrollment deadline. Millions may be eligible for a second chance to sign up for subsidized insurance this year. And people who get coverage after the deadline can still avoid, or at least reduce, the fine for going uninsured. Here are five options for those still without insurance:

1. Take advantage of the grace period This special break was created for anyone who began enrolling in an insurance marketplace by Monday’s deadline but didn’t finish. That includes people stymied by website out-

ages or overwhelmed phone lines, missing information on applications, and other problems or confusion. Those who started an application on HealthCare.gov by March 31 should log on and finish it as soon as possible. Federal officials say they will take what time is necessary to work through cases pending. People applying online will have until April 15 to finish, administration spokesman Aaron Albright said Tuesday. Paper applications will be accepted until April 7. Consumers will have to attest that they had tried to enroll by March 31. Rules vary in the 14 states running their own insurance marketplaces. For most people, going through a marketplace opens the door to lower costs. Those who use the grace period will

get coverage starting May 1 a parent — open a 60-day win- bought outside the marketdow to sign up for marketplace places don’t come with governand won’t owe a fine. ment subsidies that hold down coverage. the cost for people with low or 2. Use a special incomes. But they 3. Sign up for medicaid mid-level enrollment period do include the law’s consumer Those who qualify can still protections. The government also is offerFor example, insurers can’t ing special extensions for a host enroll in Medicaid — there’s no deadline. Eligibility is based turn down customers because of problems that might have on income and varies from state of pre-existing medical condiprevented people from signing to state. About half the states tions. up through a marketplace: NatEven after the deadline, ural disasters. Domestic abuse. expanded their Medicaid programs. The main beneficiaries buying a plan that meets the A serious illness. Mistakes by of the change are adults earning law’s essential coverage stanapplication counselors. Errors up to about $16,100 per year, dard reduces the penalty owed, by insurance companies. To seek a “special enrollment with no children living at home. which is based on the number period,” contact the federal call Previously, Medicaid was lim- of months without coverage. The fine for going unincenter, at 1-800-318-2596, or ited mostly to poor children and their parents and people with sured all year is the greater of your state marketplace and extwo formulas: about 1 percent plain what went wrong. It’s on disabilities. of household income above the the honor system. If the extentax-filing threshold of $10,150 sion is approved, that brings an- 4. Buy insurance outor $95 per adult and $47.50 other 60 days to enroll. side the marketplaces per child under 18, up to $285 Also, at any time during the Buyers can always go di- per family. year, certain life events — such It’s due to the IRS in April as changing jobs, getting mar- rectly to an insurance company, 2015. ried or divorced, or becoming but it may be expensive. Plans

5. Get ready for next time Open enrollment for 2015 is coming later this year. It’s scheduled to begin Nov. 15 and run just three months. That’s another chance to get covered or switch into a plan with subsidies. Supporters of the law are calling on President Barack Obama to make things easier next time around. The advocacy group Families USA suggested a bunch of improvements Tuesday, including more face-to-face sign-ups, coordinating enrollment with tax-filing season so people better understand the fines, and improving coordination with Medicaid programs. Something to think about: The uninsured penalty next year rises to 2 percent of income or $325 per adult and $162.50 per child.

Atlanta archbishop apologizes for posh residence By RACHEL ZOLL and RAY HENRY Associated Press

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ATLANTA — Archbishop Wilton Gregory seems to have gotten the pope’s message about modest living. Days after Pope Francis permanently removed a German bishop for his lavish spending on a new residence, the Atlanta archbishop apologized for building a $2.2 million mansion as his residence. He bowed to criticism from local parishioners and said he’d consider selling the new home in Buckhead, Atlanta’s toniest neighborhood. In letters, emails and a meeting, local Catholics told Gregory the price tag was outlandish, especially in light of Francis’ frugality. The Tudorstyle mansion, stretching nearly 6,400 square feet, includes two dining rooms and a safe room. The archbishop said the new pope has “set the bar” for church leaders and others, and Gregory said he hadn’t looked at the project’s cost in terms of his own “integrity and pastoral

credibility.” “I failed to consider the impact on the families throughout the archdiocese who, though struggling to pay their mortgages, utilities, tuition and other bills, faithfully respond year after year to my pleas to assist with funding our ministries and services,” Gregory wrote late Monday on the website of the archdiocesan newspaper. It’s a challenge bishops will be facing more pointedly — and publicly — in the age of Francis. In the Archdiocese of Newark, N.J., parishioners have recently criticized Archbishop John Myers, and withheld some donations, after they learned the archdiocese was spending at least $500,000 to expand his retirement home, adding an indoor therapy pool, fireplaces and an office library. Last week, Francis removed German bishop Franz-Peter Tebartz-van Elst after he spent $43 million on a new residence and related renovations. “More people are thinking about it, how to tone it down

AP Photo/David Goldman

In this March 31, photo, the former residence of Atlanta Archbishop Wilton Gregory sits under construction to be used as a rectory for six priests after Gregory moved to a nearby $2.2 million mansion for his own use in Atlanta.

as far as their living arrangements,” said Russell Shaw, a former spokesman for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and a Catholic writer. The Vatican declined comment Tuesday. Pope Francis has made clear he expects his priests and bishops to follow his example of

sobriety, imploring them to refrain from driving fancy cars or using the latest iPhone. To emphasize the point, Francis convened the heads of all Vatican offices Tuesday to discuss implementing his apostolic exhortation “The Joy of the Gospel.” In the statement, a blue-

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print for his papacy, Francis denounces the “idolatry of money,” self-indulgence and “insidious worldliness” within the church, and laments how the poor have been excluded from the global economy. Francis has implemented a spending review within the Vatican, enacting a hiring freeze and overtime cut in a bid to reduce waste. Gregory’s new residence was made possible by a $15 million gift from the nephew of Margaret Mitchell, the author of the Civil War epic “Gone With The Wind.” When Joseph Mitchell died in 2011, he left much of his estate to the archdiocese, asking that the proceeds be used for “general religious and charitable purposes.” Mitchell sought primary consideration for his home parish, Christ the King Cathedral. The archdiocese set aside $7.5 million for the cathedral’s building fund. Another $3.75 million went to Catholic Charities and other service groups, and several million more went to disadvantaged parishes, par-

ish endowments, a retirement fund for priests and a Jesuit high school. But Gregory needed a new home after giving up his residence near the cathedral, where more space was needed for a growing congregation. The cathedral used money from Mitchell to buy Gregory’s old home for $1.9 million, according to tax records. The church will spend another $292,000 to expand the home so its priests can live there. The archbishop then decided to build the new residence on land Mitchell had donated. The one-story home already standing on the property, where Mitchell lived, was demolished to make way for the mansion. Gregory moved in three months ago. Gregory initially defended the decision as an accommodation he had made for the sake of the cathedral. But parishioners raised questions, and some met with him to directly voice their concern about the expenditure. In one meeting, they cited the pope.


A-8 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, April 2, 2014

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World

NATO allies pledge to beef up eastern defenses By JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and VLADIMIR ISACHENKOV Associated Press

BRUSSELS — NATO foreign ministers moved Tuesday to beef up the defenses of frontline alliance members feeling menaced by a more assertive Russia, with Secretary of State John Kerry proclaiming the U.S. commitment to their security is “unwavering.” The ministers from NATO’s 28 member nations also ordered suspension of all “practical civilian and military cooperation” with Vladimir Putin’s Russia, though they made sure a line of communication with the Kremlin remains open at the ambassadorial level. The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, keystone of U.S. and European security since the end of World War II, is facing its most acute geopolitical crisis in years: the fallout from Moscow’s unilateral annexation of Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula, which the Obama administration and its allies condemn as a brazen, illegal land grab. On Tuesday, an estimated 35,000 to 40,000 Russian troops equipped with tanks, other armored vehicles and fixed and rotary wing aircraft remained positioned near the border with Ukraine, a NATO military official told The Associated Press, speaking on condition of anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the information. The military official described the Russian buildup as “a complete combat force” that was highly threatening to Ukraine. Those troops, and future aggressive moves that Putin’s Kremlin may make, have become a troubling concern for NATO countries, especially the alliance’s eastern-most members — the Baltic states, Poland, and Romania, all of which

‘And more U.S. support is on the way.’ — Secretary of State John Kerry were once in Moscow’s orbit. To reassure those skittish allies, Kerry told a news conference, the U.S. has already sent six F-15 fighters to perform air patrols over the Baltic, deployed a dozen F-16s to Poland and dispatched the USS Truxtun, a guided-missile destroyer, to the Black Sea. “And more U.S. support is on the way,” Kerry said. At the Tuesday afternoon meeting he attended with the foreign ministers, the secretary said, “more allies pledged their own contributions to make sure every ally from the Baltic to the Black Sea feels secure.” He did not provide details. A senior U.S. defense official said the U.S. was also likely to send a small team of soldiers to Europe and was encouraging NATO allies to contribute more aircraft to the Baltic air patrol mission. Despite annexing Crimea, Putin and other Kremlin officials have said that Russia has no intention of invading other areas of Ukraine. Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu insisted Tuesday the Kremlin wants a “political settlement that would take interests and rights of the entire Ukrainian people into account.” Meeting behind closed doors, Kerry and his Canadian and European colleagues agreed unanimously on steps NATO must take in response to Russian actions. A civilian alliance official who attended the session and briefed reporters afterward on condition of anonymity said

the measures include possible deployment and reinforcement of military assets in NATO member countries that feel Moscow’s actions may pose a security threat, as well as an increase of readiness levels for NATO rapid response forces. Other steps include a review of NATO’s crisis response plans, as well as military training and exercise schedules. While NATO ordered the suspension of “all practical civilian and military cooperation” with Russia, Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen said later he thought some mutually beneficial cooperation programs with the Russians might continue, such as the project to train anti-narcotics personnel in Afghanistan, Pakistan and Cen-

tral Asia. The four-star U.S. Air Force general who is NATO’s supreme military commander, Philip Breedlove, has been ordered to devise plans to provide visible reassurance to alliance countries in Central and Eastern Europe that other NATO nations are ready to help protect them “on land, air and at sea,” Kerry said. America’s commitment to NATO’s core principle — that an attack on one alliance member shall be considered an attack on all — is “unwavering,” the secretary said. NATO ministers also met Tuesday with Ukrainian Foreign Minister Andriy Deshchytisa. Kerry said “they stood together in defense of Ukraine’s

right to choose its future and in defense of international law.” Kerry blasted what he called Russia’s “tactics of intimidation, especially deployment of unprecedented forces around Ukraine’s borders.” On Monday, Russia’s Defense Ministry said one battalion — about 500 troops — had been pulled back, but NATO’s secretary general downplayed talk of a major withdrawal. “This is not what we have seen,” Rasmussen told reporters. “And this massive military buildup can in no way contribute to a de-escalation of the situation — a de-escalation that we all want to see. So I continue to urge Russia to pull back its troops, live up to its international obligation and engage

in a constructive dialogue with Ukraine.” Deshchytisa, the Ukrainian foreign minister, told a separate news conference that NATO ministers had treated Ukraine’s situation with “understanding and support and knowledge.” His country doesn’t need weapons, the Ukrainian official said, but is hoping for “military technical equipment.” He said a delegation of experts from NAT0 member countries was expected to visit Kiev next week for consultations. In other developments, Russia sharply hiked the price for natural gas to Ukraine and threatened to reclaim billions in previous discounts, raising the heat on Ukraine’s cash-strapped government.

Jailed leader scoffs at Egypt courts By SARAH EL DEEB Associated Press

CAIRO — The jailed leader of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood scoffed at the series of mass tribunals against his group and demanded judges not let the courts be politicized, speaking from his defendants cage Tuesday at the stormy opening of a new trial of him and 50 others. The session saw many of the courtroom tensions that have plagued most of the trials so far. Defendants broke out into chants. At one point, the presiding judge screamed “Shut up” at one defendant. All the defense lawyers walked out of the Cairo courtroom to press their demands the judge recuse himself. In the new trial, Brotherhood leader Mohammed Badie and the other defendants in the case face charges including plotting to bring down the constitution, establish an “alternative government” and kidnap Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi — the military chief who ousted the Islamist president last summer and who last week stepped down from his post to run in upcoming presidential elections.

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The wave of mass trials is the latest phase of the heavy crackdown waged against supporters of Mohammed Morsi since his ouster. At least 16,000 people have been arrested — and hundreds killed — including most of the leadership of his Muslim Brotherhood. The trials have raised criticism from rights groups, particularly after one court sentenced more than 500 to death after a trial that lasted only two sessions. The military-backed interim government has branded the Brotherhood a terrorist organization, alleging it has plotted violence since Morsi’s removal. The Brotherhood denies the claims, saying the prosecutions are intended to give a legal veneer to what they call a coup that removed an elected president. Badie is a defendant in a number of trials, including one mass tribunal of hundreds of defendants in the city of Minya, on murder charges that carries possible death penalties. One charge in the current trial — forming a group that uses terrorism — could also carry the death penalty. On trial with him in the case that opened Tuesday are several Brotherhood

spokesmen, including Gehad el-Haddad, the group’s main spokesman to Western media, as well as a dual U.S.-Egyptian citizen, Mohammed Soltan, who is the son of prominent Brotherhood member Salah Soltan and has been on hunger strike for over two months and was unable to walk unassisted. The trial’s opening, which lasted nearly half an hour, was rowdy. As the judge entered the courtroom, the defendants sang the national anthem, and chanted: “Free men are in prison cells. Revolutionaries are in the squares.” When Judge Mohammed Nagi Shehata officially noted the disruption in court records, Soltan shouted from the cage that he can’t hear. “Shut up!” Shehata brusquely snapped back at him — a break in judicial decorum that prompted further outcry from the defendants and their lawyers. In response, the defense lawyers asked the judge to recuse himself from the case accusing him of “humiliating” the defendants. The judge initially ignored their request, prompting the lawyers to withdraw from the courtroom. C

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Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, April 2, 2014

A-9

Palestinians resume bid for further UN recognition By KARIN LAUB and MOHAMMED DARAGHMEH Associated Press

RAMALLAH, West Bank — In a surprise move that could derail U.S. peace efforts, Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas on Tuesday resumed a campaign for further international recognition of a state of Palestine, despite a previous promise to suspend such efforts during nine months of negotiations with Israel. Shortly after Abbas’ announcement, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry canceled plans to return to the Middle East on Wednesday, but also said it’s “completely premature” to write off the Israeli-Palestinian peace talks he restarted in late July. “We are continuing, even now ... to be engaged with both parties,” Kerry told a news conference in Brussels, where he was attending a meeting of NATO foreign ministers. “We urge both sides to show restraint while we work with them.” There was no immediate Is-

raeli comment. However, Abbas’ decision threw into doubt Israeli claims that a deal was emerging that would have extended Israel-Palestinian talks beyond an April 29 deadline and included the release of Jonathan Pollard, an American convicted of spying on the U.S. for Israel in the 1980s. It remained unclear whether Abbas’ dramatic announcement was a negotiating tactic or signaled a fundamental shift in strategy. In a hastily convened ceremony televised live from his West Bank headquarters, Abbas signed applications for Palestinians to join to 15 international treaties and conventions. Abbas said he was compelled to act because Israel had failed to carry out a promised release of Palestinian prisoners by the end of March. At the same time, Abbas said he is not seeking a confrontation with the United States and remains determined to “reach a peaceful solution through negotiations” with Israel. A senior

‘We urge both sides to show restraint while we work with them.’ — Secretary of State John Kerry aide, Nabil Abu Rdeneh, later urged the international community to pressure Israel to release the prisoners, indicating that the Palestinians might reverse course if their demand is met. Still, Abbas’ surprise decision signaled a new crisis in Kerry’s troubled peace efforts. Kerry had nudged Israelis and Palestinians back to the table in July, after a five-year break in negotiations, and got them to commit to nine months of negotiations, until April 29. The target was to reach a framework deal on the terms of a Palestinian state alongside Israel. As part of the resumption of talks, Abbas had promised to suspend efforts to seek further international recognition of a state of Palestine for nine months. A major nod from the U.N.

came in November 2012, when the General Assembly voted by an overwhelming majority to accept a Palestinian state in the West Bank, Gaza and east Jerusalem — lands Israel occupied in 1967 — as a non-member observer, overriding Israeli and U.S. objections. Palestinian officials have said that vote paved the way for Palestine to join 63 international institutions, conventions and treaties. A Palestine Liberation Organization statement quoted Abbas as saying Tuesday that the 15 letters he signed were for conventions and treaties that can be joined immediately. Israel, meanwhile, had pledged last year to release 104 of the longest-held Palestinian prisoners during the course of the negotiations. The Palestin-

Iraq parliamentary election campaign starts By SAMEER N. YACOUB Associated Press

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BAGHDAD — Campaigning officially kicked off Tuesday for Iraq’s first parliamentary elections since the withdrawal of U.S. forces from the country more than two years ago, with Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki seeking a new term at a time of escalating sectarian violence. The United Nations appealed for national unity to help reduce sectarian violence ahead of the April 30 elections. Shiite, Sunni and Kurdish candidates are all vying for 328 assembly seats in the deeply divided country, plagued by violence and corruption. The past year has seen violence swell, with the Sunni Muslim minority embittered over what it sees as marginalization by al-Maliki’s Shiite-led government. The violence threatens to disrupt voting in parts of mainly Sunni Anbar province, possibly

furthering the community’s disenfranchisement. When Sunni protests were broken up last year, it prompted a spiral of attacks by Sunni militants on the military and police. Earlier this year, al-Qaida-inspired militants overran Fallujah, one of the country’s biggest Sunni cities, and parts of Ramadi, the capital of Anbar province — and security forces are still battling to wrest them back. In 2013, more than 8,800 people were killed in violence, the highest toll since the worst of Iraq’s sectarian bloodshed began to subside in 2007. The trend has continued this year. In a statement Tuesday, the United Nations Mission to Iraq said 592 Iraqis — including 108 members of the security forces — were killed in March. The capital, Baghdad, was the worst affected with 180 people killed. The two previous months each saw more than 700 dead. The counts from January

through March do not include casualties of violence and fighting in Anbar province, where the campaign to retake Fallujah is ongoing. “With election day getting nearer, I once again stress the need for unity and a holistic approach to violence and terrorist threat in Iraq,” U.N. mission chief Nickolay Mladenov said in a statement. He called on Iraqi political leaders to resort to dialogue in order to resolve disputes. Al-Maliki is eyeing a third term, even as he is faces criticism by opponents — including influential Shiite figures who accuse him of failing to provide security and basic services to the nation. As the election campaign kicked off Tuesday, Iraqi towns and cities were flooded with posters of the candidates for parliament seats on main streets and intersections. Maliki’s State of Law bloc is

likely to secure the largest single number of seats in the polls, but he will still need the support of other Shiite parties and the Kurds in order to secure the second term. Al-Maliki’s situation seems more difficult now because he has acquired more political enemies among Shiite and Kurdish factions since the 2010 elections. Once the election results are announced, leaders of winning blocs start extensive meetings in order to form a broad coalition that would make the biggest bloc in the new parliament. This biggest bloc would have the right to name the new prime minister among its ranks. There are no apparent competitors to al-Maliki right now. The only real completion al-Maliki ever faced was from secular Shiite politician Ayad Allawi, but Allawi’s chances are much less now because his Iraqiya bloc is deeply fragmented.

