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Slam

State

Runner takes up Alaska challenge

Stars open tourney with overtime game

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Sports/B-1

CLARION

A little snow 20/10 More weather on Page A-2

P E N I N S U L A

Friday-Saturday, february 14-15 Soldotna-Kenai, Alaska

Vol. 44, Issue 116

50 cents newsstands daily/$1.00 Sunday

Board gets to the point

Question Do you think the Alaska Permanent Fund dividend program should be protected in the state constitution? n Yes; or n No. To place your vote and comment, visit our Web site at www. peninsulaclarion. com. Results and selected comments will be posted each Tuesday in the Clarion, and a new question will be asked. Suggested questions may be submitted online or e-mailed to news@peninsulaclarion.com.

Catch-andrelease king fishing to be barbless By RASHAH McCHESNEY Peninsula Clarion

In the news Weapon discharged in Kasilof, one in custody

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Alaska State Troopers responded to a report Thursday morning that a weapon was discharged in Kasilof, which prompted a precautionary lockdown of a nearby school. Trooper spokesperson Megan Peters said they received a call at 8:55 a.m. of a domestic disturbance approximately 3 miles from Tustumena Elementary School. Peters said a patrol unit arrived on the scene at a residence off of Crooked Creek Road and detained Brian Henry, 40, of Kasilof. Henry is charged with assault in the third degree and has been taken into custody, she said. Nobody was injured in the incident and troopers are not releasing the name of the victim involved in the domestic dispute, she said. Peters said troopers notified the school that they were responding to an incident in the vicinity as a precaution. A SERT team arrived on scene, but the situation was contained by 11 a.m., she said. The incident is now over, but troopers are still on scene investigating, she said. — Dan Balmer

Inside ‘As far as the U.N. is concerned, we will certainly not leave one stone unturned if there is a possibility to move forward.’ ... See page A-8

Index Opinion.................. A-4 Alaska.................... A-5 Nation/World.......... A-8 Religion................ A-10 Sports.....................B-1 Recreation............ C-1 Classifieds............ C-3 Comics................. C-11 Check us out online at www.peninsulaclarion.com To subscribe, call 283-3584.

those are yet. The consultant will help to determine how some of the possible legislative changes will effect local governments. The agreement proposes a tax structure to allow producers, to make payment in lieu of taxes instead of paying ad valorem taxes on oil and gas property. Navarre said it’s uncertain whether a change in tax structure would affect existing

King salmon will soon find it easier to slip a hook on the Kenai River. During the 14th and final day of the Alaska Board of Fisheries meeting in Upper Cook Inlet, the seven-member board considered a suite of proposals to modify the Cook Inlet sport fisheries — including one that the group modified to apply specifically to king salmon fishing on the Kenai River when managers designate the fishery as catch-and-release. A United Cook Inlet Drift Association proposal would have restricted all catch-and-release fishing to single, unbaited, barbless hooks. UCIDA president David Martin called catchand-release fishing “playing with your food” during public testimony. “I believe it’s the only time we’ve ever adopted a regulation that talks about barbless hooks in the state,” said Board of Fisheries chairman Karl Johnstone. “We’ve had barbless hook regulations proposed in other fisheries, particularly in Bristol Bay and we didn’t quite pass them. I favor them for fisheries that were non-retention species.” Johnstone joined board members Tom Kluberton, Fritz Johnson and Sue Jeffrey in a split 4-3 vote after two amendments were introduced — one defining barbless hook and the other restricting the proposal to just catch-and-release king fishing on the Kenai river. “In my opinion, it’s a conservation measure,” Johnstone said. “It reduces handling time.” Alaska Department of Fish and Game, or ADFG, regional

See TALKS, page A-12

See FISH, page A-12

Photo by Dan Balmer/Peninsula Clarion

Debbie Morris, right, and Tonya Gilmore prepare ordered flower arrangements at Tammy’s Flowers and Gifts in Soldotna Thursday. Morris runs the Candy Boutique in the shop with the help of her husband Mike.

Meeting the holiday rush By DAN BALMER Peninsula Clarion

For all those last minute shoppers, it is not too late to pick out a gift for your valentine. Kim Mariman, owner of Tammy’s Flowers and Gifts for the last four years, said while she has already sold out 600 dozen roses, she has plenty of jewelry, candy, flowers, cards and balloons available. Mariman said she ordered 5,000 stems in preparation for Valentine’s Day, the busiest day of the year for the shop. Four

vans will make 300 deliveries in nine hours around the central peninsula Friday. With a staff of only four employees, she said she brings in more hands to handle the extra work. “I could not have done it without the hard work from my holiday helpers,” she said. “They meticulously clean every flower and put arrangements together.” Mariman said they probably do one arrangement a minute based on each of their preordered deliveries. One of her designers, Debbie Morris, runs the Candy Boutique, which has an

assortment of chocolates and candy, another Valentine gift staple. Her husband Mike Morris also helps her stock the shelves. The two have been married for 42 years. Morris said he first met his wife when she worked at flower shop in Oregon. “She is tired of flowers and candy so she picked out four pieces of jewelry at Fred Meyer and I get to choose one for her,” he said. “So there is some surprise.” Reach Dan Balmer at daniel.balmer@ peninsulaclarion.com.

Looking for pipeline impacts Borough, other municipalities ask to have input in negotiations By KAYLEE OSOWSKI Peninsula Clarion

The Kenai Peninsula Borough has joined forces with other government agencies in the state examine potential impacts of the Alaska Pipeline Project. At its Tuesday meeting, the assembly adopted a laydown ordinance to appropriate $50,000 toward jointly hiring one or more consultants to ana-

lyze how the project will affect tax revenues. Fairbanks North Star Borough, North Slope Borough and the City of Valdez have all signed on to the effort and submitted a letter to Gov. Sean Parnell requesting to participate in discussions concerning the tax structure. Each municipality also put up $50,000 to hire at least one consultant until the end of the 2016 legislative session.

“Everybody wants the project to move forward, but we really have a responsibility to the local government officials to figure out what it means,” Navarre said. The State of Alaska, ExxonMobil, ConocoPhillips, BP and TransCanada entered, in January, a Head of Agreement. Borough Mayor Mike Navarre said the details of the agreement are important and municipalities don’t know what

Council changes city code Soldotna amends ordinance governing SADs By KAYLEE OSOWSKI Peninsula Clarion

The Soldotna City Council talked city codes at its Wednesday night meeting. Of the two ordinances up for public hearing, the council postponed one and adopted the other. A third code-related ordinance was introduced on the consent agenda. An ordinance prohibiting commercial vehicles from using certain city streets was originally introduced to council in October 2013 and was postponed then for clarifications. It was scheduled for public hearing Wednesday and council voted to amend the ordinance as recommended by administration. The ordinance originally

didn’t allow commercial vehicles on collector and secondary streets. The council amended it to prohibit commercial vehicles from all city streets unless they are making deliveries or pickups or performing services requiring travel on the street. “Simply because there are no city streets that any commercial vehicle should be on unless they’re using it for local delivery,” City Manager Mark Dixson said. The council voted to postpone the pubic hearing on the ordinance to its next meeting to allow for additional time for public response to the amendment. The council unanimously approved an ordinance introduced by council member Keith Baxter to amend special assessment district code.

Previously the code stated that the council may not proceed with a SAD if property owners bearing 50 percent of the estimated cost of the improvement object, unless it is passed with a 75 percent majority vote or the council revises the SAD so the objections are fewer than half of the improvement cost. If the city is funding 75 percent of the project, the code sets an impossible standard for the property owners’ objections to reach the 50 percent threshold, Baxter said in a previous Clarion interview. The ordinance revised the code so that objections are applied to the estimated improvement cost to be assessed to property owners instead of the See CITY, page A-12 C

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Photo by Dan Balmer/Peninsula Clarion

A Kenai man was taken to the hospital after a collision Thursday morning. A red Jeep Liberty was traveling south on Bridge Access Road when the driver crossed the centerline and struck a northbound utility van at approximately 11:30 a.m., said Kenai Police Sgt. Ben Langham. Police did not identify the driver of the Jeep, who was transported to Central Peninsula Hospital for treatment of injuries. His condition was unknown at press time. The driver of the utility van did not suffer any injuries, Langham said. The roadway was closed for approximately one hour while the debris was cleared and the vehicles were towed. The investigation into the cause of the accident is ongoing.


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A-2 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, February 14, 2014

CLARION P

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(USPS 438-410) Published daily Sunday through Friday, except Christmas and New Year’s, by: Southeastern Newspapers Corporation P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Street address: 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 1, Kenai, AK Phone: (907) 283-7551 Postmaster: Send address changes to the Peninsula Clarion, P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Periodicals postage paid at Kenai, AK Represented for national advertising by The Papert Companies, Chicago, IL Copyright 2014 Peninsula Clarion A Morris Communications Corp. newspaper

Who to call at the Peninsula Clarion News tip? Question? Main number.............................................................................................. 283-7551 Fax............................................................................................................. 283-3299 News email...................................................................news@peninsulaclarion.com General news Will Morrow, editor ............................................ will.morrow@peninsulaclarion.com Jeff Helminiak, sports editor........................... jeff.helminiak@peninsulaclarion.com Borough government................................................... news@peninsulaclarion.com Fisheries, photographer.............................................................................................. ............................ Rashah McChesney, rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com Kenai........................................ Dan Balmer, daniel.balmers@peninsulaclarion.com Soldotna, courts............... Kaylee Osowski, kaylee.osowski@peninsulaclarion.com Education ............................................................... schools@peninsulaclarion.com Arts and Entertainment................................................ news@peninsulaclarion.com Community, Around the Peninsula............................... news@peninsulaclarion.com Sports............................................ Joey Klecka, joey.klecka@peninsulaclarion.com Page design........ Florence Struempler, florence.struempler@peninsulaclarion.com

Circulation problem? Call 283-3584 If you don’t receive your newspaper by 7 a.m. and you live in the Kenai-Soldotna area, call 283-3584 before 10 a.m. for redelivery of your paper. If you call after 10 a.m., you will be credited for the missed issue. Regular office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Sunday. General circulation questions can be sent via email to circulation@peninsulaclarion.com. The circulation manager is Randi Keaton.

For home delivery Order a six-day-a-week, three-month subscription for $39, a six-month subscription for $73, or a 12-month subscription for $130. Use our easy-pay plan and save on these rates. Call 283-3584 for details. Mail subscription rates are available upon request.

Want to place an ad? Classified: Call 283-7551 and ask for the classified ad department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or email classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com. Display: Call 283-7551 and ask for the display advertising department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Leslie Talent is the Clarion’s advertising director. She can be reached via email at leslie.talent@peninsulaclarion.com. Contacts for other departments: Business office...................................................................................... Jane Russell Production................................................................................................ Geoff Long Online........................................................................................ Vincent Nusunginya

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Warm West, cold East, average January By SETH BORENSTEIN AP Science Writer

WASHINGTON — For those who shivered through January, this may be hard to believe: Nationwide, the average temperature for the month was about normal because a warm West offset a cool East. January in the Lower 48 states was the 53rd coldest of 120 years of record-keeping, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration announced Thursday. The average was 30.3 degrees, only onetenth of a degree below normal for the month. While Alabama had its fourth coldest January on record, California and Alaska had their third warmest. “The phrase, ‘the new normal’ definitely applies to our perception of January 2014 weather out east,” Weather Underground meteorology director Jeff Masters said in an email. “We’ve gotten used to a warmer climate.” The frequent but not unusual cold winters of 30 years ago now seem “really extreme,” he said. Nationwide, it was the fifth driest January on record. New Mexico had its driest January, Arizona had its second driest and California, its third. And even though it seemed like it snowed a lot in the East, the snow on the ground in January in the Lower 48 was the 16th smallest in 48 years of record-keeping by the Rutgers University Global Snow Lab.

AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File

This Jan. 7 photo shows ice in the Mississippi River flowing past the Gateway Arch in St. Louis. The National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration said January in the Lower 48 states was the 53rd coldest of 120 years.

Snow cover was above average in the Northern Plains, Midwest and Northeast but below average in the Rockies and the West. Nearly every state, from Missouri and Iowa to the East, had a much cooler than normal start of the year. Nearly every state from Colorado and Wyoming west had a much warmer than normal January. That’s because starting in January and stretching through early February, the jet stream plunged due south in an unusual and persistent pattern that brought bone cold temperatures to the east of the big dip and dry warm weather to the west of the plunge, said Rutgers University climate scientist Jennifer Francis. The jet stream is a river of air that normally runs more west-to-

LIO Schedule Friday 8:00 a.m. The House Education Committee will sponsor a public hearing to discuss HB 278 Education: Funding / Tax Credits / Programs, Discussion on Technical Vocational Education Programs and Presentation by Dept. of Labor & Workforce Development on GED - Graduate Equivalency Diploma. Testimony will be taken. All teleconferences are held at the Kenai Legislative Information Office, 145 Main Street Loop No. 217, Kenai, unless otherwise noted. To confirm call 283-2030 or email Kenai.LIO@akleg.gov. To listen or watch online go to http:// alaskalegislature.tv/. C

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east around the top of the globe and is intricately connected to weather patterns. The odd jet stream has meant a stormy and wet winter for Great Britain, unusual warmth for Olympics host city Sochi, Scandinavia, Alaska and the rest of the Arctic region, Fran-

cis said. It is not connected to the nor’easter in the South and East this week, she added. But Francis, Masters and other meteorologists said the jet stream is finally becoming unstuck. The National Weather Service is predicting that the next couple weeks will bring warmer than normal temperatures for the East and Midwest. As he was shoveling snow in suburban Washington Thursday, NOAA climate prediction center deputy director Mike Halpert said he told neighbors he had good news and bad news. The bad news: Maybe another inch or two of snow was coming overnight. The good: Temperatures next week would be in the 50s and maybe, just maybe, an end to the big storms for the season. Online: NOAA’s January climate report: http://www.ncdc.noaa. gov/sotc/national/2014/1

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, February 14, 2014

Obituary

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Around the Peninsula

Thomas Harold Witcher

Violinist, pianist to perform in Soldotna

Soldotna resident Thomas Harold Witcher, 68, passed away Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2014 from lymphoma. Memorial services will be 5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15, at the Soldotna Church of God. Pastor Alan Humphries will officiate. Tom, born Nov. 22, 1945 in Long Beach, Calif., graduated from Grant’s Pass High School in 1964. He served in the U.S. Navy from 1964-68 on the USS Isle Royale. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in automotive technology. Tom worked as a logger and long haul truck driver in Oregon then moved to Alaska in 1979 to King Salmon as an Airway Transportation Specialist and received multiple certificates and awards from the FAA. He retired in 1997. Tom was a member of the Soldotna Church of God since 1991. He taught Sunday school and volunteered for maintenance in the church. Tom had a passion to share Christ. An avid hunter and fisherman, he enjoyed snowmachines and motorcycles; was a master McGyver, survivalist, and family man. His wife said, “He was the most caring, protective husband. He was my rock. He taught his family values, and to survive the harsh perils of Alaskan winters. They called him ‘Safety Dad.’ He was loved beyond measure.” Shane said, “Dad always put his family’s needs above his own and made sure we never went without. Was a Godly man always helping others. He taught me most everything I know, helped me land my first fish, and he put me on my first moose. Hunting during his later years was just a ride in the truck down a gravel road with snacks, drinks, and conversation; but I wouldn’t trade those moments for anything.” Todd said, “I know how strong the meaning of the word ‘Dad’ is. So simple, so powerful, strong. I could never conceive to compete with that.” Joni said, “Dad was simply who loved his family and friends with a pure love that will forever stand the test of time. This extraordinary man in this ordinary world made every day a blessing to those privileged enough to know him.” Tamara said, “My dad was a giant, the strongest toughest man I ever knew, always there for me. Dad was a proud patriot, teaching Shane, me, and our kids to shoot and gun safety of course! My dad always encouraged me to do and be my best, to do it right THE FIRST TIME! I see him in my brother, in my children. The legacy he leaves is massive, and so is the hole.” Tom was preceded in death by his parents, Claude and Vivian Witcher, and father-in-law, Charles Scroggins. He is survived by his wife of 42 years, Dian Witcher; daughter, Tamara Quincy; son and daughter-in-law, Shane and Joni Witcher; grandchildren, Carissa, Kasey, and Brookelyn Lingle, Kyliera and Gabriel Quincy, Tyler, Chelsea and Alyssa Witcher; brother and sister-in-law, Virgil and Charlyn Witcher of Grants Pass, Ore.; and nieces, Tiffany Baskett of Salem, Ore. and Chantay Witcher of Beaverton, Ore. Arrangements were by Peninsula Memorial Chapel in Kenai.

The Performing Arts Society presents the Sitka Summer Music Festival Musicians in concert on Monday at 7:30 p.m. at Soldotna Christ Lutheran Church. Violinist Paul Rosenthal and Pianist Piers Lane will perform music of Bach, Beethoven and Chopin. Tickets are $20 general admission and $10 student, and available at River City Books, Northcountry Fair, Already Read Books and Country Liquor, and at the door.

Peninsula Clarion death notice and obituary guidelines: The Peninsula Clarion strives to report the deaths of all current and former Peninsula residents. Notices should be received within three months of the death. Pending service/Death notices are brief notices listing full name, age, date and place of death; and time, date and place of service. These are published at no charge. Obituaries are prepared by families, funeral homes, crematoriums, and are edited by our staff according to newspaper guidelines. The fee for obituaries up to 500 words with one black and white photo ranges from $50 to $100. Obituaries outside these guidelines are handled by the Clarion advertising department. The deadline for Tuesday – Friday editions is 2 p.m. the previous day. Submissions for Sunday and Monday editions must be received by 3 p.m. Friday. We do not process obituaries on Saturdays or Sundays unless submitted by funeral homes or crematoriums. Obituaries are placed on a space-available basis, prioritized by dates of local services. For more information, call the Clarion at 907-283-7551.

AmVets meetings scheduled

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Neighbor-to-Neighbor workshop explores garden lighting Interested in learning about solar power systems and LED lighting options for gardening? These cost effective lighting systems have been researched and new innovations are being introduced rapidly providing assistance to gardeners who want to extend the growing season. A free presentation on Solar Power Systems, LED lighting and the Home Garden will take place Feb. 27 from 6:30-8 p.m. at the Cooperative Extension Office, 43961 K-Beach Road in Soldotna. Class size is limited so register in advance by calling the CES office at 262-5824.

Bake sale benefits spay-neuter fund

AmVets Post 4, AmVets Auxiliary and the Sons of Amvets A bake sale to benefit the Peninsula Spay/Neuter Fund will meet Tuesday at Post 4 in the Red Diamond Center on K-Beach. The ladies meet at 6:30 p.m. and the men meet at 7:00 p.m. For be held from noon-6 p.m. today at Save-U-More on Kaliforsnky Beach Road. For information, call 690-2723. more information call 262-3540.

Parents of children with special needs gather for support

Coast Guard Auxiliary to discuss boating The Kenai Flotilla of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary will conduct it’s monthly meeting on Feb. 15 at 1 p.m. at the Nikiski Fire Station No. 1, 44800 Kenai Spur Highway. The public is cordially invited to join us to share ideas and information about boating. For more information, contact the Flotilla Commander at 776-8522 or the Vice Flotilla Commander at 776-8457.

A Parents of Special Needs Children Support Group meeting will take place Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at the Kenai River Center on Funny River Road across the street from Soldotna Airport. If your child has special circumstances that makes others look or speak of them differently then you need to come to our meeting and get acquainted with other parents that are dealing with the same issues. Discuss the issues of everyday life, school and Redoubt Elementary plans winter carnival acceptance in society. For more information contact Peggy LarThe Redoubt Elementary School PTA will host their second son at: 260-3621/394-6310 or peggysuelee@gmail.com annual “Winter Carnival” Feb. 15 from noon to 4 p.m. The event will inlcude a silent auction, dunk tank, games, food, door prizes and raffles. Big ticket raffle items include a 32GB iPad Air, Camp Peninsula Senior Games take center stage and Play wagon filled with camping supplies, and a student Grand Senior centers on the Kenai Peninsula will be holding the Gift basket. Tickets for the iPad are $10 each. Only 150 tickets will annual Senior Olympic Games from Tuesday, Feb. 18 through be sold. Tickets are available at the school office or the day of the Feb. 22. There are 13 diffeent events, including pool, water carnival. This is a family fun event that is open to the community. walk, cribbage, bridge, darts, walk-a-thon, hand-n-foot, bowling, basketball, pinochle, dominos, ping pong, and poker. The Cribbage tournament continues events will be held at various locations in the Nikiski, Kenai and Soldotna areas. The Senior Olympics are open to all PenThe Soldotna Lions 20th annual Kenai Peninsula Cribbage insula seniors 55 years of age and older. Local senior centers Tournament continues every Saturday at 3 p.m. through May 3 have details on the games and sign-up sheets for all events. An at the American Legion Post 20, 902 Cook Street in Kenai. The awards ceremony will be held in the Central Peninsula Mall on public is invited to participate. For more information, call Ray Feb. 22 at 12:30 p.m. to present medals to winners, followed by at 776-5688 or Bob at 776-5339. a no-host dinner at Ginger’s Restaurant.

KCHS reunion planning under way It’s not too early to get started on planning for 2015. Kenai Central High School classes of 1970 through 1979 are having a reunion Aug. 1-2, 2015. Please contact Anna Carlson at 907469-0409 or email annasherpa@gmail.com.

Pinochle club season under way

The Eagles Aerie No. 4317 on North Cohoe Loop in Kasilof will host the Kasilof Pinochle Club. The group plays Saturdays at 12:30 p.m. Entry fee is $2 per week, with awards paid out at the end of the season. For more information, call Jay at 2526397.

Community Calendar Today 9:45 a.m. • TOPS #AK 196 meets at The Grace Lutheran Church, in Soldotna. Call Dorothy at 262-1303. Noon • Alcoholics Anonymous recovery group at URS Club, 405 Overland Drive. Call 262-1917. 12:30 p.m. • Well Elders Live Longer exercise (W.E.L.L.) will meet at the Nikiski Senior Center. Call instructor Mary Olson at 907-776-3745. 8 p.m. • Narcotics Anonymous Support Group “It Works” at URS Club, 405 Overland Drive.

• AA 12 by 12 at the United Methodist Church, 607 Frontage Road, Kenai. • Twin City Al-Anon Family group, United Methodist Church, 607 Frontage road in Kenai. Call 541-9538335.

support group “Dopeless Hope Fiends” at 607 Frontage Road, Kenai. • Bingo, Funny River Community Center. 8 p.m. • AA North Roaders Group at North Star Methodist Church, Mile 25.5 Kenai Spur Highway. Call 2429477.

Saturday 10 a.m. • Narcotics Anonymous meeting, URS Club, 405 The Community Calendar Overland Drive, Kenai. lists recurring events and 7 p.m. meetings of local organiza • Narcotics Anonymous

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tions. To have your event listed, email organization name, day or days of meeting, time of meeting, place, and a contact phone number to news@peninsulaclarion. com.


