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CLARION

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P E N I N S U L A

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2014 Soldotna-Kenai, Alaska

Vol. 44, Issue 113

Question Do you think the Alaska Permanent Fund dividend program should be protected in the state constitution? n Yes; or n No. To place your vote and comment, visit our Web site at www. peninsulaclarion. com. Results and selected comments will be posted each Tuesday in the Clarion, and a new question will be asked. Suggested questions may be submitted online or e-mailed to news@peninsulaclarion.com.

50 cents newsstands daily/$1.00 Sunday

Oil taxes debated on Senate floor By BECKY BOHRER Associated Press

JUNEAU — The floor of the Alaska Senate broke into an impromptu debate over oil taxes Monday. Sen. Cathy Giessel sparked the discussion in a special order, which is when members speak on issues of their own

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28th LEGISLATURE

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choosing. Hers was entitled “What Could It Look Like?” Giessel, R-Anchorage, and chair of the Senate Resources Committee, spoke of the need

for a healthy oil industry for Alaska’s economy and what alternatives Alaska had for comparable tax revenues. They included having tens of thousands of cruise ships visit Alaska, every Alaskan of drinking age down 138 shots a day and every Alaskan of age smoke 10 packs of cigarette a day. She said those aren’t things the state

would want to do. Giessel said there is new activity on the North Slope under the rewrite of Alaska’s oil production tax, which the Legislature passed last year. The state is better protected at lower oil prices under the new law and the new system would yield more revenues if prices continued to fall than under the for-

mer tax structure, she said. She is much happier to see the activity on Point Thomson and additional rigs on the North Slope than the alternative, Giessel said. Sens. Hollis French and Bill Wielechowski offered rebuttals. French, the Senate minority See TAX, page A-8

In the news Bill to repeal local education funding advances

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JUNEAU (AP) — A bill that would repeal the required local contribution municipalities make to education has advanced from the House Education Committee but without a ringing endorsement. Chairwoman Lynn Gattis said some members felt there were constitutional issues that needed to be addressed. The bill received an additional referral, to the House Judiciary Committee, on Monday. The bill would end the practice of having certain boroughs fund part of their school districts. The Ketchikan Gateway Borough has sued the state over the required contribution, saying it’s unconstitutional. The lawsuit created another buzz last week. Gov. Sean Parnell said Friday he wasn’t threatening the borough when he told Ketchikan reporters that the lawsuit could “shade or color” reaction to the community’s requests for state money to fund infrastructure projects.

Clarification A story in Monday’s Clarion requires clarification. A golden fire axe given to retired Kenai Fire Chief Mike Tilly was presented by the Kenai Firefighters Association.

Index Opinion.................. A-4 Nation/World.......... A-5 Sports.....................A-6 Classifieds............. A-9 Comics................. A-12 Pet Tails............... A-13

Check us out online at www.peninsulaclarion.com To subscribe, call 283-3584.

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion

Alaska Board of Fisheries member Tom Kluberton gathers with a group of Cook Inlet commercial fishermen to go over the finer points of a board generated proposal to further restrict the fleet Sunday in Anchorage. Kluberton’s proposal was not the final one adopted by the board.

Board makes driftnet fishery changes Cook Inlet Central District drift fishery management plan includes new area By RASHAH McCHESNEY Peninsula Clarion

On Monday, the Alaska Board of Fisheries approved several changes to the Central District Drift Gillnet Fishery Management Plan outlined in a proposal submitted by the Matanuska-Susitna Borough Fish & Wildlife Commission. After more than an hour of discus-

sion, the board voted unanimously to adopt the new regulation that includes provisions establishing a 1 percent rule for the fishery in August and a new area to fish called the Anchor Point section. The fishing season — which opens on the later date of either the third Monday in June or June 19 — will allow fishing from July 9–15 in the Expanded Kenai and Kasilof Sections and Area 1.

The expanded Kenai and Kasilof sections follow the shoreline on the east side of the Cook Inlet from the Ninilchik River to an area north of the Kenai River. Area 1 encompasses most of the lower Cook Inlet with the northernmost boundary being a line south of the Kasilof River that bisects the Inlet to a spot near Polly Creek on the west side; the southern boundary bisects the

Inlet from a line that starts at Anchor Point. The new Anchor Point section starts just south of the Kasilof section, near Ninilchik and runs down the shoreline before terminating near Anchor Point. During board deliberations, commercial area management biologist Pat Shields was asked what kind of sockeye salmon catch rates are observed for See FISH, page A-8

Assembly to consider federal priorities list By KAYLEE OSOWSKI Peninsula Clarion

Topping the Kenai Peninsula Borough’s federal priorities list for fiscal year 2015 are environmental concerns that, without action, could affect the local economy. The top priority on the list of five project and programs is the eradication of elodea, an invasive aquatic plant. “There is elodea and it can choke off lakes and salmon habitats, so that’s clearly very important to our economy,” Kenai Peninsula Borough Mayor Mike Navarre said.

John Morton, fish and wildlife biologist with the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, said the plant first showed up in September 2012 and about 68 lakes with a high probability for having elodea on the peninsula were surveyed last summer. These lakes were ones with boat launches, lots of land owners and float plane traffic. The plant was found in three lakes on the peninsula, Stormy, Daniels and Beck lakes. If the plant spreads to other lakes, it will be difficult to contain and the cost to try to get rid of it increases, Morton said. Morton said elodea spreads

The invasive plant elodea in one of the many ways it is transported from lake to lake. The borough has listed federal funding to eradicate the plant on the peninsula as a priority.

easily because it doesn’t require seeds. If a fragment of the plant is transported to a body of water, it can clone itself and spread. “That’s why we are so concerned about it,” Morton said, “that if we don’t get it while it’s still just in three lakes, we will not be able to stop it if it continues to spread.” According to the description of the project, if the plant becomes so widespread that eradication from the lakes is impossible, the borough will “suffer substantial and irreversible economic, social and cultural impacts.”

Photo courtesy Kenai National Wildlife Refuge

See FUNDING, page A-8

Former nurse pleads Senate rejects pay increases to tampering charge By DAN BALMER Peninsula Clarion

A former Soldotna school nurse pleaded guilty to a charge of tampering with public records Monday afternoon at the Kenai Courthouse after allegations that she forged a signature on school immunization records. Donna Cotman, 65, a retired school nurse from Redoubt Elementary School, entered a guilty plea of tampering with public records, a Class A mis-

demeanor. Defense attorney Peter Ehrhardt and State District Attorney Helen Hickman came to an agreement to drop four counts of second-degree forgery, a Class C felony, for the change of plea. Kenai District Court Judge Dan Ogg sentenced Cotman to 80 hours of community service, a fine of $1,500 and no jail time. According to a Soldotna Police affidavit, a parent contacted Sgt. Duane Kant on April 17, 2013 about a forged signature See PLEA, page A-8

By BECKY BOHRER Associated Press

JUNEAU — The Alaska Senate passed legislation Monday rejecting pay raises for top state officials, with a Democrat saying the increases were not deserved. “In the real world, you get paid for your performance,” said Sen. Bill Wielechowski, D-Anchorage. “We had a $17 billion surplus. The policies of this administration have left us with a $2 billion deficit this year and $2 (billion) C

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to $3 billion deficits into the foreseeable future.” The salaries were rejected on a vote of 19-0. The bill still must go to the House for consideration. The increases would take effect July 1, unless a bill disapproving all the recommendations is enacted within 60 days after the recommendations are submitted, the director of the state Division of Personnel and Labor Relations has said. The final report was submitted late last month. The State Officers Com-

pensation Commission, created to review salaries, benefits and allowances for top office holders and legislators, proposed raising the salaries of the governor, lieutenant governor and department heads, mainly referred to as commissioners, to catch up with pay increases for other executivebranch employees. It called for raising the governor’s salary from $145,000 a year to $150,873, and the lieutenant governor’s salary from $115,000 to $119,658. See PAY, page A-8


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A-2 Peninsula Clarion, Tuesday, February 11, 2014

CLARION P

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(USPS 438-410) Published daily Sunday through Friday, except Christmas and New Year’s, by: Southeastern Newspapers Corporation P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Street address: 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 1, Kenai, AK Phone: (907) 283-7551 Postmaster: Send address changes to the Peninsula Clarion, P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Periodicals postage paid at Kenai, AK Represented for national advertising by The Papert Companies, Chicago, IL Copyright 2014 Peninsula Clarion A Morris Communications Corp. newspaper

Who to call at the Peninsula Clarion News tip? Question? Main number.............................................................................................. 283-7551 Fax............................................................................................................. 283-3299 News email...................................................................news@peninsulaclarion.com General news Will Morrow, editor ............................................ will.morrow@peninsulaclarion.com Jeff Helminiak, sports editor........................... jeff.helminiak@peninsulaclarion.com Borough government................................................... news@peninsulaclarion.com Fisheries, photographer.............................................................................................. ............................ Rashah McChesney, rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com Kenai........................................ Dan Balmer, daniel.balmers@peninsulaclarion.com Soldotna, courts............... Kaylee Osowski, kaylee.osowski@peninsulaclarion.com Education ............................................................... schools@peninsulaclarion.com Arts and Entertainment................................................ news@peninsulaclarion.com Community, Around the Peninsula............................... news@peninsulaclarion.com Sports............................................ Joey Klecka, joey.klecka@peninsulaclarion.com Page design........ Florence Struempler, florence.struempler@peninsulaclarion.com

Circulation problem? Call 283-3584 If you don’t receive your newspaper by 7 a.m. and you live in the Kenai-Soldotna area, call 283-3584 before 10 a.m. for redelivery of your paper. If you call after 10 a.m., you will be credited for the missed issue. Regular office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Sunday. General circulation questions can be sent via email to circulation@peninsulaclarion.com. The circulation manager is Randi Keaton.

Students push for exit exam changes By MIKE COPPOCK Associated Press

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Some high school students traveled nearly 900 miles to lobby state lawmakers on Monday to do away with Alaska’s school exit exam, saying the test is so simple, it’s laughable. The exit exam was just one part of Gov. Sean Parnell’s omnibus education bill that drew students, superintendents and education department officials to the Capitol for testimony. The wide-ranging bill also would allow schools denied charter status to appeal to the state and increase the student funding formula, known as the base student allocation. Dillingham High School senior Brandie Bocatch told the Senate Education Committee that the state’s exit exam has

become irrelevant. “It’s on an eighth-grade level,” Bocatch said. Such an exit test was first given to seniors in 1998, but only about 50 percent showed a proficiency in core areas, Mike Hanley, Alaska education and early childhood development commissioner, has said. The test has been revised over the years, and students as young as those in the eighth grade now take essentially the same test as the one given to high school seniors. But Bocatch said some young students in Dillingham believe that by passing the test, their education is over. “We’ve heard the same thing on taking an exit exam in the eighth grade, that students tend to drop out afterwards,” said Sen. Gary Stevens, R-Kodiak,

Clarion Question Results The Clarion question for last week was:

Do you think the minimum wage should be raised?

For home delivery Order a six-day-a-week, three-month subscription for $39, a six-month subscription for $73, or a 12-month subscription for $130. Use our easy-pay plan and save on these rates. Call 283-3584 for details. Mail subscription rates are available upon request.

Want to place an ad? Classified: Call 283-7551 and ask for the classified ad department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or email classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com. Display: Call 283-7551 and ask for the display advertising department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Leslie Talent is the Clarion’s advertising director. She can be reached via email at leslie.talent@peninsulaclarion.com. Contacts for other departments: Business office...................................................................................... Jane Russell Production................................................................................................ Geoff Long Online........................................................................................ Vincent Nusunginya

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Follow the Clarion online. Go to peninsulaclarion.com and look for the Twitter, Facebook and Mobile links for breaking news, headlines and more.

Results are not scientific

Monday Stocks Company Final Change ACS.......................... 2.16 -0.01 Agrium Inc................87.22 +0.07 Alaska Air Group...... 76.71 -1.11 AT&T........................ 32.44 +0.14 BP ............................47.50 -0.11 Chevron................... 111.69 -0.36 ConocoPhillips......... 64.58 -0.39 1st Natl. Bank AK... 1,765.00 — Forest Oil.................. 2.88 -0.04 Fred Meyer.............. 36.19 -0.09 GCI........................... 9.45 — Harley-Davidson...... 64.59 -0.39 Home Depot............ 76.41 -0.04 Key Bank................. 12.67 -0.07 McDonald’s.............. 94.86 -1.06 National Oilwell........ 75.00 -0.07 Shell Oil................... 69.12 -0.09 C M Y

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Safeway................... 32.04 +0.88 Tesoro.......................47.77 -0.12 Walmart................... 73.76 +0.01 Wells Fargo.............. 45.52 +0.15 Gold closed............ 1,274.68 +7.41 Silver closed............ 20.07 +0.04 Dow Jones avg..... 15,801.79 +7.71 NASDAQ................ 4,148.17 +22.31 S&P 500................1,799.84 +2.82 Stock prices provided by the Kenai Peninsula Edward Jones offices.

Oil Prices Friday’s prices not available

the committee chairman. Passing the exit exam is required to receive a diploma. Parnell’s education bill would require a college base-assessment exam be given in place of the exit exam. But Kake City School District Superintendent Kevin Shipley had concerns about dropping the exit exam. “How does it affect our accountability to the state?” Shipley said. “That needs to be addressed in this bill.” The state currently pays a vendor, Data Recognition Corp. of Maple Grove, Minn., $2.7 million annually to administer the exams in Alaska. Even if the state does away with the test, Hanley testified that his department would like to allow former students to return to take the current exit exam to receive their diploma for the next three years. He said 300 former students returned last year to take the exit exam, and half of them passed. That extension would

cost $1.3 million. Also under the broad bill, schools that were denied a charter designation by local school districts would be able to appeal to the state education department. Stevens, the committee chairman, expressed concerns with that provision, wondering what the state could do when local districts rejected the schools. He said that would have to be addressed. Hanley noted that a charter school permit has never been denied, and that drew a sharp response from Sen. Berta Gardner, D-Anchorage. “Then what problem is this fixing since no charter schools have been denied a permit?” Gardner asked. Hanley said the bill brings integrity to local decision making on charter schools. In addition, the bill would raise the base student allocation, or per-pupil funding formula, by $85 the next fiscal year, from $5,680 to $5,765, and then by $58 each of the next two years, bringing it to $5,881.

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Peninsula Clarion, Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Sing together

Obituary

Kenai Central High School hosts the school district’s Mass Choir Festival, with a concert today at 6 p.m. at the school. High school choirs from Soldotna, Kenai Central, Nikiski, Ninilchik, Seward, Skyview and Homer will each perform individually, followed immediately by the Mass Choir, under the direction of John Baker. Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for senior citizens and $2 for students.

Gertrude Frostad Lifelong Kenai resident Gertrude Frostad died at her home on Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014. She was 78. A Celebration of Life will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014 at the Kenai Elks Lodge. Mrs. Frostad was born Sept. 11, 1935 in Kenai. Her family writes, “Gert, Mom, Grandmom, Sister, Friend was a lifetime Alaskan. She was an avid traveler, but Kenai was home. She was born, raised, and resided in Kenai her entire life. Gert was the cook for the Kenaitze Head Start program, where she was known as Ms. Gert, the cooker lady. She will be deeply missed by all who love her.” She was an active member of the Kenai Elks Lodge. Mrs. Frostad was preceded in death by her husband, Norman Frostad; parents Victor and Madrona Segura; brothers, Edward and Victor Segura; and her son, William Coveyou. She is survived by her brothers, Jim, Bill, Dave and Rick Segura; sisters, Clara Swan and Rita Smagge; children, Jimmy Coveyou, Debbie Coveyou, Virginia and James Fraase, and Carey and John Edwards; grandchildren, Jack, Dustin, and Willie Williams, Christopher Anderson, Sarah, Rachel, Kathryn, Anthony, and Katie Coveyou, Jarrod Edwards, Alisha, Erin, and Erica Smith, Jeffery and Autumn Taylor, John and Roxi Taylor, and Jamie and James Okane; and many more loved great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. Condolences may be sent care of Debbie Coveyou, P.O. Box 295, Kenai, Alaska 99611.

Peninsula Take A Break will be meeting on Feb. 19 from 11:00 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. at Solid Rock Conference Center, Mile 90.5 Sterling Highway. Michelle Williams of Hey, Good Lookin’ will share tips for the new you in the new year. The inspirational speaker will be Carol Bannock. Cost of the luncheon is $12 and complimentary child care is provided. All ladies are cordially invited. Please make reservations by Sunday by calling Susan at 335-6789 or e-mail tab-reservations@ hotmail.com.

Cindy Diane Lynch

Cook Inlet RCAC plans meeting

Longtime Sterling resident Cindy Diane Lynch, 61, died Friday, Feb. 7, 2014 at her home in Sterling with her family by her side. A celebration of her life will be held at 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 15, 2014 at the Sterling Senior Center, 34453 Sterling Highway in Sterling. Mrs. Lynch was born Sept. 11, 1952 in Seattle. Cindy moved to Alaska in 1980 and has lived in Sterling ever since. She worked for Doyon Services for 10 years, from 2000 to 2010. She loved gardening, cooking, and reading. Her family wrote, “She was a loving wife, mother, sister, sister in-law and friend.” Cindy is survived by her husband, Joe Lynch of Sterling; son, John Kelgard and wife, Andrea of Kenai; and siblings, Patty Larkin, Jack Larkin, and Darlene Larkin. She was preceded in death by her parents, Shirley Larkin and Vern Larkin. Arrangements made by Peninsula Memorial Chapel & Crematory. Please visit Cindy’s obituary and online guestbook at www.AlaskanFuneral.com.