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ians say the fourth and final group was to have been released by the end of March. Israel argues that the release was contingent on the Palestinians negotiating “in good faith.” In recent days, Kerry has been trying to negotiate a deal on extending the talks until the end of the year. An Israeli official close to the negotiations said earlier Tuesday that Kerry was pushing a formula that would include Pollard’s release. In exchange for Pollard, Israel would free the last group of 26 veteran Palestinian prisoners, show “restraint” in settlement building and release about 400 additional Palestinian prisoners it would select, the official said. The Israeli offer received a cool reception in Ramallah, according to Palestinian officials who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the issue with reporters. The officials said the release of the long-held prisoners was not up for new negotiations,

and that any discussions about extending negotiations can only begin once those prisoners are freed. The Palestinians demanded a full settlement freeze and the release of 1,000 additional prisoners, including political leaders, as a condition for extending negotiations. The officials said Israel’s offer to show “restraint” in settlement expansion on occupied lands was largely meaningless since it would halt only the issuing of tenders for new construction. The Israeli anti-settlement group Peace Now said Tuesday that promise would not affect construction of thousands of settlement apartments that have already been approved. The inclusion of Pollard, a former U.S. naval intelligence analyst convicted of spying for Israel nearly three decades ago, had been the most surprising element of recent efforts to rescue the faltering peace talks. It reflected the importance Kerry put on continuing the talks.


A-10 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, April 2, 2014

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Sports

Woods to miss Masters due to back surgery Recent operation will put 4-time event winner out of field for first time since inaugural attempt DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer

Tiger Woods chose surgery to heal his ailing back over a quest for another green jacket, announcing Tuesday that he will miss the Masters for the first time in his career. Woods said on his website that he had surgery Monday in Utah for a pinched nerve that had been hurting him for several months, knowing the surgery would keep him from Augusta National next week for the first time since he was a senior in high school. The No. 1 player in the world is a four-time Masters champion. “After attempting to get ready for the Masters, and failing to make the necessary progress, I decided in consultation with my doctors to have this

procedure done, Woods said. “I’d like to express my disappointment to the Augusta National membership, staff, volunteers and patrons that I will not be at the Masters. “It’s a week that’s very special to me,” he said. “It also looks like I’ll be forced to miss several upcoming tournaments to focus on my rehabilitation and getting healthy.” The Masters gets the highest television ratings of any golf tournament, and Woods commands most of the attention, even though he last won a green jacket in 2005. He won his first Masters in 1997 when he set 20 records, from youngest Masters champion at 21 to his 12-shot margin of victory. “I know Tiger has been working very hard to return to form, and as I have said many times, Tiger has a lot of years of good

golf ahead of him,” Jack Nicklaus said. “I hate to see him robbed of some of that time by injury. But we all know he is doing what is in the best interest of his health and future. I wish him well on a speedy recovery.” Nicklaus played 154 straight majors for which he was eligible until he missed the 1998 British Open because of an ailing left hip that he had replaced a year later. Nicklaus rarely had injury problems in compiling 18 professional majors, the record that Woods wants. Woods has been stuck on 14 majors for six years. Woods has had four surgeries on his left knee, and now his biggest concern is his back. He has been coping with back issues since last summer: a twinge in the final round of the PGA Championship and spasms in the final round of

The Barclays that caused him to fall to his knees. Then, they returned with alarming regularity recently in Florida. He withdrew after 13 holes in the final round of the Honda Classic with what he described as lower back pain and spasms. Woods shot the highest final round of his career at Doral a week later when he said his back flared up again in the final round. He skipped the Arnold Palmer Invitational, where he was the two-time defending champion, to rest his back and do everything possible to be at Augusta National next week. “Tiger was gracious in keeping us updated of his condition and making us aware of his decision,” Augusta National chairman Billy Payne said. “We wholeheartedly offered our best wishes for his immediate and long-term recovery.”

AP Photo/Dave Martin, File

In this April 13, 1997, file photo, Masters champion Tiger Woods receives his green jacket from the previous year’s winner Nick Faldo, rear, at the Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Ga. Woods will miss the Masters for the first time in his career after having surgery on his back. Woods said on his website that he had surgery Monday in Utah for a pinched nerve that had been hurting him for several months.

Blues edge Flyers in shootout to near league lead The Associated Press

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Ryan Miller stopped 31 shots and T.J. Oshie and Kevin Shattenkirk scored in a shootout in the St. Louis Blues’ 1-0 victory over the Philadelphia Flyers on Tuesday night. Western Conference leader St. Louis has 109 points, one fewer than East leader Boston for the top spot in the NHL. Miller, who earned his 29th career shutout, made a skate save against Vincent Lecavalier and a glove save on Claude Giroux in the shootout. One of Miller’s best saves came with 1:30 to go in overtime when he stretched out and denied Jakub Vo-

Landeskog’s scores. racek’s bid to slide the puck under his in the shootout. Ville Leino had the winner in the ninth pads. round of the shootout and Nathan Lieuwen LIGHTNING 3, CANADIENS 1 made 33 saves for his first NHL win. SHARKS 5, OILERS 4 The Devils are 0-11 this season in TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — Tyler Johnson SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) — Patrick Marleau scored his 32nd goal of the season with 7:29 left in the third period to lift San Jose over Edmonton. The Sharks had blown a 3-1 lead and were 0 for 5 on power plays before Marleau rocketed a shot past Ben Scrivens after the goalie had deflected a one-timer by San Jose’s Brent Burns.

in the final second of overtime, lifting the Golden State to the win. Curry finished with 23 points and 10 rebounds. Klay Thompson led Golden State with 27 points, and Jermaine O’Neal added 20. Dallas had a three-point lead until Thompson made a 3-pointer with 1:01 remaining in regulation. O’Neal blocked a Dallas shot with the game tied at 120, setting the stage for Curry’s winning move. He dribbled the ball to the left side of the court and hit from 20 feet. The Mavericks called timeout, but the inbounds pass failed to connect as time ran out.

TRAIL BLAZERS 124, LAKERS 112

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Damian Lillard scored 34 points, LaMarcus Aldridge had 31 points and 15 rebounds, and Portland overpowered Los Angeles. The Blazers’ fourth straight victory, coupled with Houston’s loss at Brooklyn, moved Portland within one game of the Rockets for fourth place in the Western Conference and home-court advantage in the opening round of the playoffs. The Rockets have three games in hand. Nick Young, the fifth and last player off the Los Angeles bench, made his WARRIORS 122, first eight shots and finished 15 for 26 MAVERICKS 120, OT with a season-high 40 points. But it DALLAS (AP) — Stephen wasn’t enough to prevent the Lakers’ Curry made a tiebreaking jumper 10th defeat in 14 games.

Astros top Yanks in Jeter’s final opener The Associated Press

HOUSTON (AP) — Jesus Guzman and L.J. Hoes homered off CC Sabathia to help the Houston Astros roll to a 6-2 win Tuesday night in the first game of Derek Jeter’s farewell tour with the New York Yankees. Jeter’s final big league season began by being plunked on the left arm by Scott Feldman. The 13-time All-Star went 1 for 3 with a single. Jeter, who has won five World Series with New York, announced in February that his 20th season would be his last. The Astros added Dexter Fowler and Scott Feldman to improve a team coming off three straight 100-loss seasons. On the first day, it worked.

AVALANCHE 3, BLUE JACKETS 2, OT

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Gabriel Landeskog scored twice, including a power-play goal at 4:27 of overtime to help the Avalanche extend their winning streak to four. SABRES 3, AVALANCHE 2 Rookie scoring leader Nathan MacKinnon, centering the top line with Matt BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — Tyler Ennis scored twice in the third period and again Duchene expected to miss a month with a knee injury, assisted on both of

Nets top Rockets to get playoff bid NEW YORK (AP) — The Brooklyn Nets clinched a playoff berth by beating the Houston Rockets for the first time in eight years, getting 32 points from Joe Johnson in a 105-96 victory on Tuesday night. Shaun Livingston added 17 points for the Nets, who extended their home winning streak to 14 games, longest in their NBA history and tops in the league this season. They also pulled within one game of Toronto and Chicago for the No. 3 seed in the Eastern Conference. The Nets ended a 14-game skid against Houston with their first victory in the series since March 13, 2006. The Nets hadn’t defeated the Rockets at home since March 31, 2003, when they were still playing in East Rutherford, N.J. James Harden scored 26 points for Houston, which lost its second straight following a five-game winning streak. Still without Dwight Howard because of a sore left ankle, the Rockets shot just 38 percent from the field.

shootouts. They are three points out of the Eastern Conference’s final wild card spot.

Fowler had two doubles as Houston jumped on Sabathia (0-1) for six runs in the first two innings. Feldman allowed two hits in 6 2-3 innings in his Houston debut after signing a three-year, $30 million contract. BLUE JAYS 4, RAYS 2 ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — Drew Hutchison won his first start in almost two years and Adam Lind homered for the visiting Blue Jays. Hutchison (1-0) allowed three hits and walked three over 5 1-3 shutout innings in his first big league game since June 15, 2012. The right-hander had elbow ligament replacement surgery in AuSee MLB, page A-11

Pavelec stopped Antoine Vermette’s attempt to send Winnipeg past Phoenix. The Coyotes dropped into a tie for the final playoff spot in the Western Conference with the Dallas Stars, who blanked scored the go-ahead goal on a short-hand- the Capitals 5-0. Dallas has a game in ed breakaway late in the third period and hand with seven left to play. the Lightning clinched a playoff berth. The win, and losses by New Jersey HURRICANES 4, PENGUINS 1 and Washington, gave Tampa Bay its first postseason berth since 2011 and only its PITTSBURGH (AP) — Rookie Elias second in seven years. The Canadiens also Lindholm scored twice for the first multiqualified for the postseason by virtue of goal game of his career and Carolina dethe losses by New Jersey and Washington. nied listless Pittsburgh a chance to wrap up the Metropolitan Division title. Eric Staal and Justin Faulk also scored JETS 2, COYOTES 1, SO for Carolina while Jeff Skinner added two GLENDALE, Ariz. (AP) — Andrew assists. Anton Khudobin stopped 30 shots Ladd scored in regulation and in the secSee NHL, page A-11 ond round of the shootout, and Ondrej

Scoreboard basketball NBA Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB x-Toronto 42 32 .568 — x-Brooklyn 40 33 .548 1½ New York 32 43 .427 10½ Boston 23 51 .311 19 Philadelphia 16 58 .216 26 Southeast Division y-Miami 51 22 .699 — Washington 38 36 .514 13½ Charlotte 36 38 .486 15½ Atlanta 32 41 .438 19 Orlando 21 53 .284 30½ Central Division y-Indiana 52 23 .693 — x-Chicago 42 32 .568 9½ Cleveland 30 45 .400 22 Detroit 27 47 .365 24½ Milwaukee 14 60 .189 37½ WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division x-San Antonio 58 16 .784 — Houston 49 24 .671 8½ Memphis 44 30 .595 14 Dallas 44 31 .587 14½ New Orleans 32 42 .432 26 Northwest Division x-Oklahoma City 54 19 .740 — Portland 49 27 .645 6½ Minnesota 36 37 .493 18 Denver 32 42 .432 22½ Utah 23 52 .307 32 Pacific Division x-L.A. Clippers 53 22 .707 — Golden State 46 28 .622 6½ Phoenix 44 30 .595 8½ Sacramento 26 48 .351 26½ L.A. Lakers 25 49 .338 27½ x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Tuesday’s Games Brooklyn 105, Houston 96 Golden State 122, Dallas 120, OT Portland 124, L.A. Lakers 112 Wednesday’s Games Cleveland at Orlando, 3 p.m. Detroit at Indiana, 3 p.m. Boston at Washington, 3 p.m. Charlotte at Philadelphia, 3 p.m. Brooklyn at New York, 3 p.m. Houston at Toronto, 3 p.m. Milwaukee at Miami, 3:30 p.m. Chicago at Atlanta, 3:30 p.m. Memphis at Minnesota, 4 p.m. Golden State at San Antonio, 4:30 p.m. New Orleans at Denver, 5 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Phoenix, 6 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Sacramento, 6 p.m. All Times ADT

hockey NHL Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts y-Boston 75 52 17 6 110 x-Tampa Bay 76 42 25 9 93 x-Montreal 77 43 27 7 93 Detroit 75 35 26 14 84 Toronto 77 37 32 8 82 Ottawa 75 32 29 14 78 Florida 77 27 42 8 62 Buffalo 75 21 45 9 51 Metropolitan Division x-Pittsburgh 76 48 23 5 101 N.Y. Rangers 77 43 30 4 90 Philadelphia 75 39 27 9 87 Columbus 75 38 30 7 83 Washington 76 34 29 13 81 New Jersey 76 32 28 16 80 Carolina 76 33 32 11 77 N.Y. Islanders 75 30 35 10 70 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division x-St. Louis 75 51 17 7 109 x-Colorado 75 48 21 6 102

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x-Chicago 76 42 19 15 99 Minnesota 76 39 26 11 89 Dallas 75 37 27 11 85 Winnipeg 77 34 33 10 78 Nashville 76 33 32 11 77 Pacific Division x-Anaheim 75 49 18 8 106 x-San Jose 77 48 20 9 105 Los Angeles 76 44 26 6 94 Phoenix 76 36 27 13 85 Vancouver 77 34 32 11 79 Calgary 76 31 38 7 69 Edmonton 76 26 41 9 61 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Tuesday’s Games Buffalo 3, New Jersey 2, SO St. Louis 1, Philadelphia 0, SO Winnipeg 2, Phoenix 1, SO Toronto 3, Calgary 2 N.Y. Islanders 4, Florida 2 Carolina 4, Pittsburgh 1 Dallas 5, Washington 0 Colorado 3, Columbus 2, OT Tampa Bay 3, Montreal 1 N.Y. Rangers 3, Vancouver 1 San Jose 5, Edmonton 4 Wednesday’s Games N.Y. Islanders at Ottawa, 3 p.m. Boston at Detroit, 4 p.m. Edmonton at Anaheim, 6 p.m. Phoenix at Los Angeles, 6:30 p.m. All Times ADT

baseball American League

East Division W Baltimore 1 Tampa Bay 1 Toronto 1 Boston 0 New York 0 Central Division Chicago 1 Cleveland 1 Detroit 1 Kansas City 0 Minnesota 0 West Division Seattle 2 Houston 1 Texas 1 Oakland 0 Los Angeles 0

L Pct 0 1.000 1 .500 1 .500 1 .000 1 .000

GB — ½ ½ 1 1

0 1.000 0 1.000 0 1.000 1 .000 1 .000

— — — 1 1

0 1.000 0 1.000 1 .500 1 .000 2 .000

— ½ 1 1½ 2

Tuesday’s Games Houston 6, N.Y. Yankees 2 Toronto 4, Tampa Bay 2 Texas 3, Philadelphia 2 Seattle 8, L.A. Angels 3 Cleveland at Oakland, ppd., rain Wednesday’s Games Kansas City (Vargas 0-0) at Detroit (Scherzer 0-0), 9:08 a.m. Minnesota (Correia 0-0) at Chicago White Sox (Paulino 0-0), 10:10 a.m. Cleveland (Kluber 0-0) at Oakland (Kazmir 0-0), 11:35 a.m., 1st game Boston (Lackey 0-0) at Baltimore (Jimenez 0-0), 3:05 p.m. Toronto (Buehrle 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Moore 0-0), 3:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Kendrick 0-0) at Texas (Ross 0-0), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 0-0) at Houston (Cosart 0-0), 4:10 p.m. Cleveland (McAllister 0-0) at Oakland (Undecided), 5 p.m., 2nd game Seattle (Paxton 0-0) at L.A. Angels (Santiago 0-0), 6:05 p.m.

National League

East Division W Miami 2 Washington 1 Atlanta 1 Philadelphia 1 New York 0

L Pct 0 1.000 0 1.000 1 .500 1 .500 1 .000

GB — ½ 1 1 1½

Central Division Pittsburgh 1 St. Louis 1 Milwaukee 1 Chicago 0 Cincinnati 0 West Division Los Angeles 3 San Diego 1 San Francisco 1 Arizona 1 Colorado 0

0 1.000 0 1.000 1 .500 1 .000 1 .000

— — ½ 1 1

1 1 1 3 2

— 1 1 2 2

.750 .500 .500 .250 .000

Tuesday’s Games L.A. Dodgers 3, San Diego 2 Miami 4, Colorado 3 Texas 3, Philadelphia 2 Atlanta 5, Milwaukee 2 Arizona 5, San Francisco 4 Wednesday’s Games Atlanta (Harang 0-0) at Milwaukee (Garza 0-0), 9:10 a.m. Chicago Cubs (Jackson 0-0) at Pittsburgh (Morton 0-0), 3:05 p.m. Colorado (Lyles 0-0) at Miami (Alvarez 0-0), 3:10 p.m. St. Louis (Wacha 0-0) at Cincinnati (Cingrani 0-0), 3:10 p.m. Washington (G.Gonzalez 0-0) at N.Y. Mets (Colon 0-0), 3:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Kendrick 0-0) at Texas (Ross 0-0), 4:05 p.m. San Francisco (Hudson 0-0) at Arizona (Cahill 0-1), 5:40 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Haren 0-0) at San Diego (Ross 0-0), 6:10 p.m. All Times ADT Astros 6, Yankees 2 NY 000 000 020—2 6 1 Hou. 420 000 00x—6 9 0 Sabathia, Betances (7), Nuno (8) and McCann; Feldman, K.Chapman (7), Qualls (8), Albers (9) and J.Castro. WСFeldman 1-0. LСSabathia 0-1. HRsСHouston, Guzman (1), Hoes (1). Blue Jays 4, Rays 2 Tor. TB

300 100 000—4 6 0 000 000 011—2 7 0

Hutchison, Loup (6), Delabar (8), Santos (9) and Navarro; Cobb, H.Bell (6), Lueke (7), C.Ramos (8), McGee (9) and Hanigan. WСHutchison 1-0. LСCobb 0-1. SvСSantos (1). HRsСToronto, Lind (1). Mariners 8, Angels 3 Sea. LA

004 011 002—8 10 2 000 200 010—3 8 0

E.Ramirez, Wilhelmsen (8), Beimel (8), Rodney (9) and Buck; C.Wilson, Shoemaker (6), Kohn (9) and Conger. WСE.Ramirez 1-0. LСC.Wilson 0-1. HRsСSeattle, B.Miller 2 (2). Los Angeles, Ibanez (1). Rangers 3, Philadelphia 2 Phi. Tex.

