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Invasive

NBA

New clam found on Cook Inlet beaches

Heat try to stay hot against Lakers

Recreation/C-1

Sports/B-1

CLARION

Morning showers 40/30 More weather on Page A-2

P E N I N S U L A

Friday-Saturday, January 24-25 Soldotna-Kenai, Alaska

Vol. 44, Issue 98

Question

All fun and games

Which team do you think will win the Super Bowl? n The Denver Broncos n The Seattle Seahawks To place your vote and comment, visit our Web site at www. peninsulaclarion. com. Results and selected comments will be posted each Tuesday in the Clarion, and a new question will be asked.

On the web

50 cents newsstands daily/$1.00 Sunday

Native Youth Olympics, Peninsula Winter Games on center stage

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Find a Native Youth Olympics slideshow online at www.peninsulaclarion.com.

In the news Cantwell asks Obama to limit mining in Bristol Bay SEATTLE (AP) — U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell is asking President Barack Obama to take action to restrict or prohibit the development of large-scale mining in the Bristol Bay watershed. In a letter sent Thursday, Cantwell asked the Obama administration to invoke a rarely used veto authority under the federal Clean Water Act to protect the region. The Democratic senator from Washington state wrote that the science shows Pebble Mine poses a direct threat to Bristol Bay salmon, maritime jobs and Alaska Native people. She also said thousands of jobs in Washington are tied to Bristol Bay salmon fishing.

Index Opinion.................. A-4 Police, courts......... A-5 Nation.................... A-6 World..................... A-8 Religion................ A-10 Sports.................... B-1 Recreation............ C-1 Classifieds............ C-3 Comics.................. C-9 Check us out online at www.peninsulaclarion.com To subscribe, call 283-3584.

Feds declare disaster for Kalifornsky Beach area By KAYLEE OSOWSKI Peninsula Clarion

By RASHAH McCHESNEY Peninsula Clarion

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It’s a weekend for the kids as the 38th annual Peninsula Winter games rolls into Soldotna today. For some, it will be a weekend of spontaneous fun with ice-bowling, a bounce house, cookie decorating and a monopoly tournament to keep them busy. For others, this weekend’s Native Youth Olympics will be the culmination of months, sometimes years, of training to compete in ten ultra-athletic competitions including a seal hop, Eskimo stick pull and one-foot high kick. “The games have been used as strengthening skills and hunting skills or strength and stamina,” said Michael Bernard, Yaghanen programs director for the Kenaitze Indian Tribe. “There were some, like the high kicks, that were as signals across the tundra a long way a way. You could signal ‘I need assistance to help carry game back to the village.’ There were no cell phones or VHF radios then.” The tribe is hosting the regional Native Youth Olympics for a second year and Bernard said the same teams that competed last year will compete again this year including about 40 kids on the Kenaitze tribe’s Ggugguyni, or Raven, team. Others will be travelling from Seward, Ninilchik, Chickaloon and Wasilla. The Native Youth Olympics opening ceremony starts Photos by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion at 5:45 p.m. today at the Kenai Middle Above, Siobhan Dempsey, 11, practices the Squirrel dance with the Kenaitze InSchool gym. While NYO and the Kenai Peninsula dian Tribe’s Jabila’ina dance group Thursday at the Yaghanen Youth Center in See GAMES, page A-12 Kenai. Top, Tatiahana Dehoyos, 10, practices the Raven song with the group.

President Barack Obama declared the fall flooding in the Kenai Peninsula Borough along Kalifornsky Beach Road a federal disaster last week. Kenai Peninsula Borough Mayor Mike Navarre said while the declaration is limited to aiding public infrastructure, it can help to fund mitigation plans and make low-interest Small Business Administration loans available to businesses affected by the Oct. 27-28, 2013 flood. According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, state and local governments, Native tribes and certain nonprofit organizations are eligible to apply for Hazard Mitigation Grant Program funding. Communities can apply to the program on behalf of homeowners and businesses, but individuals cannot apply directly, unlike the State Individual Assistance program, the application period for which closed last week. Navarre said the borough is working with the state on an “overall plan” and determining which agencies and departments are responsible for various areas affected by the flooding. Diana Bartelds, who lives on Bore Tide Court with her husband Jon Bartelds, said they aren’t “nearly as bad off” as some of their neighbors, but they’re still experiencing the effects of the flood. The couple takes short showers and doesn’t flush the toilet more than twice See FLOOD, page A-12

Soldotna passes public records ordinance By KAYLEE OSOWSKI Peninsula Clarion

At its Wednesday night meeting, the Soldotna City Council discussed a public records ordinance. The council unanimously voted to approve a substitute ordinance brought forth by council member Linda Murphy instead of an administration introduced ordinance. The original ordinance was introduced on the council’s con-

sent agenda at its Jan. 8 meeting. City Clerk Shellie Saner said the ordinance’s main goal is to clarify the procedure for handling requests for public records. Murphy’s ordinance made three “major changes” to the administration’s public records ordinance, one of which made the ordinance less restrictive, she said. The first change was that it substituted city clerk for city manager throughout the ordinance because according to Alaska Statute, the city clerk is

the records manager, she said. “There may be a few municipalities where the manager makes that final decision, but I’m not aware of any,” Murphy said. To ensure record requests are well tracked, Murphy’s ordinance changed some references to city agencies to city clerk. The original ordinance called for requests for records to be submitted to the department keeping the record. “I think it’s important that we have one person receiving

all requests regardless of where the record is stored at that time,” she said. … “And make sure that one person is responsible for not only taking that request in but see it through its conclusion including the collection of any fees that may be assessed.” The original ordinance gave the city manager and chief of police candidates as well as current employees the right to decide if their applications could be released to the public. Murphy said the section is actually

written so that they would have to approve the release of their employment applications. She cited state case law in which the courts determined high-ranking city employees don’t have any right to privacy when it comes to employment applications. City Manager Mark Dixson said the administration supports the substitute ordinance. Kaylee Osowski can be reached at kaylee.osowski@ peninsulaclarion.com.

Funding increase for schools? DEC says Alaska fish are safe to eat 2014 20 By BECKY BOHRER Associated Press

JUNEAU — Gov. Sean Parnell said a per-pupil funding increase would be part of an overall education package he plans to introduce as early as Friday. Parnell told reporters Thursday that if legislators accept his proposal, he would be glad to sign the bill. But he said once they start making changes, which he fully expects as part of the legislative process, then “it becomes a negotiation for

28th LEGISLATURE

2nd SESSION

Alaska’s benefit.” In his State of the State address Wednesday, Parnell said if legislators were willing to work with him in passing “real education reform,” he would work with them to authorize an increase in the per-pupil funding formula known as the base-student allocation. That statement

was left open for interpretation in the hours that followed. Ron Fuhrer, president of NEA-Alaska, a major teachers’ union, said it “almost feels like blackmail.” Sen. Berta Gardner, D-Anchorage, said her takeaway was that Parnell was holding hostage student services to try to force legislators into policy changes some don’t believe will necessarily improve schools. In his first news conference of the session Thursday, ParSee SCHOOL, page A-12 C

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By JENNIFER CANFIELD Morris News Service-Alaska Juneau Empire

The Department of Environmental Conservation isn’t actively testing fish for radiation, Commissioner Larry Hartig told the Senate Natural Resources Committee on Wednesday.

A radiation leak from a nuclear power plant in Japan after a March 2011 earthquake and subsequent tsunami continues to worry some about whether it’s safe to eat fish from the Pacific Ocean, but Hartig said those concerns are unfounded. Hartig said the state is reSee SAFE, page A-12


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A-2 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014

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(USPS 438-410) Published daily Sunday through Friday, except Christmas and New Year’s, by: Southeastern Newspapers Corporation P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Street address: 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 1, Kenai, AK Phone: (907) 283-7551 Postmaster: Send address changes to the Peninsula Clarion, P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Periodicals postage paid at Kenai, AK Represented for national advertising by The Papert Companies, Chicago, IL Copyright 2014 Peninsula Clarion A Morris Communications Corp. newspaper

Who to call at the Peninsula Clarion News tip? Question? Main number.............................................................................................. 283-7551 Fax............................................................................................................. 283-3299

Police find suspect on Facebook FREELAND, Pa. (AP) — Police in one northeastern Pennsylvania town really “liked” this Facebook post. Officers in Freeland arrested 35-year-old Anthony Lescowitch on Monday night, less than two hours after he shared a wanted photo of himself and taunted police for not being able to find him, the (Wilkes-Barre) Times Leader reported Tuesday. An officer pretending to be an attractive woman then messaged Lescowitch, according to police. Lescowitch refused the offer of a drink but eventually agreed to meet for a cigarette, and was arrested at the agreedupon location.

News email...................................................................news@peninsulaclarion.com General news Will Morrow, editor ............................................ will.morrow@peninsulaclarion.com Jeff Helminiak, sports editor........................... jeff.helminiak@peninsulaclarion.com Borough government................................................... news@peninsulaclarion.com Fisheries, photographer.............................................................................................. ............................ Rashah McChesney, rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com Kenai........................................ Dan Balmer, daniel.balmers@peninsulaclarion.com Soldotna, courts............... Kaylee Osowski, kaylee.osowski@peninsulaclarion.com Education ............................................................... schools@peninsulaclarion.com Arts and Entertainment................................................ news@peninsulaclarion.com Community, Around the Peninsula............................... news@peninsulaclarion.com Sports............................................ Joey Klecka, joey.klecka@peninsulaclarion.com Page design........ Florence Struempler, florence.struempler@peninsulaclarion.com

Circulation problem? Call 283-3584 If you don’t receive your newspaper by 7 a.m. and you live in the Kenai-Soldotna area, call 283-3584 before 10 a.m. for redelivery of your paper. If you call after 10 a.m., you will be credited for the missed issue. Regular office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Sunday. General circulation questions can be sent via email to circulation@peninsulaclarion.com. The circulation manager is Randi Keaton.

For home delivery Order a six-day-a-week, three-month subscription for $39, a six-month subscription for $73, or a 12-month subscription for $130. Use our easy-pay plan and save on these rates. Call 283-3584 for details.

Mail subscription rates are available upon request.

Want to place an ad? Classified: Call 283-7551 and ask for the classified ad department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or email classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com. Display: Call 283-7551 and ask for the display advertising department between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Leslie Talent is the Clarion’s advertising director. She can be reached via email at leslie.talent@peninsulaclarion.com. Contacts for other departments: Business office...................................................................................... Jane Russell Production................................................................................................ Geoff Long Online........................................................................................ Vincent Nusunginya

Oil Prices Wednesday’s prices North Slope crude: $105.39, up from $103.86 on Tuesday West Texas Int.: $96.78, up from $94.99 on Tuesday

Thursday Stocks Company Final Change ACS.......................... 2.41 +0.05 Agrium Inc................91.16 -1.44 Alaska Air Group.......81.35 -0.52 AT&T........................ 33.80 +0.46 BP ........................... 48.63 -0.41 Chevron...................118.39 -2.04 ConocoPhillips..........67.85 -0.52 1st Natl. Bank AK...1,752.00 -8.00 Forest Oil.................. 3.48 +0.02 Fred Meyer.............. 36.40 -0.03 GCI.......................... 10.55 -0.25 Harley-Davidson...... 65.89 -0.98 Home Depot............ 80.24 +0.04 Key Bank................. 13.68 -0.46 McDonald’s.............. 95.32 +0.44 National Oilwell.........76.12 -1.46 Shell Oil................... 72.37 +0.28 Safeway....................31.28 -0.40 Tesoro...................... 52.33 -0.38 Walmart....................74.96 -0.39 Wells Fargo.............. 46.35 -0.32 Gold closed............1,236.65 -4.76 Silver closed............ 19.79 -0.10 Dow Jones avg..... 16,197.35 -175.99 NASDAQ................ 4,218.88 -24.13 S&P 500................1,828.46 -16.40 Stock prices provided by the Kenai Peninsula Edward Jones offices. C

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014

Community Calendar Today 9:45 a.m. • TOPS #AK 196 meets at The Grace Lutheran Church, in Soldotna. Call Dorothy at 262-1303. Noon • Alcoholics Anonymous recovery group at URS Club, 405 Overland Drive. Call 262-1917. 12:30 p.m. • Well Elders Live Longer exercise (W.E.L.L.) will meet at the Nikiski Senior Center. Call instructor Mary Olson at 907-776-3745. 8 p.m. • Narcotics Anonymous Support Group “It Works” at URS Club, 405 Overland Drive. • AA 12 by 12 at the United Methodist Church, 607 Frontage Road, Kenai. • Twin City Al-Anon Family group, United Methodist Church, 607 Frontage road in Kenai. Call 541-9538335. Saturday 10 a.m. • Narcotics Anonymous meeting, URS Club, 405 Overland Drive, Kenai. Noon • Homemade soup, Funny River Community Center. 7 p.m. • Narcotics Anonymous support group “Dopeless Hope Fiends” at 607 Frontage Road, Kenai. 8 p.m. • AA North Roaders Group at North Star Methodist Church, Mile 25.5 Kenai Spur Highway. Call 242-9477. The Community Calendar lists recurring events and meetings of local organizations.To have your event listed, email organization name, day or days of meeting, time of meeting, place, and a contact phone number to news@peninsulaclarion.com.

Peninsula Clarion death notice and obituary guidelines:

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The Peninsula Clarion strives to report the deaths of all current and former Peninsula residents. Notices should be received within three months of the death. We offer two types of death reports: Pending service/Death notices: Brief notices listing full name, age, date and place of death; and time, date and place of service. These are published at no charge. Obituaries: The Clarion charges a fee to publish obituaries. Obituaries are prepared by families, funeral homes, crematoriums, and are edited by our staff according to newspaper guidelines. Obituaries up to 300 words are charged $50, which includes a one-year online guest book memoriam to on Legacy.com. Obituaries up to 500 words are charged $100, which also includes the one-year online guest book memoriam. Tax is not included. All charges include publication of a black and white photo. Obituaries outside these guidelines are handled by the Clarion advertising department. How to submit: Funeral homes and crematoriums routinely submit completed obituaries to the newspaper. Obituaries may also be submitted directly to the Clarion, online at www.peninsulaclarion.com, or by mail to: Peninsula Clarion, P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, Alaska, 99611. Pre-payment must accompany all submissions not already handled by a funeral home or crematorium. Deadlines: Submissions for Tuesday – Friday editions must be received by 2 p.m. the previous day. Submissions for Sunday and Monday editions must be received by 3 p.m. Friday. We do not process obituaries on Saturdays or Sundays unless submitted by funeral homes or crematoriums. Obituaries are placed on a space-available basis, prioritized by dates of local services. Copyright: All death notices and obituaries become property of the Clarion and may not be republished in any format. For more information, call the Clarion at 907-2837551.

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ing to volunteer 2 to 4 hours per week as Hospice volunteers. Training sessions will be held at, Christ Lutheran Church 128 Soldotna Avenue, Soldotna, from 6-9 p.m. on Frb 7 and 21, and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. on Feb. 8 and 22. The fee is $25, scholarship asKenai Kennel Club hosts obedience classes sistance is available. Registration is required. For information Starting Feb. 1, the Kenai Kennel Club will host a six-week and to register call 262-0453 or email hospice.admin@alaska. session of dog obedience classes, with Beginning Family Dog net. Obedience from 1-2 p.m. and Advanced Obedience from 2:303:30 p.m. Kenai Kennel Club is located in the Kenai Mall in Kenai. Please leave your dog in the car while registering and Kachemak Bay comments due bring your dog records. For more information call the club at The Alaska Department of Natural Resources held an Open 335-2552 or email kenaikennelclub@gmail.com. House in Homer on Nov. 13, 2013 to kick off a planning process to revise the Kachemak Bay State Park and Kachemak Bay State Wilderness Park Management Plan. Additionally, the Boys and Girls Club indoor soccer kicks off public was encouraged to complete the Recreational, Use, FaRegistration for the 2014 Boys and Girls Club indoor soccer cilities and Access Questionnaire to help the planning team get season is under way at the Kenai Recreation Center and runs a feel for how the park is being used. As a reminder, the deadthrough Feb. 14. Indoor soccer is open to players from age 4 line for submitting the questionnaire is fast approaching. The through fifth grade. Registration is $60 for pre-K and kinder- deadline to submit questionnaires is Jan. 31. gartners, $85 for first- through fifth-graders. For more informaTo view the existing park plan, fill out the questionnaire, and tion call 283-3318. learn more about the process, visit: http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/ plans/kbay/kbayplan.htm.

Around the Peninsula

Sweetheart Dinner for Veterans planned

Tom and Adele Bearup are planning a Sweetheart Dinner for Veterans at their home on Valentine’s Day, Feb. 14. The Bearups are inviting veterans and their spouses or girlfriends on for a date night and nice romantic dinner from 6-10 p.m. Their home is located at 41212 Sterling Highway, mile 91, between Lynden Transport and Solid Rock Bible Camp. There is no charge for the event, but donations are appreciated. RSVP to 907-953-9233 by Feb. 7.

Hospice schedules volunteer training Hospice of the Central Peninsula has scheduled volunteer core training for compassionate, caring people who are will-

Court Appointed Special Advocates needed The Kenaitze Indian Tribe will hold a meeting to provide information to people interested in becoming Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) volunteers. CASA volunteers advocate for abused and neglected children in both tribal and state courts. Learn how to be the voice of a child in need Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. The meeting will be at the Kenatize Indian Tribe’s administration building at 150 N. Willow St. in Kenai. For more information about the Kenai Peninsula CASA program, contact Joy Petrie at 335-7219 or at jpetrie@kenaitze.org. Submit announcements to news@peninsulaclarion.com.

States weigh labels on genetically altered food By DAVID KLEPPER Associated Press

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — In the absence of federal regulation, states from Rhode Island to Hawaii are considering laws to require labels on food items containing genetically modified ingredients. Currently, only Connecticut and Maine have laws requiring labels for genetically modified food. But those requirements won’t kick in until other states adopt their own rules. Bills to do just that are expected in more than two dozen states. Seventy percent of processed foods contain at least one ingredient made or derived from genetically modified crops, known as GMOs, according to the nonprofit Center for Science in the Public Interest. The industry-backed Grocery Manufacturers Association puts the number between 70 and 80 percent. Genetic modifications to a plant can improve its quality, hardiness or resistance to pests or disease. Scientific studies have found no evidence that GMOs are more harmful than foods without genetic modifications, but those pushing for label requirements point to the value in the information itself. “I don’t know if it’s harmful or unhealthy, but it’s something people have a right to know

about,” said Rhode Island state Rep. Dennis Canario, a Democrat sponsoring a labeling bill. “They put calories on a package. They put the fat content. If the ingredients have been genetically altered, shouldn’t that be listed on there somewhere?” The proposals are opposed by biotechnology companies and many agricultural groups, who say genetic engineering has yielded more sustainable, affordable and productive farming around the globe. Business groups worry that labeling requirements would raise costs for food producers — and ultimately consumers — and raise unnecessary fears. “This is mainstream agriculture,” said Karen Batra, a spokeswoman with BIO, a biotechnology trade association. “It is how our food is grown, and it’s how the vast majority of our commodity crops are grown. There’s never been a single reported medical incident related to the consumption of these foods.” Voters in California and Washington rejected ballot proposals in the past two years that would have required GMO labeling. And in New Hampshire, lawmakers defeated a GMO labeling bill Wednesday. Among other arguments, opponents said any labeling requirements would likely face a legal challenge.

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“If you believe genetic modification produces food that has a health risk, then you’re saying the FDA should be the one to label it,” said New Hampshire state Rep. Linda Lauer, a Democrat and a retired chemist. “And if there’s no health risk, then why are you requiring a label?” So Connecticut and Maine continue to wait on other states to enact laws before their own will take effect. Lawmakers in those two states added that provision to prevent a patchwork of state labeling rules that might be onerous to food producers. The issue may be decided in Washington, where both sides are pushing for a federal standard on how GMO foods are labeled. The Food and Drug Administration, which says all genetically engineered foods must meet the same requirements as traditional foods, now allows producers to voluntarily label their items as genetically engineered or not. Last week, a coalition of organic food producers, GMO critics and supporters in Congress wrote to President Barack Obama urging the FDA to require labeling. Meanwhile, last month the Grocery Manufacturers Association wrote to the FDA asking whether foods “derived from

biotechnology” could be allowed to be labeled “natural.” The association represents Monsanto Company, McDonald’s, Procter & Gamble and hundreds of other companies. It notes that GMOs have been on the market for two decades, and include soy, corn, sugar and other items commonly used in a variety of foods. Some businesses aren’t waiting for government action. Whole Foods announced last year that it plans to label GMO products in all its U.S. and Canadian stores within five years. And General Mills recently announced it would no longer use GMOs in its original Cheerios recipe. Dozens of nations including the members of the European Union already have GMO labeling laws. Scott Faber, executive director of the pro-GMO labeling organization Just Label It, said he believes the U.S. will follow suit, following pressure from states passing their own requirements first. “Clearly the FDA has the authority to require labeling, but the states are leading the way,” Faber said. “Ultimately, once a number of states act, the federal government will too.”


A-4 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014

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Opinion

CLARION P

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Serving the Kenai Peninsula since 1970 STAN PITLO Publisher

WILL MORROW������������������������������������������������������������������������ Editor Jane Russell...................... Controller/Human Resources Director LESLIE TALENT................................................... Advertising Director GEOFF LONG.................................................... Production Manager VINCENT NUSUNGINYA.................................... New Media Director Daryl Palmer.................................... IT and Composition Director RANDI KEATON................................................. Circulation Manager A Morris Communications Corp. Newspaper

Libraries are so much more than books Want to download music? Maybe take

a book or movie home for a few days? Need some extra math tutoring? How about a few minutes with a staffer who can help you set up an e-mail account, program your Kindle and iPad, or find a kernel of information in the vast sea of the internet? Need to brush up on your German but don’t want to shell out several hundred dollars for that Rosetta Stone program? Or, maybe you just want a quiet place to curl up and read the latest issue of Alaska Magazine or Time. You can do any of these things, for free, at your local library, and if a library is any reflection of the community that builds it, central Kenai Peninsula residents look good. The price of a bad library is an ignorant community, but the reward of a good library is education, personal enrichment and a thriving democracy. The recent renovation and grand opening of the Joyce K. Carver Soldotna Public Library added another multimedia hub, community meeting place and knowledge repository to the Kenai Peninsula. It’s comforting to know that our local libraries have met the challenge of adapting to the digital world with a continued commitment to bring knowledge, free of charge, to anyone who applies for a library card. Now, you can walk into the Kenai library and meet someone on the other end of the computer who will help you with your taxes; or, bring your laptop and stretch out by the fire at the Soldotna library. High school and college students plugging their way through research papers can work through the library’s vast array of database subscriptions next to fourth graders who can browse tutor.com for one-on-one help with basic math, alongside community members who need free legal aid or a place to build a resume. As they have always been, the local libraries are the great equalizers in the community. First, they brought books and community gathering space and knowledge to those who couldn’t afford to access those things on their own. Now, libraries offer consistent access to a digital world for people from all walks of life who don’t have computers and mobile devices and find themselves struggling to stay relevant. Still, local libraries are finding themselves stretching budgets to accommodate the dazzling array of mediums available to convey the print message. “If I buy a title, I’m buying the book, the audiobook, the DVD or the e-book and the e-audio,” said Mary Jo Joiner, Library Director at Kenai’s library. “We’re talking about buying the same title four, maybe five different ways.” If you haven’t been in one lately, check it out. Even the most curmudgeonly of non-readers are bound to find something useful.