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Today 10:30 a.m. • Take Off Pounds Sensibly, for all ages, meets at the Kenai Senior Center. For more information call 907-283-3451. Noon • Alcoholics Anonymous recovery group at URS Club, 405 Overland Drive. Call 907-2621917. • Kenai Bridge Club plays party bridge at the Kenai Senior Center. Call 907-252-9330 or 907-283-7609. 1 p.m. • National Family Caregiver Support Group meets at the Soldotna Senior Center. Call Dani at 907-262-1280. • Free Seated Zumba Gold at the Kenai Senior Center. New participants, active older adults, and chair-bound or limited mobility participants are encouraged. 5:30 p.m. • Nikiski Senior Service Area board meets at the Nikiski Senior Center, 50810 Island Lake Road. Call 907-776-7654 for more information. 6 p.m. • Weight Watchers, Woodruef Building, 155 Smith Way, Soldotna. Doors open at 5:15; joining members should arrive by 5:30; Getting Started ses-

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sion for newcomers at 6:30. Call 907-262-4892. 6:30 p.m. • Narcotics Anonymous Support Group at Central Peninsula Hospital, Redoubt Room, Soldotna. 7 p.m. • Lost & Found Grief Self Help Group at Christ Lutheran Church, 128 Soldotna Ave. For more information, call 907-4203979. 8 p.m. • Narcotics Anonymous Support Group “It works” at URS Club, 405 Overland Drive, Kenai. • AA North Roaders Group Step and Traditions Study at North Star Methodist Church, Mile 25.5 Kenai Spur Highway. Call 907-242-9477. • Alcoholics Anonymous Ninichik support group at United Methodist Church, 15811 Sterling Highway, Ninilchik. Call 907-567-3574. The Community Calendar lists recurring events and meetings of local organizations. To have your event listed, email organization name, day or days of meeting, time of meeting, place, and a contact phone number to news@peninsulaclarion.com.

Peninsula Clarion and obituary guidelines: The Peninsula Clarion strives to report the deaths of all current and former Peninsula residents. For more information, call the Clarion at 907-283-7551.

Submitted photo

Around the Peninsula Take A Break has tips to find the new you

each employer, unemployment compensation statements, SSA1099 (Social Security), all 1099 forms (1099-INT, 1099-DIV, 1099-B, etc.) showing interest or dividends and documentation showing original purchase price of sold assets, 1099-MISC showing miscellaneous income; 1099-R (pension), forms showing federal income tax paid, dependent care provider information, receipts or canceled checks if itemizing deductions, Social Security cards or other official documentation, and a picture ID for yourself and spouse if married filing jointly. Volunteers are not able to do rental property with depreciation, business with inventory or business use of a home. For more information or to make an appointment, call the Senior Center at 262-6808.

Free tax assistance available

IRS-certified volunteers from the Kenaitze Indian Tribe are offering free tax preparation services to Alaska Native and American Indian people who make $52,000 or less and need assistance preparing their own 2013 income tax returns. This service will be available each Saturday, from 9 a.m to 4 p.m., through March 1 at the tribe’s administration office at 150 N. Willow St. in Kenai. For complete information, pick up a flyer at the tribe’s administration office Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 Recycle education group meets p.m., or visit the “news and notices” page on the tribe’s webRe-Group will meet Wednesday in room 203 at Kenai Pen- site. The website address is www.kenaitze.org. insula College at 6:30 p.m. Plans to do public educations about recycling in various venues will be discussed. For more infor- Habitat opens home application period mation  call Jan 252-2773 Central Peninsula Habitat for Humanity is seeking qualified Alaska Judicial Observers seeks courtroom volunteers Alaska Judicial Observers is looking for volunteers to ob- applicants for the 2014 summer build in Kenai. Local famiserve in courtrooms. Volunteers must be able to take notes, lies in need of safe, affordable housing can see qualification complete paperwork and sit for up to 2 hours at a time. Vol- details at www.hfhcentralpeninsula.org or call Sharon at 907unteers are screened to ensure that they have not been a victim 283-7797 or 907-262-7534. The application period closes Feb. of a violent crime, have no criminal background and have no 14, 2014. cases pending before the court. Volunteers go through approximately 40 hours of classroom and courtroom training and then RurAL CAP accepting applications are asked to evaluate for a minimum of 10 hours per month in RurAL CAP is now accepting applications for their 2014 the courtroom closest to your home. For more information call Mutual Self Help Housing Project. There will be 11 lots avail907-646-9880. able in the Soldotna City Limits. Space will fill up fast, so those interested should contact Mi’shell or Valerie at 260-3451 to Tax help available apply and to obtain more information. RurAL CAP also ofAARP Tax-Aide volunteers will be available to provide fers credit counseling services for those who are interested in free tax preparation services at the Sterling Area Senior Center participating in this program, but may need some additional starting Feb. 4. Volunteers will be available every Tuesday from assistance in this area. All information is kept strictly confiden10 a.m.-2 p.m. Tax preparers will be available by appointment tial. Please call 907-260-3451 or stop by their office at 131C on Feb. 8, March 8 and April 12 from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Tax filers Warehouse Avenue in Soldotna for more information. RurAL should bring a copy of last year’s tax return, W-2 forms from CAP is an equal housing opportunity program. Cook Inlet Regional Citizens Advisory Council (Cook Inlet RCAC) will hold its Prevention, Response, Operations & Safety Meeting (PROPS) at CISPRI in Nikiski beginning at 10 a.m. Feb. 28. The public is welcome to attend. For more information or an agenda, please call 1-800-652-7222 or 907-2837222. Board materials will be available online just prior to the meeting.

Caffeine common in kids, young adults By LINDSEY TANNER AP Medical Writer

CHICAGO — Nearly 3 out of 4 U.S. children and young adults consume at least some caffeine, mostly from soda, tea and coffee. The rate didn’t budge much over a decade, although soda use declined and energy drinks became an increasingly common source, a government analysis finds. Though even most preschoolers consume some caffeine-containing products, their average was the amount found in half a can of soda, and overall caffeine intake declined in children up to age 11 during the decade. The analysis is the first to examine recent national trends in caffeine intake among children and young adults and comes amid a U.S. Food and Drug Administration investigation into the safety of caffeine-containing foods and drinks, especially for children and teens. In an online announcement about the investigation, the FDA notes that caffeine is found in a variety of foods, gum and even some jelly beans and marshmallows. The probe is partly in response to reports about hospital-

izations and even several deaths 2010, energy drinks were an The results were published after consuming highly caffein- uncommon source of caffeine online Monday in the journal ated drinks or energy shots. The for most U.S. youth. Pediatrics. drinks have not been proven to be a cause in those cases. The new analysis, by researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, shows that at least through

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A-4 Peninsula Clarion, Tuesday, February 11, 2014

E N I N S U L A

Serving the Kenai Peninsula since 1970 STAN PITLO Publisher

WILL MORROW������������������������������������������������������������������������ Editor Jane Russell...................... Controller/Human Resources Director LESLIE TALENT................................................... Advertising Director GEOFF LONG.................................................... Production Manager VINCENT NUSUNGINYA.................................... New Media Director Daryl Palmer.................................... IT and Composition Director RANDI KEATON................................................. Circulation Manager A Morris Communications Corp. Newspaper

What Others Say

Governor slips up on education lawsuit Take note, Fairbanks. Gov. Sean Par-

nell doesn’t much like it that the Ketchikan Gateway Borough has filed a lawsuit to invalidate the requirement in state law that local governments contribute funds to help pay the cost of K-12 education. Ketchikan argues that the funding requirement punishes the state’s incorporated areas while unincorporated areas have their education costs paid in full by the state. The Fairbanks North Star Borough Assembly is considering joining the lawsuit. Mayor Luke Hopkins supports Ketchikan’s contention. The governor had some threatening words about the lawsuit in an interview this week with the Ketchikan Daily News: “I do want to address this issue of how the lawsuit is viewed by legislators and by me because it does shade or color the reaction to Ketchikan requests,” he told the newspaper. “It’s an inevitable consequence that if Ketchikan is the driving force behind a lawsuit that could result in more financial exposure to the state, legislators and I view requests from Ketchikan through that lens.” Sounds like a threat against Ketchikan. You file a lawsuit, you risk unfavorable treatment when we review your budget requests. By extension, that’s something that Fairbanks should be aware of — and that we should make known to the governor isn’t the correct way to conduct business. By Friday evening, the governor was modifying his statement. His press office issued a clarification. “Let me be clear: In no way, shape or form, will I or my administration use the pending education lawsuit as a basis to punish or single out a specific community or region of the state.” “Unquestionably, this lawsuit presents financial uncertainty to the state, estimated at several hundred million dollars annually. While everyone has a right to their day in court, it is reasonable to assume that lawmakers would view funding requests through the lens of that financial risk, and the lawsuit.” So, earlier in the week it was the governor saying how the lawsuit would be viewed “by legislators and by me.” On Friday, it was “In no way” will “I or my administration” use the lawsuit as a means of punishing communities. Which is the real position? You can bet that Ketchikan and any community that supports it, including Fairbanks, will be watching the budget process more closely than usual through the remainder of this legislative session to gauge which is the real position. The governor’s remarks shouldn’t dissuade support for Ketchikan. The borough makes a good argument. Article 1, Section VII of the Alaska Constitution puts responsibility for education squarely with the state: “The legislature shall by general law establish and maintain a system of public schools open to all children of the State, and may provide for other public educational institutions.” The Constitution doesn’t say that organized local governments such as Ketchikan and Fairbanks are to contribute to the maintaining of that system. Let’s hope that Gov. Parnell is true to his revised statement and that neither he nor anyone in his administration seeks to punish Ketchikan or any of its municipal supporters for exercising their right to seek a change through the judicial system. And let’s hope, too, that legislators behave in the same manner. — Fairbanks Daily News-Miner, Feb. 8

Doonesbury Flashback 

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Opinion

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By GARRY TRUDEAU

A presidential trust deficit

Most people accept the notion that politicians don’t always tell the truth. Some lies are harmless enough; others more consequential. Lyndon Johnson skirted the truth when he promised during the 1964 presidential campaign not to send any more American troops to fight a land war in Southeast Asia. He knew then that American intervention would eventually be necessary, but the lie helped him win the election. After the election, Johnson sent additional troops, more American lives were lost and the war escalated. Richard Nixon claimed he knew nothing about Watergate. “I am not a crook,” he said. Lies. In 1976, Jimmy Carter promised never to lie to us, a promise that rested on a perception of his own virtue. Given his sad record, the country might have willingly exchanged veracity for competence. Bill Clinton? We know about one of his most famous lies, emphasized by that wagging finger and video showing him lying under oath as he labored to define the word “is.” Clinton’s lies led to his impeachment. The public didn’t seem to care that much because as Democrats and the media repeatedly said, it was “just about sex” and everyone lies about sex. Former CBS News anchor Dan Rather had a curious spin on lying when he told Fox’s Bill O’Reilly that even though Clinton lied about not having sex with Monica

Lewinsky, he still believed Clinton to be an honest man: “I think you can be an honest person and lie about any number of things,” said Rather. George W. Bush was accused of lying when he justified in- Cal Thomas vading Iraq and toppling Saddam Hussein by claiming he had weapons of mass destruction. WMDs were never found. President Obama’s most famous lie (so far) has been his promise: “If you like your (insurance) plan you can keep it.” Same with your doctor, he said. And he promised health insurance and treatment costs would go down under Obamacare. Not for everyone. Oops. According to CNN.com, former congressional chief of staff and Washington lobbyist Ed Uravic, author of the book “Lying Cheating Scum,” claims, “Every president has not only lied at some time, but needs to lie to be effective.” A president can lie up to a point, but when a president’s lies extend beyond protecting the country (white lies) and drift into a darker area that is self-serving (black lies) it is something quite different, often prompting public rejection when he’s exposed. Speaker John Boehner says he and his

fellow Republicans can no longer trust the president due to what they believe is his repeated lies. Last week, Boehner said House Republicans are not prepared to move ahead on immigration reform this year because they do not trust President Obama to follow the law. Boehner and his GOP colleagues are particularly disturbed by the president’s assertions he can go around Congress when he wants to, changing the health care law and writing executive orders when it suits his fancy. Claiming an American president is not trustworthy ruins whatever credibility he brought to the office and this president brought a lot. Most people wanted to believe in him and a large majority did believe in him at the start. Many no longer do, as his declining approval ratings demonstrate. In dealing with the Soviet Union, Ronald Reagan employed a Russian proverb, “trust but verify.” Boehner and the Republicans seem to be saying there is no need to verify with this president, because he can’t be trusted. The inability by a major party to trust a president is more than lamentable; it is not good for the country and our standing before other nations and groups that wish to do us harm. Readers may e-mail Cal Thomas at tcaeditors@tribune.com.

The dangers of school choice Rushing headlong like lemmings into the sea, Christians are piling on their legislative efforts to enable people to afford private education. It’s not hard to understand why: Christians rightly sense that our country must turn to God, and the restoration of Christian education is necessary for such a return. But some thin, reedy voices of caution are in order. Our culture is so ingrained with the idea that the government should pay for just about everything, that even wellmeaning people are working overtime for what may be a cleverly-disguised trap. The first premise we need to understand, is that courts are seldom the friend of faithbased legislation. Don’t believe me? Look at the injunction just issued this week by Judge John Suddock against the State’s regulatory attempt to stop Medicaid funding for abortion. Suddock refused to recuse himself — and the State Attorney defending the regulation did not object — even though Suddock’s firm, Suddock & Schleuss, sued the State over Medicaid funding for abortions in 2001. But let’s assume that judges are, in fact, impartial. Even so, they should not be regarded as gurus sitting atop a mountain with a font of wisdom ready to be consulted. Because we have elevated the courts to a god-like status, we have created a tendency to accept their dictatorial decisions, even when they adversely affect us. Secondly, even though the First Amendment should not apply to the states, most Americans believe just the opposite. How did this happen? Well, the vaunted yet misunderstood “separation of church-and-state” issue emanates from the First Amendment. However, it should never have applied to the states, and it can be proven in about thirty seconds, viz: The last state to possess an official, taxsupported religion divested itself of it, and voluntarily, around 1833. But how could this be? How could a state have dared to have such a wanton violation of the First Amendment, which went into effect in the early 1790s? Simple. Everyone knew back then that the First Amendment only applied to the federal government. But sometime in the early 20th century, the Supreme Court invented the “incorporation” doctrine, which C

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Voices of the

P eninsula B ob B ird

vate school curriculums, in order to keep their precious funding, are going to cave in, slowly and incrementally, but inevitably, to whatever government dictates come from the courts and bureaucracies: state, local and federal. Supreme Court Justice Robert Jackson saw this clearly: “If the state may aid these religious schools, it may therefore regulate them. Many groups have sought aid from tax funds, only to find that it carried political controls with it.” OK, so how can we make private education affordable for the beleaguered and abused taxpayers? A short-term fix is a property and sales tax credit for those sending their kids to a private school. Why should they have to pay twice for education? First, for the public schools through their taxes, and then again for their children through tuition payments? For that matter, why should anyone have to pay for a service they are not using? Should the retired widow, who barely scrapes by, have to pay property and sales taxes to support public schools? The bachelor, childless couple, retiree? The socialist’s argument is shopworn, but let’s give it its stage: “Everyone benefits from an educated society.” I don’t know about you, but I have had about enough of that platitude, especially as no one in their right mind would want to argue that society is better educated than we were, say, in the 1950s. The long term will be harder: if we started to obey the Constitution, the lighter tax burden would free disposable income for the lower and middle class — especially the middle class, and for the faithful in the pews, who used to be able to generously give to the cause of private education, even when they had no one in the system. But this will be hard to do as long as Christians view the government as a Sugar Daddy handing out candy … when the proper view of it ought to be that we are dealing with a sinister, surly and hooded drug dealer, ready to enslave us with its “generosity,” and then tyrannize us with its methods of organized crime.

it has since used to apply individual provisions of the Bill of Rights against individual states. And when the power-grabbing courts of the mid-20th century stepped on the accelerator, they managed to put a proper understanding of the First Amendment outside of the living memory of most Americans. Now, some will rejoice to find that the federal courts have no lawful authority to decide the issue of state-supported vouchers for private schools. But the reality is that public and juridical constitutional ignorance reigns supreme, to be complicated by another socialist tendril making its way into our lives: federal support for education. Now say out loud as many times as it takes to let it sink in: “Government funding means government dependency and control.” Let us suppose someone fairly clever has figured this out, and has written into state legislation that this will not be permitted to happen. Ya think? After countless lies and betrayals, are Christians ready to trust the federal government, which lends educational dollars to the states? Or even our state government, if it refused the money? Would Alaska resist the inevitable (if unwarranted and arguably unconstitutional) interference from the federal courts? Are we certain that today’s friendly state legislature will always be that way? Do Christian educators expect that public monies will evangelize a generation before the public purse becomes hostile? If not, are they ready to resist? Then, gird up thy loins for a fight. And, we’ll fight federal government mandates on abortion, contraception, gun control, and the endless other usurpations of justice, common sense, natural law, and the Constitution. Bob Bird, of Nikiski, is a longtime Kenai But let’s not kid ourselves, because Peninsula educator. He ran for U.S. Senate that’s not where we’re going here. It takes as a Republican in 1990 and as the Alaskan very little imagination to see that the pri- Independence Party candidate in 2008.

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Peninsula Clarion, Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Nation & World Around the World White House delays health law coverage mandate for some firms WASHINGTON — Trying to limit election-year damage on health care, the Obama administration Monday granted business groups another delay in a much-criticized requirement that larger firms cover their workers or face fines. In one of several concessions in a complex Treasury Department regulation, the administration said companies with 50 to 99 employees will have an additional year to comply with the coverage mandate, until January 1, 2016. For businesses with 100 or more employees the requirement will still take effect in 2015. But other newly announced provisions, affecting technical issues such as the calculation of working hours, may help some of those firms.

Obama administration: American terror suspect possibly targeted for drone attack WASHINGTON — The case of an American citizen and suspected member of al-Qaida who is allegedly planning attacks on U.S. targets overseas underscores the complexities of President Barack Obama’s new stricter targeting guidelines for the use of deadly drones. The CIA drones watching him cannot strike because he’s a U.S. citizen. The Pentagon drones that could are barred from the country where he’s hiding, and the Justice Department has not yet finished building a case against him. Four U.S. officials said the American suspected terrorist is in a country that refuses U.S. military action on its soil and that has proved unable to go after him. And Obama’s new policy says American suspected terrorists overseas can only be killed by the military, not the CIA, creating a policy conundrum for the White House. Two of the officials described the man as an al-Qaida facilitator who has been directly responsible for deadly attacks against U.S. citizens overseas and who continues to plan attacks against them that would use improvised explosive devices. The officials said the suspected terrorist is well-guarded and in a fairly remote location, so any unilateral attempt by U.S. troops to capture him would be risky and even more politically explosive than a U.S. missile strike.