000 002 000—2 8 0 000 001 101—3 10 1

A.Burnett, Diekman (7), Bastardo (8), Hollands (9), Rosenberg (9) and Ruiz; M.Perez, Frasor (6), Cotts (8), Soria (9) and Chirinos. WСSoria 1-0. LСHollands 0-1. Dodgers 3, Padres 2 L.A. 200 100 0 00—3 7 1 S.A. 000 110 000—2 6 2 Greinke, P.Rodriguez (6), Withrow (7), Howell (8), Jansen (9) and A.Ellis; Kennedy, A.Torres (6), Stauffer (6), Vincent (7), Benoit (8), Thayer (9) and Grandal. W_ Greinke 1-0. L_Kennedy 0-1. Sv_ Jansen (2). HRs_Los Angeles, Puig (1). San Diego, S.Smith (2). Marlins 4, Rockies 3 Col. 000 200 010—3 9 1 Mia. 020 002 0 0x—4 5 0

Anderson, Ottavino (7), Brothers (8) and Rosario; Eovaldi, Marmol (7), M.Dunn (8), A.Ramos (8), Cishek (9) and Saltalamacchia. W_Eovaldi 1-0. L_Anderson 0-1. Sv_Cishek (1). Braves 5, Brewers 2 Atl. 000 021 0 11—5 9 1 Mil. 100 000 010—2 6 0 A.Wood, D.Carpenter (8), Kimbrel (9) and Gattis; Lohse, Duke (8), Henderson (8), Thornburg (9) and Lucroy. W_A.Wood 1-0. L_Lohse 0-1. Sv_Kimbrel (1). HRs_Atlanta, Heyward (1), Freeman 2 (2). Milwaukee, C.Gomez (1). D-Backs 5, Giants 4 S.F. 400 000 000—4 7 0 Ari. 200 102 00x—5 11 0 M.Cain, J.Gutierrez (6), Casilla (8) and Posey; Miley, Harris (8), A.Reed (9) and Montero. W_Miley 1-1. L_J.Gutierrez 0-1. Sv_A.Reed (1). HRs_San Francisco, Belt (2).

Transactions BASEBALL American League NEW YORK YANKEES Placed INF Brendan Ryan on the 15day DL, retroactive to March 22. Selected the contract of INF Yangervis Solarte from ScrantonWilkes-Barre (IL). Designated INF Eduardo Nunez for assignment. OAKLAND ATHLETICS Assigned RHP Fernando Rodriguez to Sacramento (PCL) for a rehab assignment. TEXAS RANGERS Designated C Chris Gimenez for assignment. Selected the contract of RHP Daniel McCutchen from Round Rock (PCL). Assigned LHP Michael Kirkman outright to Round Rock. National League ATLANTA BRAVES Assigned LHP Mike Minor to Mississippi (SL) for a rehab assignment. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA Fined Detroit G Brandon Jennings $5,000 violating the league’s anti-flopping rules for the second time this season. Fined Sacramento F Reggie Evans $15,000 for elbowing New Orleans F-C Anthony Davis in the face during Monday’s game. Women’s National Basketball Association LOS ANGELES SPARKS Signed G Armintie Herrington. Traded G Jenna O’Hea to Seattle for a 2015 second-round draft pick. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS Signed CBs LeQuan Lewis and Eddie Whitley to two-year contracts. DENVER BRONCOS Signed CB Chris Harris Jr. to a one-year contract. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS Agreed to terms with LB Parys Haralson on a one-year contract. NEW YORK GIANTS Signed OL Charles Brown. NEW YORK JETS Signed WR/ KR Jacoby Ford and CB Dimitri Patterson. OAKLAND RAIDERS Released G Mike Brisiel. PITTSBURGH STEELERS Signed CB Brice McCain to a one-year contract. ST. LOUIS RAMS Signed WR Kenny Britt, DL Alex Carrington, QB Shaun Hill, LB Etienne Sabino and CB Greg Reid. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS

Signed FBs Josh Baker and Jorvorskie Lane. HOCKEY C National Hockey League CAROLINA HURRICANES Recalled F Chris Terry from Charlotte Y (AHL) on an emergency basis. DALLAS STARS Assigned D Troy Vance to Elmira (ECHL). DETROIT RED WINGS Reassigned RW Zach Nastasiuk from Owen Sound (OHL) to Grand Rapids (AHL). EDMONTON OILERS Assigned G Laurent Brossoit from Oklahoma City (AHL) to Bakersfield (ECHL). FLORIDA PANTHERS Recalled F Bobby Butler and D Jonathan Racine from San Antonio (AHL). LOS ANGELES KINGS Signed F Michael Mersch to a three-year, entry-level contract and F Nic Dowd to a one-year, entry-level contract. MINNESOTA WILD Signed D Christian Folin to a two-year, entry-level contract. NEW JERSEY DEVILS Recalled F Mike Sislo from Albany (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS Signed F Garrett Thompson to a one-year, entry-level contract and G Chris Driedger to a three-year, entrylevel contract. SAN JOSE SHARKS Reassigned D Mirco Mueller to Worcester (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING Signed F Adam Erne to an entry-level contract and assigned him to Syracuse (AHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS Recalled F Chris Brown from Hershey (AHL). Reassigned D Brett Flemming from Reading (ECHL) to Hershey. WINNIPEG JETS Reassigned G Eric Comrie from Tri-City (WHL) and D Josh Morrissey from Prince Albert (WHL) to St. John’s (AHL) and G Jussi Olkinuora from St. John’s to Ontario (ECHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer SPORTING KANSAS CITY Signed M Victor Munoz. WINTER SPORTS U.S. SKI AND SNOWBOARD ASSOCIATION Named Trisha Worthington executive vice president and chief development officer. COLLEGE CARROLL (MONT.) Named Doug Mello men’s soccer coach. FORDHAM Named Jon Wholley asstistant defensive coordinator/ linebackers coach and Darin Edward defensive line coach. LOUISIANA-MONROE Named Jeff Dow women’s basketball coach. LSU Announced F Johnny O’Bryant III will enter the NBA draft. LOUISIANA TECH Named Tyler Summitt women’s basketball coach. MARQUETTE Named Steve Wojciechowski men’s basketball coach. MONTANA STATE Named Brian Fish men’s basketball coach. RICE Named Scott Pera men’s assistant basketball coach. TCU Named Raegan Pebley women’s basketball coach. TOLEDO Extended the contract of Tod Kowalczyk men’s basketball coach through the 2020-21 season. UCLA Dismissed OT Torian White from the football team. UT MARTIN Signed women’s basketball coach Kevin McMillan to a six-year contract extension through the 2019-20 season.

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gust 2012. Lind hit a three-run homer in the first off Alex Cobb (0-1). He sent a 3-1 pitch over the centerfield fence. Cobb gave up four runs, five hits and four walks in five innings. Jonathan Diaz, filling in for injured Toronto shortstop Jose Reyes, made it 4-0 with his first major league hit, an RBI single in the fourth.

RANGERS 3, PHILLIES 2 ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) — Adrian Beltre singled home ShinSoo Choo with the winning run in the ninth inning, and the Rangers saved a run on a successful replay challenge. Choo, who also scored the tying run in the seventh, reached base for the fourth time on a walk to start the ninth against Mario Hollands (0-1), who was making his major league debut. After Elvis Andrus’ sacrifice and a walk to Prince Fielder, Phillies manager Ryne Sandberg went to right-hander B.J. Rosenberg. Beltre then singled, scoring Choo without a throw. New Texas closer Joakim Soria (1-0) got the win with a perfect ninth inning in his season debut. The first replay review of the series was a successful challenge by Rangers manager Ron Washington and helped keep a run off the board in Philadelphia’s two-run sixth inning.

MARINERS 8, ANGELS 3 ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) — Brad Miller hit two homers, Erasmo Ramirez pitched seven innings of six-hit ball, and Seattle beat Los Angeles again. Justin Smoak hit a three-run double, while Abraham Almonte and Dustin Ackley also had RBI doubles as the Mariners followed up their 10-3 win on opening day with another surprising offensive barrage. Seattle scored 16 runs in its first 15 innings of the year while beating Jered Weaver and C.J. Wilson, their AL West rivals’ two best starters. Wilson (0-1) labored into the sixth inning for the Angels, who are off to their first 0-2 start since 2001. Ramirez (1-0) backed up his solid spring training, striking out six without walking a batter.

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DODGERS 3, PADRES 2 SAN DIEGO — Yasiel Puig hit a 410-foot drive for a two-run homer and Zack Greinke won his season debut, leading the Los Angeles Dodgers to a 3-2 victory against the San Diego Padres on Tuesday. Carl Crawford started the game with a base hit and Puig then drove a 2-1 pitch from Ian Kennedy into the balcony on the third deck of the Western Metal Supply Co. Building in the left-field corner. It was his first homer. It was the second time Kennedy faced the Dodgers since June 11,

when, while with Arizona, he hit Puig and Greinke with pitches, inciting a brawl at Dodger Stadium. Kennedy was suspended 10 games. He was traded to the Padres on July 31. San Diego loaded the bases with two outs in the ninth against Kenley Jansen, on singles by Yonder Alonso and Will Venable, and a walk to Yasmani Grandal. The closer then struck out pinch-hitter Nick Hundley to earn his second save in two chances.

MARLINS 4, ROCKIES 3 MIAMI — Nathan Eovaldi pitched six innings and Miami made the most of five hits to beat Colorado for the second night in a row. The Marlins’ 2-0 start hints at big improvement from last year, when they began 14-41 en route to a 100-loss season. The Rockies are 0-2 after finishing last in the NL West in 2013. Eovaldi (1-0) allowed two runs and struck out six after Jose Fernandez limited Colorado to one run in the season opener. Eovaldi gave up six hits, walked one and reached 99 mph on the radar gun. A.J. Ramos struck out Nolan Arenado with runners at the corners to end the eighth, protecting a one-run lead. Steve Cishek converted his 30th consecutive save opportunity and first of the year by pitching a perfect ninth. Brett Anderson (0-1) pitched six innings and allowed four runs, three earned, in his first start for the Rockies.

BRAVES 5, BREWERS 2 MILWAUKEE — Freddie Freeman hit a pair of solo home runs and Jason Heyward added a tworun shot to back a solid outing by Alex Wood. Heyward’s first homer of the season off Kyle Lohse (0-1) put the Braves on top 2-1 in the fifth and snapped a string of 22 scoreless innings against the Brewers. Freeman opened the sixth with his first homer and added a two-out home run in the eighth to make it 4-1. Wood (1-0) settled down after allowing a home run to Carlos Gomez on his first pitch. The lefthander allowed one run on five hits in seven innings. Craig Kimbrel struck out the side in the ninth for the save.

DIAMONDBACKS 5, GIANTS 4 PHOENIX — A.J. Pollock broke out of an 0-for-13 start to the season with three hits, scoring twice and driving in a run for Arizona. Wade Miley (1-1) gave up four runs in the first inning, and then blanked the Giants for the next six, retiring 15 in a row in one stretch. Gerardo Parra had two hits and the sacrifice fly that scored to the go-ahead run in the sixth inning. Brandon Belt hit a three-run home run in the first, his second homer in as many games. Addison Reed, who gave up the game-winning home run to Buster Posey Monday night, pitched a scoreless ninth for his first save with the Diamondbacks.

Final 4 broadcasts include 3 channels RACHEL COHEN AP Sports Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Rob Bromley once called a Kentucky high school basketball game that Rex Chapman won on a last-second shot. That’s the sort of history, the sort of knowledge that TV executives wanted from the local commentators who will appear on the school-specific broadcasts of Saturday’s Final Four games. The announcing teams revealed Tuesday include Bromley, a longtime sports anchor in Lexington, and Chapman, a former Wildcats star. Turner Sports and CBS are experimenting with airing two additional telecasts of both NCAA semifinals. Along with the main coverage on TBS, there will be separate versions on TNT and truTV with different announcing crews connected to each program. For the early game, the Florida broadcast will be on TNT and UConn’s on truTV. Kentucky will be on TNT and Wisconsin on truTV for the second semifinal. —For Florida, play-byplay will be handled by David Steele, who has previously hosted Gators basketball and

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football TV and radio coverage and is the current voice of the Orlando Magic. He will be joined by Mark Wise, a longtime analyst for the Gator Basketball Network, and reporter James Bates, a former Florida football player. —For UConn, the play-byplay announcer will be Connecticut native Eric Frede, a studio host for regional network Comcast SportsNet New England who also calls Huskies women’s games for New York cable station SNY. He will work with two former UConn stars: analyst Donny Marshall, a commentator for Brooklyn Nets games on YES Network, and reporter Swin Cash, who won two national titles with the women’s team. —For Kentucky, Bromley, who has worked Wildcats games for the UKTV Network since 1980, will do play-by-play. The analyst will be Chapman, and the reporter will be Dave Baker, Bromley’s colleague at CBS affiliate WKYT. —For Wisconsin, Big Ten Network announcer Wayne Larrivee will be the play-byplay voice. The analyst will be former Badgers guard Mike Kelley, who played in the 2000 Final Four. games and sits comfortably in an Eastern Conference playoff spot.

ISLANDERS 4, PANTHERS 2

as the Hurricanes avoided being UNIONDALE, N.Y. (AP) — swept in the season series by PittsJosh Bailey had a goal and assist, burgh for the first time in 18 years. and New York kept up its strong finish with a victory over Florida. New York, on the verge of elimSTARS 5, CAPITALS 0 ination in the Eastern Conference WASHINGTON (AP) — Tyler playoff race, quickly bounced back Seguin scored his 33rd goal, Dustin from Quinton Howden’s shortJeffrey got his first two of the sea- handed goal less than two minutes son, and Dallas routed Washington in and sent the Panthers to their in a game between ninth-place fourth straight loss. teams trying to leapfrog into a playoff spot.

RANGERS 3, CANUCKS 1 VANCOUVER, British Columbia (AP) — Martin St. Louis scored his first goal with New York and Henrik Lundqvist made 34 saves in the victory over Vancouver. Daniel Carcillo and Benoit Pouliot also scored for New York, which has won seven of eight

MAPLE LEAFS 3, FLAMES 2

TORONTO (AP) — Toronto snapped an eight-game losing streak to remain in the playoff chase. Jay McClement, Dave Bolland and David Clarkson scored for the Maple Leafs, who got 20 saves from Jonathan Bernier in his first victory since March 10.

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Sports Briefs Jackson signs 3-year deal with Redskins WASHINGTON (AP) — Three-time Pro Bowl receiver DeSean Jackson is joining the Washington Redskins. Jackson’s publicist tweeted Tuesday night the former Philadelphia Eagles wideout was signing with the Redskins after two days of meeting with coaches and officials. Jackson arrived in the D.C. area Monday night and spent much of Tuesday at Redskins Park while his agent and the agent negotiated with the front office. Late Tuesday, Jackson tweeted: “ITS GOIN DOWN !! BURGUNDY & GOLD”. Jackson set career-highs with 82 catches for 1,332 yards last season for the NFC East champion Eagles, but Philadelphia tried to trade him and then cut him last week amid reports of off-the-field concerns. Jackson issued a statement denying he was associated with gang activity.

Kershaw return will take some time SAN DIEGO (AP) — Reigning NL Cy Young Award winner Clayton Kershaw won’t be ready to come off the disabled list when he’s eligible to be activated on April 14, Los Angeles Dodgers manager Don Mattingly said Tuesday. “This thing is going to take some time,” Mattingly said before the Dodgers played the San Diego Padres. The Dodgers said that after consultation with Dr. Neal ElAttrache and a review of an MRI scan, Kershaw will be placed on a rehab that includes a submaximal throwing program for the next two to three weeks. He will then be re-evaluated by ElAttrache to determine when he can start throwing at increased velocity. Kershaw will likely have to make a rehab start before he can return, Mattingly said. Kershaw was placed on the DL on Sunday with a swollen muscle in his left upper back. He already had been scratched from his scheduled start on Sunday after an MRI revealed the problem. Mattingly says Kershaw was supposed to have thrown before Tuesday’s game but didn’t because it was cool and damp.

Marquette gets new men’s hoops coach Marquette found its replacement for Buzz Williams in Mike Krzyzewski’s coaching tree. The Golden Eagles introduced Duke assistant Steve Wojciechowski as their next men’s basketball coach Tuesday, with Krzyzewski’s long-time right-hand man saying he wants to follow his mentor’s lead while bringing his new program to similar heights. Krzyzewski “allowed me to understand just how fun and incredible the game of basketball is, but when used the right way, how it can change your life,” Wojciechowski said during his introductory news conference in Milwaukee. “I hope to do that here at Marquette.” University President-Elect Michael Lovell called Wojciechowski, 37, “a winner on the court” who “has all the values that we expect at Marquette University.” He replaces Williams, who left for Virginia Tech last month after leading Marquette to a 139-69 record and five NCAA tournament appearances in six seasons. The Golden Eagles missed the tournament this year.