Letters to the Editor Alaskans always willing to help I would like to express my (belated) thanks and appreciation to Don Johnson and the two passing truckers who helped me out about six weeks ago. I was on my way into town when two moose came out of the woods and crossed the road in front of me. I hit one, but in trying to avoid it, I wound up in the ditch. Somebody produced a tow rope and they pulled me out and back on the road. One man even retrieved my side mirror which had been knocked off by the impact. It never ceases to amaze me that Alaskans are always so willing to help out in any situation. Norma Cooper Soldotna

Letter writer encourages fish board action I am a retired Army Soldier, with 24 years of service, and two combat tours. I am a full-time Alaska resident, and have been in the state for a total of 14 years. I have lived on Fort Richardson, Fort Wainwright, and now, in Eagle River. I currently serve as a defense contractor on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. I am also a lifelong sportfisherman. I have fished all over the world (literally). I am also a sportfishing guide and local business owner. I am sure you are aware how incredible our fish and fisheries are, and how much economic value they provide — $1.4 billion annually was the last number I saw. With the exception of the Florida Keys, I have never seen this level of sportfishing economy anywhere in the world. We won’t sustain our fish or revenue like that, nor will we sustain our jobs (many of us), if we cannot do something to take care of our fish, particularly king salmon, sockeye, rainbow trout, and halibut. Alaska’s Board of Fisheries meets this month to discuss solutions to our drastically reduced king salmon returns. I hope you and your readers will join me in encouraging the Board to take decisive action, with what

Time to stop relying on VPSO program for police protection House Bill 199, a bill introduced in the legislature last year by Representative Bryce Edgmon, would authorize Village Public Safety Officers (VPSOs) to carry firearms in the course of their duties. The bill attempts to give VPSOs a self-protection tool, a firearm, when carrying out law enforcement. According to the proposed legislation, a VPSO can carry a firearm if he or she “meets minimum standards and training.” While on its face this may seem reasonable, carrying a firearm and using deadly force in a law enforcement situation is actually a very complex issue and deserves careful consideration. We have strict state laws and local ordinances in Alaska regarding who can carry out law enforcement, and who can carry a firearm in the course of those duties. Alaska subjects all state and local police officers to the minimum hiring standards set in statute, and police officers are certified by the Alaska Police Standards Council (APSC). These standards include minimum age, education, moral character, citizenship, and physical and mental standards. Further, most Alaska law enforcement agencies go beyond these minimum regulations, and include psychological evaluations and polygraph examinations in their selection processes. Once a municipal or state police candidate is successful in passing all of these strict hiring standards and is lucky enough to be hired, he or she begins a nearly yearlong process of training before becoming a fully-functioning police officer. First, a candidate must complete one of three police academies in the state. Second, most municipal and state police candidates complete a three to four month field training process. Third, these officers must successfully complete at least one year of on-thejob probation, during which time they are closely evaluated by their supervisors, who are trained and certified police officers

Doonesbury Flashbacks

Letters to the Editor: E-mail: news@peninsulaclarion.com

Write: Peninsula Clarion P.O. Box 3009 Kenai, AK 99611

is best for sustainable returns and resident populations of our iconic fish, in mind. Phil Goldstine Eagle River

Fax: 907-283-3299 Questions? Call: 907-283-7551

The Peninsula Clarion welcomes letters and attempts to publish all those received, subject to a few guidelines: n All letters must include the writer’s name, phone number and address. n Letters are limited to 500 words and may be edited to fit available space. Letters are run in the order they are received. n Letters addressed specifically to another person will not be printed. n Letters that, in the editor’s judgment, are libelous will not be printed. n The editor also may exclude letters that are untimely or irrelevant to the public interest. n Short, topical poetry should be submitted to Poet’s Corner and will not be printed on the Opinion page. n Submissions from other publications will not be printed. n Applause letters should recognize public-spirited service and contributions. Personal thank-you notes will not be published. C

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themselves. There is no one to better supervise a law enforcement officer than an experienced, highly trained, educated law enforcement officer. VPSOs are not subjected to the same stringent hiring process as police officers are. In fact, VPSOs are private, corporate employees. They are not state or municipal police officers. They are limited to misdemeanor law enforcement for minor offenses, and much of their time is taken up with emergency medical service, firefighting, and search and rescue duties. Currently, VPSOs are supervised by the non-profit agencies they represent, but they are overseen by the Alaska State Troopers. The troopers who oversee VPSOs do not have the authority to hire, or terminate the VPSOs in their areas. They merely have the ability to make recommendations to the VPSO’s supervisor regarding their continued employment, justification in a use of force situation, or overall suitability for continued service. The direct supervisor of a VPSO would typically be someone with little to no training in law enforcement or policing at all. Before the legislature decides to arm VPSOs, the legislature should consider increasing the Alaska State Troopers’ authority in VPSO hiring, supervision, and training. The legislature should also consider requiring VPSOs to be APSC certified police officers. Alaska law enforcement should be provided by certified, trained Alaska police officers. Police should be hired by a public agency, accountable to the citizens and residents of the area and not by a corporation. Merely giving a VPSO a firearm does not make a community safer; it does not automatically give the VPSO the authority, training, knowledge, and integrity of an Alaska police officer or trooper. It’s time to stop relying on the VPSO program to supplement inadequately staffed rural law enforcement, and time to begin making the providers of rural law enforcement accountable to the citizens who they serve. Alaska’s rural community deserves better. They deserve legitimate police protection. Chris Gifford, municipal chapter president, Public Safety Employees Association

By GARRY TRUDEAU

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014

Inmate convicted of assaulting correction officer ANCHORAGE — A convicted murderer has been found guilty of assaulting a correctional officer at an Anchorage jail. James Coven, 27, was convicted Tuesday of two counts of felony assault at Anchorage Correctional Complex East. Coven was convicted of first-degree murder in February 2012 in the shooting deaths of two teenage drug dealers in Anchorage. Christon Lee and Matthew Peterson were both 19 on Feb. 18, 2009, when Coven walked up to their pickup and fired an AK-47 into the cab. Coven was sentenced to 199 years in prison in the case. Prosecutors said Wednesday in a news release that Coven asked to make a phone call on Sept. 5, 2012, but was denied. Officer Sean Winslow ordered Coven back to his cell, but Coven instead attacked the officer, prosecutors said. Coven punched Winslow in the head, which knocked him to the floor, and then repeatedly kicked him. Winslow suffered multiple fractures to his jaw and his nose. The assault left him with broken teeth and a concussion. Coven is scheduled for sentencing April 2 in the assault case.

Anchorage police cite retailers under ‘Spice’ law

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ANCHORAGE — Anchorage police have started to issue tickets to local gas stations and smoke shops that are caught selling a designer drug known as “Spice.” Police have issued three $500 warning tickets as of Tuesday under a local ordinance passed by the Anchorage Assembly last week, the Anchorage Daily News reported. Businesses market the drug as incense or potpourri. Police and others, however, said an increasing number of users are getting high on the synthetic material, which also is known by other names. Under the ordinance, labels on containers holding the drug must accurately identify the substance. Among other guidelines in the law, labels also must detail the name of the manufacturer and provide directions for use. “This is just a piece of the puzzle,” said municipal prosecutor Cynthia Franklin, who helped write the legislation. “This is just a little ordinance designed to address a very specific part of the problem, this open-air dealing and this myth that because it can be sold and can be bought over the counter it must be safe.” A shop or individual will be fined $500 per unit if police return and the material is still for sale, according to police Sgt. Mark Rein. The charge is erased if the fine is paid, Franklin said. Possession of the synthetic drug is considered a minor offense, as are using, providing selling, manufacturing and distributing it. “Nobody can go to jail under this ordinance,” Franklin said. Spice isn’t new to the city, but changing ingredients have complicated law enforcement. The city and the state in the past outlawed what is called a “synthetic cannabinoid,” based on a specific composition. Manufacturers shifted ingredients to sidestep the law. Franklin spent time searching for the right language for criminalize Spice as problems with it — such as emergency room calls — increased. She said Spice is an increasing problem among soldiers and North Slope workers trying to bypass drug tests. “It’s extremely dangerous, it’s unregulated and it’s being marketed to our young people for the profit of a greedy few and to the detriment of our entire community,” Franklin said.

n On Jan. 9 at 5:37 p.m., troopers were dispatched to a motor vehicle collision involving two cars with injuries at Mile 28 of the Kenai Spur Highway. Investigations revealed Jon L. Harman, 60, of Kenai, was traveling south bound in a white pickup truck that crossed the centerline and collided with northbound vehicle, a blue Suburban, on the driver’s side. Susan Whipp, 62, of Nikiski, the driver of the Suburban, was taken to Central Peninsula Hospital by Nikiski Fire Department. Whipp was wearing her seat belt and sustained moderate injuries. Harman was not wearing his seat belt and sustained minor injuThe following judgments recently were handed down in District Court in Kenai: n Theresa Ann Parker, 42, of Kasilof, pleaded guilty to fourth-degree assault, committed Nov. 5. She was sentenced to 60 days in jail and fined a $50 court surcharge and a $50 jail surcharge. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Evan M. Perkins, 32, of Nikiski, pleaded guilty to sixthdegree misconduct involving a controlled substance, committed Dec. 14. He was fined $150 and a $50 court surcharge and forfeited items seized. n Warren J. Pharris, 46, of Nikiski, pleaded guilty to driving while license cancelled, suspended, revoked or limited, committed Dec. 27. He was sentenced to 70 days in jail with 60 days suspended, fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, had his license revoked for 90 days and placed on probation for three years. n Michael Dale Poulter, Jr., 25, of Nikiski, pleaded guilty to one count of an amended charge of attempted fourthdegree misconduct involving a controlled substance and one count of first-degree criminal trespass, committed Aug. 1. On the count of attempted fourthdegree misconduct involving a controlled substance, he was sentenced to 12 months in jail with seven months suspended, fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment and placed on proba-

Police reports ries. Harman was arrested on the charges of driving under the influence/third-degree assault. Both vehicles were inoperable and were towed. n On Jan. 6 at 2:54 p.m., Alaska State Troopers with the Bureau of Highway Patrol, Girdwood Team, stopped a 1989 Nissan Pulsar for speeding near Mile 101.5 of the Seward Highway. Stephan Edward Rose, 23, of Kenai, was found to be driving with a suspended license. Rose was arrested for driving while license suspended and taken to the Anchorage Jail on $1,000 bail. n On Jan. 10 at 4:49 p.m.,

Court reports tion for four years. On the count of first-degree criminal trespass, he was sentenced to 12 months in jail with 11 months suspended, fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, forfeited items seized and placed on probation for four years. n Lonnie Alfred Pritchard, 36, of Anchor Point, pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of attempted fourth-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance, committed Oct. 18, 2012. He was sentenced to 360 days in jai with 330 days suspended, fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment, forfeited items seized, except cash, and was placed on probation for three years. n David Richardson, 55, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to fourth-degree assault, committed July 18. He was sentenced to 120 days in jail with 115 days suspended, fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment and to obtain a mental health evaluation, ordered to have no contact with victim except as needed for in-court proceeding and was placed on probation for three years. n David Richardson, 55, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to fourth-degree assault, commit-

— The Associated Press

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A-5

Alaska State Troopers responded to a two-vehicle collision on the Kenai Spur Highway at Hinerman Avenue in Nikiski. Investigation revealed that Janette Herrin, 63, of Kenai, was driving a school bus when she pulled onto the Kenai Spur Highway from Hinerman Avenue. The bus was struck on the driver’s side by a Toyota sedan, driven by Collin Attleson, 19, of Kenai. Both vehicles sustained major damage and were towed from the scene. There were no students on the bus at the time of the collision. All occupants were wearing seat belts and reported no injuries. Herrin was issued a citation for failure to yield. n On Jan. 10 at 5:34 p.m.,

the Alaska Bureau of Highway Patrol, Kenai Peninsula Team, stopped a red 2003 Dodge car near Mile 90 of the Sterling Highway for speeding. The stop occurred within the Sterling Highway Traffic Safety Corridor. Investigation revealed that Herbert Dean Myddelton, 43, of Sterling, was driving while impaired and under the influence of alcohol and that he had five prior driving under the influence convictions. Myddelton was arrested for felony driving under the influence, driving while license revoked and driving in violation of license limitations and was taken to Wildwood Pretrial Facility without bail pending arraignment.

ted Aug. 6. He was sentenced to 360 days in jail with 330 days suspended, fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete Alcohol Safety Action Program treatment and to obtain a mental health assessment and comply with recommendations with quarterly reports to the District Attorney, forfeited items seized, ordered to have no contact with Wells Fargo, and was placed on probation for three years. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Richard R. Robinson, 43, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to failure to appear in court to answer citation, committed Oct. 15. He was fined $150, a $50 court surcharge and a $50 jail surcharge. n Tegan L. Tipler, 32, address unknown, pleaded guilty to one count of failure to appear on a misdemeanor charge, committed Aug. 27. Tipler was fined $150, a $50 court surcharge and a $50 jail surcharge. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Laura Anne Tisserand, 36, of Soldotna, pleaded guilty to false information or report, committed Nov. 17. She was sentenced to 40 days in jail with 35 days suspended, may perform 40 hours of community work service in lieu of jail time, was fined a $50 court surcharge and placed on probation for one year. n Esterlin Jimenez Torres, 20, address unknown, pleaded guilty to driving without a valid license, committed June 23,

2012. Torres was fined $150 and a $50 court surcharge. n Hosea Talmadge White III, 30, of Kasilof, pleaded guilty to fourth-degree assault, committed Oct. 10. He was sentenced to 260 days in jail with 200 days suspended, fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete a domestic violence intervention program and to schedule a mental health assessment and comply with all recommendations and was placed on probation for five years. All other charges in this case were dismissed. n Jack D. Williams, 19, address unknown, pleaded guilty to driving without a valid license, committed July 20. He was fined $150 and a $50 court surcharge. n Wesley Phillip Yurcina, 35, of Nikiski, pleaded guilty to fourth-degree assault, committed July 15. He was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 80 days suspended, may perform 80 hours of community work service in lieu of jail time, was fined a $50 court surcharge and a $150 jail surcharge with $100 suspended, ordered to complete a batterer’s intervention program, ordered to pay restitution, ordered to comply with all mental health recommendations, forfeited weapon, ammunition and magazine seized and placed on probation for two years. All other charges in this case were dismissed.


A-6 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014

Around the World

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Nation Review of nuclear force ordered

Virginia attorney general, a Democrat, joins fight against his state’s gay marriage ban

By ROBERT BURNS AP National Security Writer

RICHMOND, Va. — Gay marriage moved closer to gaining its first foothold in the South when Virginia’s attorney general said Thursday that the state’s ban on same-sex matrimony is unconstitutional and he will join the fight to get it struck down. “It’s time for the commonwealth to be on the right side of history and the right side of the law,” newly elected Democrat Mark R. Herring said in a state that fiercely resisted school integration and interracial marriage in the 1950s and ‘60s. Republicans accused Herring of shirking his duty to defend the state’s laws after less than two weeks on the job, while gay rights activists exulted over the latest in a string of victories — this one in a conservative and usually hostile region of the country. “It’s a nice day to be an American from Virginia,” Tom Shuttleworth, one of the lawyers challenging the ban, said in an email.

WASHINGTON — With public trust and safety at stake, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ordered immediate actions Thursday to define the depth of trouble inside the nation’s nuclear force, which has been rocked by disclosures about security lapses, poor discipline, weak morale and other problems that raise questions about nuclear security. It amounted to the most significant expression of highlevel Pentagon concern about the nuclear force since 2008, when then-Defense Secretary Robert Gates fired the top uniformed and civilian officials in the Air Force following a series of mistakes that included an unauthorized flight of nucleararmed cruise missiles across the country. Hagel had recently said he was considering what may lay behind problems in the nuclear Air Force — many revealed by The Associated Press— but his chief spokesman said Thursday that the defense secretary concluded urgent remedies were needed. “To the degree there are systemic problems in the training and professional standards of the nuclear career field, the secretary wants them solved,” the spokesman, Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said. “To the degree there are gaps in our understanding or implementation of those standards, he wants them closed. And to the degree leaders have failed in their duties, he wants them held to account.” Hagel summoned top military officials to a Pentagon conference, to be held within two weeks, to “raise and address” any personnel problems infesting the nuclear force, and he ordered an “action plan” be written within 60 days to explore nuclear force personnel issues, identify remedies, and put those fixes into place quickly. Hagel said he and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff,

Huckabee: Democrats seek female votes; pitch about need for government birth control WASHINGTON — Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee told fellow Republicans on Thursday that rival Democrats were trying to win over female voters by promising them birth control and telling them “they cannot control their libido or their reproductive system without the help of the government.” Huckabee made the comment as he was making a pitch that the GOP needs to broaden its appeal and end its internal divisiveness. Huckabee, a favorite of Christian conservatives and a Fox News personality, told the Republican Party’s leaders and activists that purity tests within the party only shrink the ranks. His speech about expanding the appeal of the GOP, designed to whet the 168-member Republican National Committee’s appetite for a Huckabee 2016 campaign, won a quick rebuke from the White House over contraception. Asked about Huckabee’s comments, press secretary Jay Carney told reporters at the White House that it “sounds offensive to me and to women.” In private meetings and public speeches Huckabee has been offering a prescription for Republicans to expand their reach after losing back-to-back presidential contests. Chief among his recommendations is for the GOP to end the Republican-on-Republican fighting that has sometimes hurt his own political fortunes.

Reputed mobster pleads not guilty in 1978 Lufthansa heist featured in ‘Goodfellas’ NEW YORK — More than 30 years after hooded gunmen pulled a $6 million airport heist dramatized in the hit Martin Scorsese movie “Goodfellas,” an elderly reputed mobster was arrested at his New York City home on Thursday and charged in the robbery and a 1969 murder. Vincent Asaro, 78, was named along with his son, Jerome, and three other defendants in wide-ranging indictment alleging murder, robbery, extortion, arson and other crimes from the late 1960s through last year. The Asaros, both identified as captains in the Bonanno organized crime family, pleaded not guilty through their attorneys and were ordered held without bail at a brief appearance in federal court in Brooklyn. ­— The Associated Press

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‘Personnel failures within this force threaten to jeopardize the trust the American people have placed in us to keep our nuclear weapons safe and secure.’ — Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, will host the nuclear summit. The Pentagon chief also said he would assemble a small group of outsiders with expertise in the nuclear field to conduct a broader review of the U.S. nuclear force, with a focus on personnel issues, and to recommend changes “that would help ensure the continued safety, security and effectiveness of our nuclear forces.” “Personnel failures within this force threaten to jeopardize the trust the American people have placed in us to keep our nuclear weapons safe and secure,” Hagel wrote in a memo to a dozen top officials, including heads of the Air Force and Navy. Sen. Mark Udall, D-Colo., chairman of the Senate subcommittee that oversees the nation’s strategic nuclear forces, welcomed Hagel’s move. “I remain concerned by the lapses in judgment and discipline displayed by some nuclear missile launch officers in recent months, and I applaud Defense Secretary Hagel’s swift and appropriate actions to identify the root causes of those issues,” Udall said. “Our nation demands a great deal of the men and women in our nuclear enterprise for good reason.” Since May, the AP has reported that nuclear missile force officers, from the commanding officer on down, had engaged in numerous misbehaviors or lapses. Some of those included failing security tests, violating security rules like leaving the blast door open while one of two officers napped, morale so low an officer complained of “rot” in his force and a report citing worryingly high levels of

burnout. Personnel issues are important because ICBMs are kept on alert every hour of every day, and the potential for human error is ever-present. Some argue that the men and women who hold the keys to the nuclear missiles have lost some of their focus on the mission, while others say their commanders are more to blame. Not at issue, at least in the short term, is the Obama administration’s commitment to keeping the bulk of the current nuclear force, which is comprised of ballistic missile submarines, nuclear-capable bombers and the Air Force’s fleet of 450 Minuteman 3 intercontinental ballistic missiles based in silos in five states. Hagel recently reiterated his support for the nuclear force and said he is not questioning its safety. Hagel directed his concern mainly at the Air Force and its Minuteman 3 missiles, which have been the source of many of the problems the AP reported. And just last week, in a disclosure that apparently startled Hagel, the Air Force said a drug investigation that began at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont., which operates onethird of the ICBM force, led to a separate investigation of alleged cheating on proficiency tests by 34 officers who operate the missiles there. Those 34 officers had their security clearances suspended in a scandal that the commander at Malmstrom, Col. Robert W. Stanley II, told the AP in an interview last Friday had left his force “brokenhearted.” Last month an Air Force in-

AP Photo/Charles Dharapak

In this Dec. 19, 2013 file photo, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel takes questions as he briefs reporters at the Pentagon in Washington.

vestigation revealed that Maj. Gen. Michael Carey, who was commander of the nuclear missile force, had engaged in embarrassing behavior while leading a U.S. government delegation to a nuclear security exercise in Russia, including heavy drinking and cavorting with suspicious women. He had been fired in October, just days after another senior nuclear officer, Navy Vice Adm. Tim Giardina, was relieved of command at U.S. Strategic Command amid allegations linked to counterfeit gambling chips. Kirby said no single event had prompted Hagel to take action. Rather, Hagel had taken notice of a string of news reports about problems in the ICBM force, including AP reporting that “made an impact on his thinking,” Kirby said. With an eye toward avoiding further surprises, Hagel’s planned Pentagon summit meeting with top officers, as well as other actions announced Thursday, include participation by Navy officials responsible for their portion of the nuclear arsenal. The Navy has not suffered any recent reported lapses or failures within its nuclear submarine force, but Kirby said Hagel believed it would be imprudent for him not to examine the entirety of the arsenal.

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014

A-7

Michigan seeks visas to lure immigrants to Detroit By DAVID EGGERT and JEFF KAROUB Associated Press

DETROIT — Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder asked the federal government Thursday to set aside thousands of work visas for bankrupt Detroit, a bid to revive the decaying city by attracting talented immigrants who are willing to move there and stay for five years. The Republican governor has routinely touted immigration as a powerful potential force for growing Detroit’s economy, saying immigrant entrepreneurs start many small businesses and file patents at twice the rate of U.S.-born citizens. “Let’s send a message to the entire world: Detroit, Michigan, is open to the world,” Snyder said at a news conference. The proposal involves EB-2 visas, which are offered every year to legal immigrants who have advanced degrees or show exceptional ability in certain fields. But the governor’s ambitious plan faces significant hurdles: The visas are not currently allocated by region or state. And the number he is seeking — 50,000 over five years — would be a quarter of the total EB-2 visas offered. The program would require no federal financial bailout, the governor said, only the easing of immigration rules and visa limits to help fill jobs in automotive engineering, information technology, health care and life sciences. “It’s really taking up the offer of the federal government

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to say they want to help more,” Snyder said. “Isn’t this a great way that doesn’t involve largescale financial contributions from the federal government to do something dramatic in Detroit?” He said the Obama administration has “been receptive to us bringing significant ideas to them, and this would be near the top of the list.” Snyder, a first-term governor who made millions as a computer industry executive and venture capitalist, said it’s not clear whether the White House could act administratively or if such a change would require legislative action. He said he’s talking about the proposal with Michigan’s congressional delegation and plans private meetings Friday with administration officials while in Washington for a panel discussion about the economic benefits of an immigration overhaul. The governor’s proposal seemed to take officials by surprise at the State Department, which works with the Homeland Security Department to decide on visa requests. In Washington, State Department deputy spokeswoman Marie Harf told reporters Thursday that she was aware of the governor’s comments but had no immediate response. Snyder’s office has said immigrants created nearly onethird of the high-tech businesses in Michigan in the last decade, and he cited a study that found for every job that goes to an immigrant, 2.5 are created for U.S.-born citizens.

Being more welcoming to immigrants would also make the city more attractive to employers. “The point isn’t just to say, ‘Let’s have a lot of jobs created in Detroit for immigrants,’” he said. “Let’s step this up. Let’s do something that could really be a jumpstart to the continuing comeback of Michigan and Detroit.” The city, the largest in American history to file for bankruptcy, has been hollowed out by a long population decline, from 1.8 million people in its heyday of the 1950s, to about 713,000 today at the time of the 2010 census. During that time, Detroit steadily lost many of its manufacturing jobs, and huge numbers of workers fled to the suburbs. The governor is trying to

find flexibility in a waiver that allows foreign workers with a master’s degree or higher — or who demonstrate exceptional skills in science, business or art — to come to the U.S. if it’s in the “national interest.” Snyder wants to broaden the definition of national interest to apply it to Detroit, likening the concept to one already in place where foreign-born physicians can get a green card after working in an underserved area for five years. One critic of Snyder’s proposal said it appears to dismiss immigrants who have not achieved high levels of education. Even if it does not take a specific job away from native-born job-seekers, it makes immigrants “more marketable than educated current residents,” said the Rev. Horace

Sheffield III, executive director of the Detroit Association of Black Organizations. “What does that do to displace people who are born here and who don’t have the education and are already competing for scarce jobs?” Sheffield said. “The other problem is the governor only picked educated immigrants. That only pits immigrants against immigrants.” About 1 in 5 Detroit residents are without a high school diploma, according to Detroit Future City, a 2012 report that examined how the city can remake itself. Another 35 percent have diplomas, but no other kind of training. And for every 100 residents, there are only 27 jobs, the study found. Under Snyder’s plan, Detroit would be allocated 5,000 visas

in the first year, 10,000 each of the next three years and 15,000 in the fifth year. Snyder is especially keen on keeping foreign students in Michigan, many of whom come to the state to earn advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering or math, then leave. In his annual State of the State address last week, he announced a plan to join two other states in putting immigration services under a special office, as well as a separate initiative to make Michigan the second state to run a regional visa program to attract immigrant investors for development projects. Frank Venegas is chief executive and chairman of the Ideal Group, a family-owned manufacturing and construction company where the governor made Thursday’s announcement.

Government panel urges end to phone data spying By STEPHEN BRAUN Associated Press

WASHINGTON — A government review panel warned Thursday that the National Security Agency’s daily collection of Americans’ phone records is illegal and recommended that President Barack Obama abandon the program and destroy the hundreds of millions of phone records it has already collected. The recommendations by the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board go further than Obama is willing to accept and increase pressure on Congress to make changes. The panel’s 234-page report included dissents from two of the board’s five members — former Bush administration

national security lawyers who recommended that the government keep collecting the phone records. The board described key parts of its report to Obama this month before he announced his plans last week to change the government’s surveillance activities. In that speech, Obama said the bulk phone collection program would continue for the time being. He directed the Justice Department and intelligence officials to find ways to end the government’s control over the phone data. He also insisting on close supervision by a secretive federal intelligence court and reducing the breadth of phone records the NSA can investigate. Phone companies have said they do not want to take responsibility for overseeing the data under standards

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set by the NSA. In addition to concluding that the daily collection of phone records was illegal, the board also determined that the practice was ineffective. “We have not identified a single instance involving a threat to the United States in which the program made a concrete difference in the outcome of a counterterrorism investigation,” it said, and added, “We are aware of no instance in which the program directly contributed to the discovery of a previously unknown terrorist plot or the disruption of a terrorist attack.” It said the NSA should instead seek individual records relevant to terror cases directly from phone service providers under existing laws.