A-4 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, February 14, 2014

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Opinion

CLARION P

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Serving the Kenai Peninsula since 1970 STAN PITLO Publisher

WILL MORROW������������������������������������������������������������������������ Editor Jane Russell...................... Controller/Human Resources Director LESLIE TALENT................................................... Advertising Director GEOFF LONG.................................................... Production Manager VINCENT NUSUNGINYA.................................... New Media Director Daryl Palmer.................................... IT and Composition Director RANDI KEATON................................................. Circulation Manager A Morris Communications Corp. Newspaper

Looking out for the borough’s interests At its Tuesday meeting, the Kenai

Peninsula Borough Assembly made an important decision to protect the borough’s financial interests. The assembly approved a measure brought forward by Borough Mayor Mike Navarre to work with other municipalities to hire a consultant to analyze the potential impact a natural gas pipeline would have on municipal tax revenues. While a gas pipeline project, especially one with a terminus and gas liquefaction plant in Nikiski, would no doubt be a boon to the borough’s economy, the borough administration has some concerns, especially with a part of the proposed agreement that would allow producers to make a payment in lieu of taxes, instead of ad valorem taxes, on oil and gas property. In other words, the state could negotiate a payment in lieu of taxes from the oil and gas industry that’s significantly less than revenues collected under the current tax structure based on the assessed value of oil and gas property. According to a memo to the assembly from Navarre, the agreement with producers could apply the payment in lieu of taxes to existing oil and gas property as well as future development, regardless of whether a pipeline is ever built. Bills up for consideration in the Legislature would authorize the commissioner of the state Department of Natural Resources to engage in confidential negotiations to develop terms for a natural gas pipeline. Navarre is working with mayors from other affected municipalities, including the Fairbanks North Star Borough, the North Slope Borough, and the city of Valdez to ensure that municipalities are able to participate in discussions that would significantly impact local tax revenue. Fiscal concessions may be necessary to get a pipeline built, but those impacted should have a voice in how far concessions go. With the state and producers finally moving forward on the project, the action by the borough assembly and administration is a smart and prudent move.

Quotable “My face is all frozen, my glasses are all frozen, my hair is all frozen. I know how to drive in the snow. But this storm came on suddenly and everyone was leaving work at the same time. I don’t think anybody did anything wrong; the weather just hit quickly.” — Soo Keith of Raleigh, N.C., who parked her car after making little headway after two hours and made it home four hours after her commute began. “From my vantage point, which was sometimes no further than an inch from his face, and one time nose on nose, he was inarguably the greatest pantomimist, monologist and single sketch comedian who ever worked in television.” — Carl Reiner on the death of Sid Caesar, 91, the comic genius of 1950s television.

Letters to the Editor Lawmakers must disentangle themselves from donors

Minimum wage should be raised because as we go into a grocery store and from week to week find that a $10-12 item suddenly becomes a $13-14 item and a $12.50 item has suddenly became a $15plus item. I believe that since minimum wage was last increased, there has been roughly a 50 to 75 percent in the cost of merchandise. My measly 1.3 per cent raise in Social Security is eaten up every week when we go into stores because of their raising the prices daily. Paul D. Morrison Kenai

With all due respect, I’d like to recommend that the Alaska State Legislature and the governor not pass another law until they’ve cleared up one critical and obvious issue: They must firmly and legally say “no” to the vast amounts of money being donated to them for political purposes! It’s getting ever more difficult to take the guys at the top seriously, when we (on the more humble end of the scale) all know that there’s a lot of wining, dining, gift-giving, and gift-receiving that goes on behind closed doors. Sorry to be so blunt, but someone’s got- Goals being set ta say it! Thank you for reading through my mes- to ensure failure sage. Again, I mean this with the deepest The Board of Fish meeting is just about respect. over and unless a last second reconsideraKate Veh tion is made the commercial fishery plans Soldotna are set. The Board has put coho and chinook Comments from attorney don’t salmon as a priority fish in upper Cook Inlet but has not stated that in regulation and reflect work of school nurses yet kept the sockeye salmon goals in place Tuesday’s Peninsula Clarion article which creates a conflict. “Former school nurse pleads guilty to tamHere is the bottom line: the Board said pering” includes a quote by the defense at- to the Department of Fish and Game, do torney (“I would guess that 99.9 percent of not fish here and do not fish many hours all school district nurses in the state have but make all the salmon goals. We underdone this”) that suggests that our school stand that you cannot do this so we will nurses are lackadaisical and breaking the say that our plans are not fixed so you can law with their record keeping. We strongly use your emergency order authority to disagree with this suggestion and know manage the fisheries — wink, wink, nod, that our school nurses are offended to be nod. characterized in this way. The past decade has pointed out that inOur KPBSD nurses treat the record season local managers have requested to keeping component of their jobs seriously go outside plans for sockeye management, and well understand the possible conse- even when other goals have been met, and quence of not doing so. It is regrettable that have been refused by Commissioners for reflection about one school nurse leads to a political reasons. demeaning generalization such as this. In contrast to the Board, the ADF&G Steve Atwater, Superintendent leadership is saying to the public, these are Naomi Walsworth, KPBSD Health not our plans and if the goals are exceeded Services Coordinator it is the fault of the Board of Fish as they

Doonesbury Flashbacks

Letters to the Editor: E-mail: news@peninsulaclarion.com

Write: Peninsula Clarion P.O. Box 3009 Kenai, AK 99611

Minimum wage hasn’t kept up with cost of living

Fax: 907-283-3299 Questions? Call: 907-283-7551

The Peninsula Clarion welcomes letters and attempts to publish all those received, subject to a few guidelines: n All letters must include the writer’s name, phone number and address. n Letters are limited to 500 words and may be edited to fit available space. Letters are run in the order they are received. n Letters addressed specifically to another person will not be printed. n Letters that, in the editor’s judgment, are libelous will not be printed. n The editor also may exclude letters that are untimely or irrelevant to the public interest. n Short, topical poetry should be submitted to Poet’s Corner and will not be printed on the Opinion page. n Submissions from other publications will not be printed. n Applause letters should recognize public-spirited service and contributions. Personal thank-you notes will not be published. C

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are the Board’s plans. So each has created an out for not managing the sockeye fisheries. This was very obvious in 2012 when the Commissioner said she did not have authority to go outside the plans — ignorance or planned deception? In 2013, it appeared ADF&G would go outside plans if the political backlash is acceptable but will not when it is a political advantage. So what is the solution to this broken system? One is to have honest representation on the Board and a new type of Board of Fish. Good representation is a choice of the Governor and a new system is up to the Legislature. If the present Board wants to put a priority on chinook and coho salmon, say so, but also change the sockeye salmon goals so ADF&G will not fail in management. If they want to be honest with the public set the Kenai River sockeye goals higher and say we are giving up millions of dollars of yield for this other allocation priority. Instead, the Board kept the sockeye goals in place and said we can have our cake and eat it too. That, as everyone knows, is not possible. So the dishonest approach to decision making has set everyone up to fail. The various industries are in chaos and the public is totally confused on how a season will be managed. Will the plans be followed, will a new Governor take the heat, will ADF&G finally say we have to manage to both goals and really use emergency order authority to alter plans? It is not good public service to do what this Board has done. They are acting irresponsible in passing these plans with limitations on ADF&G emergency order authority. What they should do is remove the time and area restrictions and set the goals so ADF&G can succeed more years than fail. Once the goals are set ADF&G professional managers can use the tools they have to manage to those goals. Ken Tarbox Soldotna

By GARRY TRUDEAU

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Alaska Criminals’ PFDs may go to victims’ fund By MIKE COPPOCK Associated Press

JUNEAU — The Senate State Affairs Committee has advanced a bill calling for the annual state oil wealth disbursement checks of those incarcerated to go first toward victim compensation. The bill sponsored by Sen. Fred Dyson, R-Eagle River, clears up who has priority to such Permanent Fund Dividend checks, as well as creates a reliable funding source for the Violent Crimes Compensation Board.

“This is one of the more significant things I’ve done,” said Dyson who has served in the Legislature for nearly 20 years and will be retiring at the end of his term. “There are a lot of victims out there this will help.” The bill passed unanimously Thursday, with the committee’s three Republicans and one Democrat voting in favor. There was no opposition voiced at the hearing. Felons and certain misdemeanor offenders have been ineligible by law to receive Permanent Fund Dividend checks since 1988.

The forfeited PFD checks were meant to fund victim compensation, but in 2012, the Violent Crimes Compensation Board received only 1.5 percent of court-ordered restitutions. Dyson said since 1988 other statutes have been added into law regarding the dividing of the forfeited PFD checks among various state entities resulting in the Violent Crimes Compensation Fund being underfunded. SB104 puts the Victim Compensation Board first on the list in receiving the forfeited funds followed by child support, re-

habilitation program payments and coverage of any additional costs with that individual’s incarceration. The bill also officially labels the fund the PFD Criminal Fund. The phrase is currently being used for accounting purposes only. It will be administered through the Office of Management and Budget. The bill now goes to the Senate Finance Committee. It faces several more legislative hurdles, but Dyson says he feels confident that his proposal has enough support to eventually become law.

Former territorial governor injured in fall FAIRBANKS (AP) — A former Alaska territorial governor featured in possibly the most well-known photograph in Alaska’s battle for statehood has been hospitalized in California after suffering head injuries in a fall. Former Gov. Mike Stepovich, 94, was injured Saturday night at the San Diego home of his son Jim Stepovich, another son told the Fairbanks Daily NewsMiner on Thursday. Fairbanks attorney Michael

Stepovich described his father’s condition as “probably critical” and said doctors continue to monitor him. The elder Stepovich has been semiconscious since falling, and doctors are trying to keep his lungs clear. “That’s what you’re always worried about, is pneumonia,” Michael Stepovich said. “We’re just kind of waiting and seeing.” The former governor’s 13 children have traveled to San Diego to be with their father.

Stepovich was born in 1919 in Fairbanks and became a key player in pre-statehood politics. He served in the Alaska Territorial Legislature in the 1950s before President Dwight D. Eisenhower appointed him territorial governor in 1957. Stepovich resigned a year later to run for U.S. Senate but lost the race. A well-known July 1, 1958, photograph by The Associated Press shows Stepovich stand-

ing between Eisenhower and Interior Secretary Frederick Seaton. Stepovich is flashing a broad smile and holding a newspaper with a banner headline, “WE’RE IN.” Stepovich and his wife, Matilda, moved out of Alaska about 30 years ago, but he maintained close ties to friends in interior Alaska. An event celebrating his 95th birthday next month in Medford, Ore., has been canceled, Michael Stepovich said.

Funds sought for spill-prevention account By BECKY BOHRER Associated Press

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JUNEAU — An account used for the cleanup of contaminated sites, non-emergency spill response and other activities soon will not have enough money to keep up with costs, the director of the state’s Division of Spill Prevention and Response told lawmakers Thursday. Kristin Ryan told a House subcommittee the shortfall in the prevention account is projected to happen in fiscal year 2016, and the account will likely need an appropriation from the general fund. The account gets its money from a four-cent surcharge on each barrel of oil. But the surcharge hasn’t been increased to keep pace with inflation, Ryan said, and declining oil production means less money generated by the fee. In 2010, the surcharge generated $8.9 million. It’s estimated the surcharge will produce $7 million this year. Money from

fines, penalties and settlements also go into the fund, which helps pay for inspections, readiness activities and other costs. The account will likely need anywhere from $6.6 million in 2016 to $8.3 million in 2022 from the general fund. If the surcharge were raised to nine cents a barrel, it would largely sustain the account through 2020, assuming a 1.5 percent annual growth in expenses, though the account would still need money from the general fund, Ryan said. The Legislature last year passed a cut in oil-production taxes in the hope it would lead to more production. In a recent report, the Department of Environmental Conservation, under which the Division of Spill Prevention and Response falls, said oil production would have to top 1 million barrels a day for the current surcharge to generate enough money to cover the division’s costs. For the year so far, oil flowing through the trans-Alaska pipeline is aver-

aging just over 560,000 barrels per day. The account evolved from a response fund created by the Legislature in the wake of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989. A five-cent-per-barrel surcharge on production was levied for prevention, preparedness and response programs after the disaster, according to the department. That was changed in 1994, with the creation of separate response and prevention accounts, and the five-cent surcharge divided so three-cents a barrel went to the prevention account and the rest toward building and maintaining a $50-million response account for emergencies and major events. In 2006, amid concerns with the prevention account being able to meet the division’s costs, the allocation was changed again, resulting in the current allocation of four cents a barrel to the prevention account and one cent a barrel to the response account, the de-

partment said. At the end of 2013, the balance for the response account was $48 million. Steps have been taken to slow the draw on the prevention account, such as eliminating a grant and loan program for the removal of underground storage tanks and requesting general funds to clean up state-owned contaminated sites rather than drawing that money from the account, the report says. Ryan said she also wants to see more efforts to recover the costs of cleanup from the parties responsible for spills. The department, in its report, said other possible ways to increase the amount going into the prevention account include expanding the surcharge to apply it to refined products produced, stored or moved within the state; imposing fees on services funded through the account; and raising the surcharge on oil, something that Rep. Peggy Wilson noted the industry has resisted.

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, February 14, 2014

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Around Alaska Stoltze: No fallout expected for Ketchikan JUNEAU — A co-chair of the House Finance Committee says the Ketchikan Gateway Borough won’t face fallout in terms of capital appropriations over its lawsuit with the state on school funding. Rep. Bill Stoltze is the committee’s lead on the capital budget. He was asked about comments made last week by Gov. Sean Parnell that the lawsuit would “shade or color” how he and legislators viewed Ketchikan requests. Parnell later said he wasn’t threatening Ketchikan and would continue to be fair. Lawmakers are considering a scaled-back budget in response to a crash in revenue. But he said there’s no causeand-effect relationship between that and the lawsuit. He said lawmakers “go through a pretty rational process.”

Senate committee consider share for DMV vendors JUNEAU — Private vendors for the Division of Motor Vehicles would get to keep a percentage of proceeds collected from customers plus charge fees of their own under a bill pending in the Legislature. The Senate State Affairs Committee began hearing testimony on SB127 Thursday. The bill, from Sen. Cathy Giessel, would allow private vendors who handle things like license renewals or title changes for the Division of Motor Vehicles to keep 15 percent of proceeds collected from customers. They also could charge a fee on top of state required fees. Giessel said the bill compensates small businesses for credit card processing and other fees and the updating of equipment. However, Sen. Bill Wielechowski said the bill would cost the state $1.2 million that would otherwise go into the general fund.

Senators split on debt limit vote JUNEAU — Alaska’s two U.S. senators split on a vote on raising the federal debt limit Wednesday’s vote was 55-43. Democratic Sen. Mark Begich voted in favor and Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski voted against. The measure permits Treasury Department to borrow regularly through March 15, 2015. Begich, in a statement, said he voted “to keep the country on the path to long-term economic security.” He said a default could lower the nation’s credit rating and lead to higher interest rates on home mortgages, college loans, credit cards and car loans. He added, moving forward, Congress must do more to cut the deficit. Murkowski said raising the debt limit represents an “abdication of Congress’ responsibility” to address the national debt. She said Congress must work together on a plan to rein in spending. — The Associated Press


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A-6 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, February 14, 2014

Peninsula Clarion, Friday, February 14, 2014

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A-8 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, February 14, 2014

Nation & World

Around the World ‘Snow is a four-letter word’: Northeast hit with another storm; South still reeling from ice PHILADELPHIA — Yet another storm paralyzed the Northeast with heavy snow and sleet Thursday, giving the winter-weary that oh-no-not-again feeling, while hundreds of thousands across the ice-encrusted South waited in the cold for the electricity to come back on. “Snow has become a four-letter word,” lamented Tom McGarrigle, a politician in suburban Philadelphia, where shoveling out has become a weekly — sometimes twice-weekly — chore. The sloppy and treacherous mix of snow and face-stinging sleet grounded more than 6,500 flights Thursday and closed schools and businesses as it made its way up the heavily populated Interstate 95 corridor. In its icy wake, utility crews in the South toiled to restore electricity to more than 800,000 homes and businesses, mostly in the Carolinas and Georgia. Temperatures in the hard-hit Atlanta area, with more than 200,000 outages, were expected to drop below freezing again overnight. At least 20 deaths, mostly in traffic accidents, were blamed on the storm.

Comcast deal to buy Time Warner Cable poses quandary for regulators, questions LOS ANGELES — With a single behemoth purchase, Comcast is creating a dominant force in American entertainment and presenting federal regulators with an equally outsized quandary: How should they handle a conglomerate that promises to improve cable TV and Internet service to millions of homes but also consolidates unprecedented control of what viewers watch and download? Comcast, which was already the nation’s No. 1 pay TV and Internet provider, says its $45.2 billion purchase of Time Warner Cable will provide faster, more reliable service to more customers and save money on TV programming costs. If the acquisition is approved, Comcast will serve some 30 million pay TV customers and 32 million Internet subscribers. But industry watchdogs say the deal will give the company too much power and ultimately raise the price of highspeed connections. “How much power over content do we want a single company to have?” said Bert Foer, president of the American Antitrust Institute, a Washington-based consumer-interest group. The all-stock deal approved by the boards of both companies trumps a proposal from Charter Communications to buy Time Warner Cable for about $38 billion. It also represents another giant expansion following Comcast’s $30 billion purchase of NBCUniversal, operator of networks like NBC, Bravo and USA, which was completed last March.

Male, female or custom? Facebook adds options for users to self-identify MENLO PARK, Calif. — You don’t have to be just male or female on Facebook anymore. The social media giant has added a customizable option with about 50 different terms people can use to identify their gender as well as three preferred pronoun choices: him, her or them. Facebook said the changes, shared with The Associated Press before the launch on Thursday, initially cover the company’s 159 million monthly users in the U.S. and are aimed at giving people more choices in how they describe themselves, such as androgynous, bi-gender, intersex, gender fluid or transsexual. “There’s going to be a lot of people for whom this is going to mean nothing, but for the few it does impact, it means the world,” said Facebook software engineer Brielle Harrison, who worked on the project and is herself undergoing gender transformation, from male to female.

Syria strikes kill 400 so far By BARBARA SURK and JOHN HEILPRIN Associated Press

GENEVA — The United States and Russia promised to try to break the stalemate in Syria peace talks, a U.N. mediator said Thursday, as Syrian activists said government shelling and airstrikes with makeshift barrel bombs killed about 400 people in the country’s largest city so far this month. A second round of peace talks in Geneva has offered a rare opportunity for conversation, but yielded little more than acrimony. The violence has escalated on the ground and delegates in Geneva have failed to even agree on an agenda for the talks. U.N.-Arab League mediator Lakhdar Brahimi said after meeting with senior U.S. and Russian officials that they pledged to try help. “They have kindly reaffirmed their support to what we are trying to do and promised that they will help both here and in their capitals and elsewhere to unblock the situation for us because until now we are not making much progress,” he told reporters. He met with U.S. Undersecretary of State Wendy Sherman

and Russian Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs Gennady Gatilov to try to salvage the talks. “Failure is always staring at us in the face. As far as the U.N. is concerned, we will certainly not leave one stone unturned if there is a possibility to move forward,” he said. The bombings in Aleppo are part of a campaign by President Bashar Assad’s forces to wrest control of neighborhoods that were seized by rebels in the northern city since mid-2012. They come as a cease-fire in the central city of Homs has been extended for three days as of Thursday in order to allow more people to leave besieged rebel-held parts of the city, the Homs governor said. Gov. Talal Barrazi said that as long as there are people who want to leave rebel-held areas in Homs, the truce will be extended. An official at Barrazi’s office said there were no evacuations from Homs on Thursday, adding that officials were working on clearing some 70 men of fighting age who left over the past days. The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity in line with regulations, said evacuations are expected to resume on Friday. It was the second extension since the truce went into

AP Photo/Bilal Hussein

Syrian citizens ride in the back of a truck with their belongings after fleeing Yabroud, the last rebel stronghold in Syria’s mountainous Qalamoun region, as they drive towards the LebaneseSyrian border town of Arsal in eastern Lebanon, Feb. 13. Syrian troops pounded Thursday the town of Yabroud the last rebel stronghold in Syria’s mountainous Qalamoun region, forcing hundreds to flee into the nearby Lebanese town of Arsal. Backed by Lebanon’s Hezbollah fighters, the Syrian army has been on a crushing offensive in the region since early December.

effect last week. Hundreds of civilians have been evacuated from Homs since Friday when a rare cease-fire went into effect. Aid workers took advantage of the temporary truce that was implemented by the warring sides before the second round of peace talks started in Geneva this week. The cease-fire expired on Wednesday night.

U.N. spokesman Martin Nesirky said the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, or OCHA, reported that 1,370 people have been evacuated from the Old City of Homs since last Friday and that food, medical supplies and essential household and hygiene items have been delivered for 2,500 people, with enough food for one month.

Obama to hold more than 18 Dem fundraisers By JOSH LEDERMAN Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama has committed to holding more than 18 fundraisers to help Democrats this year, putting the full force of his political brand behind his party’s efforts to gain seats in the House and prevent Republicans from snatching control of the Senate. The stepped-up commitment from the president stands in clear contrast to 2010, when Democrats complained Obama did too little to boost the party — and has been paying a heavy price ever since. Democrats that year took what Obama dubbed a “shellacking,” losing control

— The Associated Press

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of the House and severely impeding the president’s ability to move his legislative agenda through Congress. With no presidential campaign this year to attract Obama supporters to the polls, Democrats are concerned that 2014 could be a difficult year, especially if voters unhappy with Obama’s health care law opt to exact retribution in November on the Democrats who supported it. Traditionally, a president’s party loses seats during his sixth year in office, but Democrats are hoping to buck that trend. To pull that off, Democrats will need cash — lots of it. So the party is turning to its top fundraiser to help stockpile the

hundreds of millions of dollars that will help determine the outcome of November’s election. Obama has agreed to at least six fundraisers this year for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, which works to elect House Democrats, and another six for the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, according to Democrats involved in the planning, who demanded of anonymity because they weren’t authorized to discuss the events by name. He’ll also hold an

event for the Democratic Governors Association. “It’s certainly making up for lost time,” said former DCCC Chairman Vic Fazio, who represented California in Congress for two decades. “Unfortunately, a lot of the damage has been done. But now, I’m sure there’s a great deal of pleasure and satisfaction coming from the leadership.” His own approval ratings sagging, Obama’s value to Democrats on the campaign trail is limited.

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, February 14, 2014

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Hey Romeo, thank these guys for bringing the roses By SCOTT MAYEROWITZ AP Airlines Writer

MIAMI — If Cupid were to have a home, it would be Miami International Airport. Before millions of Americans can present their loved ones with a bouquet of Valentine’s Day roses, most of the flowers are flown from Colombia and Ecuador to Miami, many in the bellies of passenger planes. There, cargo handlers and customs agents — call them Cupid’s helpers — ensure that the deep red petals stay perfect until they reach their final destination. In the weeks leading up to Valentine’s Day, about 738 million flowers — 85 percent of imported flowers — come through the Florida airport. Los Angeles is a distant second, with 44 million. The roses, carnations, hydrangeas, sunflowers and other varieties are rushed by forklift from planes to chilled warehouses and then onto refrigerated trucks or other planes and eventually delivered to florists,

gas stations and grocery stores across the country. “We always joke that a passenger gets themselves to the next flight while a bit of cargo does not,” says Jim Butler, president of cargo operations at American Airlines. The biggest problem this Valentine’s Day might be the final few miles of the journey. A massive snowstorm that blanketed the east coast has made some suburban roads difficult for local delivery drivers. For U.S. passenger airlines such as American, cargo is a small, but increasingly important part of their business. New jets are built with more freight space and the airlines are adding new non-stop international routes popular with shippers. Most airline passengers focus on what’s visible to them, like the amount of legroom and the space in the overhead bins. Few think about what’s beneath the cabin floor. There’s fresh Alaskan salmon, this season’s latest luxury clothing from Milan and plenty

AP Photo/J Pat Carter

In this Jan. 9, photo, a group of U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials check imported flowers at Miami International Airport.

of Peruvian asparagus heading to London. Then there are the more unusual items like human corneas, the occasional live cheetah or lion and large shipments of gold and diamonds. And there are the flowers. Valentine’s Day is a big day for flowers, topped only by Mother’s Day, and cargo teams work extra hours ahead of both to ensure on-time deliveries.