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The other two petitions were denied. KPFA asked for a change to the new East Side setnet regulations that create additional restrictions for late-run Kenai River king salmon when the run is projected to be less than 22,500 fish. The organization wrote that it believed not all state salmon escapement policies were considered in setting the new goal. The current minimum escapement goal is 15,000 laterun kings and the 2014 forecast is for 19,700 kings. The other petition from South K Beach Independent Fishermen’s Association, which goes by the acronym SOKI (pronounced “sockeye”), addressed the difficulty in getting the shortened gear that the Alaska Department of Fish and Game can now require. The difficulty of getting the new gear was unknown at the time the regulation passed, Shadura said. In a Tuesday letter, Board

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of the House and Senate to tap — had about $11.6 billion. Neither the House nor the Senate has released a plan to address the public employees’ retirement system, and there has been very little public discussion or analysis during the legislative session on the available options for addressing the pension obligations. The House Finance Committee draft of HB278 was released Tuesday, day 71 of the scheduled 90-day session. Supporters of the committee’s proposal question how affordable Parnell’s plan is, in light of lower forecasted revenues, ongoing budget obligations and Parnell’s desire to hold the line on state spending. They also pushed back against the Parnell plan’s reliance on trust fund earnings to pay benefits and questioned how reli-

had time to comment on them before considering them. Instead of being automatically added to the agenda, Haight was tasked with sending the board members an email on March 27 after the staff comments were provided and asking them to respond with a yes or no on whether they wanted to consider the petitions in a meeting. According to the board policy, at least two board members must say they want to have a special meeting to consider the petition, otherwise it is considered denied. The Journal has submitted a public records request seeking the relevant emails including how each member voted; the state has not yet provided those. Reached by cell phone Tuesday, Johnstone declined to comment on why the outof-meeting process was used for determining whether to hold a meeting for the petitions rather than the in-meeting process.

of Fisheries Executive Director Glenn Haight wrote that the SOKI petition concerning the gear requirement was denied. “The Board of Fisheries considered the emergency petition and found that it does not meet the emergency petition criteria found in regulation under 5 AAC 96.625,” Haight wrote. “The board determined that there was no unforeseen or unexpected event that either threatens a resource or an unforeseen, unexpected resource situation where a biologically allowable resource harvest would be precluded.” Haight said Tuesday that the emergency determinations were based on board members’ votes whether to hold a meeting regarding each petition. Haight said each vote reflects whether or not the petition appears to rise to the level of emergency, but there are no deliberations between members. The Department of Law has advised that it’s not appropriate for board members to discuss the issues outside of a public forum, so the process is simple, Haight said. “It’s very static,” Haight

According to Shadura, the process by which the second SOKI petition was denied does not match the board’s policy. “I’m not happy about any of this,” Shadura said, calling the process “disturbing.” A 2000 board policy states that if an emergency petition is submitted at a board meeting, or when one is coming up, it is supposed to be added to the current or future meeting’s agenda. That means the petitions submitted March 20 during a board meeting should have been discussed at that meeting, he said. But at the end of the meeting, when considering the other emergency petitions on Molly Dischner can be the agenda, Johnstone said the reached at molly.dischner@ board would wait until ADFG alaskajournal.com.

able the anticipated earnings rate might be. Rodell said she had confidence in the management of the funds but was concerned about state contributions under the House Finance plan getting caught up in politics. Rodell said an actuary had been asked to run numbers on the House Finance proposal. Between the public employees’ and teachers’ retirement systems, the state has an unfunded pension obligation of about $12 billion. John Boucher, a senior economist with Parnell’s Office of Management and Budget, said in an interview that it was hard to gauge the potential budgetary impact of the committee proposal without seeing plans for addressing both pension obligations. Rodell told the committee its proposal could be viewed by ratings agencies as a backingaway by the state on the commitment it’s made on its pension obligation. She expressed

concern the plan could hurt Alaska’s financial standing and come back to haunt the state if, in a few years, the state was at a point where it needed to make funding decisions for a megaproject, like the gas line project currently being pursued. Committee co-chair Bill Stoltze asked if the panel could hear from rating agencies on that issue. Administration officials on Tuesday also said they did not believe the pension issue should be included as part of a bill that also includes proposed changes to Alaska’s education system, dealing with things like charter schools, teacher tenure and an increase in the per-pupil funding formula. As part of that bill, the committee proposed a roughly $300 increase in per-pupil funding, known as the base student allocation, over three years. Parnell had proposed an increase of about $200 over three years. Minority Democrats have pushed for a roughly $400 in-

said. “’Here’s the petition, here’s staff comments, make your decision if you think we should meet.’” In an email, Haight told Shadura that the KPFA petition was denied for similar reasons to the first SOKI petition.

Emergency petition process questioned

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crease for next year, with the amount adjusted for inflation after that. The Senate Finance Committee, in its version of the state operating budget, proposed a $75 million increase in additional aid to districts outside the base student allocation for next year — on top of the $25 million that had already been proposed in the budget — and a total of $100 million for the following year, to be distributed according to the average daily membership for each district. Stoltze, R-Chugiak, called the increase proposed in HB278 an “independent action” and what committee members viewed as the best approach. House Minority Leader Chris Tuck, D-Anchorage, called the proposed funding increase a step in the right direction but not good enough to address concerns about district cuts and layoffs.

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to some of other schools on the Peninsula that have utilized the program to see how they enhanced their sites. Elementary schools that have worked on projects include: Tustumena, Seward, West Homer and Sterling. Anderson said projects that have been initiated at other schools have been well received. Many of the schools have looked at enhancing existing trails, like Kaleidoscope, or developing trails. The trails are used year-round for winter skiing, animal tracking, summer walks and bird and small mammal watching. Some schools set up bird boxes or weather stations for classes or quiet places for reading and writing, she said. “Instead of trying to explain to them, plants and plant growth, you can show them,” Anderson said. “It’s much more easier to learn when you have hands-on and you can actually see something and watch something over time.” Once the master plan is complete, O’Conner said the committee plans to reach out to members of the community who live within a few blocks of the school to help with the project. “We want them to know that we want them included in this project as they want to be because ultimately what we’re doing is creating a space for the community not just the school,” O’Conner said. “And having their support and buy-in for this will lead to greater things down the road.”

with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Kenai Soil and Water Conservation District, Kenai Peninsula Borough and the Kenai Watershed Forum. O’Conner said the group is in steps two and three of the process — site assessment and designing the project, which will be followed by installation. The committee has included students from all grades at Kaleidoscope by doing brainstorming activities for ideas of how to enhance the area, she said. O’Conner said the students’ ideas range from simple projects like planting bushes to attract certain birds and clearing areas for reflection to more elaborate ideas like covered observation decks. An observation deck is beyond the committee’s funding from Fish and Wildlife, she said; the group would have to raise money for large-scale features. Some of the students would like to see outdoor musical instruments incorporated, so the committee is looking at ways to make that a reality. “We’re shooting for the moon,” O’Conner said. “We’ve got some really big grand ideas, but we’re going to start small and do a few of them this spring and into this summer. And then really tackle the bigger projects and pulling the resources together for the bigger projects later this fall.” Kaylee Osowski can be She said the committee is reached at kaylee.osowski@ planning field trips this month peninsulaclarion.com.

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them once a month and change out the batteries at least once a year. Continued from page A-1 “We usually put the message out there to check smoke people to return. alarms and this is another good No one was injured and dam- example why having a working age to the building is estimated one is vital,” he said. at $5,000, he said. As a safety precaution NelReach Dan Balmer at danson said people should check iel.balmer@peninsulaclarion. their smoke detectors and test com. C

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ome new, out-of-the box recipes, from our friends at Post Foods, makes it possible to enjoy one of America’s favorite breakfast cereals, Honey Bunches of Oats, in ways that are as creative, as they are delicious. Packed with wholesome ingredients, such as honey, dried fruit and nuts, Post’s recipes also contain things distinguished as being “superfoods.” Rainforest Chewy Bars, for instance, are crowded with apricots and almonds (a whopping cup of each), as well as vitamin E-rich sunflower seeds. And, Morning Energy Mocha Balls, a showcase for Post’s new Morning Energy Chocolate Almond Crunch cereal, are likewise endowed, thanks to the inclu-

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sion of healthful sesame seeds, flax seeds and chia seeds – a staple in ancient Mayan and Aztec cultures. (If you are not sure what chia seeds are, see description following today’s recipes.) A simple homemade chocolate chip cookie recipe can benefit from the addition

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of some cereal, too – the one here calling for two cups of Honey Bunches of Oats with Almonds. The options for breakfast cereal are near endless, and we all have favorites. As part of a healthy-diet, cereal has its place, but keep in mind, recipes for foods intended as in-between meal snacks and treats, should be portioned and eaten within limits – especially those comprised of concentrated amounts of sugar and calories. Sue Ade is a syndicated food writer with broad experience and interest in the culinary arts. She has worked and resided in the Lowcountry of South Carolina since 1985 and may be reached at kitchenade@yahoo.com. Photos by Sue Ade unless otherwise noted

Post Foods has added Morning Energy Chocolatey Almond Crunch flavor to their line of Honey Bunches of Oats flavors. Enjoy cereal straight, in a bowl with milk, or as an ingredients in snacks, such as drop chocolate chip cookies, bottom left.

Recipe and photo courtesy Post Foods, www.postfoods.com 1¼ cups Honey Bunches of Oats Morning Energy Chocolatey Almond Crunch cereal ½ cup walnut halves 1 teaspoon chia seeds 1 teaspoon flax seeds 1 teaspoon sesame seeds 4 tablespoons almond butter 2 tablespoons honey 2 tablespoons pure maple syrup 2 tablespoons dried cranberries 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 teaspoons espresso powder ¼ teaspoon coarse sea salt ¼ cup toasted unsweetened coconut for rolling (optional)

Place the cereal in bowl of food processor. Process until finely ground. Add walnut halves, chia seeds, flax seeds, sesame seeds, almond butter, honey, maple syrup, cranberries, vanilla, espresso powder and sea salt to bowl and process until well blended and mixture forms a stiff dough. Remove dough and form into a compact ball with your hands. Form dough into 1-inch balls and roll in toasted coconut, if desired. Place balls on a wax-paper lined sheet and let stand for an hour or so, then transfer to a tin or container with a tight lid. The power balls will keep for at least a week at room temperature, or they can be chilled. Makes 20 balls. Photo credit: Post Foods

Chia seeds, flax seeds and sesame seeds are among the “superfoods” contained in Morning Energy Mocha Balls featuring Post Food’s new Honey Bunches of Oats Morning Energy Chocolatey Almond Crunch cereal. Photo credit: Post Foods

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Recipe and photo courtesy Post Foods, www.postfoods.com ¼ cup honey Microwave honey and butter in large microwaveable bowl on 2 tablespoons butter HIGH for 1 minute; stir until well blended. Add marshmallows; 1 (10-ounce) package marshmallows (about 36 marshmal- toss to coat. Microwave 1½ minutes, or until marshmallows are lows) puffed; stir until well blended. Add remaining ingredients; mix 6 cups Honey Bunches of Oats Cereal well. Press cereal mixture firmly into greased 13 x 9-inch pan. 1 cup dried apricots, chopped* Cool. Cut into 24 bars.*Kitchen Ade note: for ease of prepara1 cup almonds, chopped tion, snip apricots with scissors. Or, if you prefer, substitute dried ½ cup sunflower kernels cranberries or raisins for the apricots.

1¼ cups all-purpose flour (measured by spooning flour into a measuring cup, then leveling with the flat end of a knife) 1 teaspoon baking soda ¼ teaspoon salt ½ cup butter 1 cup firmly packed brown sugar 1 large egg 1 teaspoon vanilla 2 cups Post Honey Bunches of Oats cereal with Almonds 1 cup chocolate chips*

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Combine flour, baking soda and salt in a small bowl. Beat butter, sugar and vanilla extract in large mixer bowl until creamy. Add egg, beating well. Gradually beat in flour mixture. Stir in cereal and chocolate chips. Drop by rounded tablespoonful’s onto ungreased parchment paper-lined baking sheets. Bake for 9 to 11 minutes or until golden brown. Cool on baking sheets for 2 minutes; remove to wire rack to cool completely. Store in a tightlycovered container for up to one week. Makes about 48, 2 ½ inch cookies.

Two cups of Honey Bunches of Oats with Almonds cereal delivers crunchy texture and adds fiber to this recipe for drop chocolate chip cookies.

Photo credit: Post Foods

Rainforest Chewy Bars provides a satisfying snack in just 10 minutes.

What are chia seeds? Believing it to be an energy booster, the ancient Mayans and Aztecs grew the desert plant Salvia hispanica (known as “chia”) for its edible seeds, which could be ground into a meal to produce things like breads, biscuits and cakes. When soaked in water, chia seeds swell, creat-

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ing a gel to make porridge, puddings and, when fruit juices are added, a cooling beverage. A concentrated “superfood,” chia seeds contain healthy omega-3 fatty acids, carbohydrates, protein, fiber, antioxidants and calcium. And, yes, sprouted on terracotta figurines, chia seeds are the stuff from which commercially sold “ch-chch-chia pets” are made.


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B-2 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Grannie Annie is the author of Grannie Annie Cookbook series, featuring Alaskan recipes and stories

About growing up on the farm 1937 to 1955 Northern Colorado

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f you turned off Highway 14 going east out of Fort Collins, at Cactus Hill Observatory Grade School District 101 and went two miles north on a dusty dirt-gravel road, you were at John and Loretta McClure’s Shamrock Shorthorn Ranch. After the remodel of the house, the planting of grass in the front yard to replace the dirt we used to play in, Dad put a swing in the Boxelder tree for us to swing on. I loved pushing my sisters on that swing — and my little brother Jim. If I pushed Elaine long enough in the swing she would go to sleep. Dad also purchased a hammock (which none of us kids mastered). Dad would carefully crawl in the hammock and rest after dinner (lunch) under the cotton wood tree that provided lots of shade from the hot Colorado summer sun. After his rest he would pull his irrigation boots back on, get in his old International pickup and go back out to the corn, sugar beets and hay fields. He “walked” the rows to see if all his little ditches were full of precious irrigation water that soaked into the thirsty ground. The crops would grow and produce his fall crops of hay bales, corn silage and the sugar beets that put him in the Top Ten Sugar Beet production for northern Colorado. We knew how tired he was as he got up at 3:30 every morning to go out and “check the water” just in case some of the water was running some where else and wasting some of the water that his crops so relied on. Mom always had a nice dinner (what we call lunch now) on the table right at noon, mashed potatoes, fried beef, gravy, vegetables and always a dessert of some kind. He would go rest in his hammock and I would help Mom wash the dishes in the new sink that had running hot and cold water. It was carefully guarded and we did not waste “a drop.” Water was something that we were always conscious of and if we wasted “a drop” we were duly scolded. In the early days before the

Grannie Annie

remolding of the house, we had an iceman that came around and Mom would purchase ice from him for the “ice box.” Us kids would line up so we could get some of the slivers of ice he had after chipping off a square of ice for Mom. We loved the ice man! Sure is funny how the iceman and the water wagon disappeared into the forever memories of a few of us. The milk man was another person that disappeared after big milk trucks came along and sucked up the milk into the big tanks. The milk can became a flower pot decoration in the yard. The ice box got hauled off to the dump and the big old black cook stove was gone and replaced by Mom’s big white electric stove that said “ELECTRIC” on it. I still do not know what happened to that big old cook stove! How I would love to have it now, decorating some corner of my house, of course! Although I do cook on our wood heating stove, it does not hold a candle to the wonderful loaves of bread, cakes, cookies and beef roasts that came out of that old stove. Or the Sunday fried chicken and mashed potatoes and milk gravy it produced on top of the stove. Or the heat that it provided us kids as we got dressed in front of it in the winter. Mom’s flowers were gifted with the irrigation water also — she honestly looked forward to the days Dad would “let” the water down the ditch beside our yard so she could either go bare foot or in her little Woolworth canvas to take care of her flowers. They also planted a garden but I do not remember too much about it — other than Mom

said it was too much work for the amount of vegetables and tomatoes she got. So it was a short two or three year adventure. They planted apple and cherry trees in the garden area “out beyond the clothes line.” Mom picked cosmos and snap dragons and what ever flower she could spare for the kitchen table or the dining room table. She always took time to arrange them in beautiful bouquets and stand back and admire her handy work. I never got the hang of flower arrangements, much to the disgust of Bernie, Susan and a few of my other friends. I trim the stems, put them in water, tell them they are pretty and it’s all done in a matter of seconds. My Mom and Bernie and Susan will take time to arrange them in a beautiful vase that transformed those flowers into a burst colors. This summer I am looking forward to all the beautiful flowers that Susan planted for me last summer in my country garden beside the sewing room. I will pick some and I will take the time to arrange them in a beautiful vase that Ginger or Susan gave me. Because I have waiting so long for the spring and summer! A small house will hold as much happiness and a big house. Yes, to become simple and live simply, not only within yourself but also in your everyday dealings. Don’t make ripples around you, don’t try so hard to be interesting and do everything. Keep your distance, be honest, fight the desire to be thought so fascinating by your friends and the outside world. — Ella Hillsum “If you had everything —where would you put it??” — Ann Landers Please pray for the less fortunate, the ill and the sad. Most of all never forget that we have more than most, especially those who are fighting diseases. They need all the prayers we can offer. Thank you for yours! And never forget to Thank God for this day and all that he has done.

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he series is written by a 44 year resident of Alaska, Ann Berg of Nikiski. Ann shares her collections of recipes from family and friends. She has gathered recipes for more that 50 years. Some are her own creation. Her love of recipes and food came from her Mother, a self taught wonderful cook. She hopes you enjoy the recipes and that the stories will bring a smile to your day. Grannie Annie can be reached at anninalaska@gci.net

CHICKEN POT PIE I have several chicken pot pie recipes, this is the easiest. 1 can cream of chicken soup Stir until just moist. Place chicken vegeta1/2 can chicken broth or milk ble mixture in a 9 inch glass pie pan (Yes foil 1 cup cooked diced chicken pans will work) and spoon the Bisquick over 1 small pkg of mixed vegetables top. Sprinkle with small amount of salt and Pre heat oven to 400°. Mix soup, broth, pepper. Bake about 30 to 40 minutes. I usually chicken and vegetables in a bowl take another can of cream chicken soup and In a smaller bowl, mix: make a gravy of 1 can and add 1/2 can milk. 1 cup Bisquick ( I use the reduced fat one) Heat in sauce pan on top of stove just be1/2 cup milk fore you serve. 1 egg

ALASKAN RHUBARB PINEAPPLE CRUNCH In a 9 X 13 glass dish, melt two tablespoons of butter. Add cut rhubarb-enough to fill dish half full Sprinkle with the following: 1 cup brown sugar - sweetness depends on how sweet or tart you like you rhubarb 1/2 cup broken walnut pieces 1 small box of raspberry Jell-o ( I, most times, leave this out-optional) Add 1 can 16oz well drained crushed pine-

apple on top. Dot with butter. Sprinkle with 1/2 box dry white cake mix. Bake at 350° for 45 minutes to one hour. Let set one hour and serve with vanilla ice cream or whipped cream. Better yet, double this and make two 9 x 13 foil pans and freeze one. That way you will not have a1/2 box of white cake mix left. And you will have an all ready dessert made for the summer company.

PICKLED CARROTS From the Cappers Farmer Newspaper 1958 4 pounds of carrots 1 tsp salt 2 qts water 1 1/2 c vinegar (apple cider) 1 1/2 cups water 1 1/2 cup sugar 1 tsp whole cloves 1 medium lemon, thinly sliced 1/2 onion sliced thinly Wash and scrape (peel) large carrots or use the new tiny carrots. Place in large kettle

with 2 qts of water. Cover and cook until just tender - do not over cook. Drain and pack carrots, lemon and onion sliced tightly in hot sterilized jars. Combine remaining ingredients. Boil 5 minutes. Pour over carrots with in 1/8 inch of top of jars. Seal. Makes 4 pints. Make sure if they seal. OR the newer way of doing this hot water bath for 10 minutes.

WILD RICE CHICKEN BAKE From the recipe box of Susan Jordan, located in the cookbook Grannie Annie’s Cookin’ at the Homestead 1 6oz pkg Uncle Ben’s quick cooking long grain and wild rice, with seasonings 1 1/2 cup water 1 10 oz can of reduced sodium cream of mushroom soup 1 8 oz can of sliced water chestnuts, drained 3/4 cup frozen peas 1 carrot shredded 3 whole boneless, skinless chicken breasts, halved lengthwise.

1/8 tsp paprika 1/8 tsp black pepper Place uncooked rice and half the seasoning pkg in a 3 quart 11 x 9 baking dish. Stir in water, soup, water chestnuts, peas, carrots. Arrange chicken of top of rice. Sprinkle with paprika and pepper. cover with foil and bake 350° for 50 to 60 minutes. - until rice is done and chicken is tender. Serve with a big green salad.