Commercial pilots head to wrong airports more often than officials admit, reports show

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WASHINGTON — At a time when a cellphone can guide you to your driveway, commercial pilots attempt to land at the wrong airport more often than most passengers realize or government officials admit, according to an Associated Press search of government safety data and news reports since the early 1990s. On at least 150 flights, including a Southwest Airlines jet last month in Missouri and a jumbo cargo plane last fall in Kansas, U.S. commercial passenger and cargo planes have either landed at the wrong airport or started to land and realized their mistake in time. A particular trouble spot is San Jose, Calif. The list of landing mistakes includes six reports of pilots preparing to land at Moffett Field, a joint civilian-military airport, when they meant to go to Mineta San Jose International Airport, about 10 miles to the southeast. The airports are south of San Francisco in California’s Silicon Valley. “This event occurs several times every winter in bad weather when we work on Runway 12,” a San Jose airport tower controller said in a November 2012 report describing how an airliner headed for Moffett after being cleared to land at San Jose. The plane was waved off in time. In nearly all the incidents, the pilots were cleared by controllers to fly based on what they could see rather than relying on automation. Many incidents occur at night, with pilots reporting they were attracted by the runway lights of the first airport they saw during descent. Some pilots said they disregarded navigation equipment that showed their planes slightly off course because the information didn’t match what they were seeing out their windows — a runway straight ahead.

Email shows top special operation officer’s effort to shield bin Laden photos WASHINGTON — A newly-released email shows that 11 days after the killing of terror leader Osama bin Laden in 2011, the U.S. military’s top special operations officer ordered subordinates to destroy any photographs of the alQaida founder’s corpse or turn them over to the CIA. The email was obtained under a freedom of information request by the conservative legal group Judicial Watch. The document, released Monday by the group, shows that Adm. William McRaven, who heads the U.S. Special Operations Command, told military officers on May 13, 2011 that photos of bin Laden’s remains should have been sent to the CIA or already destroyed. Bin Laden was killed by a special operations team in Pakistan on May 2, 2011. McRaven’s order to purge the bin Laden material came 10 days after The Associated Press asked for the photos and other documents under the U.S. Freedom of Information Act. Typically, when a freedom of information request is filed to a government agency, the agency is obliged to preserve the material sought — even if the agency later denies the request. On May 3, 2011, the AP asked Special Operations Command’s Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Division office for “copies of all e-mails sent from and to the U.S. government account or accounts” of McRaven referencing bin Laden. McRaven was then vice admiral. A May 4, 2011 response from the command’s FOIA office to the AP acknowledged the bin Laden document request and said it had been assigned for processing. AP did not receive a copy of the McRaven email obtained by Judicial Watch.

Explosion with injuries reported at New Hampshire ball bearings plant PETERBOROUGH, N.H. — A spokeswoman at a New Hampshire ball bearings plant says an explosion there doesn’t appear to have caused any life-threatening injuries. Spokeswoman Kathy Gerrity says people were hurt in the Monday afternoon explosion at New Hampshire Ball Bearings Inc. in Peterborough but she’s unsure how many. She says it’s unclear what caused the explosion. Gerrity says the building was evacuated, which is standard procedure. She says she’s unsure how many people were inside but there are usually about 450 working at that time. The southwest New Hampshire plant employs 700 people. New Hampshire Ball Bearings’ corporate headquarters are in Chatsworth, Calif. It’s a division of Japanese company Minebea. — The Associated Press

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Militants set off bomb, 21 dead By SAMEER N. YACOUB Associated Press

BAGHDAD — An instructor teaching his militant recruits how to make car bombs accidentally set off explosives in his demonstration Monday, killing 21 of them in a huge blast that alerted authorities to the existence of the rural training camp in an orchard north of Baghdad. Nearly two dozen people were arrested, including wounded insurgents trying to hobble away from the scene. The fatal goof by the al-Qaida breakaway group that dominates the Sunni insurgency in Iraq happened on the same day that the speaker of the Iraqi parliament, a prominent Sunni whom the militants consider a traitor, escaped unhurt from a roadside bomb attack on his motorcade in the northern city of Mosul. Nevertheless, the events underscored the determination of the insurgents to rebuild and regain the strength they enjoyed in Iraq at the height of the war until U.S.-backed Sunni tribesmen turned against them. The militants are currently battling for control of mainly Sunni areas of western Iraq in a key test of the Shiite-led government’s ability to maintain security more than two years after the withdrawal of U.S. troops. While the Iraqi army has been attacking insurgent training camps in the vast desert of western Anbar province near the Syrian border, it is unusual to find such a camp in the center of the

‘The terrorist groups have made a strong comeback in Iraq and that the security problems are far from over, and things are heading from bad to worse.’ — Hamid al-Mutlaq country, just 95 kilometers (60 miles) north of the capital. The discovery shows that “the terrorist groups have made a strong comeback in Iraq and that the security problems are far from over, and things are heading from bad to worse,” said Hamid al-Mutlaq, a member of the parliament’s security and defense committee. The militants belonged to a network now known as the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, an extremist group that recently broke with al-Qaida. The ISIL, emboldened by fellow fighters’ gains in the Syrian civil war, has tried to position itself as the champion of Iraqi Sunnis angry at the government over what they see as efforts to marginalize them. Car bombs are one of the deadliest weapons used by this group, with coordinated waves of explosions regularly leaving scores dead in Baghdad and elsewhere across the country. The bombs are sometimes assembled in farm compounds where militants can gather without being spotted, or in car workshops in industrial areas. The explosion Monday took place at a camp tucked away in

an orchard in the village of alJalam, a farming area that has been a stronghold of al-Qaida close to the Sunni city of Samarra. According to a police officer, an army official and a hospital official, all of whom spoke on condition of anonymity for security reasons, the events unfolded as follows. The militants were attending a lesson on making car bombs and explosive belts when a glitch set off one of the devices during the car bomb part of the demonstration. Security forces rushed to the area after hearing the thunderous blast and arrested 12 wounded militants along with another 10 trying to flee. Authorities searched two houses and a garage in the orchard, finding seven car bombs as well as several explosive belts and roadside bombs. The cars did not have license plates. Bomb experts then started the work of defusing the devices. Later Monday, a bomb exploded near a cafe in western Baghdad shortly after nightfall, killing three people and wounding 11 others, according to police and medical officials who all spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not

authorized to speak to media. The U.S. strongly condemned the assassination attempt on parliament speaker Osama al-Nujaifi, a roadside bombing that wounded one of his bodyguards. “Speaker Nujaifi has been a strong partner of the United States’ efforts in Iraq and we are grateful that he was unharmed in the attack,” State Department deputy spokeswoman Marie Harf said in a statement. “Today’s attack exemplifies the danger terrorist groups pose to all Iraqis, and the importance of Iraqi leaders from all communities working together to isolate militant groups from the broader population.” Violence has spiked in Iraq since last April, when security forces cracked down on a Sunni protest camp north of Baghdad in clashes that left 45 dead. The situation deteriorated significantly in late December, when security forces dismantled a protest camp near the Anbar provincial capital of Ramadi. To defuse the tension, the security forces withdrew from Ramadi and the nearby city of Fallujah. ISIL militants promptly took over parts of Ramadi and the center of Fallujah. The Iraqi government and allied tribes launched an offensive on Jan. 26 to wrest control of the cities back from the militants. Sporadic clashes are still continuing around Fallujah and in some parts of Ramadi, with only limited success by security forces.

Records sought on military sex crimes By RICHARD LARDNER and YURI KAGEYAMA Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Pentagon is coming under pressure to give Congress detailed information on the handling of sex crime cases in the armed forces following an Associated Press investigation that found a pattern of inconsistent judgments and light penalties for sexual assaults at U.S. bases in Japan. Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, who’s led efforts in Congress to address military sexual crimes, is pressing the Defense Department to turn over case information from four major U.S. bases: Fort Hood in Texas, Naval Station Norfolk in Virginia, the Marine Corps’ Camp Pendleton in California, and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio. Such records would shed more light on how military commanders make decisions about court martials and punishments in sexual assault cases and whether the inconsistent judgments seen in Japan are more widespread. AP’s investigation, which was based on hundreds of internal military documents it first began requesting in 2009, found that what appeared to be strong cases were often reduced to lesser charges. Suspects were unlikely to serve time even when military authorities agreed a crime had been committed. In two rape cases, commanders overruled recommendations to court-martial and dropped the charges instead. Gillibrand, who leads the Senate Armed Services personnel panel, wrote Monday to Defense Secretary Chuck

Hagel asking for “all reports and allegations of rape, forcible sodomy, sexual assault, sex in the barracks, adultery and attempts, conspiracies or solicitations to commit these crimes,” for the last five years. She said AP’s investigation is “disturbing evidence” that some commanders refuse to prosecute sexual assault cases and the Pentagon should have provided the records more quickly. The documents may build momentum for legislation she has introduced that would strip senior officers of their authority to decide whether serious crimes, including sexual assault cases, go to trial. The bill would place that judgment with trial counsels who have prosecutorial experience and hold the rank of colonel or above. The legislation, expected to be voted on in coming weeks, is short of the 60 votes needed to prevent a filibuster. Defense Department officials have acknowledged the problem of sexual assaults in the ranks and said they are taking aggressive steps to put a stop to the crimes. “This isn’t a sprint,” said Jill Loftus, director of the Navy’s sexual assault prevention program. “This is a marathon and it’s going to take a while.” Col. Alan Metzler, deputy director of the Defense Department’s Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office, said numerous changes in military law and policy made by Congress and the Pentagon are creating a culture where victims trust that their allegations will be taken seriously and perpetrators will be punished. Defense officials noted that the cases in Japan preceded changes the

Aid officials rush to evacuate residents as truce is extended

BEIRUT — Aid officials rushed to evacuate more women, children and elderly from rebel-held areas that have been blockaded by government troops for more than a year in Syria’s third-largest city, Homs, after a U.N.-brokered ceasefire in the city was renewed for three more days Monday. The truce, which began Friday, has been shaken by continued shelling and shooting that prevented some residents from escaping and limited the amount of food aid officials have been able to deliver into the besieged neighborhoods. U.N. humanitarian chief Valerie Amos sharply criticized the

two sides, saying U.N. and Syrian Red Crescent workers were “deliberately targeted.” The drama in Homs, where Amos said around 800 civilians have been evacuated so far, played out as activists on Monday reported new sectarian killings in Syria’s civil war. Al-Qaida-inspired rebels killed more than two dozen civilians, including an entire family, when they overran a village populated by minority Alawites on Sunday, Rami Abdurrahman of the British-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. They also killed around 20 local fighters in the village, he said. C

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Pentagon implemented in May. The information acquired by AP through the open records law consists of more than 1,000 reports of sex crimes involving U.S. military personnel between 2005 and early 2013. Although AP sought the full investigative file for the cases, to include detail-rich exhibits, the Pentagon mainly provided summaries of cases from the U.S. Naval Criminal Investigative Service. That service, which handles the Navy and Marine Corps, excised the names of U.S. commanders from the records, affording senior officers the same degree of privacy as the alleged victims. But with their identities kept secret, commanders can’t be held publicly accountable for how they handled the cases. Gillibrand’s request doesn’t seek the exhibits for cases. She is asking for reports and recommendations made in Article 32 proceedings, the military’s version of a grand jury, and the results of all courts-martial that were convened to adjudicate rapes and other serious sex crimes. She said it’s been a struggle to get timely and accurate data from the Defense Department about sexual assault cases. “They are maintaining a

closed system when what we really need is sunshine,” Gillibrand said in an AP interview. “What we really need is light and transparency so we can get to the root of the problem and then find the right solutions.” But Metzler cautioned that too much openness could result in a fewer victims stepping forward to report crimes. “To suggest that we need to be very public about what’s going on in each individual case risks the trust that we want to build with those victims,” Metzler said. Such information, however, is publicly available in the civilian justice system. The top U.S. officer in Japan, Lt. Gen. Salvatore Angelella, was unable to make a scheduled appearance Monday at the Japan National Press Club in Tokyo due to heavy snow. Angelella took questions submitted in advance over Skype but did not respond to AP’s question about the adjudication of sexual assault cases involving U.S. personnel in Japan. In an earlier statement to AP, Angelella said the military takes the issue of sexual assault “very seriously.” “Sexual assault is a crime and a contradiction to everything we stand for,” he said.


A-6 Peninsula Clarion, Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Warriors rip Philadelphia By The Associated Press

OAKLAND, Calif. — Marreese Speights scored a careerhigh 32 points to hand his former team a near-record setback, leading the Golden State Warriors past the woeful Philadelphia 76ers 123-80 on Monday night. Philadelphia, which lost 12378 at the Los Angeles Clippers on Sunday night in a game it trailed by 56 points in the third quarter, nearly matched the NBA mark for the largest total margin of defeat in consecutive games. The Detroit Pistons lost by 95 points combined in backto-back games in November 1966, according to STATS. Michael Carter-Williams scored 24 points for a rebuilding 76ers team that never put up much of a fight. The two-game stretch was the worst in nearly 20 years for the 76ers, who lost back-to-back games in April 1994 by a combined 93 points. No other team in NBA history has lost two straight games by at least 40 points each. Philadelphia has now done it twice. PISTONS 109, SPURS 100

AUBURN HILLS, Mich. — Brandon Jennings scored 21 points and the Detroit Pistons beat the San Antonio Spurs in John Loyer’s first game as interim coach. Detroit abruptly fired Maurice Cheeks on Sunday after only 50 games as coach, but although they’ve been unimpressive for the most part this season, the Pistons have played better lately. The comfortable win over the Spurs was Detroit’s fifth in seven games. Rodney Stuckey scored 20 points for the Pistons, and Greg Monroe added 15 points and 10 rebounds.

ROCKETS 107, TIMBERWOLVES 89 MINNEAPOLIS — Dwight Howard had 18 points and 15 rebounds, and the surging Houston Rockets used a fourth-quarter push to hold off the Minnesota Timber-

On Tap Peninsula high school sports Wednesday Basketball King Cove girls at Nikolaevsk, 5 p.m. King Cove boys at Nikolaevsk, 6:30 p.m. Thursday Hockey State at Curtis Menard Sports Complex in Wasilla Soldotna vs. Chugiak, 2:30 p.m. Basketball Kenai girls at Sitka, TBA Kenai boys at Sitka, TBA Valdez Elks Tournament Nome girls vs. Skyview, 2:30 p.m. Kotzebue girls vs. Seward, 11:30 a.m. Nome boys vs. Seward, 10 a.m. Barrow boys vs. Skyview, 1 p.m. Tok Tournament Ninilchik boys vs. Fort Yukon, 5 p.m. Ninilchik girls vs. Tok, 6:15 p.m. Friday Hockey State at Curtis Menard Sports Complex in Wasilla Soldotna, TBD Skiing Region III Nordic Ski Championships At Tsalteshi Trails Girls varsity 5-kilometer freestyle, 2 p.m. Boys varsity 5-kilometer freestyle, 2:45 p.m. Basketball Soldotna girls at Kodiak, 7 p.m. Kodiak boys at Soldotna, 7 p.m. Kenai girls at Mt. Edgecumbe, TBA Kenai boys at Mt. Edgecumbe, TBA Seldovia girls at CIA, 6 p.m. Seldovia boys at CIA, 7:30 p.m. Valdez Elks Tournament Seward, Skyview girls, boys TBD Tok Tournament Ninilchik boys vs. Effie Kokrine, 4 p.m. Ninilchik girls vs. Tri-Valley, 11:30 a.m. Saturday Hockey State at Curtis Menard Sports Complex in Wasilla Soldotna, TBD Skiing Region III Nordic Ski Championships At Tsalteshi Trails Boys varsity 7.5-kilometer classical mass start, 11 a.m. Girls varsity 5-kilometer classical mass start, Noon Basketball Soldotna girls at Kodiak, 2 p.m. Kodiak boys at Soldotna, 7 p.m. Kenai girls at Sitka, TBA Kenai boys at Sitka, TBA Nikiski girls at Houston, 4 p.m. Nikiski boys at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Seldovia girls, boys at Homer JV Valdez Elks Tournament Seward, Skyview girls, boys TBD Tok Tournament Ninilchik boys vs. Tok, 4:15 p.m. Ninilchik girls vs. Effie Kokrine, 1 p.m.

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wolves for their sixth consecutive victory. Chandler Parsons had 20 points and James Harden scored 19 for the Rockets, who have won six straight for the first time since taking seven in a row from Jan. 13-23, 2012.

PACERS 119, NUGGETS 80 INDIANAPOLIS — David West scored 25 points and Roy Hibbert added 14 as the Indiana Pacers routed the short-handed Denver Nuggets. Indiana snapped a five-game skid in the series, beating the Nuggets for the first time since a 31-point blowout in November 2010. The Pacers (40-11) still have the NBA’s best record, the league’s best home record (25-2) and now lead two-time defending champion Miami by four games in the Eastern Conference.

RAPTORS 108, PELICANS 101 TORONTO — Kyle Lowry had 19 points and 12 assists, Patrick Patterson scored a season-high 22 and the Toronto Raptors beat the New Orleans Pelicans. DeMar DeRozan also had 22 points, Terrence Ross added 14 and Tyler Hansbrough scored 12 for Toronto, which has won five consecutive meetings and seven of eight against New Orleans. The first-place Raptors moved three games ahead of Brooklyn in the Atlantic Division by winning for the ninth time in 11 home games. AP Photo/The Canadian Press/Whitehorse Star, Marcel Vander Wier

CELTICS 102, BUCKS 86 MILWAUKEE — Jeff Green scored 29 points and Kelly Olynyk added 14 points and 11 rebounds as the Boston Celtics pulled away from the Milwaukee Bucks in the fourth quarter. The Celtics used a 12-4 run to start the final quarter to break open what had been a tight game. Green had seven points during the spurt and 11 overall in the quarter, while Olynyk scored 10 after Boston entered the fourth clinging to a 70-68 lead.