“There’s a spark in the air while loading these,” says Andy Kirschner, director of cargo sales for Delta Air Lines. “You know this is going to loved ones.” Worldwide, airlines and air shippers carried about 52 million tons of freight representing $6 trillion worth of goods last year, according to the International Air Transport Associa-

tion, the airlines’ trade group. That was up 1.4 percent from the prior year. The amount of air cargo is expected to climb 17 percent in the next five years. Shipping by air costs about 10 times more than by sea, says David G. Ross, a transportation analyst at Stifel. So, plane rides are reserved for trendy highend fashion items, the hottest electronics or perishable foods and flowers. “If it’s the new product on the block and everybody wants it, then you can ship it by air,” Ross says. Most non-perishables, such as T-shirts, jeans and even mass-produced flat-screen TVs, travel by ship. “If you have a low price point on it, you don’t have room for expensive transportation,” says Ross. That’s been the philosophy of many corporations coming out of the recession — and has made for rough going for the air cargo business. Low interest rates have also factored into companies choosing to take a

few extra weeks to ship products to the marketplace by sea. As a result, air cargo rates have been depressed. Air shippers worldwide took in $59 billion in revenue last year, down 12 percent from two years ago. For the biggest U.S. airlines — American Airlines, Delta and United Airlines — cargo accounted for just 2.3 percent of their overall revenue last year, down from 2.5 percent in 2012 and 2.8 percent in 2011. United’s cargo revenue fell 13.4 percent last year, while Delta’s fell 5.4 percent. American’s remained virtually flat, thanks in part to its dominance on South American routes. It’s the largest carrier in Miami. The airlines don’t break out cargo costs but the side business is said to be profitable. They already have the jets and are paying the pilots, and they fill planes with enough passengers to cover their expenses. Plus, there’s plenty of space next to the passenger luggage in a wide-body jet like the Boeing 777.

Venezuela protest leader unseen amid arrest rumors By JOSHUA GOODMAN Associated Press

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CARACAS, Venezuela — A hard-line leader of Venezuela’s opposition dropped out of sight amid media reports Thursday that an arrest order had been issued charging he incited violence at anti-government protests that resulted in three deaths. Leopoldo Lopez was last heard from Wednesday night at a news conference where he vowed that demonstrations against President Nicolas Maduro’s 10-month-old government would continue. Allies dismissed any notion the Harvard-educated former mayor was lying low. They said Lopez was at his home in Caracas trying to verify the authenticity of a judge’s order that purportedly authorizes his arrest on charges including conspiracy, murder and terrorism. A leaked copy of the order was published

in the newspaper El Universal. Lopez’s backers also denounced an attempt by armed military intelligence officers to search the offices of his Popular Will party Thursday, calling it an effort to intimidate members. Lawyers for the party turned the officers away because they didn’t have a warrant. Chief federal prosecutor Luisa Ortega made no mention of an arrest order for Lopez in statements to the media Thursday, al-

though several Cabinet officials denounced him as the “mastermind” of what they called a strategy to replicate the unrest that preceded the 2002 coup that briefly removed President Hugo Chavez from power. Amid swirling rumors of an impending crackdown on dissent, Venezuela’s two political camps traded blame for violent clashes Wednesday that began when a group of pro-Maduro vigilantes roared up on motor-

cycles and fired guns at a small crowd of demonstrators who had been sparring with police. Some 200 students held a peaceful sit-in vigil in a Caracas plaza Thursday demanding justice for 24-year-old Bassil Da Costa, who was killed during the mayhem with a bullet wound to the head. Cabinet officials accused Lopez and a “fascist” conspiracy with links to right-wing elements in the U.S. with trying

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to destabilize the country and oust Maduro from power two months after his party’s candidates prevailed by a landslide in mayoral elections. In Washington, the U.S. State Department denied it had any involvement in Venezuela’s politics. Lopez’s allies blamed the blamed the violence on the government. They charged that security forces acting on the president’s orders stood by

while pro-government militia members attacked the small group of student protesters, who lingered downtown after thousands of other Maduro opponents went home after a demonstration. Lopez, the leader of a splinter faction of the opposition alliance challenging what he considers the meek leadership of two-time presidential candidate Henrique Capriles, has vowed to remain on the streets.


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Religion

‘Love stinks’— really? Try looking in the right places

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f all the sayings we hear about Valentine’s Day, you are hard pressed to find a greeting card with “Love Stinks” on the cover. The J. Geils Band sang this pithy anthem as the singer concluded he was in a one-sided relationship: “And so it goes till the day you die, this thing they call love it’s gonna make you cry. Love stinks, yeah yeah, love stinks.” While these lyrics were penned almost 35 years ago, it is a common response for many who have been hurt and broken by “love.” Even for those who have not felt that sting of brokenness, many can relate to Foreigner’s lyrics, “I Want to Know What Love Is.” Espe-

And when I find it, how do I live in love? I heard the Bible described once as God’s love letter to His creation. The “big story” is how God created humanity to be in relationship with Frank A lioto Him. When His creation revolted in cially on a day like today, there is a disobedience, God pursued with a longing to truly experience the real plan of love to come near and rescue meaning of love. them. The story of redemptive love There are many positive expresdrips off the pages. 1 John 4:7 desions of love in human relationships: clares, “love comes from God.” those for your spouse, children, God is the source of love and verse parents, brothers and sisters, family, eight says, “Whoever does not love, friends, etc. Some of us have been does not know God, because God is blessed to experience this kind of love.” So if someone does not love, love and bless others with it. Love it means that they do not know God. is more than a feeling, and it is hard God is love and His creation can only work. But where does love originate? understand what real love is when

Church Briefs Hidden talents date changed The Midnight Son Seventh Day Adventist Church invites the public to watch a Hidden Talent Show at 6:30 p.m. March 15 at the church, located Mile 8.2 of the Kenai Spur Highway in Kenai. For more information, call Toni Loop at 740-1476.

Sack Lunch Sunday

Voices of R eligion

they go to the source. The passage then explains how God demonstrated his love by sending Himself through Jesus to restore the relationship by His sacrificial death and resurrection (verse 10). People can respond to His love and be in relationship with the God who created them. This is not a one-sided love relationship, but an intimate love relationship that can be experienced and freely given to others. This divinely inspired love makes it possible for people to actually experience a love that does not “stink” and is not elusive. So, if you are “down on love,” or still “looking for love in all the wrong places,” consider this divine

love. The results will change your life, as you then can be a positive source of love for others. In loving others, with God’s love, we can truly live in love because “God lives in us and his love is made complete in us” (verse 12) That’s what LOVE is all about. Now go enjoy this Valentine’s Day! Frank Alioto is the pastor of The River Covenant Church: “An Alaskan church for people who would rather go to the River.” We gather on Sundays, 10:30 a.m. at Kalifornsky Beach Elementary in Soldotna. Call 252-2828 or visit www.therivercovenantchurch.org.

A year since Benedict’s decision

Food Pantry open weekly The Soldotna Food Pantry is open every Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. for residents in our community who may be experiencing food shortages. The Food Pantry is located at the Soldotna United Methodist Church at 158 South Binkley Street. Nonperishable food items or monetary donations may be dropped off at the church Tuesdays 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. or 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. and Sundays 9 a.m. to 12 noon. Thank you for your support.

Star of the North Lutheran Church, 216 Clothes 4 U at First Baptist North Forest Drive in Kenai, will serve free First Baptist Church Soldotna, located at 159 sack lunches every Sunday starting at 1 p.m. S. Binkley Street, is re-opening its Clothes 4 U For more information, call 283-4153 or visit program. It is open on the second and fourth www.sotnlc.org. Saturday of each month from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. All clothing and shoes are free to the public.

Sterling church hosts AWANA

Sterling Baptist Church is starting an United Methodist Church AWANA program this year, every Wednesday provides food pantry from 6-8 p.m. The club will meet at Sterling The Kenai United Methodist Church proBaptist Church. Children 3 years old through sixth grade are welcome. Call Sterling Baptist vides a food pantry for those in need every Monday from noon to 3:00 p.m. The Methodfor more information at 262-4711. ist Church is located on the Kenai Spur Highway next to the Boys and Girls Club. The enCalvary Baptist hosts AWANA trance to the Food Pantry is through the side Calvary Baptist Church in Kenai is of- door. The Pantry closes for holidays. For more fering AWANA for kids ages 3 through information contact the church office at 2836th grade. AWANA (www.awana.org) is 7868 or email kumcalaska@gmail.com. an international kids club. Each week, participants will memorize Bible verses, play Clothes Quarters open weekly games, hear Bible lessons, and earn rewards. Clothes Quarters at Our Lady of the AnBeginning Sunday, the club will meet at Kenai Middle School from 5:25-7:15 p.m. Use gels Church is open every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., and the first Saturday of the back doors. To register or for more information, call every month from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, call 907-283-4555. 283-4781 or visit www.kenaicalvary.org.

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By NICOLE WINFIELD Associated Press

VATICAN CITY — It was the quietest of announcements that had the effect of a thunderclap on the Catholic world: A year ago Tuesday, Pope Benedict XVI said in a voice so soft that cardinals strained to hear (and in a Latin not all could easily follow) that he was becoming the first pontiff to resign in more than half a millennium. On the eve of the anniversary, Benedict’s longtime private secretary credited his boss’ stunning decision with opening the way to the “enormous impact” Pope Francis is having on the church and world at large. Monsignor Georg Gaenswein’s comments sent out a message of continuity between the awkward, bookish Benedict and his charismatic, super-star successor, the first Jesuit pope and the first pontiff from Latin America. It also may suggest that Benedict approves of the dramatic changes that Francis is bringing about within the church — even if many seem to go against the grain of his more restrained papacy. “We are all seeing the impact that Pope Francis is having on the world, not just the faithful in the church but in the world — it’s an enormous impact — and this impact was also facilitated by Pope Benedict in resigning,”

Gaenswein told Vatican Television. “He opened a possibility that until then wasn’t there, and we can see that Pope Francis has taken this situation in hand and we’re delighted.” Gaenswein is in the historically unique situation of serving two popes: While he remains Benedict’s secretary, lives with him in his retirement home in the Vatican gardens and takes daily walks with him each afternoon, Gaenswein is also the head of Pope Francis’ household, arranging his schedule and appearing regularly with him at his Wednesday general audiences and other public events. Gaenswein was by Benedict’s side on that Monday morning, Feb. 11, 2013 when, during the course of a routine announcement of new saints on a Vatican holiday, Benedict announced that he no longer had the “strength of mind and body” to be pope and would retire at the end of the month. Francis was elected about a month later and has dazzled the world with his simple style, message of mercy over moralizing and a tone of welcoming that has thrilled progressive Catholics and troubled conservatives. He has since been named “Person of the Year” by Time magazine and has injected new life into an institution that was crumbling following

a decade of scandal over sexual abuse, and more recently over the theft of Benedict’s private papers by his own butler. As the anniversary of that momentous day approached, Vatican officials have sought to stress Benedict’s generosity, courage and service to the church in deciding to step down as they battle to preserve his legacy amid the increasing temptation to contrast his often problematic papacy and reserved personality with his crowd-pleasing successor. It’s no easy feat when no one ever made a “Super Pope” wall painting of Benedict or created a life-sized chocolate statue of him — as has been the case with Francis. Recently, the Vatican spokesman felt the need to defend Benedict when Rolling Stone magazine put Francis on the cover and compared his “gentle revolution” to the “disastrous papacy” of his predecessor. Benedict’s longtime deputy recently issued a mea culpa for not having been able to better protect his boss from the “ruthless criticism” lobbed his way over sexual abuse and the leaks of confidential papal documents. And over the weekend, Benedict’s personal theologian, Cardinal Georges Cottier, said the REAL Benedict really only came to be known once he resigned.

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. . . Fish Continued from page A-1

said of an encounter with law enforcement in another state. “I intended to bend down the barb, but it wasn’t adequate for that guy and it cost me $95.” Reed Morisky, one of three board members who voted in opposition to the proposal, said there was not enough science to prove that barbless hooks would be effective at reducing the mortality of catch-and-release fishing. “The research that I’ve read on catch-and-release is that time out of water is more critical than barbless even,” Morisky said. “We’ve heard that this has no conservation value, it would be punitive to thousands of Alaskans.” Johnson, who amended the proposal to include a definition of a barbless hook, said he thought anglers could learn to be effective without barbs. “It requires a greater level of skill and attention to what you’re doing,” he said. “It’s something that would require evolution of ability. ... It encourages more deliberate fishing.” After the meeting adjourned, Kenai River Profesional Guide Association President Steve McClure said he was happy to see a barbless hook regulation go into effect. “I think it’s good they finally got something on the record,” he said. “They finally defined it, that’s been the hold-up.” Johnstone said he had voted in favor of barbless hook proposals, in other parts of the state, to no avail and was happy to see one finally pass. “It was totally unexpected to me,” Johnstone said. “I didn’t think we’d ever get to this point. I thought that I’d fallen on my sword enough times in the past and we weren’t going to get there. I was pretty surprised.”

fisheries management coordinator Matt Miller told board members that using barbless hooks would not reduce mortality in the fishery from releases of hooked fish. “It’s going to be in the inefficiency of the gear,” he said. According to ADFG commentary on the issue, angler efficiency is estimated to be reduced by between 11 to 24 percent in barbless hook fisheries “with young and inexperienced anglers disproportionately affected.” The measure was one of several discussed at the board’s Lower and Upper Cook Inlet meetings. During the Lower Cook Inlet meeting Miller presented research calling barbless hooks an allocation not just among user groups, but among anglers. Dwight Kramer, chairman of the Kenai Area Fishermen’s Coalition supported the proposal during the Lower Cook Inlet meeting. “There’s a big difference when you’re trying to release a fish and just clipping the hook out or not, it comes out a lot easier when there’s not a barb on it,” Kramer said. The board opted to define a barbless hook as one that was manufactured barbless with a smooth bump on the shank, or a hook with a barb filed completely off or one with the barb crimped to the point that it makes contact with the shank. The definition was important, said Mike Crawford, chairman of the Kenai and Soldotna Fish Game Advisory during his testimony on the issue at the Lower Cook Inlet meeting. “In the past, I’ve received a citation in a barbless area when Reach Rashah McChesney I had my barb bent over, but it at rashah.mcchesney@peningrabbed his sweater,” Crawford sulaclarion.com.

. . . Talks Continued from page A-1

producers. Lawmakers are currently considering Senate Bill 138/ House Bill 277, which stems from the agreement. If it is enacted, according to the ordinance, the commissioner of the Department of Natural Resources will be authorized to negotiate fiscal terms, including a PILT. “And that may be fine,” Navarre said. “In fact it probably makes good sense for a project of this size to have something like that as part of it, but we’d like to know what that’s going to be and be able to have our input into that. Otherwise it’s just letting them decide what we’re going to get and it may

negatively impact us in the long term.” If a PILT is enacted, the borough will generate less money that it does with its current property tax structure, Navarre said. The borough’s revenue would depend on how the PILT is structured. If the tax is paid to the state and then a portion from the state is paid to local governments, Navarre said, will there be a contractual guarantee? Or will the state be allowed to cut down the PILT counted on by local governments? If the latter is true, he said there could be severe impacts to governments dealing with the costs related to hosting a project of that magnitude. The borough collects nearly $4.5 million from state assessed oil and gas property for the general government as well as

The Alaska Board of Fisheries approved 44 of the 236 proposals on the table at its triennial Upper Cook Inlet finfish meeting, Jan. 31 to Feb. 13 in Anchorage. The changes restrict fishing somewhat with an eye toward conserving fish and getting more salmon into rivers throughout the region. Certain habitat and inriver protections also carried. n Proposal 209 — Modified the Kenai River LateRun King Salmon Management Plan. n Proposal 214 — Amend the Kasilof River Salmon Management Plan. n Proposal 186 — Reference Kenai River early-run king OEG and provide department with flexibility. n Proposal 192 — Change the Kenai River early-run king slot limit size. n Proposal 201,202 — Extended the Slikok Creek king salmon sanctuary an additional 200 yards, and made that area the lower boundary for restrictions in July to conserve early-run king, including prohibiting bait there for two weeks in July. n Proposal 166 — Allows a 24-hour closure window for the setnet fishery in the Upper District between Monday and Thursday. n Proposal 170 — Increased the possession limit for Kenai River sockeyes from three to six fish. n Proposal 153 — Changed the Kasilof Sockeye Management Plan to allow setnets to operate within 1,200 feet of the mean high tide mark in the Kasilof River Special Harvest Area, and restrict the drift fleet in that same area. n Proposal 135 — Changed the area descriptions and other components of the drift fishery management plan, including the time available for fishing. n Proposal 173 — Modified the pink salmon plan to clarify that it referred to the Upper Subdistrict. n Proposal 178 — Removed the 600-foot restriction from the pink salmon management plan and allow setnets to be operate from shore in the Upper Subdistrict. n Proposal 119 — Changed the one percent rule for sockeye harvests in the Upper Subdistrict so that it applies separately to the Kasilof Section and a combined Kenai and East Forelands section. n Proposal 263 — Allow coho fishing from a guided vessel in the Kenai River on labor day. n Proposal 319 — Changed the regulations for the Jim Creek drainage to close the area to sportfishing on Mondays and Tuesdays from mid-August through December, and preventing anglers from continuing to fish after reaching a salmon bag limit. n Proposals 269, 270 — Updated sockeye salmon numbers in the personal use salmon management

about another $2 million from locally assessed industry properties. Service areas receive taxes based on their mill rates. The State of Alaska taxes oil and gas companies at 20 mills minus the local mill rate. The borough’s mill rate is 4.5, and for the Nikiski area, mill rates for emergency and maintenance services are applied on top of that. A mill represents $1 of tax for each $1,000 of taxable value. Whether the state will also be receiving PILT from the producers or will still be paid based on a mill rate of 20 is unclear, Navarre said. If the companies do make a PILT to the state and perhaps decide to make the payment one time instead of dealing with regular municipal tax structure changes, and then the state determines how to distribute the

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plan to align with the Kenai River Late-Run Sockeye Salmon Management Plan, and clarified the harvest recording regulations so that harvest must be recorded before salmon are transported from the area open to fishing. n Proposal 291 — Extend the personal-use smelt fishery on the Lower Kenai River from April 1 to June 15. n Proposal 318 — Open the Fish Creek personaluse fishery from July 10 to 31 unless the sockeye escapement is projected to be less than 50,000. n Proposal 124 — Changed certain regulatory markers for the Northern District. n Proposals 128, 129 — Changed registration requirements for set and drift gillnet gear in Upper Cook Inlet to refer to electronic registration capabilities, and removing the registration requirement for joint drift gear. n Proposal 252 — Allow rainbow fishing year round on the Kenai River downstream of the Lower Killey River and increase the spawning closure area. n Proposals 255, 256, 257, 258 — Change some Kenai River management areas and spawning closures for resident species, and change the pike fishing gear limits ice fishers targeting northern pike at Stormy Lake. n Proposals 229, 230, 231, 232 — Limit the area where king fishing is allowed on Moose Creek and change notation and regulatory markers on the Kenai River. n Proposal 233 — Prohibit sport fishing at the Soldotna Centennial Campground boat launch lagoon. n Proposal 298 — Push the date for allowing bait on the Deshka River from May 15 to June 1. n Proposal 305 — Closed the Fish Creek drainage to sportfishing. n Proposal 306 — Move several lakes from one unit to another in the Susitna River drainage. n Proposal 316 — Require the use of four-stroke or direct injection two-stroke motors on the Little Susitna River. n Proposal 322, 324, 325 — Change the Eklutna Tailrace fishing regulations, update the stocked lakes listing for the Knik Arm drainage and reduce the bag limit for Anchorage stocked lakes. n Proposal 323, 376 — Create youth-only coho and king fisheries in the Eklutna Tailrace. n Proposal 48 — Require barbless hooks when catch and release fishing for salmon. n Proposal 244 — Close Hidden Lake Creek and Jean Lake Creek to salmon fishing.

. . . City

payments to municipalities, is a “huge issue,” Navarre said. “And we don’t know (the method), and if it’s allocated by Continued from page A-1 valuation, fine,” Navarre said. “The borough is probably OK whole project cost. “The council still can overwith that, but we don’t know any of the details that’s the big- ride objections,” he said. “It just gives more weight and vagest issue.” lidity to the objections process Kaylee Osowski can be for property owners.” An ordinance amending city reached at kaylee.osowski@ code concerning streets, sidepeninsulaclarion.com.

walks and public places was introduced on the consent agenda for public hearing at the Feb. 26 meeting at 6 p.m. Revisions to the code include giving projects more flexibility by changing “minimum right-of-way” in definitions of different types of streets to “recommended right-of-way.” Kaylee Osowski can be reached at kaylee.osowski@ peninsulaclarion.com.

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SoHi drops state opener in 3 OTs Stars come within minutes of being 1st Peninsula team to win opener at state By JOEY KLECKA Peninsula Clarion

When Thursday’s first-round state tournament game with Chugiak went into overtime, the Soldotna Stars hockey team had to be feeling the game was right in their wheelhouse. For SoHi, it was the third straight overtime game — and seventh of the year — going back to last Friday, so when the buzzer sounded after regulation with a 1-1 score, Soldotna knew what to do. Unfortunately for the Stars, a state title bid went up in smoke with a 2-1 loss to the Mustangs at the Curtis Me-

nard Sports Complex in Wasilla. Thursday’s tilt took three overtime periods to decide a winner, but Sam Hanson netted the game-winner for Chugiak 2 minutes, 59 seconds, into the period to the uproar of the blueand-black-clad crowd. Before the game went into extra minutes, however, it looked like Soldotna was on the verge of becoming the first Kenai Peninsula hockey team to win a first-round game at the state tournament, when Soldotna junior Bobo Lott scored the game’s first goal with 10:31 left in the contest. For Soldotna head coach Aaron Swanson, the final 10 minutes of the

game felt slow, as his team tried to hang on to a one-goal lead. “It was a heartbreaker of a game for sure,” Swanson said. “We wanted to keep playing our game, we didn’t tease anything out, we scored our goal and kept playing the way we were playing.” With the loss, the Stars get one more chance at keeping their season alive with an 8 a.m. matchup with Lathrop today. If they win, they will compete in the tournament fourth-place game Saturday morning. Against Chugiak, the Stars were facing pressure all game long, getting outshot 42-22. Swanson said the open-

ing 15 minutes were not exactly what he was hoping for, as the Mustangs outshot SoHi 13-3. “The first period, we were nervous but we still played well,” Swanson said. Soldotna had a number of chances to score narrowly brushed away by Chugiak goalie Jack Straub in the second period, but still the game remained scoreless heading into the third period. With both goalies working on a shutout, something had to give. After Lott’s goal early in the third frame, which he scored on a rebound shot from Coel Nelson, SoHi continued to attack, but the Mustangs be-

came aggressive as they tried to keep their state title chances alive. “We just kept it as simple as possible,” said Chugiak coach Rodney Wild. “We were just keeping guys committed on defense, getting in the shooting lanes. Usually the teams that win overtimes are the teams that make the fewest mistakes. When you make mistakes in overtime, you don’t get a second opportunity.” With 1:20 left, Joseph Brazfield took the puck down the ice toward SoHi goalie Cody Harvey and took a shot, lifting it into the air, which Harvey nearly caught. Unfortunately, the See PUCK, page B-4

Skiers face uncertainty But that hasn’t stopped them before, so why would it now? By JEFF HELMINIAK Peninsula Clarion

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AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Paul Chiasson

Skiers will enter the great unknown today and Saturday at Tsalteshi Trails in the Region III Nordic Ski Championships. And they are just fine with that. Will it snow? Or will the conditions stay blazing fast, as they have been since the snowpack froze rock-solid weeks ago? Will a ski glide smoothly? Or will it stutter over the forest debris that blanketed the trails in a windstorm just a week ago? Will the competition be similar to the Lynx Loppet held way back in mid-December, the last time most of the region schools got together? Or have

things changed in the hit-ormiss training conditions of this season? And what will it be like to race a classic race if there are no classic tracks? “Conditions may not be the best,” said Kenai Central coach Brad Nyquist, who was in a bus this season that crashed on the way to a Valdez meet. “Things may be a bit adverse, but that’s the way this season has gone. “It’s been a season of constant change, and it has forced us to adapt, but that’s what we as ski teams seem to do.” Alaska spring sports may disagree a little bit, but there is no Alaska prep sport that is affected by the weather as much See SKI, page B-4

Evgeni Plushenko of Russia waves as he leaves the ice after withdrawing from the men’s figure skating competition due to illness at the Iceberg Skating Palace during the 2014 Winter Olympics on Thursday in Sochi, Russia.

