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Dig in

Scorch

Filmmaker explores Alaska mining

Booker hits 50 but Suns lose again

Arts/A8

Sports/A6

CLARION

Drizzle 44/31 More weather on Page A2

P E N I N S U L A

Thursday, March 28, 2019 Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

Vol. 49, Issue 152

In the news Alaska seeks to delist Arctic ringed seals as threatened ANCHORAGE — Alaska officials say they are seeking to remove threatened species protection from an Arctic seal species. KTVA-TV reports the state Department of Fish and Game announced Tuesday that it has petitioned the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to delist the ringed seal from the federal Endangered Species Act. State Division of Wildlife Conservation Director Eddie Grasser says ringed seals number in the millions, so there doesn’t appear to be a significant case for listing. NOAA spokeswoman Julie Speegle says the agency has received the petition, triggering a 90day deadline for NOAA to publish a determination on if the petition has “substantial information” to proceed. Speegle says a status review process would begin if the petition moves forward, leading to a delisting decision to be made within a year.

Police arrest 3 suspected of crashing 1,800can food display ANCHORAGE — Police have arrested three juveniles suspected of crashing a display of 1,800-food cans collected for an Alaska food bank. The chest-high structure built by 17 engineering students at Anchorage’s Dimond High School was displayed at the Dimond Center mall. The display was the only student structure in an annual “Canstructure” competition, which raises food donations for the Food Bank of Alaska. Architecture and engineering firms entered a dozen other entries. Anchorage police say the suspects slammed their bodies into the display Sunday night and fled. Two suspects are from Dimond High. The third is a home-school student. Police forwarded vandalism charges on all three to juvenile authorities. The food was valued at $2,300. Many of the cans were damaged. The food bank is evaluating whether damaged cans can be accepted. — Associated Press

Index Local................A3 Opinion........... A4 Sports..............A6 Arts..................A8 Classifieds.... A10 Comics.......... A12 Check us out online at www.peninsulaclarion.com To subscribe, call 283-3584.

$1 newsstands daily/$1.50 Sunday

Kenai ‘chooses respect’ Dunleavy to pick new

By BRIAN MAZUREK Peninsula Clarion

The Kenai community held its 10th annual Choose Respect March on Wednesday. Organized by volunteers and employees of the LeeShore Center, the event was meant to show solidarity with Alaskans marching all over state in order to raise awareness and promote prevention of sexual assault and domestic violence. More than 50 peninsula residents marched from Leif Hansen Memorial Park to the Kenai Visitor’s Center. Local state troopers and Kenai police also joined in the procession, See KENAI, page A2

judge from council nominees By BECKY BOHRER Associated Press

Peninsula residents participate in the annual Choose Respect March in Kenai on Wednesday. (Photo by Brian Mazurek/Peninsula Clarion)

JUNEAU — Gov. Mike Dunleavy has relented and said Wednesday he now will fill a Palmer Superior Court seat with one of two remaining candidates sent to him by the Alaska Judicial Council. His announcement followed a meeting Tuesday with Alaska Supreme Court Chief Justice Joel See PICK, page A3

‘Best of Broadway’ puts spin on theater’s biggest hits By JOEY KLECKA Peninsula Clarion

From “Hairspray,” “Phantom of the Opera” and “The Music Man” to “All That Jazz” and “West Side Story,” music and theater buffs often have a favorite production that stands out above the rest. For the past three months, the difficult task of compiling all those legendary pieces together for one performance has been the job the producers of “The Best of Broadway.” The show, which will be performed by members of Forever Dance Alaska in collaboration with the Aurora Dance Company, opens to audiences this weekend for a two-night affair. Forever Dance Alaska

about how it’s so fun to see the show come to fruition,” Swanson said. The show opens as the Aurora Dance Company’s annual showcase. Swanson has owned Forever Dance Alaska with her husband Aaron since the company moved from Vergine’s Dance Studio in Soldotna. Swanson said the idea of putting together a Broadway-themed show that combines many of theater’s greatest hits began several years ago. Swanson said she and her choreographers decided to finally take the plunge Youth members of Forever Dance Alaska take part in rehearsal Tuesday, at the Renee in spring 2019. Hendersen Auditorium at Kenai Central High School, for the company’s production of “We thought, ‘This is “Best of Broadway.” (Photo by Joey Klecka/Peninsula Clarion) the year to do it’,” Swanson said. “We have the staff and owner Darcy Swanson said ity that began during the dancers will take the stage dancers to do it justice.” the excitement of the final winter holiday season. In this weekend. The show includes “We’ve been thinking See BEST, page A3 show caps a flurry of activ- all, Swanson said 49 youth

Students send a message By VICTORIA PETERSEN Peninsula Clarion

Students from across the peninsula are working to make sure their voices are heard by lawmakers. On the central peninsula, local parent groups are helping students voice their concerns through letter writing. On Wednesday, March 20, parents and students from River City Academy organized a postcard-writing event open to the public. River City Academy 10th-grader Kaegan Koski See SEND, page A2

Senate votes to roll back conflict of interest restrictions By MOLLIE BARNES Juneau Empire

River City Academy student Molly Koski helps host a postcard-writing event on Wednesday, March 20, at the Soldotna Public Library. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/ Peninsula Clarion)

The Senate voted on Wednesday to roll back some conflict of interest laws that some lawmakers said were too broad and restricted legislators from being able to do their jobs. “It really comes to your constitutional duty to be able to speak freely as a member of Alaska’s Senate or House,” Sen. John Coghill, R-North Pole, said. “When do you throttle back the 32,000 people and their voice? And when is it

a real conflict with you? I don’t know that we’ve got the perfect balance … It’s meant to be accountability structures … that if you’re grandizing yourself at the state expense with your authority, you should be held accountable.” Majority Leader Mia Costello said the reason the bill was before the senate was because lawmakers realized they need to return some common sense to unintended consequences of HB 44, a bill which required legislators See ROLL, page A3

White supremacist gang members face federal charges By MARK THIESSEN Associated Press

ANCHORAGE — Filthy Fuhrer and five other members of a white supremacist gang that was spawned in prisons in Alaska, Arizona and Colorado have been charged in the gruesome beating death of a member whose Nazi tattoo was burned off his rib cage with a hot knife. Fuhrer, who legally changed his name from Timothy Lobdell, and the others sporting tattoos like iron crosses, swastikas or Schultzstaffel (SS) lightning bolt tattoos also face federal racketeering charges of kidnapping and assault in the August

Two others, Nicholas Kozorra and Dustin Clowers, have previously pleaded guilty to murder charges in Staton’s death. Those plea agreements were recently unsealed. Bryan Schroder, the U.S. attorney in Alaska, said at a news conference in Anchorage on Wednesday that 14 other members of the 1488 prison gang or its associates have been charged or already sentenced in the Jeffery Peterson, special agent in charge of the Anchor- federal investigation for age FBI office, left, and Bryan Schroder, U.S. Attorney, offenses like being a felon right, announce charges in a racketing enterprise in in possession of a firearm, Anchorage on Wednesday. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen) mail theft or distributing drugs or firearms. The gang got its start 2017 beating death of Mi- Knife. Court documents in 2010 among 50 to 100 chael Staton, who went by did not list attorneys for the prisoners either serving the gang nickname Steak men charged. time in Alaska facilities or

those shipped out-of-state to serve their sentences in Arizona or Colorado. Once members are paroled from prison, they are to report to leaders in what they call “Free Alaska.” “Recently, the 1488s structure and influence expanded to rural and suburban areas throughout Alaska,” the court documents say. “If you see those kind of severe tattoos on people in your neighborhood, then maybe you want to let local law enforcement know, because there might be something going on,” Schroder said. The name of the gang, 1488, refers to different

See GANG, page A3


A2 | Thursday, March 28, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

AccuWeather® 5-day forecast for Kenai-Soldotna Today

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Monday

Rain and drizzle this afternoon

Mostly cloudy

Partly sunny

Plenty of sun

Plenty of sunshine

Hi: 44

Lo: 31

Hi: 45

Lo: 27

RealFeel

Hi: 46

Lo: 27

Lo: 28

Hi: 49

Kotzebue 35/25

Lo: 30

Sun and Moon

The patented AccuWeather.com RealFeel Temperature® is an exclusive index of the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m.

40 46 44 40

Today 7:42 a.m. 8:38 p.m.

Sunrise Sunset

New Apr 4

First Apr 12

Daylight Day Length - 12 hrs., 55 min., 54 sec. Daylight gained - 5 min., 36 sec.

Alaska Cities Yesterday Hi/Lo/W 42/28/pc 45/32/pc 30/17/sf 38/26/pc 42/34/pc 57/29/pc 43/35/c 41/30/sn 41/27/pc 44/34/pc 39/34/pc 39/31/s 54/28/pc 51/25/pc 56/34/s 48/30/pc 54/30/s 56/34/s 36/27/pc 47/28/s 61/39/s 45/40/r

City Adak* Anchorage Barrow Bethel Cold Bay Cordova Delta Junction Denali N. P. Dillingham Dutch Harbor Fairbanks Fort Yukon Glennallen* Gulkana Haines Homer Juneau Ketchikan Kiana King Salmon Klawock Kodiak

Hi: 48

Moonrise Moonset

Today 5:37 a.m. 11:46 a.m.

Unalakleet 36/29 McGrath 42/23

Albany, NY Albuquerque Amarillo Asheville Atlanta Atlantic City Austin Baltimore Billings Birmingham Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo, NY Casper Charleston, SC Charleston, WV Charlotte, NC Chicago Cheyenne Cincinnati

50/22/pc 77/51/c 80/49/t 57/30/s 63/47/s 47/25/s 79/43/pc 51/28/pc 56/36/pc 71/38/s 57/28/pc 62/44/c 41/30/s 52/23/pc 63/28/pc 63/40/pc 65/26/s 59/33/s 59/29/pc 68/35/pc 61/31/s

55/44/s 78/47/s 84/48/pc 65/37/s 69/48/s 53/42/s 78/60/c 61/48/pc 39/30/sn 73/47/s 44/27/c 57/37/sh 52/42/s 50/36/sh 57/29/c 71/46/s 69/50/pc 67/41/s 60/38/sh 62/35/t 67/52/pc

City

Cleveland Columbia, SC Columbus, OH Concord, NH Dallas Dayton Denver Des Moines Detroit Duluth El Paso Fargo Flagstaff Grand Rapids Great Falls Hartford Helena Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Jackson, MS

Precipitation

From the Peninsula Clarion in Kenai

Anchorage 43/33

Glennallen 41/23

54/22/s 62/40/s 56/27/s 46/16/s 76/51/pc 57/26/pc 73/45/pc 72/41/pc 53/26/pc 58/39/r 86/59/pc 45/33/pc 58/32/pc 54/23/pc 44/29/sn 47/22/pc 42/33/sh 83/68/pc 75/50/s 58/29/pc 73/37/s

55/43/c 70/42/s 59/50/c 53/38/s 73/59/c 60/51/c 67/39/pc 57/40/sh 55/35/sh 43/21/c 86/55/pc 37/18/c 60/31/s 55/35/c 40/26/sn 54/41/pc 35/26/sn 84/67/c 75/62/pc 58/51/c 77/49/pc

Jacksonville Kansas City Key West Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Midland, TX Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Norfolk Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix

CLARION E N I N S U L A

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P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Periodicals postage paid at Kenai, AK Copyright 2019 Peninsula Clarion

Who to call at the Peninsula clarion News tip? Question? Main number ........................................... 283-7551 Fax .......................................................... 283-3299 News email.................. news@peninsulaclarion.com

General news

Erin Thompson Editor ....................... ethompson@peninsulaclarion.com Jeff Helminiak Sports & Features Editor .........................jhelminiak@peninsulaclarion.com Victoria Petersen Education .................. vpetersen@peninsulaclarion.com Joey Klecka Sports/Features ............. jklecka@peninsulaclarion.com Brian Mazurek Public Safety...............bmazurek@peninsulaclarion.com Kat Sorensen Fisheries & City .......... ksorensen@peninsulaclarion.com Tim Millings Pagination ....................tmillings@peninsulaclarion.com

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Publisher ...................................................... Jeff Hayden Production Manager ............................ Frank Goldthwaite

Juneau 54/33

(For the 48 contiguous states) High yesterday Low yesterday

Kodiak 46/35

88 at Death Valley, Calif. -10 at Clayton Lake, Maine

High yesterday Low yesterday

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

64/57/pc 73/45/c 78/73/pc 78/60/pc 65/39/pc 70/56/pc 66/32/s 66/38/pc 80/64/pc 78/56/pc 61/31/pc 64/39/pc 68/31/s 74/54/s 47/34/s 51/40/s 75/44/pc 76/51/pc 73/59/t 53/31/pc 82/62/pc

71/50/s 66/50/r 79/70/s 76/52/s 76/55/pc 68/51/s 69/53/pc 74/56/pc 79/69/sh 83/58/c 56/35/c 50/29/c 73/52/pc 75/58/pc 54/48/pc 59/46/s 73/57/c 57/41/c 77/59/s 58/47/pc 86/57/s

Sitka 51/35

State Extremes

Ketchikan 58/37

62 at Klawock 12 at Nuiqsut

Today’s Forecast

City

Pittsburgh Portland, ME Portland, OR Rapid City Reno Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Santa Fe Seattle Sioux Falls, SD Spokane Syracuse Tampa Topeka Tucson Tulsa Wash., DC Wichita

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

56/23/s 40/20/s 56/40/r 61/37/pc 60/44/r 63/53/r 66/48/c 76/52/c 67/57/pc 62/54/r 73/39/pc 60/42/pc 69/48/pc 52/32/c 51/21/pc 75/59/r 75/45/c 85/55/pc 74/43/pc 55/35/pc 73/49/pc

60/49/sh 47/39/s 63/44/sh 45/29/c 55/32/c 62/45/c 55/39/pc 79/62/c 67/53/s 61/49/sh 74/38/pc 63/44/c 54/32/c 50/36/c 55/39/c 79/61/s 69/50/r 84/51/s 73/57/c 63/52/s 72/53/c

City

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Acapulco Athens Auckland Baghdad Berlin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Magadan Mexico City Montreal Moscow Paris Rome Seoul Singapore Sydney Tokyo Vancouver

96/68/s 65/50/pc 77/60/pc 72/46/pc 50/36/c 78/71/pc 55/45/pc 74/57/pc 56/43/pc 69/34/s 22/7/c 77/46/s 43/21/s 36/27/pc 55/39/pc 64/46/pc 61/41/pc 93/81/pc 75/63/sh 66/48/s 54/36/pc

88/74/pc 57/48/sh 72/62/sh 71/52/pc 52/42/sh 80/72/pc 61/48/pc 82/60/s 59/41/s 66/37/s 25/5/pc 80/49/pc 49/34/r 36/28/pc 56/41/pc 64/41/s 55/36/pc 91/80/c 78/65/pc 61/44/sh 57/38/pc

. . . Send Continued from page A1

said he wrote six postcards to his legislators. “The recently proposed budget cuts — they are looking a little grim from a lot of people’s points of view,” Koski said. “We just want to talk about all the things that we don’t want to be cut as a result of this budget. It’s just a way to make it easier for the public to get their views to the legislators and to advocate for full funding.” The parent group initiative had the postcards prestamped and pre-addressed for all the legislators representing the Kenai Peninsula to make the process as simple as possible. Koski said the group encouraged postcard writers to remain positive and to highlight what they love about their schools. Keeping the pupil-toteacher ratio low is one concern Koski wrote about to his legislators. “I think that a 25 percent cut of a budget is still incredibly intense,” Koski

. . . Kenai Continued from page A1

holding signs and guiding the marchers down Frontage Road along the Kenai Spur Highway. After arriving at the visitor’s center, marchers were treated to a free lunch and a raffle. The marchers also had the opportunity to hear several speakers while at the visitor’s center. Elaina Spraker, regional director for U.S. Sen. Dan Sullivan’s office, read a letter from the senator to the marchers expressing his support for the event. Spraker told the story of how Sullivan originally pushed to create the Choose Respect initiative while he was the attorney general for Alaska.

Rain will fall from the central Plains to the eastern Great Lakes today. Wet weather is also in store for parts of Florida and the Northwest while snow falls on a portion of the northern Rockies.

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation

Cold -10s

Warm -0s

0s

Stationary 10s

20s

Showers T-storms 30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

70s

Flurries 80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2019

Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

P

Valdez 44/25

National Extremes

World Cities City

24 hours ending 4 p.m. yest. . 0.00" Month to date .......................... 0.12" Normal month to date ............ 0.58" Year to date .............................. 1.50" Normal year to date ................ 2.42" Record today ................ 0.67" (2016) Record for March ......... 3.18" (1963) Record for year ........... 27.09" (1963) Snowfall 24 hours ending 4 p.m. yest. ... 0.0" Month to date ............................ 0.1" Season to date ........................ 32.7"

Seward Homer 45/35 48/36

Kenai/ Soldotna Homer

Dillingham 44/29

National Cities City

Fairbanks 44/24

Talkeetna 48/30

Bethel 41/28

Today Hi/Lo/W 35/25/sf 42/23/sf 56/37/s 32/26/sf 43/24/pc 53/24/pc 48/32/s 57/34/s 30/20/pc 40/36/pc 45/35/pc 51/35/s 53/35/s 48/30/pc 37/22/pc 49/28/c 36/29/c 44/25/s 47/33/s 41/31/s 49/33/s 49/33/s

High .............................................. 48 Low ............................................... 28 Normal high ................................. 38 Normal low ................................... 20 Record high ....................... 50 (2015) Record low ....................... -11 (2013)

Kenai/ Soldotna 44/31

Cold Bay 44/31

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Almanac From Kenai Municipal Airport

Tomorrow 6:19 a.m. 12:45 p.m.

Unalaska 41/36 Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Internet: www.gedds.alaska.edu/ auroraforecast

Anaktuvuk Pass 28/11

Nome 32/26

Last Apr 26

Yesterday Hi/Lo/W 36/28/c 42/17/pc 51/40/s 32/28/c 43/33/pc 46/22/pc 49/32/pc 52/30/s 31/21/c 41/33/sf 49/29/pc 55/37/s 54/30/s 51/30/pc 37/22/pc 44/27/pc 38/29/c 49/28/pc 51/31/pc 46/30/pc 52/31/pc 53/28/s

City Kotzebue McGrath Metlakatla Nome North Pole Northway Palmer Petersburg Prudhoe Bay* Saint Paul Seward Sitka Skagway Talkeetna Tanana Tok* Unalakleet Valdez Wasilla Whittier Willow* Yakutat

Today’s activity: ACTIVE Where: Auroral activity will be active. Weather permitting, active auroral displays will be visible overhead from Barrow to Anchorage and Juneau, and low on the horizon from King Salmon and Prince Rupert.