A-8 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014

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World

South Sudan, rebels sign cease-fire By ELIAS MESERET and JASON STRAZIUSO Associated Press

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — South Sudan’s government and rebels signed a cease-fire deal Thursday that leaders hope will put a pause to five weeks of warfare that has killed thousands of soldiers and civilians. The peace deal represents the first real progress since political friction turned violent Dec. 15, fueling countrywide battles with ethnic overtones. But questions were immediately raised about whether all fighters in South Sudan would abide by the agreement, and how long others would follow it. The military spokesman for South Sudan cautioned that a group of rebel fighters from the former vice president’s Nuer ethnic group — thousands of armed youths known as the “White Army” — may not want peace. “Riek Machar has been using that force to fight the SPLA, so we have to see what will happen,” said Col. Philip Aguer, using the acronym for South Sudan’s military. “War is not good for anybody, especially war fought for power of a political position,” Aguer continued. “Civilians, innocents are dying, so it is good for the people of South Sudan to have peace.” Nhail Deng Nhail, the head of South Sudan’s negotiating team, said his side is worried that since many on the rebel side are civilians who took up arms, “it may become difficult to follow the cease-fire since they are not militarily disciplined.” President Barack Obama welcomed the deal — technically called a cessation of hostilities — and described it as a “first critical step toward building a lasting peace.” In a statement, he called

on South Sudan’s leaders to implement it fully and start a political dialogue to resolve the conflict’s causes. He said it was critical that political detainees currently held by South Sudan’s government fully participate. Obama said “those working for a more peaceful, democratic, unified South Sudan will continue to have a steady partner in the United States of America.” The U.N. Security Council also issued a statement welcoming the cease-fire, condemning violent attacks on civilians and U.N. bases in South Sudan and demanding accountability. In a separate statement, a U.N. spokesman said the U.N. secretary-general called on all parties to “immediately implement this agreement” and called for freedom of movement for mission and aid workers and human rights monitors. Talks are scheduled to resume in early February, but a sore point between the sides remains. Machar’s side has been pushing to get 11 top former government leaders released from prison. President Salva Kiir has said the 11 will be subjected to South Sudan’s judicial process. The top negotiator for Machar’s side, Taban Deng Gai, a general in South Sudan’s army before he defected, said late Thursday that talks would not continue if the government does not release the 11 detain-

ees. South Sudan’s information minister, Michael Makuel Lueth, said the detainee issue has nothing to do with the cessation of hostilities agreement. The United States helped broker talks that saw South Sudan end its civil war with Sudan in 2005 and then gain independence in 2011. Tepid progress by the world’s newest country — and one of the globe’s poorest — has been turned upside down. An estimated half million residents have fled their homes

because of the fighting, which has often pitted Kiir’s Dinkaled government and military against Nuer fighters backing Machar. The U.N. has warned of atrocities committed by both sides on the battlefield. The fighting has imperiled South Sudan’s oil industry, after technical workers fled and rebel fighters took control of the fields for some time. The U.N. on Thursday said it is protecting 76,000 civilians

at eight bases in South Sudan. The U.N. mission has received reports of fighting continuing in multiple locations in the country. The aid group World Vision said the deal “could mean we finally have access to areas where children are in desperate need and have been trapped by the violence and cut off from aid.” The Enough Project, a U.S.based advocacy group that works on Central Africa issues, said

Thursday’s deal is only the first step on a long road to a durable peace. The group said it was “far from guaranteed” that all combatants would lay down arms. “If an inclusive peace process is not constructed that seeks to address root causes, the conflict will continue, with deadly consequences,” said John Prendergast, the group’s co-founder. His group called for an inclusive dialogue, a commitment to accountability and security sector reform.

Ukraine opposition urges continued cease-fire MARIA DANILOVA and YURAS KARMANAU Associated Press

KIEV, Ukraine — A top opposition leader on Thursday urged protesters to maintain a shaky cease-fire with police after at least two demonstrators were killed in clashes this week, but some in the crowd appeared defiant, jeering and chanting “revolution” and “shame.” Emerging from hours-long talks with President Viktor Yanukovych, opposition leader Oleh Tyahnybok asked demonstrators in Kiev for several more days of a truce, saying the president has agreed to ensure the release of dozens of detained protesters and stop further detentions. But other opposition leaders offered mixed reports on the outcome of the meeting, with Vitali Klitschko saying negotiations had brought little result. He and Tyanhnybok were booed at the barricades by angry demonstrators and

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the atmosphere appeared tense. “We are not going to sit and wait for nobody-knows-what,” said ski maskwearing protester Andriy Pilkevich, who was building barricades near police lines from giant bags of ice. “Those who want to win, must fight.” Interior Minster Vitali Zakharchenko issued a statement guaranteeing that police would not take action against the large protest camp on Independence Square, known as the Maidan. He also called on the police to exercise calm and not react to provocations. The developments came as hundreds of enraged protesters in several regions in western Ukraine, where Yanukvoych has little support, seized government offices and forced one governor loyal to Yanukovych to resign. At least two people were killed by gunfire at the site of clashes in Kiev on Wednesday. Demonstrators had pelted riot police with barrages of stones and set

police buses on fire, while the officers responded with rubber bullets, tear gas and stun grenades. Opposition leaders had offered a Thursday evening deadline for the government to make concessions or face renewed clashes. Protesters had quenched barricades that had been set on fire, but lit them again during the evening. Although one opposition leader, Arseniy Yatsenyuk, said after the talks that “there is a really good chance” to stop the bloodshed, Klitschko was more downbeat. “The only thing we were able to achieve was not much,” a grim Klitschko told the crowd. He urged protesters to refrain from violence and continue peaceful protests to avoid further bloodshed. “I am afraid, yes, I am afraid of human losses,” Klitschko said. “We will be widening the territory of the Maidan further until these guys start reckoning with us.

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014

A-9

UN: Mobs kill more than 40 Muslims in Myanmar By ROBIN McDOWELL Associated Press

YANGON, Myanmar — At least 48 Muslims were killed when Buddhist mobs attacked a village in an isolated corner of western Myanmar earlier this month, the United Nations said Thursday, calling on the government to carry out a swift, impartial investigation and to hold those responsible accountable. Presidential spokesman Ye Htut, who has vehemently denied reports of a massacre, said he “strongly objects” to the U.N. claims. The facts and figures, he said, are “totally wrong.” Myanmar, a predominantly Buddhist nation of 60 million people, has been grappling with sectarian violence since June 2012. The incident in Du Char Yar

Tan, a village in Northern Rakhine state, appears to be the deadliest in a year, and would bring the total number killed nationwide to more than 280, most of them Muslims. Another 250,000 people have fled their homes. Northern Rakhine — home to 80 percent of the country’s 1 million long-persecuted Muslim Rohingya population — runs along the Bay of Bengal and is cut off from the rest of the country by a mountain range. It is off-limits to foreign journalists and humanitarian aid workers have limited access, adding to the difficulties of confirming details about the violence, which flared more than a week ago. But evidence of a massacre, first reported by The Associated Press, has been steadily mounting. The U.N. High Commis-

sioner for Human Rights, Navi Pillay, said she had received credible information that eight Rohingya Muslim men were attacked and killed in Du Chee Yar Tan village by local Rakhine on Jan 9. This was followed by a clash on Jan. 13 in the same village, following the reported kidnapping and killing of a police sergeant by Rohingya residents, according to witnesses and rights groups. That triggered a security crackdown. Most Rohingya men and boys — who typically flee when soldiers and police are thought to be approaching, because it is they who usually bear the brunt of abuses — fled the village in fear, leaving behind mostly women and children. Police did nothing to stop revengeseeking a Buddhist mob that entered later that night with

knives, sticks and swords, witnesses and rights groups said. Pillay said the U.N. believes at least 40 Rohingya Muslim men, women and children were killed, bringing the total to at least 48. “I deplore the loss of life in Du Chee Yar Tan and call on the authorities to carry out a full, prompt and impartial investigation and ensure that victims and their families receive justice,” she said. “By responding to these incidents quickly and decisively, the government has an opportunity to show transparency and accountability, which will strengthen democracy and the rule of law in Myanmar.” The village has been emptied and sealed off since the massacre. Matthew Smith, executive director of the Thailand-based

rights group, Fortify Rights, called on the government to give humanitarian workers, independent observers and journalists unfettered access to the area. He said hundreds are still in hiding and may need help. He also called for an end to mass arrests, saying in the hours that followed the killings, riot police started rounding up all male Rohingya, including children over the age of 10, in surrounding areas. “These arbitrary detentions broaden the scope of the human rights violations in the area and should be immediately brought to an end,” Smith said. “There needs to be accountability for this wave of horrific violence ... but mass arrests of Muslim men and boys are not the way.” The Myanmar government has repeatedly denied that any violence took place in the area,

apart from the death of the police sergeant and an alleged attack by Rohingya Muslims on police. Statements have appeared almost daily in the staterun media and government websites. A statement published on the Ministry of Information website on Thursday said Chief Minister of Rakhine state Hla Maung Tin visited the area on Wednesday and told people about “false news published and aired by foreign media that children and women were killed in the violence.” Officials with the U.N. accompanied the government delegation, but did not comment on that trip. There are around 1 million Rohingya in Myanmar. The United Nations has called them one of the most persecuted minorities in the world.

Central African Republic leader sworn in amid looting By HIPPOLYTE MARBOUA and KRISTA LARSON Associated Press

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BANGUI, Central African Republic — Interim President Catherine Samba-Panza urged fighters to put down their arms as she took the oath of office Thursday, even as looters pillaged Muslim neighborhoods and sectarian tensions escalated in the anarchic Central African Republic. Samba-Panza, the nation’s first female leader, was sworn in at a ceremony days after being chosen by a national transitional council. The rebel leader behind the March 2013 coup stepped aside nearly two weeks ago under mounting international criticism of his inability to control his fighters and stem the violence. In her inaugural address, Samba-Panza urged both the Muslim fighters behind the coup and the Christian militiamen who rose up in opposition to support peace. “I strongly call on the fighters to show patriotism in putting down their weapons,” she said. “The ongoing disorder in

the country will no longer be tolerated.” Central African Republic has been wracked by sectarian violence for months, with more than 1,000 people killed in Bangui over the course of several days in December alone. Nearly 1 million people have fled their homes, with 100,000 of them living in and around the Bangui airport being guarded by French soldiers. U.N. officials have warned that the crisis is at high risk of escalating into a genocide, driven by fighting between Christian and Muslim communities in the country with a history of coups and dictatorship. Christian Bernis Latakpi, 24, a university student, said he hoped that Samba-Panza, who has been mayor of Bangui since June, would bring much-needed reconciliation after months of bloodshed. “Since independence, men have always run the country and they have failed at the job,” he said. “We’re looking to her to quickly bring security and to reunite our Muslim and Christian brothers. Because the Muslim Central Africans — they were

born here, grew up here and we can’t disown them. Now it’s up to the mother to reconcile these different communities.” Yet even in the hours leading up to her inauguration, tensions flared across Bangui. Hundreds of Christians went on a rampage Wednesday, looting and setting fire to Muslim-owned homes and businesses and threatening to go on a killing spree. Rwandan peacekeepers and French forces intervened late Wednesday to rescue about 30 Muslims trapped inside their homes by marauding gangs in the PK13 district of Bangui, witnesses said. The help arrived after international human rights activists pleaded for help for the families. “If these people are not evacuated within the next hour, they will be dead tomorrow. As soon as we leave they will be killed,” urged Peter Bouckaert, emergency director at Human Rights Watch. As night fell, French forces provided a truck to take the family and their few belongings to a nearby refugee camp of Muslims under international protection. Muslim civilians have come

under growing threat following the 10-month rule of coup leader Michel Djotodia and his mostly Muslim fighters who were blamed for scores of atrocities against the predominantly Christian population.

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A Christian militia launched a coup attempt last month that unleashed bloodshed. Djotodia finally surrendered power about two weeks ago. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry has welcomed Samba-

Panza’s selection, saying “she has a unique opportunity to advance the political transition process, bring all the parties together to end the violence, and move her country toward elections not later than February 2015.”


A-10 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014

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Religion

Living a happier and healthier life

percieve that it is falling out of fashion to make new year resolutions and this late in the first month of the new year if you have made a resolution, you might be already struggling to keep it. Losing weight, making a will, living on a budget, reading more or whatever, the motivation to make positive changes in our lives lies deep inside each one of us. We yearn to live happier, healthier lives. Aiding us in this desire to move in a positive direction in our lives is God Himself. Yes. He wants you to live a happier, healthier life. I don’t know if you think of God in this way, but His Word is full of instructions that would lead us to those very ends. The key is

Nor sits in the seat of the scornful; [2] But his delight is in the law of the Lord, And in His law he meditates day and night. [3] He shall be like a tree S tephen B rown Planted by the rivers of water, getting those instructions inside of us. That brings forth its fruit in its My favorite passage of scripture is season, Psalm 1. For brevity, I will only post Whose leaf also shall not wither; a portion of it, but enough that it will And whatever he does shall prosgive anyone a dose of motivation for per. moving forward on your quest for a Read that Psalm carefully. Just happier, healthier 2014. those three verses can change your Psalm 1:1-3 (NKJV) life and move you forward toward Blessed is the man your desires. Verse one, essentially Who walks not in the counsel of tells us to get good information, avoid the ungodly, ungodly, sinful and negative sources Nor stands in the path of sinners, of information. The old computer

Voices of R eligion

programmer’s saying is: “garbage in, garbage out.” Meaning of course that if we put bad information into our minds, we get bad results. Where then do we get good information? Check out verse two. Yes, the law of the Lord, otherwise known as the Bible, is that very source of good information for living a happier, healthier life. Not far away in Psalm 19 is this gem: Psalm 19:7 (NKJV) The law of the Lord is perfect, converting the soul; The testimony of the Lord is sure, making wise the simple; All of this reading and meditating results in verse three of Psalm 1. What a beautiful picture. If I

was a tree, being planted by a river would be my choice. What a place to grow strong and healthy. I also especially love that last line: “… and whatever he does shall prosper.” Wow. Our happier, healthier life can come from what we discover in the Bible. As we move forward through 2014, I hope Psalm 1 might be an outline for your growing happier and healthier. If you failed to live up to your resolutions last year, partner up with the Bible to see yourself make that progress you so deeply desire. Rev. Stephen S. Brown is Pastor at the Kenai New Life Assembly of God.

titled “If you want to walk on water, you’ve got to get out of the wards. Beginning Sunday, the club will meet at Kenai Middle boat” on Thursdays at noon through Feb. 13. For more informa- School from 5:25-7:15 p.m. Use the back doors. tion call Carole at 283-7772 or the church at 283-7672. To register or for more information, call 283-4781 or visit www.kenaicalvary.org.

Church Briefs

Community invited to participate in Souper Bowl of Caring

Submitted photo

The group Veritas will perform at Soldotna Bible Chapel.

Soldotna Bible Chapel to host singing group Soldotna Bible Chapel will be hosting Veritas, a men’ singing group, at 7 p.m. Saturday. Their style is fashioned from a fusion of artistic excellence, creative pursuit, and a performance that promises to inspire an audience of any distinction! Come be a part of an evening that will comfort, encourage, and challenge you to fall in love with a God who cares deeply for you. Soldotna Bible Chapel is located at 300 W. Marydale in Soldotna.

The Kenai Peninsula Food Bank invites you to participate in the Souper Bowl of Caring. This event is a national movement of young people working to fight hunger and poverty in their own communities around the time of the Super Bowl football game. In the weeks leading up to or on Super Bowl Sunday, young people take up a collection (many use a soup pot), asking for one dollar or one item of food for people in need. They give 100 percent of their donation directly to the local hunger-relief charity of their choice. In Romans 12:13 we are told: Share with God’s people who are in need. Practice hospitality. Many local congregations certainly obey that command. The Souper Bowl of Caring most often benefits local food banks and soup kitchens, but world hunger organizations, denominational missions and other international ministries have also been recipients of Souper Bowl of Caring dollars. Collections can go to the church’s feeding program or the Kenai Peninsula Food Bank. For resource information, please go to http:// www.souperbowl.org/page_navs/74/Resources.

Food Pantry open weekly The Soldotna Food Pantry is open every Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. for residents in our community who may be experiencing food shortages. The Food Pantry is located at the Soldotna United Methodist Church at 158 South Binkley Street. Non-perishable food items or monetary donations may be dropped off at the church Tuesdays 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. or 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. and Sundays 9 a.m. to 12 noon. Thank you for your support.

Clothes 4 U at First Baptist Church First Baptist Church Soldotna, located at 159 S. Binkley Street, is re-opening its Clothes 4 U program. It is open on the second and fourth Saturday of each month from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. All clothing and shoes are free to the public.

United Methodist Church provides food pantry

The Kenai United Methodist Church provides a food pantry for those in need every Monday from noon to 3:00 p.m. The Methodist Church is located on the Kenai Spur Highway next Sterling church hosts AWANA to the Boys and Girls Club. The entrance to the Food Pantry is Sterling Baptist Church is starting an AWANA program through the side door. The Pantry closes for holidays. For more information contact the church office at 283-7868 this year, every Wednesday from 6-8 p.m. The club will meet or email kumcalaska@gmail.com. at Sterling Baptist Church. Children 3 years old through sixth grade are welcome. Call Sterling Baptist for more information at 262-4711. Clothes Quarters open weekly

Clothes Quarters at Our Lady of the Angels Church is open every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., and the first Calvary Baptist Church in Kenai is offering AWANA for Saturday of every month from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more kids ages 3 through 6th grade. AWANA (www.awana.org) is information, call 907-283-4555. First Baptist Church starts Bible study an international kids club. Each week, participants will memoThe First Baptist Church of Kenai is hosting a Bible study rize Bible verses, play games, hear Bible lessons, and earn reSubmit church news to news@peninsulaclarion.com.

Calvary Baptist hosts AWANA

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014

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A-12 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014

. . . Games Continued from page A-1

year, it’ll be nice and slick.” The winter games offer free noon and 4 p.m. meals for attendees and fireworks at 5:30 p.m. just outside of the sports complex. The Peninsula Winter Games are designed to “get kids active in the winter time so you don’t have to get cabin fever and sit inside all winter,” Yeager said. Last year, volunteers with the winter games saw at least 800 kids, she said. The unseasonably warm weather is also threatening another Kenai Peninsula winter staple, the Tustumena 200 sled dog race — which is scheduled to begin Feb. 1. Yeager said organizers of that race would make the call early next week on whether it was feasible. Despite the weather, Yeager said she hoped the community would celebrate the weekend of free events. “We really want to encourage people to come out and just enjoy the winter, celebrate winter with us,” she said.

Hockey Association tournament start today and run through Sunday, the busiest afternoon will be Saturday when the winter games open from noon to 4 p.m. in the Soldotna Regional Sports Complex. “There’s a little bit of a change this year with the weather being really warm,” said January Yeager, project coordinator for the Soldotna Chamber of Commerce. “We’re not actually going to be having the snowmachine rides and the kicksled races. It’s kind of hard to do kicksled races on the asphalt.” However, inside the sports complex, kids can attend an ice cream social, a Monopoly tournament, a scavenger hunt called the “Amazing Race,” a cookie decorating activity and practice their archery. Yeager said pine cone crafts, ice bowling and a bounce house would also be available. “We also have the ice slide,” Reach Rashah McChesney she said. “It just won’t be as at rashah.mcchesney@peninbig. It’ll just be really fast this sulaclarion.com.

. . . Flood Continued from page A-1

said. Clare Swan said she and her husband Van Swan fared better than many of their neighbors and friends in the area. However, the couple did have standing water in their basement for more than a month. Clare Swan said they don’t know for sure the extent of the damage to their home. “We’re worried about mold,” she said. … “We’ve never had that before. … That would mean replacing the insulation and cleaning it up downstairs in our basement.” A memo from Scott Walden, director of the Office of Emergency Management at the borough, was provided at the Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly meeting Tuesday. The Roads Service Area will continue to monitor problem areas identified last fall and clear ice and snow from existing ditches to make sure natural flow isn’t impeded, he wrote. In February or March, the borough plans to hold a public meeting about actions, planning, property owner considerations and assistance programs, according to the memo.

Senate leader: Same-sex marriage ‘inevitable’ By BECKY BOHRER Associated Press

JUNEAU — Senate Minority Leader Hollis French said Thursday the legalization of same-sex marriage across the country seems inevitable. “If you can’t see it coming, your eyes are closed,” he said. Over the last year, the U.S. Supreme Court has struck down a provision of the federal Defense of Marriage Act that prevented legally married same-sex couples from receiving a range of federal benefits. States like Hawaii and Illinois

Around Alaska Treadwell: Life begins at conception JUNEAU — Alaska U.S. Senate candidate Mead Treadwell says life begins at conception. Treadwell released a statement Wednesday marking the anniversary of the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that legalized abortion. Treadwell is one of the candidates seeking the GOP nomination for Senate. Another of those candidates, Joe Miller, also released a statement saying he too believes life begins at conception.

App helps rescuers find lost Nevada man KETCHIKAN — A 77-year-old Nevada man who became

a day. Everyday they check the leach field and the septic as well as their basement and sump pump. “After this long we kind of forget that the stuff we’re doing is differently because it’s become part of daily life,” Diana Bartelds said. She said their electric bill is about three times higher than previous years at this time because they had to run their pump and dehumidifier all day. Around Christmas they stopped pumping floodwater. Diana Bartelds said the recent warmer temperatures have her concerned about what will happen with the frozen floodwaters blanketed with snow when thawing occurs. “We just don’t know when the ground thaws underneath it and when the ditches thaw, are we all in trouble again,” she said. Karluk Avenue resident Clare Swan expressed similar worries about what’s going to happen when the weather warms up this spring. “All we know for sure is Kaylee Osowski can be that we don’t have water in the reached at kaylee.osowski@ house right at the moment,” she peninsulaclarion.com.

. . . School

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partnership between the state and the Alaska seafood industry. He said people who make claims that Alaska’s fish, or fish from the Pacific Ocean, are unsafe to eat are misinformed.

also that it can affect people’s decisions on what they eat.” Tyson Fick, spokesman for Continued from page A-1 the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute, said he has the same lying on data and analyses from concerns. ASMI is a marketing other coastal states, British Columbia and federal agencies like the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency to determine the safety of Alaska’s fish. The Food and Drug Administration says that it hasn’t found any evidence to-date that dangerous levels of radionuclides are in the U.S. food supply. The EPA also says their monitoring shows no dangerous level of radiation in Pacific fish. A report from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found radiation levels far below what would pose a health risk in Pacific bluefin tuna spawned off the coast of Japan around the time of the Fukushima Daiichi incident. Still, Sen. Cathy Giessel, R-Anchorage, said her constituents have come to her with concerns. Hartig said in an interview that the department tests fish regularly, just not for radiation. “We try to test for things that we think present real risk, like mercury,” Hartig said. With more coastline than the continental United States, Hartig said it would be too expensive for the state to undertake a testing program that would be “statistically valid.” He said that people who claim that Alaska’s seafood is unsafe are mostly people from Outside. He said he’s concerned that people are being misinformed and aren’t taking into consideration scientific research. “Fish in Alaska is a very important food resource; it’s a very healthy food resource,” Hartig said. “So, when I see things thrown out there, it worries me that not only will it affect our fisheries markets but

legalized same-sex marriage, and state constitutional bans in Utah and Oklahoma have been struck down by federal courts, though appeals are pending or expected. Virginia’s attorney general said Thursday that he believes that state’s ban on same-sex marriage is unconstitutional and would support efforts to fight it. French said he believed the U.S. Supreme Court would ultimately take up the issue and find denying an adult the right to marry whomever he or she wants violates the equal protec-

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nell said real education reform, to him, means more opportunity for kids and more parental choice in options for kids. He said that comes in a range of forms. His bill, in addition to a proposed formula increase for each of the next three years, would allow for improved access to charter schools and address residential school funding, new career technical opportunities and testing out of classes for course credit, Parnell said. The bill also would propose eliminating the high school exit exam and replacing it with the ACT, SAT or WorkKeys skills test, he said. Parnell said he had not settled on the proposed level of funding increase in the student formula. In his speech, Parnell called on legislators to debate and send to voters a proposed constitutional amendment that would strike a provision in Alaska’s Constitution that prohibits the

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state from using public funds for the direct benefit of private and religious schools. Such a proposal has been pending in the Legislature, with some supporters seeing it as a way of providing parents with more educational options for their kids. Critics fear it could take money away from the public education system. Parnell said passage of the proposed amendment isn’t a requirement for him to support a funding increase. But he said it becomes part of the negotiation once lawmakers move away from his proposal. The governor said he expected that separate legislation would have to be passed should an amendment be successful, spelling out the terms of how the amendment would be implemented. Parnell has been reluctant to support an increase in the base-

tion clause. He called it an exciting legal development. Alaska voters in 1998 approved a state constitutional amendment defining marriage as being between a man and a woman. Sen. Berta Gardner, D-Anchorage, said she thinks that will change in time. She said she is committed, in the meantime, to removing barriers and discrimination “so that people can live their lives and be measured on what they contribute and how they live their lives rather than who they love.” Gardner has in-

troduced legislation that would prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation, or gender identity or expression. Gov. Sean Parnell was asked in December if he believed the state needed to revisit the ban on same-sex marriage given developments around the country. He said he didn’t think so. He said at the time that the state extended certain benefits offered to spouses of public employees to same-sex domestic partners after the Alaska Supreme Court ordered it, and the state honors and respects each citizen.

lost on a hike in southeast Alaska was found after authorities helped him download a locator app on his cellphone, rescuers said. Ed Leckey had started out on a short hike at Frog Pond Trail in the Ketchikan area Monday afternoon. But Leckey became lost after he turned off the main trail, the Ketchikan Daily News reported. Leckey called Alaska State Troopers that evening, but cellphone contact was intermittent, according to searchers. Also, concern for his phone battery life prompted a request that he shut it off and follow a communication schedule, Ketchikan Volunteer Rescue Squad chief Jerry Kiffer said. No trace of Leckey was found by 10 p.m., so a trooper dispatcher helped Leckey activate a GPS on his phone. That provided his coordinates, and Leckey was able to relay his position, with just 12 percent of the battery life remaining. — The Associated Press

student allocation in the past, in part citing the need to see greater results. He said his hope in couching his proposal the way he has is to move both sides of the funding debate from their entrenched positions and begin a discussion. But any funding increase has to be tied to “more educational opportunity for our kids,” Parnell said. The governor said it comes down to this: “I want to see more results for our kids and more results for the people’s money. I understand that the other side sees the BSA increase as the be-all end-all to that. So I’m willing to step forward and say, I will accept something that I did not accept before, which is a way of funding, assuming we can get more opportunity, more access for our kids.” Gardner told reporters earlier that she took exception to any suggestion that legisla-

tors or educators believed that money alone solved problems in education. She said inflationproofing and adequately funding schools is a component of any successful program. She also said that data show quality preschool programs, class sizes, high standards and high quality teachers all influence student success. Gardner said she would never support using state money for private or religious schools and said the governor’s call to allow voters to decide on any constitutional changes seemed a “hollow slogan.” She said the Legislature doesn’t always hold to what the public decides, when they do weigh in on issues through the initiative process. “I believe we’re elected to do this, and there are some things that are just right and some things wrong,” she said.