Plushenko calls it a career Skyview girls Russian star withdraws from men’s event due to medical reasons win in Valdez By The Associated Press

SOCHI, Russia — Evgeni Plushenko’s Olympics are over. His competitive career, too. The Russian star retired Thursday just after he withdrew from the men’s event at the Sochi Olympics for medical reasons. The 31-year-old Plushenko is the only modern-era figure skater to win medals in four Olympics. He helped Russia win the team gold over the weekend. “I think it’s God saying, ‘Evgeni, enough, enough with skating,’” said Plushenko, who originally was hurt in a training session Wednesday. “Age, it’s OK. But I have 12 surger-

ies. I’d like to be healthy.” In warmups before the short program, he fell on a triple axel and said it felt “like a knife in my back.” He skated toward his coaches while bent over, then tried to loosen up by skating around the Iceberg rink some more. He then attempted another axel and botched it, shook his head and consulted with coach Alexei Mishin. When Plushenko’s name was announced to the crowd seconds later — to loud applause — he skated to the event referee and withdrew. Before the latest injury, Plushenko said he planned to go out in style. “I said to myself, ‘Evgeni,

you must skate. It’s two more days, short and long program,’” the 2006 Olympic gold medalist said. He also won Olympic silver in 2002 and 2010. Before leaving the ice, he held up both hands to the crowd as if to say he was sorry, and took a small bow. He was Russia’s only man in the competition, so the host country will have no finisher in the event. Plushenko finished second at the Russian national championships and didn’t appear headed for Sochi at all. He was added to the Russian roster late last month after a trial run-through in front of federation officials convinced them

he was the country’s best men’s option. That decision paid off when he finished second in the team short program and first in the free skate, helping Russia to its first gold of the Sochi Games. In that final full practice Wednesday, he fell three times, but was laughing and joking with Mishin after two of the flops. Mishin even said Plushenko was “ready” for the men’s event. That changed Thursday, and when Plushenko limped out of the arena, the cheers turned to mild applause from the stunned audience. “Some people say we had See SOCHI, Page B-3

Staff report

The Skyview girls basketball team started the 37th Annual Valdez Elks Basketball Tournament with a 45-24 victory over Nome. The Panthers advance to the semifinals of the tournament today at 4 p.m. against Hutchison. Hutchison notched a victory over Barrow on Thursday. Hayley Ramsell paced the Panthers with 16 points, while Jacy Rouse had 10 points and Sam Reynolds added nine. The Panthers led by 22-10 at halftime, then blew open the game with a 15-4 run in the third quarter for a 39-14 score. In other girls action at the tournament, the Seward girls toppled Kotzebue 29-25. The game was close throughout.

The Seahawks face the Cordova-Valdez winner at 7 p.m. in the semifinals. In the boys tournament, the Skyview boys lost 69-40 to Barrow. The Panthers face the Cordova-Valdez loser in the fourth-place bracket today at 11:30 a.m. The Nome boys beat Seward. Seward plays the HutchisonKotzebue loser at 8:30 a.m. Kenai Central hoops loses a pair in Sitka The Kenai Central girls and boys basketball teams got off to slow starts and lost on the road in nonconference action in Sitka on Thursday night. The Kenai girls trailed 17-5 after the first period. The Kards See HOOPS, page B-4

Thunder give Lakers another home loss By The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Kevin Durant scored 19 of his 43 points in the fourth quarter and the Oklahoma City Thunder sent the undermanned Los Angeles Lakers to a record-setting seventh straight home loss with a 107-103 victory on Thursday night. The Thunder have a 1½-game lead on Indiana for the NBA’s best record. Their 43-12 mark has equaled the best start in the franchise’s 47-year history, set by the 1995-96 Seattle Supersonics. Chris Kaman and Wesley Johnson scored 19 points apiece for Los Angeles, and Kendall Marshall added 14 points and 17 assists. The Lakers have lost 22 of their last 27 games and are tied with Sacramento for last place in the Western Conference. Oklahoma City is 20-7 without second-leading scorer Russell Westbrook, who hasn’t played since getting a triple-

double on Christmas Day at Madison Square Garden. Westbrook is recovering from arthroscopic surgery on his right knee. Forward Serge Ibaka had 10 points and seven rebounds after averaging 17.9 points over his previous 16 games. The Thunder, coming off a 98-95 win against Portland in which they held All-Stars LaMarcus Aldridge and Damian Lillard to a combined 1-for-17 from the field in the second half, trailed by as many as 15 points late in the third quarter. But Durant’s first 3-pointer of the game cut the Lakers’ lead to 85-77 in the opening minute of the fourth, triggering a 15-2 run that enabled Oklahoma City to pull ahead 92-87 with 5:46 to play. Los Angeles committed seven of its 23 turnovers during the first 4:03 of the final period, and former Laker Derek Fisher tied it at 87-all on a 3-pointer. Durant then stole the ball from

Johnson and hit a driving layup that gave the Thunder their first lead, 89-87. The five-time AllStar capped the rally with a 3-pointer 32 seconds later. Steve Blake responded with a three-point play after getting fouled by Jeremy Lamb on an off-balance 20-footer from the left elbow. That put the Lakers back in front 95-94 with 3:34 left, but Ibaka’s two free throws put the Thunder ahead to stay with 2:38 remaining and they closed with an 11-7 run as Fisher and Durant each made two free throws in the final 17 seconds. Lakers coach Mike D’Antoni was down to eight healthy players, with point guard Steve Nash sitting out because of a recurrence of root irritation in his back and hamstring. Los Angeles is still missing five of its top six scorers — Kobe Bryant, Pau Gasol, Jordan Farmar, Nick Young, Jodie Meeks and Xavier Henry. The Lakers came out of the

gate like a team that desperately wanted to avoid surpassing the franchise record for consecutive home losses they shared with the 1992-93 squad. Marshall, starting at point guard in Nash’s place, led Los Angeles to a 24-17 lead after one quarter with 10 points, and Shawne Williams matched his total in the second quarter to help the Lakers take a 54-45 halftime advantage. BULLS 92, NETS 76 CHICAGO — Taj Gibson scored 16 points and Carlos Boozer returned from an injury to add 15 in Chicago’s victory over Brooklyn. Boozer missed the last three games because of a strained left calf. Joakim Noah had 14 points and 13 rebounds for his fifth straight double-double. The Bulls (27-25) AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill moved two games above .500 for the first time since they were 6-4 Lakers center Chris Kaman, right, puts up a shot as Oklahoma on Nov. 21. They have won four of City Thunder forward Serge Ibaka, of Congo, defends during five. the first half Thursday in Los Angeles. C

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Jeter will get farewell tour just like Rivera RONALD BLUM AP Sports Writer

TAMPA, Fla. — Derek Jeter pulled into the parking lot of the New York Yankees’ minor league complex on Thursday, walked out of his gray Mercedes-Benz and waved a hand holding a bottle of mineral water as about 50 fans applauded his mere arrival. After taking batting practice in an indoor cage and throwing on a field, he started to drive out of the parking lot about 90 minutes later — the car cleaned and polished, its silver hub caps shining. He stopped and rolled down the driver’s side window to sign photographs, baseballs and other memorabilia for the first dozen people or so who had waited in line. Already the most adored player on the baseball team with the highest profile, the New York Yankees captain figures to be the recipient of an ever-heightened level of adulation during the next 7½ months as he circumnavigates the major leagues in a farewell tour that could be called Pinstriped Parting 2 following Mariano Rive-

ra’s emotional exit last year. Asked whether he felt good about the decision he announced Wednesday, Jeter responded: “I do.” But he didn’t want to get into an extended discussion. New York opens its big league spring training camp Friday, and position players report next week, when Jeter is likely to hold a news conference to discuss his decision. “I’ll address it when we get over there the first day of spring. It’s easier that way,” he said. Jeter took the Yankees by surprise with his Wednesday morning telephone call to owner Hal Steinbrenner, and his Facebook announcement later in the day jolted fans accustomed for nearly two decades to the constants of his hot hitting and cool demeanor. Speculation began about a suitable replacement: Hanley Ramirez, Asdrubal Cabrera and J.J. Hardy are among the players eligible for free agency after the season. “I wish he’d have quit in ‘05,” Cleveland manager Terry Francona said, laughing, remembering Jeter’s many performances against his Boston

Red Sox. “If you’re a baseball fan, he is the walking example of what’s good in baseball. You respect him so much, and yet you want him to have as little to do with the outcome of the game if you’re his opponent — and that’s probably the biggest compliment you can give him. He’s going to find a way to beat you whether it’s on the bases, on defense or at the plate. “And again, because I was in that division, I saw it too much,” Francona went on. “He ranks right up there with the most respected players. I’m glad he’s walking away on his own terms. We’ll probably get to see him seven, eight times. I hope he goes 0 for 28 and we give him a nice plaque or something, but I don’t see that really happening.” By Wednesday night the Yankees had sent out an email with links to Jeter gear and ticket information. They announced Thursday that general individual ticket sales will start Feb. 24 — up from March 5 last year. Stubhub’s lowest price for the Yankees’ regular-season home finale on Sept. 25 was

$307.50 for a single upper-deck seat and its highest was a fanciful $66,432.90 for a pair in the bleachers. Asking amounts for game No. 162 at Boston three days later were similarly inflated. Mariano Rivera’s farewell season turned into a marketing opportunity, Already Steiner Sports is selling Jeter gameused equipment that includes jerseys ($15,000 and up), cleats ($1,049.99 and up), batting gloves ($599.99 and up) and even a sock ($525). “This was all sudden. We’ll sit with Derek and Casey and his people and come up with a plan,” Yankees President Randy Levine said, referring to Jeter’s agent, Casey Close. Jeter had no desire to switch positions or change teams. He wanted to be a member of the Yankees and a shortstop, and nothing else. He was limited to 17 games last season after breaking an ankle in the 2012 playoffs, and he turns 40 in June. He could join Luis Aparicio and Ozzie Smith as the only one-position players with 2,500 or more major league games, according to

AP Photo/Chris O’Meara

New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter smiles as he leaves after practicing at the baseball team’s minor league facility Thursday in Tampa, Fla. Jeter announced that he will be retiring after the 2014 season.

STATS. If he is able to regain his place on a regular basis, he would be a superannuated shortstop. Only Honus Wagner (1914, ‘15), Luke Appling (‘47, ‘49) and Omar Vizquel (2007) have appeared in 100 or more games at the position

in the year they turned 40 or later. “With the captain, it’s an experience I’m going to tell all my kids and the people that I know,” Yankees catcher Francisco Cervelli said, “because I think he’s the greatest player I’ve ever seen in my life.”

Bielema, Saban concerned about quick attacks Proposal would not allow college offenses to snap ball until 29 seconds are left on 40-second play clock RALPH D. RUSSO AP College Football Writer

NEW YORK — Arkansas coach Bret Bielema and Alabama coach Nick Saban voiced their concerns about the effects of up-tempo, no-huddle offenses on player safety to the NCAA committee that passed a proposal to slow down those attacks. Neither Bielema nor Saban were on the committee and they did not vote on the proposal passed Wednesday to allow defenses time to substitute between plays by prohibiting offenses from snapping the ball until 29 seconds are left on the 40-second play clock. NCAA coordinator of officials Rogers Redding said Thursday that Bielema was at the meeting in Indianapolis as a representative of the American Football Coaches Association. “Coach Saban asked for the opportunity to meet with the committee and

talk about this,” Redding said. “It’s not routine, but it’s not unique, either.” Bielema and Saban run methodical offenses and have publicly questioned if the quickening pace of offenses is good for the game. FBS coaches on the panel are Air Force’s Troy Calhoun, who is the chairman, and Louisiana-Lafayette’s Todd Berry. Their teams ranked 104th and 93rd, respectively, last season in plays per game in FBS. The proposal must be approved by the playing rules oversight panel, which meets March 6. Redding said it’s not a rubber stamp panel, but more often than not it approves proposals. The panel does not consider competitive issues, Redding said. “Their role is to examine rules on the basis of player safety, economic impact and image of the game,” he said. Right now the proposal is in what is known as a comment period. Coaches

‘I don’t see the injury piece. I think we need more data.’ — Steve Addazio, Boston College coach can electronically submit their opinions to the NCAA on the proposal, supporting it or opposing it. Redding said it is “rare though not unheard of for the committee to revisit” a proposal. He added the comments are taken seriously by the oversight panel. Redding said rules changes that would affect the pace of the game were discussed by the committee last year and during the AFCA convention in January at meeting he attended of about 35 coaches, including Bielema.

The proposal passed by the NCAA committee was an idea that came out of the AFCA meeting, Redding said. Plenty of coaches have made it known they are not happy with the proposal, especially those such as Auburn’s Gus Malzahn, Texas Tech’s Kliff Kingsbury, Texas A&M’s Kevin Sumlin and Arizona’s Rich Rodriguez who run fast-paced offenses. “The 10-second rule is like asking basketball to take away the shot clock - Boring!” Oklahoma State coach Mike Gundy tweeted Thursday. “It’s like asking a blitzing linebacker to raise his hand.” The committee said the proposed change addresses concerns that defensive players are at increased risk for injury because defenses cannot substitute if the offense goes straight to the line scrimmage when the ball is spotted and the 40-second clock has starts. An exception will be made in the

Storm wreaks havoc on schedule STEVE REED AP Sports Writer

The winter storm that continued to wreak havoc Thursday in the South and Northeast forced the postponement of sporting events for the second straight day. Two men’s basketball games featuring Top 25 teams were postponed — No. 13 Louisville at Temple, and No. 23 SMU at Rutgers. They have been rescheduled for Friday night. Other Division I men’s games scheduled for Thursday night that have been postponed include: Charleston Southern at High Point, Bryant at Mount St. Mary’s, Central Connecti-

cut State at St. Francis, Wagner at Farleigh Dickinson, Northern Kentucky at Kennesaw State, and Western Carolina at Chattanooga. Due to snow in the Baltimore and Washington markets, live racing at Laurel Park was canceled Thursday. It’s the third cancellation of the year at the central Maryland track. Races at Aqueduct New York for Friday have been canceled. The winter storm that left the South blanketed in snow Wednesday, moved up the East Coast causing further issues. In Baltimore, residents awoke to 15 inches of snow. Washington had nearly a foot of snow forcing the city’s two main airports to

close. Philadelphia has 9 inches of snow and still counting. In Chapel Hill, N.C., snow continued to fall and the Tar Heels’ three-game baseball series with College of Charleston starting Friday was postponed. That comes a day after snow and ice forced the postponement of the rivalry men’s basketball game between No. 8 Duke and North Carolina. That game has been rescheduled for Thursday, Feb. 20 with the Atlantic Coast Conference announcing it will start at 9 p.m. However, the 17th-ranked Tar Heels women’s team did play against Pittsburgh on Thursday night. And 10th-ranked North

Gordon says title will mean retirement DAN GELSTON AP Sports Writer

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Jeff Gordon is prepared to retire if he can win a fifth NASCAR championship. The 42-year-old Gordon won championships in 1995, 1997, 1998 and 2001. He won all of them when NASCAR’s top series ran under the Winston Cup banner. He wants to win a Sprint Cup championship. With a family at home, a fifth title could convince him to call it quits. “If that happened, that would be all the reasons I need to say, this is it. I’m done,” Gordon says. “Go out on a high note.” Gordon said recently he was “jokingly serious” about retiring after another championship. At Daytona, he insisted he was serious. “I go home and I look at my trophy room. I see four trophies, championship trophies,” he said Thursday at Daytona 500 media day. “But they say

Winston Cup on them. You can name me a four-time Sprint Cup champion for technical reasons all you want, but to me, I’m still not. I want that before my career’s over.” He would love to make a push in the No. 24 in the revamped Chase for the Sprint Cup championship. Gordon was added to the Chase last season when NASCAR chairman Brian France used his power to make an unprecedented expansion to the field after two separate investigations into radio chatter revealed numerous instances of race manipulation at Richmond. France determined Gordon did not have a fair chance to race his way into the 12-driver field because of the actions of at least three organizations over the closing laps. Gordon was sixth last season in the standings, his best finish since he was third in 2009. He has 88 Cup victories, third on the career Cup list, and has had only two winless seasons since 1993. C

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Carolina State won at Clemson in a women’s game that started three hours earlier than scheduled to help with potential travel problems. In Columbia, S.C., the weather eased enough for South Carolina to beat Vanderbilt 65-59 in a rescheduled game from Wednesday. It was eerily quiet with only about 1,000 fans in attendance, and no pep band or cheerleaders. In Greenville, S.C., practice for the College All-Star Bowl game featuring many of the nation’s top NFL prospects was moved back Thursday, but the game is expected to go on as scheduled Friday night at Furman’s Paladin Stadium.

final two minutes of each half to allow the offense to snap the ball as quickly as it wants. Many coaches aren’t convinced this is a player safety issue. “I don’t see the injury piece,” said Boston College coach Steve Addazio, whose team runs an offense that is rarely in a rush. “I think we need more data.” Redding said the proposal was not made based on a study of data. “I can’t say there is hard physical evidence,” he said. “It’s more common sense.” Redding added he studied film of two games involving up-tempo offenses and only once in each game did a team snap the ball within 10 seconds of the 40-second clock starting. “The majority of time was somewhere in the 20s,” he said. “The average time was 17 seconds. “You really don’t impact what people are already doing.”

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, February 14, 2014

B-3

Russians get off to quick start in hockey tourney

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he hometown lads started so fast that you half-expected to see Vladimir Putin, the 60-year-old president who suited up for an exhibition game here last month, slip back into a uniform and take a few shifts. Maybe Maria Sharapova, too. Russia vs. Slovenia was always going to be a mismatch. But the hosts’ shaky 5-2 win in Thursday’s opener turned out to be cold comfort for a nervous nation hoping to reconnect with its glorious — but increasingly distant — hockey past. Russia got the first goal when Alex Ovechkin roofed a wrister just over a minute into the game. The second came less than three minutes later when Ovechkin, who plays for the National Hockey League’s Washington Capitals, came up with a new variation on the old Statue of Liberty play. He stopped the puck just outside the Slovenia blue line and then stood still, dummying the defense while speeding teammate Evgeni Malkin scooped up the disc and zoomed in untouched for another easy score. The cheerleaders lining every staircase at the Bolshoy Ice Dome began swaying in unison, and fans wearing the blue, red-and-white Russia jerseys — including a few sporting throwback red “C.C.C.P” versions, evoking memories of the old Soviet Union’s “Big Red Machine” Olympic dynasty — responded by howling at the top of their lungs. But things got quiet almost as soon as the second period began. After managing just four shots and one legit scoring chance in the opening

20 minutes, the Slovenians notched an early goal from Ziga Jeglic to pull within 2-1. The building went eerily quiet for the next 15 minutes after that, then revived briefly when Malkin netted his second during a power play, on a snapshot from the slot, with some two minutes left in the period. But barely a minute later, back came Jeglic, squirming between two Russian defenders and finally slipping the puck past keeper Semyon Varlamov with all the oomph of a hotel bill arriving under the door. No matter. It counted, and suddenly Slovenia was back within 3-2 and hardly looking like such a pushover anymore. “Didn’t seem like in that first period they were nervous,” recalled Jeglic, who plays professionally in Germany. “Then we said in our locker room, we have nothing to lose.” We can only imagine what Russian coach Zinetula Bilyaletdinov told his charges after the second period. “We have 15 players from the NHL, they have one! And his father is probably the only man in the country who knows enough about hockey to be the coach! We have 27 shots, they have eight! We have 70 times more people, 825 times the number of square miles — and some of you are going to wind up living in a very remote corner, with very few inhabitants, if you don’t go out there and turn this around!” What Bilyaletdinov said he told his side was slightly less dramatic. “Lots of beautiful passes, but at the end of the day, all that matters is scoring goals. I tried to explain to them,” he said, “there are some things we need to fix.”

S ports V iews J im L itke So they did. Valeri Nichushkin and Anton Belov scored for Russia three minutes apart, the second coming after Slovenian netminder Robert Kristan had dropped his knees expecting a low shot from the point. When Belov’s high drive hit the net and the goal horn sounded, Kristan pitched forward and lay face down on the ice for a few seconds, knowing his side wasn’t going to find its way back from the deficit. Beating Russia at home was always going to be a big ask for Slovenia. As for other teams, “it’s going to be tough,” said Anze Kopitar, who plays for the Los Angeles Kings and is Slovenia’s only NHL entrant. “It’s kind of like going in a road rink in the NHL, and some rinks are tougher than others,” he added, “and I’m sure this is going to be no different.” On the contrary. If the Russians can’t play any better than this, they’re going to get bounced from the tournament by the time the medals are being handed out and perhaps even sooner. Considering their lineage — after the Big Red Machine made its debut at the 1956 games, the Soviets won seven of the next nine (and an eighth if you count the Unified Team in 1992) — and adding that Putin himself has said anything less than a medal would be cause for some serious reflection, this

AP Photo/Mark Humphrey

Russia forward Alexander Ovechkin reacts with forward Alexander Syomin and forward Yevgeni Malkin after scoring a goal against Slovenia in the first period of a men’s ice hockey game at the 2014 Winter Olympics on Thursday in Sochi, Russia.

Russian team is in trouble. How much depends on where you sit. After the game a reporter asked Bilyaletdinov whether it would be “a death sentence” to leave Varlamov in the net for Russia’s next game against the United States, which pummeled a much-better Slovakia team 7-1 in its opener.

“Every player,” the stone-faced coach responded, “has a chance to be in for any of the games.” At this rate, maybe even Putin. Jim Litke is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at jlitke@ap.org and follow him at Twitter.com/JimLitke.

Bach OK with balmy weather STEPHEN WILSON AP Sports Writer

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AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

A shirtless spectator watches Russia’s Julia Ivanova compete during the women’s 10K classical-style cross-country race at the 2014 Winter Olympics on Thursday in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia.