Cookbooks make great gifts! The “Grannie Annie” Cook Book Series includes: “Grannie Annie’s Cookin’ on the Woodstove”; “Grannie Annie’s Cookin’ at the Homestead”; “Grannie Annie’s Cookin’ Fish from Cold Alaskan Waters”; and “Grannie Annie’s Eat Dessert First.” They are available at M & M Market in Nikiski.

Syrup-makers go high-tech with wireless monitoring By HOLLY RAMER and LISA RATHKE Associated Press

MILTON, Vt. — Maple syrup production has come a long way from metal buckets hung on trees, but even high-tech operations have had to rely on old-fashioned foot patrols to fix a common problem — leaks. The tubes that draw sap from trees straight to sugar houses often get pulled down or bent by falling limbs or chewed by critters, meaning sugar-makers spend hours and sometimes days stomping through snowy woods to find and fix problems — a big time-waster in a sugaring season that lasts just a few weeks. But now sugar-makers are harnessing new technology to keep the precious sap flowing. Meadowbrook Maple Syrup in January installed a monitoring system that is already paying off. Designed to help midto-large scale syrup producers keep an electronic eye their sap vacuum lines, the Tap Track system consists of solar batterypowered radio units strapped to trees, with each unit monitoring the pressure on a half-dozen lines. The data is transmitted to a computer or smartphone, where it shows up as a map with green dots indicating lines with good sap flow and red dots indicating leaks. Users can even get text messages alerting them to problems. “I think it’s the thing of the future. I really do,” owner Don-

nie Richards said. In the past, Richards and his crew would have to walk the woods of Milton listening and looking for leaks, which was time-consuming. “And if you didn’t find the leak that day, you didn’t get sap off that part of the woods all day long,” he said. Now he uses his iPhone to check the system and can immediately see a leak and when it is repaired. Richards’ operation includes about 5,000 taps, with about 18 miles of tubing spread out over more than 100 acres. The new system costs $1 to $2 per tap, but inventor Jason Gagne said the return on investment can be seen in one season. He said the test site of 20,000 taps in Ontario resulted in a more than 5 percent increase in sap collection, or an extra $15,000. Gagne, who used to spend days on end patrolling his own sugar bush in Swanton, came up with the idea several years ago, teaming up with Canadian sugar-maker Doug Thompson to develop the product. The University of Vermont’s Proctor Maple Research Center is using a similar remote monitoring system for the first time this season, as the technology becomes more commercially available. Smartrek, produced by a Quebec-based company, also monitors sap lines for leaks and provides the information immediately on a smartphone or tablet. Nationally, maple syrup pro-

AP Photo/Holly Ramer

In this photo taken March 21, maple syrup producer Donnie Richards poses with sap lines on a maple tree and his wireless radio unit box containing sensors that monitor pressure on sap lines in Milton, Vt. Richards has about 5,000 taps, with about 18 miles of tubing spread out over more than 100 acres and uses the wireless sensors to monitor the flow of sap that provides information immediately on a smart phone of tablet computer.

duction totaled 3.25 million gallons last year. Vermont led with 1.3 million gallons, followed by New York, Maine, Wisconsin, Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Connecticut. Each of those gallons of syrup required sugar-makers to collect 40 gallons of sap. C

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It takes warm days and cold nights for sap to flow, so the conditions are just right for syrup-making for only about 4 to 6 weeks. And cold weather has already pushed back Vermont’s season this year. But Proctor researchers expect the new system to make their operation more efficient and productive.

It will also give sugar-makers, who are prone to staying up late to boil sap down to syrup, a few extra hours of sleep, said Brian Stowe, Proctor’s sugaring operations manager. “We find that a lot of sugarmakers get sleep deprived during the season, this again they can take a quick look from their

house and then they can go to bed and get some good sleep and not have to worry,” Stowe said. The ideal system would have a sensor at the end of each of the main lines. But that can be expensive for some sugar-makers — about $200 per Smartrek vacuum sensor and $400 for a tank level sensor — so some sugar-makers may start with a smaller number depending on what they want to monitor. “Whether it’s mine or Tap Track of any of the other systems, the technology is fantastic,” said Eric Sorkin, of Thunder Basin Maple Works in Cambridge, who was so impressed with Smartrek that he became a distributor. In the past, Sorkin said, the only way to increase production was to make sure sap is flowing in the system, and that meant lots of man-hours checking each line. “With these remote monitoring systems, we can effectively lower our labor costs and increase our production,” he said. Gagne described an incident last year when his system showed a leak where a porcupine had cut the line. Just as workers had repaired the break, Tap Track showed another leak. “You could follow the porcupine prints right to the next line where he’d cut it,” he said. “Otherwise, it would have been a few more days before we found those two lines.”

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BRISTOL BAY Crew needed for the 2014 season. Commercial fishing experience preferred. Pay is percentage based on experience. Contact Dan (907)398-6367

The Peninsula Clarion is accepting applications for a Newspaper Carrier. Delivery area Sterling.

•Must have own transportation. •Independent contractor status. •Home delivery - 6 days a week. •Must have valid Alaska drivers license. •Must furnish proof of insurance. •Copy of current driving record required upon hire

is accepting offers for 25,000 board feet of 110 year old Fir wood, in varying condition and value, reclaimed from the old Homer Cannery Warehouse. The entire amount will be sold, as is, to the highest offeror. The buyer is responsible for all costs to pick up the wood from its location in Kenai within 30 days of purchase. Offers will be accepted through April 9 at 5:00pm, contact Natalie Wolfe at 907-335-7206.

Property Management Division 170 N. Birch Suite 101, Soldotna (907)262-2522 Mary.Parske@century21.com www.Century21FreedomRealty.com

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THREE-Bedroom, 2-bath, 2 large walk-inclosets, 1352 inside living space, crawl space, 1.5 car garage, fenced back yard, front and back decks. Asphalt DW & neighborhood roads. Large space next to garage for boat or RV. Back yard fully sunned, perfect for greenhouse. Just shy of 1/2 acre. Excellent water. 2 blocks down from K-Beach. New in 2010 natural gas furnace, all new in 2010 appliances included (DW, oven, microwave, frig, washer & dryer). Master bath renovated w/walk-in tile shower; beautiful easy to maintain high-end vinyl flooring throughout. Custom vertical blinds in living room and kitchen, and window coverings. Also included is 55-inch Samsung Plasma TV and 3-speaker Bose surround system; 8 camera security system; outside shed w/Honda lawn mower & weed trimmer. $1500 paint and wallpaper credit provided. Broker courtesy 2.5%. TWO ways to buy - Straight purchase $207K or ASSUME low balance with $880 monthly payments for $70,000 up front cash. (No realtor or credit check is required for the assumption) MLS 14-560 and Zillow.com. Please call 398-8161; 24 hr notice requested for viewing. Owner financing not available.

Apartments, Unfurnished REDOUBT VIEW Soldotna’s best value! Quiet, freshly painted, close to schools. 1-Bedroom from $625. 2-Bedroom from $725. 3-Bedroom, 2-bath, from $825. No pets. (907)262-4359. SOLDOTNA 2-bedroom, No Smoking/ No pets. $875./ plus electric. (907)252-7242.

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is recruiting for a permanent, full-time massage therapist (32 hours per week). Requirements: completion of minimum 500 hour massage therapy training program, willing to work collaboratively within the guidelines established by clinic, professional appearance, communication and work ethic a must. Licensed individual preferred but we may consider a suitable unlicensed practitioner. Pay and benefits based on experience. Send resume to hpt@homerphysicaltherapy.com or fax to 907-235-3417. No walk-ins or phone calls please.

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MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST Opportunity for a part-time experienced medical receptionist with excellent customer service and organizational skills. Requires strong computer literacy and the ability to perform multiple tasks in a fast-paced environment. Must be a team player and have an understanding of HIPAA laws. Please fax resumes to (907) 262-0834 or email to kpo.rriley@acsalaska.net

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PRIME KENAI RETAIL/ OFFICE SPACE 1,832SqFt to 20,000SqFt. Rates start @ $.50SqFt. Call Carr Gottstein Properties, (907)564-2424 or visit www.carrgottstein.com

For more information contact Peninsula Clarion Circulation Dept. (907)283-3584

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Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, April 2, 2014 B-3

EFFICIENCY APT. $450./ month. Includes Electric Call for appointment, (907)260-2092. Mile 118 Clam Gulch, Ocean View.

3-Bedroom 2-bath 2-car garage. Beautiful cedar sided home in very quite paved neighborhood on a corner lot with 1.37 acres. All one floor with no steps! All doors are extra wide. Paved driveway and parking area. Excellently maintained. Ideal open floor plan with open kitchen. In floor heat throughout. Vaulted ceilings and a gas fireplace. Large master bedroom with walk in closet and sliding glass door leading to the back deck with lots of privacy (perfect for a hot tub). Each room has its own thermostat and this house is very energy efficient. Well maintained large front and back lawn with lilac trees and rose bushes. Top of the line water filtration system that has eliminated all iron! Garage is 601Sq.Ft. Asking $269,000. (907)283-5747

Employment Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

General Employment BARTENDER WANTED TAPS card, part-time could be full-time. Apply in person, call 776-5833.

DOWNTOWN Soldotna on the river. 2-bedroom, 1-bath, Seasonal/ Permanent, furnished/ unfurnished, NO pets/ NO smoking. Credit/ background checks. $795., (907)252-7110 EFFICIENCY 1-Person basement unit Downtown Kenai, quiet, adult building. No smoking/ pets, $550. including tax/ utilities. Security deposit/ lease. (907)283-3551.

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KENAI 1-Bedroom, furnished, heat, cable included. No pets. $675. month. (907)283-5203, (907)398-1642.

WINTER IN MESA ARIZONA. Why pay rent when you can own a 3-bedroom home in a 5 star gated retirement park. Priced to sell at $27,000. Includes major appliances, air conditioning & much more. For more information please call (505)321-3250

KENAI Large 1-bedroom furnished, $600., plus utilities. No animals/ smoking. (907)398-1303

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BEAUTIFUL 1-Bedroom home, large kitchen/ bath on 5 acres. Walk to beach, Happy Valley area. $750. month plus deposit. (907)399-2992 KENAI 3-Bedroom, 3-bath, appliances. washer/dryer. No pets/ smoking. $1,400. plus utilities. (907)398-1303 WHY RENT ????? Why rent when you can own, many low down & zero down payment programs available. Let me help you achieve the dream of home ownership. Call Now !!! Ken Scott, #AK203469. (907)395-4527 or cellular, (907)690-0220. Alaska USA Mortgage Company, #AK157293.

TOYO A/T TIRES. P245 70R16 065 1yr old, plus they are on rims, I have Ford hub caps (4). Came off ‘02 Explorer. ALL just $600. (907)260-5943

Trucks: Heavy Duty MAKE AN OFFER 2010 dually long bed, F-350, 4wheel drive, 6.4 diesel truck, 24k miles, Auto Tran. Hide away goose neck Tow & Trailer brake packages. Spray bed liner. Back up camera. Heated/power mirrors, warranty, Power chip Keyless entry, Power windows/seats Asking $36,400 OBO. KBB at $37k (907)953-4696

Pets & Livestock Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes NIKISKI 2-Bedroom $800. 2-Bedroom, 2-bath, with huge family room, dinning area. $975. per month. Pets allowed, includes utilities. Call (907)776-6563.

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Education/ Instruction RESIDENTIAL CONTRACTORS Test Prep Course. Wisdom & Associates, Inc. (907)283-0629.

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Cats FREE TO A GOOD HOME Older female cat, spayed, very loving, will go outside. Grandkids are allergic so she must find a new home. (907)398-4647

RED DIAMOND CENTER K-Beach Rd. 1,200- 2,400sq.ft. Retail or office, high traffic, across from DMV. Please call (907)953-2222 (907)598-8181

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Services Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Services Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

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KENAI KENNEL CLUB

Pawsitive training for all dogs & puppies. Agility, Conformation, Obedience, Privates & Rally. www.kenaikennelclub.com (907)335-2552

TEACH ALL DOGS Everything with brains, not pain. Obedience, Puppy, Nose work, Rally, Agility, Privates. K-Beach Road (907)262-6846 www.pendog.org

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B-4 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, April 2, 2014

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Automotive Insurance Walters & Associates Located in the Willow Street Mall

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

Bathroom Remodeling AK Sourdough Enterprises Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

Business Cards Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai

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Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing 35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

Computer Repair Located in the Willow Street Mall

Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing 35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

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Please make the phone ring! Call anytime! (907)741-1644, thanks!

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Peninsula Memorial Chapels & Crematory Kenai........................................283-3333 Soldotna ..................................260-3333 Homer...................................... 235-6861 Seward.....................................224-5201

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605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

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Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD

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Walters & Associates

Oral Surgery, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

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Located in the Willow Street Mall

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

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Public Notices

INVITATION TO BID CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS ASHLE AVENUE AND ELLY CIRCLE #C3ASH GLACIER BLUE STREET, RIVERWIND DRIVE, VIENNA COURT, LEGENDS CIRCLE AND CRAMPON COURT #C3GLA The Kenai Peninsula Borough Road Service Area hereby invites qualified firms to submit a firm price for acceptance by the Borough for Road Capital Improvement Projects: â&#x20AC;¢ Ashley Avenue and Elly Circle #C3ASH (Soldotna) â&#x20AC;¢ Glacier Blue Street, Riverwind Drive, Vienna Court, Legends Circle and Crampon Court (Soldotna) Projects consist of furnishing all labor, materials, and equipment to upgrade these roads. Projects include subgrade modification, drainage, clearing, ditching and roadbed widening. Pre-bid conferences will be held at the Kenai Peninsula Borough Road Service Area office, 47140 East Poppy Lane, Soldotna, Alaska for Road Capital Improvement Projects:

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF ALASKA THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT AT KENAI In the Matter of a Change of Name for:

) ) ) ) )

DONNALEE ENGELKE Current Name of Adult Case No: 3KN-14-00212CI

Notice of Petition to Change Name A petition has been filed in the Superior Court (Case # 3KN-14-00212CI) requesting a name change from (current name) DONNALEE ENGELKE to DONNALEE MOYASON ENGELKE. A hearing on this request will be held on May 08, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at Courtroom 6, Kenai Courthouse, 125 Trading Bay Drive, Suite 100 Kenai, AK.

MARCH 14, 2014 Effective Date:

CARL J BAUMAN Superior Court Judge

PUBLISH: 3/26, 4/2, 9, 16, 2014

1647/73750

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Ashley Avenue and Elly Circle, April 9, 2014 @10:00 AM â&#x20AC;¢ Glacier Blue Street, Riverwind Drive, Vienna Court, Legends Circle and Crampon Court, April 9, 2014 @ 10:30 AM Attendance at pre-bid conferences is recommended but not mandatory. Contracts are subject to the provision of State of Alaska, Title 36, Minimum Wage Rates. Contracts will require certificates of insurance and may require performance and payment bonds. Bid documents may be obtained beginning March 27, 2014 at the Kenai Peninsula Borough Road Service Area office, 47140 East Poppy Lane, Soldotna, Alaska 99669 (907) 262-4427, for a non-refundable fee of $20.00 per set, $10.00 additional for mailing. Bid documents may also be downloaded from the web at: http://purchasing.borough.kenai.ak.us/ Opportunities.aspx One (1) complete set of the bid package is to be submitted to the Kenai Peninsula Borough, Purchasing and Contracting Department, 144 N. Binkley Street, Soldotna, Alaska 99669. These forms must be enclosed in a sealed envelope with the bidder's name on the outside and clearly marked: BID: GLACIER BLUE STREET, RIVERWIND DRIVE, VIENNA COURT, LEGENDS CIRCLE AND CRAMPON COURT #C3GLA DUE DATE: April 16, 2014, no later than 2:00 PM BID: ASHLEY AVENUE AND ELLY CIRCLE #C3ASH DUE DATE: April 16, 2014, no later than 4:00 PM PUBLISHED: 3/27, 4/2, 7, 2014

1648/224

Public Notices IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF ALASKA THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT AT KENAI In the Matter of the Dissolution of the marriage of: MARK D WAGNER

and NELLIE CHARLENE HICKEY WAGNER Case No: 3KN-14-00211CI NOTICE TO ABSENT SPOUSE TO: NELLIE CHARLENE HICKEY WAGNER

) ) ) ) ) )

You are hereby notified that a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage was filed in this court by MARK D WAGNER on 03/11/2014. The petition states that an incompatibility of temperament has caused the irremediable breakdown of your marriage and that your whereabouts are unknown. You must make your whereabouts know to the court at this address:

Kenai Trial Court 125 Trading Bay Drive Suite 100 Kenai, AK 99611 Failure to do so within 30 days after the last date of publication/ posting of this notice may result in the court granting a decree of dissolution of marriage as requested in the petition. 3/18/14 By: Shelly Bird Date Deputy Clerk PUBLISH: 4/2, 9, 16, 23, 2014

1653/73750

Notice to Creditors Public Notices IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF ALASKA THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT AT KENAI In the Matter of the Estate

PENINSULA THAI MASSAGE

Thompsonsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Building/ Soldotna, Sterling Highway Next to Liberty Tax (907)252-8053, (907)398-2073

Home Health Care PERSONAL CARE ASSISTANT

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of SUSIE MARIE LEWIS, Deceased. Case No. 3KN-14-27

CITY OF SOLDOTNA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING April 9, 2014

) ) ) ) ) ) ) )

PR/E

NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned Personal Representative of the estate, at the Law Office of DALE DOLIFKA, P.O. Box 498, Soldotna, Alaska, 99669. DATED this 28th day of March, 2014. PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE STEVEN A. LEWIS PUBLISH: 4/2, 9, 16, 2014

1654/6090

The Soldotna City Council will conduct a public hearing on April 9, 2014, on the following ordinances: Ordinance 2014-009 - An Ordinance Increasing Estimated Revenues and Appropriations by $4,693.06 in the General Fund for Federally Forfeited Property (City Manager) Ordinance 2014-010 - An Ordinance Increasing Estimated Revenues and Appropriations by $690,000 in the General Fund, $60,000 in the Utility Fund and $750,000 In The Street Construction Fund for North Aspen Drive Road Improvements (City Manager) City council meetings commence at 6:00 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chamber, 177 N. Birch St., Soldotna, Alaska. All interested persons are invited to attend and participate in the public discussion. Written comments may be sent to the City Council, c/o City Clerk, 177 North Birch Street, Soldotna, AK 99669. Copies of ordinances scheduled for public hearing are available at City Hall and on the internet at www.ci.soldotna.ak.us. For further information, call the City Clerk's Office at 907-262-9107. Please be advised that, subject to legal limitations, ordinances may be amended by the council prior to adoption without further public notice. Shellie Saner, CMC City Clerk ]

Any Business

PUBLISHED: 4/2, 2014

Any Service

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Notices

Notice to Consumers The State of Alaska requires construction companies to be licensed, bonded and insured before submitting bids, performing work, or advertising as a construction contractor in accordance with AS 08..18.011, 08.18.071, 08.18.101, and 08.15.051. All advertisements as a construction contractor require the current registration number as issued by the Division of Occupational Licensing to appear in the advertisement. CONSUMERS MAY VERIFY REGISTRATION OF A CONTRACTOR . Contact the AK Department of Labor and Workforce Development at 907-269-4925 or The AK Division of Occupational Licensing in Juneau at 907-4653035 or at www.dced.state.ak.us/acc/home.htm

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www.peninsulaclarion.com • 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite #1, Kenai, Alaska 99611 • 283-7551 • FAX 283-3299 • Monday - Friday 8 A.M. - 5 P.M.