Prudhoe Bay 30/20

Temperature

* Indicates estimated temperatures for yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W 45/40/c 43/33/s 27/9/c 41/28/pc 44/31/pc 47/29/pc 52/32/pc 45/29/pc 44/29/pc 42/36/pc 44/24/pc 37/17/pc 41/23/s 51/25/s 54/34/s 48/36/s 54/33/s 58/37/s 34/25/sf 46/29/c 61/34/s 46/35/pc

Aurora Forecast

Readings ending 4 p.m. yesterday

Tomorrow 7:39 a.m. 8:41 p.m.

Full Apr 19

Utqiagvik 27/9

said. “I don’t think to reach a midway point is something we could even reach … Education is something we cut first. It’s something that we need and it’s pretty terrible that we have to question that right now.” Carla King, a River City Academy parent, was writing several letters at the event. She said her choice to move to Alaska was greatly dependent on the education system. “Yeah, I could go to Mississippi and pay lower taxes, but I don’t want to go to a place where they have no future,” King said. “The administration is basically making the decision to make life easier for the oil companies at a cost to kids … I don’t know what Dunleavy’s thinking. This is not the way to run a state if you expect it to remain a state into the future.” Koski’s mother, Eva Knutson, helped host the letter-writing event. Postcards were made available to other schools in the district as well. She said more than 600 postcards have already been completed. Two peninsula students associated with Alaska

Youth for Environmental Action visited Juneau earlier this month to talk with lawmakers about legislation they were passionate about. Eva Downing is from Sterling and attends Soldotna High School and has been involved with Alaska Youth for Environmental Action for two years. She said she went to Juneau to advocate for education as well as legislation looking to increase energy efficiency and include clean energy resources on public, statefunded buildings. With her dad working at the Kenai Peninsula College, her brother attending the University of Alaska Anchorage and her own school district in Soldotna, Downing said she’s concerned about the depth of Gov. Mike Dunleavy’s proposed budget cuts. “It doesn’t seem to me that it would lead to a sustainable state,” Downing said of the budget cuts. “The state is putting oil and other issues above students and above the future of our state.” Downing said she met with many lawmakers who gave positive feedback, and

many told her they didn’t think the proposed budget would pass. It was Homer High School student Summer McGuire’s first time visiting the state Capitol when she traveled with Alaska Youth for Environmental Action earlier this month. She also went to Juneau to speak about legislation that promotes energy efficiency in public buildings. She said the advocacy group prepared her to speak with state leaders. McGuire said she worked hard to channel her passion about the issues she was discussing, while also focusing on how she could best communicate to legislators. “I had to be my clearest in what I was speaking about so I could be respected as a constituent and they could understand,” McGuire said. The opportunity to visit the Capitol and speak with lawmakers was thrilling, McGuire said. “It was so empowering,” she said. “Now I have the confidence to talk about what I’m passionate about. I think we can all take it upon ourselves to create a better world.”

Spraker explained that Sullivan was touring the state 10 years ago as part of former Gov. Sean Parnell’s Taskforce on Domestic Violence when a group of women in one rural community told him of a young woman who was raped by a family member. “I knew that sexual abuse is a huge problem in our state. But there was something about that particular story that broke my heart, and steeled my resolve to do all I could do to stop it,” Sullivan said in the letter. Spraker said that soon after Sullivan returned to Parnell with his findings, Choose Respect posters were being put up in schools and marches were being held around the state. Sullivan also authored the POWER Act last year

that aimed to increase the public resources available for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault, and the POWER Act was signed into law in September of 2018. Michelle Blackwell from U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski’s Soldotna office read a letter from the senator that expressed her support for the movement. “Through gatherings like this, we honor the strength of the survivors among us, and know that healing is possible,” Murkowski said in the letter. “I do not suggest that by simply coming together to announce as a community that we choose respect, that the epidemic will end. But perhaps it will inspire one person to stop, to think, to get help, and to refrain from hurt-

ful action. That in itself makes today worthwhile.” Finally, Renee Lipps, the prevention coordinator for the LeeShore Center, spoke about the importance of prevention efforts in reducing the rates of sexual assault and domestic violence. Lipps explained that a big part of prevention is spreading awareness about the causes and signs of adverse childhood experiences, teen dating violence, intimate partner violence and sexual assault. Lipps also touched on the Peninsula’s Green Dot program, which is an initiative that encourages bystanders to intervene in ways that are safe for the bystander and the victim when they see instances of domestic violence or sexual assault taking place.


Peninsula Clarion | Thursday, March 28, 2019 | A3

Soldotna/Kenai 100+ Women Who Care

Around the Peninsula Vietnam Vets Memorial Day Kenai Peninsula College will host a National Vietnam War Veterans Day event on Friday, March 29 from 6-7 p.m. at the Ward building at 156 College Rd. in Soldotna. Keynote address by Jim McHale. Colors presented by VFW Post 10046. RSVP to Royce Bird at rlbird@alaska. edu or 907-262-0261.

Kenai Senior Center events —March for Meals Fundraiser will take place Friday, March 29 at the Kenai Senior Center. So No Senior Goes Hungry: Dinner, Pie & Silent Auction, Country Store (opens at 5 p.m.). $30 per person —Activities cancelled/No lunch served: Friday, March 29 8 a.m. to 5 p.m

Soldotna Historical Society & Homestead Museum Our board meeting will be held April 2 at 9 a.m. at the museum, 461 Centennial Park road. Please consider volunteering! Questions? Contact Carmen at 262-2791.

GPS for Mariners class The USCG Auxiliary Kenai Flotilla will be conducting a GPS for Mariners class on Saturday, March 30 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Cook Inlet Aquaculture Center located at 40610 Kalifornsky Beach Road, Soldotna, next to Spenard Builders. The class is an introduction to GPS navigation to aid the boater in operating their vessel using supplement type of navigation tool. For more information and registration, please contact Mike Chase at 907-2011792.

Kenai Peninsula Soccer Club tryouts

meeting, discussion of BOF Cook Inlet proposals to submit, and any other items of business that may properly The Soldotna/Kenai 100+ Women Who Care group come before the committee. For more information contact will be meeting March 28 from 6-7 p.m. at the Kenai Jim McCracken at 362-3701. Visitor Center in Kenai. This will be our 1st quarter meeting. All members in good standing will have a chance to Kenai/Soldotna Fish & Game Advisory pitch for a cause or nonprofit they support. Three names Committee election meeting will be drawn — those three will make their pitch, and The Kenai/Soldotna Fish & Game Advisory Committee the group will vote on the cause that receives the funds from the meeting. All the money stays local, if you are a will hold an election meeting on Thursday, April 4 at the member, bring a friend!!!! We hope to reach 100 women Kenai River Center at 6 p.m. Also on the agenda will be very soon! Local nonprofits who benefited in 2018 are preparing BOF proposals, and any other business that may the Kenai Watershed Forum, Hospice of Central Penin- come before the committee. For more information contact sula, Students in Transition and the Kenai Peninsula Food Mike Crawford at 252-2919. Bank, over $20,000 raised to date! For more information Canine Good Citizen Advanced (CGCA) test find us on Facebook. Kenai Kennel Club will be offering a Canine Good CitiKenai Peninsula Fish Habitat Partnership zen Advanced (CGCA) test on Sunday March 31 at 10:30 2019 Symposium a.m. at Kenai Kennel Club, 11312 Kenai Spur Hwy Unit 21 The Kenai Peninsula Fish Habitat Partnership 2019 (behind Home Gallery in the mall Job Center is in). Your Symposium will take place on Thursday, April 18 from 9 dog must have successfully passed the CGC test before a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Cannery Lodge. RSVP required. Join testing for CGCA. To register for the CGCA test or with us for discussions about habitat protections on the Kenai any questions, contact Paula at paulalovett@yahoo.com. Peninsula, including defining the future of fish habitats CIRCAC board of directors meeting and few stories from Dr. Kristin Mitchell and Sue Mauger Cook Inlet Regional Citizens Advisory Council (CIRon their trips to Antarctica. Lunch will be provided. This CAC) is holding its Board of Directors Meeting on Friday, is a FREE event but please register! Visit www.kenaifishApril 5 at 9 a.m. at the Cook Inlet Aquaculture Associapartnership.org. tion building, 40610 Kalifornsky Beach Road, Kenai, AK Sterling Senior Center breakfast 99611. The public is welcome to attend. For an agenda, The Sterling Senior Center will be serving breakfast directions or more information, call 907-283-7222 or toll on Saturday, March 30 from 9 a.m. to noon. The menu in- free 800-652-7222. Meeting materials will be posted online cludes sausage, bacon, ham, scrambled eggs, pancakes and at www.circac.org. biscuits and gravy. $10 for Adults, $5 for children. EveryLeeShore Center monthly board meeting one is welcome. All proceeds benefit the center. For further The LeeShore Center will be holding its monthly board information call 262-6808. meeting at The LeeShore Center on Wednesday, March 28. KPC Showcase: An Alaskan Doctor’s The meeting is open to the public and begins at 6 p.m. For further information call 283-9479. Perspectives on Antarctica

Kenai Peninsula Soccer Club tryouts will be held Saturday and Sunday, March 30 and 31. Register at www.kpDr. Kristin Mitchell will present An Alaskan Doctor’s soccerclub.com and see what time your child’s age group Perspectives on Antarctica on Thursday, April 4 at 6:30 is schedule to tryout. p.m. in the McLane Commons, Kenai Peninsula College. Mitchell recently visited Antarctica as part of the Home30th Anniversary of Visual Feast ward Bound initiative. She was one of 80 women hailing The Kenai Peninsula Borough School District is cel- from 23 different nationalities that were a part of this proebrating the 30th Anniversary of Visual Feast, the annual gram, with each of them specializing in various fields of districtwide student art show. Featuring work from across science, engineering, technology and mathematics. the peninsula, this show highlights the best high school and middle school artists from a wide variety of schools. Seward Fish & Game Advisory Committee This show is a revelation every year, showcasing the election meeting amazing talent that exists on the Kenai Peninsula in both The Seward Fish & Game Advisory Committee will 3-D and 2-D work. The show will run the month of April hold an election meeting on Thursday, April 4 at 7 p.m. at at the Kenai Fine Arts Center with an opening reception the City Council Chambers, located at 410 Adams Street on Thursday, April 4 at 5 p.m. in Seward. Agenda will also include a review of the BOF

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Bolger, who serves on the council. Bolger has said that framers of Alaska’s Constitution intended for a governor to appoint for judgeships candidates nominated by the council. He also defended the council’s process for vetting and nominating candidates. Dunleavy last week filled one Palmer Superior Court seat but refused to fill a second. “I will not be selecting a second candidate from this truncated list,” he wrote in a letter to council members. The council sent Dunleavy three candidates for the two seats. Dunleavy said he believed there were qualified applicants who “inexplicably” were not nominated and sought the council’s reasoning “to determine whether additional qualified candi-

dates could be nominated by the Council for this position.” The council’s website shows there were 13 applicants for the two seats. Two withdrew, and a third was appointed to another judgeship. The constitution calls for a governor to fill a superior court vacancy by appointing one of two or more persons nominated by the council. State law calls for a governor to fill such a vacancy or appoint a successor for an impending vacancy within 45 days after receiving nominations from the council. That period has passed. In a statement Wednesday, Dunleavy said his meeting with Bolger provided “important clarification” on the nominations process that Dunleavy was seeking when he delayed the second appointment. “As a result, I intend to interview the two Palmer Superior Court nominees and will soon fill this vacancy from the council’s nominees,” he said.

LIO Schedule Thursday, March 28 1:30 p.m.: The Senate Labor & Commerce Committee will hold a public hearing to discuss SB 52 Alcoholic Beverage Control; Alcohol Regulation. Testimony will be taken.

Friday, March 29 3:30 p.m.: The Senate Resources Committee will hold a public hearing to discuss SB 90 Cook Inlet: New Administrative Area; Permit Buyback. Testimony will be taken. All teleconferences are held at the Kenai LIO 145 Main St Lp #217, Kenai, AK 99611 unless otherwise noted. To confirm call 283-2030 or email Kenai. LIO@akleg.gov. To listen / watch online go to http://alaskalegislature.tv/

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to declare if they or a family member are financially affected by legislation under discussion. The conflict has to be worth at least $10,000, the bill stated. If the legislation comes to the floor of the House or Senate, the lawmaker had to declare a conflict there and request to be excused from voting. It only took one objection from an-

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21 total dance numbers, with hit songs such as “On Broadway,” “Pure Imagination,” “Thoroughly Modern Millie,” “Singin’ in the Rain,” “It’s a Hard Knock Life” and more modern tunes from the hit show “Hamilton.” Swanson said the selections were made based on audience familiarity but also to introduce the dancers — some still in grade school — to the tunes that have made theater what it is. “Broadway is a pretty daunting task to take on,”

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tenets of white supremacy, according to court documents. The “14” refers to the 14 words in a white nationalist creed: “We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children.” There are two possible meanings for the last part of the gang’s name. The 88 could reference the 88 precepts outlined by white supremacist David Lane, or they could stand for “Heil Hitler,” since H is the eighth letter of the alphabet. They require all members to “be white, look white and act white.” Members adorn themselves with Nazi-style tattoos, but the most coveted is awarded to so-called “made” members, who gain full membership by committing an act of violence on behalf of the gang. The 1488 “patch” tattoo

Trauma Workshop

A Trauma Workshop will take place on March 30, 1-4 p.m. at Soldotna United Methodist Church with Trauma Specialist, Lisa Schmitter. Visit the Facebook page for the Trauma Workshop at https://www.facebook.com/ events/2327680134135110/.

Kenai Peninsula Foundation grant cycle open Kenai Peninsula Foundation 2019 competitive grants cycle is open from March 6 to April 3. We are currently accepting applications. Please direct general questions to KPF’s Program Manager, Hadassah Knight, at hknight@ alaskacf.org. Please direct eligibility and technical questions about the online grant system to The Alaska Community Foundation at grants@alaskacf.org.

other legislator to force that person to vote, though, according to the law. Sen. Shelley Hughes, RPalmer, said she had to halt her work on health care issues because her spouse works in the health care field. “These are flaws that surfaced, we all understand they need to be fixed,” Hughes said. “I’m just grateful I get to take this vote today.” The bill removing the restrictions passed 15-4,

with Democratic Sens. Jesse Kiehl, Scott Kawasaki, Donald Olson and Bill Wielechowski voting nay. Coghill said that the HB 44 definition was too broad and it put a cloud over legislators’ heads. The new bill “resets” that, going back to some of the original language that the state had before HB 44. As a Republican from Anchorage, Costello said she was unable to have conversations about aviation in her office because her hus-

band works for the industry. “My representing the district that has the Ted Stevens International Airport… means that I need to be able to talk about aviation,” Costello said. People knew her husband worked for the aviation industry when they voted for her, so it’s not a conflict of interest, she said. Several amendments were proposed, two by Kiehl and one by Sen. David Wilson, R-Wasilla. Neither passed.

she said. “There’s so many iconic and legendary pieces out there, so this is a way to inspire the younger dancers with this generation coming on up. Many don’t watch musicals any more, or aren’t experiencing it anymore … this is a way to inspire them to learn more about why these are iconic pieces that have stood the test of time.” The show will have a rapid-fire flow to it, with musical pieces seamlessly transitioning into the next. Swanson said the production incorporates many styles of music and theater, from hiphop to contemporary and ballet. It was the job of the show’s choreography talent — Chelsea Caffey, Clayton

Cunningham and Kacia Oliver — to find a way to seamlessly combine the show’s wildly varying styles. Caffey directs the hiphop/contemporary pieces; Cunningham plays piano (among his other roles) on the “Phantom of the Opera” number “Music of the Night,” and Oliver coordinates the tap and jazz numbers. While Caffey and Cunningham hail from outside Alaska, Oliver is a Soldotna local who began her dance career at Vergine’s Dance Studio. Swanson praised the help of several featured guests, including SoHi senior Allison Towell, Justin Ruf-

fridge, Chris Pepper and Spencer McAuliffe. Those who hold ties to the Kenai Performers organization will make a big impact on several of the pieces, Swanson said. “It’s a labor of love for the (Aurora Dance Company) showcase,” she said. “It’s our best show by far, and the level of talent and production that goes into it is great.”

is an iron cross superimposed over a swastika, and is tattooed on the right side of the ribcage. This was the tattoo that was burned off Staton’s body the night he died in August 2017. According to Clowers’ plea agreement, gang members suspected Staton had been stealing drugs and a Hells Angels’ vest from Craig King, who is also charged. All the men were out of jail at this time, but Clowers was on ankle monitoring. Staton was beaten by four men, and his hands and feet were bound with duct tape and rope. He was delivered to a duplex in Wasilla, about 40 miles north of Anchorage. King and his wife lived on one side. The other side was vacant but prepared for the beating with walls and floor covered with painter’s plastic. Inside, court documents say, Staton was further beaten before Clowers and

two others heated the knife with a propane torch and took turns burning off Staton’s 1488 patch. “At that point Staton was still alive but was badly beaten,” court documents say. His body was rolled in the carpet and the plastic, and put in the back of a vehicle and driven off. The gang gets its money from the illegal trafficking of drugs and firearms, and members used violence including murder, assault and obstruction of justice to protect and enhance their power, officials said. One of its goals was to enlist new members, recruited both inside prisons and outside. New recruits had to be sponsored by an existing member, but they would not accept someone for their sheer hustle, money or friendship. “Instead, they claimed that only ‘violence and unquestionable loyalty’ could earn a patch,” court documents say. A recruit was observed

for at least 14 months before the membership cast a final vote. The vote had to be unanimous for a man to become a member. The gang didn’t accept gay members, “rats” or people who had been charged with sex offenses, the documents say. Women are not allowed membership in the 1488. But they can be associates, and could be expected to smuggle drugs into imprisoned members. Alaska had inmates in Arizona and Colorado prior to 2013, said Sylvan Robb with the Department of Corrections. Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy, as part of his budget, proposed sending at least 500 inmates to out-of-state prisons as a potential way to save money. A House subcommittee recently rejected the idea, with House Finance Committee Cochair Tammie Wilson saying the administration provided little information for how that would work.

“Best of Broadway” will be performed Friday and Saturday nights this weekend. Both performances begin at 7 p.m. at the Renee C. Henderson Auditorium at Kenai Central High School. Tickets are $15.