. . . Sochi Continued from page B-1

this plan from the very beginning, but we did not,” he said. “We were going to go to the end. If I really wished to withdraw after the tem event, I would have.” Six medals were awarded on Day 7 of the Olympics: in slopestyle skiing, cross-country skiing, biathlon, speedskating, short track speedskating and luge. In the first final of the day, the U.S. freestyle skiers swept the podium in slopestyle, with Joss Christensen leading the way in his Olympic debut. Germany completed a sweep of the four luge events by winning the team relay; Justyna Kowalczyk of Poland, skiing with a fractured foot, won gold in the women’s cross-country 10-kilometer classical race; and Li Jianrou of China won gold in 500-meter short track speedskating after all three of her opponents in the final fell. FIGURE SKATING: Japan’s Yuzuru Hanyu made figure skating history, and now can chase even more of it. Hanyu became the first figure skater to break the 100-point mark with a spectacular performance in the men’s short program on Thurs-

day night at the Sochi Games. He earned 101.45 points with a playful, almost seductive routine in which he seemed to flow above the ice. “I was so surprised with my score,” Hanyu said. “I didn’t know I got over 100.” He shouldn’t have been, considering the speed, sharpness, entertainment value and total conviction of his skating. He nailed his two biggest jumps, including a huge a quadruple toe loop to open the program, and his triple lutztriple toe combination was exquisite. And then the fun began. He charmed the judges with his facial expressions, staring directly at them with an inviting smile during his intricate steps and turns to “Parisian Walkaways.” “For Yuzuru, that was perfection,” said his coach, Brian Orser. “That’s as good as it gets.” SLOPESTYLE SKIING: For only the third time in Winter Games history, a U.S. team swept the podium. Christensen led the way with a dominating performance that featured four near-perfect runs over the rails and jumps at the Rosa Khutor Extreme Park. Gus Kenworthy and Nick Goepper captured the silver and bronze, as the U.S. skiers matched the country’s previous sweeps in men’s fig-

ure skating in 1956 and men’s halfpipe snowboarding in 2002. “I am stoked to be up here with my friends,” Christensen said. “America, we did it.” CROSS-COUNTRY: Kowalczyk led virtually all the way, finishing in 28 minutes, 17.8 seconds and beating silver medalist Charlotte Kalla of Sweden by 18.4 seconds. Therese Johaug of Norway took bronze, 28.3 seconds behind. SHORT TRACK: Li’s win in the 500 keeps the Olympic title with China. Injured teammate Wang Meng couldn’t defend the title she has won at every Winter Games since 2002. Arianna Fontana of Italy took the silver and Park Seung-hi of South Korea earned the bronze. Elise Christie of Britain caused the first crash of the wild final and was disqualified. SPEEDSKATING: In the women’s 1000-meter race, Zhang Hong pulled off a stunning victory to give China its first gold ever in Olympic speedskating. Her time of 1 minute, 14.02 seconds, broke the track record and just missed the Olympic mark set by Chris Witty at the 2002 Games. Ireen Wust took the silver and Margo Boer the bronze, giving the Dutch a dozen speedskating medals. BIATHLON: Martin Four-

cade of France earned his second gold of the Sochi Games with a victory in the men’s 20-kilometer individual race. Fourcade, who won the 12.5K pursuit on Monday, finished 12.2 seconds ahead of silver medalist Erik Lesser of Germany. Yevgeny Garanichev of Russia won the bronze. LUGE: Germany scored a golden sweep of all four luge events by winning the inaugural team relay. Felix Loch, Natalie Geisenberger and the doubles team of Tobias Wendl and Tobias Arlt finished their runs in 2 minutes, 45.649 seconds, beating Russia for the title by 1.030 seconds. Latvia won the bronze. CURLING: Gold medal favorites Canada, Sweden and Britain posted wins in the men’s curling tournament, keeping the pressure on undefeated China, which had a bye Thursday. In the women’s competition, Canada swept away its fifth straight opponent, while Sweden knocked Switzerland from the ranks of the undefeated. Britain revived its chances of making the semifinals with a win over China. SKELETON: Lizzy Yarnold of Britain and Noelle Pinkus-Pace grabbed the top two spots midway through the women’s skeleton competition. The final two runs for the gold are Friday. C

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SOCHI, Russia — The balmy weather in Sochi poses no “major risk” to the Olympics, for now, with no need to bring in stored snow at the mountain venues, IOC President Thomas Bach said Thursday in an interview with The Associated Press. Spring-like temperatures covered Sochi for a second straight day, reaching highs of 15 C (59 F) both along the coast and in the mountains, raising concerns over slushy snow and ice. Similar conditions are forecast for Friday. Sochi organizers have stored tons of snow from the previous winter, but Bach said there was no need to turn to the contingency plan yet. “The situation so far is under control,” Bach said. “The organizing committee together with the international federations are working very hard. There is still storage of snow. So far it is going well.” “There is still enough snow available,” he added. “At this point in time, we don’t see a major risk.” The International Olympic Committee leader recalled even hotter conditions at the 1988 Winter Games in Calgary.

“I remember going around in the last days of the games in a T-shirt,” he said. “It was about 25 degrees Celsius (77 F).” Bach, meanwhile, expressed sympathy for an Olympic track worker who was struck by a bobsled and hospitalized with two broken legs and a possible concussion. The worker was hit by a forerunning sled in the braking area near the finish line at the Sanki Sliding Center, just before the start of Thursday’s two-man bobsled training. “We still do not know why he was in this zone and exactly what happened,” Bach said. “We are following up on this matter.” The Sochi track was designed to be safer following the death of Georgian luger Nodar Kumarishtavili in an accident hours before the opening ceremony of the Vancouver Games four years ago. Bach praised the security operations put in place by Russia, which has deployed a force of more than 40,000 police and military personnel to guard the Olympics. The leadup to the games was dominated by concerns over threats of attacks by Islamic militants form the North Caucasus.

Hockey favorites start tourney strong LARRY LAGE AP Hockey Writer

SOCHI, Russia — Four of the favorites in Olympic men’s hockey started the Sochi Games with wins. The host Russians rolled early as Alex Ovechkin had a goal and an assist in a breathtaking start of a 5-2 victory against Slovenia on Thursday. The defending gold-medal winning Canadians shook off a slow start with a dominant second period of a 3-1 win over Norway. Most impressively, the U.S. scored six times in the second period and routed Slovakia 7-1. Finland beat Austria 8-4, but it came at a cost. The Finns played the final two periods without captain Teemu Selanne because of an upper-body injury. They expect the 43-year-old forward to be healthy enough to play Norway on Friday, but he may rest to be ready to face the Canadians on Sunday in the final game of the tournament’s round-robin preliminary round. Alex Ovechkin, perhaps

the biggest star of the Olympics, scored 1:17 after the puck dropped with a wrist shot that made the crowd roar. The superstar made the flag-waving fans gasp in awe 2:37 later with a drop pass to set up Evgeni Malkin’s goal that gave Russia a 2-0 lead. The Russians relaxed, letting Slovenia pull within a goal twice in its first Olympic hockey game before taking control with two goals in the third. Canada’s Shea Weber and Jamie Benn scored in the second after a scoreless first period and Carey Price finished with 19 saves in his Olympic debut. The Americans were expected to face the stiffest test, but they were simply sensational against Slovakia. Paul Stastny scored twice to help the U.S. score six consecutive goals in a 13:51 span. Jarkko Immonen and Mikael Granlund scored two goals apiece for Finland, the only nation with three medals since the NHL began letting its players participate in the Olympics 16 years ago.


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B-4 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, February 14, 2014

. . . Puck Continued from page B-1

puck narrowly slipped by his glove and into the back of the goal to tie things up. “It was an unfortunate bounce, the defensemen played it perfectly and it went off his stick and our goalie was moving,” Swanson said. “It just took an unlucky bounce and went in.” Fortunately for SoHi, overtime seemed to be just the thing the Stars needed. The Stars won both overtime tilts they played last weekend in the North Star Conference tournament, including the title game. “I would say we were comfortable going into overtime more than anything,” Swanson said. “Overtime is definitely a place we’re accustomed to, it’s a pressure-packed situation. I give credit to both teams, it was a great battle all game long.” After an opening eight minutes that went scoreless, both teams settled in for another eight minutes. In the second overtime, Chugiak outshot Soldotna 10-1. Going into the ninth overtime period in the span of three games, SoHi finally experienced a letdown when Hanson found some space and went on the attack on the SoHi goal. Harvey blocked his shot, but the puck managed to get underneath him and slowly trickled into the back of the goal for the game-winner. “Cody played it well, he just about had it,” Swanson said. “It would’ve been another one

of those miracle saves, but he’s still the player of the game for us.” Chugiak coach Wild said he was impressed with Soldotna’s composure afterward. “For them to come back, playing a game like that with such an emotional letdown, I think the coaching staff did a wonderful job keeping their kids engaged, and not allowing them to feel that emotional drop-down and coming back,” Wild said. Swanson said that an early morning matchup on Friday is not what his team was hoping for, but expressed confidence that the Stars will fight back. “The big thing is we get some rest, get some fluids, and making sure we’re up early to get started early in the game,” Swanson said. “We can’t play another first period like we did tonight. “We’ve got to play three periods of hockey, and knowing us, maybe three periods will turn into four, five or six again.” Thursday in Wasilla Mustangs 2, Stars 1, 3OT Chugiak 0 Soldotna 0

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1st period — no scoring. Penalties — Chugiak 1 for 2:00. 2nd period — no scoring. 3rd period — 1. Soldotna, B. Lott (Nelson, O’Lena), 4:29; 2. Chugiak, Brazfield (unassisted), 13:40. Overtime — no scoring. Penalties — Chugiak 2 for 4:00; Soldotna 2 for 4:00. 2nd overtime — no scoring. 3rd overtime — 3. Chugiak, Hanson (Hammer) 2:59. Shots on goal — Chugiak 13-5-12-1-101—42; Soldotna 3-7-8-2-1-1—22. Goalies — Chugiak, Straub (22 shots, 21 saves); Soldotna, Harvey (42 shots, 40 saves). Power play — Chugiak 0 for 2; Soldotna 0 for 4.

. . . Hoops

team 56-36. Wednesday, Nanwalek notched an 86-51 victory over Kodiak ESS. Continued from page B-1 John Romanoff poured in 39 points in the Wednesday viccut the gap to 29-20 after three tory, while Michael Anahonak periods, but could never come had 20 and Xavier Romanoff all the way back in a 36-26 chipped in with 19. loss. Ninilchik opens up with The Kenai boys also got off split in Tok tournament to a slow start in a 65-49 loss. The Ninilchik girls and Nanwalek boys spend week boys basketball teams opened up play in the Tok tournament in Kodiak The Nanwalek boys scored Thursday. The Ninilchik girls defeated three victories in a trip to KoFort Yukon, while the Ninilchik diak this week. Monday, the Eagles topped boys lost to Fort Yukon. Scores Kodiak ESS JV 75-19. Tues- and details were not available day, Nanwalek beat Kodiak’s C as the Clarion went to press.

. . . Ski Continued from page B-1

as skiing. The long warm and wet spell in the middle of this winter was a perfect example. But central Kenai Peninsula coaches say they were able to keep skiing at Tsalteshi Trails. “Bill Holt and his crew have been doing an amazing job to keep things skiable,” Skyview head coach Kent Peterson. “Bill has been working his magic, but I think he’s getting pretty tired.” And coaches fully expect Holt’s wizardry to make the best course possible for today’s freestyle races, starting at 2 p.m., and Saturday’s classical races, starting at 11 a.m. “I think it’s going to be good come the actual first day,” Soldotna coach Dan Harbison said. “Plus, there’s snow in the forecast. If there is snow, that’ll change everything.” As things stand now, fans wanting to watch today’s freestyle race had best not blink. “It’s not an overly killer course so they should be able to keep speed around most of it,” Harbison said. “It should take around 13 minutes to do five kilometers. They’re going to be flying around there.” Who will be flying around the fastest is anyone’s guess, because all the teams haven’t skied together in so long, and

a lot of wind and perfect conditions. It’s sunny and a really nice temperatures,” Johnson said. “It’s still golf, though. You’ve still got to adjust no matter what you’re doing.” That was no trouble for Walker, whose victory in the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am was his third of the season. He drove his RV down from the Monterey Peninsula, got up at 4:30 a.m. Wednesday to appear on Golf Channel, and then went right back to work. Walker was in the middle of the pack until his tee shot on the par-3 16th settled just over a foot from the cup. He nearly reached the par-5 17th in two to set up a simple birdie, then finished with one of his best shots — an 8-iron from 184 yards out of a flyer lie in the rough to the back of the green and a 30-foot putt. “It’s four more days of golf,” Walker said. “You can ride the momentum of really good play. But everyone started at even and you just have to be like, ‘Let’s go get it again.’” It was a glorious day off Sunset Boulevard, and Riviera was

DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer

LOS ANGELES — Dustin Johnson moved down the coast of California and brought his game with him Thursday in the Northern Trust Open. So did Jimmy Walker. Johnson made six birdies on a warm, sunny day at Riviera for a 5-under 66, giving him a one-shot lead when the opening round was suspended by darkness. Walker birdied his last three holes and was in the large group at 67 that included Francesco Molinari of Italy and Torrey Pines winner Scott Stallings. Four days ago, Johnson closed with a 66 in the gray, cold weather of Pebble Beach to finish one shot behind Walker. In conditions that could not have been any different — and could not have been any better — he made birdie on all of the par 5s at Riviera and only had one bogey on his card, at the long par-3 fourth. The only comparison was the quality of his golf. “It was cold, windy and wet at er with 47.8 seconds left to give Pebble on Sunday. Here, it’s not Creighton a win over Butler. The Bluejays (20-4, 10-2 Big East) have won five of six and 15 of 17, and are now within a half game of No. 6 Villanova in the conference standings. Minnesota 25 28 .472 17 24 27 .471 17 Olympics Denver Kellen Dunham had 16 Utah 19 33 .365 22½ points and Alex Barlow added Pacific Division Medals Table 13 for Butler (12-13, 2-11), L.A. Clippers 37 18 .673 — At Sochi, Russia Phoenix 30 21 .588 5 Through Thursday, Feb. 13 which has lost four straight. Golden State 31 22 .585 5 (38 of 98 events) After leading most of the first Nation L.A. Lakers 18 35 .340 18 G S B Tot Sacramento 18 35 .340 18 4 3 6 13 half, Creighton found itself in a Norway 4 3 5 12 back-and-forth struggle most Netherlands Thursday’s Games United States 4 2 6 12 of the second half and couldn’t Russia Chicago 92, Brooklyn 76 2 5 4 11 Oklahoma City 107, L.A. Lakers 7 2 1 10 fend off Butler’s charges until Germany 103 4 4 2 10 McDermott hit the 3 to make it Canada Austria 1 4 0 5 64-63. Sweden 0 4 1 5 Men’s Scores Andrew Chrabascz had two Switzerland 3 0 1 4 EAST France 2 0 2 4 chances to give Butler a late Slovenia Manhattan 86, Rider 69 1 1 2 4 Quinnipiac 80, Fairfield 72 2 1 0 3 lead but twice lost the ball and a China Robert Morris 66, St. Francis (Pa.) Czech Republic 0 2 1 3 3 from Dunham that might have Italy 60 0 2 1 3 forced overtime was short. St. John’s 68, Seton Hall 67 Japan 0 2 1 3

EAST LANSING, Mich. — Adreian Payne had 20 points and 14 rebounds, and No. 9 Michigan State cruised past Northwestern 85-70 on Thursday night to stay tied atop the Big Ten. The Spartans (21-4, 10-2) are even in the standings with rival Michigan — and those two teams meet in Ann Arbor on Feb. 23. Gary Harris added 14 points for Michigan State, rebounding a bit from a poor shooting performance in a loss to Wisconsin last weekend. The Spartans shot 53 percent from the field against a Northwestern team that came in with a sterling defensive reputation. The Wildcats (12-13, 5-7) had not allowed 80 points in a game in over a month. No. 21 WISCONSIN 78, Michigan State was without MINNESOTA 70 point guard Keith Appling, who MADISON, Wis. — Frank has been bothered by a wrist inKaminsky scored 17 points and jury. Wisconsin regained some of its frontcourt swagger in a win No. 18 CREIGHTON 68, over Minnesota. BUTLER 63 Fellow forward Nigel Hayes INDIANAPOLIS — Doug added 15 for the Badgers, who McDermott scored 26 points kept Minnesota in the game foland made the go-ahead 3-point- lowing late free-throw woes.

US women’s soccer blows past Russia

ATLANTA (AP) — Abby Wambach scored her record 165th international goal and the U.S. women’s soccer team beat Russia 8-0 in an exhibition Thursday night to extend its unbeaten streak to 42 games. Shutting out Russia for the second time in six days by a combined 15-0 score, the world’s No. 1-ranked team improved to 36-0-6 since March 2012. The Americans are 70-010 in their last 73 home games.

With the United States up 2-0 on own goals in the 11th and 50th minutes, Amy Rodriguez took Heather O’Reilly’s pass from the right side and volleyed it in with her left leg for a 3-0 lead in the 52nd minute. Wambach, scoring her 40th goal in the Americans’ last 48 games, made it 4-0 in the 54th, taking Megan Rapinoe’s pass from the left side and bowling over goalkeeper Maria Zhamanakova in the penalty box.

Levi Michael, Addison Downing, Aaron Swedberg and Drew Kant will have to excel to pass the Moose. “We’ve only seen the Palmer team once,” Harbison said. “It’s this great unknown where they are now. But I think they’ve been on pretty good snow given the winter.” Peterson also said his boys are coming on strong after being slowed by the weather and the same bus accident that involved the Kenai squad. Peterson expects a solid performance in Skyview’s last region meet before closing the school doors in the spring. The coach said Brenner Musgrave has his eye on a top-10 finish. The other hardworking, improving varsity skiers are Sky Schlung, Jeremiah Hudson, Sterling Stasak, Daniel Shuler and Logan Hemphill. Groth said the Mariners will be led by Brian Rowe. Also skiing on varsity will be Josh Vantrease, Hoxie Parks, Tadhg Scholz, Ryan Navrot and Tianen Liu. For Seward, varsity skiers Jerry Swanson and Nick Zweifel were the leaders at boroughs. On the girls side, Sadie Fox will lead Soldotna’s pursuit of a region crown. “We haven’t gotten to see how they’re doing at this stage of the game with any Anchorage or Valley schools, so we’ll see,” Harbison said. “I know they’re ready to go.”

With a third-place finish at Lynx Loppet and solid performances in Besh Cup, Fox has stamped herself as one of the state’s top skiers and the favorite to win regions. Hannah Pothast is mostly recovered from illness and should be right behind Fox. Then it will be up to Dani McCormick, Olivia Hutchings, Molly Erickson, Emily Werner and Xochi Harbison to shave crucial seconds. The Skyview girls will be led by Mika Morton, who finished second to Fox in a 5K skate Saturday. “For her mentally, that was a big step,” Peterson said. “Now she can approach these races knowing she has the potential to do really well.” Peterson said Mieka Chythlook also has been coming on strong, while Brittany Hollers and Sage Link will fill the crucial slots that give Skyview a scoring team. Nyquist said the Stars have been pretty far ahead of his girls, so the focus is improvement. He said varsity skiers Kirsten Nyquist, Alex Bergholtz, Katie Cooper and Mikaela Salzetti are all intent on finishing the season strong. Groth said he has a solid top three in Aspen Daigle, Cassidy Soistman and Rachel Ellert. He said the three are all pretty close. He said Mariah Vantrease and Audrey Russel will fight to be the final scorer for varsity.

Dustin Johnson takes lead

Michigan St. rips Wildcats By The Associated Press

because teams have had varying training conditions based on location. Last week, coach Eric Groth and his Homer squad showed up a day early for the borough meet just to do some skiing. “There’s been three different occasions this year where we lost snow entirely and had to go back to running,” Groth said. “It’s been rough for us.” Nikiski coach Anna Widman, who will have JV skiers at the meet, said the trails at the school have been too dangerous. The Bulldogs had been using the trails at the recreation center until the windstorm. Now, they must travel to Tsalteshi to practice. Nyquist said his boys squad is eyeing a region title. “If everybody skis a good race, I don’t see why they couldn’t be in the top end,” he said. The Kards will be led by Travis Cooper, one of the region’s top skiers along with Daniel Serventi of Grace Christian. After that, it will fall to Fox Michaud, Olen Danielson, James Butler, Liam Floyd and Nate Mole to provide enough good performances for the win. Harbison said his guess is the Kenai and Colony boys will vie for first. He said his boys will have to overcome Palmer to take third. The coach said the JV races will show his program has plenty of depth, but said varsity skiers Colton Diehl, Tanner Best,

in ideal shape — firm and fast, particularly on the greens. The warmth meant a little more distance, such as the 349yard tee shot Johnson hammered down the middle of 13th fairway, a slight dogleg left framed by eucalyptus trees. That left him only 97 yards, and he stuffed it. And on the par-5 17th — 608 yards up the hill, no help from wind — he reached it in two and had a two-putt from just over 20 feet. His only glitch was coming up just short of the green and in the bunker on the 225-yard fourth. Johnson isn’t playing a lot this season, but when he does, he plays well. He already has a win at the HSBC Champions in Shanghai. He shared the 54-hole lead at Kapalua and tied for sixth, and then took off four weeks before returning at Pebble Beach. That was a good sign for Johnson, who said he doesn’t have a good history of playing well in the first event after a long break. “This time, I stayed with it. I worked hard at home,” Johnson said. “It was tough at Pebble be-

cause of the weather, and it was hard to keep your concentration.” Life is bliss right now for Walker, who is going for his third win in California this season, starting with the Frys.com Open at CordeValle in October. The only struggle was a bogey on the par-5 11th when his tee shot just missed the fairway and buried in a small indentation in the long grass. He followed that with another bogey on the tough 12th, and then rallied at the end. “I don’t know what it’s like for some of those guys that are winning 40 times and they have done this a ton,” Walker said. “But right now, enjoy it. It’s fun. It’s a good place to be.” Jim Furyk, Keegan Bradley and Rickie Fowler were among those at 68. Jordan Spieth looked as though he might be among the leaders after holing out from 125 yards for eagle on No. 7 to reach 3 under. He was in position for a birdie on the 11th until leaving a shot in the greenside bunker and missing the par putt.