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2014 WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON/EVENING

1:30

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Nightline G’ (3) ABC-13 7030

Always ny in (6) MNT-5 7035 adelphia Late w/Craig (8) CBS-11 7031 (N) ‘PG’ (9) FOX-4 7033

Late ht With (10) NBC-2 7032 Meyers (12) PBS-7 7036

Death ‘PG’

4 PM

4:30

Alaska Daily

5 PM

A = DISH

5:30

News & Views ABC World (N) News

The Dr. Oz Show Imported, Channel 2 counterfeit medicines; CPR. News 5:00 (N) ‘PG’ Report (N) WordGirl ‘Y7’ Wild Kratts ‘Y’ BBC World News America ‘PG’

CABLE STATIONS

(31) TNT

138 245

(34) ESPN 140 206 (35) ESPN2 144 209 From

(36) ROOT 426 651

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180 311

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(57) TRAV 196 277 (58) HIST 120 269

Storage s ‘14’ (59) A&E

118 265

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(65) CNBC 208 355 (67) FNC

205 360

de Amy (81) COM 107 249 umer ture Shop (82) SYFY 122 244

6:30

7 PM

7:30

8 PM

APRIL 2, 2014

8:30

9 PM

9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30

Wheel of For- The Middle Suburgatory Modern Fam- (:31) Mixology Nashville “Crazy” News tune (N) ‘G’ “The Smell” (N) ‘14’ ily (N) ‘PG’ (N) ‘PG’ about Maddie causes a media (N) ‘PG’ frenzy. (N) ‘PG’ The Insider Inside Edition Family Feud Family Feud Family Guy 30 Rock “Kho- Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent American Family Guy (N) (N) ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘14’ nani” ‘14’ A well-known atheist is mur- Goren has to interrogate his Dad “Home “The King Is dered. ‘14’ nemesis. ‘14’ Adrone” ‘14’ Dead” ‘14’ The Ellen DeGeneres Show KTVA 5 p.m. CBS Evening KTVA 6 p.m. Evening News Survivor “Head of the Snake” Criminal Minds “Blood Rela- CSI: Crime Scene Investiga(N) ‘G’ First Take News (N) (N) ‘PG’ tions” (N) ‘14’ tion “The Fallen” ‘14’ Bethenny ‘PG’ Entertainment Two and a The Big Bang The Big Bang American Idol “Finalists Perform” The top finalists perform. (N Fox 4 News at 9 (N) Tonight (N) Half Men ‘14’ Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ Same-day Tape) ‘PG’

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’

NBC Nightly Channel 2 Newshour (N) News (N) ‘G’ Alaska Weather ‘G’

PBS NewsHour (N)

Revolution “Austin City Limits” Law & Order: Special Vic- (:01) Chicago PD Lonnie Jason brings Miles informa- tims Unit “Downloaded Child” Rodiger is found dead. (N) ‘14’ tion. (N) ‘14’ (N) ‘14’ Nature “White Falcon, White NOVA “Wild Predator Invasion” Secrets of the Dead CarWolf” ‘PG’ Returning predators to the thaginians in South America. wild. (N) ‘PG’ (N) ‘PG’

ABC News at (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live ‘14’ (:37) Nightline 10 (N) (N) ‘G’ 30 Rock “Sub- How I Met The Office way Hero” ‘14’ Your Mother “Dinner Party” ‘PG’ ‘PG’ KTVA Night- (:35) Late Show With David cast Letterman (N) ‘PG’ The Arsenio Hall Show ‘14’ Two and a Half Men ‘14’

It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia Late Late Show/Craig TMZ (N) ‘PG’

Channel 2 (:34) The Tonight Show Star- (:36) Late News: Late ring Jimmy Fallon (N) ‘14’ Night With Edition (N) Seth Meyers Earth: The Inside Story The Charlie Rose (N) world’s geologic hot spots. ‘G’

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

Parks and Parks and Parks and Parks and (8) WGN-A 239 307 Recreation Recreation Recreation Recreation ox” FeaturIn the Kitchen With David “PM Edition - Lenox” Featuring (20) QVC 137 317 Lenox. (N) ‘G’ Cathy choWife Swap “Bittner/Reimers” Wife Swap Disparate women ers. ‘PG’ (23) LIFE 108 252 Florida, Virginia mothers trade swap homes and families. ‘PG’ lives. ‘PG’ sley NCIS Director’s contact is NCIS “In the Dark” A blind ( 28) USA 105 242 ws Best killed. ‘PG’ photographer. ‘PG’ an ‘14’ The King of The King of Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ (30) TBS 139 247 Queens ‘PG’ Queens ‘PG’

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Rules of En- Rules of En- Rules of En- Rules of En- Rules of En- Rules of En- 30 Rock ‘14’ It’s Always Futurama ‘PG’ ’Til Death ‘PG’ gagement gagement gagement gagement gagement gagement Sunny Digital Cameras ‘G’ Roberta’s Unique Gardens Susan Graver Style ‘G’ Your Life Connected “Elec‘G’ tronics” ‘G’ Bring It! Kayla feels pressure Preachers’ Daughters Tay- Preachers’ Daughters Bring It! “Sunjai in Stilettos” (:01) Bring It! Kayla feels (:02) Preachers’ Daughters as team captain. ‘PG’ lor’s love life gets messy. ‘14’ Megan’s brother returns home The Dancing Dolls travel to pressure as team captain. ‘PG’ Taylor’s love life gets messy. from rehab. (N) ‘14’ Memphis. ‘PG’ ‘14’ NCIS Gibbs and Fornell’s ex NCIS The team searches for NCIS NCIS facilities manager NCIS Investigating a helicop- NCIS: Los Angeles “Identity” NCIS: Los Angeles “The Only ter crash. ‘PG’ ‘14’ Easy Day” ‘14’ asks for help. ‘PG’ Harper Dearing. ‘14’ is found dead. ‘PG’ Seinfeld “The Family Guy The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang Deal With It Conan Actor Simon Helberg; The Pete Conan ‘14’ Abstinence” “Love Blactu- Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘14’ Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ (N) ‘14’ musical guest Eli Young Band. Holmes Show ‘PG’ ally” ‘14’ (N) ‘14’ ‘MA’ Castle An prominent scientist Castle A body is found in the Castle “Nikki Heat” ‘PG’ Castle “Poof, You’re Dead” (:01) Castle Castle and Beck- (:02) Castle A murdered lot- (:03) Save Our Business (:03) Inside Job “Mazda” is found dead. ‘PG’ East River. ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ett grow closer. ‘14’ tery winner. ‘PG’ “Wine and Roses” ‘PG’ (N) ‘PG’ (3:00) NBA Basketball Brooklyn Nets at New High School Basketball McDonald’s All-American Game: SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) NBA Basketball Brooklyn York Knicks. (N) (Live) East vs. West. From Chicago. (N) (Live) Nets at New York Knicks. MLB Baseball Philadelphia Phillies at Texas Rangers. From Globe Life Park in Arlington, Soccer United States vs. Mexico. From Glendale, Ariz. (N) (Live) Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) SportsCenter SportsCenter (N) Texas. (N Subject to Blackout) (Live) (N) MLB Baseball: Mariners at Mariners All Mariners MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. From Angel Stadium of Mariners MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. From Angels Access Pregame Anaheim in Anaheim, Calif. (N Subject to Blackout) (Live) Postgame Angel Stadium of Anaheim in Anaheim, Calif. “Kick-Ass” (2010, Action) Aaron Johnson, Christopher Mintz-Plasse. An “The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift” (2006, Action) Lucas Black. An “Ninja Assassin” (2009, Action) Rain, Naomie Harris, Ben Miles. A rogue “Dawn of the ordinary teen decides to become a superhero. American street racer takes on a Japanese champion. assassin saves the life of a Europol agent. Dead” “Pulp Fiction” (1994, Crime Drama) John Travolta, Samuel L. Jackson, Uma Thurman. Crimi- “Face/Off” (1997, Action) John Travolta, Nicolas Cage, Joan Allen. An FBI agent and a vio- (:01) “Hitman” (2007, Action) Timothy Olyphant. An assassin nals cross paths in three interlocked tales of mayhem. lent terrorist switch identities. becomes embroiled in a political conspiracy. King of the King of the The Cleve- The Cleve- American Family Guy American Family Guy Robot The Boon- Squidbillies American Family Guy American Family Guy Robot Hill ‘PG’ Hill ‘PG’ land Show land Show Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ Chicken docks ‘MA’ ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ Chicken River Monsters: Unhooked River Monsters: Unhooked River Monsters: Unhooked River Monsters: Unhooked River Monsters “American Killers” Searching for a modern- River Monsters: Unhooked River Monsters “American ‘14’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ day “Jaws.” ‘PG’ ‘PG’ Killers” ‘PG’ Win, Lose or I Didn’t Do It I Didn’t Do I Didn’t Do Austin & Dog With a “Cinderella” (1950) Voices of Ilene Woods. Animated. Fairy Good Luck Jessie ‘G’ Austin & Dog With a Good Luck Good Luck Draw ‘G’ “Pilot” ‘G’ It ‘G’ It ‘G’ Ally ‘G’ Blog ‘G’ godmother leads maid to Prince Charming. Charlie ‘G’ Ally ‘G’ Blog ‘G’ Charlie ‘G’ Charlie ‘G’ SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob Sam & Cat ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Friends ‘PG’ (:36) Friends (:12) Friends ‘PG’ ‘14’ Baby Daddy Baby Daddy Baby Daddy Baby Daddy Baby Daddy Baby Daddy Melissa & Baby Daddy “Along Came Polly” (2004) Ben Stiller. A jilted newlywed The 700 Club ‘G’ Baby Daddy Baby Daddy ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘PG’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Joey (N) ‘14’ (N) ‘14’ finds solace with another woman. ‘14’ ‘14’ The Little My 600-Lb. Life (N) ‘PG’ Hoarding: Buried Alive “It’s a Dr. G: Inside the Caylee Hoarding: Buried Alive “It’s a Dr. G: Inside the Caylee Long Island Long Island Long Island Long Island The Little Medium Medium Medium Couple ‘G’ Couple ‘PG’ Rat’s Nest” ‘PG’ Anthony Case ‘14’ Rat’s Nest” ‘PG’ Anthony Case ‘14’ Medium Dual Survival ‘G’ Naked and Afraid ‘G’ Naked and Afraid ‘G’ Survivorman ‘PG’ Survivorman (N) ‘PG’ Ice Cold Gold “Rubies Re- Survivorman ‘PG’ Ice Cold Gold “Rubies Revealed” ‘PG’ vealed” ‘PG’ Man v. Food Man v. Food Bizarre Foods With Andrew Man v. Food Man v. Food Bizarre Foods With Andrew Toy Hunter Toy Hunter ‘G’ Toy Hunter ‘G’ Toy Hunter Food Paradise “Mexican Food Toy Hunter ‘G’ Toy Hunter ‘G’ ‘G’ ‘PG’ Zimmern ‘PG’ “Austin” ‘G’ “Butte” ‘PG’ Zimmern ‘PG’ (N) ‘G’ ‘PG’ Paradise” ‘G’ American Pickers “Where’s American Pickers “The Pos- American Pickers “Lead of a American Pickers “Mountain American Pickers A Colorado Down East Dickering “Dicker- (:02) Vikings Lagertha and (:01) American Pickers Aldo?” ‘PG’ sum Trot” ‘PG’ Lifetime” ‘PG’ Mayhem” ‘PG’ mega-pick. (N) ‘PG’ ing 101” (N) ‘PG’ Ragnar unite again. ‘14’ “Mountain Mayhem” ‘PG’ The First 48 A homeless man The First 48 “Blood Alley; Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty (:01) Duck Dynasty Surprise (:01) Duck (:31) Duck is murdered. ‘PG’ Bad Deal” A drug deal turns ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ wedding for Phil and Kay. ‘PG’ Dynasty ‘PG’ Dynasty ‘PG’ deadly. ‘14’ Property Brothers First-time Property Brothers “Kate & Property Brothers A super Property Brothers “Megan & Property Brothers (N) ‘G’ House Hunt- Hunters Int’l Property Brothers “James & Property Brothers ‘G’ buyers need help. ‘G’ Cole” ‘G’ stylish modern home. ‘G’ Greg” ‘G’ ers (N) ‘G’ David” ‘G’ The Pioneer Southern at Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Restaurant: Impossible Save My Bakery “Schubert’s Restaurant: Impossible Restaurant: Impossible “Un- Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Restaurant: Impossible Woman ‘G’ Heart ‘G’ “Pizza: Impossible” ‘G’ Bakery” (N) ‘G’ “Barely Edible” ‘G’ gratifying” (N) ‘G’ “Barely Edible” ‘G’ American Greed “Young Lust American Greed A comptrol- Money Talks A salesman isn’t The Profit “Sweet Pete’s” American Greed A comptrol- Money Talks A salesman isn’t Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Goes Bust” ler steals millions. (N) pulling his weight. (N) ler steals millions. pulling his weight. The O’Reilly Factor (N) The Kelly File (N) Hannity (N) The O’Reilly Factor The Kelly File Hannity On the Record With Greta Red Eye (N) Van Susteren (3:58) Fu(:28) Fu(4:58) South (:29) Tosh.0 The Colbert Daily Show/ Workaholics South Park South Park South Park Workaholics Triptank (N) Daily Show/ The Colbert (:01) At Mid- (:31) Triptank turama ‘14’ turama ‘14’ Park ‘MA’ ‘14’ Report ‘PG’ Jon Stewart ‘14’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ (N) ‘14’ ‘MA’ Jon Stewart Report ‘PG’ night ‘14’ ‘MA’ “Ghost Storm” (2012) Crystal Allen, Carlos Bernard. A su- “Resident Evil” (2002) Milla Jovovich, Michelle Rodriguez. A “30 Days of Night” (2007, Horror) Josh Hartnett, Melissa George, Danny “30 Days of Night: Dark Days” (2010, Horpernatural electrical storm threatens an island. deadly virus turns the living into zombies. Huston. Hungry vampires descend on an Alaskan town. ror) Kiele Sanchez, Diora Baird.

PREMIUM STATIONS

Parks and Parks and Recreation Recreation Turquoise Jewelry ‘G’

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

“Identity Thief” (2013, Comedy) Jason Bateman, Melissa Doll & Em (:25) Doll & Real Time With Bill Maher John Leguizamo’s Ghetto McCarthy, Jon Favreau. A victim of identity theft fights back. (N) ‘14’ Em (N) ‘14’ ‘MA’ Klown ‘MA’ ‘R’ Prison Termi- (:45) The University of Sing 24/7 PacMichelle “Taken 2” (2012, Action) Liam Neeson. A “U-571” (2000) Matthew McConaughey. GIs nal-Pvt. Jack Sing (Subtitled-English) quiao/Brad- vengeful father abducts Bryan Mills and his try to steal an encryption device from a GerCollins Hall ley 2 wife. ‘PG-13’ man sub. ‘PG-13’ (3:50) “Jack the Giant Slayer” (2013, Fantasy) Nicholas (5:50) “Hell Baby” (2013, Comedy) Rob Ed Confi“The Purge” (2013, Suspense) Ethan “The Place Beyond the Pines” (2012, Crime Drama) Ryan Gosling, Bradley (:25) The ial 4 Girl’s Guide + MAX 311 514 Hoult. A young farmhand must defend his land from fearsome Corddry. A woman gives birth to a demonic Hawke. All crime becomes legal during an an- Cooper, Eva Mendes. A biker robs banks to support his infant son. ‘R’ giants. ‘PG-13’ infant that wreaks havoc. ‘R’ nual 12-hour period. ‘R’ to Depravity xy Baby” “Java Heat” (2013, Action) Kellan Lutz, Mickey Rourke, Ario (5:55) “The Cold Light of Day” (2012, Ac- House of Lies 60 Minutes Sports (N) ‘14’ Shameless “Emily” Fiona 60 Minutes Sports ‘14’ “The Best Man” (1999, 2) ‘NR’ 5 SHOW 319 540 Bayu. An American looks for a terrorist in Indonesia. ‘R’ tion) Henry Cavill, Verónica Echegui, Bruce “Together” goes to a correctional facilComedy-Drama) Taye Diggs, Willis. ‘PG-13’ ‘MA’ ity. ‘MA’ Nia Long. ‘R’ (3:45) “For Ellen” (2012, Drama) Paul Dano. (:20) “My Week With Marilyn” (2011, (1998, “Winter Solstice” (2004) Anthony LaPaglia. “Between Us” (2012) Julia Stiles, Taye “The Master” (2012, Drama) Joaquin Phoenix, Philip SeySexual 8 TMC 329 545 A musician struggles to gain shared custody Drama) Michelle Williams, Eddie Redmayne, A New Jersey widower has difficulty reaching Diggs. Two couples discover drastic changes mour Hoffman, Amy Adams. A drifter becomes a charismatic of his daughter. ‘NR’ Kenneth Branagh. ‘R’ out to others. ‘R’ since they last met. ‘R’ religious leader’s disciple. ‘R’

ew vs.

“The Dark Knight Rises” (2012, Action) Christian Bale, Anne Hathaway, HBO 303 504 Tom Hardy. Batman faces a masked villain named Bane. ‘PG-13’ !

Face Off With Max Kellerman (:10) “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey” (2012, Fantasy) Ian McKellen, Martin Free HBO2 304 505 man, Richard Armitage. Bilbo Baggins joins the quest to reclaim a lost kingdom. ‘PG-13’ ^

March 30 - April 5, 2014

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• In the event of typographical errors, please call by 10 A.M. the very first day the ad appears. The Clarion will be responsible for only one incorrect insertion. • Prepayment or credit card required. • Ads can be charged only after an approved credit application has been filed. • Ads may also be charged to a current VISA or MasterCard • Billing invoices payable on receipt. • No refunds under $5.00 will be given. • Minimum ad is 10 words. • One line bold type allowed. Additional bold text at $1.00 each word. • Blind Box available at cost of ad plus $15.00 fee. • The publisher reserves the right to reject any advertisement deemed objectionable either in subject or phraseology or which is considered detrimental to the newspaper.