Kansas St. nips Kansas

Two Rivers musher Allen Moore kisses his lead dog, Quito, after winning his second consecutive Yukon Quest International Dog Sled Race in Whitehorse, Yukon, Monday.

Moore defends Quest crown

ANCHORAGE — Alaska musher Allen Moore won his second consecutive Yukon Quest International Sled Dog Race on Monday, hours after seeing an injured competitor off to the hospital. The 56-year-old from Two Rivers crossed the finish line at Takhini Hot Springs near Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, at 2:12 a.m. Alaska time, according to the race’s website.

Hugh Neff was in second place Monday morning. He left Braeburn, the last checkpoint, shortly after midnight and was expected to cross the finish line in the afternoon. Moore was running a close race with Eureka musher Brent Sass until Sunday, when fell while traveling toward the Braeburn checkpoint and suffered a head injury. Neff told the Fairbanks

Daily News-Miner that he came across Canadian Rangers, who were waiting Sunday with Sass’ dog team for race marshal Scott Smith to arrive. Neff fed and watered Sass’ team. After Smith arrived, Neff helped drive the team into Braeburn. Moore was ahead of Sass when the accident occurred, and waited an hour beyond his appointed leave time to

see Sass off to the hospital. Sass was treated and released. The two had been running neck-and-neck until Sass’ accident. “It feels weird not to race out of here,” Moore told the website when leaving Braeburn with a comfortable lead in the race. The 1,000-mile Yukon Quest started Feb. 1 in Fairbanks.

By The Associated Press

MANHATTAN, Kan. — Marcus Foster scored 20 points, including two free throws in the closing seconds of overtime, and Kansas State held on to beat No. 7 Kansas 85-82 on Monday night. Will Spradling added 15 points for the Wildcats (17-7, 7-4 Big 12), who blew a nine-point lead with less than 2 minutes left in regulation, only to survive for just their third win over the Jayhawks (18-6, 9-2) in 26 games at Bramlage Coliseum. Hundreds of students flooded the court when the final buzzer sounded to celebrate the end of a six-game skid against Kansas. The Wildcats, who had lost 48 of the last 51 in the series, hadn’t beaten their rivals in their on-campus octagon since Feb. 14, 2011. WEST VIRGINIA 102, No. 11 IOWA ST. 77 MORGANTOWN, W.Va. — Remi Dibo scored a career-high 20 points as West Virginia handAP Photo/Alessandro Trovati ed Iowa State its most lopsided Germany’s Maria Hoefl-Riesch passes a gate in the slalom portion of the women’s super-combined to win the gold medal in the loss in three years. Juwan Staten Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics on Monday in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia. added 19 points and Eron Harris and Terry Henderson each had 16 points for the Mountaineers (15-10, 7-5 Big 12).

Hoefl-Riesch takes super-combined

No. 17 VIRGINIA 61, MARYLAND 53 CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — Joe Harris scored 19 points and Virginia stretched its winning streak to eight games by beating Maryland in its last visit as an ACC rival. Malcolm Brogdon added 14 points and Akil Mitchell had 13 for the Cavaliers (20-5, 11-1 Atlantic Coast Conference), who continued their best start in conference play since the 1981-82 team opened 12-1.

KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia (AP) — In Alpine skiing, there are speed specialists and there are technical specialists, and then there’s Maria Hoefl-Riesch. As versatile as they come, the German is establishing herself as one of the very best ever — and she owns three Olympic golds to prove it. Solid in Monday morning’s downhill run, then much more special in the afternoon’s slalom, Hoefl-Riesch won the super-combined — the event C

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intended to measure all-around skill — for the second Winter Games in a row. Her total time of 2 minutes, 34.62 seconds was 0.40 seconds faster than silver medalist Nicole Hosp of Austria. HoeflRiesch was 0.53 better than first-run leader Julia Mancuso, whose bronze was her fourth career Olympic medal in Alpine skiing, twice as many as any other U.S. woman has won. “Of course, the expectations were really high for today. I was one of the top favorites —

or, actually, the top favorite,” Hoefl-Riesch said. “The pressure was really high. I tried to keep cool and easy. ... Yeah, you can say that, but it’s not always possible.” For her, it seems, anything is possible, particularly when it matters most. This was the sixth Olympic race for the 29-year-old HoeflRiesch — there’s been talk that she could retire after the season — and she’s finished inside the top 10 in each one. She missed the 2006 Turin Games after

tearing ligaments in both knees the year before, then started making up for that lost opportunity with victories in Vancouver four years ago in the supercombined and slalom. She also is a five-time world championship medalist, won the 2011 overall World Cup title and leads the current standings. “She won everything,” said Hans Pum, Austria’s Alpine director. “She’s now one of the greatest.” Only one woman has won See SOCHI, Page A-7

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Peninsula Clarion, Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Heat is on at Olympics SOCHI, Russia — With temperatures rising on the Black Sea coast, the Sochi Olympics are starting to feel more like the Summer Games. On Monday, these SubTropical Olympics really started to heat up with temperatures soaring to 16 degrees C (61 degrees F). That led to skiers in the mountains above Sochi putting snow in their racing suits to cool down, and left ski jumpers landing in puddles. “I’m trying to hide from the sun here because I feel like I’m getting red,” said Chemmy Alcott, a British skier who competed in the supercombined race. The weather could get even warmer by the end of the week. Organizers said the temperature could reach 17 C (63 F) on Thursday. But even up in Krasnaya Polyana, where the outdoor events are being held, temperatures were well above freez-

A-7

ing. “It was pretty warm snow and I don’t think I adapted to it well,” said American skier Stacey Cook, who missed a gate in the slalom leg of the super-combined. “It slides under your ski more.” At the RusSki Gorki Jumping Center, organizers canceled the first of three jumps after sunny skies and 15 C (59 F) temperatures softened the snow in the landing area. The second session was postponed after an official said the first competitor fell while landing. When training resumed, only 38 of 55 starters made jumps in each of the two rounds. The mountain venues are AP Photo/Felipe Dana expected to return to freez- France’s Martin Fourcade competes on his way to win the gold medal in the men’s biathlon 12.5-kilometer pursuit at the 2014 ing Tuesday, organizers said. Winter Olympics on Monday in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia. But from Wednesday, warmer hut at the top of the steeper- Riesch was fifth fastest in the BIATHLON: Fourcade’s win weather is in the forecast. than-usual slalom course that opening downhill leg, trail- earned France its first medal. To combat the possibility only 22 of 31 starters were ing Mancuso by 1.04 seconds. Ondrej Moravec of Czech Reof high temperatures, orgaable to complete. With artificial The German’s two-run time of public took the silver, and Jean nizers have been storing large Continued from page A-6 lights turned on as thick gray 2 minutes, 34.62 seconds was Guillaume Beatrix of France amounts of snow and say will they have enough to continue. four Alpine Olympic golds, clouds covered the sun, Hoefl- 0.40 seconds faster than Hosp. earned bronze. Ole Einar BjoJanica Kostelic of Croatia, and Riesch slammed through the Mancuso, who finished 0.53 erndalen of Norway finished Hoefl-Riesch could match that gates, producing a run that was behind Hoefl-Riesch, won her fourth, missing out on a record as soon as Wednesday, in the more than 1½ seconds faster fourth career Olympic medal in 13th Winter Olympic medal. downhill, when she’s sure to be than the American managed. Alpine skiing. No other AmeriMEN’S MOGULS: BiloStanding in the finish area can woman has won more than deau became the Olympics’ tested by Mancuso again. “I don’t think about records to watch the only woman with two. first repeat winner in men’s moKing Cove sweeps Ninilchik so much,” said Hoefl-Riesch, a chance to beat her, Hoefl-RiSHORT TRACK SPEED- guls. Canadian teammate Miwho has won three of seven esch saw that she’d won, let her SKATING: At 29, Hamelin was kael Kingsbury won the silver, The visiting King Cove girls and boys basketball teams swept World Cup downhills this sea- skis drop to the snow, and put the oldest skater in the first final giving the Canadians a 1-2 finNinilchik on Monday. her hands on her head. son. “If it happens, it’s great.” of the short track competition. ish in both men’s and women’s In the girls game, the T-Jacks notched a 34-28 victory over the “She’s not especially spec- The wily veteran maintained a moguls. She stood fifth after MonWolverines. Ninilchik led 10-8 after one quarter and the game was tied at 20 day’s downhill, 1.04 seconds tacular, but, I mean, I have so top-three position throughout CURLING: The Norwegian at halftime. King Cove had a 25-24 lead after three quarters before much respect for her,” said most of the 14-lap race, leav- men, curling’s fashion kings of behind Mancuso. clinching the game in the fourth quarter. Switzerland’s Dominique Gi- ing enough at the end to de- cool, made their Sochi debut Not a problem. Peyton Kuzakin and Kailee Colver each had nine points for “I know,” Hoefl-Riesch sin, who was fifth Monday, feat a loaded field, including with another snazzy pattern on King Cove. For Ninilchik, Jessica Rogers led all scorers with 16 would say later, “she’s not as “because no matter where you Ahn and silver medalist Han their pants -- a mixture of red, points. are, no matter what discipline, Tianyu of China. Ahn was a white, blue and gray squares good as me in slalom.” In the boys game, King Cove won 75-57. King Cove got off to a she’s always there.” That’s certainly true. Manthree-time gold medalist for his and rectangles. Norway dazzled hot start, taking a 22-9 lead after one quarter and a 38-18 lead halfAlso on Day 4 of the Sochi native South Korea, but after the U.S. 7-4, but the surprise of cuso was the super-combined way through the second quarter. Ninilchik was able to cut the lead Olympic silver medalist in Olympics, Charles Hamelin of missing the Vancouver Games opening day was Switzerland’s to 40-27 at the half, but King Cove was able to re-establish control 2010, but she hadn’t even raced Canada raced to the 1,500-me- he changed his name and be- upset of defending champion in the second half. Austin White had 18 points for the Wolverines while Tyler Presley added 14. a full-length slalom since Janu- ter short track speedskating came a Russian citizen. When Canada. On the women’s side, The Ninilchik girls and boys head to the Tok Tournament on gold, and Viktor Ahn earned the he stepped on the medals podi- Sweden defeated Britain 6-4 in ary 2013. Thursday, Friday and Saturday. “I could definitely risk more, bronze to give Russia its first- um, the mostly Russian crowd a matchup of two favorites for but without having the slalom ever short track medal; Michel erupted in wild cheers. the women’s curling gold. Monday girls mileage, it’s really tough to Mulder of the Netherlands SPEEDSKATING: Mulder’s ICE HOCKEY: The United T-Jacks 34, Wolverines 28 snap off turns and try to make earned the 500-meter speed- 500-meter speedskating victory States romped to a 9-0 vicKing Cove 8 12 5 9 —34 Ninilchik 10 10 4 4 —28 up speed,” Mancuso said. “It’s skating gold; Martin Fourcade earned him the title of fastest tory over Switzerland to all-but more just: Survive and get to won the 12.5-kilometer biath- man on skates. Teammate Jan clinch a spot in the Olympic KING COVE (34) — Gould 0 0-0 0, M. Yatchemeneff 0 0-0 0, Newman 3 0-1 7, Kuzakin 4 1-2 9, Samuelson 1 0-2 2, Colver 4 1-3 9, R. Yatchemeneff 3 1-2 7. Totals lon pursuit; and Alex Bilodeau Smeekens was 0.01 seconds be- women’s hockey semifinals. the finish.” — 15 3-10 34. Hoefl-Riesch pounded her won his second consecutive hind for silver, and twin Ronald Canada topped Finland 3-0 to NINILCHIK (28) — Rogers 8 0-7 16, Cooper 0 0-0 0, Sinclair 0 0-0 0, Goins 1 0-0 2, Ehlers 0 0-0 0, Finney 3 2-2 8, Me. Clark 1 0-0 2, Mi. Clark 0 0-2 0. Totals — 13 right fist over her heart during gold medal in men’s moguls. Mulder took bronze in a Dutch ensure its spot in the semifi2-11 28. ALPINE SKIING: Hoeflthe final moments in the startsweep. nals. 3-point goals — King Cove 1 (Newman). Team fouls — King Cove 11, Ninilchik 12.

. . . Sochi

Sports Briefs

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Fouled out — none.

Lumen Christi travels to Seldovia The Seldovia girls and boys basketball teams split with Lumen Christi this weekend. The Seldovia boys topped Lumen 53-18. Seldovia coach Mark Janes said his team was led by Calem Collier in the win, with contributions from Soulymane Sibide and Aidan Philpot. The Seldovia girls lost to Lumen 46-24. The Nanwalek boys also beat Lumen. It was Nanwalek’s second victory of the season.

Richard Petty criticizes Patrick CHARLOTTE, N.C. — NASCAR Hall of Fame driver Richard Petty says Danica Patrick can only win a Sprint Cup Series race “if everybody else stayed home.” The seven-time champion made the comment during a Sunday appearance at the Canadian Motorsports Expo in Toronto, according to the website wheels.ca. Petty also said Patrick only gets attention because she’s a woman, but added that publicity is good for NASCAR. “If she’d have been a male, nobody would ever know if she’d showed up at a racetrack,” Petty said, according to the website. “This is a female deal that’s driving her. There’s nothing wrong with that, because that’s good PR for me. More fans come out, people are more interested in it. She has helped to draw attention to the sport, which helps everybody in the sport.” Petty still maintains partial control of Richard Petty Motorsports, which fields cars for Marcos Ambrose and Aric Almirola in the Sprint Cup Series. Patrick is headed to Daytona International Speedway this week to begin her second full season at NASCAR’s top level. She became the first woman a year ago to win the top starting spot for the Daytona 500 and she finished eighth. It was Patrick’s best finish during a rough rookie year in which she averaged a 26th-place finish. Patrick was 27th in the final Sprint Cup standings.

Beckett will be ready for season GLENDALE, Ariz. — Josh Beckett said he will be ready for the start of the Dodgers’ season after having a rib removed last July in a surgery to alleviate a nerve condition that was affecting his right arm “I don’t have numbness and tingling, anymore,” Beckett said Monday. No doubts, either. The right-hander is expected to battle newly acquired Paul Maholm for the fifth spot in the Dodgers’ starting rotation this spring. Beckett, the fifth starter before last year’s mid-season surgery, breezed through his first bullpen session Monday in Arizona. He threw 30 pitches with no sign of trouble. “I’m not tentative,” said Beckett, who reported to camp a day late so he could attend a wedding. “I’m going to throw as hard as I can and see what happens. Right now, I feel great. I’ll throw the ball until I blow out and I’m hoping that’s not for a few more years.”

Twins GM Ryan has cancer MINNEAPOLIS — Diagnosed with cancer in his neck, Minnesota Twins general manager Terry Ryan has taken leave from his job for treatment and recovery. The timetable for his return is unclear, but the prognosis is optimistic. Though sobered by and concerned about the news, the Twins expressed confidence in the ability of their front office’s long-time leader to beat the disease and get back to running the — Staff and wire reports team.

Scoreboard Basketball The AP Top 25

The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’ college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Feb. 9, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: Record 1. Syracuse (65) 23-0 2. Arizona 23-1 3. Florida 21-2 4. Wichita St. 25-0 5. San Diego St. 21-1 6. Villanova 21-2 7. Kansas 18-5 8. Duke 19-5 9. Michigan St. 20-4 10. Cincinnati 22-3 11. Iowa St. 18-4 12. Saint Louis 22-2 13. Louisville 19-4 14. Kentucky 18-5 15. Michigan 17-6 16. Iowa 18-6 17. Virginia 19-5 18. Creighton 19-4 19. Texas 18-5 20. Memphis 18-5 21. Wisconsin 19-5 22. Ohio St. 19-5 23. SMU 19-5 24. UConn 18-5 25. Pittsburgh 20-4

Pts Prv 1,625 1 1,525 2 1,477 3 1,445 4 1,373 5 1,288 6 1,234 8 1,130 11 1,025 9 970 7 925 16 908 13 866 14 769 18 702 10 686 17 608 20 552 12 417 15 333 24 242 — 214 — 205 — 194 22 175 25

Others receiving votes: Oklahoma 99, Gonzaga 44, UCLA 43, New Mexico 23, Oklahoma St. 10, George Washington 6, Southern Miss. 6, Stephen F. Austin 3, Arizona St. 1, Kansas St. 1, North Carolina 1.

USA Today Top 25 Poll

The top 25 teams in the USA Today men’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Feb. 9, points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Syracuse (32) 23-0 800 1 2. Wichita State 25-0 744 2 3. Arizona 23-1 742 3 4. Florida 21-2 711 4 5. San Diego State 21-1 675 5 6. Villanova 21-2 629 6 7. Kansas 18-5 569 9 8. Louisville 19-4 529 10 9. Duke 19-5 511 11 10. Mich. State 20-4 479 8 11. Cincinnati 22-3 467 7 12. Saint Louis 22-2 427 15 13. Kentucky 18-5 403 14 14. Iowa State 18-4 369 17 15. Iowa 18-6 333 13 16. Virginia 19-5 310 21 17. Creighton 19-4 305 12 18. Michigan 17-6 254 16 19. Texas 18-5 170 18 20. Ohio State 19-5 162 25 21. Wisconsin 19-5 158 24 22. Memphis 18-5 152 — 23. Pittsburgh 20-4 148 22 24. Gonzaga 21-4 78 20 25. Oklahoma 18-6 55 23

Others receiving votes: UConn 54, Kansas State 38, SMU 37, Southern Miss. 25, UMass 15, UCLA 15, New Mexico 12, Oklahoma State 10, George Washington 6, Colorado 5, Stephen F. Austin 1, VCU 1, West Virginia 1.