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Snowmobiler Moore wins for his brother Soldotna’s Davis places 6th in snowmobile freestyle contest at Winter X Games PAT GRAHAM AP Sports Writer

ASPEN, Colo. — Snowmobiler Colten Moore reached toward the sky and stuck three fingers into the air on one hand and his index finger up on the other. That number — “31” — belonged to his brother, Caleb. As far as Colten is concerned, No. 31 picked up another victory Thursday night. Returning to Aspen a year after his older brother’s death, Colten rode to victory in the freestyle contest during a touching, emotional evening at what used to be one of the Winter X Games’ most raucous events. “I wanted to come out here and dominate for him. Not only ride for him but ride with him,” said Colten, whose score of 91.33 on the first run held up and allowed him to take a stress-free victory lap on his final pass. Cory Davis of Soldotna competed in

the event and finished sixth. Davis had a 77.00 on his first run and a 81.66 on his second run. Davis also will compete in the Snowmobile Long Jump Final on Saturday. Colten said he could feel the presence of his brother. “I knew he was with me all night and just helping me be smooth and push hard. To come here and get gold for him, I couldn’t ask for anything more.” About 60 family and friends, many from the Moores’ hometown of Krum, Texas, were on hand to watch Colten perform on a clear, crisp winter night in Colorado. They waved Texas flags and hollered whenever he landed tricks. Caleb died Jan. 31 from injuries he sustained in a crash during the snowmobile competition. Safety measures were tightened, and ESPN, which runs the X Games, decided to stick with the event. After some soul searching, Colten also decided he’d return, too. “I just knew he’d be riding with me

every time I go ride,” Colten said. “He’s there with me and, if I tried to quit and he could, he would smack me.” Moore’s father, Wade, watched with tears in his eyes. “It’s tough. Harder to watch this year,” Wade said. “But his confidence is up. He just gets better and better. He just wanted to ride. That’s what he likes doing. He has fun doing it. That’s what him and his brother did. They’re still doing it together. I promise they are.” The night before the race, Colten said everywhere he looks at Winter X, he sees little reminders of his older brother. Some are subtle — Caleb’s number, 31, on a parking lot sign or a building — and some are heartfelt — Texas-shaped stickers plastered on windows and benches that read, “Ride in Peace.” Returning to this venue a year after his brother’s death hasn’t been difficult for Colten. No, it’s actually beneficial, because here, riding his snowmobile, he feels

closest to Caleb. “I’m riding better than I’ve ridden in a long time,” said Colten, who earned his second gold medal in the event. “I know it’s him helping me out.” Caleb crashed on the night of Jan. 24 while attempting a backflip. His machine caught the lip of the landing area, sending him flying over the handlebars. The 450-pound sled rolled over him. Later that evening, Colten wiped out, too, separating his pelvis. At first, it appeared Colten might have sustained the more serious injury, especially since Caleb walked off with help from his father after suffering a concussion. Soon after, Caleb’s condition worsened. He developed bleeding around his heart and was flown to a hospital in Grand Junction for surgery. He died a week later from internal injuries he suffered in the crash, the first fatality in X Games history. “I just continue to push on,” the

24-year-old Colten said. After taking his victory lap Thursday night, Colten drove his snowmobile to the peak of a slope and parked it. He climbed off and looked up toward the sky. “I was thinking about my brother,” explained Colten, who covered his snowmobile in decals to honor his brother and plans to place this gold medal next to a picture of Caleb. “To come here, do what we always came here to do — dominate — I know he would be super pumped.” Colten hardly held back on his winning tricks, getting huge air on every pass. It’s a run he knew his brother would’ve appreciated. “And then, he’d also go out there and try to beat me,” Colten said. His mom, Michele, could hardly hold back tears as she posed next to her son for pictures in the victory celebration. “Caleb was there with him every step of the way,” she said.

Heat cruise past Lakers By The Associated Press

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MIAMI — It’s not common for Chris Bosh to put up a big number of shots. Maybe the Miami Heat should make it happen more often. Bosh made his final eight shots on the way to a 31-point night, LeBron James added 27 points and 13 rebounds and the Heat never trailed in a 109-102 victory over the Los Angeles Lakers on Thursday. Bosh was 15 for 22 from the field, 9 for 10 after halftime and 5 for 5 in the final quarter, when the Lakers made runs but never got the lead. “We know what he’s capable of doing,” James said. “When he’s got his midrange working like that he’s pretty dangerous. And that rim looked mighty big for him tonight.” Mario Chalmers and Norris Cole each finished with 11 points to help the Heat beat the Lakers for the eighth time in their last nine meetings. Ray Allen added 10, and Miami shot 58 percent and outrebounded the Lakers 48-35.

Jodie Meeks and Pau Gasol each scored 22 points for the Lakers, who lost for the 14th time in their last 17 outings. Nick Young added 19 points — needing 20 shots to do it — for Los Angeles, which nearly came all the way back from a 16-point second-half deficit. TRAIL BLAZERS 110, NUGGETS 105 PORTLAND, Ore. — LaMarcus Aldridge had a career-high 44 points and 13 rebounds, and Portland rallied to beat Denver. Wesley Matthews added 24 points for the Blazers, who snapped a two-game losing streak coming off a 2-2 road trip. The Blazers have not lost three straight this season. Wilson Chandler had 18 points for Denver, which has lost four of their last five games after a fivegame winning streak. The Blazers trailed by as many as 15 points in the third quarter before pulling to 91-90 on Matthews’ turnaround fadeaway before taking the lead on his 15-foot jumper. The teams wrestled for control, but Aldridge’s jumper put Portland up a 102-99 with 3:08 left.

Fans vote for 4 1st-time starters BRIAN MAHONEY AP Basketball Writer

NEW YORK — Stephen Curry, Kevin Love, Paul George and Kyrie Irving were voted NBA All-Stars Thursday, putting four first-time starters in the Feb. 16 game in New Orleans. Kobe Bryant was elected by fans to his 16th All-Star game, second-most in NBA history, but this one is shaping up as a kids’ game. Curry, perhaps the biggest snub last season, will join him in the Western Conference backcourt. Love passed Dwight Howard in the final days of voting and will start in the frontcourt along with Oklahoma City’s Kevin Durant and the Clippers’ Blake Griffin. LeBron James was the leading vote-getter with 1.4 million and Miami teammate Dwyane Wade also was voted in Thursday. George, who has led Indiana to the league’s best record, and New York’s Carmelo Anthony are the other East forwards, and

Irving will start at guard. Bryant has been limited to just six games this season because of injuries and will be out until at least early next month, but remains one of the league’s most popular players with fans. Only Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, with 19, was selected to more All-Star games. But even Bryant could finish only second to Curry among West guards, a remarkable turnaround for the Golden State sharpshooter. He was the highest-scoring player not chosen last year, but moved past the Clippers’ Chris Paul in the third returns of balloting, then passed Bryant in the final days to finish with more than a million votes and become the Warriors’ first All-Star starter since Latrell Sprewell in 1995. Love also made a late move to surge into the top three, finishing about 8,000 votes ahead of Houston center Dwight Howard to become Minnesota’s first AllStar starter since Kevin Garnett in 2007.

Photos by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion

Cook Inlet Academy’s Nicole Moffis maneuvers her way in for a shot against Kodiak on Thursday in Soldotna.

Kodiak JV girls top Eagles By JOEY KLECKA Peninsula Clarion

The Cook Inlet Academy girls came up short in a 34-25 nonconference loss to the Kodiak JV hoops squad Thursday night at Cook Inlet Academy in Soldotna. Led by the sharpshooting of senior Nicole Moffis, the Eagles managed to stay within reach of the Bears after a sluggish start, but Kodiak took control and distanced itself in the final minute of the game. The loss drops CIA to a 3-3 overall record. “I was just trying to keep them focused on rebounding, boxing out,” said CIA coach Rustin Hitchcock. “(Kodiak is) a 4A team, and I know it’s their JV team but they had experience to go up against.” CIA also was hampered by the absence of Madison Orth, a regular starter for the team. Hitchcock said Orth was suffering from back spasms. Defense was the name of the game early on, as a 6-1 score after one quarter would indicate. It wasn’t until Ash-

leigh Hammond threw up a layup early in the second quarter that CIA would get a bucket. Sure enough, the Eagles offense began to find a rhythm, hitting three straight shots to tie the score up at 12 apiece with 1 minute, 5 seconds, left in the first half. However, once the offense got going, the defense began to struggle. Kodiak managed two easy layups in the final 46 seconds to distance itself once again. The same problems struck in the second half — Moffis hit consecutive 3-pointers midway through the third quarter to bring CIA within four points of Kodiak, but the Bears answered with another layup. Moffis’ jumper with 6:34 to go in the game closed the gap to two points at 24-22, but Kodiak immediately hit a layup in transition, plus the foul. Danielle Hills’ bucket put CIA within three points of the lead with 5:03 to go, but that was the closest the Eagles Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion would get. Kodiak ended the Cook Inlet Academy’s Kendra Brush looks for an opening to See PREP, page B-4 pass during their game against Kodiak on Thursday.

Blue Jackets defeat Flyers for record 8th-straight win By The Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Matt Calvert and Brandon Dubinsky each had a goal and assist to lead the Columbus Blue Jackets to a team-record eighth-straight win — and the longest active streak in the league — with a 5-2 victory over the Philadelphia Flyers on Thursday night in the franchise’s 1,000th game. Jack Johnson, Derek MacKenzie

and Nathan Horton also scored for Anaheim as the Southern California rivals Winnipeg, handing Paul Maurice his first Kevin Shattenkirk scored the tiebreaking power-play goal early in the third period, warmed up for their meeting at Dodger loss in five games as coach of the Jets. Columbus. DUCKS 2, KINGS 1 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Patrick Maroon scored the tiebreaking goal on a wraparound late in the second period, and the Ducks beat the Kings 2-1 in the prelude to the clubs’ landmark outdoor game this weekend. Frederik Andersen made 30 saves for

Stadium on Saturday with a physical, Pavelski snapped a scoreless tie with hard-hitting meeting dominated by the 13:12 remaining when he scored his 28th Ducks’ defense. of the season and seventh in the past four games to lead the Sharks to their fifth straight win with the help of another strong SHARKS 1, JETS 0 performance from their backup goalie. SAN JOSE, Calif. — Joe Pavelski scored his 19th goal in the past 21 games BLUES 2, RANGERS 1 and Alex Stalock made 20 saves in his secNEW YORK — St. Louis defenseman ond straight shutout to help the Sharks beat C

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and the Blues got the best of the Rangers. Alexander Steen also had a goal for the Blues before leaving late in the second period with a lower-body injury. David Backes had two assists, and Jaroslav Halak made 34 saves in beating New York’s Henrik Lundqvist in a matchup of Olympic goalies. New York’s Rick Nash scored his sixth See NHL, Page B-4


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B-2 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014

Stan the Man reaches final MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — Stanislas Wawrinka backed up his upset of fourtime champion Novak Djokovic by reaching his first Grand Slam final with a 6-3, 7-6 (1), 6-7 (3), 7-6 (4) win over Tomas Berdych in the Australian Open semifinals on Thursday. Wawrinka ended a 14-match losing streak against Djokovic with a dramatic five-set, four-hour win in the quarterfinals, then followed that with a dominating performance against Berdych, the 2010 Wimbledon finalist. “I don’t know what to say. I’m speechless,” he said. “I didn’t expect to make a final in a Grand Slam — tonight it’s happening.” The eighth-seeded Wawrinka will meet the winner of Friday’s semifinal showdown between Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer, the 33rd installment of their rivalry and the first at a Grand Slam since Nadal knocked Federer out of the Australian Open at the same stage in 2012. Whoever he plays, Wawrinka will go into the final as an underdog. He has never beaten Nadal in 12 meetings, and has lost all but one of his 14 matches against his countryman, Federer. “I take the confidence from my level in general,” he said. “I know that I’m playing my best tennis.” Wawrinka has long been in Federer’s shadow as Switzerland’s less-heralded No. 2, but he’s been slowly gaining confidence in his game since narrowly losing a heartbreaking marathon match to Djokovic in

Melbourne last year. In April, he hired a new coach — Magnus Norman, a former Swedish player once ranked as high as No. 2. Since then, he’s risen to a career-high No. 8 in the rankings and reached his first Grand Slam semifinal at the U.S. Open. Now he’s taken the next step into the final of a major, where he could meet his good friend and sometime doubles partner, Federer. Wawrinka said he received a text message from Federer on Wednesday night saying he was really happy there were two Swiss players in the semifinals of a major for the first time. “I told him, ‘For you it’s normal, for me it’s not normal,’” he joked. Federer, who has reached his 11th consecutive semifinal at the Australian Open, said he’d love to see an all-Swiss final at Melbourne Park. “Hopefully he can make it. Then he can put the pressure on me,” Federer said after his quarterfinal win over Andy Murray on Wednesday. Wawrinka jumped out to the early lead against Berdych, getting the only break of the match when the seventh-seeded Czech player, looking tentative at the start, made several misses on his forehand before driving an easy overhead long. With neither player giving anything on their service games after that, Berdych was the first to crack in the crucial tiebreakers. He double-faulted twice in the third-set

tiebreaker, including on set point, and then again in the fourth-set breaker. Little separated the two players in the match — Wawrinka won total 143 points to Berdych’s 142, while they each made 49 unforced errors. The Swiss player served a little more consistently, though, facing only one break point in the match. “It’s really hard to find what could be the difference,” Berdych said. “I mean, we both play great. We play a good match. Stan was the one that just took it, and that’s it.” The women’s side also has a first-time Grand Slam finalist after Slovakia’s Dominika Cibulkova beat Agnieszka Radwanska in a 6-1, 6-2 rout in the semifinals earlier Thursday. She’ll meet Chinese No. 4-seeded Li Na, who reached her third final in four years at Melbourne Park with a 6-2, 6-4 win over 19-year-old Canadian Eugenie Bouchard. In a women’s tournament full of results, Cibulkova’s run has been the most dramatic. The diminutive Slovakian has won all but one of her matches in straight sets and only needed 70 minutes to win her first Grand Slam semifinal. “When you look at it this way, it is nice for me. I didn’t spend so much time on the court,” said Cibulkova, who also took out No. 3-seeded Maria Sharapova in the fourth round. Li, the 2011 French Open champion, was the only major winner remaining in the semis after Serena Williams, Victoria Azarenka and Sharapova all fell.

AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi

Stanislas Wawrinka of Switzerland celebrates after defeating Tomas Berdych of the Czech Republic during their semifinal at the Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne, Australia, Thursday.

Woods starts slow DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer

SAN DIEGO — The best score belonged to Stewart Cink. The best round belonged to Pat Perez. Tiger Woods didn’t come close to claiming either Thursday in the Farmers Insurance Open, where the seven-time champion failed to break par in the opening round for first time in his career. Cink ran off three straight birdies late in his round on the easier North Course at Torrey Pines for an 8-under 64. That gave him a one-shot lead over Gary Woodland, who also was on the North, which is more than 600 yards shorter. Perez was on the South Course, host of the 2008 U.S. Open and with greens so firm this year that it felt like a major. Perez had a 67, the best score on the South by two shots, and even more astounding is that he played bogey-free. The South played nearly four shots harder than the North. Woods, making his 2014 debut, failed to birdie any of the par 5s and had to settle for a 72. “Even par is not too bad, but I didn’t play the par 5s worth a darn today,” Woods said. “Obviously, that’s (tantamount) to try to get any kind of scoring on the South Course. You’ve got to take care of the par 5s because there’s not a lot of holes you can make birdie here. “Subsequently, I didn’t finish under par.” Even at eight shots behind, he wasn’t worried about a chance to win at Torrey for the ninth time — including a U.S. Open. The courses are so different than it’s difficult to gauge where anyone stands until everyone has had a crack at both courses. The weekend rounds are on the South. “I’m going to have to go out there and get it a little bit tomorrow to not be so far behind come Saturday or Sunday,” Woods said. Cink did what he was supposed to do. The rough is up on the North, too, so it was important to get the ball in play. He did that, allowing him to take on some pins. Phil Mickelson, meanwhile, felt awful. He was coping with a back locked up on him, unusual for Mickelson because he doesn’t have a history of back pain. It got so bad at one point that Mickelson thought about withdrawing from his hometown event, especially after his 4-iron on the par-5 18th at the North Course nearly went outof-bounds. Mickelson used his short game to make birdie, and then made another birdie on the next hole and he scratched out a 69. C

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014

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Manning has chance to answer critics ARNIE STAPLETON AP Pro Football Writer

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. — Peyton Manning found no need to dunk his right hand in a bucket of ice water Thursday — it was 9 degrees when the Broncos returned to their practice field for the first time since clinching a spot in next week’s Super Bowl at MetLife Stadium. “Anytime you can have ... a situation that you can simulate during practice that might be in a game, that’s always a good thing,” said Manning, his breath vaporizing as he spoke from the podium after the two-hour workout. Manning, who spent much of his career inside in Indianapolis, has prepared for some cold-weather games since coming to Denver in 2012 by soaking his right hand in ice water. He welcomed the blast of wintry weather after a relatively balmy stretch of January, which included a 63 degree Sunday afternoon when he led the Broncos past the New England Patriots for the AFC title. The knock on Manning is that for

all his greatness he crumbles in the cold and in the playoffs — he has just one championship ring in 12 previous trips to the postseason, eight of which ended in first-round exits, including last year’s double-overtime loss to Baltimore on a frigid night in Denver. Manning could take care of both of those criticisms next week when the Broncos face the Seattle Seahawks in East Rutherford, N.J., in the first outdoor Super Bowl ever held in a cold-weather city. With a win, he would be the first quarterback to lead two teams to the title. Although it’s too early for forecasters to predict what the weather will be, there’s a decent chance for freezing temperatures or snow by kickoff on the night of Feb. 2. Although Manning is 167-73 in the regular season, he’s 11-11 in the playoffs. And he’s 4-7 in games that are below freezing at kickoff, although some of those were games where he played sparingly because the Colts had already locked up playoff seeding. Others were against

New England, when the Patriots clearly had the better team. And Manning did complete 39 passes for 397 yards and four touchdowns against Tennessee last month when the temperature at kickoff in Denver was 18 degrees. If the Broncos beat the Seahawks — and they’re favored by oddsmakers for the 30th straight game — Manning will match little brother Eli’s two Super Bowl rings. Eli said Peyton doesn’t have to beat Seattle to secure his legacy, however. “I think Peyton’s already created his own legacy,” Eli said during a conference call Thursday. “He’s played at a very high level for a long period of time and he’s overcome injuries and obviously set numerous records and been on a lot of playoff teams, playing in his third Super Bowl.” Peyton’s resume is impressive: 13-time Pro Bowler, seven-time AllPro and odds-on favorite to win his fifth MVP after setting NFL records by throwing for 55 TDs and 5,447 yards. Eli does not think the cold will be

a factor in the game, either. “I don’t think this hurts or helps either team,” he said. “Peyton has been in Denver this year and played outside in a lot of cold games. I think obviously if it were to snow or be very windy, it could be a disadvantage to the Broncos, just because how much they like to throw the ball, compared to Seattle and their running game. “For the most part, it’s really going to be the best team that is going to win, whoever plays the best football that day. It’s going to come down to that and execution. The weather isn’t going to decide the game.” Although the Seahawks are more run-oriented, the Broncos do have a good 1-2 punch in running backs Knowshon Moreno, who grew up 45 minutes from the Meadowlands, and Montee Ball, who combined for 2,290 yards from scrimmage and 17 touchdowns this season. Denver safety Mike Adams, who’s also from New Jersey, scoffed at the notion that inclement weather could hurt the Broncos. “We’re talking about the Super

Bowl. I’m not worried about the cold, I promise you that,” Adams said. “Weren’t we practicing in like minus-3 degree weather here? So I’m definitely not worried about any cold weather. If anything, I’m worrying about them cancelling the game.” The NFL’s contingency plans call for the game to be played anywhere from Friday, Jan. 31, to Monday, Feb. 3, in case of a major snowstorm. Manning — who is 10-3 while wearing a glove on his throwing hand the last two seasons — and the Broncos are embracing the elements. “We practice in the cold all the time. I think we practiced indoors one time,” Denver pass-rusher Shaun Phillips said. “We’re definitely cold weather bred, and we’ll be ready for it.” Notes: K Matt Prater (illness) didn’t practice. Neither did DT Mitch Unrein (knee). RB Knowshon Moreno (ribs) was limited. AP NFL website: www.pro32. ap.org AP Sports Writer Tom Canavan contributed.

Teammates square off New Pro Bowl format means Mathis will rush QB Luck OSKAR GARCIA Associated Press

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AP Photo/Nick Ut

A hockey rink is ready at Dodger Stadium for the upcoming 2014 NHL Stadium Series hockey game in Los Angeles. The ice is seen Wednesday. The Los Angeles Kings and Anaheim Ducks will play outdoors at Dodger Stadium on Saturday.

LA ice expected to hold up GREG BEACHAM AP Sports Writer

LOS ANGELES — Dan Craig and his crew have been at Dodger Stadium from dusk to dawn every night for the past week, patiently building a sheet of NHL-quality ice in the middle of the iconic baseball field. They’re just about ready to drop the puck in sunny Southern California. The ice is solid, the fans have bought nearly every ticket, and the two local teams are eager for their historic showdown under the lights and stars. Only a few tweaks remain before the Los Angeles Kings face the Anaheim Ducks on Saturday in the NHL’s first official outdoor game in a warm-weather climate. “It’s hard not to get excited about it now that it’s almost here,” Anaheim captain Ryan Getzlaf said. “It seems like everybody is talking about it.” While the NHL raised plenty of eyebrows with the announcement of outdoor hockey in one of the nation’s hottest places, Craig has al-

ways been confident that this unorthodox game wouldn’t turn into a swim meet. The NHL’s ice specialist is working a vicious schedule this winter with preparations for six outdoor games, but he’s most excited about the chance to do the improbable in Chavez Ravine. “This is the challenge that everybody who works with me wanted to try,” Craig said. “The crew that’s in New York (for two upcoming games at Yankee Stadium) doesn’t want to be in New York. They want to be here.” Even with daytime temperatures in the 80s and abnormal humidity in Los Angeles over the past week, Craig is quietly confident about the ice sheet created by his meticulous crew and the huge refrigeration unit in the 53-foot truck beyond center field. They work at night, building and grooming more than 10,000 gallons of water into a 1¾-inch sheet that stays cool under a heat-reflecting blanket during the day. The ice is out of the sun’s reach by roughly 4 p.m. each day, and that’s when Craig’s crew goes

to work. “We are very patient with what we do,” Craig said. “Our guys aren’t getting a whole lot of sleep. I know I won’t be getting a whole lot of sleep.” Craig said he could have made NHL-quality ice just about anywhere in North America for several years now, but the league didn’t expand its outdoor exploits to a warm-weather city until expanding its series of stadium games this winter. Glycol coolant is constantly circulated from the truck and below the rink, keeping the ice temperature around 22 degrees. The outdoor temperature is likely to be in the high 50s at game time on Saturday night, which would be plenty cold enough for Craig’s purposes. “It’s a hard concept for anybody that’s not in the field to understand,” Craig said. “I’ve got two very efficient systems that we’re marrying together.” Craig and Kings executive Luc Robitaille skated on the ice Wednesday, with Robitaille pronouncing it ready to go. The Kings and Ducks will hold separate practices

at Dodger Stadium on Friday to get used to the rink’s peculiarities. The boards, benches and glass were trucked into Dodger Stadium from the Winter Classic at Ann Arbor’s Michigan Stadium, although they won’t need the heaters. The NHL is also embracing the unusual setting with a variety of amusements in the Dodger Stadium bowl — everything from a beach volleyball court and a pond to two performance stages. The game will be the NHL’s first outdoor venture west of Alberta, but it’s not the first attempt at Southwest outdoor hockey. Robitaille and the Kings played an exhibition against the New York Rangers in Las Vegas in 1991, and everything went fairly well — except for the swarm of grasshoppers that jumped onto the ice. “These guys know what they’re doing, and the ice is going to be great,” Robitaille said. “This is an incredible opportunity for these two teams to bring hockey to a new level in Southern California.”

PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii — Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck is disappointed he’s not teammates with Robert Mathis during the Pro Bowl. But the Colts linebacker says if he gets a shot at Luck during Sunday’s game, he’ll take it. “I’m going to bust him,” Mathis said Thursday after practicing for Team Rice, drawing laughs from a crowd of fans while signing autographs. Luck versus Mathis is just one of several head-to-head matchups made possible by a new Pro Bowl format modeled after fantasy sports and schoolyard pickup games. The teams were drafted by Hall of Famers Jerry Rice and Deion Sanders. Arizona wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald could line up against teammate Patrick Peterson. Chicago’s wide receiver tandem of Brandon Marshall and Alshon Jeffery might have to face off against cornerback Tim Jennings. And Kansas City quarterback Alex Smith could be sacked by linebacker Tamba Hali or defensive tackle Dontari Poe, or intercepted by safety Eric Berry. Nearly 30 of 88 players in the Pro Bowl have a reasonable chance of facing their NFL teammates on Sunday during the game at Aloha Stadium. Marshall said practicing against Jennings throughout the season has given him inside information he plans to use during the game. “I know what he likes, I know what he doesn’t like,” Marshall said. “I know what he bites on so I’m going to give him some double moves, give him some triple moves and I’m going to run right by him a few times.” Asked if Jennings could say the same about him, Marshall

said: “I don’t think so, man. I don’t give away a lot.” “I’m a good actor out there,” he said. Rice and Sanders split up the Pro Bowlers in an “unconferenced” format earlier in the week. Players on six NFL teams — Baltimore, the New York Jets, Houston, New Orleans, Tampa Bay and Washington — ended up with their teammates only on the same Pro Bowl side. All five New Orleans Saints players ended up on Team Rice, which he built around quarterback Drew Brees. “I love having my guys — I know they can all play,” Brees said Thursday. “And I definitely don’t want to go up against any of them.” His teammate, tight end Jimmy Graham, said Brees was the mastermind behind makings sure the Saints ended up together. The players practiced in front of a military crowd on Thursday at Joint Base Pearl HarborHickam, next to an airfield with a Boeing C-17 Globemaster on the tarmac and service members and their families in a crowd on a track and field named for Amelia Earhart. “You made my day,” 12-year-old Sam Grazzini shouted toward Brees after the Saints’ quarterback posed for a picture with him and signed an autograph in a spiral notebook. Sanders, after trading barbs with Rice many times in the weeks leading up to the game, practiced with his team’s cornerbacks, wearing football gloves and doing positional drills. “I feel good, man. This is fun,” said Sanders, who has pushed to square off against Rice in the game. Rice did not appear to be at his team’s practice. He was scheduled to appear at a mall opening in west Oahu with Eddie DeBartolo, Jr., the mall’s developer and former 49ers owner.

Donovan optimistic about chances at World Cup TALES AZZONI AP Sports Writer

SAO PAULO — Landon Donovan says the United States will head to the World Cup with its most experienced group of players, giving the Americans a “real chance” to do well at this year’s tournament. As the U.S. finishes a week-and-ahalf training camp in the host country, Donovan said American players have enough confidence and experience to confront more traditional World Cup teams heading into a first round that includes matches against Germany, Portugal and Ghana. “I think the experience that we have now far exceeds the experience that we

ever had with any team, and that lines up to give us a real chance,” Donovan said Thursday. “We are confident in how we play. We are confident in what we do. Our guys have had enough experiences against all of these players, against teams like Ghana, Portugal, Germany. ... We feel confident that we can get results against them, and that’s a nice feeling going into a World Cup.” The U.S. opens against Ghana on June 16, plays Cristiano Ronaldo’s Portugal six days later and closes the group stage against Germany on June 26. The Americans will be playing in their seventh straight World Cup, and Donovan is heading to his fourth.

“There’s never been competition for places like there is in our team now,” the midfielder said during a news conference. “You can really make a case for probably 35 or 40 guys to be a part of a 23-man roster, and that’s never been the case. It’s really up for grabs in a lot of positions, and that in itself obviously creates competition, which makes the team better.” Donovan, who turns 32 in March, said the U.S. team is more respected by opponents. “The reason it’s the group of death is because we are in it,” he said. “In the past, it would have been a relatively easier group for Germany or Ghana or Portugal because they had us in it. C

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But now, because we are in it, it makes it one of the most difficult groups in the tournament.” Donovan said the first goal remains to reach the knockout stage of the 32-nation tournament. “Our expectations, like most teams, are to get out of the group,” he said. “We are aware that we have a difficult group, but the expectation is that we can do it and we are going to try to get out of our group, just like most teams in this World Cup. That is the objective. That is the goal. But we feel good about where we are at.” German coach Jurgen Klinsmann brought 26 players to this training camp get acclimated to the team’s World Cup base in South America’s

biggest city. The team, mostly with players from Major League Soccer, will play an exhibition against South Korea on Feb. 1 at Carson, Calif. “We’ve been very lucky to have two weeks here in Sao Paulo,” Donovan said. “It’s been very nice to have a couple of weeks to adapt to what it’s going to be like this summer. When we come back we have a comfort level. We know the people, the club, the training facilities. It makes it a lot easier. You get a feeling for what it’s like here, and it helps a lot.” Klinsmann is expected to visit the Arena da Amazonia on Friday in the jungle city of Manaus, where the U.S. will play Portugal.


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B-4 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014

. . . Prep Continued from page B-1

game on a 7-1 run in the final two and half minutes to clinch victory. CIA will face Peninsula Conference opponent Wasilla Lake on Saturday at home, with the boys tipping off at 1:30 p.m. and the girls at 3 p.m. Cordova Tip Off Tournament The Nikiski girls and boys basketball teams opened up play in Cordova on Thursday with victories. The Nikiski girls topped Unalaska 53-30, while the boys notched a 47-41 victory over Unalaska. Luke Johnson led the Bulldogs with 17 points, while teammate Seth Carstens contributed 10. Johnson hit 7 of 12 free throws in the fourth quarter. “It was a back-and-forth game, and we were able to control the ball and get free throws in the end,” said Nikiski boys coach Reid Kornstad. The boys improved to 3-9 on the season. The girls put Unalaska away early with a halftime lead of 34-9. Nikiski was led by Alyssa Darch with 12 points, while teammates Rachel Thompson and Emily Lynch each added 10.

. . . NHL Continued from page B-1

goal in four games — netting at least one in each — but Shattenkirk took advantage of Nash’s slashing penalty, scoring 9 seconds into the power play at 3:09.

HURRICANES 5, SABRES 3 BUFFALO, N.Y. — Alexander Semin had two goals and defenseman Andrej Sekera added a score at 9:50 of the third to lift the Hurricanes over the Sabres.

Also in Cordova, the Seldovia girls were swamped by Cordova in a 56-17 loss, after starting slow with only two points in the first quarter. The home team put up 14 buckets in the first half en route to a 29-15 halftime lead. Marina Chissus led Seldovia with seven points, all in the second quarter, while teammate Olivia Turner added six points in the first half. The Cordova boys routed Seldovia with a 62-37 victory. Nikolaevsk Warrior Rumble The Skyview girls started off the tournament with a victory over the hosts Thursday. The Panthers took a 13-2 lead after the first quarter. Nikolaevsk then gradually cut into the lead as the game wore on. Samantha Reynolds led Skyview with 14 points, while Meghan Powers added 13. For Nikolaevsk, Kilina Klaich and Serafima Kalugin each had nine points. The Nikolaevsk boys capped the night with a 56-35 victory over Kalskag, taking command with a 26-13 first quarter. Neil Gordeev had 16 points for the Warriors, while Jonah Fefelov had 12 and Jaruby Nelson added 10. For Kalskag, Derrick Holmberg had 13 points. In Friday’s early girls game, Nenana defeated Birchwood Christian 65-21. Mariah Dela Rosa paced Nenana with 21 points, while Edna Standi-

fer pitched in with 17 points. For Birchwood Christian, Tia Goward had eight points. In Friday’s early boys game, Nenana rolled to a 67-43 victory. Kynan Monroe had 15 points to lead Nenana, while Frankin Richards had 12 points and Glenn Krause notched 10. For Birchwood Christian, Tyler Kieffer led all scorers with 25 points, while Dakota Jones added 10. Thursday girls Bears 34, Eagles 25 Kodiak JV CIA

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KODIAK JV (34) — Krysthel 3 0-0 6, Rica 0 0-0 0, Kahye 1 0-0 2, Rosie 0 0-0 0, Richelle 0 1-2 1, Sadie 4 1-2 9, Chaimaine 1 0-0 2, Stephanie 7 0-4 14. Totals 16 2-8 34. CIA (25) — Moffis 5 0-2 13, Hanna 0 0-0 0, Taplin 0 0-0 0, Brush 1 0-0 2, Lyons 0 0-0 0, Hammond 1 2-5 4, McGahan 0 1-2 1, Hills 2 1-2 5. Totals 9 4-11 25. 3-point field goals — CIA 3 (Moffis 3). Team fouls — Kodiak JV 9; CIA 10. Bulldogs 53, Raiders 30 Nikiski Unalaska

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NIKISKI (53) — Riddall 2 1-1 5, Vollersten 0 0-0 0, Cook 2 0-0 4, Costello 4 0-0 8, Litke 1 2-4 4, Lynch 5 0-0 10, Thompson 4 0-2 10, Parrish 0 0-0 0, Kornstad 0 0-0 0, Litzen 0 0-0 0, Darch 5 2-6 12. Totals 21 5-13 53. UNALASKA (30) — Tungul 1 0-0 2, Vernon 3 0-0 6, Price 0 0-0 0, Olson 3 2-3 8, Seman 2 0-0 4, Kochuten 1 0-0 2, Shaishnikoff 2 1-2 6. Totals 12 3-5 30. 3-point field goals — Nikiski 2 (Thompson 2); Unalaska 1 (Shaishnikoff 1). Team fouls — Nikiski 11; Unalaska 12. Wolverines 56, Sea Otters 17 Cordova Seldovia

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CORDOVA (56) — Gonzales 0 0-0 0, Hoepfner 7 0-0 14, Songer 7 0-2 14, Platt 1 0-0 2, Felix 1 0-0 2, Phillips 2 0-0 4, Wiese 2 2-2 6, Hamberger 6 2-5 14. 26 4-9 56. SELDOVIA (17) — Chissus 3 0-4 7, Omar 0 0-0 0, Mitchell 0 0-2 0, Waterbury 1 0-0 2, Swick 1 0-0 2, Turner 3 0-0 6, Crosby 0 0-0

Jeff Skinner also scored for the saves for the Eastern ConferenceHurricanes, who overcame three leading Penguins (36-13-2). one-goal deficits. Jiri Tlusty sealed the win by scoring into an empty WILD 2, BLACKHAWKS 1 net with one second remaining. ST. PAUL, Minn. — Jason Pominville and Matt Cooke scored PENGUINS 6, first-period goals, Darcy Kuemper ISLANDERS 4 made 33 saves and the Wild beat UNIONDALE, N.Y. — Rookie the Blackhawks. defenseman Olli Maatta scored the go-ahead goal early in the second LIGHTNING 4, period and Evgeni Malkin added SENATORS 3, SO an insurance score in the third as TAMPA, Fla. — Nikita the Penguins held on for a wild Kucherov scored the lone shootwin over the Islanders. The Islanders had a 5-on-3 out goal and the Lightning beat the power play for 50 seconds late in Senators. Kucherov beat Craig Anderson the third, but couldn’t score against backup Jeff Zatkoff, who made 30 on the first shot during the shoot-

0. Totals 8 0-6 17. 3-point field goals — Seldovia 1 (Chissus 1). Team fouls — Cordova 13; Seldovia 8. Panthers 38, Warriors 32 Skyview Nikolaevsk

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SKYVIEW (38) — Powers 4 4-8 13, Ramsell 2 3-5 7, Mahan 1 0-2 2, Reynolds 3 6-6 14, Rouse 1 0-0 2, Glaves 0 0-0 0. Totals — 11 13-21 38. NIKOLAEVSK (32) — Ki. Klaich 3 0-0 9, Kr. Klaich 0 0-0 0, Fefelov 0 0-0 0, So. Kalugin 2 2-2 6, Stafford 1 0-0 2, Se. Kalugin 4 1-3 9, Dorvall 3 0-2 6, Hickman 0 0-0 0. Totals — 13 3-7 32. 3-point goals — Skyview 3 (Reynolds 2, Powers); Nikolaevsk 3 (Ki. Klaich 3). Team fouls — Skyview 6, Nikolaevsk 17. Fouled out — none. Thursday boys Bulldogs 47, Raiders 41 Nikiski Unalaska

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NIKISKI (47) — Stangel 1 0-1 2, Anderson 2 2-2 7, Johnson 4 9-15 17, Holloway 2 0-0 4, Tauriainen 0 2-2 2, S. Carstens 4 2-3 10, N. Carstens 0 0-0 0, Riddall 0 0-0 0, Jackson 2 0-0 5. Totals 15 15-23 47. UNALASKA (41) — Magalong 0 0-0 0, Seman 2 0-0 4, Nagnos 6 0-0 12, R. Enlow 5 2-2 12, B. Enlow 0 0-0 0, Remolino 2 0-0 5, Earnshaw 0 0-0 0, Carpentero 4 0-0 8. Totals 19 2-2 41. 3-point field goals — 2 (Anderson 1, Jackson 1); Unalaska 1 (Remolino 1). Team fouls — Nikiski 5; Unalaska 17. Warriors 56, Grizzlies 35 Kalskag Nikolaevsk

13 26

14 13

2 6

6 —35 11 —56

KALSKAG (35) — L. Levi 1 0-0 2, Samuelson 1 3-4 5, R. Levi 0 0-0 0, A. Hetherington 1 0-0 3, R. Levi 0 0-0 0, Holmberg 6 0-2 13, Davis 3 0-0 6, B. Hetherington 2 0-0 6, Kerr 0 0-0 0. Totals — 14 3-6 35. NIKOLAEVSK (56) — Lasiter 0 0-1 0, Molodih 1 0-2 2, Nelson 4 0-1 10, Trail 0 0-0 0, A. Yakunin 2 0-4 6, S. Yakunin 0 0-0 0, N. Fefelov 3 1-4 8, Gordeev 8 0-0 16, J. Fefelov 4 4-7 12, Kalugin 1 0-0 2. Totals — 23 5-19 56. 3-point goals — Kalskag 4 (B. Hetherington 2, Holmberg, A. Hetherington); Nikolaevsk 5 (Nelson 2, A. Yakunin 2, N. Fefelov). Team fouls — Kalskag 15, Nikolaevsk 11. Fouled out — A. Hetherington.

out. Lightning goalie Ben Bishop stopped all three shots he faced.

STARS 7, MAPLE LEAFS 1 DALLAS — Valeri Nichushkin scored two goals to lead the Stars to a victory over Toronto.

PREDATORS 2, CANUCKS 1 VANCOUVER, British Columbia — Nick Spaling scored the goahead goal on the power play in the third period and the Predators defeated the Canucks for their fourth win in five games. Craig Smith also scored for Nashville.

Scoreboard Basketball NBA Standings

SOUTH

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Toronto 21 20 Brooklyn 18 22 New York 15 27 Boston 15 29 Philadelphia 14 28 Southeast Division Miami 31 12 Atlanta 22 19 Washington 20 21 Charlotte 19 25 Orlando 11 32 Central Division Indiana 33 8 Chicago 21 20 Detroit 17 25 Cleveland 15 27 Milwaukee 8 33

Pct .512 .450 .357 .341 .333

GB — 2½ 6½ 7½ 7½

.721 — .537 8 .488 10 .432 12½ .256 20 .805 — .512 12 .405 16½ .357 18½ .195 25

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division San Antonio 32 10 Houston 29 15 Dallas 25 19 Memphis 20 20 New Orleans 16 25 Northwest Division Oklahoma City 33 10 Portland 32 11 Denver 20 21 Minnesota 20 21 Utah 14 29 Pacific Division L.A. Clippers 29 15 Golden State 26 17 Phoenix 24 17 L.A. Lakers 16 27 Sacramento 15 26

.762 — .659 4 .568 8 .500 11 .390 15½ .767 .744 .488 .488 .326

65 Siena 64, St. Peter’s 47 St. John’s 77, Seton Hall 76

— 1 12 12 19

.659 — .605 2½ .585 3½ .372 12½ .366 12½

Thursday’s Games Miami 109, L.A. Lakers 102 Portland 110, Denver 105 Friday’s Games L.A. Lakers at Orlando, 3 p.m. Toronto at Philadelphia, 3 p.m. Dallas at Brooklyn, 3:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Boston, 3:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Cleveland, 3:30 p.m. New Orleans at Detroit, 3:30 p.m. San Antonio at Atlanta, 3:30 p.m. Charlotte at New York, 3:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Chicago, 4 p.m. Memphis at Houston, 4 p.m. Washington at Phoenix, 5 p.m. Indiana at Sacramento, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Golden State, 6:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Chicago at Charlotte, 3 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Toronto, 3 p.m. Oklahoma City at Philadelphia, 3:30 p.m. Houston at Memphis, 4 p.m. Atlanta at Milwaukee, 4:30 p.m. Indiana at Denver, 5 p.m. Washington at Utah, 5 p.m. Minnesota at Portland, 6 p.m. All Times AST

Men’s Scores EAST Bryant 87, LIU Brooklyn 79 CCSU 87, Wagner 83 Fairleigh Dickinson 86, St. Francis (NY) 85 Hartford 56, Binghamton 54 Mass.-Lowell 74, Maine 62 Monmouth (NJ) 63, Fairfield 60 Mount St. Mary’s 83, St. Francis (Pa.) 77 New Hampshire 60, Albany (NY) 56 Penn St. 58, Nebraska 54 Robert Morris 91, Sacred Heart

Appalachian St. 80, The Citadel 67 Belmont 80, Morehead St. 66 Chattanooga 84, Elon 63 Davidson 82, W. Carolina 77 E. Kentucky 94, Tennessee St. 78 ETSU 99, North Florida 93 Florida 68, Alabama 62 Georgia St. 77, Louisiana-Lafayette 70 Jacksonville St. 71, Austin Peay 59 Louisiana Tech 80, Charlotte 60 Memphis 82, Houston 59 Mercer 68, Florida Gulf Coast 55 Murray St. 92, Tennessee Tech 53 SC-Upstate 79, Jacksonville 69 Samford 88, UNC Greensboro 78 Southern Miss. 75, Old Dominion 60 Stetson 68, Kennesaw St. 65 Tulane 59, East Carolina 54 UT-Martin 84, E. Illinois 77 W. Kentucky 69, Louisiana-Monroe 51 Wofford 74, Georgia Southern 64 MIDWEST Ball St. 71, Buffalo 68 Cincinnati 69, UCF 51 Denver 74, Nebraska-Omaha 60 North Dakota 82, Sacramento St. 71 Ohio St. 62, Illinois 55 SE Missouri 82, SIU-Edwardsville 78 Valparaiso 74, Youngstown St. 71 W. Illinois 79, South Dakota 61 W. Michigan 75, Kent St. 59 SOUTHWEST Incarnate Word 85, Sam Houston St. 74 Lamar 65, Abilene Christian 57 Marshall 73, Rice 63 New Orleans 79, Houston Baptist 66 North Texas 76, UAB 65 Northwestern St. 76, Cent. Arkansas 68 Stephen F. Austin 72, Oral Roberts 69 Texas A&M-CC 74, SE Louisiana 71 Texas-Arlington 59, Troy 56 Tulsa 58, Middle Tennessee 53 UALR 69, Texas St. 64 FAR WEST Arizona 69, Colorado 57 Arizona St. 79, Utah 75 Cal Poly 58, Cal St.-Fullerton 56 Chicago St. 71, CS Bakersfield 63 E. Washington 90, S. Utah 83 Gonzaga 59, San Diego 56 Grand Canyon 86, Idaho 73 Hawaii 90, UC Davis 73 Loyola Marymount 92, Pacific 81 Montana 59, Idaho St. 54 N. Colorado 87, N. Arizona 72 Portland 114, BYU 110, 3OT Saint Mary’s (Cal) 80, Pepperdine 74 UC Irvine 72, CS Northridge 66 UC Santa Barbara 68, UC Riverside 65, OT UCLA 91, Stanford 74 Utah Valley 66, UMKC 48 Washington 80, Oregon 76 Weber St. 86, Montana St. 57

Women’s Scores EAST Albany (NY) 88, New Hampshire 47 Hartford 66, Binghamton 42

Hofstra 65, Northeastern 55 Marist 71, St. Peter’s 42 Niagara 71, Manhattan 67, OT Stony Brook 83, Vermont 49 Syracuse 84, Clemson 75 SOUTH Alabama 57, Kentucky 55 Campbell 77, Winthrop 74, OT Coastal Carolina 75, UNC Asheville 65 Duke 85, Florida St. 77, OT ETSU 74, Kennesaw St. 68 Florida Gulf Coast 56, Jacksonville 49 Gardner-Webb 55, Charleston Southern 51 Georgia St. 72, Louisiana-Lafayette 67, OT Georgia Tech 73, Virginia Tech 52 High Point 73, Radford 62 James Madison 74, Drexel 47 LSU 71, Auburn 60 Liberty 74, Longwood 41 Mississippi 87, Mississippi St. 85, OT NC State 85, Boston College 76 North Carolina 83, Wake Forest 65 SC-Upstate 63, Mercer 62 Stetson 75, North Florida 67 Tennessee 89, Florida 69 Towson 64, Coll. of Charleston 60 UNC Wilmington 60, William & Mary 59 Virginia 86, Maryland 72 MIDWEST Akron 80, Ohio 56 Bowling Green 71, E. Michigan 57 Buffalo 63, N. Illinois 52 CS Bakersfield 90, Chicago St. 59 Illinois 61, Michigan St. 51 Minnesota 64, Wisconsin 53 Notre Dame 79, Miami 52 Oakland 73, Cleveland St. 62 Ohio St. 61, Michigan 50 Purdue 90, Northwestern 65 Texas A&M 62, Missouri 57 Toledo 73, Ball St. 61 UMKC 83, Utah Valley 66 Valparaiso 85, Detroit 44 W. Illinois 81, South Dakota 71 Wright St. 69, Milwaukee 64 SOUTHWEST Cent. Arkansas 73, Northwestern St. 61 Houston Baptist 66, New Orleans 54 Lamar 85, Abilene Christian 83 Oral Roberts 64, Stephen F. Austin 55 Sam Houston St. 60, Incarnate Word 51 Texas A&M-CC 83, SE Louisiana 54 FAR WEST BYU 81, San Francisco 47 Cal Poly 69, Cal St.-Fullerton 65 Denver 73, Nebraska-Omaha 66 Gonzaga 91, Loyola Marymount 82, OT Idaho 58, Grand Canyon 54 Montana 67, Idaho St. 48 Montana St. 87, Weber St. 71 N. Colorado 86, N. Arizona 82, OT Portland 53, Pepperdine 43 S. Utah 69, Portland St. 60 Sacramento St. 110, North Dakota 104 San Diego 79, Santa Clara 55 UC Irvine 83, CS Northridge 73 UC Santa Barbara 74, UC Riverside 61

Hockey NHL Standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L Boston 49 31 15 Tampa Bay 51 30 16 Montreal 50 27 18 Toronto 53 27 21 Detroit 50 22 18 Ottawa 51 22 19 Florida 50 20 23 Buffalo 49 13 29 Metropolitan Division Pittsburgh 51 36 13 N.Y. Rangers 53 27 23 Columbus 50 26 20 Philadelphia 52 25 21 Carolina 50 22 19 New Jersey 51 21 19 Washington 50 22 20 N.Y. Islanders 53 21 25

OT Pts GF GA 3 65 141 109 5 65 150 126 5 59 127 125 5 59 151 163 10 54 127 138 10 54 144 159 7 47 120 151 7 33 92 142 2 74 168 125 3 57 132 135 4 56 148 140 6 56 141 152 9 53 125 142 11 53 122 124 8 52 142 152 7 49 151 175

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division Chicago 53 32 9 12 76 189 146 St. Louis 50 34 11 5 73 173 116 Colorado 49 31 13 5 67 144 127 Minnesota 53 28 20 5 61 127 130 Dallas 51 23 20 8 54 148 153 Nashville 52 23 22 7 53 127 153 Winnipeg 52 23 24 5 51 144 153 Pacific Division Anaheim 53 38 10 5 81 179 130 San Jose 51 33 12 6 72 162 123 Los Angeles 52 29 17 6 64 132 110 Vancouver 52 26 17 9 61 130 130 Phoenix 50 23 18 9 55 143 152 Calgary 51 17 27 7 41 114 161 Edmonton 52 15 31 6 36 132 183 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Thursday’s Games Tampa Bay 4, Ottawa 3, SO Carolina 5, Buffalo 3 St. Louis 2, N.Y. Rangers 1 Columbus 5, Philadelphia 2 Pittsburgh 6, N.Y. Islanders 4 Minnesota 2, Chicago 1 Dallas 7, Toronto 1 Nashville 2, Vancouver 1 Anaheim 2, Los Angeles 1 San Jose 1, Winnipeg 0 Friday’s Games Washington at New Jersey, 3 p.m. Ottawa at Carolina, ppd., schedule conflict Montreal at Detroit, 3:30 p.m. Colorado at Florida, 3:30 p.m. Nashville at Calgary, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Edmonton, 5:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Ottawa at Carolina, 8 a.m. St. Louis at N.Y. Islanders, 9 a.m. Boston at Philadelphia, 9 a.m. Washington at Montreal, 3 p.m. Colorado at Tampa Bay, 3 p.m. Buffalo at Columbus, 3 p.m. Toronto at Winnipeg, 3 p.m. Pittsburgh at Dallas, 4 p.m. Anaheim vs. Los Angeles at Los Angeles, CA, 5:30 p.m. Minnesota at San Jose, 6:30 p.m. All Times AST

Transactions BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS — Agreed to terms with RHP David Aardsma on a minor league contract. KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Agreed to terms with RHP Jon Rauch on a minor league contract. SEATTLE MARINERS — Agreed to terms with OF Endy Chavez on a minor league contract. TAMPA BAY RAYS — Agreed to terms with RHP Grant Balfour on a two-year contract. National League SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Agreed to terms with INF Joaquin

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Arias on two-year contract. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NEW ORLEANS PELICANS — Waived G Tyshawn Taylor. Women’s National Basketball Association TULSA SHOCK — Named Fred Williams coach. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS — Promoted Terry McDonough to vice president of player personnel. CHICAGO BEARS — Named Reggie Herring linebackers coach and Paul Pasqualoni defensive line coach. CINCINNATI BENGALS — Named Brian Braswell assistant offensive line and quality control coach. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Named Mike Pettine coach. DALLAS COWBOYS — Signed PK Dan Bailey to a seven-year contract. PITTSBURGH STEELERS — Named Mike Munchak offensive line coach. TENNESSEE TITANS — Named Giff Smith defensive line coach and Bob Bostad offensive line coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League BUFFALO SABRES — Assigned G Connor Knapp from Rochester (AHL) to Florida (ECHL). MINNESOTA WILD — Reassigned D Jonathon Blum to Iowa (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Recalled LW Joe Whitney from Albany (AHL). NEW YORK RANGERS — Assigned G David LeNeveu to Hartford (AHL). ST. LOUIS BLUES — Activated F Maxim Lapierre from the injured list. Assigned F Adam Cracknell to Chicago (AHL). LACROSSE National Lacrosse League EDMONTON RUSH — Traded F Dane Stevens to Minnesota for a 2014 fourth-round draft pick. SOCCER Major League Soccer CHIVAS USA — Signed D Andrew Ribeiro. COLUMBUS CREW — Named Craig Devine trainer and John Velasco equipment manager. NEW YORK RED BULLS — Signed D Armando. TENNIS World TeamTennis TEXAS WILD — Traded Bob and Mike Bryan to San Diego for financial considerations. SAN DIEGO AVIATORS — Named David Macpherson coach. COLLEGE OHIO STATE — Named Chris Ash co-defensive coordinator/ safeties coach. SAM HOUSTON STATE — Named K.C. Keeler football coach. SAN JOSE STATE — Named Jolene Shepardson women’s volleyball coach. TROY — Named Al Pogue cornerbacks coach. UALR — Suspended men’s basketball G/F Leroy Isler one game.