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B-6 Peninsula Clarion, Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Woman in relationship can’t resist flirting with other men DEAR ABBY: I have been with my current boyfriend for a year and a half and I love him dearly. However, I often find myself drawn to other guys who I know are nothing but trouble. It never goes further than simple flirting, but I still feel guilty for doing it when I’m in a relationship. How do I keep myself from temptation? — HARD TO RESIST DEAR HARD TO RESIST: Temptation to do what? To involve yourself with a man who is nothing but trouble? A way to discourage that would be to ask yourself how you would feel if you lost your boyfriend. That would be a high price to pay for acting immaturely. However, if you’re asking how to overcome the IMPULSE, my advice is to have an honest conversation with yourself about why you feel the need. Most of the women (and men) who act this way are constantly trying to prove to themselves that they are attractive. If this could be you, then start working on your self-esteem, because if you don’t, I predict you’ll ruin a good relationship.

aware of the medical warnings. Who isn’t? But I have decided to accept myself as I am, relax and be happy. For years I have been hard on myself for not being slim. This is me in my 50s. I don’t expect myself to be slim like I was in my 20s. Now I can smile, breathe easier, have a good time, and finally buy the new clothes I have put off buying until I was thinner. My Abigail Van Buren new spirit is weightless and my new attitude has made my life more meaningful. Any thoughts? — LIVING FREE AT LAST DEAR LIVING FREE: Only this, that we all have choices to make about our health, what is important to us and how we want to live our lives. You have made yours, and at this point it appears to have been the right one for you. May it ever be thus.

DEAR ABBY: I’m in my 50s and overweight. I work hard, eat three meals a day and am — more or DEAR ABBY: My husband has a paralyzing fear less — healthy except for sore feet after work. I’m of driving over bridges. It interferes with our life to-

Rubes

HH Pull back a little, and try not to initiate any new projects or ideas right now. If you make the first move, the results are likely to be irritating at best. You might decide to toy with a situation from which you have nothing to lose. Tonight: Say “yes” to a good night’s sleep. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Push comes to shove very easily. Even if you have second thoughts about a loved one, it might not be the right time to have a discussion. You still will want to be present, but just observe rather than act. Tonight: Time to let off some steam. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Consider reaching out to someone at a distance, as you might not trust what you are hearing. Get as many perspectives as possible, and then imagine the situation from others’ standpoint. As a result, you will get a better sense of direction. Tonight: Where there is music. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Deal with one person at a time. You could be overwhelmed by everything that is happening, but try to stay organized and take notes. In the long run, this meticulous attitude will pay off. A partner seems to be everywhere but present. Tonight: Say “yes” to an offer. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH You might want to understand what is going with a partner or close loved one. You seem to lose your temper easily with this person. Detach, and you might discover what the best course of action will be. Maintain a sense of humor. Tonight: Reach out to a close friend.

By Leigh Rubin

Ziggy

By Eugene Sheffer

gether. He is otherwise healthy, but will not see a therapist for this problem. We have been married for 27 years. I am 63 and he is 67. I am very sad that our life is so limited. Any advice? — LANDLOCKED IN VIRGINIA DEAR LANDLOCKED: It would be interesting to know how your husband developed this phobia. But because he refuses to do anything about it and you feel restricted, consider traveling with another companion. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. For an excellent guide to becoming a better conversationalist and a more sociable person, order “How to Be Popular.” Send your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $7 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby, Popularity Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and handling are included in the price.)

Hints from Heloise

Jacqueline Bigar’s Stars A baby born today has a Sun in Aries and a Moon in Taurus. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday, April 2, 2014: This year you have a lot going for you. Others easily succumb to your charm. Never underestimate your potential, as you will be in a period where you could make a dream a reality. Friends inspire you and support you with some very wild ideas. If you are single, your Romeo or Juliet could appear at the most unexpected moment. The relationship will flourish naturally. If you are attached, the two of you enjoy living together even more than you have in the past. You even might decide to meet one of your mutually desired goals this year. TAURUS knows you much better than you think. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You have reason to want to change directions, and you will act in, what others will believe to be, an unanticipated way. Little do they know how well thought out many of your ideas are. A partner could toss more seriousness into a situation. Tonight: Buy a new item on the way home. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH You’ll feel as if you are empowered and can turn a situation around. The problem is that one person, who has been more than difficult for a while, could try to stand in your way. Open up to some more innovative ideas, and you might find a solution. Tonight: All smiles. GEMINI (May 21-June 20)

Crossword

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Pace yourself, and understand what is happening. If you follow your sixth sense, you will be successful. Your creativity also is likely to flourish. Good news could come from a distance. Realize what you are asking for from an associate. Tonight: Use your imagination. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH You will be more tuned in to the moment than you originally might have thought possible. Allow your ingenuity to guide you. You like to be logical, so you could feel insecure working on only an emotional level. Tonight: Have a good time wherever you are. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Listen to news and decide what you plan to do with it. You can point your energy and interest in nearly any direction. Use your intuition to guide conversations. You initially might be uncomfortable starting a conversation. Tonight: Only what you enjoy. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH You might be firmly set on responding in a certain way to a specific situation. You could be more protective than you realize about a domestic matter or a family member. Ask yourself whether it would hurt to hear a different perspective. Tonight: Order in from a favorite spot. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH You could have mixed feelings about a child or loved one, or perhaps just about what you want from life in general. You might be overwhelmed by what you need to do. An unexpected cost could concern you. Trust in your abilities to handle this issue. Tonight: All fun and games.

Don’t delay the chicken Dear Heloise: I am a regular reader of your column in the (Rochester, Minn.) Post-Bulletin. I remember a hint about microwaving bone-in chicken pieces a short time before grilling to ensure doneness. Could this have come from your column? Would you please research and respond? — Sue O. in Minnesota Well, Sue, you may have read it in my column. So, here is the information you requested from the experts this expert relies on. You can microwave chicken first (according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture), but ONLY if you IMMEDIATELY plan to move it to a hot grill to finish cooking. Don’t partially cook meat or chicken when planning to refrigerate and cook later. All of the bacteria may not be killed, and you certainly don’t want to make your family sick! — Heloise Send a great hint to: Heloise P.O. Box 795000 San Antonio, TX 78279-5000 Fax: 210-HELOISE Email: Heloise(at)Heloise.com Stay fresh Dear Heloise: I love cookie jars and have a small collection. I like to actually use them (certain ones for certain holidays, etc.). However, I have found that many jars do not have a sealed lid to keep the cookies truly fresh. I keep the cookies sealed in a plastic, zipper-lock bag inside the jar. You still are using the decorative jar, but are making sure that they stay extra fresh when someone goes to eat them. — Jane D. in Ohio

SUDOKU

By Tom Wilson

6 5 3 7 2 8 1 4 9

7 1 4 3 9 6 5 2 8

8 9 2 4 1 5 3 7 6

9 2 7 8 6 1 4 3 5

5 4 8 2 7 3 9 6 1

3 6 1 9 5 4 7 8 2

4 3 9 1 8 2 6 5 7

1 8 5 6 3 7 2 9 4

Difficulty Level

2 7 6 5 4 9 8 1 3

2014 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Friday.

4/01

Previous Puzzles Answer Key

B.C.

Tundra

By Johnny Hart

Garfield

Shoe

By Jim Davis

Take It from the Tinkersons By Bill Bettwy

By Chad Carpenter

By Chris Cassatt & Gary Brookins

Mother Goose and Grimm

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By Michael Peters

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Peninsula Clarion

04/02/14

Find out why the Waterworks rubber ducky crossed the street. Page 2

Katherine Olson stops by to wish Tom & Lynn a happy retirement. Page 2

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Fire Marshall Gary Hale retires from a 40 year career in May. Page 3

Cross section of work opportunities greet job seekers at Peninsula Job Fair.

With extended hours this year the Annual Peninsula Job Fair not only set an all-time record but exceeded last year’s attendance by nearly 35%, according to Rachel O’Brien, employment security supervisor for the State of Alaska Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development. “Breaking that down of the 956 total attendance, 817 were adult job seekers and 139 were student visitors interested in summer work. We had 53 employers this year which was a few less than last year, but more people actually getting hired than ever before. Everyone left with great information and we actually had a table set up for individuals to complete their written applications and walk over to the Job Center and

print out their resumes so they could apply for positions before leaving the fair,” she reported. For those interested in career pathways Krystal Kompkoff program manager for the Alaska Job Corps was on hand to explain opportunities for admissions and career transition services. “We offer services to low income 16 to 24 year olds and can help them get their GED or high school diploma if they don’t already have it and then we train them and help them find a job and keep a job when they are done so that it becomes a career and not just a job,” Kompkoff explained. For the second year the Job Center partnered with the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District to bring juniors and seniors from

KCHS, Skyview, Nikiski, SoHi and Kenai Alternative school to the fair. The booths with the longest waiting lines seemed to be the employers related to the oil and gas industry. Jennifer Woolsey, human resources assistant with Peak Oilfield Service, said they were hiring for the summer. “We have a lot of roust-a-bout positions coming open and are looking for vac-truck operators, mechanics, truck drivers and all kinds of positions that we’ll be hiring in the next couple of weeks. It’s going to be a busy summer and it never slowed down this winter so we like to have a lot of resumes in the files and this is a good opportunity for us. For those looking for work the best place to start is

at the Job Center and let them know they type of job you’re looking for; they’ll send us a referral. We do hire without experience and do on the job training,” said Woolsey, who was raised in Nikiski. Military recruiters were also on hand and reported steady interest from high school visitors interested in their 14month senior option which saves students the stress and expense of applying to colleges. Healthcare positions were also of interest to those finding out about Peninsula Health Care Services and expanded job opportunities for those interested in working with people. According to Jackie Garcia who helped organize the first Peninsula Job Fairs in the be-

ginning when industries such as Agrium were shutting down the purpose was to help people who found themselves out of work see what opportunities were available on the Peninsula that they might not have been aware of as well as, get young people aware of what career paths were here. “This year I was so excited because every employer that came to the fair had jobs and was looking to hire. Opportunities here are expanding and it’s an exciting time to be looking for a career in Alaska,” said Garcia. For help on preparing a skills based resume and for more employment and training opportunities stop by the Peninsula Job Center in the Old Carrs Mall in Kenai or call 907-335-3001. See JOBS, page A-4

Left, Oil & Gas industry jobs draw most interest at Annual Job Fair.

Visit Us Online!

www.peninsulaclarion.com

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Page 2 Clarion Dispatch, April 2, 2014

Why did the Waterworks rubber ducky cross the road?

Wellness Dutchess Cheryl Lindsley at the new Waterworks location at the “Y” in Soldotna.

Follow the Waterworks rubber duck across the street & experience Zero Gravity relaxation.

To soak it up on the other side at the new Waterworks location of course! For years the Peninsula’s largest rubber ducky has been located at the “Y” in Soldotna heralding “Alaska’s Hot Water Experts” location next to Chez Moi Boutique. Now the giant tub toy has crossed the street where there is much more display space for their wide variety of spas, saunas and massage chairs. According to Wellness Dutchess Cheryl Lindsley, “The Waterworks since 1976 has been spe-

eration owner Kali Bennett, “Ever since people got word that Tim had made himself a Redwood Hot Tub back in the 70’s, they started asking him to build one for them. So that’s when Tim & his lovely wife Linda decided this was a great idea for a business. It wasn’t until the 80’s that Tim & Linda found a portable hot tub that was worthy of Alaskans, so that’s when they introduced Hot Springs Spas to the market. In the time since that first

cializing in connecting Alaskans with Hot Tubs, Traditional & Infra-Red Saunas, & more recently luxury massage chairs by Infinity. I’ve heard people say ‘Oh! We have a massage chair at home.’ Then they try out the Infinity, experience zero gravity and will say, ‘But not like this, this is the difference between having a car and having a Cadillac,” she said in an interview from the new location, “we don’t just want people to purchase our products—we want them to discover all the

benefits of being part of the Hot Spring Spas family. Everything we do is based on creating an ownership experience that is unmatched in Alaska.” The Waterworks is Alaska’s authorized Hot Springs, Caldara, & Free Flow Hot Tub Dealership. The Waterworks has been serving Alaska from its locations in Anchorage, Eagle River, & Soldotna. The Waterworks is also an authorized dealer of Finnleo Saunas. It all started back in the ‘70’s according to second gen-

Redwood Tub until now, The Waterworks has become known as Alaska’s Hot Water Experts and our new motto of “Wellness For Life” fits well with all our new product lines. With our larger location in Soldotna we are now able to showcase a wider variety of hot tubs, saunas, & massage chairs to better serve the Kenai Peninsula while maintaining our special bond with Alaskans that goes all the way back to the 70’s,” stated Bennett in a news release.

Stop by The Waterworks new location and speak with the Wellness Dutchess herself anytime Tuesday – Friday 10:00am – 6:00pm and check out their booth at the upcoming Home Show and at Sport Rec & Trade Show, “And we’ll also have our famous tent sale going on the same weekend May 2nd through May 10th with extra special re-grand opening deals going on to help you enjoy wellness for life,” said Lindsley.

Community wishes Tom & Lynn Hodel a Happy Retirement

New Soldotna Pharmacy owners Kevin Faris & Dan MacPhee congratulate the Hodel’s at their Friends turn out to wish the Hodel’s a fun filled retirement. retirement celebration.

Tom and Lynn Hodel left their Soldotna Pharmacy as owners for the last time Friday, March 21st after a parade of friends and customers came by to wish them well and thanks for their service over the years. “This will be a whole new experience for us. This community has been such a blessing to us through the years and it’s going to be hard to step aside. We’ll miss our employees and people we see every day, but we’re excited about the next phase of our life and while it’ll be different we’re looking forward to it with strong emotions,” said Tom. Earlier this year at the Soldotna Chamber of Commerce annual awards luncheon the Hodel’s were honored with the Pioneer Award given to those who have made significant improvements and contributions to the community. Tom said they plan to retire right here in the community, “This is our home this is where our friends are, but we’ll have the opportunity to travel more and spend time with our granddaughters and we have a grandson on the way in Colorado, so we’re excited about the coming years and what the future has in store for us,” While the Hodel’s won’t be at the Soldotna Pharmacy everyday everything else that the small town friendly pharmacy has become known for will stay the same, “The new owners

are wonderful guys and want to continue the traditions that folks appreciate. It’s a good fit for everybody. They want to do a lot of the same community involvement that we’ve been associated with, the staff will stay the same Kimberly will be manager and Justin the pharmacy manager and the same customer service and patient care that we’ve become known for will continue,” said Hodel. New owners Kevin Faris and Dan MacPhee were on hand

to congratulate the Hodel’s as well and meet all their friends, “We’re excited to embrace the great legacy that Tom and Lynn have created, we’ll keep it local, supporting the community and give back as much as we can,” MacPhee told the Dispatch. He said it was the community that drew him and inspired him to purchase the pharmacy, “When we first met Tom and Lynn we knew it was a fantastic business opportunity and something we became excited to be a part of,”

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he said. MacPhee and his partner Kevin Faris will continue to live in Washington, “We’ll be up on a regular basis but we have full confidence in the staff and the team here that will keep the business on the same path that has made it so successful,” added MacPhee.

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Clarion Dispatch, April 2, 2014

Page 3

Fire Marshall Gary Hale retires from a 40 year career in May.

Fire Marshall Gary Hale’s office is a firefighter’s toy museum.

Capt. Burn-ee & Edith plan May retirement

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After a career that has spanned four decade,s Central Emergency Services (CES) Fire Marshall Gary Gale will be hanging up his boots come the first of May, The only fire engines he’ll be shinning will be the thousands of toys he has collected through the years. “There just are not enough words to explain the happiness that come when you are ready for retirement. No second thoughts, you put the paperwork in and you know you have arrived,” Hale told the Dispatch in an interview. Hale started his firefighter career in Colorado before moving to Alaska to be near family and was hired first in Kenai by Marathon on board the Steelhead platform eventually transferring to the Kalifornsky department in the eighties which eventually morphed into CES and Hale taking on the position of Fire Marshall. During his career Hale and his wife Sharon have endeared

themselves to the community as Captain Burn-ee and Edith (exit drills in the home) wearing full clown regalia and make up they took the CES public fire prevention education program to new heights. “I started doing it on my days off and during fire education month in the schools. We resurrected the puppet show and stage that had gotten put away in storage expanded it and added several more volunteer puppeteers and went from the original four to now over a hundred puppets and a trailer to transport all our

props, stage and sound equipment. It was in the early nineties when I met a firefighter clown in Phoenix and he showed me some clowning and we took it to the schools with the puppets; my talented seamstress wife making all our costumes. It was great in the schools and for families to learn basic fire prevention, but getting into make-up and costume took almost an hour every time, so Capt. Burn-ee actually went into early retirement five years ago and is said to be looking for a winter home for us somewhere

warm,” said Hale. He recalled a couple of times he received fire calls while in costume, “Once I made the front page of the Clarion when I got a call while heading to Sterling Elementary, I was the first on scene to make a size up and am looking for a place to hide and along comes Clarion photographer Scott Moon at the time. I didn’t go into the fire, but was changing out air packs for the assistant commander while in clown attire, but it earned me an accommodation from the Governor,” laughed Hale.

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Hale also said he was very proud to clown around with what he called his fellow street walkers at the “Y” in Soldotna every Labor Day Weekend for the annual Fill the Boot campaign for Jerry’s Kids and the Muscular Dystrophy Assoc. “We did it for 22 years, Sharon was there every year even the one year I had a medical emergency. Every year this community met or exceeded what they gave the previous year and we knew that many times the motivation for giving was an expres-

sion of thanks to the firefighters and recognition for what we do, but over those years we raised I believe over a quarter of a million dollars and that’s amazing for a small community, but the people here are amazing and will always open their hearts and wallets when asked to,” he stated. As to their future plans, “I’m asked that every day and at this point we plan to play it by ear. We’ll stay in the community but will be looking for warmer lands to spend the winters.”


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Page 4 Clarion Dispatch, April 2, 2014

... Continued from page -

Harry Lockwood & Pascale Dilley of the Job Center greet visitors with free press.

Alaska Job Corps opportunities outlined by Krystal Kompkoff & Rachel Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien.

Cross section of work opportunities greet job seekers at Peninsula Job Fair.

Recruiters of all kinds turn out for Peninsula Job Fair.

Hundreds of high school students learn of summer job opportunities on the Kenai. C

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Clarion Dispatch, April 2, 2014 Page 5

To place an ad call 283-7551 or go online at www.peninsulaclarion.com Photo courtesy of Daryl Palmer

Classifieds Classified Index

Clarion Dispatch

Employment Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted Real Estate - For Sale Commercial Property Condominiums/Town homes Farms/Ranches Homes

Real Estate - For Sale (Cont’d) Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property Real Estate - Rentals Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums Town homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals

General Employment

04/02/14

Real Estate - Rentals (Cont’d) Merchandise For Sale (Cont’d) Vacation Rentals Musical Instructions FINANCIAL Office/Business Equipment Auctions Vacations/Tickets Business for Sale Wanted To Buy Financial Opportunities Recreation Mortgage/Loans Aircrafts & Parts Merchandise For Sale All-Terrain Vehicles Antiques/Collectibles Archery Appliances Bicycles Audio/Video Boat Supplies/Parts Building Supplies Boats & Sail Boats Computers Boat Charters Crafts/Holiday Items Boats Commercial Electronics Campers/Travel Trailers Exercise Equipment Fishing Firewood Guns Food Hunting Guide Service Furniture Kayaks Garage Sales Lodging Heavy Equipment/Farm Machinery Marine Lawn & Garden Motor Homes/RVs Liquidation Snowmobiles Machinery & Tools Sporting Goods Miscellaneous Transportation Music Autos

Healthcare

Apartments, Unfurnished

BRISTOL BAY Crew needed for the 2014 season. Commercial fishing experience preferred. Pay is percentage based on experience. Contact Dan (907)398-6367

General Employment

NEWSPAPER CARRIER The Peninsula Clarion is accepting applications for a Newspaper Carrier. Delivery area Sterling.