Opinion

A4 | Thursday, March 28, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

CLARION P

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Serving the Kenai Peninsula since 1970 Jeff Hayden Publisher ERIN THOMPSON......................................................... Editor DOUG MUNN........................................... Circulation Director FRANK GOLDTHWAITE......................... Production Manager

What Others Say

Electoral College defends democracy Last week we wrote about

Democratic ambitions to pack the Supreme Court. This week the Electoral College is on the chopping block as Sen. Elizabeth Warren comes out in favor of its abolition, Beto O’Rourke makes sympathetic noises and Colorado’s Democratic governor signs a bill adding his state to the “National Popular Vote Interstate Compact.” Scrapping the system the U.S. has used to select presidents since its founding will likely soon be the Democrats’ default position. Like the Supreme Court, the Electoral College sometimes frustrates the will of political majorities. That makes it an easy target in this populist age. But while “majority rules” has always been an appealing slogan, it’s an insufficient principle for structuring an electoral system in the U.S. Presidential elections often do not produce popular majorities. In 2016 neither Hillary Clinton nor Donald Trump won 50 percent. “Plurality rules” doesn’t have the same ring to it. In the absence of the Electoral College, the winner’s vote share would likely be significantly smaller than is common today. Third-party candidates who can’t realistically win a majority in any state would have a greater incentive to enter the race. Democrats are upset that Mr. Trump is president with 46 percent of the vote to Ms. Clinton’s 48 percent. What if a Republican was elected with a third of the vote in an election featuring five formidable third-party candidates? A freefor-all plebiscite would hurt the system’s legitimacy. The Electoral College helps narrow the field to two serious contenders, as voters decide not to waste their vote on candidates who have no chance to win. The founders designed the Electoral College to help ensure that states with diverse preferences could cohere under a single federal government. Anyone who thinks this concern is irrelevant today hasn’t been paying attention to the current polarization in American politics. The Electoral College helps check polarization by forcing presidential candidates to campaign in competitive states across the country, instead of spending all their time trying to motivate turnout in populous partisan strongholds. In a popular-vote contest in 2020, for example, the Democratic candidate might ignore the economically dislocated areas that Mr. Trump won and focus on urban centers along the coasts. Mr. Trump might campaign more in upstate New York or Texas but ignore urban voters. The Electoral College also contributes to political stability by delegating vote-counting to the states and thus delivering with rare exceptions a faster result. The uncertainty arising from a nationwide recount for president amid myriad regional irregularities — as happened in North Carolina and Florida in 2018 — would make Florida 2000 look tame. The Electoral College abolitionists are unlikely to get a supermajority of three-fourths of states to agree to pass a constitutional amendment. The greater danger is the popular vote compact that Colorado has joined, which requires signatories to ignore their voters and grant their electoral votes to the national popular vote winner. It goes into effect once states representing 270 electoral votes have signed. If the governors of New Mexico and Delaware sign their states’ bills as expected, then 14 states and the District of Columbia with 189 votes will have signed up. A Democratic sweep at the state level could one day get to 270. The pact is likely unconstitutional. But if it succeeded it would inject more corrosive uncertainty into American elections in pursuit of a hyper-populist system that goes against the structure of the Constitution that has protected liberty for 230 years. — The Wall Street Journal, March 19

Be very afraid of politicians who say not to worry

Lt. Gov. Kevin Meyer said “don’t be too upset” at Gov. Mike Dunleavy’s budget butchery. Sen. Bert Stedman, R-Sitka, takes the slow roll “step down” to the same cuts strategy. Don’t believe either of them. Their job is to get you to back off and be calm. Your loss, their gain. The budget is the ultimate expression of any commitment to your needs. Lack of funding and underfunding means their words are hollow. It’s not about how much money is really available, it’s who it is spent on that counts much more. If you chill out as they want, your needs will be funded last. The squeaky wheel gets the grease, not the silent one. Dunleavy has no problem with $1 billion for oil company credits with more state debt, but can’t find one-tenth that amount ($97 million) to keep the Alaska Marine Highway System viable. He’d rather destroy it. Then in the future, propose some government subsidized socialist type funding for privatized for-profit carriers. That’s the way crony capitalism works. There is a viable budget middle ground between the PFD and public funding needs. Choices do have to be made, and not all needs will be fulfilled. But there is no reason for this ideological savage budget butchery other than setting Alaskans against each other. That’s what politicians do best. To claim that Dunleavy is only following through on campaign promises that were unrealistic and blatantly opportunistic as to their viability when made is irresponsible nonsense. Alaskans need workable choices, not dog whistle call outs that work only to destroy the collective fabric of our state. ConocoPhillips and the oil indus-

GOP-Murkowski crew rammed through their new defined contribution plan simply ignoring the prior laska oices process. They fired the board, put political appointees in charge and subjected employee appeals to a new hearings process they controlled. A nselm S taack The employee representatives were completely outmaneuvered by their try, Meyer’s former employer, and mostly calm complacency. lobbyists have priority in directing The real objective was to move the legislator drones, not the public at system to the corporate 401(k) model a meeting, no matter how packed. so Wall Street, bankers and private Meyer is here to protect billions financiers could more directly and in credits for oil companies at the handsomely profit from such plans. expense of Alaskans. He shepherded Were the Stedman/Murkowski adminthese through as a senator when he istration tactics and strategy unusual was a ConocoPhilips employee. or possibly illegal? Not at all. That’s Stedman was the legislative how the world actually works. Forget godfather (along with the Gov. the childish civics lessons about fair Frank Murkowski administration) play and good faith dealing. who insisted upon the Public EmAs Alaska’s oil and gas tax ployees’ Retirement System (PERS) resource revenue process shows, proand Teachers’ Retirement System fessional ethics or public-first policy (TRS) Defined Contribution plans. has nothing to do with it. Follow the The Murkowski administration and money, connect the dots. Only your the GOP squandered their precious own zealous advocacy, persistent if limited political capital on their jihad annoying attention, and skepticism converting the retirement system, about slick phony unreliable explawhich didn’t really solve the problem. nations, promises and agendas that Then they had no political capital left don’t add up, count. for an oil and gas line that clearly was I repeat: never let Dunleavy, a more important priority in 2005 and Meyer and the entire Alaska Legis still so 14 years later. islature rest for a moment. That inAt the time, the Division of Retire- cludes Republicans and Democrats, ment and Benefits held a yearlong Alaska Native and non-Native. You series of member meetings to look and your family’s future depends into various alternative plans, which on it. was little more than an elaborate sham that was always going to end Anselm Staack is registered in a defined contribution tier and nonaffiliated, is a Certified Public the removal of the elected employee Accountant and an attorney who has board. It served its purpose: To calm been an Alaska resident for over 45 the plan members, while the elected years. He was the Treasury Comptrolboard thought they were working on a ler for Alaska under Gov. Jay Hambalanced viable solution. mond and worked directly on the creA few days before the legislative ation of the Alaska Permanent Fund session was to end, the Stedman/ Corporation. He resides in Juneau.

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Prosecutor: Grand jury in Russia probe 'continuing robustly' By COLLEEN LONG Associated Press

WASHINGTON — A grand jury that was involved in special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation is "continuing robustly," a federal prosecutor said Wednesday. The prosecutor, David Goodhand, made the revelation during a hearing over whether court filings in the Mueller probe should be unsealed related to an unidentified foreign corporation that had refused to turn over documents to the special counsel. Attorneys for the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, seeking the filings, also sought to unmask the

corporation and country behind it. Mueller officially completed his investigation when he turned over his report to Attorney General William Barr on Friday. He found no evidence that President Donald Trump's campaign "conspired or coordinated" with Russia to influence the 2016 presidential election but reached no conclusion on whether Trump obstructed justice, according to a letter Barr sent to Congress summarizing the special counsel's findings. But Mueller referred some matters he discovered to U.S. attorneys' offices. It's not entirely clear what else a grand jury, whose dealings are generally secret under law, may

be considering. The case in court Wednesday centered on a corporation owned by a foreign government, neither of which have been identified. The corporation was held in contempt for refusing to turn over information demanded by Mueller's investigators. The Supreme Court had rejected an appeal from the corporation on Monday, and the case is now being handled by prosecutors in Washington. The corporation has been racking up fines of $50,000 a day for not complying with the grand jury subpoena for documents. Fines have been accruing since Jan. 15 and could total more than $3.5 million. New daily fines stop

once the grand jury is discharged. The hearing came after attorneys for the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press filed a motion seeking access to court filings tied to the subpoena fight that developed during Mueller's investigation. The attorneys also sought the name of the mystery corporation, arguing in part that although the investigation was closed, the public's right to know remains. "It really is a special situation," Theodore Boutrous, the attorney who represented the press freedom organization, argued in court. "We have a company, owned by a foreign nation, litigating all the way to the Supreme Court."

Letter to the Editor Put Alaskans 1st Our current effective oil tax rate is an embarrassing 4.6 percent and ConocoPhillips receives twice as much profit per barrel of Alaskan oil than it does anywhere else. A recent ConocoPhillips investor briefing explains that the company won’t invest much of those lavish profits on new North Slope wells and that shareholders can count on reaping those profits. Profits that will come at the expense of our PFDs, our children’s future, our sick people, our

grandparents, and our ability to reach communities that rely on our ferry system. Recently, when I asked Sen. Peter Micciche if he supports SB 14, a bill requiring oil companies to drill their own oil wells, he said the problem is much more complicated than that. And I agree, so I asked Peter to produce a comprehensive alternative that would ensure that Alaskans begin receiving a fair deal for our oil. Peter is a strong leader with terrific organizational abilities. He knows the oil industry. He is respected in the

Senate. He has the knowledge and power to take steps to prevent the careless, short-sighted, cruel budget cuts Gov. Mike Dunleavy proposes. It comes down to whether or not he has the courage and the desire to put Alaskans’ interests first, and I think he’s that kind of man. I urge you to contact Sen. Micciche and ask him to put Alaskans first and work with senators across the aisle to guarantee that we will no longer need to pay oil companies to take our oil. — Eric Treider, Soldotna


Peninsula Clarion | Thursday, March 28, 2019 | A5

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A6 | Thursday, March 28, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

Sports

Pastrnak tallies hat trick, Bruins top Rangers BOSTON (AP) — David Pastrnak had three goals and two assists for a career-high five points, sending the Boston Bruins to a 6-3 victory over the New York Rangers on Wednesday night. Coming off a 3-1 road trip but disappointed after blowing a twogoal lead Monday night against NHL-best Tampa Bay, the Bruins broke it open with four goals in the third period for their 12th consecutive victory at home. It’s their longest streak since winning 14 straight during the 2008-09 season. Pastrnak completed his fourth hat trick and third this season with

a power-play goal to make it 4-2 with 7:08 to play. He became the first Bruins player with a trio of hat tricks in one season since Hall of Famer Cam Neely in 1993-94. The Bruins had gone 1-7-2 in their last 10 games against the Rangers, including losing the first two meetings this season. Backup goalie Jaroslav Halak made 20 saves. Jake DeBrusk, Charlie McAvoy and Patrice Bergeron also scored for Boston.

rie scored to become Colorado’s career goals leader among defensemen, Philipp Grubauer made 34 saves the playoff-chasing Avalanche beat Vegas. Matt Calvert, Nathan MacKinnon and Gabriel Bourque also scored to help the Avalanche stay two points in front of Arizona for the last wild-card spot in the Western Conference with five games left. Barrie’s 73rd career goal moved him out of a tie with Sandis Ozolinsh for most among Avalanche defenders. Barrie also had two assists. Paul Stastny, Reilly Smith and AVALANCHE 4, Alex Tuch scored for Vegas, which was denied a chance to clinch a playGOLDEN KNIGHTS 3 off spot. Malcolm Subban stopped 26 DENVER (AP) — Tyson Bar- shots in his sixth consecutive start.

in the shootout, Couturier deked to his forehand and beat Frederik Andersen. Carter Hart secured Philadelphia’s third win the last eight games when he PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Sean stopped Nylander’s attempt. Couturier scored in regulation and had the only goal in a shootout in PhilaSTARS 2, FLAMES 1 delphia’s victory over Toronto. Radko Gudas, Travis Konecny and CALGARY, Alberta (AP) — AlRyan Hartman also scored for Philaexander Radulov and Miro Heiskanen delphia. The Flyers remained mathscored to lead Dallas over Calgary in ematically alive for a playoff berth, a game in which Stars goaltender Ben moving within eight points of idle Bishop left with an apparent injury. Montreal for the final playoff spot Play was stopped with Bishop on his with five regular-season games reknees in obvious discomfort at 13:22 of maining. the second period. He skated off under Auston Matthews, Connor Brown, his own power and went straight to the Nazem Kadri and William Nylander dressing room. There was no immediate scored for Toronto. word on his condition. After the first four Flyers missed

FLYERS 5, MAPLE LEAFS 4, SO

Freddie’s Drags Booker nets 50 in Suns loss wrap up season Phoenix star Staff report Peninsula Clarion

Freddie’s Roadhouse, located at Mile 16 Oilwell Road in the Caribou Hills near Ninilchik, ended the snowmachine drag racing season Saturday with what it called the “Slush Cup.” Jeff Hanson took three of the six races, while Will

Hubler took a pair of races and Kaity Wolfe took a race. The results follow:

Stock — 1. Jeff Hanson; 2. George Derkevorkian; 3. Fred Pollard Jr. 600 modified — 1. Jeff Hanson; 2. Kevin Powers. 370 stock — 1. Kaity Wolfe; 2. Robert Wolfe. Vintage — 1. Will Hubler; 2. Fred Pollard Jr.; 3. Jeff Hanson. 800 modified — 1. Jeff Hanson; 2. Charlie Johnnie; 3. Fred Pollard Jr. Open — 1. Will Hubler; 2. Jeff Hanson; 3. Fred Pollard Jr.

Goodell finally gets rules right By BARRY WILNER AP Pro Football Writer

PHOENIX — Roger Goodell got it right. NFL fans rarely feel that way. Right now, they should. Many times, perhaps most of the time, the NFL commissioner is doing the bidding of the owners. That’s led to plenty of criticism of Goodell when it’s the guys who run the 32 franchises who deserve more bad reviews than he does. When it comes to league probes, the NFL so often has fallen short — Ray Rice, Kareem Hunt, Saints bounties — that Goodell takes the arrows rather than the investigators who should be blamed. And yes, there are instances, particularly when it comes to handing out discipline, in which Goodell is the correct target. So when the guy uses his power for the good of the game, for the players, the coaches and, indeed, the fans, then praise is due. Two months after one of the most embarrassing moments of his regime — or that of any other commissioner — Goodell pretty much made sure a deeply necessary change to the rules was passed. Don’t underestimate the significance of the addition of pass interference, whether flagged or not, to

the video review officiating system. Such calls and noncalls now can be challenged by coaches and reviewed by officials. It was passed for one season, by the astounding margin of 31-1. It almost certainly is here to stay, and Goodell is a major reason. “I told the owners we need to get to a place, and I felt strongly we should have OPI and DPI and that we should be able to throw flags (that were not thrown on the field),” Goodell said Tuesday. “Everyone in there finally got to understand through a long process and a lot of discussion, everyone wanted to get it right. Some had to remove themselves from long-shared views.” A short-shared view among fans, especially those in the Big Easy, has been that an egregious missed call in the NFC championship game cost the New Orleans Saints a trip to the Super Bowl. Their case was strengthened by this decision. Yet, in a way, this is a more important victory for the Who Dats and for all pro football fans. The sport has become so fast, so complex and so wide open that the officials struggle to keep up. Even worse, technology is so advanced that the errors made in real time become exacerbated when examined in the close-up, super-slow motion shots

sees another game wasted By JOSE M. ROMERO Associated Press

PHOENIX — Devin Booker became the youngest player in NBA history with consecutive 50-point games, but his latest scoring binge was wasted once again by the last-place Phoenix Suns in a 124-121 loss to the Washington Wizards on Wednesday night. Thomas Bryant’s threepoint play with 2.8 seconds left put Washington ahead for good in a back-andforth game. Bryant caught Bradley Beal’s pass off a baseline drive and dropped in the winning layup while getting fouled. After he added the free throw, Phoenix had one more chance to tie, but Troy Daniels missed a 3-pointer from the corner just before the final buzzer. The 22-year-old Booker finished with 50 points and 10 rebounds as the Suns, with the worst record in the Western Conference at 17-59, dropped their fifth straight. Booker scored 59 points in a 125-92 loss Monday night at Utah. It was the first time a Phoenix player reached 50 in back-to-back games. Tom Chambers had been the only member of the Suns to score even 40 in successive games. Beal and Jabari Parker had 28 points apiece for the Wizards, who snapped a five-game skid. Bryant added 18 points and a career-high 19 rebounds. The game featured 23 lead changes and neither team led by more than seven points. Booker scored his 46th point when he missed his initial shot, fell to the floor, got back up to catch the rebound and rattled in a second shot with 5:08 to play. His 50th point came on a layup with 1:30 left, tying the score at 118. Booker missed a 3 that could have put Phoenix

Phoenix Suns guard Devin Booker (1) gets a shot off and is fouled by Washington Wizards forward Jeff Green, left, during the first half of an NBA basketball game Wednesday in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

ahead with 48 seconds left, and Bryant drained a 3 at the other end to give the Wizards a 121-118 lead with 28.6 seconds to go. Jamal Crawford tied it again on a 3 with 17.1 seconds to go before Beal’s drive and dish to Bryant for the winner.

103 on Wednesday night to take sole possession of the Western Conference lead. Curry also had 10 rebounds, and DeMarcus Cousins added 16 points and nine rebounds to help the Warriors break a tie with idle Denver for the top spot in the West. Jonas Valanciunas led Memphis with 27 points and 13 rebounds, and Mike Conley added 22 points to take WARRIORS 118, the franchise’s career scorGRIZZLIES 103 ing lead and added eight asMEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) sists. Bruno Caboclo had 17 — Stephen Curry and Kev- points and 13 rebounds. in Durant each scored 28 points, with Durant going 12 THUNDER 107, of 13 from the field, and the PACERS 99 Golden State Warriors beat OKLAHOMA CITY the Memphis Grizzlies 118-

(AP) — Paul George scored 31 points against his former team, and Oklahoma City had a 24-0 run in the third quarter to pull away from Indiana. Steven Adams had 25 points and 12 rebounds, and Russell Westbrook added 17 points, 12 assists and 11 rebounds for his 29th tripledouble of the season. The Thunder won for only the second time in seven games.