No. 1 Arizona stays perfect By The Associated Press

TUCSON, Ariz. — Nick Johnson scored 18 points, Brandon Ashley added 15 and top-ranked Arizona remained unbeaten with a 69-57 win over Colorado on Thursday night. Arizona (19-0, 6-0 Pac-12) had a week off after blowing out rival Arizona State and raced out to an early 14-point lead. Aaron Gordon added 12 points for Arizona, which overcame a 3-for-15 night from 3-point range and some missed free throws down the stretch to extend the best start in school history. A year after nearly pulling off an upset in the desert, Colorado (15-5, 4-3) had no chance for late-game heroics in its third game without injured leading scorer Spencer Dinwiddie. The Buffaloes struggled to slow Arizona’s bevy of scorers and couldn’t overcome the big early hole, falling to 0-16 against No. 1 teams. Xavier Johnson led Colorado with 21 points and Josh Scott added 15. No. 6 FLORIDA 68, ALABAMA 62 TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — Michael Frazier II scored 18 points and made five 3-pointers to lead Florida over Alabama. It was the 10th consecutive win for the Gators (16-2, 5-0 Southeastern Conference), matching last season’s longest streak. The Crimson Tide (8-10, 2-3) had its league-best 14-game SEC home winning streak snapped. Florida went 8 of 10 from the free throw line over the final 47 seconds to halt any Alabama threat. Frazier shot 5 of 13, all from 3-point range. Casey Prather scored 14 points on 6-of-16 shooting for the Gators. Scottie Wilbekin had 10 points and four assists. Trevor Releford led Alabama with 14 points and Nick Jacobs had 12. The Tide was without No. 2 scorer Retin Obasohan, who strained his left hip flexor in Tuesday’s practice. The Gators, who earned win No. 100 for the four-man senior class, have won the last eight meet-

ings and 10 of 11. Alabama has lost three of its last four overall.

No. 15 CINCINNATI 69, CENTRAL FLORIDA 51 CINCINNATI — Justin Jackson matched his career high by blocking seven shots and Sean Kilpatrick scored 19 points with a strong second half that carried Cincinnati past Central Florida for its 11th straight win. Cincinnati (19-2, 7-0 American Athletic) is off to its best start since 2001-02, when it was in Conference USA. The Bearcats’ winning streak is their longest since they opened last season with 12 wins. And it’s been mostly a matter of defense. The Bearcats have held their last 27 opponents under 70 points, the longest active streak in Division I. They took control of this one by opening the second half with an 18-5 run.

No. 17 OHIO STATE 62, ILLINOIS 55 COLUMBUS, Ohio — LaQuinton Ross scored 18 points and Lenzelle Smith Jr. had 16 — including a critical 3-pointer in the waning moments — to help Ohio State end a four-game skid with a win over Illinois. Aaron Craft added 11 points, six rebounds and five assists for the Buckeyes (16-4, 3-4 Big Ten), who had lost four in a row for the first time since 2007-08. Joseph Bertrand had 19 points for the Illini (13-7, 2-5), who lost their fifth straight. They haven’t won since Jan. 4 and play three of their next four games against ranked opponents.

No. 23 MEMPHIS 82, HOUSTON 59 MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Shaq Goodwin had 20 points, Joe Jackson added 18 points and seven assists, and Memphis jumped out to a big lead early against Houston. The Tigers (14-4, 4-2 American Athletic Conference) never trailed and led by 17 in the first half of their fourth win in five games. Meanwhile, the Cougars (11-8, 3-3) have lost three of four. TaShawn Thomas led Houston with 14 points and Brandon Morris added 13. C L.J. Rose had 10 assists for the Cougars, who shot 42.6 percent Y and committed 18 turnovers.

Sports Briefs Browns hire Pettine as coach CLEVELAND — After nearly a month of twists, turns and talk, the Browns found their man. Mike Pettine is Cleveland’s new coach. Buffalo’s defensive coordinator, who met with team officials for the first time just a week ago, finalized a five-year contract Thursday to become the Browns’ seventh full-time coach since 1999. The team fired Rob Chudzinski on Dec. 29 following one season and embarked on a winding search that ended with Pettine. “We wanted to be thorough from the start,” CEO Joe Banner said, “and we interviewed as many people as we could. From that group, we hired the best individual for this job. Our players and fans are going to really enjoy Mike Pettine and his leadership style.” The 47-year-old Pettine, the son of a legendary Pennsylvania high school coach, spent one year with the Bills after four as Rex Ryan’s defensive coordinator with the New York Jets. With his clean-shaven head and no-nonsense approach, Pettine, who also was an assistant coach with Baltimore, is popular with players. He’ll inherit a Cleveland team that went 4-12 this season after losing its last seven games.

Adrian Peterson has another surgery MINNEAPOLIS — For the third straight offseason, Adrian Peterson will be recovering from surgery. The Minnesota Vikings said their star running back had an operation Thursday to repair his adductor muscle, which is part of the groin. The team said Peterson was expected to be fully recovered in about six weeks, giving him plenty of time to heal before offseason workouts get going. The procedure was performed by Dr. William Meyers at the Vincera Institute in Philadelphia. Peterson rushed for 1,266 yards in 14 games, missing two in December due to a sprained right foot. The groin problem was lingering long before that, though, sapping him of some of his explosiveness. He acknowledged after a loss at Seattle Nov. 17 that the injury was bothering him “a lot.” Peterson gained only 65 yards on 21 carries that afternoon, albeit against the league’s best defense. He still managed, two weeks later, to rush for 211 yards against Chicago, the fourth-highest total of his career. But then came the sprained foot in the snow Dec. 8 at Baltimore, and he played only once more, and not at full speed.

Maddux, La Russa forgo logos COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. — Greg Maddux and Tony La Russa will not have logos on their Hall of Fame plaques. The decision was announced Thursday by the Hall, which said Joe Torre’s plaque will have the logo of the New York Yankees. Plaques for Tom Glavine and Bobby Cox will have Atlanta Braves logos, and Frank Thomas’ will have the logo of the Chicago White Sox. The six will be inducted during ceremonies on July 27. The managers were elected last month by the Hall’s expansion-era committee and the players were chosen this month by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America. Of the 300 previous Hall members, 86 have caps with logos and 42 don’t have caps.

Mat-Su Invite canceled The Mat-Su Invite has been canceled due to warm and rainy conditions. Peninsula skiers will not compete this weekend. — Staff and wire reports

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f your standard of living depends on how much money you make by fishing for salmon, chances are good that you’ll be attending the Alaska Board of Fisheries meeting in Anchorage from Jan. 31 to Feb. 13. On the other hand, if you fish for recreation and to put salmon on your table, you’ll likely come up with some excuse for staying home. Normal humans try to avoid pain, so don’t feel guilty about not going to fish board meetings. The pain comes from sitting for eight hours or more while listening to biologists’ reports on all the various fisheries, listening while scores of people try to convince board members why this or that regulation ought to be changed, and listening to board members trying to make sense of it all. Still more pain comes with the realization that you’re the only one in the crowded room who doesn’t fish for a living. It’s a fact. If you don’t have money in the game, you very likely won’t play the game. It takes a lot of will power, courage, persistence and coffee to sit through one of these meetings and stay until it’s over. Step out of the room at the wrong time, and you’ll miss something important, such as a chance to talk to a board member, or to sit on a key committee. You might claim that you live for fishing, but unless you fish for a living, you probably won’t have enough incentive to make it through one of these meetings. If you leave, you lose. In 2002, I testified at a fish board meeting in Anchorage, stayed through days of public testimony and biologists’ reports, and left the room, thinking I had done all I could. By the time I came back to the meeting the next day, the board had made the early run of Kenai River king salmon almost totally a catch-and-release fishery. Board members later said they thought they were doing what the public wanted. That was because the only “public” the board heard from were fishing guides and the guide-friendly Kenai River Sportfishing Association. Emotions sometimes run wild at fish-board meetings. In 1999, the last time the full board met in Soldotna, things became so hostile that an Alaska State Trooper stood at the back of the room for most of the meeting. Ever since, when Upper Cook Inlet Finfish regulations are being addressed, the board has met in Anchorage. The board has turned down many entreaties to meet in the Kenai-Soldotna area, claiming that Anchorage is central to all the users and Department of Fish and Game staff, that Anchorage has more and better facilities, and that meeting expenses are lower in Anchorage. To the best of my knowledge, State Troopers have never been called to one of the meetings in Anchorage. I’ve heard many complaints from people who say they can’t See PALMER, page C-2

AP Photo/The Pantagraph, David Proeber

In this Jan. 8, photo, Doug DeLong rides his fat bike through a snowy “off-road” section of Constitution Trail in Normal, Ill. The bike uses extra wide tires and disc brakes. While the tires on a road bike are less than an inch from the edge to the rim, fat bikes have tires that are five times that size.

By LENORE SOBOTA The (Bloomington) Pantagraph

BLOOMINGTON, Ill. (AP) — To some outdoor enthusiasts, snow is something to be enjoyed, not endured. Instead of running to the store for milk and bread when winter weather warnings are issued, they’re running for their skis, snowshoes, snowmobiles and bicycles. Yes, bicycles. A relatively new phenomenon in this area is the “snow bike” or “fat bike.” While some people were skiing or snowshoeing in area parks or zooming around on snowmobiles, others were rolling on and off trails on two wheels. If you have walked down snowcovered Constitution Trail recently, you might have seen their wide tracks dwarfing the tracks from other bikes.

These are more than your average mountain bike; with their super-sized wheels, these are more like monster trucks. “When I get on my fat bike, I just feel like riding over curbs and anything else in my way,” said Doug DeLong of Bloomington, who regularly commutes on his fat bike. While the tires on a road bike are less than an inch from the edge to the rim, fat bikes have tires that are five times that size. Their tires run with extremely low pressure — 5 to 8 pounds per square inch compared to 110 psi on a road bike, DeLong said. That makes the tires “squishy” and able to go over things that another bike would slip off of, he explained. In addition, “the fat bike’s huge tires act as a suspension system of sorts,” DeLong said. Mike Miner of Normal, another fat-

bike fan, said, “The handling is phenomenal. You get maximum traction.” That makes them popular on sandy beaches as well as snow. DeLong admits, “When it first came out, I remember thinking, ‘Who would buy that?’” He even made fun of the tires at first. But then, like Mikey in the old Life cereal commercial, he tried it and liked it. Miner isn’t a hard-core bicycle commuter; he usually drives to work at Bloomington Cycle and Fitness. But after the area received 7 inches of snow earlier this winter, “I rode to work that day,” Miner said. “It entices you to ride.” This is the second winter Miner and DeLong have had their bikes. “The bike is just a blast. It’s instant eye candy,” Miner said. Of course, others used more traditional methods to enjoy the recent

storm. When Patty Carlson of Bloomington arrived at Ewing Park to crosscountry ski late Sunday morning, as the snowstorm was just kicking into high gear, other skiers had already been there. Wind-blown drifts hid signs of their passage in exposed areas, but their tracks were easy to follow in the wooded area, protected from the polar blast. “I have many people who say I’m crazy, but if you’re dressed appropriately, there’s nothing better than being out in it,” Carlson said. “I like being in nature and seeing the twinkling snow and feeling the crisp wind in your face.” She said buying skis, snowshoes or ice skates is cheaper than a gym membership. “The activities are right there outside your door,” she said. See BIKE, page C-2

Master artist carves booming niche decoy business By CARRIE McDERMOTT Daily News

WAHPETON, N.D. (AP) — A Lidgerwood man’s passion for woodworking has developed into a successful business. Whittier Spear Fishing Decoys, owned by Rick Whittier, sells beautifully painted, carved wood spear fishing decoys. When the Smithsonian declared spear fishing decoys were an early form of folk art, it started a revolution and launched the American Folk Art movement. They are now very sought after by collectors worldwide. In addition to their popularity in the United States, Whittier regularly ships his pieces to customers in Europe, South Africa and even China. Whittier will be featured by TV host Bill Sherck on “Due North Outdoors.” He said he originally emailed an open invitation to Sherck last year, to come and visit his shop anytime.

‘We’ll bring a swim tank, 120 gallons, so the kids can play with the decoys.’ —Rick Whittier Four hours later, he was on the phone with Sherck. After several months of planning and scheduling, the production company set the dates for a visit. One day will be spent filming in the shop, and another day spent spear fishing on the ice. During his busy week, Whittier is also scheduled to speak to the Junior Wildlife Club and Red River Area Sportsman’s Club. “We’ll bring a swim tank, 120 gallons, so the kids can play with the de-

coys,” he told the Daily News. He uses a testing tank in his shop as well, so every decoy he makes can be tested. He creates a hollow space inside each that he fills with molten lead for added weight, so the decoy will sink and “swim” in circles as it’s lowered into the water. Whittier is a master artist with decades of woodworking experience. He’s been hand-carving and painting fish decoys since 2004. His shop is in the basement of his home. He’s created 400 different species and sub-species of fish decoys the last decade. The realistic-looking decoys include game fish, trout and salmon, and rough and bait fish, ranging in size from 4.756.25 inches for small decoys, and 8.75-9.25 inches for large decoys. Whittier has an unusual way of painting his carvings. Rather than using an airbrush, he uses Krylon spray paints. He blends the colors in midair

and mists them to give a wet look. He works with a palette of about 50 colors, he said. “Everything you see is off the shelf spray paint out of the can,” he said. “It dries really fast, and I like to mix the paints before they dry.” He touches them up and adds details, such as spots or stripes, with a brush and paint from the spray cans. According to the North Dakota Council on the Arts, he’s the only one known to paint fish in this way throughout the decoy world for competitions. After seeing his work, it’s surprising to hear he’s had no formal art training. Whittier is assisted by his wife, Connie, who sands the blanks and does the wood burning of scales. She also handles the office work. The couple sells about 1,500 decoys annually, and the business is growing, he said. See DECOY, page C-2

There is a new clam on the beaches of the Kenai Peninsula R efuge N otebook M att B owser

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his last June while my family was out at the local beach, my son brought me a clam he had found in the mud flats, a clam of a kind unfamiliar to me. At home that evening, I identified it as a soft-shell clam (Mya arenaria), an exotic species. I had no idea that there were nonnative clams in our area, but I learned that this was not news. Soft-shell clams were first documented on the Kenai Peninsula in 1999. By 2006, soft-shells were already a dominant species in mud flats in the area. At Photo by Matt Bowser least one clammer was targeting them A bucket of soft-shell clams, an exotic species from the East Coast, har- in Kachemak Bay by 2011. Soft-shell clams are native to the vested from an east-side Cook Inlet beach this past New Year’s Day. C

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Atlantic coast of North America from North Carolina to Labrador and to the North Pacific from Korea to the coast of Alaska on the Bering Sea. In the 1870s, they were accidentally introduced to the San Fransisco Bay area in a shipment of oysters transplanted from the Atlantic. Soft-shells had replaced native clams in the Bay area before the end of the 19th century. Through a combination of natural dispersal and intentional transplanting, soft-shells spread rapidly on the west coast, reaching southeast Alaska by the 1940s (http://bit.ly/1fWWcdy). Alaska is not the only place that these clams are invading. Vikings brought soft-shell clams across the Atlantic around 1300 A.D. to Europe where they are now widespread. There, soft-shells have continued to invade new areas in recent years, reaching high densities, decreasing abundance of native clams, and filtering enough algae to substantially reduce chlorophyll concentrations in seawater.

Given that soft-shell clams have made it to Cook Inlet and are already abundant here, I was now curious about the consequences of this invasion. Do they compete with native clams for space or food? What are the effects of this species on other wildlife? Will there be harvestable populations of soft-shell clams for me and others to exploit? Might a new clam fishery in Cook Inlet increase human use and pressures on Kenai Peninsula beaches? Soft-shell clams do appear to be competing with native clams in some locations, at least for habitable space in mud flats where this species is often dominant. Measured densities of soft-shells in Cook Inlet reached 11 clams per square meter at Katmai National Park on the other side of Cook Inlet. For comparison, densities of harvestable razor clams vary from about 0.5 to 5 clams per square meter at Clam Gulch and Ninilchik beaches. See REFUGE, page C-2


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C-2 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014

. . . Palmer

not. I like the Alaskan process for making regulations for fishing, hunting and trapping. Continued from page C-1 It’s probably more democratic, more open to the public and more fair than any system in afford to go to fish board meetings in Anchorage, where the world. The process isn’t they’ll have to spend upward pretty, but what political process is? Certainly not one that of $2,000 to live in a hotel and eat in restaurants for two allows distant bureaucrats to make the rules. weeks. Most fishing guides What concerns me most and commercial fishermen about Alaska’s regulationcan’t afford this expense making process isn’t that it’s any better than anyone else, so political, but that the main but they somehow manage players — often the only playto go to Anchorage and stay ers — have money at stake. through the meeting. They For this reason, it’s extremely can’t afford not to go and important to maintain a balstay. ance on the board, so as to People attend these board ensure that all user groups are meetings with mixed emofairly represented. tions. Some expect to gain The Alaska Constitusomething, some expect to lose something. In reality, the board tion says fish are commonly owned by all Alaskans. What it giveth and the board taketh doesn’t say — and this should away. All salmon fisheries in Cook Inlet are fully allocated, go without saying — is that Alaskans who want to take so if the board gives a fish to one user group, it has to take it part in the rule-making process should attend Board of Fisherfrom another. ies meetings. My explanation of the nature of the beast — the fishLes Palmer can be reached board meeting — might seem at les.palmer@rocketmail.com. like I’m complaining, but I’m

. . . Bike Continued from page C-1

Dick Smith of WildCountry Outfitters in Normal also was at the park Sunday and included a run at the sledding hill he calls “Mount Ewing.” A veteran ski racer, Smith has completed the famed American Birkebeiner, a 52-kilometer ski race in northern Wisconsin, 22 times. He also led a team that

. . . Decoy Continued from page C-1

As part of the Art4Life program, through the North Dakota Council on the Arts, they travel to assisted living homes and teach the residents how to paint decoys. The couple brings along the swim tank, as well. “They get to keep them, and we let them swim the decoys when they’re finished,” he said. Whittier regularly enters the Minnesota Darkhouse and Angling Association competitions and the National Fish Decoy Association’s World Points Championship where he’s won close to 80 awards and ribbons, including Minnesota Carver of

competed in ABC-TV’s “Expedition Impossible.” His last Birkie was about a decade ago, but “There’s this old inner spirit in me that thinks I ought to go back and try it again.” He likes skiing because it is an opportunity to “observe the beauty of the outdoors and get some exercise.” Smith offers this advice for coping with winter: “Rather than curse the cold, embrace it.”

the Year. Whittier’s impressive track record includes an exclusive exhibit at the North Dakota Governor’s office for three months in 2010. His work has also been on display at the Center for Art in Wood in Philadelphia. He’s used his talent and experience to teach three apprentices for the North Dakota Council on the Arts, as well. Whittier said his intent with contacting Sherck’s TV program was to spotlight the art form of creating spear fishing decoys and its importance as American folk art. “I want to show people how to make them,” he said. “All the old carvers are dying off. In order to keep this art alive we have to encourage others to do it.”

Former quarry provides ice-climbing thrills By ANN WESSEL St. Cloud Times

SANDSTONE, Minn. (AP) — From a distance, the scene looked like a Lilliputian tooth-cleaning. Suspended by harnesses and ropes held taut by belayers on the ground, a line of climbers tapped away at the pearly ice-covered wall jutting a vertical 60 to 90 feet, eventually finding a good spot to anchor their curved axes and continue the ascent. During the past nine years, the beginners’ clinic and related demonstrations at Sandstone Ice Festival have introduced about 1,000 people to ice climbing at Robinson Park, a former sandstone quarry that Minnesota Climbers Association President James Loveridge counts among the best ice-climbing sites from here to Thunder Bay. Loveridge, 44, of Minneapolis, a former Black Diamond rep who now runs his own agency, estimated 300 Minnesotans are serious enough about the sport to own equipment. The cost can run $1,000 for a pair of ice tools, boots and crampons. Most are rock climbers and already own

. . . Refuge Continued from page C-1

Native Baltic macomas, false soft-shell clams, and other species had already occupied the mud flats in which softshells are now abundant and must be experiencing some level of competitive pressure from this new-comer. Soft-shell clams are probably not competing for space very directly with other clam species commonly targeted by people in Cook Inlet. Razor clams, butter clams, and littleneck clams generally occupy more coarsely-grained substrates than soft-shells. Other wildlife may benefit from this invasion. Many animals prey upon soft-shell clams, including crabs, flatfish, shorebirds, diving ducks, and sea otters. A study at Hallo Bay, Katmai National Park found that soft-shell clams were the primary species consumed by brown bears in mud flats, an important food source for bears in the spring until salmon start appearing in the streams. As to usefulness by people, soft-shell clams have long been harvested on the east coast of North America. This species supports a 10 million pound per year commercial fishery in Maine alone. Called “steamers” in New England, soft-shells are

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ropes and harnesses. (The outlay is less than the cost of a snowmobile, Loveridge points out.) At Ice Festival, beginners try equipment for free. For spectators, the difference between rock and ice might be the sound. Behind instructors’ words of encouragement ran a constant loop of creaking, scraping, clattering and shattering as climbers tapped, jabbed and pulled themselves up. Ice chips sprayed. Larger chunks crashed to the ground. Getting in close required a helmet. For climbers, the difference might be the feel. “The feeling is different, because you’re feeling through your tools,” said Bryan Karban, 25, of St. Paul, the climbing and trips coordinator for the University of Minnesota’s outdoor program. He and Loveridge spoke by phone as they drove to Sandstone to set up for the Dec. 13-15 festival. Ice climbing had been going on secretly at Robinson Park for years before the MCA approached the city about developing the site. “There’s always been climbing in the

served as an integral part of the New England clambake. As word gets out about this species’ presence on the Kenai Peninsula, more clammers may target them. If you have visited Ninilchik or Clam Gulch beaches during extremely low tides, you know that the razor clam fishery can be extremely popular (up to 1,367 clammers at Ninilchik beach on one low tide). I imagine that the softshells might attract at least some clammers to our mud flats, increasing human use on these beaches. My next question was

park,” City Administrator Sam Griffith told the St. Cloud Times. The city, which previously had chosen to ignore the activity, formed an advisory committee about 11 years ago. Representatives came from MCA, Vertical Endeavors, St. Cloud State University and the University of Minnesota-Duluth. Griffith said when the group approached the city’s insurer about coverage, it was summer and everyone assumed rock climbing was the topic. Emphasizing safety at every turn, Griffith said the group worked up to the idea of ice climbing. The additional premiums cost $1,500 a year. A couple of years ago, the city extended a water line at a cost of $4,600. The line makes it easier to “farm” ice — to build layer upon layer until the ice forms a solid wall. Relying upon nature is far more unpredictable. The ice climbing routes they build and maintain give climbers a reliable, challenging course 90 minutes from the Twin Cities. For its investment, Griffith said the city has benefited from climbers’ organized cleanups.

whether or not there was a harvestable population where my son had initially found the softshell. On the -5.1 ft. tide this New Year’s Day, my brother-inlaw and I slogged out onto the mud flats to find out. We turned up nothing but worms for much of the tide, but eventually we found beds where the substrate was apparently more stable and obviously more productive than the surrounding mud, with many dimples from worms and clams. We had some success, eventually bringing home 24 eating-size soft-shells. While

this small yield failed to justify the effort we expended to get them, I was more than satisfied to have learned more about soft-shell clams. To learn about local marine clams, download Dennis Lees’ Guide to Intertidal Bivalves in Southwest Alaska National Parks (http://bit.ly/1aHvoJQ). Matt Bowser serves as Entomologist at the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. You can find more information about the refuge at http://kenai.fws.gov or http://www.facebook.com/kenainationalwildliferefuge.