The Women’s Top 25

The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’ women’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Feb. 9, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: Record 1. UConn (36) 25-0 2. Notre Dame 23-0 3. Duke 22-2 4. Louisville 23-2 5. South Carolina 22-2 6. Stanford 22-2 7. Baylor 20-3 8. Tennessee 19-4 9. Maryland 19-4 10. NC State 21-3 11. Penn St. 18-5 12. Oklahoma St. 19-4 13. West Virginia 20-3 14. Texas A&M 18-6 15. Arizona St. 20-4 16. Vanderbilt 17-5 17. North Carolina 17-6 18. Kentucky 17-6 19. LSU 18-6 20. Gonzaga 22-3 21. Nebraska 17-5 22. California 16-7 23. Purdue 17-7 24. St. John’s 18-5 25. Michigan St. 16-8

Pts 900 864 811 758 739 737 710 659 604 541 525 452 448 380 359 355 317 298 274 235 202 118 113 69 61

Prv 1 2 5 4 6 3 7 8 10 14 9 12 17 19 11 18 13 15 16 20 22 23 25 — 24

Others receiving votes: Middle Tennessee 32, Rutgers 31, Wichita St. 29, Iowa 14, Oklahoma 12, Texas 12, Chattanooga 10, DePaul 9, Bowling Green 5, Florida St. 5, Florida 3, Georgia Tech 3, James Madison 3, Michigan 2, Syracuse 1.

NBA Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Toronto 27 24 Brooklyn 23 26 New York 20 31 Boston 19 34 Philadelphia 15 38 Southeast Division Miami 35 14 Atlanta 25 24 Washington 25 25 Charlotte 22 29 Orlando 16 37 Central Division Indiana 40 11 Chicago 25 25 Detroit 22 29 Cleveland 18 33 Milwaukee 9 42

Pct .529 .469 .392 .358 .283

GB — 3 7 9 13

.714 — .510 10 .500 10½ .431 14 .302 21 .784 — .500 14½ .431 18 .353 22 .176 31

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division San Antonio 37 15 Houston 35 17 Dallas 31 21 Memphis 27 23

.712 .673 .596 .540

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— 2 6 9

New Orleans 22 29 Northwest Division Oklahoma City 41 12 Portland 36 15 Denver 24 26 Minnesota 24 28 Utah 17 33 Pacific Division L.A. Clippers 36 18 Phoenix 30 20 Golden State 31 21 L.A. Lakers 18 33 Sacramento 17 34

.431 14½ .774 — .706 4 .480 15½ .462 16½ .340 22½ .667 — .600 4 .596 4 .353 16½ .333 17½

Monday’s Games Indiana 119, Denver 80 Toronto 108, New Orleans 101 Detroit 109, San Antonio 100 Houston 107, Minnesota 89 Boston 102, Milwaukee 86 Golden State 123, Philadelphia 80 Tuesday’s Games Sacramento at Cleveland, 3 p.m. Dallas at Charlotte, 3 p.m. Atlanta at Chicago, 4 p.m. Washington at Memphis, 4 p.m. Miami at Phoenix, 5 p.m. Oklahoma City at Portland, 6 p.m. Utah at L.A. Lakers, 6:30 p.m. All Times ADT

Men’s Scores EAST Georgetown 83, Providence 71 Quinnipiac 83, Marist 78 Siena 77, Fairfield 75 West Virginia 102, Iowa St. 77 SOUTH Alabama A&M 91, MVSU 82 Bethune-Cookman 72, NC A&T 71 Delaware St. 79, Savannah St. 59 Grambling St. 95, Alcorn St. 80 Hampton 71, Md.-Eastern Shore 65 James Madison 59, Hofstra 53 Miami 77, Florida St. 73 Morgan St. 82, Coppin St. 77 NC Central 92, Florida A&M 49 Norfolk St. 75, Howard 49 SC-Upstate 75, ETSU 63 Southern U. 68, Jackson St. 63 UNC Wilmington 66, Towson 53 Virginia 61, Maryland 53 W. Carolina 83, Furman 75 Wofford 95, Hiwassee 60 MIDWEST Kansas St. 85, Kansas 82, OT SOUTHWEST Ark.-Pine Bluff 76, Alabama St. 71 Arkansas St. 72, W. Kentucky 58 FAR WEST Sacramento St. 68, S. Utah 56

Women’s Scores EAST LIU Brooklyn 59, CCSU 48< Mount St. Mary’s 88, Fairleigh Dickinson 70< Robert Morris 90, Sacred Heart 66< St. Francis (NY) 90, St. Francis (Pa.) 76< Wagner 78, Bryant 64< SOUTH

Alcorn St. 78, Grambling St. 77< Belmont 69, Austin Peay 67< Chattanooga 68, W. Carolina 46< Coppin St. 76, Morgan St. 60< Elon 66, Davidson 63< Florida A&M 70, NC Central 63< Hampton 54, Md.-Eastern Shore 35< Howard 77, Norfolk St. 63< MVSU 68, Alabama A&M 56< NC A&T 66, Bethune-Cookman 35< North Carolina 89, Duke 78< Samford 55, Appalachian St. 47< Savannah St. 77, Delaware St. 71< Southern U. 70, Jackson St. 55< Tennessee 81, Vanderbilt 53< Tennessee St. 72, Murray St. 65< UNC-Greensboro 76, Georgia Southern 65< MIDWEST Ill.-Chicago 82, Valparaiso 73< Iowa 90, Northwestern 84< SE Missouri 69, SIU-Edwardsville 60< SOUTHWEST Alabama St. 69, Ark.-Pine Bluff 51< FAR WEST Colorado 81, Oregon 75< Oregon St. 60, Utah 47< S. Utah 93, N. Arizona 59<

Olympics Medals Table

At Sochi, Russia Through Monday, Feb. 10 (18 total events) Nation G S B Tot Canada 3 3 1 7 Netherlands 3 2 2 7 Norway 2 1 4 7 Russia 1 2 3 6 United States 2 0 3 5 Austria 1 2 0 3 Czech Republic 0 2 1 3 Germany 2 0 0 2 France 1 0 1 2 Sweden 0 2 0 2 Italy 0 1 1 2 Poland 1 0 0 1 Slovakia 1 0 0 1 Switzerland 1 0 0 1 China 0 1 0 1 Finland 0 1 0 1 Slovenia 0 1 0 1 Britain 0 0 1 1 Ukraine 0 0 1 1

Transactions BASEBALL National League WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Agreed to terms with RHP Tyler Clippard on a one-year contract. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association DETROIT PISTONS — Promoted assistant coach John Loyer to interim head coach. HOUSTON ROCKETS — Called up F Robert Covington from Rio Grande Valley (NBADL). PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Named Jake Reynolds vice president of ticket sales and service.

FOOTBALL National Football League DETROIT LIONS — Named Jim Bob Cooter quarterbacks coach. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Waived OL Justin Anderson. Signed S David Sims, LB Henoc Muamba and OL Jack Breckner. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — Named Robert Saleh linebackers coach, Scottie Hazelton assistant linebackers coach and Scott Trulock trainer. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Named Hank Fraley assistant offensive line coach. NEW YORK JETS — Promoted Tony Sparano Jr. to offensive assistant. Named Eric Smith seasonal intern. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Signed TE Travis Beckum, DB Terrance Parks and LB Mike Taylor to future contracts. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Named Doug Williams personnel executive. Canadian Football League SASKATCHEWAN ROUGHRIDERS — Announced the retirement of FB Graeme Bell. WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS — Announced the retirement of LS Chris Cvetkovic. Acquired DB Chris Randle from Calgary for their 24th overall 2014 draft pick and signed Randle to a contract extension. Arena Football League ORLANDO PREDATORS — Traded QB Aaron Garcia to Jacksonville for QB Bernard Morris, OL Trevis Turner and DL Matt Marcorelle. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS — Reassigned LW Emerson Etem to Norfolk (AHL). DETROIT RED WINGS — Recalled RW Mikael Samuelsson from Grand Rapids (AHL). Assigned RW Tomas Jurco and C Riley Sheahan to Grand Rapids. SOCCER Southern Professional Hockey League PEORIA RIVERMAN — Announced G Eric Levine has been returned from loan to Syracuse (AHL). Major League Soccer FC DALLAS — Promoted Academy coach Josema Bazan to assistant coach. COLLEGE ALABAMA — Named Erwin van Bennekom assistant soccer coach. DEPAUL — Announced men’s basketball F Cleveland Melvin has left the school. DUKE — Promoted receivers coach Scottie Montgomery to offensive coordinator. KANSAS — Named Rob Ianello director of football research and running backs coach Reggie Mitchell recruiting coordinator. MONTANA STATE — Named Cody Kempt receivers coach and Michael Pitre running backs coach.


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. . . Fish Continued from page A-1

be allowed in Area 1. At run strengths of greater than 4.6 million sockeye to the Kenai, just one of the regular 12-hour fishing periods during the week will be restricted to the expanded Kenai, Kasilof and Anchor Point sections. Any additional fishing time given to the fleet will be allowed only in the expanded Kenai, Kasilof and new Anchor Point sections of the Inlet. From Aug. 1-15, if the Alaska Department of Fish and Game managers determine that less than 1 percent of the season’s total sockeye harvest in the driftnet fishery has been taken in a period for two consecutive periods, the fishery will be closed. The 2014 sockeye salmon forecast to the Kenai River is about 3.8 million. Dyer Van Devere, Cook Inlet drift fisherman, said the new Anchor Point section would be chaotic as the drift fleet would be competing with halibut fishers and private boats that put out into the inlet at the Anchor Point boat launch.

the drift fleet in the new area. While the specific number was hard to pin down, Shields said, the ADFG test boat fishery starts in that area and it’s the station where the boat catches the least amount of sockeye. “Speaking with drifters over the years, this is an area where we don’t fish a lot,” Shields said. From July 16-July 31 at run strengths of fewer than 2.3 million sockeye salmon to the Kenai River, fishing during all regular 12-hour periods will be restricted to the expanded Kenai and Kasilof sections. Previously, fishing during just one of those periods was restricted to those sections. During that same period, if the run strength is projected to be 2.3 million to 4.6 million sockeye to the Kenai River, fishing one of the fleet’s regular 12-hour fishing periods will be expanded to any or all of the Kenai, Kasilof and Anchor Point sections and Area 1. DurReach Rashah McChesney ing the other weekly 12-hour at rashah.mcchesney@peninregular period, fishing will not sulaclarion.com.

. . . Funding Continued from page A-1

list, with the federal government owning 60 percent of the total land within the borough, payment in lieu of taxes is being requested. According to the description, the borough’s budget is impacted by services provided to residents and visitors in relation to federal lands. The borough is seeking federal involvement in its efforts to protect the declining king salmon population. “Without federal attention and involvement, no amount of local protections will be able to revitalize this fishery,” the request states. Lastly, the borough is requesting the continuation of funding for the Spruce Bark Beetle Mitigation Program, which reduces wildfire damage by removing trees killed by the beetles. According to the Division of Forestry’s website, the beetles have killed trees on 1.2 million acres of forested land on the peninsula since the mid 1970s. The assembly will vote on the list, which is a consent agenda item, at its meeting tonight at 6 p.m. at the George A. Navarre Borough Administration Building in Soldotna.

“Our feeling is … that if we can go at it right now this year we might be able to successfully eradicate it from the Kenai Peninsula,” Morton said. The borough previously requested a $700,000 allocation for the eradication in Gov. Sean Parnell’s proposed budget, but saw no money appropriated when the budget was released in December 2013. Navarre said the elodea is a common problem and has been seen on federal, state, borough and private lands. “We have to deal with the problem or we’re all going to suffer,” he said. With a tight federal budget, Navarre said the elodea issue as well as the No. 2 priority, funding for Cook Inlet beluga whale research, are clear concerns for the borough. He hopes to see funding for the issues. Navarre said with a flourishing oil and gas industry in the inlet, research is needed to determine how to regenerate the beluga species that calls the inlet home without negatively impacting energy development Kaylee Osowski can be and exploration. reached at kaylee.osowski@ Also making the priorities peninsulaclarion.com.

. . . Pay Continued from page A-1

It proposed giving each another 2.5 percent increase beginning July 1, 2015. The commission also called for raising the salaries of the main department heads from $136,350 to $146,143, with an increase of 2.5 percent beginning July 1, 2015. In December, after the raises were first proposed, Gov. Sean Parnell said he would decline an increase for himself in light of budget issues, but said he believed an increase in pay for commissioners was warranted. Sen. Kevin Meyer, who carried the bill on the floor, said he believed the recommendations had merit. “It’s just that, in these times of tight budgets and deficit spending, we cannot afford these recommendations at this time,” the Anchorage Republican said. The state Revenue Department called lower-than-expected oil prices the “single-most influential contributor” to the lower-than-expected revenues

. . . Plea Continued from page A-1

on his child’s immunization exemption form. A police investigation involving the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District found that Cotman forged a parent signature on four forms between January 2012 to February 2012. All students in Alaska schools are required to “be immunized against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, measles, mumps, rubella and Hepatitis A and B, unless exempt for medical or religious reasons,” according to Alaska statute. In the affidavit, Aaron Parker

. . . Tax Continued from page A-1

leader, in a speech he entitled “Another Idea,” said the state also could “undo that bad tax idea and put a fair oil tax back on the books.” Alaska under the new system will never capture windfall profits when oil taxes spike as the state did under the old system, he said. A referendum on the tax law is scheduled for the August primary ballot. French said Alaskans can go to the polls and vote to fix the tax, allowing lawmakers to work on putting a fair tax on the books. Wielechowski, D-Anchorage, in his remarks, entitled “Where’s the Production?” said Gov. Sean Parnell “promised us, told us” there would be more production — including 1

million barrels of oil — if the oil-tax change was passed. But he said forecasts call for continued production declines. He called the bill “a complete and utter failure.” Parnell, when he began seeking an overhaul in the oil-tax structure several years ago, set a goal of 1 million barrels of oil a day through the trans-Alaska pipeline system in a decade. The Department of Natural Resources in 2012 said that during that period, the target could include sources like development of smaller pools of conventional oil, production from shale and heavy oil plays and production from the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, which state officials have been pushing to have opened to drilling. The refuge remains off limits to drilling, however. During the tax debate last year, oil company officials said they believed the tax cut

Around Alaska BP announces seismic, spending plans

would lead to more production, but it wasn’t clear just how much more and when the increased production would happen. People on both sides of the tax debate have at different times sought to use the tax structure as at least part of the reason for the long-term trend of declining production. It happened during the push to change taxes in 2011 and 2012 — which ultimately culminated in the passage of the new system last year — and is being used by opponents of the new tax structure, who say the state’s lower revenues are just the start of problems if the tax stands. The current fiscal year was divided between the old tax structure and the new one. In an interview, Wielechowski said the tax structure actually has “very little” impact on production and that there are

other steps the state can take to encourage new investment. He said Democrats are considering rolling out a new proposal this session that would offer Alaskans a view of what a new tax structure might look like, if the referendum to repeal the current one is successful. Parnell spokeswoman Sharon Leighow said by email Friday that Parnell’s goal included production from the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, portions of the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska and offshore. Shell recently announced it was halting operations off Alaska’s Arctic shores this year and possibly withdrawing for good, in part after an adverse court decision. “However,” Leighow said, “we remain very optimistic for Alaska’s oil future, especially with the billions of dollars in new investment we’ve seen already.”

vandalism to property belonging to the Pebble Partnership in Iliamna. Company officials say someone last week set fire to 10 plastic totes stored within a chain link fence at an incinerator site. Pebble spokesman Mike Heatwole says the heavy plastic totes were 4-by-4-by-3 feet. With the cost of transportation, they cost $800 to $1,000 to replace. The totes were used to move material to an incinerator. Troopers say the totes were apparently set on fire from outside the fence. Heat from the fire also damaged wiring at the site. Illiamna is a community of 97 about 225 miles southwest of Anchorage.

JUNEAU — The president of BP Alaska says the company plans to boost its capital spending in the state from just under $900 million last year to $1.2 billion this year. Janet Weiss says Alaska is more competitive under its new oil tax structure. She says the company plans to reinvest 90 cents of every dollar over the next five years in Alaska. She says production follows investment. Weiss says some projects that figure in to BP’s capital spending program were started under the old tax structure and a more aggressive timeline for others was implemented since the new Companies spend big to oppose referendum tax was passed. BP is announcing a seismic program, beginning this sumANCHORAGE — Major oil companies are spending heavmer, on the northern edge of Prudhoe Bay. Weiss says prelimi- ily to retain tax cuts approved last year by the Alaska Legislanary data suggests recoverable resources of about 55 million ture, campaign spending reports indicated. barrels there. The tax cuts could be repealed by Ballot Measure One, placed on the August primary ballot by referendum. BP and ExxonMobil each have donated more than $1.3 million in the Man charged with trying to keep bear kill “Vote No on One” campaign, the Anchorage Daily News reANCHORAGE — A Sitka man is charged for lying to wild- ported Sunday. life officials about the circumstances of a bear shooting, and for The Vote No group raised $3.5 million as of Wednesday, ackeeping the hide. cording to reports filed with the Alaska Public Offices ComThe Anchorage Daily News reports Alaska Wildlife Troop- mission. ers accuse 49-year-old Patrick Hughes of shooting a brown The group has begun radio and television advertisements bear in self-defense when it charged him and then obtaining a urging Alaska voters to reject the measure. brown bear tag and permit so he could keep the kill. An opposing group, “Vote Yes —Repeal the Giveaway,” Troopers claim the incident took place on Oct. 11, 2009, at raised just more than $104,000 through the end of the year, Katlin Bay, near Sitka. according to its last report. Most of the money was spent to Troopers served Hughes with a court summons on Satur- gather signatures. day. Former state Senate President Chancy Croft, who backs the Under Alaska law, animals killed in defense of life and prop- referendum, said he had previously told a reporter he expected erty can’t be kept for personal use. the Vote Yes group to be outspent 10-to-1. “So I was wrong,” he said Friday. “They are going to outspend us 50-to-1.” Pebble Partnership reports vandalism KING SALMON — Alaska State Troopers are investigating

Budget officials grilled on 10-year fiscal plan By BECKY BOHRER Associated Press

projected in a report last fall. Alaska relies heavily on oil revenues to fund state government. Other factors cited included lower oil production, residual effects of the former tax system, like closeout of credits, and higher-than-expected deductible lease expenditures. Unrestricted general fund revenues have been forecast at $4.9 billion this year, down from $6.9 billion last year. It is forecast at $4.5 billion for fiscal year 2015. Wielechowski is a critic of the new oil tax system, major provisions of which took effect Jan. 1. His reference to the surplus is money that had been put into savings. According to the Legislative Finance Division, there is projected to be about $15 billion in the constitutional and statutory budget reserve funds at the end of the current fiscal year. The Parnell administration has said the state will need to be restrained in spending and use savings to help get by while oil prices are lower. Supporters of the new tax law have said they believe it will lead to more production, but critics question that.