WIZARDS 124, SUNS 121 PHOENIX (AP) — Devin Booker became the youngest player in NBA history with consecutive 50-point games, but his latest scoring binge See NBA, page A7

See BARRY, page A7

Baseball moves into new era with opening day 2019 By BEN WALKER AP Baseball Writer

Four-man outfields. High-tech anti-spying rules. A starting pitcher facing just one batter in a playoff game. But beyond all the shifts, analytics and social media outreach, here’s the best way to tell Major League Baseball has zoomed into a new era: There’s not a single active player left from the 20th century. Not one. Adrian Beltre and Bartolo Colon were the last, the Elias Sports Bureau said. And with all 30 teams set to play Thursday — from Bryce Harper’s home debut at Citizens Bank Park to Mookie Betts and the champion Boston Red Sox visiting Seattle — this

year MLB becomes the first of the four major sports without someone still around who played in the 1900s. The last time that was true in the big leagues? Back before even the World Series existed. Already this season, the great Ichiro Suzuki has retired, done at 45 after two hitless games last week as the Seattle Mariners swept Oakland at the Toyko Dome. “I really wanted to play until I was 50, but I couldn’t do it,” he said. Yankees lefty CC Sabathia says it’s his last year, and so does Giants manager Bruce Bochy. But, as always, youth springs eternal. Vladimir Guerrero Jr., Fernando Tatis Jr. and Eloy Jimenez lead a strong rookie crop of boppers who might stick around for a

while. Will they be the next Mike Trout or Joe Mauer, or the future Manny Machado or Chase Utley? We’ll see over the years. In the meantime, after a long winter of waiting, it’s time for everyone to play ball. “Opening day, since I was a kid, I feel like it’s a celebration of our sport, so it’s something I always look forward to,” Yankees manager Aaron Boone said. A look at the lineup going into Thursday: MARQUEE MATCHUPS Jacob deGrom, fresh off a big contract boost from the New York Mets, starts against Washington ace Max Scherzer at Nationals Park. DeGrom earned his first Cy Young Award last season, and three-time winner Scherzer fin-

ished second. It’s a similar duel at Tropicana Field — AL Cy Young winner Blake Snell of the Rays faces runner-up Justin Verlander and the Astros. DANDY DEBUTS Harper takes his first swings since signing a $330 million deal with the Phillies (that was a record until Trout got $426.5 million from the Angels soon after). Harper has five careetr home runs on opening day, tied with Albert Pujols and Ian Kinsler for most among active players, and will take on Julio Teheran and the NL East champion Braves. Harper is 18 for 50 (.450) with a personal-high eight homers against the Atlanta right-hander. Machado starts up with San Diego, Paul Goldschmidt is with St. Louis, Robinson Cano got traded to the Mets, Nelson Cruz swings

for Minnesota and the excitable Yasiel Puig is in Cincinnati. Josh Donaldson joined the Braves and is expected to be in action this weekend — it’ll be Atlanta vs. Philadelphia in the first Sunday Night Baseball matchup on ESPN, with those games starting an hour earlier this season. SKIPPING ALONG Brandon Hyde takes on the daunting task of handling the 115-loss Orioles. He’s among six new managers — Hyde, Charlie Montoyo (Blue Jays), David Bell (Reds), Rocco Baldelli (Twins) and Chris Woodward (Rangers) are first-timers. Brad Ausmus was hired to replace longtime Angels skipper Mike Scioscia. FINE FORECASTS A year after a bunch of early See NEW, page A7


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basketball

was wasted once again by last-place Phoenix in a loss to Washington. Thomas Bryant’s three-point play with 2.8 seconds left put the Wizards ahead for good in a back-and-forth game. Bryant caught Bradley Beal’s pass off a baseline drive and dropped in the winning layup while getting fouled. After he added the free throw, Phoenix had one more chance to tie, but Troy Daniels missed a 3-pointer from the corner just before the final buzzer. The 22-year-old Booker finished with 50 points and 10 rebounds as the Suns, with the worst record in the Western Conference at 17-59, dropped their fifth straight. Booker scored 59 points in a 125-92 loss Monday night at Utah.

TRAIL BLAZERS 118, BULLS 98 CHICAGO (AP) — Seth Curry scored a season-high 20 points and Portland beat Chicago. Still shaken by Jusuf Nurkic’s gruesome leg injury two nights earlier in a double-overtime victory over Brooklyn that secured Portland’s sixth straight playoff appearance, the Trail Blazers won their fifth in a row even though Damian Lillard scored a season-low 11. Chicago’s Shaquille Harrison set career highs with 21 points and 10 rebounds.

JAZZ 115, LAKERS 100 SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Rudy Gobert had 22 points and 11 rebounds, Derrick Favors scored 20 and Joe Ingles nearly posted his first triple-double to power Utah over depleted Los Angeles. Jae Crowder scored 16 points and the balanced Jazz, with seven players in double figures, won for the eighth time in nine games. Six weeks ago, Ingles went public with the news that his 2-year-old son was diagnosed with autism. Since then, he has been a vocal advocate for funding and awareness. Playing on Autism Awareness Night, he set a career high with 14 assists and added 11 points and nine rebounds.

. . . Barry Continued from page A6

available to viewers. The NFL needed a leap forward like this. Indeed, it’s more like a long Drew Brees to Michael Thomas touchdown pass than an Alvin Kamara run for a first down. Both plays move the ball, but the TD throw can be an instant game changer. Credit Goodell for laying down the law to get the video review rules enhanced. Also credit Saints coach Sean Payton, who helped lead the charge to progress not only because he was the victimized guy with the head set on the sideline for the blown call, but for catalyzing the movement.

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snowouts and 54 total postponements — the most since 1989 — no blizzards are on the radar. It could be rainy in Kansas City and perhaps Oakland, but it’s supposed to be sunny at Dodger Stadium and several other sites. Also helping MLB get off to clean start: Toronto, Tampa Bay, Seattle, Milwaukee and Miami all open indoors. EXTEND THEIR SUCCESS Chris Sale, who struck out Machado to end the World Series and seal Boston’s fourth crown in 15 seasons, starts the opener for the 108win Red Sox. Sale, Trout, Verlander, Goldschmidt and Rockies third baseman Nolan Arenado were among the stars whose teams locked them with rich, long-term deals. But not every big name got a big contract — All-Star closer Craig Kimbrel and former Cy Young winner Dallas Keuchel were free agents all winter and went into opening day without jobs. OUCH! Cleveland shortstop Francisco Lindor sprained an ankle while recovering from a strained calf and will miss opening day. Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw and Yankees starter Luis Severino are out, too. Astros star Carlos Correa, unlikely World Series MVP Steve Pearce and Reds sparkplug Scooter Gen-

Peninsula Clarion | Thursday, March 28, 2019 | A7

NBA Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB x-Toronto 52 23 .693 — x-Philadelphia 47 27 .635 4½ x-Boston 44 31 .587 8 Brooklyn 38 37 .507 14 New York 14 60 .189 37½ Southeast Division Orlando 37 38 .493 — Miami 36 38 .486 ½ Charlotte 35 39 .473 1½ Washington 31 45 .408 6½ Atlanta 27 48 .360 10 Central Division y-Milwaukee 56 19 .747 — x-Indiana 45 30 .600 11 Detroit 37 37 .500 18½ Chicago 21 55 .276 35½ Cleveland 19 56 .253 37 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division x-Houston 47 28 .627 — San Antonio 43 32 .573 4 New Orleans 31 45 .408 16½ Memphis 30 45 .400 17 Dallas 29 45 .392 17½ Northwest Division x-Denver 50 23 .685 — x-Portland 47 27 .635 3½ Utah 45 30 .600 6 Oklahoma City 44 31 .587 7 Minnesota 33 41 .446 17½ Pacific Division x-Golden State 51 23 .689 — x-L.A. Clippers 45 30 .600 6½ Sacramento 37 37 .500 14 L.A. Lakers 33 42 .440 18½ Phoenix 17 59 .224 35 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Wednesday’s Games Golden State 118, Memphis 103 Oklahoma City 107, Indiana 99 Portland 118, Chicago 98 Washington 124, Phoenix 121 Utah 115, L.A. Lakers 100 Thursday’s Games Brooklyn at Philadelphia, 3 p.m. Orlando at Detroit, 3 p.m. Dallas at Miami, 3:30 p.m. Toronto at New York, 3:30 p.m. Denver at Houston, 4 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Milwaukee, 4 p.m. Sacramento at New Orleans, 4 p.m. Cleveland at San Antonio, 4:30 p.m. All Times ADT

NIT Glance Quarterfinals Tuesday, March 26 Wichita State 73, Indiana 63 TCU 71, Creighton 58 Wednesday, March 27 Lipscomb 94, N.C. State 93 Texas 68, Colorado 55

“There were just a lot of great healthy discussions about our game,” said Payton, along with Pittsburgh’s Mike Tomlin the only coaches on the powerful competition committee that recommends rule adjustments. “When you are on this committee there is a little bit of a responsibility just to the game and football fans in general. “Anytime, I think, if we have gone through a process like this and with an open heart tried to look at doing what is right, and after much discussion came to a conclusion where ownership, league office, coaches, general managers felt real good about, certainly fans won, knowing that, man, those guys are working hard at the right decision.”

nett are ailing. Angels two-way sensation Shohei Ohtani, the AL Rookie of the Year, won’t pitch this season while returning from Tommy John surgery but will hit. Yankees shortstop Didi Gregorius is expected back in midseason. Royals catcher Salvador Perez, Tigers pitcher Michael Fulmer and Diamondbacks outfielder Steven Souza Jr., injured this week in a spring training game, are out for the year. PARK IT HERE The Texas Rangers begin their 26th and final season at their current ballpark before moving across the street into a new stadium with a retractable roof. A tasty way to remember their last year is the Fowl Pole, a two-pound chicken tender that’s a new item on the concession stand menu in Arlington. ... The Arizona Diamondbacks have converted their field from grass to artificial turf, joining Toronto and Tampa Bay as teams playing on synthetic surfaces. ... The gaudy and gargantuan Home Run Sculpture at Marlins Park is gone. Well, just not inside the park anymore. It’s outside in a plaza. Overall, MLB attendance has dropped for three straight seasons and last year the average fell below 30,000 for the first time since 2003. “We’re a little down off where we were last year, but we’re optimistic that things are going to pick up,” Commissioner Rob Manfred said.

Semifinals At Madison Square Garden New York Tuesday, April 2 Wichita State (22-14) vs. Lipscomb (28-7), 3 p.m. TCU (23-13) vs. Texas (19-16), 5:30 p.m. Championship At Madison Square Garden New York Thursday, April 4 Semifinal winners, 3 p.m.

NCAA Tournament Schedule

Friday, March 29 Michigan State (30-6) vs. LSU (286), 3:09 p.m. North Carolina (29-6) vs. Auburn (28-9), 3:29 p.m. Duke (31-5) vs. Virginia Tech (26-8), 5:39 p.m. Kentucky (29-6) vs. Houston (33-3), 5:57 p.m. Thursday, March 28 Gonzaga (32-3) vs. Florida State (29-7), 3:09 p.m. Tennessee (31-5) vs. Purdue (25-9), 3:29 p.m. Michigan (30-6) vs. Texas Tech (286), 5:39 p.m. Virginia (31-3) vs. Oregon (25-12), 5:57 p.m. All Times ADT

hockey NHL Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA z-Tampa Bay 77 59 14 4 122 306 206 x-Boston 77 47 21 9 103 243 197 Toronto 77 45 25 7 97 275 233 Montreal 77 41 28 8 90 233 220 Florida 77 33 32 12 78 249 268 Buffalo 76 31 36 9 71 207 251 Detroit 76 28 38 10 66 206 258 Ottawa 76 27 43 6 60 226 278 Metropolitan Division Washington 77 45 24 8 98 264 235 N.Y. Islanders 77 44 26 7 95 212 188 Pittsburgh 77 42 24 11 95 261 228 Carolina 76 42 27 7 91 226 210 Columbus 76 42 30 4 88 232 218 Philadelphia 77 37 32 8 82 234 256 N.Y. Rangers 76 29 34 13 71 211 256 New Jersey 77 29 39 9 67 211 260

WESTERN CONFERENCE x-Winnipeg x-Nashville St. Louis Dallas Colorado Minnesota Chicago

Central Division 76 45 27 4 77 43 28 6 76 41 27 8 77 40 31 6 77 35 29 13 77 35 33 9 76 33 33 10 Pacific Division

94 256 223 92 224 202 90 226 206 86 195 189 83 244 232 79 203 224 76 248 272

x-Calgary 77 47 23 7 101 269 215 x-San Jose 76 43 24 9 95 268 240 Vegas 77 42 29 6 90 238 213 Arizona 77 37 33 7 81 200 212 Edmonton 76 34 34 8 76 221 253 Vancouver 77 32 35 10 74 211 242 Anaheim 78 32 36 10 74 185 241 Los Angeles 76 28 40 8 64 185 243 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Top three teams in each division and two wild cards per conference advance to playoffs. x-clinched playoff spot z-clinched conference

Wednesday’s Games Philadelphia 5, Toronto 4, SO Boston 6, N.Y. Rangers 3 Dallas 2, Calgary 1 Colorado 4, Vegas 3 Thursday’s Games Washington at Carolina, 3 p.m. Montreal at Columbus, 3 p.m. Detroit at Buffalo, 3 p.m. Florida at Ottawa, 3:30 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Winnipeg, 4 p.m. Dallas at Edmonton, 5 p.m. Los Angeles at Vancouver, 6 p.m. Chicago at San Jose, 6:30 p.m. All Times ADT

baseball Baseball Opening Day American League

Thursday’s Games Baltimore (Cashner 0-0) at N.Y. Yankees (Tanaka 0-0), 9:05 a.m. Detroit (Zimmermann 0-0) at Toronto (Stroman 0-0), 11:37 a.m. Houston (Verlander 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Snell 0-0), 12:00 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Lester 0-0) at Texas (Minor 0-0), 12:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Cahill 0-0) at Oakland (Fiers 0-1), 12:07 p.m. Cleveland (Kluber 0-0) at Minnesota (Berrios 0-0), 12:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Rodon 0-0) at Kansas City (Keller 0-0), 12:15 p.m. Boston (Sale 0-0) at Seattle (Gonzales 1-0), 3:10 p.m.

National League

Thursday’s Games N.Y. Mets (deGrom 0-0) at Washington (Scherzer 0-0), 9:05 a.m. St. Louis (Mikolas 0-0) at Milwaukee (Chacin 0-0), 10:10 a.m. Atlanta (Teheran 0-0) at Philadelphia (Nola 0-0), 11:05 a.m. Chicago Cubs (Lester 0-0) at Texas (Minor 0-0), 12:05 p.m. Arizona (Greinke 0-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 0-0), 12:10 p.m. Colorado (Freeland 0-0) at Miami (Urena 0-0), 12:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Taillon 0-0) at Cincinnati (Castillo 0-0), 12:10 p.m. San Francisco (Bumgarner 0-0) at San Diego (Lauer 0-0), 12:10 p.m. All Times ADT

transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Assigned C Sandy Leon outright to Pawtucket (IL). DETROIT TIGERS — Placed OF JaCoby Jones and RHP Drew VerHagen on the 10-day IL; Jones retroactive to Monday, VerHagen to Tuesday. Placed LHP Gregory Soto on the restricted list. Recalled OF Dustin Peterson from Toledo (IL). LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Placed OF Justin Upton on the 10-day DL. Optioned RHP Jaime Barria to Salt Lake (PCL). Released LHP Dan Jennings. Selected the contract of OF Peter Bourjos from Salt Lake. MINNESOTA TWINS — Selected the contract of RHP Ryne Harper. Optioned INF Ronald Torreyes to Rochester (IL). Placed RHPs Matt Magill, Addison Reed, LHP Gabriel Moya, and 3B Miguel Sano on the 10-day IL. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Optioned RHP Ryan Dull to Las Vegas (PCL). Placed RHP Chris Bassitt and 1B Matt Olson on the 10-day IL. Named Lydia Tan managing director/real estate. Transferred RHP Jharel Cotton to the 60-day IL. SEATTLE MARINERS — Placed OF Ichiro Suzuki on the voluntarily retired list. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Placed OF Dalton Pompey on the 7-day IL, retroactive to Monday. Optioned RHP Sean Reid-Foley to Buffalo (IL). Acquired INF Jesus Lopez and international signing bonus pool space from the Oakland Athletics for INF Kendrys Morales and cash considerations. National League COLORADO ROCKIES — Selected the contract of 1B Mark Reynolds from Albuquerque (PCL). MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Optioned RHP Jake Petricka to San Antonio (PCL). ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Assigned LHP Chasen Shreve outright to Memphis (PCL). SAN DIEGO PADRES — Claimed OF Socrates Brito off waivers from the Arizona Diamondbacks. Placed OF Travis Jankowski on the 60-day IL. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Optioned LHPs Ty Blach and Williams Jerez to Sacramento (PCL). Reassigned OF Henry Ramos and INF Donovan Solano to minor league camp. WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Selected the contract of INF Jake Noll. Placed RHP Koda Glover, INF Howie Kendrick and OF Michael A. Taylor on the 10-day IL, retroactive

to March 25. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS — Suspended F Jordan Bell one game for conduct detrimental to the team. FOOTBALL National Football League CINCINNATI BENGALS — Signed DE Kerry Wynn to a one-year contract. DALLAS COWBOYS — Signed S George Iloka to a one-year contract. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Signed QB Blaine Gabbert. HOCKEY National Hockey League BOSTON BRUINS — Agreed to a 10-year partnership agreement with Providence (AHL). CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS — Agreed to terms with D Carl Dahlstrom on a two-year contract extension. DETROIT RED WINGS — Recalled F Martin Frk from Grand Rapids (AHL). NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Signed D Dante Fabbro to a threeyear, entry-level contract. RODEO PROFESSIONAL RODEO COWBOYS ASSOCIATION — Elected Josh Edwards, Cody Rostockyj, Matt Sherwood, John Franzen, Steve Sutton and Jerry Dorenkamp to the executive council. Re-elected Larry McConnell, Mike Mathis, David Morehead, David Petty, Eva Chadwick, Caleb Bennett and Jerome Schneeberger to the executive council. SOCCER National Premier Soccer League NEW YORK COSMOS — Resigned G Kevin Tenjo, D Armando Guarnera and M Joey Sanchez. USL Championship USL — Suspended LA Galaxy II D Didie Traore one game. COLLEGE ALABAMA — Named Nate Oats men’s basketball coach. GEORGIA SOUTHERN — Named Anita Howard women’s basketball coach. GEORGIA STATE — Promoted assistant men’s basketball coach Travis Williams to interim head coach. SAN FRANCISCO — Promoted men’s associate basketball coach, Todd Golden, to men’s basketball coach. TENNESSEE — Fired women’s basketball coach Holly Warlick. UNLV — Named T.J. Otzelberger men’s basketball coach. WASHINGTON STATE — Named Kyle Smith men’s basketball coach and signed him to a six-year contract.