Scoreboard

Poland Latvia South Korea Belarus Slovakia Australia Finland Britain Ukraine

2 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0

0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 1

2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1

Basketball NBA Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Toronto 28 24 Brooklyn 24 27 New York 20 32 Boston 19 35 Philadelphia 15 39 Southeast Division Miami 37 14 Atlanta 25 26 Washington 25 27 Charlotte 23 30 Orlando 16 38 Central Division Indiana 40 12 Chicago 27 25 Detroit 22 30 Cleveland 20 33 Milwaukee 9 43

Pct .538 .471 .385 .352 .278

GB — 3½ 8 10 14

.725 — .490 12 .481 12½ .434 15 .296 22½ .769 — .519 13 .423 18 .377 20½ .173 31

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division San Antonio 38 15 Houston 36 17 Dallas 32 22 Memphis 29 23 New Orleans 23 29 Northwest Division Oklahoma City 43 12 Portland 36 17

.717 — .679 2 .593 6½ .558 8½ .442 14½ .782 .679

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SOUTH Appalachian St. 74, Samford 68 Arkansas St. 85, South Alabama 61 Austin Peay 88, E. Illinois 83 Belmont 73, Tennessee St. 71 Coll. of Charleston 47, Drexel 46 ETSU 89, Florida Gulf Coast 81 Georgia Tech 74, Boston College 71 Louisiana-Lafayette 93, UALR 87, 2OT Middle Tennessee 71, Tulane 44 Morehead St. 69, Jacksonville St. 67 Murray St. 82, SIU-Edwardsville 72 New Orleans 70, Nicholls St. 64 Radford 102, UNC Asheville 92 SE Louisiana 62, McNeese St. 53 South Carolina 65, Vanderbilt 59 Tennessee Tech 72, E. Kentucky 66 Texas-Arlington 85, LouisianaMonroe 74 UAB 84, Southern Miss. 60 UNC Greensboro 68, Georgia Southern 56 UNC Wilmington 55, Northeastern 45 W. Kentucky 81, Troy 76 MIDWEST Cleveland St. 73, Ill.-Chicago 53 Creighton 68, Butler 63 Green Bay 71, Youngstown St. 40 IPFW 75, South Dakota 69 IUPUI 59, Denver 49 Michigan St. 85, Northwestern 70 Missouri 86, Arkansas 85 Montana St. 78, North Dakota 70 N. Dakota St. 56, W. Illinois 52 S. Dakota St. 77, Nebraska-Omaha 60

Wisconsin 78, Minnesota 70 SOUTHWEST FAU 71, UTEP 69 FIU 80, UTSA 72 Incarnate Word 80, Abilene Christian 68 Old Dominion 72, North Texas 62 Oral Roberts 80, Houston Baptist 66 Sam Houston St. 67, Northwestern St. 64 Stephen F. Austin 78, Lamar 69 Texas A&M-CC 84, Cent. Arkansas 73 Texas-Pan American 71, Chicago St. 68, OT Tulsa 76, East Carolina 58 FAR WEST CS Bakersfield 76, Idaho 67 Cal Poly 62, CS Northridge 55 Cal St.-Fullerton 74, UC Davis 64 E. Washington 85, Sacramento St. 72 Gonzaga 83, Pepperdine 68 Hawaii 87, UC Riverside 76 N. Arizona 65, Portland St. 63 N. Colorado 89, Montana 86, OT New Mexico St. 71, UMKC 48 Pacific 89, BYU 82 Portland 71, Loyola Marymount 64 Saint Mary’s (Cal) 69, San Diego 57 Seattle 71, Utah Valley 57 UC Santa Barbara 65, Long Beach St. 64 UCLA 92, Colorado 74 Utah 79, Southern Cal 71 Weber St. 75, S. Utah 55

Women’s Scores EAST Fairfield 52, Rider 50 Florida St. 83, Syracuse 59 George Washington 80, VCU 62 Manhattan 52, Canisius 44 Niagara 65, Siena 57 Northeastern 78, William & Mary 57 Notre Dame 82, Boston College 61 SOUTH Auburn 68, Vanderbilt 62 Campbell 82, Coastal Carolina 81 Charlotte 85, Louisiana Tech 61 Florida Gulf Coast 99, Mercer 57 Gardner-Webb 74, Longwood 73, OT Kentucky 108, Mississippi 78 Lipscomb 94, Jacksonville 79 Maryland 67, Miami 52 McNeese St. 75, SE Louisiana 61 N. Kentucky 78, North Florida 65 NC State 69, Clemson 63, OT

Nicholls St. 63, New Orleans 45 North Carolina 86, Pittsburgh 50 Presbyterian 46, Liberty 43 Radford 64, UNC Asheville 52 Stetson 87, Kennesaw St. 57 Wake Forest 65, Virginia Tech 64 MIDWEST Cleveland St. 82, Valparaiso 74 Iowa 69, Illinois 55 Nebraska 76, Michigan 68 Oakland 97, Detroit 78 Penn St. 71, Indiana 63 S. Dakota St. 71, Nebraska-Omaha 60 South Dakota 84, IPFW 71 Texas-Pan American 75, Chicago St. 52 UMKC 92, New Mexico St. 84 W. Illinois 76, N. Dakota St. 68 SOUTHWEST Arkansas 75, Alabama 55 Houston Baptist 84, Oral Roberts 75 Lamar 75, Stephen F. Austin 73 Sam Houston St. 57, Northwestern St. 53 Texas A&M 78, Georgia 73, OT Texas A&M-CC 45, Cent. Arkansas 42 West Virginia 76, Oklahoma 75 FAR WEST BYU 67, Portland 43 CS Bakersfield 79, Idaho 60 CS Northridge 83, Cal Poly 57 Cal St.-Fullerton 65, UC Davis 62 E. Washington 79, Sacramento St. 73 Gonzaga 66, San Diego 48 IUPUI 68, Denver 55 Loyola Marymount 76, St. Mary’s, Cal. 74 Montana 61, N. Colorado 55 Montana St. 78, North Dakota 67 N. Arizona 84, Portland St. 61 Pacific 91, Pepperdine 67 S. Utah 70, Idaho St. 66 Seattle 69, Utah Valley 65 UC Santa Barbara 80, Long Beach St. 69

Transactions BASEBALL MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL — Named Justin Klemm director of instant replay. American League CLEVELAND INDIANS — Agreed to terms with OF Michael Brantley on a four-year contract. SEATTLE MARINERS — Agreed to terms with RHP Fernando Rodney on a two-year contract and LHP Randy Wolf and RHP Zach Miner on minor league contracts. Placed OF Franklin Gutierrez on

the restricted list. National League CHICAGO CUBS — Agreed to terms with RHPs Jason Hammel and James McDonald on oneyear contracts. LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Named Jack McDowell manager of Ogden (Pioneer). Agreed to terms with OF Carlos Mosquera. MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Assigned RHP Donovan Hand outright to Nashville (PCL). PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Released RHP Chad Gaudin. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Agreed to terms with LHP YaoHsun Yang on a minor league contract. WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Traded RHP Nathan Karns to Tampa Bay for C Jose Lobaton, OF Drew Vettleson and LHP Felipe Rivero. Placed RHP Erik Davis on the 60-day DL. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association HOUSTON ROCKETS — Reassigned F Robert Covington to Rio Grande Valley (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League DETROIT LIONS — Released WR Nate Burleson and S Louis Delmas. GREEN BAY PACKERS — Signed TE Raymond Webber. SOCCER Major League Soccer CHIVAS USA — Named Paul Grafer goalkeeper coach. SPORTING KANSAS CITY — Acquired MF Jimmy Medranda from Deportivo Pereira (Colombia) and signed him to a multiyear contract. North American Soccer League NEW YORK COSMOS — SIgned M Marcos Senna to a contract extension. COLLEGE MEMPHIS — Suspended men’s basketball F Dominic Woodson indefinitely. OHIO — Named Scott Isphording offensive coordinator/quarterbacks coach, Dave Johnson offensive line coach and elevated Chris Rodgers from operations assistant to director of football operations. PENN STATE — Named Salima Rockwell women’s associate volleyball coach. SOUTHERN CAL — Announced QB Max Wittek plans to transfer.

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Extreme Alaska challenge: 100-mile run, with sled

The first king

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ike your first kiss, you never forget your first king salmon. I was born in 1937, and raised in Sedro-Woolley, Washington, within walking distance of the Skagit River. In the 1930s, the Skagit became world famous for its large king salmon. Even as recent as the 1950s, after dams had blocked fish passage, and after many of the spawning streams in the Skagit’s drainage had been impacted by years of clear-cutting and roadbuilding, a few kings were being caught, or so I’m told. I fished the Skagit as a kid, but never saw anyone catch a king. The thing was, kings were mostly just a memory by that time, something old men talked about when recalling the good-old days. As a kid, I had the fishing bug bad, but the only king salmon I ever saw were in my dreams. When my high-school buddies were chasing girls, I was chasing cutthroat, Dolly Varden and humpies. The only thing that kept me from becoming even more smitten by fishing was that I was too broke to buy tackle, a boat and a pickup truck. After leaving home at age 17 to join the Air Force, I did a little fishing, but nothing serious. I fished for grayling where the Chena River runs past Ladd Air Force Base, outside Fairbanks. I fished off piers in California, and caught fish no bigger than my bait. In a crowd of anglers, I fished for king salmon on Eastern Washington’s Yakima River, and didn’t so much as glimpse a king. The year I spent in Alaska while in the Air Force left me wanting to see more of the state. In 1964, while working for Burroughs Corporation in Yakima, I had a chance to transfer to Fairbanks, and then, in 1967, to Juneau. It was in Juneau that the fishing bug bit me again. That was where I caught my first king. I was 30, divorced, living in an apartment, when Pete Hansen invited me to go king salmon fishing. I don’t remember much about the fishing, other than that it was in the evening, and we were trolled herring. I was using the only gear I owned at the time, a light spinning outfit that I had bought for steelhead fishing, and had never used. I don’t think we even left Auke Bay, where Pete kept his boat. Anyhow, we trolled for a couple of hours without a bite, and then it happened. Until that moment, the largest fish I’d ever had on my line was a humpback salmon of maybe five pounds, tired from having swum 20 miles up the Skagit. This fish felt nothing like that. It yanked hard, pulling my rod tip into the water. It didn’t run far — good thing, given See PALMER, page C-2

AP Photo/The Juneau Empire, Klas Stolpe

In this photo taken on Feb. 9, Houston Laws tows his recrafted sled across the ice at Mendenhall Lake near Juneau, Alaska, during a training run for the Susitna 100, a 100-mile ski, bike or run event that starts on Saturday, Feb. 15. It will be the first of four 100-mile races Laws hopes to complete in 2014 to achieve an Alaska ultrarunning “Grand Slam.” The Alaska grand slam consists of the Susitna, the White Mountains 100, the Sluice Box 100 and the Resurrection Pass Trail 100. By KLAS STOLPE Juneau Empire

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Man against nature. The theme is as old as time, or as old as man has existed in time. Juneau’s Houston Laws has set his sights on four 100-mile ultrarunning (long-distance) races that will pit his body against nature, against time and against himself. A 100-miler usually features the athlete alone in the wilderness and in his own thoughts. “I like that,” Laws said. “In my job working at the hospital it is pleasing everybody else and serving everybody else, which I enjoy, but when it is my

time this is how I can help myself. That solitude, decompressing from work, that is what running is. Being out there alone is the alluring part, and achieving the goal is what draws me to these 100-milers.” The original Grand Slam of Ultrarunning consists of running, and finishing, the four oldest 100-mile trail runs in the U.S. in the same year: the Western States 100 Mile Endurance Run, Vermont 100 Mile Endurance Run, Leadville Trail 100 Mile run and the Wasatch Front 100 Mile Endurance Run. The Alaska Grand Slam consists of the Susitna, the White Mountains 100, the Sluice Box 100 and the Resurrection Pass Trail 100.

Laws will question if he has done everything right to earn each of the 100-mile finishes. His first is Saturday, Feb. 15, in the Susitna 100 where temperatures will vary between the lower teens and minus 10. “That is the big appeal,” Laws said, the Mendenhall Lake ice catching his footfalls as he ran laps around its snow-tipped shores. “If I do better in time that is just awesome. That is icing. I can’t predict what will happen, but what happens along the event is part of why I do it.” On this day Laws is towing a small child’s sled remodeled to hold the roughly 25 pounds of gear that will follow him along the paths.

Susitna 100 Race officials require runners to pack or drag provisions such as emergency food, a minus20-degrees-Fahrenheit sleeping bag, foam mat, front and rear light, two quarts of water and a tent. Laws will add snacks, several clothes, eight pairs of socks and undergarments. Safety checkpoints will provide hot meals and fresh water. Runners will be disqualified if their gear bags fall under 15 pounds or if they don’t finish within 48 hours. Laws hopes to average 12-15 minute miles and finish under 30 hours. Due to safety concerns and unfavorable conditions, last year’s Susitna 100 was canceled. See RUN, page C-2

Ski resorts turn to terrain-based teaching \By HOLLY RAMER Associated Press

NORTH CONWAY, N.H. — Allison Willette’s first few skiing lessons left her with a sore butt and aching knees but not a lot of skills. But one day’s worth of terrain-based learning made all the difference. “Yesterday was probably the first day that I enjoyed it,” she said. The instruction Willette got at Cranmore Mountain Resort is a new approach that uses sculpted zones to control students’ speed and reduce fears and falls. Without worrying about sliding down the mountain out of control, students can focus on building skills because the banks, berms and bumps naturally slow them down. That means less emphasis on “snowplowing,” or pointing the skis into a wedge shape to slow down. Less time learning to stop, more time learning to go.

“Back in the good old days, we used to get people into a wedge right off the jump, but the wedge was more of a defensive posture, something to slow down and stop with,” said instructor Dave Bartlett. “But we were kind of resisting the forces we’re working with.” The new method puts the emphasis on shaping those forces, Bartlett said, getting students more comfortable more quickly. Willette, of Hadley, Mass., tried it out last month with her 8-year-old son. He had never been on skis; the few times she had she’d always felt intimidated. Both made quick progress. “It allowed you to physically feel what the turn should feel like, and then you just naturally push in the right direction. So you kind of disengage your brain, and you can do it,” she said. “I learned quickly how to make turns there, and I was able to apply that to the flatter field.” See SKI, page C-2

AP Photo/Jim Cole

In this photo taken Jan. 30, beginner skiers make their way to the terrainbased learning center for new skiers at Cranmore Mountain ski area in North Conway, N.H. Instead of teaching new skiers how to stop first, terrain-based skiing teaches new skiers skills with banks, berms, and bumps that naturally slow them down without sliding down the mountain out of control.

Genetic diversity of wildlife on the Kenai Peninsula is a mixed bag

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here are 1,786 plant and animal species known on the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. That’s extraordinary biodiversity for this latitude with perhaps another 3,000 species, by my estimation, yet to be found. George Shiras III, a famous National Geographic Society photographer, wasn’t kidding when he wrote that “were all of Alaska erased from the map except the Kenai Peninsula and its immediately adjacent waters, there would yet remain in duplicate that which constitutes the more unique and that which typifies the whole of this wonderful country.” What makes the Kenai Peninsula so species rich is the intersection of the Sitka-spruce rainforest that colonized Prince William Sound with the drier white and black spruce boreal forest that extends from interior Alaska to the Cook Inlet. Combined with elevations ranging from sea level to 6,000 feet in the Harding Icefield, Mother Nature has created lots of ecological niches to be filled by species. But because we live on a peninsula that is separated from the adjacent mainland by a narrow, 10-mile wide isthmus only recently de-glaciated,

R efuge N otebook J ohn M orton it’s logical to assume that plant dispersal and wildlife movement have been minimal with restricted genetic mixing. So although species diversity is relatively high, we would expect low genetic diversity within populations of most species on the Kenai Peninsula. On the other hand, a paper published in Science in 2003 showed that the diversity of chloroplast DNA in European plant species was highest in areas where populations dispersing from northern and southern refugia collided in the aftermath of the last ice age. Such a place could be the Kenai Peninsula, an area in which at least some species may have been colonized by populations originating from both northern (Beringia) and southern refugia. In fact, Caribou Hills, nunataks in the Harding Ice Field, and the northern part of the Kenai Mountains around

Big Indian Creek were unglaciated during the last ice age, serving as local refugia for some flora and fauna. So genetic diversity might be low because it’s an isolated peninsula or it might be high because of post-Pleistocene colonization patterns. It only gets more confusing because there are different ways of measuring genetic diversity. Modern genetics considers variation in nuclear DNA versus mitochondrial DNA. Unlike nuclear DNA, which is inherited from both parents and in which genes are rearranged in the process of recombination, there is usually no change in mitochondrial DNA from parent (usually the mother) to offspring. As such, mitochondrial DNA is a powerful tool for tracking ancestry through females. Consider Kenai brown bears. A study published in the Canadian Journal of Zoology shows they have lower levels of mitochondrial DNA diversity than most other brown bear populations in Alaska, including the Kodiak Archipelago, but relatively high nuclear diversity. The former could result from a few reproductive sows that are highly successfully. Conversely, the latter could be due to high gene C

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Kenai moose were found to have higher genetic diversity than populations elsewhere in North America

flow from males that disperse widely coupled with a tendency of females to stay close to home. As the authors suggested, determining which mechanism is in play is important for effective management of the Kenai brown bear population — there’s a danger of harvesting the wrong sows or too many boars.

In contrast, Kenai moose were found to have higher genetic diversity than populations elsewhere in North America and Scandinavia. Kris Hundertmark, originally at the Kenai Moose Research Center when this study was published in 1992, and his colleagues found that genetic diversiSee MIX, page C-2


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. . . Palmer

gut it, and discovered its flesh was white. I’d never heard of such a thing. I called Pete. Continued from page C-1 “Pete, this king has white meat!” I said. “Yah, some are like that,” he my inadequate tackle — but spent its energy with hard jerks said. “There’s white kings and and lots of twisting and thrash- red kings. You caught a white ing around. After several min- king.” “Oh. There’s nothing wrong utes, I was finally able to pull it up to where we could see its with it? It’s good to eat?” “Oh, sure. You can’t tell the broad flank gleaming in the difference.” clear water. As excited as I’ve He was right about me not ever been in my life, I eased the big fish into Pete’s net, and being able to tell the difference. I’d never eaten red king, he lifted it into the boat. let alone white. I gave away I’d never seen anything as most of it, but what I kept was beautiful as that king salmon. the best fish I’d ever eaten. A 30-pounder, it was the only I have no idea of where I fish we caught that night. I was for my first kiss, but the tried to give part of it to Pete, memory of where and when but he turned it down. It was I caught my first king salmon dark when we returned to the is as fresh as if it happened dock, so I took the fish home yesterday. in one piece. At my apartment, after Les Palmer can be reached clearing the kitchen counter of at les.palmer@rocketmail.com. motorcycle parts, I started to

. . . Mix Continued from page C-1

ty, as measured by polymorphic loci in liver and muscle samples from moose killed by collisions with vehicles, was unusually high. They suggested that this was so because the Kenai population likely originated from moose that survived the last ice age in nearby climate refugia (Beringia). Wolverines from the Kenai Peninsula were similarly found to harbor a disproportionate amount of the mitochondrial diversity in North American populations. Furthermore, the Kenai population was considered somewhat distinctive, with a single unique haplotype. While the authors of this study, published in the Journal of Mammology, suggested that the genetic structure of our wolverine is not enough to warrant designation as a subspecies (recognized as Gulo gulo katschemakensis in 1918), they also acknowledged that our local population deserves special conservation attention. Similarly, Trumpeter swans on the Kenai Peninsula were found to have slightly higher genetic diversity based on nuclear DNA than other populations in the western U.S. However, the authors of this study, from the University of Denver and U.S. Geological Survey, concluded that the diversity was not enough to warrant special management consideration. At the end of the day, why should we care about genetic diversity? Genetic diversity plays

. . . Run Continued from page C-1

“It was a fun challenge constructing this sled,” Laws said. “This race requires so much stuff and what I have read in blog posts and such is that a sled is the way to go instead of having a big back pack. You can buy sleds but they are expensive and overweight and huge.” Laws bought a roughly 3-foot long child’s sled for $10 at a local store. The use of a friend’s wood shop led to four wooden chalks added to rest the sled on top of used children’s cross country skis and lessen the drag while increasing speed. “The skis provide a focal point,” Laws said. “And that is less material to drag. More surface area to drag is more weight, the skis allows less area.” Laws used chimney rods that attach to eyebolts on the sled and connect to carabiners on a pack-harness waist belt. ‘More genetic diver- The skis were sanded down to factory tracking marks sity means greater remove on the bottom and re-waxed. resilience in a pop“So far it has seemed to work OK,” Laws said. “Temperatures ulation or species may be a concern but I don’t to survive environ- expect any sudden impacts as mental change, ex- the trail is packed each day.” Laws has averaged 20 to 30 actly what is need- miles four to five times a week for the past four months. In an ed to sustain our average four-day span he is rundiverse biota on the ning 100 to 130 miles. The biggest obstacle in Kenai Peninsula.’ training, aside from injury, is monotony. On days where training miles seem daunting he makes a deal an important role in the survival with himself: He runs a couple and adaptability of a species to environmental stressors such as rapid climate change, disease or contaminants, or how successful a native species might be in responding to competition from Continued from page C-1 invasive exotic species. Variation in a population’s gene pool Students start out on flat provides variable traits among snow, getting a feel for their the individuals of that popula- skis. The next zone is a minition. Like making the wise de- pipe, where they slide down cision to not put all your eggs one side of a gentle, U-shaped in one basket, having multiple slope and part way up the othbaskets of varying sizes en- er. The slope is a bit steeper sures that someone gets home in the “roller” zone, which is with at least some of the eggs. followed by a short section of More genetic diversity means trail with banks and berms that greater resilience in a popula- guide students through three tion or species to survive envi- turns. The “traverse trax” zone ronmental change, exactly what includes eight turns and is the is needed to sustain our diverse last stop before students head to biota on the Kenai Peninsula. the chairlift to try out a beginner trail. John Morton is the superCranmore, along with Vervisory biologist at Kenai Na- mont’s Bromley Mountain and tional Wildlife Refuge. You can Jiminy Peak in Massachusetts, find more information about the is one of three New England refuge at http://kenai.fws.gov resorts that partnered with the or http://www.facebook.com/ consulting firm Snow Operatkenainationalwildliferefuge. ing LLC to start terrain-based

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miles and sees if his feelings change. “If I don’t feel like doing 20 I won’t force myself,” Laws said. “I will change things up, make it interesting. I have gone through so many audio books. You get this feeling when running, not that you have to, but you want to and, if anything, it is my therapy. What is my next goal? How do I challenge myself more next year? The goal is the motivator, the carrot, and as I continue being active and enjoying the lifestyle I feel like I am improving my quality of life.” Laws will have two winter races and two summer races. Two feature cold physical punishment and two the warmer, fast-paced challenges. “The winters are definitely about strategy,” Laws said. “How many stops to take? What are priorities and what are not? How am I going to cut time? The extreme cold will burn more calories. It is slow going. The summer is about speed, something I am not good at. I will have to start tailoring my training to be faster. Currently I have been preparing for distance.” The Susitna 100, a humanpowered (ski, foot or bike) race, starts in Big Lake and follows packed snowmachine and sled dog mushing trails in the Susitna River Valley, north of Anchorage. David Johnston was the fastest male in 2012 with 24 hours, 11 minutes. Laura McDonough was the fastest female in 28 hours, 45 minutes. The White Mountains 100 on March 30 is a human-powered winter chiller. Last year Mc-

Donough was the first runner to reach the finish line in 30 hours, 41 minutes to win the running division for the second straight year. Laws posted a 33.4-hour time after battling exhaustion, nausea, bitter cold and hallucinations. The Sluice Box 100 on June 28, near Fairbanks, is a foot or bike race considered the toughest in the interior and has a 36-hour time limit. Last year’s fastest men’s running time went to Eric Schmidgall in 18 hours, 20 minutes and 30 seconds. McDonough posted the fastest women’s running time with 24 hours, one minute and one second. Resurrection Pass Trail 100 begins Aug. 8 at the Resurrection Pass Trailhead in Hope. The race is primarily on a U.S. Forest Service trail between Hope and Cooper Landing. Last year McDonough won the race for the third time, posting a 22 hour, 6 minute time. Laws is sponsored by Ketchikan’s Tongass Substance Screening. “The owner made it clear with her support she wants to help me do everything I can to focus on my goal to complete the Alaska Slam, be a positive role model and maybe motivate others to a more active lifestyle,” Laws said. “I have a goal but getting there is expensive. There is so much to attain, logistically, physically and informatively. She has helped make that possible through funding.” Laws wrestled at Ketchikan High School, graduating in 2004, and moved to Juneau in 2008. “We are so lucky,” Laws said.