JUNEAU — Members of the House Finance Committee grilled state budget officials Monday on how realistic their 10-year budget plan is. The plan drafted by Gov. Sean Parnell’s budget office is intended as a planning tool. The different scenarios include various oil price and production estimates and envision general fund spending of $5.6 billion a year after fiscal 2015. That’s slightly less than what Parnell initially proposed for his spending plan for next year. Committee co-chair Alan Austerman said that doesn’t seem to fit with reality with the billions of dollars in increased costs the Legislature is anticipating or discussing. John Boucher, a senior economist with the Office of Management and Budget, said it’s challenging to look out five years and project what Medicaid will cost, for example, or what the state will be paying for retirement. But he said the plan does bring value because discussions

said someone forged his wife’s signature on the form, which indicated his daughter was missing her Hepatitis A and B shot and a religious exemption was signed. In the police report, Parker’s wife, Susan Ellison Parker, said it was not her signature on the form and that her child did receive both vaccinations in 2012. Sgt. Kant interviewed Cotman and discovered the nurse destroyed the original immunization document for Parker. Police obtained a search warrant and reviewed 26 student immunization forms. According to the affidavit, Cotman forged signatures on four documents. Cotman’s attorney Ehrhardt

said Cotman, who served as a school district employee since 1975 until she agreed to retire, said the record at issue did not result in any injury or financial gain. Cotman declined to comment in court and refused an interview with the Clarion. Hickman said tampering seemed to be more accurate charge as opposed to forgery, she said. Ehrhardt said Cotman filled the school forms out after the childrens’ parents failed to do so in time. Otherwise, the school district says they have not been properly immunized. “I would guess that 99.9 percent of all school district nurses in the state have done this,” he C

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are needed to decide what will have to be sacrificed if spending must remain flat to maintain reserves. “That’s the conversation, I think, and the difficult task I think that we face,” Boucher said. Austerman, R-Kodiak, repeated his belief the state cannot cut its way to prosperity. “This state, with a flat budget for the next 10 years, will not grow to the degree that it should grow to establish a tax base that will help carry us to the future,” he said. Rep. Steve Thompson, RFairbanks, said a major portion of the state budget is personnel. With cost-of-living adjustments and other pay increases, he said it’s unrealistic to assume the state can maintain flat spending unless the state begins cutting entire programs. “Just the increases for the personnel costs alone, I mean, that doesn’t fit with what you’re saying,” Thompson said. Parnell’s budget director, Karen Rehfeld, said employees and departments have been made aware of the state’s fiscal outlook, which she said has helped to temper some expectations. said. “The prosecution of this is stupid because it makes it more difficult for the school district to manage kids.” Judge Ogg said the court would suspend imposition of sentence if Cotman pays her fine within 30 days and completes 80 hours of community service by August. She remains on probation for one year. Ehrhardt said Cotman being forced to early retirement is consequence enough. “It’s really unfortunate because the reality was she was trying to help people,” he said. Reach Dan Balmer at daniel.balmer@peninsulaclarion. com.

— The Associated Press

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Contact us

www.peninsulaclarion.com classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com

Classified Index EMPLOYMENT Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/ Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Commercial Property Condominiums/ Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

FINANCIAL Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgage/Loans

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

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Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn & Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

General Employment

TRANSPORTATION Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

PETS & LIVESTOCK Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

LOCAL EQUIPMENT RENTAL COMPANY Looking for 5/2 Operations/ Maintenance/ On-Call Personnel Duties include general Maintenance and inventory control Send resume to: akhelpwanted-personnel@yahoo.com

NOTICES/ ANNOUNCEMENTS Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

PUBLIC NOTICES/ LEGAL ADS Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

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General Employment Program Assistant

Position provides support for the Executive Director and Coalition activities for People Promoting Wellness through Community Action. He/she must be self-motivated with strong computer, communication, social marketing, and data management skills. Part time contracted position. Primarily work from home with a flexible schedule. Email kpcommunityactioncoalition@gmail.com. Call 907-335-0086 for more information

General Employment

The Kenai Peninsula Borough is recruiting for Project Manager - Construction (Capital Projects Administrator). Under the general direction and supervision of the Capital Projects Director, the Capital Projects Administrator performs project management and administration functions for capital projects involving selecting and applying accepted and standard architectural and engineering practices associated with the location, planning, design, materials, and construction of buildings, site improvements, utilities or other capital projects. This is a full time, administrative position. Starting salary is $70,000+, DOE, plus excellent benefits. For a complete job description and/or to apply, go to: http://agency.governmentjobs.com/kenaiak/ default.cfm Applications will be accepted through 5 p.m. Friday, 2/21/14

Healthcare

Current Openings • Case Manager • Forget-Me-Not Adult Day Program Manager • Care Coordinator • Early Childhood Educator Full job descriptions can be found on our website, www.fcsonline.org ________________________________________ Pick up and return application packet to FCS’ HR Department, 43335 K-Beach Rd. Suite #36, Soldotna, AK 99669 or email to work@fcsonline.org FCS is an Equal Opportunity Employer

Employment

General Employment JANITORIAL Person- Soldotna, 2 nights per week/ part-time. Call 1-800-728-1961

Real Estate For Sale Commercial Property Condominiums/Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

FOR SALE 6-PLEX All 1-Bedrooms, 1-bath 2824 Illiamna St. Kenai $299,000 OBO I am the owner placing this ad. (907)394-2293 HUGE INCOME OPPORTUNITY Recently renovated 6-plex great location: 2824 Illiamna St. Kenai. Reduced price $299,000. Motivated seller, owner finance. (907)398-3864

Waterfront Property

Healthcare

CHARIS PLACE ASSISTED LIVING,

Resident Assistant Needed for the night shift, part time and/or full time, prior experience required working with the senior population. Must pass background check. Cook Part time, must be able to work weekends. Pick up an application at: 701 N. Forest St., Kenai, AK. NO PHONE CALLS, PLEASE!

SOLD! Classifieds Sell!

283-7551

FURNISHED 1,200Sqft. 2-bedroom, 2-bath, amenities. Conveniently located in Soldotna. $1,125. monthly, utilities included. (907)262-4359

Property Management Division 170 N. Birch Suite 101, Soldotna (907)262-2522 Mary.Parske@century21.com www.Century21FreedomRealty.com

Income Property Frontier Community Services is a Soldotna based non-profit agency providing in-home and group home services to people experiencing a disabling condition. We are seeking top-notch personnel for full-time and part-time positions within the agency with an interest in providing health care services for the Kenai Peninsula area.

PRIME KENAI RETAIL/ OFFICE SPACE 1,832SqFt to 20,000SqFt. Rates start @ $.50SqFt. Call Carr Gottstein Properties, (907)564-2424 or visit www.carrgottstein.com

Apartments, Furnished

Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

Apartments, Unfurnished

Seasonal TOWNHOUSE Apartments On the River in Soldotna Fully furnished 1-bedroom, cable, WIFI, from $800. No smoking/ pets. (907)262-7835

2-BEDROOM Mile 18 Spur Hwy., $700. plus deposit of $700./ electric. No pets. Coin operated washer/dryer on site. (907)262-7248.

SOLDOTNA 4-PLEX Furnished 2-Bedroom, washer/dryer. $925. includes utilities. (907)394-4201, (907)394-4200.

3-BEDROOMS 1-full, 2-half baths. $1,025. rent, 1,025. deposit. Cats accepted, No ASHA (907)335-1950

Homes 1-BEDROOM 5-minutes Soldotna, 10-minutes Kenai. Cable. Nice Neighborhood. Immaculate. (907)262-7881

K-BEACH Large 2-bedroom, newly remodeled, utilities included. No pets. $875. (907)252-2579. KENAI 2-Bedroom, fireplace, newly remodeled, covered parking, heat included. No Pets/ Smoking. $800. or $825. plus tax. (206)909-6195

3-BEDROOM HOUSE Furnished 4370 Eagle Rock Drive Kenai Spur (907)469-0665 BRAND NEW HOME Nikiski 3-bedroom, 2-bath, 2-car garage. Refrigerator, dishwasher, & range . Wooded lot. $1,500/ month plus utilities. (907)776-5276

KENAI CLEAN, QUIET 2-BEDROOM Washer/dryer dishwasher, Heat furnished, $780 plus $600 deposit. One-year lease. No smoking & no pets. (907)252-1527. NORTH KENAI 2-Bedroom, Washer/dryer, satellite, heat included. $825/ month. No Pets. (907)398-2538. QUIET, CLEAN 2 or 3-bedroom, Gas included. Mackey Lake. No pets! (907)398-8515. REDOUBT VIEW Soldotna’s best value! Quiet, freshly painted, close to schools. 1-Bedroom from $625. 2-Bedroom from $725. 3-Bedroom, 2-bath, from $825. No pets. (907)262-4359. TWO WEEKS RENT FREE! 3-Bedroom, 1-bath on Redoubt (Kenai). Cats Allowed. Non-Smoking. No ASHA. $916. plus electric. $916. Deposit. (907)335-1950

Apartments, Furnished BEAUTIFUL HOME ON CABIN LAKE 47750 Interlake Dr. well maintained 2400sq.ft. 3-bedroom, 1.5-bath, finished basement, greenhouse, lake frontage, new shingles. Appraised $235,000. Make offer. (907)398-1012

Rentals Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

GOT JUNK?

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283-7551

Peninsula Clarion, Tuesday, Feburay 11, 2014 A-9

Retail/Commercial Space

ALL TYPES OF RENTALS

SERVICES Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

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Apartments, Unfurnished

RECREATION Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boat Charters Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snowmobiles Sporting Goods

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CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE RENTALS Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums/ Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

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1-LARGE ROOM $480. Soldotna, quiet setting, Satellite, limited cooking. (907)394-2543. DOWNTOWN Soldotna on the river. 2-bedroom, 1-bath, Seasonal/ Permanent, furnished/ unfurnished, NO pets/ NO smoking. Credit/ background checks. $850., (907)252-7110

Murwood K-Beach Ranch Updated K-Beach Ranch Nikiski Cabin Clam Gulch Cabin Spacious Soldotna Ranch Century21 Property Management (907)262-2522 NIKISKI New homes, 3-bedroom, 2-bath, garage, walking distance to Nikiski Rec. Center. Indoor pool & ice rink. $1275. per month. Leave message (907)776-3325 SOLDOTNA/ Endicott Executive home, River front, furnished 3-bedroom, 3-bath, appliances included, long term lease negotiable. (907)252-7110 WHY RENT ????? Why rent when you can own, many low down & zero down payment programs available. Let me help you achieve the dream of home ownership. Call Now !!! Ken Scott, #AK203469. (907)395-4527 or cellular, (907)690-0220. Alaska USA Mortgage Company, #AK157293.

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes NIKISKI Handicapped accessible, covered ramp, deck. Alaska Housing OK, 3-bedroom, 2-bath utilities included, pets allowed. $1,250./ month. Call (907)776-6563.

EXCELLENT OCEAN VIEW! Bay Arm Apartments, Kenai. Accepting applications for 1 & 2 bedroom apartments, utilities included. $25. nonrefundable application fee. No pets. (907)283-4405.

Retail/ Commercial Space COMMERCIAL 4-PLEX Peninsula Bearing Building on K-Beach 2 Units Available 600sqft. $500./month

EXECUTIVE SUITE 1-Bedroom, view, deck, satellite TV, High-speed Internet, washer/dryer. No Smoking. No Pets. $950. Available until May. (907)262-1361.

1500sqft. $1500./ month Heat & Electric Included (907)262-5224

283-3584

Home delivery is just a phone call away!

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Retail/ Commercial Space RED DIAMOND CENTER K-Beach Rd. 1,200- 2,400sq.ft. Retail or office, high traffic, across from DMV. Please call (907)953-2222 (907)598-8181

Financial Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgages/Loans

Business for Sale

COFFEE SHOP FOR SALE North Kenai, moveable. Contact Brad for details (907)690-7737

Merchandise For Sale Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn/Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

Recreation Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boats Charter Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snow Mobiles Sporting Goods

To place an ad call 907-283-7551

Pets & Livestock Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

Dogs

KENAI KENNEL CLUB

Pawsitive training for all dogs & puppies. Agility, Conformation, Obedience, Privates & Rally. www.kenaikennelclub.com (907)335-2552 PUPPIES Jack Russel/ Dachshund mix, 2 males left $200. (907)398-9100. PUREBRED GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPPIES with papers for sale! They are papered & will have their first set of shots. They will be ready for their new homes the second week in February. 3 males & 3 females left. Males:$900 Females:$1000 Call, text or email Tera! 907-252-7753 jtmillefamily@gmail.com

TEACH ALL DOGS Everything with brains, not pain. Obedience, Puppy, Nose work, Rally, Agility, Privates. K-Beach Road (907)262-6846 www.pendog.org

TO EARN MORE Get started with the Employment section of the Classifieds. The Classifieds are your best source for a comprehensive collection of area job opportunities. Don’t spend another year with a job that doesn’t match your earning potential; open your eyes to new career choices with the Classifieds.

283-7551

Services Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Services Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

Health JASMINE THAI Massage, open Monday- Sunday, 10am- 6pm. (907)252-8053.

Valentines Day Gift Idea: Buy GIFT CERTIFCATES for your loved ones here at Feel The Heal Massage Therapy. Now you can enjoy a relaxing massage 7 days a week. Open until 9pm. Call 598-HEAL for an appointment.

Notices/ Announcements Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

Public Notices/ Legal Ads Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

Transportation Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

Trucks ‘02 SILVERADO 1/2 Ton 4X4 Excellent condition, New tires, tune-up $7000. (907)242-7473

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We’re ready to help. www.peninsulaclarion.com

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A-10 Peninsula Clarion, Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Would you like to have your business highlighted in Yellow Advantage? â&#x20AC;¢ Reach readers in the newspaper and online that are ready, willing and able to buy your goods and services. â&#x20AC;¢ Have your business stand out from the competition by creating top of mind awareness. â&#x20AC;¢ Ads appear EVERYDAY in the newspaper â&#x20AC;¢ Easy to use online search engine puts your business ahead of the competion. â&#x20AC;¢ Update your ads and listings frequently.

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Kenai Dental Clinic Emergency appts. available Denali Kid Care/Medicaid

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605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

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908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

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605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

Insurance Walters & Associates Located in the Willow Street Mall

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Oral Surgery Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD Oral Surgery, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

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Teeth Whitening Kenai Dental Clinic Emergency appts. available Denali Kid Care/Medicaid

605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

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Outdoor Clothing Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing 35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

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Notice to Creditors IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF ALASKA THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT AT KENAI In the Matter of the Estate

) ) ) ) ) ) ) )

of ALVIN GARNETT STEELE, Deceased. Case No. 3KN-14-0007

PR/E

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned Personal Representative of the estate, at the Law Office of DALE DOLIFKA, P.O. Box 498, Soldotna, Alaska, 99669. DATED this 6th day of February, 2014. PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE GORDON T. HUGHES PUBLISH: 2/11, 18, 25, 2014

1582/6090

Notice to Creditors IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF ALASKA THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT AT KENAI

THAI HOUSE MASSAGE

Located in Kenai Behind Wells Fargo/ stripmall (907)252-6510, (907)741-1105

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Notice is hereby given that Barbara Haigh has been appointed personal representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the decedent are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to Barbara Haign, Personal Representative, % Law Offices of PHIL N. NASH, 110 S. Willow, Suite 104, Kenai, AK 99611, or be filed with the above named court. DATED this 6th day of February, 2014. Phil N. Nash, ABA #7705050

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Peninsula Clarion, Tuesday, Feburay 11, 2014 A-11

Advertise “By the Month” or save $ with a 3, 6 or 12 month contract. Call Advertising Display 283-7551 to get started!

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Notice to Consumers The State of Alaska requires construction companies to be licensed, bonded and insured before submitting bids, performing work, or advertising as a construction contractor in accordance with AS 08..18.011, 08.18.071, 08.18.101, and 08.15.051. All advertisements as a construction contractor require the current registration number as issued by the Division of Occupational Licensing to appear in the advertisement. CONSUMERS MAY VERIFY REGISTRATION OF A CONTRACTOR . Contact the AK Department of Labor and Workforce Development at 907-269-4925 or The AK Division of Occupational Licensing in Juneau at 907-4653035 or at www.dced.state.ak.us/acc/home.htm

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in the Clarion Classifieds!

You Can Find

Peninsula Clarion

www.peninsulaclarion.com • 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite #1, Kenai, Alaska 99611 • 283-7551 • FAX 283-3299 • Monday - Friday 8 A.M. - 5 P.M.