Schedule released for International Champions Cup NEW YORK — Relevent Sports Group (RSG) released the 2019 International Champions Cup (ICC) schedule today at its launch event in New York City. This year’s tournament will host 12 of the best clubs in the world playing 18 matches across the United States, Europe and Asia, cementing the ICC as the premier summer international club tournament. The tournament’s seventh installment includes world class and groundbreaking matchups highlighted by the historic rivalry between Real Madrid and Atlético de Madrid which will be played for the first time outside of Europe on July 26th, in MetLife Stadium. This year’s clubs include past winners of UEFA Champions League and all the major European leagues and Liga MX. Since its debut, this level of competition has established the ICC as a fixture on the soccer calendar and the unofficial start of the international soccer season. “We couldn’t be more excited about today’s announcement, unveiling a tournament schedule on par with any on the world stage in a setting that is truly unique,” said RSG CEO Daniel Sillman. “This year’s launch event is as much for the diehard soccer fans as it is for those who celebrate the rich history and culture surrounding game.” Saturday Night Live vet and star of Hall Pass and Horrible Bosses Jason Sudeikis hosted the 3-day launch event, unlike anything in the soccer world. Held in the heart of SoHo, New York-based contemporary artist Daniel Arsham and his firm Snarkitecture designed an experiential retail popup using art created from historic ICC memorabilia. Arsham will also release a capsule collection of exclusive ICC merchandise on day 2 and 3 of the event. The launch includes a built-in content studio, a series of discussions with influential voices from the soccer world, and reunions with key players

from the 1994 Men’s US World Cup team and the 1999 Women’s US World Cup Championship team. Legends from each ICC club including Lothar Matthaus, Bryan Robson, Robert Pires, Daniele Massaro, and David Trezeguet attended the event. “What began as a simple idea, is now a fixture on the soccer calendar,” said RSG Executive Chairman Charlie Stillitano. “We were contacted by dozens of clubs wanting to be part of the ICC, recognizing the value of starting their season playing top competition in front of tens of thousands of passionate fans.” Matches are scheduled between July 16 and August 10 showcasing the world’s elite soccer clubs, including teams from Premier League, Serie A, LaLiga, Bundesliga and Liga MX: Real Madrid; Manchester United; Tottenham Hotspur; Arsenal; AS Roma; Juventus; AC Milan; Inter; Atlético de Madrid; FC Bayern; Benfica; and Chivas de Guadalajara. The tournament format is consistent with last year’s ICC. Each team will play three matches, and the club with the most points at the end of the tournament will win the championship and receive the first trophy of the season. Each win in regulation will result in three points and a tie will go straight to a shootout; the winning team in a shootout will receive two points and the losing team will receive one. The tournament will host U.S.-based matches in iconic locations in New York/New Jersey, Los Angeles, Washington D.C., Chicago, Charlotte, Santa Clara, Houston, Arlington, Kansas City and Boston. Cardiff, London, Stockholm, Singapore, and Shanghai will serve as hosts for the Europe and Asia matches. RSG is committed to building programs that benefit underserved communities and encourage more opportunities for participation in soccer. The ICC Legacy Proj-

ect, announced at today’s launch, will identify charitable organizations in each match city to leave behind something that will benefit the community. Projects will vary by market based on the specific community need, and all projects will

be focused on growing and developing soccer at the grassroots level. “Our goal is to partner in meaningful ways with our host communities beyond simply playing a soccer match,” said RSG COO Aaron Ryan.

Today in History Today is Thursday, March 28, the 87th day of 2019. There are 278 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On March 28, 1979, America’s worst commercial nuclear accident occurred with a partial meltdown inside the Unit 2 reactor at the Three Mile Island plant near Middletown, Pennsylvania. On this date: In 1797, Nathaniel Briggs of New Hampshire received a patent for a washing machine. In 1898, the U.S. Supreme Court, in United States v. Wong Kim Ark, ruled 6-2 that Wong, who was born in the United States to Chinese immigrants, was an American citizen. In 1930, the names of the Turkish cities of Constantinople and Angora were changed to Istanbul and Ankara. In 1941, novelist and critic Virginia Woolf, 59, drowned herself near her home in Lewes, East Sussex, England. In 1942, during World War II, British naval forces staged a successful raid on the Nazi-occupied French port of St. Nazaire in Operation Chariot, destroying the only dry dock on the Atlantic coast capable of repairing the German battleship Tirpitz. In 1969, the 34th president of the United States, Dwight D. Eisenhower, died in Washington D.C. at age 78. In 1978, in Stump v. Sparkman, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld, 5-3, the judicial immunity of an Indiana judge against a lawsuit brought by a young woman who’d been ordered sterilized by the judge when she was a teenager. In 1990, President George H.W. Bush presented the Congressional Gold Medal to the widow of U.S. Olympic legend Jesse Owens. In 1999, NATO broadened its attacks on Yugoslavia to target Serb military forces in Kosovo in the fifth straight night of airstrikes; thousands of refugees flooded into Albania and Macedonia from Kosovo. In 2003, American-led forces in Iraq dropped thousand-pound bombs on Republican Guard units guarding the gates to Baghdad and battled for control of the strategic city of Nasiriyah (nah-sih-REE’uh). President George W. Bush warned of “further sacrifice” ahead in the face of unexpectedly fierce fighting. In 2005, The Colorado Supreme Court threw out the death penalty in a rape-and-murder case because five of the trial jurors had consulted the Bible and quoted Scripture during deliberations. (The U.S. Supreme Court refused to consider reinstating the death sentence of Robert Harlan, who ended up being resentenced to life in prison for the murder of cocktail waitress Rhonda Maloney.) In 2017, Wells Fargo said it would pay $110 million to settle a classaction lawsuit over as many as 2 million accounts its employees opened for customers without getting their permission. Ten years ago: Fears in Fargo, N.D., of a catastrophic flood eased with word that the surging Red River had crested at lower-than-expected levels. Nearly 4,000 cities and towns in 88 countries switched off nonessential lights for Earth Hour to highlight the threat of climate change. Thousands of people marched through European cities to demand jobs, economic justice and environmental accountability. Shuttle Discovery and its crew of seven returned to Earth, ending a 13-day voyage to install a pair of solar wings on the international space station. Film composer Maurice Jarre, 84, died in Malibu, Calif. Five years ago: Russian President Vladimir Putin called President Barack Obama to discuss a solution to the crisis in Ukraine; the leaders agreed that top U.S. and Russian diplomats should work on the details. Yuzuru Hanyu of Japan became the first man in 12 years to win the Olympic and world figure skating titles in the same year. Jeremiah Denton, 89, a former U.S. senator who’d survived 7 1/2 years as a prisoner of war in North Vietnam, died in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Ray Rice married Janay Palmer a day after the Baltimore Ravens running back was indicted for aggravated assault for punching his fiancee in an Atlantic City, New Jersey, casino elevator. (Charges against Rice were dropped when he agreed to enter an intervention program.) One year ago: President Donald Trump fired Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin and nominated White House doctor Ronny Jackson to replace him; the move came in the wake of an ethics scandal and a rebellion within the agency. (Jackson withdrew his nomination amid allegations of workplace misconduct.) A judge in New York ordered rapper DMX to prison for a year for tax evasion. The government reported that the U.S. economy had grown at a solid 2.9 percent annual rate in the final three months of 2017, a sharp upward revision. Today’s Birthdays: Author Mario Vargas Llosa is 83. Country musician Charlie McCoy is 78. Movie director Mike Newell is 77. Actress Conchata Ferrell is 76. Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte is 74. Actress Dianne Wiest (weest) is 73. Country singer Reba McEntire is 64. Olympic gold medal gymnast Bart Conner is 61. Actress Alexandra Billings (TV: “Transparent”) is 57. Rapper Salt (Salt-N-Pepa) is 53. Actress Tracey Needham is 52. Actor Max Perlich is 51. Movie director Brett Ratner is 50. Country singer Rodney Atkins is 50. Actor Vince Vaughn is 49. Rapper Mr. Cheeks (Lost Boyz) is 48. Actor Ken L. is 46. Singer-songwriter Matt Nathanson is 46. Rock musician Dave Keuning is 43. Actress Annie Wersching is 42. Actress Julia Stiles is 38. Singer Lady Gaga is 33. Electronic musician Clayton Knight (Odesza) is 31. Thought for Today: “Those who say they give the public what it wants begin by underestimating public taste and end by debauching it.” -- T.S. Eliot, American-Anglo poet and critic (1888-1965).


Arts&Entertainment

A8 | Thursday, March 28, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

What’s Happening

Filmmaker digs into mining project

Events and Exhibitions n Soldotna Library Friends Book and Art Sale, Thursday, March 28 from 2-6 p.m. Join us for great deals on books and art! All proceeds benefit the Soldotna Library Friends. n Book to Action Climate Series, Thursday, March 28 at 5:30 p.m. Climate change is affecting Alaska faster than any other state in the nation. Join us for a solution oriented discussion focused on climate action and local solutions. We will begin this series by discussing the book Drawdown. The series will be held on the 4th Thursday of each month. n The KPC Showcase will presents An Alaskan Doctor’s Perspectives on Antarctica with Dr. Kristin Mitchell on Thursday, April 4 at 6:30 p.m. in the McLane Commons, Kenai Peninsula College. Mitchell recently visited Antarctica as part of the Homeward Bound initiative. She was one of 80 women hailing from 23 different nationalities that were a part of this program, with each of them specializing in various fields of science, engineering, technology and mathematics. n The Kenai Peninsula Fish Habitat Partnership 2019 Symposium will take place on Thursday, April 18 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Cannery Lodge. RSVP required. Join us for discussions about habitat protections on the Kenai Peninsula, including defining the future of fish habitats and few stories from Dr. Kristin Mitchell and Sue Mauger on their trips to Antarctica. Lunch will be provided. This is a FREE event but please register! Visit www.kenaifishpartnership.org. n The Kenai Peninsula Borough School District is celebrating the 30th Anniversary of Visual Feast, the annual districtwide student art show. Featuring work from across the peninsula, this show highlights the best high school and middle school artists from a wide variety of schools. This show is a revelation every year, showcasing the amazing talent that exists on the Kenai Peninsula in both 3-D and 2-D work. The show will run the month of April at the Kenai Fine Arts Center with an opening reception on Thursday, April 4 at 5 p.m. n Current and former Girl Scouts in Service Unit 941, formerly named Kalgin Service Unit on the Kenai Peninsula, are invited to a Girl Scout Reunion Tea to observe the 60th Anniversary of our Service Unit on Sunday, March 31 from 2:30-5:30 p.m. at Soldotna Methodist Church, Binkley Street. Bring your Scouting memorabilia. For more info contact Rosemary Pilatti at 907-776-8916 or wrangell86@gmail.com. n The Performing Arts Society is pleased to announce the return of pianist Eduard Zilberkant, who has charmed our audiences several times in the past. Joining him are Bryan Emmon Hall, violin; Gail Johansen, viola; and Ryan Fitzpatrick, cello. They will be performing works by Beethoven, Turina, and Arensky. Please join us for this classical chamber music on Saturday, April 6, at 7:30 p.m. at Soldotna Christ Lutheran Church. Tickets are $20 general admission and $10 for students and may be purchased in advance in Soldotna at River City Books and Northcountry Fair or in Kenai at Already Read Books and Country Liquor or at the door. n Forever Dance Alaska will present “The Best of Broadway” annual showcase on March 29-30 at 7 p.m. at the Renee C. Henderson Auditorium. Tickets are $15, includes $1 KPBSD seat charge. Call 262-1641 or email info@foreverdancealaska.com.

Entertainment n The Place Motel Bar & Grill will will host Mika Day Show 8 p.m. to midnight on Friday, March 29. Karaoke starts at 9 p.m. on Saturday, March 30. n Acapulco, 43543 Sterling Highway in Soldotna, has live music at 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. n A bluegrass jam takes place on the first Sunday of the month at from 1-4 p.m. at the Mount Redoubt Baptist Church on South Lovers Loop in Nikiski.

Poet’s

Corner Kasilof Krystals By HEDY JO HUSS, Soldotna For Stormy The sun illuminates a slide of forest. Beams of light bounce without rest. Bent over, weighted pussy willows Are covered with ice pillows. Iced-up branches create a winter world Icicles slightly swirled. The water that drips from the branch Does enhance. Glistening ice hardens buds On their stems. Like cocoons, buds are in Their beds. There are so many frozen buds It seems. So many; they teem! Shimmering crystals abound. Take a gaze. This frigid Frosting won’t decorate for long. Seasonal changes have their way. Kasilof Krystals … foretell spring THAT for sure has a nice ring. Poems must include the writer’s name, phone number and address. They should be kept to no more than 300 words. Submission of a poem does not guarantee publication. Poems may be e-mailed to news@peninsulaclarion.com, faxed to 283-3299, delivered to the Clarion at 150 Trading Bay Road or mailed to P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611.

Colin Arisman and Connor Connor Gallagher work on “Rock, Paper, Fish” a movie about a proposed mining project in the Chilkat Valley near Haines and Klukwan. (Courtesy Photo | For “Rock, Paper, Fish”) By Ben Hohenstatt Capital City Weekly

Chilkat Valley residents surprised Colin Arisman, when he set out to help make the movie “Rock, Paper, Fish.” The 23-minute film captures community response to a exploration of a potential mining project in the Haines Borough near Klukwan known as the Palmer Project. The Palmer Project is a mining prospect in the advanced exploration stage, according to the Alaska Department

of Natural Resources. The Project is operated by Constantine North Inc. Previously, the tribal government of Klukwan sued the Bureau of Land Management in connection to the project. However, Arisman said the people he talked to were not as polarized as he expected. “I think we assumed that the divide between pro- and anti-mining would be pretty black and white, but in small Alaskan communities people are very thoughtful in how they express themselves,”

Arisman said in an email after a phone interview with the Capital City Weekly. “There’s a lot at stake — for the watershed, for economic security and for the well-being of the community — but yet neighbors are neighbors, and folks are respectful of each other’s perspectives. At the same time, we became more aware of how limited the opportunities are for the average person to engage with the development process for mines in Alaska, especially when they are on private land.” The documentary premiered in Klukwan earlier this month and was shot off and on over the course of two years. It is now making its way around Southeast Alaska. It was shown in Juneau and Skagway last week and a screening is planned for April 7 in Sitka. Arisman took time to talk to the Capital City Weekly this week about the Palmer Project, the movie he codirected with Connor Gallagher and his takeaways from making “Rock, Paper, Fish,” which he said will be

available to stream online at RockPaperFish.com this summer. For people who aren’t familiar with the project, can you describe it in a nutshell? The Palmer Project is in advanced exploration. It’s about 35 miles upstream of the community of Haines. Klukwan is between Haines and the Palmer Project, and basically it’s an exploratory project evaluating the prospects of a large-scale hard rock mine. The actual site was discovered several decades ago, and over the last decade, Constantine, which is a Canadian-owned mining company in partnership with Dowa Metals, which is a Japanese-owned corporation that’s invested in the project, they’ve been stepping up their efforts to explore the deposit and bring on more investment as they work on developing a full-blow hard rock mine. After making your film, what are your thoughts on the project? We definitely bring a See ROCK, page A9

‘Wolf Pack’ offers a scenic thrill ride The Bookwork Sez Hunting season has opened. And there you sit, waiting. It’s quiet in the woods, where a snapped twig is as loud as a gunshot out there and as urgent. That snick, and your attention is focused, your adrenaline rushed. The question, as posed in “Wolf Pack” by C.J. Box is: which are you, the hunter, or the hunted? According to Courtney Lockwood at the Forest Service, wolves in Yellowstone Park never strayed beyond the park’s boundaries. Wyoming Game Warden Joe Pickett knew that was untrue, as did the ranchers in Twelve Sleep County; as if anecdotal evidence wasn’t enough, a black wolf had been caught and contained in a rancher’s horse trailer. It was a magnificent animal, but it was killing the rancher’s heifers. Like most game wardens, Pickett had a soft spot in his heart for wildlife, the wolf included, just as it bothered Pickett that someone left un-

checked traps in his territory. To let any creature needlessly suffer was unimaginable to him; that the trapper left his name and address on the traps was laughable. But the guy was a “ghost,” which wasn’t funny at all; going by what Pickett could tell, the trapper didn’t exist prior to two years ago. No records, nothing. The bigger problem, though, was that it was late spring, the elk and deer that survived the winter were fragile, and some idiot with a drone was harassing the animals. Pickett’s colleague in the next county was as peeved about it as Pickett, but the issue was complicated by fact that the harasser appeared to be the father of Pickett’s daughter’s boyfriend. This wasn’t going to go well at all. Just outside the county, Pedro Infante knew he was losing control. Of the four people in the Wolf Pack – three men and Abriella Guzman – Abriella was trouble: beautiful, confident, completely merciless, all good reasons why

she wasn’t in charge. Pedro was, but finding their target and assassinating him was taking too much time. Abri-

ella was growing impatient. The Wolf Pack was getting nervous…

See BOOK, page A9

Taking robots beyond Transformers R eeling It In C hris J enness

Few things epitomize mankind’s obsession with and innate fear of progress than robots. Ever since the turn of the 20th century, fiction writers have dreamed up visions of our mechanized doppelgangers, always bringing either an end to toil or our ultimate downfall. Robots are such a common movie trope that their very existence is usually a symbol for hubris. Typically, robots are treated tragically, though not always. It didn’t start that way, but “The Terminator” series definitely turns toward a sympathetic portrayal of its titular machines. And how much sadder can you get than the doomed robots in Spielberg’s “A.I.”? Of course, in 2007 Michael Bay had to come along and ruin everything with his odious “Transformers” series. I guess we can’t have anything nice. Well, that’s not exactly true. This week I’ll be looking at two different new robot properties that manage to contrast wildly with Bay’s vision, but also give us some cool new ideas to ponder. The first, “Bumblebee,” is technically a sequel/prequel to the “Transformers” films, and the second is a bizarre animated anthology series from none

2018 Parmount Pictures

other than David Fincher. Taking place immediately after the fall of the hero’s home planet Cybertron, “Bumblebee” sees our eponymous robot escaping to earth in the year 1987. There he is to establish a new base of operations for the rebelling Autobots, currently on the run from the evil Decepticons. There’s a lot about “Transformers” that bothers me. For instance, if they are the dominant life-form on their home planet, why do they transform into vehicles that are designed to be driven/piloted by humans? Or why do they transform into dinosaurs? But we’re not going to do that. We’ll be here all day and get nowhere, just like the first five movies of this series. Instead, let’s just take the movie at face value and appreciate that it is being directed by Travis Knight, who

brought us “Kubo and the Two Strings” instead of “Bad Boy” Michael Bay. When ‘Bee lands on earth, he immediately gets into it with a pursuing Deception who destroys his voice box in the process. From there he goes into hiding, transforming into a yellow Volkswagen Beetle after which he is salvaged by a wrecker. Said purveyor of junk eventually gifts the car to his niece, Charlie, played well by Hailee Steinfeld and the story is off and running. There’s a bad military guy in the person of John Cena, a goofy love interest, and a surprisingly restrained number of giant smashing robot battles. While “Bumblebee” isn’t great art by any means, it’s a sweet film that is funny and action-packed enough to make me forget a decade of bad “Transformers” movies. That’s got to stand for something. Grade: B