“Living in Juneau is a privilege. We have everything available in the mountains around us. I have learned cool stuff and met awesome people. I met a wax guru named Peter who taught me more than what I can remember about hydrocarbon versus lowfluorocarbon ski waxes. My friends and I built a one-of-akind pulk that will carry safety equipment. I learn how hypoglycemia feels, what my body needs for better performance and I run with the Smokin’ Old Geezers. Why not take advantage of it?” When each race ends Laws will buy a pair of extra-sized shoes to allow his swollen feet comfort. Walks, perhaps to a local pool for rehabilitative swims, will be needed to soothe aches and pains and prevent further damage. “It is just like a meditation,” Laws said of ultrarunning. “It is being in your mind. It is unconscious. You just start moving your feet forward and all you know are the conversations and thoughts of everything. You do the body scan and feel if everything is good. These races are just another opportunity to be in my head, to be thinking about myself, to take care of myself in a mental capacity. I am away from distractions, away from my cellphone, away from all these other considerations.” If another athlete is in the same paces as Laws, that too will be OK. “That is welcome,” Laws said. “Over a span of 30 hours I will have plenty of time to be by myself and I have plenty of time to look forward to running with other people, too.”

learning this year. Others that have adopted the approach in recent years include Breckenridge and Vail in Colorado, Northstar in California and Mountain Creek in New Jersey. Kelly Coffey, training manager for the Breckenridge Ski and Ride School, said he has seen a marked improvement in his students, sometimes even before they actually try out the course. A family of four who took a lesson around Christmas were visibly nervous when they put on their skis, but by the time he finished explaining the zones, they were more relaxed. “I could just see the tension in their bodies just flow

out,” said Coffey, who also is a freestyle specialist for the Professional Ski Instructors of America. “From then on, I was able to get them to move a lot easier, and more gracefully, and we could progress more quickly. There were times I wanted them to turn, and they didn’t accomplish it, but they didn’t panic.” Karen Dolan, director of Cranmore’s snowsports school, said she has seen many trends come and go during her 40 years in the industry, but she believes terrain-based learning has sticking power because it makes learning more fun. And boosting the fun factor makes it more likely that students

will return — a key motivator for Cranmore and other resorts given that nationally, 85 percent of skiers never try it again after their first outing. Mountain Creek saw its socalled conversion rate rise from 17 percent to 65 percent after implementing terrain-based learning. It remains to be seen whether Cranmore will see a similar increase, but Dolan said that kind of improvement would more than justify the $37,500 expense of building and maintaining the new terrain zones. In the meantime, the entire resort, including groomers, snow-makers, instructors and managers, is getting used to the new program.

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, February 14, 2014 C-3

Classified Index EMPLOYMENT

Homes

Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/ Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Commercial Property Condominiums/ Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

REAL ESTATE RENTALS Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums/ Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

FINANCIAL Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgage/Loans

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

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Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn & Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

RECREATION Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boat Charters Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snowmobiles Sporting Goods

TRANSPORTATION Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

PETS & LIVESTOCK Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

SERVICES Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

NOTICES/ ANNOUNCEMENTS

Apartments, Unfurnished ALL TYPES OF RENTALS

Property Management Division 170 N. Birch Suite 101, Soldotna (907)262-2522 Mary.Parske@century21.com www.Century21FreedomRealty.com

Real Estate For Sale Commercial Property Condominiums/Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

Commercial Property 10-BEDROOMS Ideal for fishing guide customers or Day Care. 185 Shady Lane. MLS# 13-4964 Price reduction to $310,000. McKay Investment (907)260-6675 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Assisted Living business for sale. Charming log construction on leased building. Owner retiring. 8 rooms fully occupied. Could be increased to 16. Soldotna location. 12 cap rate at $578,625. MLS#14-121 McKay Investment (907)260-6675 MIXED USE BUILDING 7 Offices, 2-bedroom apt., and pizza restaurant. Ideal for owner occupant for the offices and commercial rentals as well. Highway Frontage in Soldotna. 7200sq.ft. for $631,000 ($88. per Sq.Ft.) MLS #13-15371 McKay Investment (907)260-6675

Income Property FOR SALE 6-PLEX All 1-Bedrooms, 1-bath 2824 Illiamna St. Kenai $299,000 OBO I am the owner placing this ad. (907)394-2293 HUGE INCOME OPPORTUNITY Recently renovated 6-plex great location: 2824 Illiamna St. Kenai. Reduced price $299,000. Motivated seller, owner finance. (907)398-3864

Classifieds

Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

PUBLIC NOTICES/ LEGAL ADS Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

Homes

Work 283-7551 www.peninsulaclarion.com

Waterfront Property

BEAUTIFUL HOME ON CABIN LAKE 47750 Interlake Dr. well maintained 2400sq.ft. 3-bedroom, 1.5-bath, finished basement, greenhouse, lake frontage, new shingles. Appraised $235,000. Make offer. (907)398-1012

Rentals Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

Apartments, Unfurnished 2-BEDROOM Mile 18 Spur Hwy., $700. plus deposit of $700./ electric. No pets. Coin operated washer/dryer on site. (907)262-7248. K-BEACH Large 2-bedroom, newly remodeled, utilities included. No pets. $875. (907)252-2579. KENAI 2-BEDROOM Covered parking, refurbished, fireplace. HEAT INCLUDED. Good neighborhood. Quiet, clean, in-town on Auk Street $830. (206)909-6195 NORTH KENAI 2-Bedroom, Washer/dryer, satellite, heat included. $825/ month. No Pets. (907)398-2538. QUIET, CLEAN 2 or 3-bedroom, Gas included. Mackey Lake. No pets! (907)398-8515. C

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C-4 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, February 14, 2014

Apartments, Unfurnished

Homes

Apartments, Furnished

TWO WEEKS RENT FREE! 3-Bedroom, 1-bath on Redoubt (Kenai). Cats Allowed. Non-Smoking. No ASHA. $916. plus electric. $916. Deposit. (907)335-1950

Apartments, Furnished

Seasonal TOWNHOUSE Apartments On the River in Soldotna Fully furnished 1-bedroom, cable, WIFI, from $800. No smoking/ pets. (907)262-7835

Homes

1-LARGE ROOM $480. Soldotna, quiet setting, Satellite, limited cooking. (907)394-2543. DOWNTOWN Soldotna on the river. 2-bedroom, 1-bath, Seasonal/ Permanent, furnished/ unfurnished, NO pets/ NO smoking. Credit/ background checks. $850., (907)252-7110 EXCELLENT OCEAN VIEW! Bay Arm Apartments, Kenai. Accepting applications for 1 & 2 bedroom apartments, utilities included. $25. nonrefundable application fee. No pets. (907)283-4405. KENAI 1-Bedroom, furnished, heat, cable included. No pets. $675. month. (907)283-5203, (907)398-1642. SOLDOTNA 4-PLEX Furnished 2-Bedroom, washer/dryer. $925. includes utilities. (907)394-4201, (907)394-4200.

Classified Advertising. Let It Work For You! 283-7551

1-BEDROOM 5-minutes Soldotna, 10-minutes Kenai. Cable. Nice Neighborhood. Immaculate. (907)262-7881 3-BEDROOM HOUSE Furnished 4370 Eagle Rock Drive Kenai Spur (907)469-0665 BRAND NEW HOME Nikiski 3-bedroom, 2-bath, 2-car garage. Refrigerator, dishwasher, & range . Wooded lot. $1,500/ month plus utilities. (907)776-5276

Murwood K-Beach Ranch Updated K-Beach Ranch Nikiski Cabin Clam Gulch Cabin Spacious Soldotna Ranch Century21 Property Management (907)262-2522 NIKISKI New homes, 3-bedroom, 2-bath, garage, walking distance to Nikiski Rec. Center. Indoor pool & ice rink. $1275. per month. Leave message (907)776-3325

Homes SOLDOTNA/ Endicott Executive home, River front, furnished 3-bedroom, 3-bath, appliances included, long term lease negotiable. (907)252-7110 WHY RENT ????? Why rent when you can own, many low down & zero down payment programs available. Let me help you achieve the dream of home ownership. Call Now !!! Ken Scott, #AK203469. (907)395-4527 or cellular, (907)690-0220. Alaska USA Mortgage Company, #AK157293.

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes NIKISKI Handicapped accessible, covered ramp, deck. Alaska Housing OK, 3-bedroom, 2-bath utilities included, pets allowed. $1,250./ month. Call (907)776-6563.

Retail/ Commercial Space RED DIAMOND CENTER K-Beach Rd. 1,200- 2,400sq.ft. Retail or office, high traffic, across from DMV. Please call (907)953-2222 (907)598-8181

Retail/Commercial Space PRIME KENAI RETAIL/ OFFICE SPACE 1,832SqFt to 20,000SqFt. Rates start @ $.50SqFt. Call Carr Gottstein Properties, (907)564-2424 or visit www.carrgottstein.com

Homes

This is JOE. He bought a home that is his dream house. He found it fast in the Real Estate Section of the Classifieds. People like Joe, People like you, People like.

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For all the advancements in automotive safety, the most sophisticated safety devices are the ones already attached to the driver. America’s orthopaedic surgeons, in partnership with automakers, urge every driver to keep hands on the wheel and eyes on the road. Visit DecideToDrive.org.

3820-AAOS-AutoAlliance-SafetyFeatures_News_6.4375x7.indd 1

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C-6 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, February 14, 2014

Homes

Homes

Homes

Looking for a companion? Check out the Peninsula Clarion Classifieds! 283-7551 C

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www.peninsulaclarion.com

283-7551 150 Trading Bay Rd, Kenai, AK 99611

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Contact us

www.peninsulaclarion.com classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com

Classified Index EMPLOYMENT Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/ Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Commercial Property Condominiums/ Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

REAL ESTATE RENTALS Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums/ Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

FINANCIAL Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgage/Loans

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

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Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn & Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

RECREATION Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boat Charters Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snowmobiles Sporting Goods

TRANSPORTATION Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

PETS & LIVESTOCK Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

SERVICES Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

NOTICES/ ANNOUNCEMENTS Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

PUBLIC NOTICES/ LEGAL ADS Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

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CLASSIFIEDS

Education

Employment

General Employment

Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

Program Assistant

STUDENT SERVICES DIRECTOR Kenai Peninsula College is recruiting for a highly qualified, enthusiastic individual for its Student Services Director position. The KPC Student Services Director will oversee programs and employees in the Student Services Department, facilitate the strategic planning process, adjudicate student requests, and oversee recruitment and retention, student success, and budgetary planning. The successful candidate will represent KPC on a variety of statewide and UAA committees, and in the local community. This is a level 83, fulltime, 12 month, exempt position to begin July 7, 2014. The salary is $2,925.60 bi-weekly and includes benefits and tuition waivers. The review date is 3/03/2014 but applications will be accepted until the position is closed. For more information and to apply for this position go to KPC's employment page at www.kpc.alaska.edu

Position provides support for the Executive Director and Coalition activities for People Promoting Wellness through Community Action. He/she must be self-motivated with strong computer, communication, social marketing, and data management skills. Part time contracted position. Primarily work from home with a flexible schedule. Email kpcommunityactioncoalition@gmail.com. Call 907-335-0086 for more information

General Employment LOCAL EQUIPMENT RENTAL COMPANY Looking for 5/2 Operations/ Maintenance/ On-Call Personnel Duties include general Maintenance and inventory control Send resume to: akhelpwanted-personnel@yahoo.com

Accounts Payable and Travel Technician 2 Kenai Peninsula College is recruiting for a qualified, energetic individual for its Accounts Payable and Travel Technician position. This position is responsible for processing Accounts Payable, Travel, and for yearly inventory and tracking of property items over $5000.00. This is a level 76, fulltime, 12 month, position to begin March, 2014. The salary is $18.05 hourly and includes benefits and tuition waivers. The review date is 2/25/2014 but applications will be accepted until the position is closed.

Experience but will train. Contact Chris (907)283-8176

POLICE OFFICER Wage Range 15 Starting Wage $25.84hr-$30.56hr D.O.E.

Financial

The City of Soldotna has an opening for a grant funded Police Officer. This position serves the City of Soldotna as a Peace Officer in the administration of laws and ordinances. Becoming a member of the Public Safety Employees Association is a requirement of the position. A complete job description and application packet is available on the City's website http://www.ci.soldotna.ak.us/jobs.html. Please submit a City application, F-3, Cover Letter and Resume to the Human Resource Department at City Hall, 177 N. Birch Street, Soldotna, by fax 1.866.596-2994, or email tcollier@ci.soldotna.ak.us by March 7, 2014. First review will be February 21, 2014. The City of Soldotna is an EEO employer.

Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgages/Loans

Business for Sale

COFFEE SHOP FOR SALE North Kenai, moveable. Contact Brad for details (907)690-7737

General Employment

Merchandise For Sale Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn/Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

www.kpc.alaska.edu

General Employment

BECOME AN OCEAN RANGER Help protect Alaska's environment and its people! Be an observer onboard cruise ships for the summer, monitoring State environmental and marine discharge requirements and identifying any potential safety, sanitation, and/or health risks. Compensation includes both salary and benefits. Minimum Qualifications: 1.) Designated Duty Engineer (DDE) or Third Assistant Engineer (3 A/E) or degree in marine safety and environmental protection from accredited maritime institution. 2.) American Maritime Officers (AMO) Union member. 3.) Pass criminal background check, able to enter Canada. 4.) Of sound physical condition and able to pass post-offer physical examination. 5.) Successful completion of Ocean Ranger training. To Apply: 1.) Online at www.Crowley.com/oceanrangers by 03/15/14. 2.) Email: marinejobs@crowley.com with questions. Alaska residents are encouraged to apply!

General Employment

The Kenai Peninsula Borough is recruiting for Project Manager - Construction (Capital Projects Administrator). Under the general direction and supervision of the Capital Projects Director, the Capital Projects Administrator performs project management and administration functions for capital projects involving selecting and applying accepted and standard architectural and engineering practices associated with the location, planning, design, materials, and construction of buildings, site improvements, utilities or other capital projects. This is a full time, administrative position. Starting salary is $70,000+, DOE, plus excellent benefits. For a complete job description and/or to apply, go to: http://agency.governmentjobs.com/kenaiak/ default.cfm Applications will be accepted through 5 p.m. Friday, 2/21/14

Recreation Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boats Charter Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snow Mobiles Sporting Goods

Healthcare

Frontier Community Services is a Soldotna based non-profit agency providing in-home and group home services to people experiencing a disabling condition. We are seeking top-notch personnel for full-time and part-time positions within the agency with an interest in providing health care services for the Kenai Peninsula area.

Transportation Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

Current Openings • Case Manager • Forget-Me-Not Adult Day Program Manager • Care Coordinator • Early Childhood Educator Peak is seeking an experienced individual to fill the WASP Facilitator position in the Nikiski office. This position requires 3+ years of oilfield experience and previous experience with Behavioral Based Safety (BBS). This person will be responsible for planning and coordinating the BBS program for all Peak operations in the Cook Inlet. A qualified candidate would have previous facilitator or steering team experience and excellent interpersonal skills. Peak is an equal opportunity employer and offers a competitive salary and benefits package. Post offer/Pre-employment screening including drug testing, functional capacity testing and other pre-employment tests are required. Submit resumes to peakhr@peakalaska.com or fax to (907)263-7041. Include the phrase “WASP Facilitator” in your email subject line and on your resume.

Advertise Online Today! www.peninsulaclarion.com

Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

Cats FREE TO A GOOD HOME 1 female older cat, spayed, very loving, will go outside. 1 male older cat, neutered, loves to go outside, does well with dogs. Grandkids are allergic so they must find new homes. (907)398-4647

Notices/ Announcements

Health

Valentines Day Gift Idea: Buy GIFT CERTIFCATES for your loved ones here at Feel The Heal Massage Therapy. Now you can enjoy a relaxing massage 7 days a week. Open until 9pm. Call 598-HEAL for an appointment.

Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

Public Notices/ Legal Ads Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

Health

Dogs

**ASIAN MASSAGE**

WANTED Refrigeration Tech.

CITY OF SOLDOTNA EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

For more information and to apply for this position go to KPC's employment page at UAA is an AA/EO Employer and Ed. Institution.

Pets & Livestock

To place an ad call 907-283-7551

JANITORIAL Person- Soldotna, 2 nights per week/ part-time. Call 1-800-728-1961

General Employment

UAA is an AA/EO Employer and Educational Institution.

Education

General Employment

Peninsula Clarion, Friday, February 14, 2014 C-7

Full job descriptions can be found on our website, www.fcsonline.org ________________________________________ Pick up and return application packet to FCS’ HR Department, 43335 K-Beach Rd. Suite #36, Soldotna, AK 99669 or email to work@fcsonline.org FCS is an Equal Opportunity Employer

Trucks ‘02 SILVERADO 1/2 Ton 4X4 Excellent condition, New tires, tune-up $7000. (907)242-7473

Barn Hunt and Treibball COMING SOON! Plus Agility, Nose Work, Obedience, Puppy, Privates, new for all breeds, Barn Hunt, Treibball. PenDOG (907)262-6846 www.pendog.org

Pawsitive training for all dogs & puppies. Agility, Conformation, Obedience, Privates & Rally. www.kenaikennelclub.com (907)335-2552

Services Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Services Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

Health ASIAN MASSAGE Please make the phone ring anytime! (907)398-8896 Thanks! JASMINE THAI Massage, open Monday- Sunday, 10am- 6pm. (907)252-8053.

Call

283-7551

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Health

jtmillefamily@gmail.com

Service Directory!

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THAI HOUSE MASSAGE

Located in Kenai Behind Wells Fargo/ stripmall

PUREBRED GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPPIES with papers for sale! They are papered & will have their first set of shots. They will be ready for their new homes the second week in February. 3 males & 3 females left. Males:$900 Females:$1000 Call, text or email Tera! 907-252-7753

By advertising your business in the

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KENAI KENNEL CLUB

SCRAPE UP MORE PROFIT

283-7551

Wonderful, Relaxing. Happy Holiday Call Anytime (907)398-8307. Thanks!

PENINSULA THAI MASSAGE

Thompsons’s Building/ Soldotna, Sterling Highway Next to Liberty Tax (907)252-8053, (907)398-2073

Health MOUNTAIN MAGIC MASSAGE

Nationally certified, Swedish deep tissue & Hotstone Massage (907)252-4460 www.mountainmagicmassage.com

Sell your used camping gear today! Classifieds Dept.

283-7551

classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com


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C-8 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, February 14, 2014

Would you like to have your business highlighted in Yellow Advantage? • Reach readers in the newspaper and online that are ready, willing and able to buy your goods and services. • Have your business stand out from the competition by creating top of mind awareness. • Ads appear EVERYDAY in the newspaper • Easy to use online search engine puts your business ahead of the competion. • Update your ads and listings frequently.

Peninsula Clarion Display Advertising

(907) 283-7551

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Get your business listed 283-7551

Automotive Insurance Walters & Associates Located in the Willow Street Mall

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

Bathroom Remodeling

Business Cards Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai

283-4977

Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

Boots

35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

Computer Repair Located in the Willow Street Mall

35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

News, Sports, Weather & More!

Family Dentistry Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD

Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

Circulation Hotline

Oral Surgery, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

Dentistry

Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing

Walters & Associates

Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing

Contractor

Carhartt

AK Sourdough Enterprises

Every Day in your Peninsula Clarion â&#x20AC;¢ www.peninsulaclarion.com

AK Sourdough Enterprises

alias@printers-ink.com

ZZZpeninsulaclarionFRP

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Kenai Dental Clinic Emergency appts. available Denali Kid Care/Medicaid

Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD

605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

Oral Surgery, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Kenai Dental Clinic Emergency appts. available Denali Kid Care/Medicaid

605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

Funeral Homes Peninsula Memorial Chapels & Crematory Kenai........................................283-3333 Soldotna ..................................260-3333 Homer...................................... 235-6861 Seward.....................................224-5201

Insurance Walters & Associates Located in the Willow Street Mall

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

Oral Surgery Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD Oral Surgery, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Print Shops Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK alias@printers-ink.com

150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai............................. 283-4977

Rack Cards Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK alias@printers-ink.com

150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai............................. 283-4977

Remodeling AK Sourdough Enterprises Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

Teeth Whitening Kenai Dental Clinic Emergency appts. available Denali Kid Care/Medicaid

605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

Classified Advertising. Let It Work For You! 283-7551

Outdoor Clothing Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing 35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

Classifieds Work!

283-7551

Legal Notices

FOR E L A S

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF ALASKA THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT AT KENAI In the Matter of Estate of: JOHN ANDREW POLJACIK, JR. Decendent. Date of Death: December 21, 2013

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Considering the Sale of Your Home?

CASE NO. 3KN-14-10 PR NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on January 29, 2014, MARY COLLEEN SINNOTT was appointed as the Personal Representative of the above-named Estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said clams will be forever barred. Claims must either be presented to MARY COLLEEN SINNOTT, Personal Representative of the above Estate, c/o Daniel L. Aaronson, Law Office of Daniel L. Aaronson, 909 Cook Drive, Kenai, Alaska 99611, or filed with the Court. DATED this 11th day of February, 2014. MARY COLLEEN SINNOTT Personal Representative PUBLISHED: 2/14, 21, 28, 2014

1585/2991

Public Notices IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF ALASKA THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT AT KENAI In the Matter of a Change of Name for: BRYDEN MAXWELL GREGORY Current Name of Minor Child Case No: 3KN-13-00832CI

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Before the sign goes up, make sure your REALTOR® will showcase your home in THE Central Peninsulaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most comprehensive Real Estate Guide.

Notice of Petition to Change Name A petition has been filed in the Superior Court (Case # 3KN-13-00832CI) requesting a name change from (current name) BRAYDEN MAXWELL GREGORY to BRAYDEN MAXWELL FREEMAN GREGORY. A hearing on this request will be held on March 13, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at Courtroom 2, Kenai Courthouse, 125 Trading Bay Drive, Suite 100 Kenai, AK.

DECEMBER 31, 2013 Effective Date:

ANNA M. MORAN Superior Court Judge

PUBLISH: 1/31, 2/7, 14, T:21, 3.752014 in

1573/73750

T: 10.5 in

Brought to you monthly by your peninsula neighbors at the Clarion.