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014 C-3

Classified Index EMPLOYMENT

Homes

Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/ Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Commercial Property Condominiums/ Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

REAL ESTATE RENTALS Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums/ Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

FINANCIAL Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgage/Loans

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

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Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn & Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

RECREATION Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boat Charters Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snowmobiles Sporting Goods

TRANSPORTATION Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

PETS & LIVESTOCK Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

SERVICES Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

NOTICES/ ANNOUNCEMENTS Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

PUBLIC NOTICES/ LEGAL ADS Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

Apartments, Unfurnished

Homes

ALL TYPES OF RENTALS

Property Management Division 170 N. Birch Suite 101, Soldotna (907)262-2522 Mary.Parske@century21.com www.Century21FreedomRealty.com

Real Estate For Sale Commercial Property Condominiums/Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

Commercial Property 10-BEDROOMS Ideal for fishing guide customers or Day Care. 185 Shady Lane. MLS# 13-4964 Price reduction to $310,000. McKay Investment (907)260-6675 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Assisted Living business for sale. Charming log construction. Owner retiring. 8 rooms fully occupied. Could be increased to 16. Soldotna location. 12 cap rate at $578,625. MLS#14-1381 McKay Investment (907)260-6675 MIXED USE BUILDING 7 Offices, 2-bedroom apt., and pizza restaurant. Ideal for owner occupant for the offices and commercial rentals as well. Highway Frontage in Soldotna. 7200sq.ft. for $631,000 ($88. per Sq.Ft.) MLS #13-15371 McKay Investment (907)2606675

Homes LEGACY ESTATES

SOLDOTNA Beautiful New Homes WE FINANCE

3-Bedroom, 2-Bath, 2-Car garage. In-slab radiant heat, Natural gas, energy efficient. $8,000. down. $1,350. per month. (907)262-0919

TO EARN MORE Get started with the Employment section of the Classifieds. The Classifieds are your best source for a comprehensive collection of area job opportunities. Don’t spend another year with a job that doesn’t match your earning potential; open your eyes to new career choices with the Classifieds.

283-7551

Manufactured Mobile Homes WINTER IN MESA ARIZONA. Why pay rent when you can own a 3-bedroom home in a 5 star gated retirement park. Priced to sell at $27,000. Includes major appliances, air conditioning & much more. For more information please call (505)321-3250

Rentals Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

Apartments, Unfurnished 2-BEDROOM Mile 18 Spur Hwy., $700. plus deposit of $700./ electric. No pets. Coin operated washer/dryer on site. (907)262-7248. 3-BEDROOMS 1-full, 2-half baths. $1,025. rent, 1,025. deposit. Cats accepted, No ASHA (907)335-1950 3-PLEX 2-Bedroom, dishwasher, washer/dryer. $780 plus electric, deposit. No smoking & no pets. (907)252-1527. COLONIAL MANOR (907)262-5820 Large 2-Bedroom, Walk-in closet, carport, storage, central location. Onsite manager. K-BEACH Large 2-bedroom, newly remodedled, utilities included. No pets. $875. (907)252-2579. QUIET, CLEAN 2 or 3-bedroom, Gas included. Mackey Lake. No pets! (907)398-8515. C

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C-4 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014

Homes

Apartments, Unfurnished

Apartments, Furnished

NEWLY REMODELED Brunswick Apts. 2-bedroom, storage, $630. Washer/dryer on premises. (907)262-7986. (907)252-9634. No AHFC.

FURNISHED 1200sqft. 2-bedroom, 2-bath, amenities. Conveniently located in Soldotna. $1,125. monthly, utilities included. (907)262-4359 KENAI RIVER FRONT Fully furnished apartments All Utilities including internet & cable except electric. washer/dryer on site. 40 ft Fishing Dock. No Pets, No Smoking. 3 Miles behind Fred Meyer, Redoubt/ Keystone Dr. 1 year lease. 3-Bedroom, 2-bath $1,350. 2-Bedroom, 1-bath, includes garage $1,800. (907)262-7430

REDOUBT VIEW Soldotna’s best value! Quiet, freshly painted, close to schools. 1-Bedroom from $625. 2-Bedroom from $725. 3-Bedroom, 2-bath, from $825. No pets. (907)262-4359. TWO WEEKS RENT FREE! 3-Bedroom, 1-bath on Redoubt (Kenai). Cats Allowed. Non-Smoking. No ASHA. $916. plus electric. $916. Deposit. (907)335-1950

Apartments, Furnished 1-LARGE ROOM $480. Soldotna, quiet setting, Satellite, limited cooking. (907)394-2543. DOWNTOWN Soldotna on the river. 2-bedroom, 1-bath, Seasonal/ Permanent, furnished/ unfurnished, NO pets/ NO smoking. Credit/ background checks. $850., (907)252-7110

Seasonal TOWNHOUSE Apartments On the River in Soldotna Fully furnished 1-bedroom, cable, WIFI, from $800. No smoking/ pets. (907)262-7835

Homes 1-BEDROOM Excellent location. Cable available. Immaculate. $825 plus utilities. (907)262-7881 1-BEDROOM On Kasilof River furnished, washer/dryer, new paint, carpet private. $900. includes utilities. (907)262-7405.

EXCELLENT OCEAN VIEW! Bay Arm Apartments, Kenai. Accepting applications for 1 & 2 bedroom apartments, utilities included. $25. nonrefundable application fee. No pets. (907)283-4405.

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283-3584

Homes Murwood K-Beach Ranch Updated K-Beach Ranch Nikiski Cabin Clam Gulch Cabin Spacious Soldotna Ranch Century21 Property Management (907)262-2522 NIKISKI New construction 3-bedroom, 2-bath, garage, completion expect Feb. 1, walking distance to Nikiski Rec. Center. $1,475. month, leave message. (907)776-3325 SOLDOTNA/ Endicott Executive home, River front, furnished 3-bedroom, 3-bath, appliances included, long term lease negotiable. (907)252-7110 WHY RENT ????? Why rent when you can own, many low down & zero down payment programs available. Let me help you achieve the dream of home ownership. Call Now !!! Ken Scott, #AK203469. (907)395-4527 or cellular, (907)690-0220. Alaska USA Mortgage Company, #AK157293.

Retail/ Commercial Space RED DIAMOND CENTER K-Beach Rd. 1,200- 2,400sq.ft. Retail or office, high traffic, across from DMV. Please call (907)953-2222 (907)598-8181

Retail/Commercial Space

It’s Easier Than You Think

PRIME KENAI RETAIL/ OFFICE SPACE 1,832SqFt to 20,000SqFt. Rates start @ $.50SqFt. Call Carr Gottstein Properties, (907)564-2424 or visit www.carrgottstein.com

To Place Your Ad Here

283-7551 Homes

Homes

Give new life to an old chair. Watch it walk away when you place a Clarion Classified garage sale ad.

Call 907-283-7551 and ask for the Garage Sale Special C

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014 C-5

Homes

Pick up a copy of the Peninsula’s most comprehensive

REAL ESTATE GUIDE published by The Peninsula Clarion

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Things Really MOVE In The Classifieds! Want to make a deal for your used tracks? Then why not drive your point across in the Classifieds? It’s a simple, cost effective way to reach qualified buyers who are looking for what you have to offer. Looking for something better, faster, or bigger? There’s no easier way than cruising the classifieds for just what you need. So don’t keep stalling. Call us to place your ad today.

283-7551

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C-6 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014

CLASSIFIEDS

Contact us

www.peninsulaclarion.com classifieds@peninsulaclarion.com

Classified Index EMPLOYMENT Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/ Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Commercial Property Condominiums/ Town Homes Farms/Ranches Homes Income Property Land Manufactured Mobile Homes Multiple Dwelling Out of Area for Sale Steel Building Vacation Property Wanted To Buy Waterfront Property

REAL ESTATE RENTALS Apartments, Unfurnished Apartments, Furnished Cabins Condominiums/ Town Homes Duplex Homes Lots For Rent Manufactured/Mobile Homes Misc. Rentals Office Space Out of Area Rentals Rental Wanted Retail/Commercial Space Roommate Wanted Rooms For Rent Storage Rentals Vacation Rentals

FINANCIAL Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgage/Loans

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn & Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

Healthcare

General Employment

TRANSPORTATION Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

BECOME AN OCEAN RANGER Help protect Alaska's environment and its people! Be an observer onboard cruise ships for the summer, monitoring State environmental and marine discharge requirements and identifying any potential safety, sanitation, and/or health risks. Compensation includes both salary and benefits. Minimum Qualifications: 1.) Designated Duty Engineer (DDE) or Third Assistant Engineer (3 A/E) or degree in marine safety and environmental protection from accredited maritime institution. 2.) American Maritime Officers (AMO) Union member. 3.) Pass criminal background check, able to enter Canada. 4.) Of sound physical condition and able to pass post-offer physical examination. 5.) Successful completion of Ocean Ranger training. To Apply: 1.) Online at www.Crowley.com/oceanrangers by 03/15/14. 2.) Email: marinejobs@crowley.com with questions. Alaska residents are encouraged to apply!

SERVICES Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

NOTICES/ ANNOUNCEMENTS Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

PUBLIC NOTICES/ LEGAL ADS Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

Hospice of Central Peninsula reaches out to individuals and families offering comfort and compassion when needed most. Are you sensitive to the human needs and situations encountered in the provision of hospice and bereavement care and ready for a life changing call to help people discover renewed meaning and purpose in life? Do you have knowledge of adult and child grief counseling, understanding of physical and psychosocial needs of terminally ill patients and caregivers? Consider the rewarding work of a Bereavement Coordinator. Job description and application for this 20 hour weekly position are available at 35911 Kenai Spur Hwy., Soldotna.

Healthcare

General Employment CITY OF SOLDOTNA EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Planning / GIS Technician Wage Range 14 $25.76/hr - $33.31/hr Non-Exempt The City of Soldotna has an opening for a regular full time Planning / GIS Technician in the Planning and Zoning Department. A complete job description is available on the City's website at http://ci.soldotna.ak.us/jobs.html. Must submit City application, resume and cover letter to Human Resources at 177 N. Birch Street, Soldotna, by email tcollier@ci.soldotna.ak.us, or fax 866-596-2994 by 5 p.m., January 31, 2014. The City of Soldotna is an EEO employer.

General Employment

UDELHOVEN OILFIELD SYSTEM SERVICES, INC.

UOSS is a merit shop construction contractor serving the Kenai Peninsula and Alaska for over 40 years. We are accepting applications for current openings on the Kenai Peninsula for JOURNEYMAN ELECTRICIANS for work offshore and onshore including overtime. If you want to become a part of an established company that puts their employees first, conducts their business with integrity, makes safe execution a priority, and shares success with their employees along with a great benefits package then we want to hear from you. Please send a copy of your resume with work history and any other information to kenaireception@udelhoven.com or fax (907) 283-5929.

Hope Community Resources is hiring on the Peninsula! Join our team as a Care Coordinator! Hope Community Resources, Inc. [Hope] is a private, non-profit agency that provides services to people who experience intellectual and developmental disabilities. Through in-home supports and community activities, people supported by Hope have the opportunity to live a full life in the community of their choice. More information regarding Hope’s mission and corporate culture is available at www.hopealaska.org JOB SUMMARY The Care Coordinator provides planning and advocacy to individuals experiencing disabilities. This includes working with the person-centered team to coordinate services, facilitate meetings, quality assure supports, and author professional documents. This position will also be required to do monthly visits at support recipient’s homes & in the community. The ideal candidate will be organized and have excellent time management, written and oral communication skills. Starting salary is $18.25/hr.

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General Employment

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VAC TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED AIMM Technologies, Inc is hiring 4 Operator/ Drivers. Minimum Class B CDL with Hazmat and Tanker endorsement. Vac Truck experience needed. CITS card needed. Pay DOE.

ROUSTABOUTS NEEDED

AIMM Technologies, Inc is hiring 4 Roustabouts. Applicants need 40 hr HazWoper, CITS and TWIC. Must have valid driver's license. Pay DOE. NO PHONE CALLS. Apply in person at Mile 17.9 Kenai Spur Hwy, Nikiski

Employment Agriculture Computing & Engineering Construction & Trades Domestics, Childcare, Aides Drivers/Transportation Education Finance & Accounting General Employment Healthcare Hospitality & Food Service Manufacturing & Production Oil & Refinery Office & Clerical Personal Care/Beauty Professional/ Management Real Estate, Leasing, Mortgage Retail Sales & Marketing Schools/Training Tourism Work Wanted

Financial Auctions Business for Sale Financial Opportunities Mortgages/Loans

150 Trading Bay Rd • 283-7551

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Brussels Griffons (to breed) Are loved for their humanly expression and comical disposition. Also referred to as the monkey face breed. If your looking for your own "Ewok" you've come to the right place! Litter whelped October 29th, 2013. 2 Females available (1 black SOLD, 2 beige color Available )Rough coats meaning wiry fur and non shedding. AKC registered, parents both on site! Tails docked, declawed, to breed standard, and up to date on shots. This will be my female’s last litter as she is 5 years old and it's not healthy to breed past that age. This is her 4th litter. $1,000. each. For more information please call, text or e-mail me. Tyliencorlis@yahoo.com (907)953-9284. Thank you for your interest. Kind regards -Tylie

Recreation Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boats Charter Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snow Mobiles Sporting Goods

Transportation

PETS & LIVESTOCK Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

Announcements AKC Brussels Griffon Puppies

RECREATION Aircrafts & Parts All-Terrain Vehicles Archery Bicycles Boat Supplies/Parts Boats & Sail Boats Boat Charters Boats Commercial Campers/Travel Trailers Fishing Guns Hunting Guide Service Kayaks Lodging Marine Motor Homes/RVs Snowmobiles Sporting Goods

Dogs

QUALIFICATIONS REQUIRED QUALIFICATIONS Two years work exp in social services or case management Bachelor’s in Health/Social Science, Psychology, Special Education or closely related field AND one year of full time, paid work experience with human services recipients- Experience may substitute for education on a 2 for 1 basis DESIRED QUALIFICATIONS One year of case management experience Experience working with individuals who experience disabilities OTHER Ability to lift 25 lbs. from a squat-and-kneel position Possess a valid Alaska driver license and proof of insurance Provide driving record that meets agency guidelines Pass a criminal background check under state regulation

To apply, please visit our website at www.hopealaska.org and complete an online application, or download a printable application form to fill out by hand. Submit paper applications by mail, fax or in person to the nearest Hope office. Résumés are optional and can be emailed to jobs@hopealaska.org.

Autos Classic/Custom Financing Motorcycles Parts & Accessories Rentals Repair & Services Sport Utilities, 4x4 Suburbans/Vans/ Buses Trucks Trucks: Commercial Trucks: Heavy Duty Trailers Vehicles Wanted

Pets & Livestock Birds Cats Dogs Horses Livestock Livestock Supplies Pet Services Pet Supplies

Dogs

KENAI KENNEL CLUB

Pawsitive training for all dogs & puppies. Agility, Conformation, Obedience, Privates & Rally. www.kenaikennelclub.com (907)335-2552 PUREBRED GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPPIES with papers for sale! They are papered & will have their first set of shots. They will be ready for their new homes the second week in February. 3 males & 3 females left. Males:$1000 Females:$1200 Call, text or email Tera! 907-252-7753 jtmillefamily@gmail.com

Miscellaneous

Antiques/Collectibles Appliances Audio/Video Building Supplies Computers Crafts/Holiday Items Electronics Exercise Equipment Firewood Food Furniture Garage Sales Heavy Equipment/ Farm Machinery Lawn/Garden Liquidation Machinery & Tools Miscellaneous Music Musical Instructions Office/Business Equipment Vacations/Tickets Wanted To Buy

WHITE GOLD RING with 1/2 carat diamond & smaller diamonds surrounding both sides. Worn for less than a year. $1,750. OBO Call/ text Kimberlee (907)598-0647

EVOS Trustee Council Teleconference January 27, 2014. The Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council will meet telephonically Monday, Jan 27, 2014, 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. in Grace Hall Conference Room 222, 4230 University Drive, Anchorage. To participate call: 800.315.6338, code 8205. For more information call: 907.278.8012 or 800.478.7745 or on the web at www.evostc.state.ak.us. If you have a disability and need special accommodations to participate, please contact Cherri Womac at the above contact numbers or email to cherri.womac@alaska.gov no later than 72 hours prior to the meeting to make any necessary arrangements.

Health

Services Appliance Repair Auction Services Automotive Repair Builders/Contractors Cabinetry/Counters Carpentry/Odd Jobs Charter Services Child Care Needed Child Care Provided Cleaning Services Commercial Fishing Education/Instruction Excavating/Backhoe Financial Fishing Guide Services Health Home Health Care Household Cleaning Services House-sitting Internet Lawn Care & Landscaping Masonry Services Miscellaneous Services Mortgages Lenders Painting/Roofing Plumbing/Heating/ Electric Satellite TV Services Snow Removal Tax Services Travel Services Tree Services Veterinary Water Delivery Well Drilling

Education/ Instruction RESIDENTIAL CONTRACTORS Test Prep Course. Wisdom & Associates, Inc. (907)283-0629.

PENINSULA THAI MASSAGE

Grand Opening! Thompsons’s Building in Soldotna, 44224 Sterling Highway (907)252-8053, (907)398-2073

Health

THAI HOUSE MASSAGE

Located in Kenai Behind Wells Fargo/ stripmall (907)252-6510, (907)741-1105

Health MOUNTAIN MAGIC MASSAGE

Health JASMINE THAI Massage, open Monday- Sunday, 10am- 6pm. (907)252-8053.

Hope Community Resources, Inc. • 540 W. International Airport Rd • Anchorage AK 99518 • 1.800.478.0078

Merchandise For Sale

To place an ad call 907-283-7551

TEACH ALL DOGS Everything with brains, not pain. Obedience, Puppy, Nose work, Rally, Agility, Privates. K-Beach Road (907)262-6846 www.pendog.org

Household Cleaning Services LOOKING TO CLEAN Homes/ Businesses, Soldotna Call Barb (907)741-0190 or message (907)741-1332

Nationally certified, Swedish deep tissue & Hotstone Massage (907)252-4460 www.mountainmagicmassage.com

Health **ASIAN MASSAGE**

Notices/ Announcements Announcements Card of Thanks Freebies Lost/Found Personals/Notices Misc. Notices/ Announcements Worship Listings

Public Notices/ Legal Ads Adoptions Articles of Incorporation Bids Foreclosures Government Misc. Notices Notice to Creditors Public Notices Regulations

Wonderful, Relaxing. Happy Holiday Call Anytime (907)398-8307. Thanks!

Advertise Online Today! www.peninsulaclarion.com

Get Results Fast

BEEP! BEEP! YOUR NEW RIDE IS WAITING IN THE CLASSIFIEDS

In the Service Directory. Just Call 283-7551 to Place your Ad today!

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014 C-7

Would you like to have your business highlighted in Yellow Advantage? • Reach readers in the newspaper and online that are ready, willing and able to buy your goods and services. • Have your business stand out from the competition by creating top of mind awareness. • Ads appear EVERYDAY in the newspaper • Easy to use online search engine puts your business ahead of the competion. • Update your ads and listings frequently.

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Automotive Insurance Walters & Associates Located in the Willow Street Mall

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

Business Cards

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

283-4977

Carhartt

Dentistry

Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing 35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

Boots

Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai

AK Sourdough Enterprises Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

AK Sourdough Enterprises

alias@printers-ink.com

Bathroom Remodeling

Computer Repair

35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

News, Sports, Weather & More!

Located in the Willow Street Mall

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD Oral Surgery, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

Circulation Hotline

Kenai Dental Clinic Emergency appts. available Denali Kid Care/Medicaid

605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

Bids

A Pre-bid Conference will be held at the offices of Nelson Engineering, PC 155 Bidarka Street Kenai, Alaska on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. local time. Attendance at the pre-bid conference is not mandatory. A five (5) percent bid bond is required.

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PROJECT TITLE: BEAVER LOOP ROAD CULVERT REPLACEMENT #3 PROJECT OWNER: Kenai Watershed Forum MAJOR WORK ITEMS: Provide temporary stream diversion. Remove and dispose of one existing 4â&#x20AC;&#x2122; diameter x 60â&#x20AC;&#x2122; CMP culvert. Remove and dispose of one existing 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; span x 60â&#x20AC;&#x2122; CMP culvert. Install Owner furnished pipe arch culvert: 80 feet x 137â&#x20AC;? x 87â&#x20AC;? x 12ga. Remove and replace 232 square yards pavement Excavation for structures - lump sum Concrete Headwalls - 2 Each Topsoil 4â&#x20AC;? thick â&#x20AC;&#x201C; All Required Seeding â&#x20AC;&#x201C; All Required Class II Rip Rap 90 Cubic Yards Relocate Sewer Main by directional drilling â&#x20AC;&#x201C; lump sum Relocate Water Main by directional drilling â&#x20AC;&#x201C; lump sum DESIGN ENGINEER: Nelson Engineering, PC PLANS WILL BE AVAILABLE: January 22, 2014 PRE-BID CONFERENCE: February 12, 2014 10:00AM BID OPENING: February 21, 2014 2:00 PM Prospective Bidders may be added to the Planholderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list via telephone by contacting Nelson Engineering, PC at (907) 283-2583. Bid documents will be sent free of charge via email by to all parties on the planholderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list. Hard copy Bidding Documents may be obtained upon payment of a non-refundable fee of $100.00. Bid will be awarded to the lowest qualified bidder. No bid negotiations will be done prior to, or after the bid opening. PUBLISH: 1/24, 29, 2/3, 6, 2014

Insurance Walters & Associates Located in the Willow Street Mall

130 S. Willow St. #8 Kenai............................. 283-5116

Oral Surgery, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

Oral Surgery

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD

Emergency appts. available Denali Kid Care/Medicaid

Oral Surgery, Crowns, Bridges Root Canals, Dentures, Partials Emergency appts. available DKC/Medicaid

605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Funeral Homes

Print Shops 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai............................. 283-4977

Rack Cards 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 2 Kenai............................. 283-4977

605 Marine Ave. Kenai............................. 283-4875

Classified Advertising. Let It Work For You! 283-7551

Classifieds Work!

283-7551 Public Notices

) ) ) ) )

Notice of Petition to Change Name A petition has been filed in the Superior Court (Case # 3KN-13-1078CI) a name change from (Current name) WILLIAM BRADLEY REMMY to WILLIAM BRADLEY HARRISON. A hearing on this request will be held on February 20, 2014 at 3:00 p.m. at Kenai Courthouse, 125 Trading Bay Drive, Kenai, AK 99611. DECEMBER 24, 2013 CHARLES T. HUGUELET Effective Date: Superior Court Judge PUBLISH: 1/3, 10, 17, 24, 2014

1541/73750

Your Ad Could Be Here!

RFP documents can be obtained on the City of Kenai website at www.ci.kenai.ak.us or at City Hall for a non-refundable fee. PUBLISH: 1/24, 28, 2014

Emergency appts. available Denali Kid Care/Medicaid

35081 Kenai Spur Hwy. Soldotna .......................262-5916

WILLIAM BRADLEY REMMY Current Name of Adult Case No: 3KN-13-1078CI

Proposers should contact the Public Works Department at (907) 283-8236 to be placed on the list to receive addenda. Attendance at the Pre-Proposal meeting is not mandatory but is strongly recommended.

Kenai ................................335-0559 Cell....................................350-0559

Kenai Dental Clinic

alias@printers-ink.com

Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing

In the Matter of a Change of Name for:

Project Name: New Water Reservoir and Water Main Replacement Design Proposal Documents Available: January 23, 2014 Pre-Proposal Meeting: Tuesday January 28, 2014 @ 2 PM at City Hall Last Day for Questions: Wednesday January 29, 2014 @ 5 PM Proposal Due Date: Tuesday February 18, 2014 @ 2 PM at City Hall The City of Kenai hereby invites qualified firms to submit proposals for design and inspection services for a new 1 million gallon water reservoir and replacement of approximately 2,100 feet of existing water main.