Far more impressive, though rarely as sweet, is Netflix’s latest, “Love, Death + Robots,” a sci-fi series that steals its style in equal parts from 1981’s “Heavy Metal” and 2003’s “The Animatrix.” Told in brilliant animation in a variety of media, “Robots” spins 18 different short stories varying in subject matter and tone, but rarely in level of quality. Though I certainly had my favorites, I was seriously impressed with the levels of creativity, emotion and drama suffusing this brightly colored, often terrifying landscape. Fincher and executive producer Tim Miller, who you might remember as the director of “Deadpool,” had been trying to get a remake of the seminal early-’80s drug trip “Heavy Metal” off the ground for a few years, but wound up with this series instead. See REEL, page A9


Peninsula Clarion | Thursday, March 28, 2019 | A9

. . . Events

n The Flats Bistro in Kenai presents live dinner music this Continued from page A8 Friday, March 29, featuring Mike Morgan and Matt Boyle from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Also on Friday, “Open Mic” Morgan hosts “Friday Night Live” with special guests Matt Boyle, Mark Hutton, Lee Johnson and many more. On Saturday, March 30, The Runaway Grooms (from Vail, Colorado) headline “Later on Saturday” from 9-11 p.m. at The Flats. Watch this space for more music at The Flats. For reservations call The Flats Bistro at 907-335-1010. n Veronica’s in Old Town Kenai has Open Mic from 6-8 p.m. Friday. Call Veronica’s at 283-2725. n The Alaska Roadhouse Bar and Grill hosts open horseshoe tournaments Thursday nights at the bar on Golddust Drive. For more information, call 262-9887. n An all acoustic jam takes place every Thursday. The jam takes place at Christ Lutheran Church in Soldotna on the first Thursday of the month, and at the Kenai Senior Center during the rest of the month. Jam starts at 6:30 p.m. n AmVets Post 4 has reopened in its brand new building on Kalifornsky Beach across from Jumpin’ Junction. Eligible veterans and their families are invited to stop by to find out more about AmVets and their involvement in the Veteran community. For members and invited guests, Friday night dance to “Running with Scissors,” and Saturday Burn your own steak and karaoke with Cowboy Don. n Odie’s Deli in Soldotna has live music Friday from 6-8 p.m. and Pub Quiz night every Wednesday from 6-8 p.m. n The Bow bar in Kenai has karaoke at 9 p.m. Thursdays. n Vagabond Inn has live music Saturday starting @ 9pm

. . . Rock

skeptical perspective to the project as folks with a background in ecology Continued from page A8 and natural resource planning. That being said, we’re really interested as filmmakers in why some folks in the community are supportive of the project. We definitely, in the film, explore multiple perspectives, and we’re not trying to say our perspective is right or it’s the only perspective. That being said, we talked to a lot of folks who were concerned about having foreign-owned mining corporations working in the Chilkat Valley with a loose regulatory environment. Is there anything you learned while making the movie that really stood out to you? It’s a challenging creative prospect to tell a story from multiple perspectives. I think it’s less likely in today’s media environment to really dig into the complexity of different perspectives that might see the world in really different ways. Everyone in the film loves being in the Chilkat Valley and wants to continue living up here. Some folks feel that an economic influx of a mine is critical to them being able to survive and stay here, and other folks can’t imagine being able to survive and stay here if a big mine does go in. That’s a really complicated thing. People are here and want to be here for similar reasons, but people are really seeing the future in different ways. Anything else I didn’t ask about that you want to add? One of the efforts we’re trying to support is the community of Klukwan in collecting their own baseline water-quality data on the river and also supporting them in government-to-government consultation. We hope folks if they’re inspired by the film will go to Chilkat.org and consider supporting Klukwan as they do this really important work to ensure the long-term health of the Chilkat Valley.

. . . Book

So. How are your fingers? In good shape, are they? Great, because Continued from page A8 you’ll need them for edge-of-your-seat clinging while you’re reading “Wolf Pack.” But first, readers may be surprised by an opening chapter that’s kind of clunky and a bit on the prurient side. It’s important to the story, so power through it — what’s to come will more than make up for it, as this tale literally winds up mountains and down through arroyos, between rocks, far above ground, and between bullets. That this book is a thriller is appealing, but the scenery in the story is just as attractive and author C.J. Box tops it off by bringing into this novel many of his best-loved characters. Just beware that some of them may not make it out. If you’re new to this author, prepare yourself for a future search for the rest of the series. For fans of Pickett or Box, though, you know what to do about “Wolf Pack”: hunt it down.

Dutch art sleuth recovers stolen Picasso stolen By MIKE CORDER Associated Press

AMSTERDAM — A Dutch art detective said Tuesday that he has recovered a valuable painting by Pablo Picasso 20 years after it was stolen from a wealthy Saudi’s yacht in France. Arthur Brand told The Associated Press that he took possession two weeks ago of the 1938 painting “Buste de Femme” after trailing it for years in Amsterdam. Brand, a renowned sleuth whose previous finds include a pair of bronze horses sculpted for Adolf Hitler, has since handed over the painting, which he estimates to be worth around 25 million euros ($28 million), to an insurance company. It wasn’t immediately clear what would happen to the painting. Brand said he knew it was the real thing as soon as he got his hands on it and peeled away two plastic bags covering the canvas. “You know it’s a Picasso because there is some magic coming off it,” he said. But that wasn’t the only reason he was convinced of its authenticity. In cases of stolen art, he said, the back of a painting can tell experts more than the front.

This image shows Dutch art detective Arthur Brand with “Buste de Femme”, a recovered Picasso painting. (Arthur Brand via AP)

He said that since the theft from a yacht moored in the swanky French Riviera port of Antibes, a number of forgeries had been offered to insurers and rejected. “But a forger never knows how the back looks,” Brand said, without specifying what was there. “When I saw the back of the painting, I knew it was the real one.” Brand began his latest hunt after hearing rumors about a Picasso stolen from a boat.

it in and reached out to Brand. Martin Finkelnberg, head of the Dutch national police’s art and antique criminality team, welcomed the recovery. No arrests have been made. Finkelnberg told Dutch national daily De Volkskrant that having such a painting can be a burden and taking it to Brand is a way out. “Done. Everybody happy,” Finkelnberg said. “The most important thing is that the artwork is back.”

Apple vs. Netflix: Why turf wars are flaring in big tech By MATT O’BRIEN AP Technology Writer

Apple’s latest move into streaming video illustrates an escalating trend: Tech’s biggest companies, faced with limits to their growth, are encroaching on each other’s turf. Apple is taking on Netflix. Facebook is edging into Amazon’s sphere with its e-commerce plans. Google, which has already challenged Amazon and Microsoft in cloud computing, is launching an online game service that could undercut the lucrative game-console business at Microsoft and Sony. Apple, which is also launching a gaming service and introducing its own credit card , may be veering the most outside its comfort zone, technology industry analyst Rob Enderle said. “This is an awful lot of breadth really quickly for a company that hasn’t been known for being great at breadth,” Enderle said. “This is much more diversity than Apple’s ever had.”

Before, when the com-

terstons. “Companies will

pany’s product suite grew too varied, “what Steve Jobs did with Apple was, he made the company focus,” Enderle said. These are different times, however, and Apple may have decided that it doesn’t have much choice amid declining sales of its premier product, the iPhone. “They have kind of bled the device market dry,” said Sally Edgar, of UK-based technology consultancy Wa-

increasingly be about subscription services. I think they have to do it to survive.” Tech companies, of course, have explored new markets and fought turf battles over them for years. Facebook and Google have long scrapped over digital ads. Google and Amazon are battling it out over voice assistants in the home. Google and Microsoft have competing search engines. And Apple and Google have

In this 2019 photo people walk on a pedestrian walkway, in Boston’s Seaport district. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

waged an epic smartphone battle for roughly a decade. But longtime tech industry analyst Tim Bajarin sees new urgency in the latest push into streaming services and other businesses that bring in continuous flows of money — not just when consumers make big investments in new phones or other hardware. “It’s just becoming clearer today that the only way a company is going to grow is by adding a recurring revenue model,” Bajarin said. “Apple is becoming an aggregator of content. They now have multiple services that will help them grow their bottom line.” Enderle said Apple is still in the “honeymoon phase” after a Monday announcement at its Cupertino, California, headquarters. Apple brought out new A-list entertainment partners such as Oprah Winfrey and Steven Spielberg and video game partners such as the creators of “SimCity” and the “Final Fantasy” series. What happens next may be harder for the company to manage. “It always looks great on

Larry Cohen, director of cult horror films, dies at 77

. . . Reel

Like “Heavy Metal,” the stories are violent, sometimes sexual, and Continued from page A8 often profane. You can almost feel the filmmakers’ teenage boy glee at times during the series, but that doesn’t stop the various stories from having real emotional weight and often disturbing underlying themes. “Love, Death + Robots” has been criticized for being somewhat misogynistic (I wouldn’t agree, but can see where that comes from) and overly gory (yes, but that’s what you sign up for), but I think those who don’t look deeper miss some good stuff buried in the blood and guts. “The Witness” and “Beyond the Aquila Rift” seem weighed down with gratuitous sex scenes, but both of these stories contained disturbing, mind-bending cores. “Three Robots” is hilarious, and “Lucky 13” is just a flat-out great action story. “Secret War” has gorgeous scope and awesome action, whereas “Zima Blue” has even greater scope surrounding a bizarre and heartbreaking center. Not all the stories are winners. I was bored with “Sucker of Souls” and “Shape Shifters,” and “Fish Night” seemed to make little to no sense. But, that’s the way with anthology series. I have to admit — this series came along at just the right time for me. I’ve been working my way through four volumes of science fiction short stories from pre-1960 so I’m really in the zone for it. I hope they continue the series and consider perhaps toning down the horror and violence just a bit in favor of more cerebral science fiction. But really, with a format this rich, if you find a story you don’t like, you can always bet the next one will be better. Grade: A“Bumblebee” is rated PG-13 for sci-fi robot violence and mild language. “Love Death + Robots” is rated TVMA for graphic robot violence, sexuality, nudity and language.

“Finally, I tracked somebody down who had had it in his possession 10 years ago and he told me which one it was,” he said. “And then it still took me three years to get near it.” Brand said the painting had circulated in the criminal underworld of the Dutch capital. “It was used as some kind of money as payment for drug and arm deals,” he said. Eventually a person who had the painting in their possession decided to turn

This 2006, file photo shows writer, director Larry Cohen, left, and wife Cynthia Cohen arriving for the launch party for FEARnet at the Boulevard 3 nightclub in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Phil McCarten, File) By JAKE COYLE AP Film Writer

NEW YORK — Larry Cohen, the maverick Bmovie director of cult horror films “It’s Alive” and “God Told Me To,” has died. He was 77. Cohen’s friend and spokesman, the actor Shade Rupe, said Cohen passed away Saturday in Los Angeles surrounded by loved ones. Cohen’s films were schlocky, low-budget films that developed cult followings, spawned sequels and gained esteem for their genre reflections of contemporary social issues.

His 1974 “It’s Alive,” about a murderous mutant baby, dealt with the treatment of children. Bernard Herrmann, Alfred Hitchcock’s frequent composer, supplied the score. His New York-set 1976 satire “God Told Me To” depicted a series of shootings and murders carried out in religious fervor. Andy Kaufman played a policeman who goes on a shooting spree during the St. Patrick’s Day parade. There were also aliens. In Cohen’s 1985 film “The Stuff,” Cohen skewered consumerism with a story inspired by the rise of junk food. It’s about a sweet yogurt-like sub-

stance that’s found oozing out of the ground and is then bottled and marketed like an ice cream alternative without the calories. The “stuff” turns out to be a parasite that turns consumers of it into zombies. “It wasn’t just going to a studio like a factory laborer and making pictures and going home every night,” Cohen told the Ringer last year. “We were out there in the jungle making these movies, improvising, and having fun, and creating movies from out of thin air without much money.” “You’ve gotta make the picture your way and no other way,” he added, “because it can’t be made otherwise.” Cohen’s approach — he would often shoot extreme scenes on New York City streets without permits or alerting people in the area — made him, like Roger Corman, revered among subsequent generations of independent genre-movie filmmakers. A documentary released last year, “King Cohen: The Wild World of Filmmaker Larry Cohen,” paid tribute to Cohen. “Larry Cohen truly was an independent freewheeling movie legend,” the writer-director Edgar Wright (“Shaun of the

Dead,” ”Baby Driver”) said on Sunday, praising him “for so many fun, highconcept genre romps with ideas bigger than the budgets.” The New York-native Cohen began in television, where he wrote episodes for series like “The Fugitive,” ”The Defenders” and “Surfside 6.” New York would be the setting for many of Cohen’s films, including 1982’s “Q,” in which a giant flying lizard nests atop the Chrysler Building. Cohen’s 1973 blaxspoitation crime drama “Black Caesar,” scored by James Brown, was about a Harlem gangster. He and star Fred Williamson reunited the next year for “Hell Up in Harlem.” Cohen later directed Bette Davis’ last film, “Wicked Stepmother,” in 1989. More recently, he wrote the 2002 Colin Farrell thriller “Phone Booth” and 2004’s “Cellular,” with Chris Evans. Cohen was often his own producer, director, writer and sometimes propmaker and production manager. “Otherwise,” he told the Village Voice, “I’d have to sit down with producers, and producers are a real pain in the ass, believe me.”


Peninsula Clarion | Thursday, March 28, 2019 | A9

. . . Events

n The Flats Bistro in Kenai presents live dinner music this Continued from page A8 Friday, March 29, featuring Mike Morgan and Matt Boyle from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Also on Friday, “Open Mic” Morgan hosts “Friday Night Live” with special guests Matt Boyle, Mark Hutton, Lee Johnson and many more. On Saturday, March 30, The Runaway Grooms (from Vail, Colorado) headline “Later on Saturday” from 9-11 p.m. at The Flats. Watch this space for more music at The Flats. For reservations call The Flats Bistro at 907-335-1010. n Veronica’s in Old Town Kenai has Open Mic from 6-8 p.m. Friday. Call Veronica’s at 283-2725. n The Alaska Roadhouse Bar and Grill hosts open horseshoe tournaments Thursday nights at the bar on Golddust Drive. For more information, call 262-9887. n An all acoustic jam takes place every Thursday. The jam takes place at Christ Lutheran Church in Soldotna on the first Thursday of the month, and at the Kenai Senior Center during the rest of the month. Jam starts at 6:30 p.m. n AmVets Post 4 has reopened in its brand new building on Kalifornsky Beach across from Jumpin’ Junction. Eligible veterans and their families are invited to stop by to find out more about AmVets and their involvement in the Veteran community. For members and invited guests, Friday night dance to “Running with Scissors,” and Saturday Burn your own steak and karaoke with Cowboy Don. n Odie’s Deli in Soldotna has live music Friday from 6-8 p.m. and Pub Quiz night every Wednesday from 6-8 p.m. n The Bow bar in Kenai has karaoke at 9 p.m. Thursdays. n Vagabond Inn has live music Saturday starting @ 9pm

. . . Rock

skeptical perspective to the project as folks with a background in ecology Continued from page A8 and natural resource planning. That being said, we’re really interested as filmmakers in why some folks in the community are supportive of the project. We definitely, in the film, explore multiple perspectives, and we’re not trying to say our perspective is right or it’s the only perspective. That being said, we talked to a lot of folks who were concerned about having foreign-owned mining corporations working in the Chilkat Valley with a loose regulatory environment. Is there anything you learned while making the movie that really stood out to you? It’s a challenging creative prospect to tell a story from multiple perspectives. I think it’s less likely in today’s media environment to really dig into the complexity of different perspectives that might see the world in really different ways. Everyone in the film loves being in the Chilkat Valley and wants to continue living up here. Some folks feel that an economic influx of a mine is critical to them being able to survive and stay here, and other folks can’t imagine being able to survive and stay here if a big mine does go in. That’s a really complicated thing. People are here and want to be here for similar reasons, but people are really seeing the future in different ways. Anything else I didn’t ask about that you want to add? One of the efforts we’re trying to support is the community of Klukwan in collecting their own baseline water-quality data on the river and also supporting them in government-to-government consultation. We hope folks if they’re inspired by the film will go to Chilkat.org and consider supporting Klukwan as they do this really important work to ensure the long-term health of the Chilkat Valley.

. . . Book

So. How are your fingers? In good shape, are they? Great, because Continued from page A8 you’ll need them for edge-of-your-seat clinging while you’re reading “Wolf Pack.” But first, readers may be surprised by an opening chapter that’s kind of clunky and a bit on the prurient side. It’s important to the story, so power through it — what’s to come will more than make up for it, as this tale literally winds up mountains and down through arroyos, between rocks, far above ground, and between bullets. That this book is a thriller is appealing, but the scenery in the story is just as attractive and author C.J. Box tops it off by bringing into this novel many of his best-loved characters. Just beware that some of them may not make it out. If you’re new to this author, prepare yourself for a future search for the rest of the series. For fans of Pickett or Box, though, you know what to do about “Wolf Pack”: hunt it down.

Dutch art sleuth recovers stolen Picasso stolen By MIKE CORDER Associated Press

AMSTERDAM — A Dutch art detective said Tuesday that he has recovered a valuable painting by Pablo Picasso 20 years after it was stolen from a wealthy Saudi’s yacht in France. Arthur Brand told The Associated Press that he took possession two weeks ago of the 1938 painting “Buste de Femme” after trailing it for years in Amsterdam. Brand, a renowned sleuth whose previous finds include a pair of bronze horses sculpted for Adolf Hitler, has since handed over the painting, which he estimates to be worth around 25 million euros ($28 million), to an insurance company. It wasn’t immediately clear what would happen to the painting. Brand said he knew it was the real thing as soon as he got his hands on it and peeled away two plastic bags covering the canvas. “You know it’s a Picasso because there is some magic coming off it,” he said. But that wasn’t the only reason he was convinced of its authenticity. In cases of stolen art, he said, the back of a painting can tell experts more than the front.