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Classified Ad Rates Number of Days Run

TUESDAY AFTERNOON/EVENING A

B

(3) ABC-13 7030 (6) MNT-5 7035 (8) CBS-11 7031 (9) FOX-4 7033 (10) NBC-2 7032 (12) PBS-7 7036

4 PM

4:30

5 PM

A = DISH

5:30

6 PM

Alaska Daily

News & Views ABC World (N) News

The Insider (N)

Inside Edition Family Feud Family Feud Family Guy (N) ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’

The Ellen DeGeneres Show KTVA 5 p.m. CBS Evening (N) ‘G’ First Take News Bethenny ‘PG’ Entertainment Two and a Tonight (N) Half Men ‘14’ The Dr. Oz Show ‘PG’

Channel 2 News 5:00 Report (N) WordGirl Wild Kratts BBC World Birthday Girl. “Skunked!” ‘Y’ News Ameri‘Y7’ ca ‘PG’

CABLE STATIONS

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’

6:30

Wheel of For- The Goldtune (N) ‘G’ bergs ‘PG’ 30 Rock ‘14’

KTVA 6 p.m. Evening News (N) The Big Bang The Big Bang Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’

NBC Nightly Channel 2 The Olympic News (N) Newshour (N) Zone (N) Alaska Weather ‘G’

7 PM

PBS NewsHour (N)

B = DirecTV

7:30 The Goldbergs ‘PG’

8 PM

8:30

(28) USA (30) TBS

The King of The King of 139 247 Queens ‘PG’ Queens ‘G’

(31) TNT (34) ESPN (35) ESPN2 (36) ROOT (38) SPIKE (43) AMC (46) TOON (47) ANPL (49) DISN (50) NICK (51) FAM (55) TLC (56) DISC (57) TRAV (58) HIST (59) A&E

Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld “The Seinfeld ‘PG’ Family Guy Busboy” ‘PG’ ‘14’

4 PM

The Goldbergs ‘PG’

4:30

5 PM

5:30

(:31) Trophy Killer Women “In and Out” ABC News at (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live ‘14’ (:37) Nightline Wife “The A famous basketball star is 10 (N) (N) (N) News (3) ABC-13 7030 Date” ‘PG’ murdered. (N) ‘14’ Bones “The Priest in the Bones “The Killer in the Con- American Family Guy 30 Rock How I Met The Office It’s Always The Insider Inside Edition Family Feud Family Feud Churchyard” Coffins litter a crete” Skeleton is encased in Dad “Meter “Brothers & “Florida” ‘14’ Your Mother “The Conven- Sunny in (N) (N) ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ (6) MNT-5 7035 cemetery’s grounds. ‘14’ concrete. ‘14’ Made” ‘14’ Sisters” ‘14’ ‘14’ tion” ‘14’ Philadelphia $10 With your classified Line ad. NCIS Tony is determined to NCIS: Los Angeles “Impact” (:01) Person of Interest KTVA Night- (:35) Late Show With David Late Late The Ellen DeGeneres Show KTVA 5 p.m. CBS Evening find Ziva. ‘14’ ‘PG’ “Liberty” ‘14’ cast Letterman ‘PG’ Show/Craig (8) CBS-11 7031 (N) ‘G’ Call 283-7551 First Take News Dads Camila insists the group New Girl Jess’ Brooklyn Fox 4 News at 9 (N) The Arsenio Hall Show ‘14’ Two and a TMZ (N) ‘PG’ Bethenny ‘PG’ Entertainment Two and a stop drinking. (N) ‘14’ sister visits. Nine-Nine Half Men ‘14’ (9) FOX-4 7033 Angle Arrow Arrow - Tonight (N) Half Men ‘14’ ‘14’ (N) ‘14’ XXII Winter Olympics Snowboarding, Figure Skating, Freestyle Skiing, Ski Jumping. From Sochi, Russia. Channel 2 (:05) XXII Winter Olympics The Dr. Oz Show ‘PG’ Channel 2 NBC Nightly Snowboarding: men’s halfpipe; figure skating; freestyle skiing; ski jumping. (N Same-day Tape) News: Late Speed Skating, Biathlon. (N (10) NBC-2 7032 News 5:00 News (N) Edition (N) Same-day Tape) Report (N) BannerBest StampBilly the Kid: American Butch Cassidy & The Sun- Frontline Rebels unify against Start Up ‘G’ The Mind of a Charlie Rose (N) WordGirl ‘Y7’ Wild Kratts ‘Y’ BBC World Alaska Experience Billy the Kid cap- dance Kid: American Experi- Islamist group. (N) ‘PG’ Chef ‘PG’ News Ameri- Weather ‘G’ (12) PBS-7 7036 tures attention. ‘PG’ ence (N) ‘PG’ ca ‘PG’

Add - A - Graphic

30 Rock ‘14’ 30 Rock ‘14’ It’s Always Sunny Discover Diamonique ‘G’

Futurama ‘PG’ ’Til Death ‘PG’ Mad About You ‘PG’ Easy Solutions ‘G’

6 PM Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’

6:3

Wheel o tune (N)

Family Guy ‘14’

30 Rock “Gavin Vo ‘14’ KTVA 6 p.m. Evening N (N) The Big Bang The Big Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘1

Channel 2 The Olym Newshour (N) Zone (N) PBS NewsHour (N)

CABLE STATIONS SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFEREN CheckmarkDollar SymbolRules of En- Rules of En- Rules of En- Rules of En- Rules of En- Rules of (8) WGN-A 239 307 gagement gagement gagement gagement gagement gagemen

In the Kitchen With David “PM Edition” Cooking with David (20) QVC 137 317 Venable. ‘G’ ElectricFirecrackerDance Moms Abby brings in Dance Moms Abby makes a Kim of Queens Kim tries to To Be Announced (:02) Dance Moms Abby Wife Swap “Harris/Van Noy” Wife Swap Mother from a new dancer Chloe. (N) ‘PG’ bold decision. (N) ‘PG’ convince Angie to compete. brings in new dancer Chloe. (23) LIFE 108 252 Oklahoma, Texas moms swap competitive family. ‘PG’ (N) ‘PG’ ‘PG’ lives. ‘PG’ Dog Show “138th Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show - Closing Night” ‘G’ Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Law & Order: Special VicNCIS A veteran confesses For Sale SignHeart- to NCIS “Heart Break” Navy (28) USA 105 242 ily ‘PG’ ily ‘PG’ tims Unit “Wannabe” ‘14’ murder. ‘PG’ commander’s death. ‘PG’ The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang Cougar Town The Big Bang Conan (N) ‘14’ Cougar Town Conan ‘14’ The King of The King of Seinfeld “The Seinfeld ‘G’ Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘14’ Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ (N) ‘14’ Theory ‘14’ ‘14’ (30) TBS 139 247 Queens ‘PG’ Queens ‘PG’ Jacket” ‘G’

Rick & Easy Solutions ‘

Wife Swap “Mink/Oaks” rhinestone cowgirl mothe

NCIS A young sailor’s bo found. ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Family G ‘PG’

Classified Ad Specials Garage Sale - 26.00 Wheel Deal

Monthly Specials!

My First My First Place ‘G’ Place ‘G’ Chopped Catfish and marshmallows. ‘G’ Shark Tank Beer-infused ice cream. ‘PG’ The Kelly File (N)

Futurama ‘PG’ Futurama ‘PG’ South Park Tosh.0 ‘14’ ‘14’ Face Off “Sexy Beasts” ‘PG’ Face Off Out-of-this-world (82) SYFY 122 244 alien creatures. ‘14’ (81) COM 107 249

PREMIUM STATIONS ! HBO 303 504 ^ HBO2 304 505 + MAX 311 514 5 SHOW 319 540

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Minimum of $6.30 per ad or 10 Word Minimum per Day A Plus B 6% Sales Tax • VISA & MasterCard welcome. Classified ads also run in the Dispatch and Online (except single day ads) Alaska Daily ad pricing, detailsNews & Views ABC World *Ask about our recruitment & deadlines

9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30

LookMagnetCastle A novelist helps police Castle A nanny’s body is Castle Death of a teenage Rizzoli & Isles “Welcome to (:01) Rizzoli & Isles ‘14’ (:02) Rizzoli & Isles “Money (:03) The Mentalist “The Thin (:03) The Mentalist “Flame Castle FPolice investigate a Castle Castle competes with Castle A plastic surgeon 138 245 find a killer. ‘PG’ (31) TNT 138 245 frozen corpse. ‘PG’ stashed in a dryer. ‘PG’ boy. ‘PG’ the Dollhouse” ‘14’ Maker” ‘14’ Red Line” ‘14’ Red” ‘14’ Beckett’s ex. ‘PG’ brutally murdered. ‘PG’ (3:00) College Basketball College Basketball Michigan at Ohio State. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (3:00) College Basketball College Basketball Duke at North Carolina. (N) (Live) 140 206 Florida at Tennessee. (N) (34) ESPN 140 206 Teams TBA. (N) (Live) NewPot of Gold(3:00) College Basketball NBA Coast to Coast (N) (Live) Olbermann (N) (Live) Olbermann NBA Tonight Basketball NFL Films NASCAR Now NFL Live (N) (3:00) College Basketball College Basketball Stanford at Washington. (N) (Live) 144 209 Oklahoma State at Texas. (35) ESPN2 144 209 Teams TBA. (N) (Live) (N) Presents (N) (3:00) College Basketball Mark Few UFC Ultimate UFC Reloaded “UFC 134: Silva vs. Okami” Silva vs Okami and Rua vs Griffin. UFA World Poker Tour: Season 11 World Poker Tour: Season 12 College Basketball ACC All-Ac- Mark Few College Basketball Air F 426 651 Clemson at Notre Dame. (36) ROOT 426 651 Show (N) Insider cess (N) Show StarWow! Stamp“X-Men” (2000, Action) Hugh Jackman, Patrick Stewart, Ian McKellen. Two “Resident Evil: Afterlife” (2010) Milla Jovovich, Ali Larter. Alice and her “RoboCop” (1987, Science Fiction) Peter Weller, Nancy Allen. A murdered “Doom” (3:00) “Resident Evil: Afterlife” (2010, Hor- Cops ‘14’ Cops ‘14’ Cops Tra 168 325 groups of mutated humans square off against each other. (38) SPIKE 168 325 ror) Milla Jovovich, Ali Larter. companions head to a rumored safe haven in Los Angeles. policeman returns as a crime-fighting cyborg. (2005) stop. ‘PG (2:00) “Hollow “Die Hard 2” (1990, Action) Bruce Willis, Bonnie Bedelia, William Atherton. “Braveheart” (1995, Historical Drama) Mel Gibson, Sophie Marceau, Patrick McGoohan. A Scottish rebel rallies his country- (:01) “Reign of Fire” (2002) (3:00) “Braveheart” (1995, Historical Drama) Mel Gibson, Sophie Marceau, Patrick McG 130 254 Man” (43) AMC 130 254 Just tell us which graphic you like! Police hero spots military terrorists at D.C. airport. men against England. Christian Bale. han. A Scottish rebel rallies his countrymen against England. Uncle Grand- Adventure King of the The Cleve- American American Family Guy Family Guy Robot Aqua Teen Squidbillies American American Family Guy Family Guy Robot Dragons: Regularpeople’s Show Kingattention of the The Cleve- American America An affordable way to grab 176 296 pa (N) (46) TOON 176 296 Time ‘PG’ Hill ‘PG’ land Show Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Chicken Hunger ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Chicken Defenders ‘PG’ Hill ‘PG’ land Show Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ Finding Bigfoot: Further Finding Bigfoot: Further To Be Announced Wild Russia ‘PG’ Wild Russia ‘PG’ Wild Russia The creatures Wild Russia ‘PG’ Wild Russia ‘PG’ Finding Bigfoot: Further Finding Bigfoot: Further To Be Announced 184 282 Evidence ‘PG’ (47) ANPL 184 282 Evidence ‘PG’ that inhabit Siberia. ‘PG’ Evidence ‘PG’ Evidence ‘PG’ A.N.T. Farm A.N.T. Farm Good Luck Good Luck Good Luck Good Luck “Beverly Hills Chihuahua 2” (2011, Com- (:35) Dog With Jessie “Toy Austin & Liv & Mad- Shake It Good Luck Good Luck Jessie ‘G’ Jessie “101 Good Luck Good Luck Good Luck Good Lu Private Party Only - Prices include sales tax. NO REFUNDS on specials. 173 291 ‘G’ Cannot be combined with‘G’ any other offer ‘G’ Charlie ‘G’ Charlie ‘G’ Charlie ‘G’ Charlie ‘G’ edy) Voices of Odette Yustman. a Blog Con” ‘G’ Ally ‘G’ die ‘G’ Up! ‘G’ Charlie ‘G’ Charlie ‘G’ (49) DISN 173 291 Lizards” Charlie ‘G’ Charlie ‘G’ Charlie ‘G’ Charlie ‘ SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob Sam & Cat ‘G’ Nick News Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Friends ‘PG’ (:36) Friends (:12) Friends Chandler’s SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob Sam & C 171 300 (50) NICK 171 300 $ * With Linda ‘14’ mother visits. ‘PG’ Twisted “Poison of InterTwisted Lacey must make a Pretty Little Liars “Hot for Pretty Little Liars “Shadow Twisted Danny turns to Jo for Pretty Little Liars “Shadow The 700 Club ‘G’ Twisted Danny turns to Jo for The Middle2 Days The -Middle The Middle The Middle Melissa & Melissa 30 words 180 311 est” ‘14’ (51) FAM 180 311 choice. ‘14’ Teacher” ‘14’ Play” (N) ‘14’ help. (N) ‘14’ Play” ‘14’ help. ‘14’ ‘PG’ Includes FREE ‘PG’ ‘PG’Kit ‘PG’ Joey ‘14’ Joey ‘14’ “Garage Sale” Promo Extreme Extreme Extreme Extreme 90 Day Fiance “90 Days Isn’t My 600-Lb. Life “Christina’s My 600-Lb. Life “Paula’s My Strange My Strange My 600-Lb. Life “Paula’s My Strange My Strange Hoarding: Buried Alive “As Hoarding: Buried Alive ‘PG’ Hoarding: Buried Alive 183 280 Chea. (55) TLC 183 280 Chea. Chea. Chea. Enough” ‘PG’ Story” ‘PG’ Story” (N) ‘PG’ Addiction Addiction Story” ‘PG’ Addiction Addiction Bad as It Gets” ‘PG’ Bering Sea Gold ‘PG’ Bering Sea Gold ‘PG’ Bering Sea Gold ‘PG’ Bering Sea Gold ‘PG’ Bering Sea Gold ‘PG’ Bering Sea Gold ‘PG’ Bering Sea Gold ‘PG’ Bering Sea Gold ‘PG’ Lone Target Lone Target Lone Target 182 278 (56) DISC 182 278 Selling a Car - Truck - SUV? Ask about or wheel deal special Man v. Food Man v. Food Bizarre Foods With Andrew Man v. Food Man v. Food Bizarre Foods America ‘PG’ Dangerous Grounds (N) ‘PG’ Border Rico Border Rico Bizarre World “Germany” Dangerous Grounds ‘PG’ Man v. Food Man v. Food Bizarre Foods With Andrew Man v. Food Man v. F 196 277 ‘G’ (57) TRAV 196 277 ‘G’ ‘PG’ Zimmern ‘PG’ ‘G’ ‘PG’ (N) ‘PG’ ‘PG’ Germany. ‘PG’ ‘PG’ Zimmern ‘PG’ ‘G’ ‘PG’ MonsterQuest “The Real MonsterQuest “Hillbilly Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Counting Counting Counting Counting American American American American (:01) Count- (:31) CountAmerican Pickers ‘PG’ American Pickers “Guys and American Pickers ‘PG’ 120 269 Moby Dick” ‘PG’ (58) HIST 120 269 Beast” ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ Cars ‘PG’ Cars ‘PG’ Cars ‘PG’ Cars ‘PG’ Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration ing Cars ing Cars Dollhouses” ‘PG’ Ask about our seasonal classified advertising specials. For itemsThe such as boats, RVs and snowmachines The First 48 Stabbing death Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars (:01) Storage (:31) Storage (:01) Storage (:31) Storage First 48motorcycles, A dice game Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dy ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘14’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ Wars ‘PG’ Wars ‘PG’ Wars ‘PG’ Wars ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ 118 265 in Louisville. ‘14’ (59) A&E 118 265 leaves a bystander dead. ‘14’ ‘PG’

My First My First (60) HGTV 112 229 Place ‘G’ Place ‘G’ The Pioneer Trisha’s (61) FOOD 110 231 Woman ‘G’ Southern Shark Tank Vincent Pastore (65) CNBC 208 355 makes a pitch. ‘PG’ The O’Reilly Factor (N) (67) FNC 205 360

8 TMC

9 PM

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

Wife Swap “Flannagin/Logan” Wife Swap “Ridgely/Corrao” Dance Moms Holly worries 108 252 A family lives a pioneer life- A cowgirl swaps with a subur- about Nia’s role. ‘PG’ style. ‘PG’ banite. ‘PG’ Dog Show “138th Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show - Closing Night” (N) (Live) ‘G’ 105 242

63¢ 44¢ 36¢ 29¢

FEBRUARY 11, 2014 WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON/EVENING

“Red Dragon” (2002, Suspense) Anthony Hopkins, Edward Norton. An FBI How I Met How I Met How I Met Parks and Parks and (8) WGN-A 239 307 agent asks Hannibal Lecter to help him nail a killer. Your Mother Your Mother Your Mother Recreation Recreation Tuesday Night Beauty “Global Beauty Edition” (N) ‘G’ Anything Goes with Rick & Shawn ‘G’ Keep It Clean ‘G’ (20) QVC 137 317 (23) LIFE

Price Per Word, Per Day*

1 .............................. 6 .............................. 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

329 545

Hunters Int’l House Hunters ‘G’ Chopped A seafood surprise. ‘G’ Shark Tank Vincent Pastore makes a pitch. ‘PG’ Hannity (N)

Property Property Virgins ‘G’ Virgins ‘G’ Chopped Popcorn balls; berries and oats. ‘G’ Shark Tank Beer-infused ice cream. ‘PG’ The O’Reilly Factor

Property Property Virgins ‘G’ Virgins ‘G’ Chopped Veal burgers; dessert burgers. ‘G’ The Profit An all-natural cleaning supply company. The Kelly File

The Colbert Daily Show/ Report ‘PG’ Jon Stewart Face Off “Dragon’s Breath” ‘14’

Kroll Show Tosh.0 ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ ‘14’ Face Off Artists must build a Face Off “In the Shadows” rock star. ‘14’ (N) ‘14’

House Hunt- Hunters Int’l ers ‘G’ Chopped “Chocolate Competition” (N) ‘G’ The Profit A flower shop in Southern California. Hannity Tosh.0 ‘14’

Kroll Show (N) ‘14’ Opposite Worlds “Life” (N) ‘14’