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•Must have own transportation. •Independent contractor status. •Home delivery - 6 days a week. •Must have valid Alaska drivers license. •Must furnish proof of insurance. •Copy of current driving record required upon hire

For more information contact Peninsula Clarion Circulation Dept. (907)283-3584

or drop off an application/resume at the

Peninsula Clarion 150 Trading Bay Road, Kenai The Peninsula Clarion is an E.O.E.

General Employment Coast guard licensed guide needed

for work on Cook Inlet. We are a family run and operated business. Guides are supplied with room and board and all meals are included. Wages discussed at time of interview. Guides must …. • have a six pack United States Coast Guard license OUPV. • previous inlet experience preferred but willing to train • be fair and honest. • be drug free. • participate in a training session on the inlet in early May. • be self motivated, proactive, team player, and have a strong work ethic. Call (907)398-0033 for more information. Looking forward to hearing from you!

Healthcare

Central Peninsula Hospital is seeking qualified candidates for the following positions: Food Service Aide at Heritage Place (Part time and Per Diem) High school diploma or GED, one year food service experience, Food Handlers Card and basic computer skills required. Compassionate and nurturing nature is a must. Institutional or restaurant cooking experience strongly preferred. Outpatient Services Technician (Full time) High school diploma or GED, minimum of one year experience in a medical office setting. EKG and phlebotomy experience required. RN opportunities (Part Time and Per Diem) Current AK licensure; current AHA certifications required depending upon position. Bachelor's degree preferred. CPH offers an excellent benefit package including major medical, dental/vision insurance, educational assistance, retirement planning, and many other great advantages. Interested applicants may apply online at www.cpgh.org. Pre-employment drug screen is required. Equal Opportunity Employer

Transportation (Cont’d) Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted PETS & LIVESTOCK Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies Services Appliance Repair Auction Services

ALL TYPES OF RENTALS

Homer Physical Therapy

is recruiting for a permanent, full-time massage therapist (32 hours per week). Requirements: completion of minimum 500 hour massage therapy training program, willing to work collaboratively within the guidelines established by clinic, professional appearance, communication and work ethic a must. Licensed individual preferred but we may consider a suitable unlicensed practitioner. Pay and benefits based on experience. Send resume to hpt@homerphysicaltherapy.com or fax to 907-235-3417. No walk-ins or phone calls please.

Employment Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

Real Estate For Sale Commercial Property Condominiums/Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

Manufactured Mobile Homes WINTER IN MESA ARIZONA. Why pay rent when you can own a 3-bedroom home in a 5 star gated retirement park. Priced to sell at $27,000. Includes major appliances, air conditioning & much more. For more information please call (505)321-3250

ppsssstt . . It’s Easier Than You Think To Place Your Ad Here

283-7551

Rentals Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

Apartments, Unfurnished

Property Management Division 170 N. Birch Suite 101, Soldotna (907)262-2522 Mary.Parske@century21.com www.Century21FreedomRealty.com

Apartments, Unfurnished

PARKVIEW APARTMENTS Now Accepting Applications For Remodeled Spacious 1, 2, & 3 Bedroom Affordable Apartments. Adjacent to Playground/Park Onsite Laundry, Full Time Manager Rent Is Based On 30% Of Gross Income & Subsidized By Rural Development For Eligible Households.

Contact Manager at 907-262-1407 TDD 1-800-770-8973 330 Columbine Soldotna, AK 99669

This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider

FSBO -

SOLDOTNA 2-bedroom, No Smoking/ No pets. $875./ plus electric. (907)252-7242.

Apartments, Furnished DOWNTOWN Soldotna on the river. 2-bedroom, 1-bath, Seasonal/ Permanent, furnished/ unfurnished, NO pets/ NO smoking. Credit/ background checks. $795., (907)252-7110 EFFICIENCY 1-Person basement unit Downtown Kenai, quiet, adult building. No smoking/ pets, $550. including tax/ utilities. Security deposit/ lease. (907)283-3551. EFFICIENCY APT. single occupancy, $450./ month. Includes Electric available 4/1/14. Call for appointment, (907)260-2092. Mile 118 Clam Gulch, Ocean View. KENAI 1-Bedroom, furnished, heat, cable included. No pets. $675. month. (907)283-5203, (907)398-1642.

Apartments, Furnished

Homes

EXCELLENT OCEAN VIEW! Bay Arm Apartments, Kenai. Accepting applications for 1 & 2 bedroom apartments, utilities included. $25. nonrefundable application fee. No pets. (907)283-4405.

BEAUTIFUL 1-Bedroom home, large kitchen/ bath on 5 acres. Walk to beach, Happy Valley area. $750. month plus deposit. (907)399-2992

News, Sports, Weather & More! C

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Pets & Livestock

Kenaitze Indian Tribe

is accepting offers for 25,000 board feet of 110 year old Fir wood, in varying condition and value, reclaimed from the old Homer Cannery Warehouse. The entire amount will be sold, as is, to the highest offeror. The buyer is responsible for all costs to pick up the wood from its location in Kenai within 30 days of purchase. Offers will be accepted through April 9 at 5:00pm, contact Natalie Wolfe at 907-335-7206.

Retail/Commercial Space PRIME KENAI RETAIL/ OFFICE SPACE 1,832SqFt to 20,000SqFt. Rates start @ $.50SqFt. Call Carr Gottstein Properties, (907)564-2424 or visit www.carrgottstein.com

Homes

Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

Cats FREE TO A GOOD HOME Older female cat, spayed, very loving, will go outside. Grandkids are allergic so she must find a new home. (907)398-4647

Dogs

Items Under $99

WHY RENT ????? Why rent when you can own, many low down & zero down payment programs available. Let me help you achieve the dream of home ownership. Call Now !!! Ken Scott, #AK203469. (907)395-4527 or cellular, (907)690-0220. Alaska USA Mortgage Company, #AK157293.

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

Retail/ Commercial Space THREE-Bedroom, 2-bath, 2 large walk-inclosets, 1352 inside living space, crawl space, 1.5 car garage, fenced back yard, front and back decks. Asphalt DW & neighborhood roads. Large space next to garage for boat or RV. Back yard fully sunned, perfect for greenhouse. Just shy of 1/2 acre. Excellent water. 2 blocks down from K-Beach. New in 2010 natural gas furnace, all new in 2010 appliances included (DW, oven, microwave, frig, washer & dryer). Master bath renovated w/walk-in tile shower; beautiful easy to maintain high-end vinyl flooring throughout. Custom vertical blinds in living room and kitchen, and window coverings. Also included is 55-inch Samsung Plasma TV and 3-speaker Bose surround system; 8 camera security system; outside shed w/Honda lawn mower & weed trimmer. $1500 paint and wallpaper credit provided. Broker courtesy 2.5%. TWO ways to buy - Straight purchase $207K or ASSUME low balance with $880 monthly payments for $70,000 up front cash. (No realtor or credit check is required for the assumption) MLS 14-560 and Zillow.com. Please call 398-8161; 24 hr notice requested for viewing. Owner financing not available.

Services (Cont’d) Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling Notices/Announcements Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/Announcements Worship Listings Public Notices/Legal Ads Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

Building Supplies

NIKISKI 2-Bedroom $800. 2-Bedroom, 2-bath, with huge family room, dinning area. $975. per month. Pets allowed, includes utilities. Call (907)776-6563.

Homes

REDOUBT VIEW Soldotna’s best value! Quiet, freshly painted, close to schools. 1-Bedroom from $625. 2-Bedroom from $725. 3-Bedroom, 2-bath, from $825. No pets. (907)262-4359.

Services (Cont’d) Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/Electric Satellite TV

RED DIAMOND CENTER K-Beach Rd. 1,200- 2,400sq.ft. Retail or office, high traffic, across from DMV. Please call (907)953-2222 (907)598-8181

Financial Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgages/Loans

Merchandise For Sale Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn/Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

Classified Advertising.

Let It Work For You! 283-7551

GOLF CLUBS $99. (907)283-2771

Recreation Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boats Charter Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snow Mobiles Sporting Goods

Transportation Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

Parts & Accessories

KENAI KENNEL CLUB

Pawsitive training for all dogs & puppies. Agility, Conformation, Obedience, Privates & Rally. www.kenaikennelclub.com (907)335-2552 SHEPHERD MIX Puppies. 2-Female & 1-male Shepherd mix puppies need homes. These 3 1/2 month old pups need active & attentive owners that can give them the proper care & training that this breed requires. Pups are house trained & active in the outdoors. They have received their 2nd booster shots & ready for an owner that can dedicate time to them. They have sweet dispositions & respond well to people. Please inquire via email or telephone.

cemcnair101@mail.com

(907)350-6450

TOYO A/T TIRES. P245 70R16 065 1yr old, plus they are on rims, I have Ford hub caps (4). Came off ‘02 Explorer. ALL just $600. (907)260-5943

Trucks: Heavy Duty MAKE AN OFFER 2010 dually long bed, F-350, 4wheel drive, 6.4 diesel truck, 24k miles, Auto Tran. Hide away goose neck Tow & Trailer brake packages. Spray bed liner. Back up camera. Heated/power mirrors, warranty, Power chip Keyless entry, Power windows/seats Asking $36,400 OBO. KBB at $37k (907)953-4696

TEACH ALL DOGS Everything with brains, not pain. Obedience, Puppy, Nose work, Rally, Agility, Privates. K-Beach Road (907)262-6846 www.pendog.org

Buyers & Sellers Are Just A Click Away www. peninsulaclarion.com

Find your new vehicle today in the Classifieds!


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Page 6 Clarion Dispatch, April 2, 2014 Services

Multiple Dwelling

Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Services Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

Health ASIAN MASSAGE

Please make the phone ring! Call anytime! (907)741-1644, Thanks!

Health **ASIAN MASSAGE** Wonderful, Relaxing. Happy Spring! Anytime! (907)741-1644, (907)398-8896. Thanks!

Health

Education/ Instruction RESIDENTIAL CONTRACTORS Test Prep Course. Wisdom & Associates, Inc. (907)283-0629.

Notices/ Announcements Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

THAI HOUSE MASSAGE

Located in Kenai Behind Wells Fargo/ stripmall (907)252-6510, (907)741-1105

Health

Lost & Found FOUND WALLET Soldotna area Call Sue to identify. (907)262-4455

Public Notices/ Legal Ads Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

TO EARN MORE Get started with the Employment section of the Classifieds. The Classifieds are your best source for a comprehensive collection of area job opportunities. Don’t spend another year with a job that doesn’t match your earning potential; open your eyes to new career choices with the Classifieds.

283-7551

PENINSULA THAI MASSAGE

Thompsons’s Building/ Soldotna, Sterling Highway Next to Liberty Tax (907)252-8053, (907)398-2073

Home Health Care PERSONAL CARE ASSISTANT

For elderly, respite, family support. Experienced. (907)252-5375

Let us shed some light on job opportunities, real estate, and great deals on used cars in the classified section of the C

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Clarion Dispatch, April 2, 2014 Page 7

Advertise â&#x20AC;&#x153;By the Monthâ&#x20AC;? or save $ with a 3, 6 or 12 month contract. Call Advertising Display 283-7551 to get started!

Advertise in the Service Directory today! - Includes Dispatch. 283-7551

Thomas Bell-Owner

Licensed & Insured Lic.#952948

commercial roofing & Services

Now located on the Kenai Peninsula for all your roofing needs.

907-260-roof (7663)

Member of the Kenai Peninsula Builders Association

www.rainproofroofing.com

776-3490 690-3490

Plumbing & Heating

Construction

24/7 PLUMBING AND

HEATING

No matter how old your system is we can make it more efficient. FREE Kenai: 283-1063 Text us at: ESTIMATES Nikiski: 776-8055 394-4017 email us at: linton401@gmail.com Soldotna: 262-1964 394-4018 UNLIMITED MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS License # 34609

just your tows!

907. 776 . 3967

www.peninsulaclarion.com

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Get your business listed 283-7551

Located in the Willow Street Mall

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

Bathroom Remodeling AK Sourdough Enterprises Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

Boots Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing 35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

Business Cards Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK alias@printers-ink.com

150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai

283-4977

Carhartt Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing 35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

Computer Repair Walters & Associates Located in the Willow Street Mall

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

www.peninsulaclarion.com

Contractor AK Sourdough Enterprises Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

Dentistry Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD Oral Surgery, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Need Cash Now?

Place a Classified Ad.

283-7551

283-7551

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Walters & Associates

Fax: (907) 262-2347

We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want your fingers,

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Automotive Insurance

Licened â&#x20AC;˘ Bonded â&#x20AC;˘ Insured

Reddi Towing & Junk Car Killers

(907) 283-7551

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Phone: (907) 262-2347

Long Distance Towing

Peninsula Clarion Display Advertising

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OF ALASKA

Raingutter Technicians with over 20 years Alaskan Experience CONTINUOUS CUSTOM ALUMINUM & STEEL GUTTERS

Slide Backs â&#x20AC;˘ Winch Out Services â&#x20AC;˘ Auto Sales Vehicle Storage â&#x20AC;˘ Roll Over Recoveries

â&#x20AC;˘ Reach readers in the newspaper and online that are ready, willing and able to buy your goods and services. â&#x20AC;˘ Have your business stand out from the competition by creating top of mind awareness. â&#x20AC;˘ Ads appear EVERYDAY in the newspaper â&#x20AC;˘ Easy to use online search engine puts your business ahead of the competion. â&#x20AC;˘ Update your ads and listings frequently.

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Licensed, Bonded & Insured

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Based in Kenai & Nikiski â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

Would you like to have your business highlighted in Yellow Advantage?

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252-3965

35 Years Construction Experience

RAINTECH

Do you look forward to your gas bill each month? If not, you should call

Small Engine Repair

Notices Roofing

residential roofing & Services

Computer Repair

â&#x20AC;˘ Rooftop Snow Removal â&#x20AC;˘ Roofing â&#x20AC;˘ Drywall â&#x20AC;˘ Decks â&#x20AC;˘ Siding â&#x20AC;˘ Building Maintenance

Notice to Consumers The State of Alaska requires construction companies to be licensed, bonded and insured before submitting bids, performing work, or advertising as a construction contractor in accordance with AS 08..18.011, 08.18.071, 08.18.101, and 08.15.051. All advertisements as a construction contractor require the current registration number as issued by the Division of Occupational Licensing to appear in the advertisement. CONSUMERS MAY VERIFY REGISTRATION OF A CONTRACTOR . Contact the AK Department of Labor and Workforce Development at 907-269-4925 or The AK Division of Occupational Licensing in Juneau at 907-4653035 or at www.dced.state.ak.us/acc/home.htm

130 S Willow Street, Suite 8 â&#x20AC;˘ Kenai, AK 99611

ROOFING

Insulation

Lic.# 30426 â&#x20AC;˘ Bonded & Insured

Computer Repair, Networking Dell Business Partner Web Design & Hosting

Rain Gutters

FREE ESTIMATES!

Handyman

Flooring

Vinyl Hardwood

907-252-7148

?

â&#x20AC;˘ Carpentry â&#x20AC;˘ General Handyman Work â&#x20AC;˘ Sheetrock â&#x20AC;˘ Painting â&#x20AC;˘ Woodwork â&#x20AC;˘ Tree Removal â&#x20AC;˘ Hauling â&#x20AC;˘ Cleanup & Repairs â&#x20AC;˘ Decks â&#x20AC;˘ Kitchen Remodels â&#x20AC;˘ Bath â&#x20AC;˘ Siding â&#x20AC;˘ Remodels â&#x20AC;˘ Unfinished Projects?

ONE ALASKAN HANDYMAN SERVICE

RFN FLOORS Professional Installation & Repair Carpet Laminate Floors

283-3362

Computer Problems Call Today ( 9 0 7 ) 2 8 3 - 5 1 1 6

Handyman

260-4943

Tim Wisniewski, owner â&#x20AC;˘ Residential & Commercial â&#x20AC;˘ Emergency Water Removal â&#x20AC;˘ Janitorial Contracts â&#x20AC;˘ Upholstery Cleaning

Rain Gutters

Licensed â&#x20AC;˘ Bonded â&#x20AC;˘ Insured â&#x20AC;˘License #33430

LLC

Lic #39710

Towing

â&#x20AC;˘ Experienced â&#x20AC;˘ Trustworthy â&#x20AC;˘ Dependable â&#x20AC;˘ Attention to detail Serving the Kenai Peninsula for over 11 years

HaveGENERAL ToolsCONTRACTING Will Travel

Timâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cleaning

Bathroom Remodeling

Full or Partial Bathroom Remodels

ZZZpeninsulaclarionFRP

Every Day in your Peninsula Clarion â&#x20AC;˘ www.peninsulaclarion.com

Dentistry

Funeral Homes Peninsula Memorial Chapels & Crematory Kenai........................................283-3333 Soldotna ..................................260-3333 Homer...................................... 235-6861 Seward.....................................224-5201

Kenai Dental Clinic Emergency appts. available Denali Kid Care/Medicaid

605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

Family Dentistry

Insurance

Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD

Walters & Associates

Oral Surgery, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

Located in the Willow Street Mall

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Oral Surgery Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD Oral Surgery, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Outdoor Clothing Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing 35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

Print Shops Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK

Kenai Dental Clinic Emergency appts. available Denali Kid Care/Medicaid

alias@printers-ink.com

605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

283-7551

150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai............................. 283-4977

Rack Cards Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK alias@printers-ink.com

150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai............................. 283-4977

Remodeling AK Sourdough Enterprises Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

Teeth Whitening Kenai Dental Clinic Emergency appts. available Denali Kid Care/Medicaid

605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

You taught them how to dribble. You taught them how to shoot. You taught them to work hard on defense.

YOU CAN TEACH THEM about the dangers of underage drinking.

1-877-SAMHSA-7 | www.SpeakWithThem.SAMHSA.gov Text â&#x20AC;&#x153;SPEAKâ&#x20AC;? to 30364 Message and data rates may apply. C

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Page 8 Clarion Dispatch, April 2, 2014

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Profile for Sound Publishing

Peninsula Clarion, April 02, 2014  

April 02, 2014 edition of the Peninsula Clarion

Peninsula Clarion, April 02, 2014  

April 02, 2014 edition of the Peninsula Clarion