This image shows Dutch art detective Arthur Brand with “Buste de Femme”, a recovered Picasso painting. (Arthur Brand via AP)

He said that since the theft from a yacht moored in the swanky French Riviera port of Antibes, a number of forgeries had been offered to insurers and rejected. “But a forger never knows how the back looks,” Brand said, without specifying what was there. “When I saw the back of the painting, I knew it was the real one.” Brand began his latest hunt after hearing rumors about a Picasso stolen from a boat.

it in and reached out to Brand. Martin Finkelnberg, head of the Dutch national police’s art and antique criminality team, welcomed the recovery. No arrests have been made. Finkelnberg told Dutch national daily De Volkskrant that having such a painting can be a burden and taking it to Brand is a way out. “Done. Everybody happy,” Finkelnberg said. “The most important thing is that the artwork is back.”

Apple vs. Netflix: Why turf wars are flaring in big tech By MATT O’BRIEN AP Technology Writer

Apple’s latest move into streaming video illustrates an escalating trend: Tech’s biggest companies, faced with limits to their growth, are encroaching on each other’s turf. Apple is taking on Netflix. Facebook is edging into Amazon’s sphere with its e-commerce plans. Google, which has already challenged Amazon and Microsoft in cloud computing, is launching an online game service that could undercut the lucrative game-console business at Microsoft and Sony. Apple, which is also launching a gaming service and introducing its own credit card , may be veering the most outside its comfort zone, technology industry analyst Rob Enderle said. “This is an awful lot of breadth really quickly for a company that hasn’t been known for being great at breadth,” Enderle said. “This is much more diversity than Apple’s ever had.”

Before, when the com-

terstons. “Companies will

pany’s product suite grew too varied, “what Steve Jobs did with Apple was, he made the company focus,” Enderle said. These are different times, however, and Apple may have decided that it doesn’t have much choice amid declining sales of its premier product, the iPhone. “They have kind of bled the device market dry,” said Sally Edgar, of UK-based technology consultancy Wa-

increasingly be about subscription services. I think they have to do it to survive.” Tech companies, of course, have explored new markets and fought turf battles over them for years. Facebook and Google have long scrapped over digital ads. Google and Amazon are battling it out over voice assistants in the home. Google and Microsoft have competing search engines. And Apple and Google have

In this 2019 photo people walk on a pedestrian walkway, in Boston’s Seaport district. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

waged an epic smartphone battle for roughly a decade. But longtime tech industry analyst Tim Bajarin sees new urgency in the latest push into streaming services and other businesses that bring in continuous flows of money — not just when consumers make big investments in new phones or other hardware. “It’s just becoming clearer today that the only way a company is going to grow is by adding a recurring revenue model,” Bajarin said. “Apple is becoming an aggregator of content. They now have multiple services that will help them grow their bottom line.” Enderle said Apple is still in the “honeymoon phase” after a Monday announcement at its Cupertino, California, headquarters. Apple brought out new A-list entertainment partners such as Oprah Winfrey and Steven Spielberg and video game partners such as the creators of “SimCity” and the “Final Fantasy” series. What happens next may be harder for the company to manage. “It always looks great on

Larry Cohen, director of cult horror films, dies at 77

. . . Reel

Like “Heavy Metal,” the stories are violent, sometimes sexual, and Continued from page A8 often profane. You can almost feel the filmmakers’ teenage boy glee at times during the series, but that doesn’t stop the various stories from having real emotional weight and often disturbing underlying themes. “Love, Death + Robots” has been criticized for being somewhat misogynistic (I wouldn’t agree, but can see where that comes from) and overly gory (yes, but that’s what you sign up for), but I think those who don’t look deeper miss some good stuff buried in the blood and guts. “The Witness” and “Beyond the Aquila Rift” seem weighed down with gratuitous sex scenes, but both of these stories contained disturbing, mind-bending cores. “Three Robots” is hilarious, and “Lucky 13” is just a flat-out great action story. “Secret War” has gorgeous scope and awesome action, whereas “Zima Blue” has even greater scope surrounding a bizarre and heartbreaking center. Not all the stories are winners. I was bored with “Sucker of Souls” and “Shape Shifters,” and “Fish Night” seemed to make little to no sense. But, that’s the way with anthology series. I have to admit — this series came along at just the right time for me. I’ve been working my way through four volumes of science fiction short stories from pre-1960 so I’m really in the zone for it. I hope they continue the series and consider perhaps toning down the horror and violence just a bit in favor of more cerebral science fiction. But really, with a format this rich, if you find a story you don’t like, you can always bet the next one will be better. Grade: A“Bumblebee” is rated PG-13 for sci-fi robot violence and mild language. “Love Death + Robots” is rated TVMA for graphic robot violence, sexuality, nudity and language.

“Finally, I tracked somebody down who had had it in his possession 10 years ago and he told me which one it was,” he said. “And then it still took me three years to get near it.” Brand said the painting had circulated in the criminal underworld of the Dutch capital. “It was used as some kind of money as payment for drug and arm deals,” he said. Eventually a person who had the painting in their possession decided to turn

This 2006, file photo shows writer, director Larry Cohen, left, and wife Cynthia Cohen arriving for the launch party for FEARnet at the Boulevard 3 nightclub in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Phil McCarten, File) By JAKE COYLE AP Film Writer

NEW YORK — Larry Cohen, the maverick Bmovie director of cult horror films “It’s Alive” and “God Told Me To,” has died. He was 77. Cohen’s friend and spokesman, the actor Shade Rupe, said Cohen passed away Saturday in Los Angeles surrounded by loved ones. Cohen’s films were schlocky, low-budget films that developed cult followings, spawned sequels and gained esteem for their genre reflections of contemporary social issues.

His 1974 “It’s Alive,” about a murderous mutant baby, dealt with the treatment of children. Bernard Herrmann, Alfred Hitchcock’s frequent composer, supplied the score. His New York-set 1976 satire “God Told Me To” depicted a series of shootings and murders carried out in religious fervor. Andy Kaufman played a policeman who goes on a shooting spree during the St. Patrick’s Day parade. There were also aliens. In Cohen’s 1985 film “The Stuff,” Cohen skewered consumerism with a story inspired by the rise of junk food. It’s about a sweet yogurt-like sub-

stance that’s found oozing out of the ground and is then bottled and marketed like an ice cream alternative without the calories. The “stuff” turns out to be a parasite that turns consumers of it into zombies. “It wasn’t just going to a studio like a factory laborer and making pictures and going home every night,” Cohen told the Ringer last year. “We were out there in the jungle making these movies, improvising, and having fun, and creating movies from out of thin air without much money.” “You’ve gotta make the picture your way and no other way,” he added, “because it can’t be made otherwise.” Cohen’s approach — he would often shoot extreme scenes on New York City streets without permits or alerting people in the area — made him, like Roger Corman, revered among subsequent generations of independent genre-movie filmmakers. A documentary released last year, “King Cohen: The Wild World of Filmmaker Larry Cohen,” paid tribute to Cohen. “Larry Cohen truly was an independent freewheeling movie legend,” the writer-director Edgar Wright (“Shaun of the

Dead,” ”Baby Driver”) said on Sunday, praising him “for so many fun, highconcept genre romps with ideas bigger than the budgets.” The New York-native Cohen began in television, where he wrote episodes for series like “The Fugitive,” ”The Defenders” and “Surfside 6.” New York would be the setting for many of Cohen’s films, including 1982’s “Q,” in which a giant flying lizard nests atop the Chrysler Building. Cohen’s 1973 blaxspoitation crime drama “Black Caesar,” scored by James Brown, was about a Harlem gangster. He and star Fred Williamson reunited the next year for “Hell Up in Harlem.” Cohen later directed Bette Davis’ last film, “Wicked Stepmother,” in 1989. More recently, he wrote the 2002 Colin Farrell thriller “Phone Booth” and 2004’s “Cellular,” with Chris Evans. Cohen was often his own producer, director, writer and sometimes propmaker and production manager. “Otherwise,” he told the Village Voice, “I’d have to sit down with producers, and producers are a real pain in the ass, believe me.”


A10 | Thursday, March 28, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

Contact us; www.peninsulaclarion.com, classified@peninsulaclarion.com • To place an ad call 907-283-7551 EMPLOYMENT

Manufactured Homes/Lots For Rent

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Rain Proof Roofing is seeking low-sloped roofers with at least 2 years of verifiable roofing experience. We pay top wages, offer health insurance, & 401K options. Safety must be first priority followed closely by quality, we maintain a drug-free work environment for our employees, potential employees must also participate in pre-employment as well as random drug testing. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer. Contact Misty @ (907) 344-5545 or send a resume via fax : (907) 349-3386 or email to: info@rainproofroofing.com KENAI PENINSULA BOROUGH IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR TEMPORARY SUMMER JOBS IN THE KENAI/SOLDOTNA, HOMER, AND SEWARD AREAS.

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT OFFICE SPACE RENTAL AVAILABLE 609 Marine Street Kenai, Alaska 404 and 394sq,ft, shared entry $1/sq.ft 240sq.ft.Shared conference/Restrooms $0.50/sq.ft 283-4672

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

Applications, positions and complete position descriptions can be found at: www.kpb.us/jobs Recruitment opened: Friday 3/22/19 Recruitment closes: Friday, 4/22/19, 5:00p.m. All positions require that applicants be 18 years of age and have a valid driver’s license. We Are Recruiting for: Wildland Firefighters Base Location: Soldotna, AK Superintendent & Assistant Superintendent. Start date in midApril. Please submit red card & training certificates w/application. For application & more info go to www.chugachmiut.org or call (907) 5624155. Chugachmiut is an EOE practicing diversity in hiring w/ Native Preference under P.L. 93638.

BEAUTY / SPA

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Merchandise 6 Framed Windows 4-3ft by 49.5in 2-4ft by 42in $100 obo 907-303-2344

LEGALS IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF ALASKA THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT AT KENAI In the Matter of the Estate of ARTHUR M. SPONSEL, Deceased. Case No. 3KN-19-00053 PR

Savadi. Traditional Thai Massage by Bun 139A Warehouse Dr, Soldotna 907-406-1968

LEGALS

NOTICE TO CREDITOR NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned Personal Representative of the estate, at DOLIFKA & ASSOCIATES, P.C., ATTORNEYS AT LAW, P.O. Box 498, Soldotna, Alaska, 99669. DATED this 12th day of March, 2019. PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE /s/CHARLOTTE ELAINE SPONSEL Pub:Mar 14,21 & 28, 2019 848399

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF ALASKA THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT AT KENAI In the Matter of the Estate of MILDRED JEAN KOSKI, Deceased. Case No. 3KN-19-00060 PR

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF ALASKA THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT AT KENAI In the Matter of the Estate of ROBERT LOUIS SCOTT, Deceased. Case No. 3KN-19-00059 PR

NOTICE TO CREDITOR NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned Personal Representative of the estate, at DOLIFKA & ASSOCIATES, P.C., ATTORNEYS AT LAW, P.O. Box 498, Soldotna, Alaska, 99669. DATED this 12th day of March, 2019. PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE /s/ GARY JOE KOSKI Pub:Mar 14,21 & 28, 2019 848401

NOTICE TO CREDITOR NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned Personal Representative of the estate, at DOLIFKA & ASSOCIATES, P.C., ATTORNEYS AT LAW, P.O. Box 498, Soldotna, Alaska, 99669. DATED this 12th day of March, 2019. PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE /s/AUDREY JOHNSON Pub:Mar 14,21 & 28, 2019 848400

LEGALS Notice of Public Comment

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT Alaska Steel Co.

Administrative Assistant Homer Electric Association, Inc. is seeking a highly qualified person to fill the position of Administrative Assistant at the Nikiski Combined Cycle Plant. This position reports to the Director of HEA’s Power, Fuels & Dispatch Department and performs a variety of administrative duties, including preparing and maintaining correspondence, directing calls, coordinating training and business travel, budget reporting, reconciling expense reports, actively coordinating with remote sites, and assisting with HEA Board of Directors administrative support. The successful candidate shall possess a high level of expertise in a wide range of software applications including Microsoft Office Suite (Excel, Word, PowerPoint, Outlook, etc.), document management systems, and Adobe Acrobat. The position also requires the ability to develop a working knowledge of network navigation, document control procedures, and a thorough understanding of the budgetary process. An Associate’s Degree in Business Administration, Office Services or a related field and 4-years of office management experience is desired. This position may require work and/or travel outside of regular business hours. Applications may be completed on line at http://homerelectric.applicantpro.com/jobs. If you are an individual with a disability and would like to request a reasonable accommodation as part of the employment selection process, please contact Human Resources at (907) 2353369 or hr@homerelectric.com. HEA is an Equal Opportunity Employer; Minorities/Women/Veterans/Disabled. This recruitment will close on 04/05/19.

Office Assistance/ Inside Sales The position requires excellent customer service skills and a strong work ethic. Basic math and computer skills a plus. Must have current driver license Drug test mandatory Hourly DOE Plus benefits

EMPLOYMENT

We are proud of our state of the art technology and the state of the heart care we provide at CPH/Heritage Place in Soldotna. Practice your art of healing at our Long Term Care facility at Heritage Place with the following opportunities: § Resident Assistant - Full-Time & Part-Time & Per Diem § LPN-LTC - Full Time § LPN LTC+MDS, - Part Time § RN-LTC- Per Diem § RN-LTC +MDS- Part Time CPH offers a total rewards package, relocation assistance & education assistance. To apply & learn more about these opportunities, visit our website at www.cpgh.org/careers. You may also contact our HR department at 907-7144785 or email tdaniel@cpgh.org. Pre-employment drug screen is required. EOE

Need Cash Now?

Place a Classified Ad.

283-7551

The Alaska Housing Finance Corporation (AHFC) is soliciting comments for changes to the current allocation plan for the GOAL Program, referred to as the Rating Criteria and Award Plan (QAP). Any changes will become effective during the FY 2020 GOAL Cycle. The QAP currently covers the allocation of four funding sources, the Low Income Housing Tax Credit, the HOME Investment Partnership Act, the National Housing Trust Fund, and the Senior Citizens Housing Development Fund. GOAL Program funding is designed to provide affordable housing for lower income households, seniors and special needs populations. Comments are due by 5:00 p.m. April 26, 2019. AHFC is interested in comments on all aspects of the QAP. Potential changes under consideration by AHFC: 1. Re-evaluating the scoring incentives and thresholds for Solar Photovoltaic energy systems; 2. Removing the scoring incentives for Solar Thermal and Geothermal energy systems; 3. Specifying unit-rounding and scoring conventions for fractional values; 4. Re-evaluation of scoring weights and ranges used to assign points; 5. Other changes to ranking criteria used in the FY 2019 round based on public comments and staff recommendations. To access a copy of the current QAP, please go to AHFC’s website at: h t t p s : / / w w w . a h f c . u s / a p p l i c a t i o n / files/1515/3030/5415/GOAL_Program_Rating_Award_Criteria_062718.pdf AHFC will hold a public teleconference on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 to solicit comments regarding this notice. This teleconference will be held from 3:00 p.m. through 5:00 p.m. (Anchorage time) at AHFC’s headquarters in the first floor boardroom. Persons may attend the public hearing in person or via telephone. Persons attending the hearing via telephone will need to dial 1-877-668-4493, then enter access code 920 610 066 when prompted. For those wishing to attend the public hearing in person, AHFC’s physical address is: 4300 Boniface Parkway Anchorage, AK 99504 Comments must be submitted via e-mail to Andy Petroni at apetroni@ahfc.us no later than 5:00 p.m. Anchorage time on April 26, 2019. AHFC complies with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Individuals with disabilities who may need auxiliary aids or special modifications to participate in the public comment process should call Andy Petroni at 907-330-8275. Pub: 3/28/2019

850318


Peninsula Clarion | Thursday, March 28, 2019 | A11

THURSDAY AFTERNOON/EVENING A B (3) ABC-13 13 (6) MNT-5 5 (8) CBS-11 11 (9) FOX-4 4 (10) NBC-2 2 (12) PBS-7 7

A = DISH

B = DirecTV

MARCH 28, 2019 FR

4 PM 4:30 5 PM 5:30 6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30 Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud ABC World ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ News

Wheel of For- Grey’s Anatomy Bailey and (:01) Station 19 “Baby Boom” tune (N) ‘G’ Ben discuss dating with Tuck. An RV crashes into Station (N) ‘14’ 19. (N) ‘14’ Chicago P.D. “Erin’s Mom” How I Met How I Met Last Man Last Man The Good Wife “Pilot” Alicia The Good Wife “Stripped” Bunny becomes involved with Your Mother Your Mother Standing ‘PG’ Standing ‘PG’ returns to work as an attor- A stripper says she was a case. ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ ney. ‘PG’ raped. ‘14’ (3:00) 2019 NCAA Basketball Tournament 2019 NCAA Basketball Tournament Regional Semifinal: Teams TBA. (N) Dr. Phil ‘14’ Regional Semifinal: Teams TBA. (Live) Two and a Entertainment Funny You Funny You The Big Bang The Big Bang Gotham “Trespassers” Nygma The Orville “Identity, Part Should Ask Should Ask Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘14’ deals with his demons. ‘14’ 1” ‘14’ 4 Half Men ‘PG’ Tonight ‘PG’ ‘PG’ Judge Judy Judge Judy Channel 2 NBC Nightly Channel 2 Newshour (N) Superstore A.P. Bio (N) Will & Grace Abby’s “Pilot” ‘PG’ News 5:00 News With “Lovebirds” ‘14’ (N) ‘14’ (N) ‘PG’ 2 ‘PG’ Report (N) Lester Holt (N) ‘14’ NOVA How armor was made BBC World Nightly Busi- PBS NewsHour (N) Father Brown Son of aero- Death in Paradise FlorNews ‘G’ ness Report nautics magnate is murdered. ence’s former schoolmate is 7 in medieval times. ‘PG’ ‘G’ ‘PG’ dead. ‘PG’

CABLE STATIONS

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’

For the People The case of ABC News at (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live ‘14’ (:37) Nightline (N) a man accused of murder. 10 (N) (3) AB (N) ‘PG’ Dateline ‘PG’ DailyMailTV DailyMailTV Impractical Pawn Stars (N) (N) Jokers ‘14’ “Jet Setters” (6) MN ‘PG’ The Ellen DeGeneres KTVA Night- (:35) The Late Show With James Cor (8) CB Show ‘G’ cast Stephen Colbert ‘PG’ den Fox 4 News at 9 (N) TMZ (N) ‘PG’ TMZ ‘PG’ Entertainment Two and a Tonight Half Men ‘14’ (9) FO Law & Order: Special Victims Unit A victim has a dual personality. ‘14’ Doc Martin “Sons and Lovers” Louisa considers a career change. ‘PG’