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, 2014 FRIDAY AFTERNOON/EVENING

11:30

7) Nightline

A

B

(3) ABC-13 7030

Always nny in (6) MNT-5 7035 ladelphia e Late ow/Craig (8) CBS-11 7031 Z (N) ‘PG’ (9) FOX-4 7033

Olympics me-day

d About u ‘PG’ (N) ‘G’

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4:30

Alaska Daily The Insider (N)

5 PM

A = DISH

5:30

News & Views ABC World (N) News Inside Edition Family Feud Family Feud (N) ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’

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CABLE STATIONS

Channel 2 News 5:00 Report (N) BBC World News America ‘PG’

NBC Nightly News (N) Alaska Weather ‘G’

6 PM

6:30

7 PM

B = DirecTV

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8 PM

FEBRUARY 14, 2014

8:30

9 PM

9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’

Wheel of For- Be My Valentine, Charlie Shark Tank An unprecedented (:01) 20/20 (N) ‘PG’ ABC News at (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live ‘14’ (:37) Nightline tune (N) ‘G’ Brown; A Charlie Brown deal. ‘PG’ 10 (N) (N) Valentine ‘G’ Family Guy 30 Rock ‘14’ Monk “Mr. Monk’s 100th Case” Monk Monk undergoes hypno- American Family Guy 30 Rock “Last How I Met The Office It’s Always ‘14’ Serial-killer case. ‘PG’ sis therapy. ‘PG’ Dad ‘14’ “Lottery Fever” Lunch” ‘14’ Your Mother “Valentine’s Sunny in ‘14’ ‘14’ Day” ‘PG’ Philadelphia KTVA 6 p.m. Evening News Hawaii Five-0 “Ka’oia i’o ma Hawaii Five-0 “A ia la aku” ‘14’ Hawaii Five-0 “Kupu ’eu” ‘14’ KTVA Night- (:35) Late Show With David Late Late (N) loko” ‘14’ cast Letterman ‘PG’ Show/Craig The Big Bang The Big Bang Bones “The Woman in White” Enlisted “Pi- Raising Hope Fox 4 News at 9 (N) The Arsenio Hall Show ‘14’ Two and a TMZ (N) ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ The team keeps a case from lot” ‘14’ ‘14’ Half Men ‘14’ Brennan. ‘14’ Channel 2 The Olympic XXII Winter Olympics Figure Skating, Alpine Skiing, Freestyle Skiing, Skeleton. From Sochi, Russia. Figure Channel 2 (:05) XXII Winter Olympics Newshour (N) Zone (N) skating: men’s gold medal final; alpine skiing; freestyle skiing. (N Same-day Tape) News: Late Ski Jumping, Skeleton. (N Edition (N) Same-day Tape) PBS NewsHour (N) Washington Alaska Edi- Great Performances “National Theatre: 50 Years on Stage” Wendy Whelan: Moments of Charlie Rose (N) Week With tion Royal National Theatre’s 50 years. (N) ‘14’ Grace ‘G’ Gwen Ifill

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Parks and Parks and (8) WGN-A 239 307 Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Recreation Recreation Dr. Denese SkinScience ‘G’ The Lisa Robertson Show (N) ‘G’ Friday Night Beauty ‘G’ Spring Fever ‘G’ (20) QVC 137 317

30 Rock ‘14’ 30 Rock ‘14’ It’s Always Futurama ‘PG’ ’Til Death ‘PG’ Mad About Sunny You ‘PG’ Gardening Made Easy by Cottage Farms ‘G’ Outdoor Living ‘G’

way: Under -inspired (23) LIFE

Wife Swap Goth mom and Wife Swap “Alcorn/Booker” A Wife Swap “Meeks/Hoover” A Bonnie & Clyde Bonnie and Clyde evade the law. ‘14’ Bonnie & Clyde Bonnie wants to generate headlines. ‘14’ (:02) Bonnie & Clyde Bonnie and Clyde evade the law. ‘14’ 108 252 hockey mom swap lives. ‘PG’ former boxer trades families. religious mother swaps. ‘PG’ ‘PG’ s “The Only NCIS A murder victim in a Law & Order: Special Vic- Law & Order: Special Vic- Law & Order: Special Vic- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- “The Break-Up” (2006) Vince (28) USA 105 242 taxi. ‘PG’ tims Unit “Storm” ‘14’ tims Unit “Alien” ‘14’ tims Unit ‘14’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ Vaughn. nan ‘14’ The King of The King of Seinfeld “The Seinfeld “The Seinfeld “The Family Guy “The Hangover” (2009, Comedy) Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms, (:15) “Due Date” (2010, Comedy) Robert Downey Jr., Zach (:15) The Of- (:45) The ‘14’ Zach Galifianakis. Three pals must find a missing groom after Galifianakis, Michelle Monaghan. A high-strung man takes a fice ‘PG’ Office “Ultima(30) TBS 139 247 Queens ‘PG’ Queens ‘PG’ Heart Attack” Revenge” ‘PG’ Deal” ‘PG’ ‘PG’ a wild bash. road trip with an annoying stranger. tum” ‘PG’ with EsSupernatural “Swan Song” NBA Basketball 2014 Rising Stars Challenge. (N) (Live) Inside the Cold Justice (N) ‘14’ APB With Troy Dunn (N) ‘PG’ Cold Justice ‘14’ APB With Troy Dunn ‘PG’ “Walking Tall” (31) TNT 138 245 ‘14’ NBA (N) (2004) (3:00) NBA Basketball All- College Basketball Arizona at Arizona State. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter NBA Basketball All-Star (34) ESPN 140 206 Star Celebrity Game. (N) Celebrity Game. cellus Wiley Karate U.S. Open: ISKA World Boxing Friday Night Fights. Chris Algieri vs. Emmanuel Taylor. Olbermann (N) (Live) Olbermann (N) NFL Live (N) SportsNation Marcellus Wiley SportsCenter (N) (35) ESPN2 144 209 n. Championships. From Huntington, N.Y. (N) (Live) and Max Kellerman. Basketball College Basketball Pepperdine at Gonzaga. WHL Hockey Portland Winterhawks at Kamloops Blazers. (N) (Live) World Poker Tour: Season 12 WHL Hockey Portland Winterhawks at Kamloops Blazers. (36) ROOT 426 651

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180 311

(55) TLC

183 280

(56) DISC 182 278

s: Buck(57) TRAV 196 277 G’ 1) Pawn (58) HIST 120 269 rs ‘PG’ : Nashville into the (59) A&E 118 265

hab Ad(60) HGTV 112 229 t ‘G’ A creative (61) FOOD 110 231 G’ d Program (65) CNBC 208 355

1) Tosh.0

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(67) FNC

205 360

(81) COM 107 249 (82) SYFY 122 244

Cops ‘PG’

10 Million Dollar Bigfoot Cops ‘PG’ Cops ‘PG’ Cops ‘PG’ Cops ‘PG’ Bounty (N) ‘PG’ (3:00) “The Green Mile” (1999, Drama) Tom Hanks, David Morse, Michael Clarke Duncan. A “Face/Off” (1997, Action) John Travolta, Nicolas Cage, Joan Allen. An FBI agent and a vio- The Walking Dead “After” ‘MA’ “Survival of the Dead” guard thinks an inmate has a supernatural power to heal. lent terrorist switch identities. (2009) Alan Van Sprang. Teen Titans Annoying King of the The Cleve- American American Family Guy Family Guy Robot Aqua Teen Squidbillies American American Family Guy Family Guy Robot Go! ‘PG’ Orange ‘PG’ Hill ‘PG’ land Show Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Chicken Hunger ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Chicken Finding Bigfoot: Further Finding Bigfoot: Further To Be Announced Treehouse Masters: Out on Treehouse Masters “Levitat- Ultimate Treehouses (N) ‘PG’ Treehouse Masters “Levitat- Ultimate Treehouses ‘PG’ Evidence ‘PG’ Evidence ‘PG’ a Limb (N) ‘PG’ ing Lighthouse” ‘PG’ ing Lighthouse” ‘PG’ Austin & Austin & Good Luck Good Luck Good Luck Good Luck “Finding Nemo” (2003) Voices of Albert Brooks. Animated. A Liv & Mad- Austin & Jessie ‘G’ Liv & Mad- A.N.T. Farm Wander Over Ally ‘G’ Ally ‘G’ Charlie ‘G’ Charlie ‘G’ Charlie ‘G’ Charlie ‘G’ clown fish searches for his missing son. die ‘G’ Ally ‘G’ die ‘G’ ‘G’ Yonder SpongeBob SpongeBob Monster High: Why Do Sam & Cat ‘G’ Hathaways The Thunder- Sam & Cat ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Friends ‘PG’ (:36) Friends (:12) Friends Carol (Jane SibGhouls Fall in Love? mans ‘G’ ‘PG’ bett) begins labor. ‘PG’ (3:00) “Another Cinderella “The Last Song” (2010, Drama) Miley Cyrus, Greg Kinnear, Liam Hems“The Prince & Me” (2004, Romance-Comedy) Julia Stiles, Luke Mably, Ben The 700 Club ‘G’ Fresh Prince Fresh Prince Story” (2008) Jane Lynch worth. A man tries to reconnect with his estranged daughter. Miller. A collegian and a Danish prince fall in love. Borrowed, Say Yes to the Dress: The Say Yes to the Dress: The Borrowed, Borrowed, Say Yes to the Dress: The Borrowed, Borrowed, Four Weddings Danielle; Four Weddings “... and a Borrowed, New Big Day ‘PG’ Big Day (N) ‘PG’ New New Big Day ‘PG’ New New Kitty; Kally; Dawn. ‘PG’ Thousand Cranes” ‘PG’ New Gold Rush ‘G’ Gold Rush ‘G’ Gold Rush ‘G’ Gold Rush: Pay Dirt (N) ‘PG’ Gold Rush “Man on Wire” Bering Sea Gold Increasingly Gold Rush “Man on Wire” ‘PG’ Bering Sea Gold Increasingly (N) ‘PG’ bad weather. (N) ‘14’ bad weather. ‘14’ Ghost Adventures “Brook- Ghost Adventures “Kings Ghost Adventures “The Ghost Adventures “Point Sur Ghost Adventures “Longfel- The Dead Files ‘PG’ The Dead Files “A Widow’s Ghost Adventures “Longfeldale Lodge” ‘PG’ Tavern” ‘PG’ Galka Family” ‘PG’ Lighthouse” ‘PG’ low’s Wayside Inn” ‘PG’ Rage” ‘PG’ low’s Wayside Inn” ‘PG’ Modern Marvels “The Potato” Modern Marvels “ConveAmerican Pickers “Sturgis or American Pickers ‘PG’ American Pickers “California American Pickers “The King’s (:02) American Pickers (:01) American Pickers ‘PG’ ‘PG’ nience Stores” ‘PG’ Bust” ‘PG’ Gold Mine” ‘PG’ Ransom” ‘PG’ “Mike’s Breakdown” ‘PG’ The First 48 A man is killed The First 48 “10 Pounds” The First 48 A gang founder The First 48 The murder of a The First 48 A young mother The First 48 “Birthday Girl” (:01) The First 48 “Missing” (:01) The First 48 The murder while being robbed. ‘14’ Drug-related murder. ‘14’ is shot in a drive-by. ‘14’ father shot in the back. ‘14’ is gunned down. ‘14’ Gunmen open fire at a birth- A 20-year-old single mother of a father shot in the back. day party. ‘14’ disappears. ‘14’ ‘14’ Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Renovation Renovation Renovation Renovation House Hunt- Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Renovation Renovation Realities ‘G’ Realities ‘G’ Realities ‘G’ Realities ‘G’ ers ‘G’ Realities ‘G’ Realities ‘G’ Unwrapped Unwrapped Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Rachael vs. Guy Celebrity Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive ‘G’ ‘G’ Cook-Off ‘G’ America’s Gun: The Rise of Mexico’s Drug War Mob Money: Murders and Crime Inc. “Deadly High” American Greed “Funny American Greed “Crash for Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program the AR-15 Acquisitions Synthetic drugs. Money” Cash” The O’Reilly Factor (N) The Kelly File (N) Hannity (N) The O’Reilly Factor The Kelly File Hannity On the Record With Greta Red Eye (N) Van Susteren Futurama ‘PG’ Futurama ‘PG’ South Park Tosh.0 ‘14’ The Colbert Daily Show/ Tosh.0 ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ South Park South Park South Park South Park ‘14’ Report ‘PG’ Jon Stewart ‘MA’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Bitten Psychotic killers are Bitten Elena endeavors to Helix “Aniqatiga” Alan makes WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) ‘PG’ Helix “Survivor Zero” Hatake Bitten Elena endeavors to Helix “Survivor Zero” Hatake being turned. ‘14’ defend Clay. ‘14’ progress. ‘14’ rescues Walker. ‘14’ defend Clay. ‘14’ rescues Walker. ‘14’

PREMIUM STATIONS

Cops ‘14’

Cops ‘14’

Jail ‘14’

Cops ‘PG’

Cops ‘14’

Cops ‘PG’

Cops ‘PG’

Cops ‘14’

Cops ‘PG’

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

(3:30) “Hitchcock” (2012, (:15) “Parental Guidance” (2012, Comedy) Billy Crystal, True Detective Cohle looks True Detective Hart and Real Time With Bill Maher (N Real Time With Bill Maher Girls “Free Looking ‘MA’ rt and Bette Midler, Marisa Tomei. A man uses old-school methods over old case files. ‘MA’ Cohle follow a series of leads. Same-day Tape) ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Snacks” ‘MA’ es of leads. ! HBO 303 504 Historical Drama) Anthony Hopkins. ‘PG-13’ to take care of his grandkids. ‘PG’ ‘MA’ he Can“Scoop” (2006) Scarlett Johansson, Woody (:35) “The Negotiator” (1998, Suspense) Samuel L. Jackson, Kevin Spacey, “Oblivion” (2013, Science Fiction) Tom Cruise, Morgan (:10) “Safe House” (2012, Action) Denzel Washington, Ryan chael Freeman, Olga Kurylenko. A stranger’s arrival triggers one Reynolds, Vera Farmiga. A rookie and a renegade operative ^ HBO2 304 505 Allen. A journalism student probes a mystery David Morse. A top police negotiator is accused of committing murder. ‘R’ in London. ‘PG-13’ man’s battle to save mankind. ‘PG-13’ try to evade assassins. ‘R’ “Abraham (:45) “Die Another Day” (2002, Action) Pierce Brosnan, Halle Berry, Toby 5) “Ameri“Identity Thief” (2013, Comedy) Jason Bateman, Melissa Banshee “Armies of One” Banshee “Armies of One” “Wild Women” (2013, Adult) n Loser” ‘R’ + MAX 311 514 Lincoln: Vam- Stephens. James Bond and an American spy track a North Korean villain. McCarthy, Jon Favreau. A victim of identity theft fights back. Jason’s past catches up to Jason’s past catches up to Erika Jordan, Krissy Lynn. ‘NR’ pire” ‘PG-13’ ‘R’ him. (N) ‘MA’ him. ‘MA’ (3:00) “Sling Blade” (1996, (:15) “The Rundown” (2003, Adventure) The Rock, Seann House of Lies Episodes 2) Jamie “Lincoln” (2012, Historical Drama) Daniel Day-Lewis, Sally Field, David “Man on a Ledge” (2012) Sam Worthington. ght in A disgraced ex-cop steps onto the ledge of a 5 SHOW 319 540 Drama) Billy Bob Thornton. ‘R’ William Scott, Rosario Dawson. A bounty hunter must find his “Soldiers” ‘MA’ “Episode 5” Strathairn. Lincoln takes measures to ensure the end of slavery forever. boss’ son in the Amazon. ‘PG-13’ ‘MA’ ‘PG-13’ high-rise. ‘PG-13’ (2:55) “Out of Sight” o Ban“Sinister” (2012, Horror) Ethan Hawke, Vincent D’Onofrio, “The Words” (2012, Drama) Bradley Cooper. (:40) “Salmon Fishing in the Yemen” (2011) Ewan Mc“Amélie” (2001) Audrey Tautou. A Parisian s revenge 8 TMC 329 545 (1998) George Clooney, Ving James Ransone. A true-crime writer uses found footage to A wannabe writer claims another man’s work Gregor. A scientist and a sheik endeavor to bring sport fishing waitress alters the lives of those around her. Rhames. ‘R’ unravel a murder. ‘R’ as his own. ‘PG-13’ to Yemen. ‘PG-13’ (Subtitled-English) ‘R’

February 9 - 15, 2014

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C-10 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, February 14, 2014

TO HIS FAMILY, HE’S A BUILDER. TO HIS COMPANY, HE’S THE KIND OF EMPLOYEE YOU CAN BUILD AROUND.

Great employees are the lifeblood of any great company. Finding them is the hard part, and finding the time is even harder. With Power Resume Search,® you’ll save both time and effort. It uses Monster’s 6Sense® search technology to deliver the best-qualified candidates – sorted, ranked and compared side-by-side. So you get better matches to your job opportunities with unprecedented efficiency. And that’s something you can build on.

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, February 14, 2014

Wife’s devotion to husband stops at the church door DEAR ABBY: About a year ago, my husband, “Scott,” started attending church. He had never gone in the few years we dated. We discussed our feelings about religion before we became engaged. He comes from a family that attended church every Sunday and believes in God. I was raised the exact opposite; I’m an atheist. I told Scott that if we had children, I would be OK with him taking them to church, but I would not join them. It bothered him a little, but we talked it over and moved on. After a difficult year that led to some mild depression (for which Scott sought help), he started going to church. I was happy for him because it seemed to help him. After a few weeks he asked me to go with him. I went several times, but felt uncomfortable. I feel like a fraud sitting in the pew. Scott says he “wants my support” and that means attending with him. I suspect he’s embarrassed to be there without his wife. I do not enjoy it. I have been offended by some of the messages that were imparted, and I would prefer having a couple of hours to myself on Sundays. Abby, what should I do? Is there any middle ground here? — FEELING COERCED IN SAN DIEGO DEAR FEELING COERCED: Tell Scott that you are happy he has found comfort in going to

Crossword

By Eugene Sheffer

church, but that you are not comfortable with what is being preached and find some of it offensive. Remind him that church attendance was not part of your agreement when you married him and that you value your solitary time at home the same way he appreciates the service. While you might relent and go with him on major Abigail Van Buren holidays — some non-believing spouses do that — there really isn’t a middle ground, and because you feel so strongly about it, you should stand yours.

on my shoulders and I don’t feel I can handle it alone much longer. We don’t live near family, and I have found it hard to make friends due to my daughter’s acting out. How do I get my husband to understand? — MARRIED SINGLE MOM DEAR MOM: I understand how stressful it must be to have all the responsibility for raising your daughters on your shoulders. And feeling as isolated as you do only intensifies your feelings. If your husband doesn’t already understand what you are going through, I doubt there is much you can say that will convince him to quit his lucrative job and help with the children. Because he is gone so much — and making good money — consider moving yourself and your daughters closer to your family so you can have some respite when you need it. And in the meanDEAR ABBY: I am the mother of two girls. One time, find a therapist for yourself. Perhaps your of them has a lot of emotional problems. My husband daughter’s doctor or your personal physician can is gone for months at a time due to his job. I have told recommend one. him many times that I want him to find another job that would have him home more often. He always says that DEAR READERS: Largely because of you, there are no jobs that will pay what he’s making now. writing this column is a labor of love for me, and I I know that we need a good-paying job, but I need would like to wish you all a very Happy Valentine’s my husband home and my girls need their father. Day! With all of our daughter’s issues, everything falls — ABBY Hints from Heloise

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to make positive? You might want to get feedback from someone who is straightforward. If you have made a plan at a time when you felt less than great, it could reflect a certain amount of negativity. Be realistic. Tonight: Use your imagination. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Understand that your moods tend to go up and down. When push comes to shove, you might want to reach out to a partner. A friend could be overassertive, and you might feel the need to respond with irritation, if not anger. Tonight: Try to make peace, not war. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Reach out to a loved one or dear friend at a distance. You have a way of communicating that lets the other person know you care. Use the upbeat mood of Valentine’s Day to spread good cheer. A misunderstanding could arise from out of the blue. Tonight: All smiles. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Listen to a loved one’s feedback. Understand that the innate tension that seems to exist between you and others is part of the Full Moon today. Problems will be exaggerated in the present stellar atmosphere. Tonight: Look at the big picture, then celebrate Valentine’s Day. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Tap into your imagination when making plans. You might notice that a friend, family member or loved one could be quite tense. Pressure builds and tempers flare as a result of the Full Moon. Try to stay clear of all the uproar. Tonight: Say “yes” to an offer.

No love for bedbugs Dear Heloise: Is there an at-home remedy to get rid of bedbugs? — A Reader in Washington. These nasty little creatures did seem to make it around the world several years ago, and many hotels had a problem. Most of that has been resolved, so be sure that you are talking about bedbugs and not fleas or ticks! There really isn’t any home remedy to get rid of bedbugs. Over-the-counter pesticides and bug-removal products do not work, according to my research. Sorry to give you not-so-good news. Extreme heat seems to be the only way to kill the little devils. So, wash and dry all of your bedding in the hottest water and highest drying temperature you can. Call a professional if they are in other areas of the house. You cannot kill them yourself, and they multiply very rapidly. So, if they really are bedbugs, don’t waste time trying old-fashioned hints. The longer you wait, the more difficult it will be to rid your home of these hitchhiking bugs! — Heloise Travel hint Dear Readers: One of the best hints I’ve learned as a “road warrior” is to never pack clothes you haven’t tried on or worn before — you might end up with something you cannot wear! And it’s too late to buy something new when standing in front of the mirror at 7 a.m. in a hotel! Try to wash and wear a new item at least once to make sure it’s comfortable. Walk, sit, stand, bend and see if the clothing will perform throughout the day. Happy travels! — Heloise

SUDOKU

By Tom Wilson

By Dave Green

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Friday.

2 3 8 4 7 1 9 6 5

1 6 7 5 2 9 8 3 4

9 4 5 8 6 3 1 7 2

7 8 6 9 4 2 3 5 1

5 1 2 6 3 8 4 9 7

4 9 3 1 5 7 2 8 6

6 2 9 3 1 5 7 4 8

3 5 1 7 8 4 6 2 9

Difficulty Level

8 7 4 2 9 6 5 1 3 2/13

Previous Puzzles Answer Key

B.C.

By Johnny Hart

Garfield

By Jim Davis

Take It from the Tinkersons By Bill Bettwy

Tundra

Shoe

2

3

6

4

7

8

4

2

9

4

1

8

5

9

3

6

Difficulty Level

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7

9

6

4 6

8 2/14

By Chad Carpenter

By Chris Cassatt & Gary Brookins

Mother Goose and Grimm

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5

3

By Michael Peters

2014 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

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denly might switch from being in a rage one minute to being eventempered the next. Extremes mark this day. Tonight: Do the Valentine thing. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH You might discover that you have more than one Valentine. Be careful when making plans, as there could be a conflict. Remember, chocolate works; nearly everyone loves it. Your feelings seem to be all over the place. Tonight: The going gets better as it gets later. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You’ll want to pursue an important matter. Let a domestic issue sit for now, because you won’t be able to change it. Be optimistic, no matter what happens. You will find a way to turn this situation around. Tonight: Too many people want to be your Valentine. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Listen to the feedback you get, though you might want to confirm what you hear at a later point. You could be moving a lot slower than usual until later today. Postpone any meetings where you have to be alert. Tonight: Recharge your batteries. TGIF! LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Run with the moment, and focus on your long-term goals. You could feel unusually tight when managing your funds. You might want to take a risk, but know that a more conservative course serves you well. Refuse to get angry with a loved one. Tonight: Honor Valentine’s Day. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Are the changes you’re about

2014 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, Feb.14, 2014: This year you could become easily irritated or have a problem when interacting with others. Use the power of detachment, and try walking in someone else’s shoes. You will gain insight and compassion as a result. If you are single, you will meet someone you adore sometime after spring. You will love being around this person. If you are attached, when you become less triggered by interactions with your sweetie, you will be more accepting and loving. VIRGO can be annoying with his or her need for precision. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH You might go overboard when dealing with a child or new friend. Your creativity will flourish as long as you are spontaneous. An associate might interject him- or herself into a situation without realizing it. Make this OK. Tonight: Be the Romeo or Juliet of the moment! TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Your feelings are a lot stronger than you realize. Someone in your immediate circle will encourage you to be more logical. You might feel as if this person is raining on your parade. Don’t worry — this behavior is only temporary. Tonight: Invite some friends over. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHRemainspontaneousdespite a co-worker’s or friend’s attitude. You have much more that you want to share, and you will. You sud-


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Profile for Sound Publishing

Peninsula Clarion, February 14, 2014  

February 14, 2014 edition of the Peninsula Clarion

Peninsula Clarion, February 14, 2014  

February 14, 2014 edition of the Peninsula Clarion