Residential/Commercial Construction & Building Maintenance *Specializing in custom finish trim/cabinets* 35 yrs experience in Alaska

Teeth Whitening

Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF ALASKA AT KENAI

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP)

AK Sourdough Enterprises

alias@printers-ink.com

Public Notices CITY OF KENAI 210 FIDALGO AVENUE Kenai, ALASKA 99611-7764 (907) 283-8236

Remodeling

Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK

Outdoor Clothing

Peninsula Memorial Chapels & Crematory Kenai........................................283-3333 Soldotna ..................................260-3333 Homer...................................... 235-6861 Seward.....................................224-5201

Bids

INVITATION TO BID Kenai Watershed Forum 44129 Sterling Hwy PO Box 2937 Soldotna, Alaska 99611 Sealed bids will be received for the furnishing of all labor, materials, and equipment for the construction of the Beaver Loop Road Culvert Replacement #3 listed below. Bids must be submitted to: Owner: Kenai Watershed Forum Address: c/o Nelson Engineering, PC 155 Bidarka Street Kenai, Alaska, 99611 Bids must be submitted on or before 2:00PM local time on Friday, February 21, 2014. All bids will be publicly opened and read aloud.

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Family Dentistry Cook Inlet Dental James Halliday, DMD

Kenai Dental Clinic

908 Highland Ave. Kenai............................. 283-0454

Walters & Associates

Sweeneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clothing

Every Day in your Peninsula Clarion â&#x20AC;˘ www.peninsulaclarion.com

Contractor

Full Color Printing PRINTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INK

ZZZpeninsulaclarionFRP

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Find your new vehicle today in the Classifieds!

283-7551

1566/03192

State of Alaska Department of Natural Resources Division of Mining, Land & Water Southcentral Region Land Office 550 W. 7th Ave., Suite 900C Anchorage, AK 99501-3577 Public Notice: Proposed Commercial Lease ADL 228852 Pursuant to AS 38.05.945 (USGS Quad Map Seward C-8) Subject to AS 38.05.070, the Southcentral Region Land Office (SCRO) has made a Preliminary Decision to offer a 30-year lease to Chugach Electric Association, Inc., on six acres of state land for the continued operation and maintenance of an electric utility substation and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) communications, located near Cooper Landing. The proposed site is located within the South1/2NW 1/4 of Section 16, Township 5 North, Range 2 West, Seward Meridian. The public is invited to review and comment on this Decision. A copy of the Decision can be found at www.dnr.alaska.gov/commis/pic/pubnotfrm.htm

or is available in hardcopy upon request. Questions concerning how to comment should be directed to Jenny Willoughby at (907) 269-8549 or by e-mail at jennifer.willoughby@alaska.gov or by fax to (907) 269-8913. All comments must be received in writing at the above listed mailing address or e-mail on or before 5:00 PM on February 24, 2014. To be eligible to appeal DNR's Final Decision, under AS 38.05.035(i)-(m), a person must have submitted written comments during this comment period. The State of Alaska, Department of Natural Resources, complies with Title II of the American with Disabilities Act of 1990. Individuals with disabilities who may need auxiliary aids, services and/or special modifications to comment should contact Jenny via TDD (907) 269-8549. DNR reserves the right to waive technical defects in this publication. PUBLISH: 1/24, 2014

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News, Sports, Weather & More!

Ditch The Doghouse Make your move to a cozy new home with a little help from the Clarion Classifieds, Dispatch Classifieds and the Alaska Real Estate Magazine. For More Information call or go online:

283-7551

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C-8 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014

Advertise “By the Month” or save $ with a 3, 6 or 12 month contract. Call Advertising Display 283-7551 to get started!

BATHROOM REMODELING

HaveGENERAL ToolsCONTRACTING Will Travel

Cell: (907) 398-3425

Lic.# 30426 • Bonded & Insured

Small Engine Repair

Long Distance Towing

Slide Backs • Winch Out Services • Auto Sales Vehicle Storage • Roll Over Recoveries

Reddi Towing & Junk Car Killers We don’t want your fingers,

• Rooftop Snow Removal • Roofing • Drywall • Decks • Siding • Building Maintenance Thomas Bell-Owner

Licensed & Insured Lic.#952948

776-3490 690-3490

residential roofing & Services

commercial roofing & Services

HEATING

No matter how old your system is we can make it more efficient. FREE Kenai: 283-1063 Text us at: ESTIMATES Nikiski: 776-8055 394-4017 email us at: linton401@gmail.com Soldotna: 262-1964 394-4018 UNLIMITED MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS License # 34609

Now located on the Kenai Peninsula for all your roofing needs.

907-260-roof (7663)

Member of the Kenai Peninsula Builders Association

www.rainproofroofing.com

Check Out

Celebrity Profiles Movie Features

select TV @ Y O U R T V E N T E RTA I N M E N T M A G A Z I N E

just your tows!

Towing

130 S Willow Street, Suite 8 • Kenai, AK 99611

24/7 PLUMBING AND

?

Computer Repair, Networking Dell Business Partner Web Design & Hosting

Do you look forward to your gas bill each month? If not, you should call

Plumbing & Heating

Notices

Insulation

– Based in Kenai & Nikiski –

Vinyl Hardwood

FREE ESTIMATES!

Notice to Consumers The State of Alaska requires construction companies to be licensed, bonded and insured before submitting bids, performing work, or advertising as a construction contractor in accordance with AS 08..18.011, 08.18.071, 08.18.101, and 08.15.051. All advertisements as a construction contractor require the current registration number as issued by the Division of Occupational Licensing to appear in the advertisement. CONSUMERS MAY VERIFY REGISTRATION OF A CONTRACTOR . Contact the AK Department of Labor and Workforce Development at 907-269-4925 or The AK Division of Occupational Licensing in Juneau at 907-4653035 or at www.dced.state.ak.us/acc/home.htm

Computer Problems Call Today ( 9 0 7 ) 2 8 3 - 5 1 1 6

ONE ALASKAN HANDYMAN SERVICE

907-252-7148

Flooring

252-3965

Licensed, Bonded & Insured

Carpet Laminate Floors Electric

Construction

Lic #39710

• Carpentry • General Handyman Work • Sheetrock • Painting • Woodwork • Tree Removal • Hauling • Cleanup & Repairs • Decks • Kitchen Remodels • Bath • Siding • Remodels • Unfinished Projects?

35 Years Construction Experience

283-3362

RFN FLOORS Professional Installation & Repair

LLC

ROOFING

Tim Wisniewski, owner • Residential & Commercial • Emergency Water Removal • Janitorial Contracts • Upholstery Cleaning

Handyman

260-4943

By Chris S Schrier

NO • Full or Partial PR W B • Plastic or Tile OJ OO ECT KI • Clean Quality Work S 2 NG 014 • Licensed-Bonded-Insured sured ! • Free Estimates/References rences • G.C.L. #37517, R.E. #2497 2497

Roofing

Licensed • Bonded • Insured •License #33430

Tim’s Cleaning

• Experienced • Trustworthy • Dependable • Attention to detail Serving the Kenai Peninsula for over 11 years

Bathroom Remodeling

Bathroom Remodeling

Full or Partial Bathroom Remodels

Computer Repair

Advertise in the Service Directory today! - Includes Dispatch. 283-7551

907. 776 . 3967

www.peninsulaclarion.com

& More!

Everybody’s talking about what’s in the classifieds. Peninsula Clarion

www.peninsulaclarion.com • 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite #1, Kenai, Alaska 99611 • 283-7551 • FAX 283-3299 • Monday - Friday 8 A.M. - 5 P.M.

Classified Ad Rates Number of Days Run

UARY 23, 2014 FRIDAY AFTERNOON/EVENING

1 PM 11:30

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4 PM

mel Live (:37) Nightline ean Lowe. (N) (3) ABC-13 7030

Alaska Daily

e Office ‘14’ It’s Always Sunny in (6) MNT-5 7035 Philadelphia With David Late Late G’ Show/Craig (8) CBS-11 7031 o and a TMZ (N) ‘PG’ lf Men ‘14’ (9) FOX-4 7033

The Insider (N)

Show With Late Night att LeBlanc. With Jimmy (10) NBC-2 7032 Fallon ‘14’ arlie Rose (N) (12) PBS-7 7036

DS.

turama ‘PG’ ’Til Death ‘PG’

Be Announced

hite Collar Peter asks for ana’s help. ‘PG’ e Pete Conan ‘14’ lmes Show A’ stle “Murder Most Fowl” G’ ortsCenter Australian Open ortsCenter (N)

ght Sports MMA (N)

105 242

(30) TBS

139 247

(31) TNT

138 245

(34) ESPN 140 206 (35) ESPN2 144 209 (36) ROOT 426 651

(55) TLC

168 325 130 254 176 296 184 282 173 291 171 300 180 311 183 280

(56) DISC 182 278

Inside Edition Family Feud Family Feud (N) ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’

The Dr. Oz Show ‘PG’ WordGirl ‘Y7’ Wild Kratts The bull frog habitat. ‘Y’

d Eye (N)

(67) FNC

205 360

1) At Mid- (:31) Broad (81) COM 107 249 ght ‘14’ City ‘14’ rror) Ving Rhames. Survi (82) SYFY 122 244 mbies. ‘14’

EEDS.

Channel 2 News 5:00 Report (N) BBC World News America ‘PG’

NBC Nightly News (N) Alaska Weather ‘G’

6 PM

6:30

7 PM

B = DirecTV

7:30

8 PM

JANUARY 24, 2014

8:30

9 PM

9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’

Wheel of For- Last Man (:31) The Shark Tank Stylish baby (:01) 20/20 (N) ‘PG’ tune (N) ‘G’ Standing (N) Neighbors (N) shoes. (N) ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ Family Guy 30 Rock ‘PG’ Monk “Mr. Monk Buys a Monk Monk goes up against a American Family Guy ‘14’ House” Monk buys a new chess genius. ‘PG’ Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ house. ‘PG’ KTVA 6 p.m. Evening News Undercover Boss “Buffets, Hawaii Five-0 “Ho’opio” ‘14’ Blue Bloods “Warriors” ‘14’ (N) Inc.” ‘PG’ The Big Bang The Big Bang Bones “The Master in the Raising Hope Enlisted Fox 4 News at 9 (N) Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘14’ Slop” Investigating a chess (N) ‘14’ “Prank War” master’s death. ‘14’ ‘14’ Channel 2 Newshour (N) Dateline NBC (N) ‘PG’ Grimm “The Wild Hunt” (:01) Dracula “Let There Be Monroe’s parents arrive early. Light” Grayson and Lady Jane (N) ‘14’ face off. ‘14’ PBS NewsHour (N) Washington Alaska Edi- The Real Mary Poppins Music Makes a City Leaders Week With tion Pamela Travers creates Mary rally to save civic orchestra. Gwen Ifill Poppins. (N) ‘PG’ (N) ‘G’

ABC News at Jimmy Kimmel Live ‘14’ 10 (N)

(:32) Nightline (N)

30 Rock ‘14’ How I Met The Office It’s Always Your Mother “Booze Cruise” Sunny in ‘14’ ‘PG’ Philadelphia KTVA Night- (:35) Late Show With David Late Late cast Letterman (N) ‘PG’ Show/Craig The Arsenio Hall Show ‘14’ Two and a TMZ (N) ‘PG’ Half Men ‘14’ Channel 2 (:34) The Tonight Show With Late Night News: Late Jay Leno (N) ‘14’ With Jimmy Edition (N) Fallon ‘14’ “Jake Shimabukuro: Life on Charlie Rose (N) Four Strings” (2012, Documentary)

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS. How I Met How I Met WGN News at Nine (N) Your Mother Your Mother California Gold Rush ‘G’ Wife Swap ‘PG’

How I Met Rules of En- Rules of En- Parks and Your Mother gagement gagement Recreation Computers & Tablets ‘G’

Parks and 30 Rock ‘14’ 30 Rock ‘14’ It’s Always Recreation Sunny Dooney & Bourke ‘G’

Futurama ‘PG’ ’Til Death ‘PG’

Wife Swap ‘PG’

The Dead Files Property in Wichita, Kansas. ‘PG’ American American American American American American Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration The First 48 An unarmed man The First 48 Fatal stabbing at The First 48 “Desperate (:01) The First 48 A decomis shot in the back. ‘14’ a Texas strip mall. ‘14’ Moves” A man is gunned posed body is found in the down in his car. ‘14’ woods. ‘14’ Hawaii Life ‘G’ Hawaii Life ‘G’ Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Beachfront Beachfront Vacation House for Free ‘G’ House Hunt- Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Bargain Bargain ers ‘G’ Chopped ‘G’ Eat Street Eat Street Diners, Drive Diners, Drive The Mauro’s Magical Disney Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives Diners, Drive Diners, Drive (N) ‘G’ (N) ‘G’ Vacation (N) ‘G’ (N) ‘G’ American Greed American Greed “Arthur American Greed Mad Money The Car Chasers The Car Chasers “Flippin Paid Program Paid Program Nadel” Ferraris” The O’Reilly Factor (N) The Kelly File (N) Hannity (N) The O’Reilly Factor The Kelly File Hannity On the Record With Greta Van Susteren Futurama ‘14’ Futurama ‘14’ South Park Tosh.0 ‘14’ The Colbert Daily Show/ Futurama ‘14’ Futurama ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘MA’ Key & Peele Key & Peele Amy Schumer: Mostly Sex ‘14’ Report ‘PG’ Jon Stewart ‘14’ ‘14’ Stuff ‘14’ “Final Destination 2” (2003) Ali Larter, A.J. Cook. Grisly Helix “274” WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) ‘PG’ Helix “Single Strand” (N) Bitten “Prodigal” fates await the survivors of a highway calamity.

PREMIUM STATIONS

Bizarre Foods With Andrew Zimmern ‘PG’ Modern Marvels Touring whiskey distilleries. ‘PG’ The First 48 A brutal convenience-store slaying. ‘14’

Man v. Food Man v. Food “DC” ‘G’ “Austin” ‘G’ American American Restoration Restoration The First 48 A mother is murdered in a home invasion. ‘14’

Ghost Adventures ‘PG’

Ghost Adventures “Letchworth Village” ‘PG’ American Restoration ‘PG’

The Dead Files (N) ‘PG’

Ghost Adventures “Letchworth Village” ‘PG’ American American Restoration Restoration (:01) The First 48 An unarmed man is shot in the back. ‘14’ Vacation House for Free ‘G’ Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Paid Program Paid Program Red Eye (N) Broad City “The Ringer” ‘14’ Helix “Single Strand”

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

(3:15) “Ocean’s Twelve” (2004) George “The Presence” (2010, Drama) Mira Sorvino. True Detective Former CID True Detective “Seeing Real Time With Bill Maher (N Real Time With Bill Maher Girls “She Looking ue Detective “Seeing partners give statements. ‘MA’ Things” Quesada warns Hart Same-day Tape) ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Said OK” ‘MA’ “Looking for ings” Quesada warns Hart ! HBO 303 504 Clooney. Indebted criminals plan an elaborate A woman travels to a remote cabin and is heist in Europe. ‘PG-13’ stalked by a ghost. ‘PG-13’ and Cohle. ‘MA’ Now” ‘MA’ d Cohle. ‘MA’ og Story” (:45) “Sav“The Lucky One” (2012) Zac Efron. A war (:45) “The Game” (1997, Suspense) Michael Douglas, Sean Penn, Deborah “Oblivion” (2013, Science Fiction) Tom Cruise, Morgan (:10) “The Chronicles of Riddick” (2004, Science Fiction) hristine ages” (2012) ^ HBO2 304 505 vet looks for the woman he believes brought Kara Unger. A businessman takes part in an unusual form of recreation. ‘R’ Freeman, Olga Kurylenko. A stranger’s arrival triggers one Vin Diesel, Colm Feore. A fugitive fights an invading ruler and ‘R’ him luck. ‘PG-13’ man’s battle to save mankind. ‘PG-13’ his army. ‘PG-13’ ies Feature 4: Luck Is a “Project X” (2012, Comedy) Thomas Mann. “Undercover Brother” (2002, Comedy) “Snitch” (2013, Crime Drama) Dwayne Johnson, Barry Pep- Banshee “The Warrior Class” Banshee “The Warrior Class” “The Super Sex Program” n of episodes. ‘MA’ ‘MA’ (2013, Adult) Mary Carey, + MAX 311 514 Three teens throw a party that spins wildly out Eddie Griffin. An ultra-cool agent squares off per, Jon Bernthal. A man infiltrates a drug cartel to save his (N) ‘MA’ of control. ‘R’ against a white villain. son from prison. ‘PG-13’ Jazy Berlin. ‘NR’ Adult-movie stars receive (3:00) “Being John Malkov- (4:55) “Fish Tank” (2009, Drama) Michael Fassbender, Katie House of Lies Episodes “Lawless” (2012, Crime Drama) Shia LaBeouf, Tom Hardy, Shameless “My Oldest Inside the NFL ‘PG’ Jarvis. Life changes for Mia when her mother gets a new ‘MA’ “Episode 2” Jason Clarke. The Bondurant brothers become bootleggers in Daughter” ‘MA’ 5 SHOW 319 540 ich” (1999, Comedy) John Cusack. ‘R’ boyfriend. ‘NR’ ‘MA’ Depression-era Virginia. ‘R’ (3:00) “How to Lose Friends “Stage Beauty” (2004, Historical Drama) Billy Crudup, Biography) Steve Coogan, “The Best Man” (1999, Comedy-Drama) Taye Diggs, Nia (:05) “Nurse Betty” (2000, Comedy) Morgan Freeman, “Fade to Black” (2004, Raymond builds a porn, club 8 TMC 329 545 & Alienate People” (2008) Claire Danes, Rupert Everett. A 17th-century actor’s dresser Long, Morris Chestnut. A writer meets an old flame at his Renée Zellweger, Chris Rock. A delusional waitress imagines Documentary) ‘R’ Simon Pegg. becomes the first actress. ‘R’ friend’s wedding. ‘R’ a TV doctor pines for her. ‘R’

January 19 - 25, 2014

Clarion TV

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Minimum of $6.30 per ad or 10 Word Minimum per Day Plus 6% Sales Tax • VISA & MasterCard welcome. Classified ads also run in the Dispatch and Online (except single day ads) *Ask about our recruitment ad pricing, details & deadlines

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Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014

Crossword

Not asking for bride’s hand is poor first step for groom DEAR ABBY: My boyfriend, “Chad,” proposed two months ago, but he didn’t ask my parents for my hand in marriage. My parents are upset about it. When I realized that Chad hadn’t gone to them, I asked him why. He said he was following what his father had done — proposing first and then speaking to the parents. But Chad still hasn’t done it. In fact, he has yet to be around them at all. How do I get my boyfriend to speak to my parents? They are no longer as angry as they were, but they still would like to talk to him. I spend lots of time with Chad’s family, but I can’t get him to even go to lunch with mine. Dad said that if Chad doesn’t clear the air with him, he may not bother showing up at our wedding! What do I do, Abby? — FIANCEE IN A FIX DEAR FIANCEE: You appear to be quite young. If I were you, I would take a step backward and see this from your parents’ point of view. It appears that Chad wasn’t entirely honest with you when he gave his reason for not talking to them. Could he be intimidated? When a daughter marries, most parents want to know something about the young man — not only where he has been, but also what are his plans for the future, including where the two of you will be

living and whether he has a job. That Chad is hiding from them isn’t a good sign. When most couples become engaged, the parents of the bride and groom usually get together and start to form a relationship. If your father hasn’t met your fiance, it makes it harder for your parents to reach out to his. When the in-laws are Abigail Van Buren friendly, it makes for a more harmonious marriage. As it stands, it appears Chad is not interested in having any relationship with your family. Frankly, I can’t blame your father for being upset about it. DEAR ABBY: My wife and I disagree on whether to tell our kids and friends how we met. When my wife and I met, she was underage. She was 16 and I was 21. We fell in love; it was true love. We have been together for 24 years. We have two beautiful children and have made a wonderful life together. I love her as much today as the first time I met her. How should we answer people when they ask about

DEAR ABBY: When I buy a sweater I usually get an extra button in a little clear baggie attached to the garment. Today, I bought a sweater with a piece of matching thread in the tiny plastic bag. Why do manufacturers insist on adding something to every article of clothing even if it is just a piece of thread? — INQUISITIVE IN ILLINOIS DEAR INQUISITIVE: The thread is provided in case the garment needs to be rewoven in the event you get a hole in it or a tear. It’s a courtesy to the customer, so stop looking a gift horse in the mouth.

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Rubes

By Leigh Rubin

Ziggy

Hints from Heloise play. Resist expressing any negativity for now, as it might stem from you and how you are seeing a situation. Keep it light and nonjudgmental, and others will be delighted. News from a distance will please you. Tonight: In the midst of the action. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Remain sensitive to your needs. You are often so busy running around, you let your needs go. Eventually, this lack of attention will catch up with you. Just wait and see. It would be a good idea to take some time just for you. Tonight: Screen calls. Keep it low-key. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You will be pleased that your friends made plans around you; however, it might appear as though you have not been informed of some sort of change. An older relative or friend could become demanding. Tonight: Among others. Don’t be alone. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH You won’t be able to escape a previously agreed-upon commitment. This activity involves a certain amount of responsibility, which could take away from the fun spirit of the weekend. Just clear up this task, and you will free yourself up. Tonight: Leader of the gang. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Your mind seems to drift to someone at a distance whom you care about. You could be tired and need a break. Why not meet this person halfway? Your sense of humor emerges with a child or loved one. Tonight: Tap into your imagination.

Dear Readers: Even though the holidays seem to have just finished, Valentine’s Day is right around the corner! In fact, the cards and candy are already out in the stores! So, here’s a hint for a very special postmark for your sweet valentine cards. Every year, Loveland, Colo. (“The Sweetheart City”), hand-stamps more than 160,000 cards with the year’s winning design and verse in the postmark. It is a wonderful way to show someone you are thinking of him or her. Why not send one to family, friends, troops overseas or even yourself? To have cards stamped with the valentine postmark and verse, address and stamp each card (49 cents for standard cards) and place them all in one large, first-class envelope. Send to: Postmaster — Attention Valentines, 446 E. 29th St., Loveland, CO 80538-9998. For your cards to make it to their destination in time, they need to be received no later than Feb. 7 for all U.S.destined mail. (Foreign mail must be there no later than Feb. 4.) There are other sweet valentine postmarks to choose from. How about: Valentine, TX (79854), Romance, AR (72136), Heartwell, NE (68945), Lovejoy, GA (30250). Follow the same procedure, and address to: Postmaster, Valentine Remailing and the city with the sweet postmark of your choice. — Heloise P.S.: How about a card from each valentine city to your special sweetie?

SUDOKU

By Tom Wilson

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Friday.

2 9 5 8 7 6 1 4 3

4 3 7 1 2 5 8 6 9

1 6 8 9 3 4 7 5 2

6 5 1 3 8 2 4 9 7

9 8 2 6 4 7 3 1 5

7 4 3 5 9 1 6 2 8

8 7 6 2 1 9 5 3 4

3 1 9 4 5 8 2 7 6

Difficulty Level

5 2 4 7 6 3 9 8 1

2014 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

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whirlwind of activity as of late, so be sure to accomplish as much as you can. Invite a child or dear friend to join you and to visit with you at the same time. Tonight: Tired yet? CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH How you handle a loved one could bring him or her much closer. If you have a criticism, step back and think about where you are coming from before you say anything. If you are single, you easily could meet someone of significance in the next few days. Tonight: Let the good times in. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You are full of energy, especially in regard to a family member. You seem to draw many people to you, so be willing to listen to their perspectives. Stay close to home, and enjoy what is happening around you. Tonight: In the middle of the action. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH You might want to return some calls and initiate some of your own before solidifying your plans. You could change your mind at the last minute. Finances also could play a role in your decision. A friendship will prove to be lucky for you once again. Tonight: Hang out with friends. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHYou could become more argumentative than you have been. In fact, if you notice others backing away, you will know why. A call from a neighbor or relative could catch you off guard. You might be forced to deal with a difficult situation. Tonight: Treat time. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHYour personality is on full dis-

By Eugene Sheffer

how we met and fell in love? I know it was wrong and against the law. — MIKE IN CALIFORNIA DEAR MIKE: You do not have to quote chapter and verse when someone asks a question. In a case like yours, you could say that you met when you were both quite young without going into the specifics. For a 21-year-old to SEE a 16-year-old girl is not against the law, as long as her parents approve and they are not having sex. The laws regarding statutory rape were enacted to prevent predators from preying on minors.

Jacqueline Bigar’s Stars HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, Jan. 24, 2014: This year you feel connected to someone in your day-to-day life. You often offer a new perspective, which this person enjoys. A good friendship could develop between you. Your image and commitments evolve and become more important than before. If you are single, come summertime, you could meet a heartthrob who you will put in your memory books. Needless to say, a lot of excitement surrounds this bond. If you are attached, you often can be seen with your significant other on your arm. You like showing off your sweetie. SCORPIO pushes you hard. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH No one questions your drive or energy right now. A friend might be delighted by your company, especially as the two of you head off on an adventure of some sort. You also could choose to get involved in a project with a loved one. Tonight: You’re best on a one-on-one basis. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Others keep piling more on your plate, but only because they want to spend more time with you. Make plans to head off to a flea market, movie, game — you name it! Make yourself more available to someone. Tonight: Go along with someone else’s plans. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH Make a point to tackle your to-do list, which hopefully involves a little exercise. You seem to be a

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Previous Puzzles Answer Key

B.C.

By Johnny Hart

Garfield

By Jim Davis

Take It from the Tinkersons By Bill Bettwy

Tundra

Shoe

By Chad Carpenter

By Chris Cassatt & Gary Brookins

Mother Goose and Grimm

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By Michael Peters


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C-10 Peninsula Clarion, Friday, January 24, 2014

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Profile for Sound Publishing

Peninsula Clarion, January 24, 2014  

January 24, 2014 edition of the Peninsula Clarion

Peninsula Clarion, January 24, 2014  

January 24, 2014 edition of the Peninsula Clarion