Scoring the Scoring the Property Property Deal (N) ‘G’ Deal (N) ‘G’ Virgins ‘G’ Virgins ‘G’ (60) Diners, Drive-Ins and Chopped Veal burgers; des(61) Dives ‘G’ sert burgers. ‘G’ Paid Program Grill like a Paid Program Paid Program (65) Pro On the Record With Greta Red Eye (N) (67) Van Susteren Daily Show/ The Colbert (:01) At Mid- (:31) Tosh.0 (81) Jon Stewart Report ‘PG’ night ‘14’ ‘14’ Face Off “In the Shadows” ‘14’ Opposite Worlds “Life” ‘14’ (82)

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

(3:30) “Entrapment” (1999, Action) Sean Real Time With Bill Maher “Vehicle 19” (2013, Suspense) Paul Walker, True Detective Hart and Connery. A woman tries to thwart a burglar on ‘MA’ Naima McLean. A man finds a woman in his Cohle follow a series of leads. Dec. 31, 1999. ‘PG-13’ rental car’s trunk. ‘R’ ‘MA’ (2:20) “Obliv- “Lethal Weapon 4” (1998, Action) Mel Gibson, Danny (:45) “42” (2013, Biography) Chadwick Boseman, Harrison Ford, Nicole ion” (2013) Glover, Joe Pesci. Detectives Riggs and Murtaugh battle Beharie. Jackie Robinson breaks baseball’s color barrier. ‘PG-13’ Chinese mercenaries. ‘R’ (3:30) “The Object of My Affection” (1998, “Magic Mike” (2012, Comedy-Drama) Channing Tatum, (:25) “Big Daddy” (1999) Adam Sandler. A Romance-Comedy) Jennifer Aniston, Paul Alex Pettyfer. A male stripper takes a young upstart under goofy ne’er-do-well adopts an impressionable Rudd, Alan Alda. ‘R’ his wing. ‘R’ youngster. ‘PG-13’ (:15) “Step Up Revolution” (2012, Drama) Ryan Guzman, Billy Joel: A Matter of Trust - The Bridge to “Soul Plane” (2004, Comedy) Kevin Hart, Kathryn McCormick. A young woman strives to be a profes- Russia Creating Billy Joel’s 1987 concert in Tom Arnold. Passengers and crew party sional dancer in Miami. ‘PG-13’ the USSR. ‘14’ aboard an airliner. ‘R’ (3:50) “Out of Sight” (1998, Crime Drama) George Clooney, (5:55) “Gone” (2012) Amanda Seyfried. “Crazy Kind of Love” (2012) Virginia MadJennifer Lopez. A U.S. marshal falls for an escaped con she A young woman goes in search of her kidsen. A newly single mother relies on her sons must capture. ‘R’ napped sister. ‘PG-13’ to keep life interesting. ‘R’

Clarion TV

Girls “Free Looking ‘MA’ True Detective Hart and “The Campaign” (2012, Snacks” ‘MA’ Cohle follow a series of leads. Comedy) Will Ferrell, Zach ‘MA’ Galifianakis. ‘R’ Real Time With Bill Maher “Oblivion” (2013, Science Fiction) Tom Cruise, Morgan ‘MA’ Freeman, Olga Kurylenko. A stranger’s arrival triggers one man’s battle to save mankind. ‘PG-13’ Banshee “The Truth About (9:50) “Con Air” (1997, Action) Nicolas Cage, John Cusack, Unicorns” Lucas considers John Malkovich. Vicious convicts hijack their flight. ‘R’ moving on. ‘MA’ House of Lies Episodes Shameless “There’s the Inside Com- Gigolos ‘MA’ “Soldiers” ‘MA’ “Episode 5” Rub” ‘MA’ edy ‘14’ ‘MA’ “The Words” (2012, Drama) Bradley Cooper. (:40) “The Machinist” (2004) Christian Bale. A wannabe writer claims another man’s work Cryptic notes and encounters torment an as his own. ‘PG-13’ insomniac. ‘R’

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Information

Buying and Selling “Brent & Buying and Selling “Ken & HGTV 112 229 Renee” ‘G’ Kimberly” ‘G’ The Pioneer Sandwich Diners, Drive Diners, Drive FOODImportant 110 231 Classified Information Woman ‘G’ Advertising King ‘G’ • In the event of typographical errors, please call by 10 A.M. the very The Car The Profit “Car Cash” The Car day the for only one CNBCfirst208 355ad appears. The Clarion will be responsible Chasers Chasers incorrect insertion. The card O’Reilly Factor (N) The Kelly File (N) • Prepayment or credit required. FNC 205 360 • Ads can be charged only after an approved credit application has

Buying and Selling “Fol & Pearl” ‘G’ Restaurant: Impossible “Mumbo Jumbo” ‘G’ The Car The Car Chasers Chasers Hannity (N)

been filed. Futurama ‘PG’ Futurama ‘PG’ South Park • Ads may COM 107 also 249be charged to a current VISA or MasterCard ‘14’

The Colbert Daily Sh Report ‘PG’ Jon Stew Opposite Worlds “Life” ‘1

Tosh.0 ‘14’

• Billing invoices payable on receipt. • No refunds underGhost $5.00 will be given. Mine An unseen pres- Ghost Mine Investigation SYFY 122 ad244 • Minimum is 10ence. words. ‘PG’ leads to a Hotel. ‘PG’ • One line bold type allowed. Additional bold text at $1.00 each word. PREMIUM STATIONS PROVIDERS MAY • Blind Box available at cost of ad plusSATELLITE $15.00 fee. (2:30)the“Joyful “The any Incredible Burt Wonderstone” (2013, • The publisher reserves right to reject advertisement deemed in subject orComedy) phraseology or which Noise” Steve Carell,is Steve Buscemi, Olivia ! HBOobjectionable 303 504 either considered detrimental to the newspaper. Wilde. ‘PG-13’

CARRY A DIFFER

(:15) “Epic” (2013, Adv Hutcherson. Animated. A a secret realm. ‘PG’ (3:15) “Game Change” (2012, Docudrama) (:20) “Taxi” (2004, Comedy) Queen Lat Place your ad online at ShopKenaiPeninsula.com ^ HBO2 304 505 Julianne Moore, Woody Harrelson, Ed Harris. A bumbling policeman and a cabby chas bank robbers. ‘PG-13’ (:10) “Bullet to the Head” (2012, Action) (:45) “The Bourne Legacy” (2012, Acti + MAX 311 514 Sylvester Stallone, Sung Kang, Sarah Shahi. Edward Norton. Jason Bourne’s actions ‘R’ ‘PG-13’ (2:25) “Silver Corrections “Lincoln” (2012, Historical Drama) Daniel Day-Lewis, Sally Field, David Line Ads In the event of typographical errors, please 10 A.M. Previous Day PlayLinings Strathairn. Lincoln takes measures to ensure the end of slavery forever. 5 SHOW 319The540 call by 10 A.M. the very first day the ad Monday - 11 A.M.book” Friday ‘PG-13’ appears. The Clarion will be responsible Sunday - 10 A.M. Friday for only incorrect (3:00) “The Man Whoone Wasn’t Theinsertion. World According to Dick Cheney The life of the fo (2001) Billy Bob president. ‘MA’ 8 TMCFaxed329 545 beThere” ads must recieved by 8:30 A.M. for the nextvice day’s publication Thornton.

Ad Deadlines


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A-12 Peninsula Clarion, Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Crossword

Best friend’s past abuse haunts family gatherings Whether the mother ever told her husband what was going on, or whether it was the continuation of a long family tradition of sexual abuse, is something we don’t know. But if you haven’t suggested to Claire that she could benefit from counseling, you should. As to you and your husband participating in these family gatherings, my ad- Abigail Van Buren vice is to stop doing it. Celebrate special occasions with your friend right before or after these occasions; many people have pre- or post-birthday get-togethers, and that’s what I recommend in a case like this.

I end up thinking about her all day, which doesn’t help. She says she has feelings for me, too, but “the timing isn’t in our favor.” What can I do to go about my day without letting thoughts of Miranda rule my brain? I am 27 and haven’t felt like this about anyone before. We’ll see each other in a couple of months and the time couldn’t be crawling by any slower. Abby, are long-distance relationships even worth trying? — ANXIOUS IN COLORADO DEAR ANXIOUS: Of course they are. As the saying goes, “nothing ventured, nothing gained.” Years ago, couples who were separated by distances courted via the mail. In fact, some of them wrote beautiful poetry and love letters that are classics. (Check out the letters of Victorian writers Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning.) Couples separated by war before the invention of the Internet DEAR ABBY: I recently became involved with also managed to nurture relationships that led to a longtime female friend of mine when she was in marriage. town. I have always loved “Miranda” as a friend, but So consider yourself lucky that you and Miranda now I also feel attracted to her as a potential perfect can be in touch every day, even though at this point match. it’s frustrating. As to the problem of her dominatThe problem is she lives far away. We keep in touch ing your thoughts all day, a way to deal with it is to almost daily. I love that, but it makes me miss her, and STAY BUSY.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2014: This year you seem more in tune with various elements of your day-to-day life. You make more time for those you care about, and you show your appreciation to the people who make your life better. If you are single, you suddenly might notice someone who has been around you for years. This bond could evolve rather quickly, as long as you don’t put the brakes on. If you are attached, the two of you feel more connected than you have in the past. You also participate in each other’s lives more. CANCER can be so emotional at times. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Opportunities will pop up from out of the blue, but conflict might surround whatever path you choose. Someone could push to have his or her way. Initially, you will try to be caring, but later you could become sarcastic. Maintain your boundaries. Tonight: A must appearance. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Your ability to communicate emerges, which allows greater give-and-take between you and others. Focus on a get-together, where you will see potential supporters and friends. You might be taken aback by an insight you gain through a conversation. Tonight: Hang out with friends. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHYou could be far more in tune with the potential of a money and/ or business offer than the person

Rubes

presenting the idea. Realize the ramifications of heading in that direction with others who are not as aware as you would like them to be. Share news with a friend. Tonight: Your treat. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH You will be in a situation that allows you to look past the obvious. Touch base with someone at a distance. A higher-up could be unpredictable and create additional tension in a meeting. You might feel far more upbeat than you have in a while. Tonight: Feeling great. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You might want to do something very differently once you gain an understanding of what is happening around you. You will gain more insight into what makes someone tick. Be willing to distance yourself from a difficult person in your life. Tonight: Not to be found. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH You might want to take action regarding a loved one. When push comes to shove, this person will head in the direction that you have chosen for him or her. As a result, the two of you will see eye to eye far more than you might have thought. Tonight: Only where the action is. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHHYou might not want to know what is ailing a higher-up. You’ll see a situation with far more openness and ingenuity than others, which will make you the natural leader. Others follow your lead. Be willing to talk through a situation and root out a problem. Tonight: Out late. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH You might want to head in a

By Leigh Rubin

Ziggy

Hints from Heloise

Jacqueline Bigar’s Stars new direction. Get feedback from those who embrace more progressive thinking. Your ability to see someone more clearly than many other people do will help guide you in the right direction. Tonight: Read between the lines. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You might feel as if you can’t get enough done. You tend to be very sympathetic to an emotional family member who often wants to share his or her feelings. You might not realize how much this person needs you. Tonight: Why not go for some fun? CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You might want to be more direct with someone, but on some level you fear this person’s reaction. You intuitively know what to say, and you’ll follow though accordingly. Understand what your goals are and how the two of you might need to work together. Tonight: Hang out. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Your nurturing side emerges. Listen to others, and you will know how to handle a problem. Honor a change, and be more forthright. A person you deal with daily might make a big difference in your life. Let this person know that he or she is appreciated. Tonight: Make it early. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHYour imagination will lead to some fun as you start to share your thoughts. Someone close to you could find you humorous. Even if you both are tense, the laughter will take the edge off. Follow your gut with someone you really care about. Tonight: Let your hair down.

The order of ordering Dear Readers: If you order productS online or by phone, are you aware of your legal rights? Sellers can face penalties due to the Federal Trade Commission’s “Mail/Telephone Order Merchandise Rule.” Here are some things you should be aware of so you don’t get taken: * The date the seller advertises for delivery of the product is the date by which it must be delivered. * If you do not have a set delivery date, the seller has 30 days to deliver the item after getting an order. * Notice must be given by the seller if the delivery date will not be met so that you can cancel your order for a refund or agree to a later delivery date. Remember to read the fine print! — Heloise Pet beds Dear Heloise: I enjoy your column in The Winchester (Va.) Star. With two large dogs, pet beds are a necessity, but they can be expensive — at minimum, $50. We keep two big dog beds in the living room. For nighttime, when the dogs want to sleep next to our bed, instead of falling over a regular dog bed, I purchased two microfiber bathmats. They can easily go into the washer. The dogs love them, and I don’t fall over them! — Pam W. in Virginia Sewing hint Dear Heloise: I had been trying to thread a needle on my sewing machine for 15 minutes. My friend called and said that if I was using white thread, I should hold some dark paper behind the needle. And if I was using a dark thread, use white paper behind it. It works like magic! — Mariann D. in Tennessee

SUDOKU

By Tom Wilson

By Dave Green

9 5 7 6 2 3 8 1 4

1 8 3 9 5 4 2 6 7

2 4 6 8 1 7 9 5 3

6 3 5 7 8 9 4 2 1

4 9 8 2 6 1 3 7 5

7 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9

5 6 9 1 3 8 7 4 2

3 2 1 4 7 6 5 9 8

Difficulty Level

8 7 4 5 9 2 1 3 6

2014 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Friday.

Tundra

By Johnny Hart

Garfield

Shoe

By Jim Davis

Take It from the Tinkersons By Bill Bettwy

1 3 9

7

3

2/10

Previous Puzzles Answer Key

B.C.

6

5

1

7

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2

5 6 7 2 8 4 2

6

4

Difficulty Level

8

3

9

1

1 2 7 6 2/11

By Chad Carpenter

By Chris Cassatt & Gary Brookins

Mother Goose and Grimm

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2

By Michael Peters

2014 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

DEAR ABBY: My best friend of 20 years, “Claire,” has suffered bouts of depression ever since I have known her. She recently confided to me that her brother had repeatedly sexually abused her as a child. When she went to her mother for help, her mother told her she needed to “thank God that it was happening because it would make her a stronger person.” Her mother is dead now, but her father is still alive. I am furious at him for allowing the abuse to happen under his roof. Abby, the family acts like it never happened! Claire invites her dad to events we plan together like birthdays. How do I attend knowing what I know? I don’t want to sit across a table from him. My husband is an abuse survivor and feels even more strongly than I do. It has made get-togethers miserable for us. Should we just smile and pretend we don’t know because we can’t fight my best friend’s fight for her? How do we get over the anger? — CONFUSED IN OKLAHOMA DEAR CONFUSED: Years ago, someone explained to me that depression is anger turned inward. Your friend is enduring these bouts of depression because she was never allowed to express her anger where it belonged — at her brother and her mother.

By Eugene Sheffer

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Pet Tails

Peninsula Clarion, Tuesday, February 11, 2014

A-13

Border collie wins Westminster show agility trial By JENNIFER PELTZ Associated Press

NEW YORK — A border collie named Kelso rocketed to a win in the Westminster Kennel Club’s new agility competition Saturday night, while a husky mix called Roo! ran away with the recognition afforded to mixed-breed dogs at the nation’s premier show for the first time since the 1800s. Shooting through tunnels, scrambling over ramps, weaving through poles as a tail-wagging blur and taking a tight turn with a celebratory bark, 7-year-old Kelso bested about 225 other dogs — including another shown by his college-student owner — to take the overall championship. And Roo! made it to the final five to garner a prize for the top mixed-breed, or “allAmerican” dog. The competition put a fastgrowing canine activity on U.S. dogdom’s biggest stage, with the finals nationally televised on Fox Sports 1. While Kelso has won other agility titles, the Westminster trial was something special to his owner, Delaney Ratner, of Cape Elizabeth, Maine. “It’s an awesome way to get our sport out there,” said

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Ratner, a sophomore economics major at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. The daughter of agility trainer Cindy Ratner, she could hardly decide which dog to root for in the final five — Jonesy, a miniature schnauzer she co-owners with her mom, won his height class. A papillon named EZ, shown by John York of Royal Palm Beach, Fla., and a Pyrenean shepherd called Dash, owned by Ashley Deacon of Menlo Park, Calif., rounded out the finalists. They were scored on both accuracy and speed, with the top dog chosen through a yard-per-second calculation to account for the competitors’ different sizes. Mixed breeds had their champion in Roo!, a dog so high-spirited that she’d been adopted and returned to an animal shelter several times before San Francisco-based dog trainer Stacey Campbell took her home about seven years ago. Barking avidly as she waited to be the last dog to run, the lanky husky mix zipped through the course to cheers from the crowd at Pier 94 in Manhattan. “It just shows that you don’t have to go get a breed to get a dog,” Campbell said afterward. “Any dog can compete in agil-

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AP Photo/Great Dane Photos, Amy Johnson

In this Dec. 16, 2012 photo, Roo! weaves through obstacles during agility competition in Orlando, Fla. Roo!,

ity.” Established decades ago, agility is an increasingly popular canine pursuit. The number of dogs competing in agility trials sanctioned by the American Kennel Club, the governing body for many events, has grown by nearly 50 percent over the last five years. Agility aficionados say the sport is a canine confidencebuilder that creates rapport between dogs and owners, provides a healthy outlet for highenergy pets and shows what dogs of all shapes and sizes

can do. Five-and-a-half-pound, top-knotted Tommy the toy poodle, for instance, flew over the jumps and tiptoed through the weave poles to finish third in his height group. “He’s a big dog in a little dog’s body,” said owner Barbara Hoopes, a biology professor at Colgate University in Hamilton, N.Y. Saturday’s competitors spanned 63 different breeds, and about 16 competitors were mixes, a substantial shift for a dog show that has long been purely purebred turf.


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A-14 Peninsula Clarion, Tuesday, February 11, 2014

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Profile for Sound Publishing

Peninsula Clarion, February 11, 2014  

February 11, 2014 edition of the Peninsula Clarion

Peninsula Clarion, February 11, 2014  

February 11, 2014 edition of the Peninsula Clarion