Channel 2 (:34) The Tonight Show Star- (:37) Late News: Late ring Jimmy Fallon ‘14’ Night With (10) NB Edition (N) Seth Meyers Midsomer Murders “Ring Out Amanpour and Company (N) Your Dead” ‘PG’ (12) PB

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

Last Man Last Man Last Man Last Man (8) WGN-A 239 307 Standing Standing Standing ‘G’ Standing Down Home with David (N) (Live) ‘G’ (20) QVC 137 317

Married ... Married ... With With Crepe Erase Body Care (N) (Live) ‘G’ Little Women: Atlanta Juicy Little Women: Atlanta Juicy Little Women: Atlanta Little Women: Atlanta An- Little Women: Atlanta Juicy gets an unexpected health Andrea struggles with a deci- drea is rushed to the hospital. meets with Atlanta rap mo (23) LIFE 108 252 lands a magazine cover shoot. ‘14’ scare. ‘14’ sion. ‘14’ (N) ‘14’ guls. (N) ‘14’ NCIS A murder tied to a dirt NCIS A Marine sergeant is NCIS A young petty officer NCIS The search goes on for NCIS “Twofer” ‘PG’ (28) USA 105 242 bike gang. ‘14’ found murdered. ‘PG’ dies in his sleep. ‘PG’ Gibbs and McGee. ‘14’ (3:15) 2019 NCAA Basketball Tournament (:45) 2019 NCAA Basketball Tournament Regional Semifinal: Teams TBA. (N) (Live) Inside March Madness (N) (30) TBS 139 247 Regional Semifinal: Teams TBA. (N) (Live) (31) TNT 138 245 (34) ESPN 140 206 (35) ESPN2 144 209 (36) ROOT 426 687 (38) PARMT 241 241 (43) AMC 131 254 (46) TOON 176 296 (47) ANPL 184 282 (49) DISN 173 291 (50) NICK 171 300 (51) FREE 180 311 (55) TLC 183 280 (56) DISC 182 278 (57) TRAV 196 277 (58) HIST 120 269 (59) A&E 118 265 (60) HGTV 112 229 (61) FOOD 110 231 (65) CNBC 208 355 (67) FNC 205 360 (81) COM 107 249 (82) SYFY 122 244

! HBO 303 504 ^ HBO2 304 505 + MAX 311 516 5 SHOW 319 546 8 TMC 329 554

CAB

Married ... Married ... How I Met How I Met Elementary Investigating a (8) WG With With Your Mother Your Mother banker’s death. ‘14’ Belle Beauty by Kim Gravel Lug - Travel & Handbags (N) Beauty We Love “Crepe (20) Q (N) (Live) ‘G’ (Live) ‘G’ Erase” (N) (Live) ‘G’ (:15) Little Women: Atlanta (:15) Little (:27) Little (:01) Little Women: Atlanta Juicy meets with Atlanta rap Women: LA Women: At- Andrea is rushed to the hos- (23) L moguls. ‘14’ ‘14’ lanta ‘14’ pital. ‘14’ NCIS Investigating a sailor’s NCIS Reeves sees his friend NCIS: Los Angeles “Preda (28) U kidnapping. ‘PG’ get kidnapped. ‘14’ tor” ‘PG’ The Last O.G. Conan ‘14’ Conan ‘14’ American American American “Swipe Right” Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ (30) T ‘MA’ Bones Hodgins makes a dis- Bones A CIA informant is Bones The remains of a repo “Beauty and the Beast” (2017, Children’s) Emma Watson, Dan Stevens. A “Blended” (2014, Romance-Comedy) Adam Sandler, Drew Barrymore. Two (31) T covery. ‘14’ murdered. ‘14’ man are found. ‘14’ young woman discovers the kind heart and soul of a beast. single-parent families are stuck together at a resort. (3:00) MLB Baseball Boston Red Sox at Seattle Mariners. SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter With Scott Van SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (34) ES From T-Mobile Park in Seattle. (N) (Live) Pelt (N) (Live) (3:00) ATP Tennis Miami Open: Men’s Quarterfinals and Women’s Semifinal. From Miami. High School Basketball UFC Unleashed ‘14’ UFC Main Event ‘14’ MLB Baseball Boston Red Sox at Seattle Mariners. From T (35) ES (N) (Live) Powerade Jamfest. Mobile Park in Seattle. (N Same-day Tape) (3:00) PBA Bowling WSOB PBA Bowling WSOB Chameleon Championship. From Allen PBA Bowling WSOB Scorpion Championship. From Allen PBA Bowling WSOB PBA World Championship. From Allen Mariners All Mariners All (36) RO Cheetah Championship. Park, Mich. Park, Mich. Park, Mich. (Taped) Access Access Mom ‘14’ Mom ‘14’ Mom ‘14’ Mom ‘14’ Mom ‘14’ Mom ‘14’ “Bad Boys II” (2003, Action) Martin Lawrence, Will Smith, Jordi Mollà. Two detectives battle a drug kingpin “Bad Boys II” (2003, Action) Martin Law (38) PA in Miami. rence, Will Smith, Jordi Mollà. (2:50) “Revenge of the (4:50) “Happy Gilmore” (1996, Comedy) Adam Sandler, “Mrs. Doubtfire” (1993, Children’s) Robin Williams, Sally Field, Pierce Brosnan. An es(:05) “Sixteen Candles” (1984, Comedy) Molly Ringwald. A (43) A Nerds” (1984, Comedy) Christopher McDonald, Julie Bowen. tranged dad poses as a nanny to be with his children. teenager’s parents forget her birthday. Samurai Jack American American Bob’s Burg- Bob’s Burg- Family Guy Family Guy Rick and Robot Chick- Squidbillies The Boon- Bob’s Burg- Family Guy Family Guy Rick and Robot Chick (46) TO ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ ers ‘14’ ers ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Morty ‘14’ en ‘14’ ‘14’ docks ‘MA’ ers ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Morty ‘14’ en ‘14’ Jeremy Wade’s Mighty Riv- River Monsters “The Mutila- River Monsters “Silent As- River Monsters “Jurassic-Sized Prehistoric Terror” Search for River Monsters: Top 10 Biggest Catches “Catches 8 and 7” River Monsters ‘PG’ (47) A ers ‘PG’ tor” ‘PG’ sassin” ‘PG’ the greatest river monster. ‘PG’ The seventh and eighth biggest catches. ‘PG’ Raven’s Raven’s Coop & Cami Coop & Cami Raven’s Raven’s Sydney to the Coop & Cami Raven’s Raven’s Sydney to the Coop & Cami Andi Mack ‘G’ Sydney to the Bizaardvark Bizaardvark (49) D Home ‘G’ Home ‘G’ Home ‘Y’ Home ‘G’ Max ‘G’ Home ‘G’ Home ‘G’ Max ‘G’ Max ‘G’ ‘G’ ‘G’ The Loud The Loud The Loud The Loud The Loud Henry Dan- SpongeBob SpongeBob “Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs” (2009, Children’s) Voices Friends ‘PG’ (:35) Friends (:10) Friends (:45) Friends (50) N House ‘Y7’ House ‘Y7’ House ‘Y7’ House ‘Y7’ House ‘Y7’ ger ‘G’ of Ray Romano, Denis Leary, John Leguizamo. ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ (:10) “Hook” (1991, Children’s) Dustin Hoffman, Robin Williams, Julia Roberts. Lawyer turns into Peter Pan (:20) “The Game Plan” (2007) Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Madison Pettis. The 700 Club “Dr. Seuss’ the Lorax” (51) FR to save kids from Captain Hook. A carefree football player learns he has a daughter. (2012) Ed Helms (3:00) 90 Day Fiancé: Before Say Yes to Say Yes to Say Yes to the Dress ‘PG’ My 600-Lb. Life “Supersized: Aaron’s Story” With facts and Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. My 600-Lb. Life With facts (55) T the 90 Days ‘PG’ the Dress the Dress bonus scenes. ‘PG’ “Shark!” ‘PG’ Two gunshot victims. ‘PG’ and bonus scenes. ‘PG’ Building Off the Grid “Glacier Building Off the Grid “Vail Building Off the Grid “White Building Off the Grid ‘G’ Building Off the Grid Kolin Alaskan Bush People: Off Building Off the Grid “Spear- Building Off the Grid Kolin (56) D River Cabin” ‘G’ Log Cabin” ‘G’ Mountain” ‘G’ plans to build a cabin. ‘G’ the Grid (N) ‘PG’ fish Canyon” ‘G’ plans to build a cabin. ‘G’ The Dead Files ‘PG’ The Dead Files “The Dark The Dead Files ‘PG’ The Dead Files “Deadly The Dead Files (N) ‘PG’ Kindred Spirits (N) ‘PG’ The Dead Files ‘PG’ The Dead Files ‘PG’ (57) TR One: Abliene, TX” ‘PG’ Promise: Chicago” ‘PG’ Swamp People ‘PG’ Swamp People “Bringing the Swamp People “Cajun Cy- Swamp People “Raising the Swamp People “Hungry for (:03) Truck Night in America (:05) Truck Night in America (:03) Swamp People “Hungry (58) H Heat” ‘PG’ clone” ‘PG’ Stakes” ‘PG’ More” (N) ‘PG’ (N) ‘PG’ ‘PG’ for More” ‘PG’ The First 48 Two murder sus- The First 48 “Taken for a The First 48 “The Other Wife” The First 48 Man gunned The First 48 A missing per- (:01) The First 48 “Lost Boys” (:04) The First 48 A social ac- (:03) The First 48 Man pects caught on camera. ‘14’ Ride” A murder in front of a A man shot while protecting down inside an apartment. ‘14’ sons case takes a turn. ‘14’ A grandmother is gunned tivist is killed at a bar. ‘14’ gunned down inside an apart- (59) A school. ‘PG’ his wife. ‘14’ down. ‘14’ ment. ‘14’ Hunters Int’l House Hunt- House Hunt- House Hunt- Hunters Int’l House Hunt- Flip or Flop Flip or Flop Flip or Flop Flip or Flop House Hunt- Hunters Int’l House Hunt- House Hunt- Flip or Flop Flip or Flop ers ‘G’ ers ‘G’ ers ‘G’ ers ‘G’ Vegas ‘G’ Vegas ‘G’ Vegas ‘G’ Vegas ‘G’ ers (N) ‘G’ ers ‘G’ ers ‘G’ Vegas ‘G’ Vegas ‘G’ (60) H Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Chopped “Under the Cuban Chopped Four family mem- Chopped Pizza pros bring Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Chopped Pizza pros bring (61) FO Flay ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ Sun” ‘G’ bers compete. ‘G’ their talent and drive. ‘G’ Flay (N) ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ their talent and drive. ‘G’ Shark Tank Affordable wed- Shark Tank ‘PG’ Shark Tank A high-tech shoe Shark Tank Wet paintbrush Shark Tank ‘PG’ Shark Tank ‘PG’ Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program (65) CN ‘G’ ding cakes. ‘PG’ insole. ‘PG’ storage. ‘PG’ ‘G’ ‘G’ ‘G’ Tucker Carlson Tonight (N) Hannity (N) The Ingraham Angle (N) Fox News at Night With Tucker Carlson Tonight Hannity The Ingraham Angle Fox News at Night With (67) F Shannon Bream (N) Shannon Bream Parks and Parks and (:15) The Office “Roy’s Wed- (5:50) The Of- (:25) The Of- The Office The Office The Office The Office Broad City (:32) The The Daily (:36) South (:06) South (:36) South (81) C Recreation Recreation ding” ‘PG’ fice ‘PG’ fice ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ (N) ‘14’ Other Two Show Park ‘MA’ Park ‘MA’ Park ‘MA’ Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama (82) S ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’

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“Inventor: (:45) “Uncle Drew” (2018, Comedy) Kyrie Irving, Lil Rel VICE News “Wonder Woman” (2017, Action) Gal Gadot, Chris Pine, Connie Nielsen. (:25) The Case Against Ad- (:35) REAL Sports With Bry- (:35) “EntrapOut for Howery, Nick Kroll. Older basketball players compete in a Tonight (N) Wonder Woman discovers her full powers and true destiny. ‘PG-13’ nan Syed ‘14’ ant Gumbel ‘PG’ ment” ! H Blood” tournament. ‘PG-13’ ‘14’ (3:10) “Inception” (2010) Leonardo DiTo Be Announced “The Meg” (2018, Science Fiction) Jason Statham, Li “The First Purge” (2018, Action) Y’lan Noel. (:40) “Hide and Seek” (2005) Robert De Caprio. A thief enters people’s dreams and Bingbing, Rainn Wilson. A diver must confront a 75-foot-long All crimes become legal for 12 hours during Niro. A widower’s daughter claims her imagi- ^ H steals their secrets. ‘PG-13’ prehistoric shark. ‘PG-13’ the first Purge. ‘R’ nary friend is real. ‘R’ (3:45) “Elektra” (2005, Action) Jennifer Gar- (:25) “Term Life” (2016, Action) Vince “12 Rounds 3: Lockdown” (2015, Action) (:35) “Anacondas: The Hunt for the Blood (:15) Strike Back Section (:05) “It” (2017, Horror) ner. An assassin tries to protect a man and Vaughn. A drug lord and corrupt cops chase a Dean Ambrose. A framed detective battles Orchid” (2004, Suspense) Johnny Messner. 20 encounters Russian ren- Jaeden Lieberher, Jeremy + M his daughter. ‘PG-13’ thief and his daughter. ‘R’ crooked officers. ‘R’ ‘PG-13’ egades. ‘MA’ Ray Taylor. ‘R’ (3:00) “Mary Shelley” (2017, “7 Days in Entebbe” (2018, Suspense) Daniel Brühl, Ro- Billions Chuck sets his sights “Baby Driver” (2017, Action) Ansel Elgort, Kevin Spacey, Desus & Mero Desus & Mero Desus & Mero Who Is AmerBiography) Elle Fanning. samund Pike, Eddie Marsan. Soldiers try to rescue hostages on a new position. ‘MA’ Lily James. A doomed heist threatens the life of a young (N) ‘MA’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ ica? ‘MA’ 5 SH ‘PG-13’ from a Ugandan airport. ‘PG-13’ getaway driver. ‘R’ (3:00) (:45) “Black Rain” (1989, Crime Drama) Michael Douglas, Andy Garcia, Ken “Open Range” (2003, Western) Robert Duvall, Kevin Costner, Annette Ben- “Wild Hogs” (2007, Comedy) Tim Allen, (:10) “High Plains Drifter” “PunchTakakura. A hard-nosed cop chases a fugitive into Japan’s underworld. ‘R’ ing. Cattle herdsmen battle a ruthless rancher in 1882. ‘R’ John Travolta. Four friends take a motorcycle (1973, Western) Clint East- 8 T Drunk Love” road trip. ‘PG-13’ wood. ‘R’

12

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A12 | Thursday, March 28, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

Crossword

Dream of joining marine corps is shot down by mom and wife My eldest daughter recently announced that she has been “going through something” and surprised us with a tattoo on her shoulder sporting her children’s names on a colorful, rather large background. I was shocked because she works at a large banking firm and was recently pro- Abigail Van Buren moted as a senior financial investor. I’m now afraid it will impede her career advancement, and also concerned it will encourage her two young daughters to get tattoos. I have never encouraged my children to do something like this. In fact, I did the opposite. I did not comment about hers. She has known how her dad and I have felt about this since she was a young child. Am I overreacting? What does a mother say about something so permanent? I no longer feel I know this person I thought was “conservative.” -- DISAPPOINTED IN NORTH CAROLINA DEAR DISAPPOINTED: Yes, you are overreacting. This is not a referendum on your parenting or your daughter’s character. In a situa-

tion like this, a mother should ask her daughter what “things” she has been going through, and what that tattoo means to her. The mother should also recognize that her daughter is an adult now, and her choice to apply body art is just that -- a choice. Then she should listen carefully to what her daughter has to say, so that, if necessary, she can be supportive. DEAR ABBY: My granddaughter moved out of our home a couple of weeks ago. Do I have the right to ask for our key back since she no longer lives here and she moved in with someone I don’t trust as far as I can throw him? -- TEXAS GRANNY DEAR GRANNY: You not only have the right, but your granddaughter should have offered to return the key at the time she moved out. Don’t be mean about it, just ask for the key. Or, because you don’t trust the person she’s now living with, have your locks changed in case he has already made a copy. It may cost you some money, but your peace of mind is worth it. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Hints from Heloise

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, March 28, 2019: This year, you’ll naturally be tense. You could be overly conscious of your public image and professional status. The funloving Ram within loves being authentic. When you’re dating and in a relationship, your core personality emerges. If single, closer to late 2019 or 2020, you’ll meet someone of substance. If you’re attached, share your public life with your sweetie, too. CAPRICORN can be very stern. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH If you’d like to, take a stand. Try to get behind a problem and root out the issue. Others will be happy with your assessment and pleased that they don’t need to handle what’s happening. Your sixth sense is guiding you. Tonight: As you might like. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Be direct. Look at what happens when you reach out for someone at a distance. If you’ve had a difference of opinion with someone in the past few weeks, this person wants to take the edge off your communication. You might be able to straighten out the problem quickly. Tonight: Make fun weekend plans. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Your ability to read between the lines emerges as your strong suit. At times, you know what motivates you. Honor a fast change of pace. You could be surprised at the sudden activity around you. Tonight: Ask for what you need. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH You could be in the situation of finding out that someone from a distance has been trying to clear the air. Reach out for another person. Examine what’s happening behind the scenes. You gain an understanding of what needs to happen. Tonight: Just be you. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Your smile goes a long way toward finding peace. You might wonder what direction you need to go. Lighten up in the moment; visit with a friend who you sometimes see when you’re out. If you’ve had a misunderstanding, you’ll be able to make amends soon. Tonight: Go with the moment. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Your playful personality melts barriers and allows someone who has

Rubes

By Leigh Rubin

had an attitude a bit of time to gain distance. Honor what’s going on around you. A light and easy attitude goes far in warming others up and reducing stress. Tonight: Devote time to a loved one or new friend. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You could be seeing a situation quite differently than you did originally. Your attitude draws a very strong reaction from another person. This person might not even know why he or she is reacting. Tonight: Head home early. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You might have difficulty keeping that insightful, cool composure for which you’re known. A friend needs to share some news with you or clear the air. You might feel uncomfortable with the end results. Tonight: An offer might entice you. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You could be surprised by recent events. You have difficulty keeping another person’s change of heart out of your thoughts. Maintain your normal course; handle finances well. Doublecheck and triple-check your figures. Tonight: Buy a treat on the way home. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH Your innate skills come forward without you even knowing. Someone could be quite impressed with you. Understand what’s going on between you and another person. Communications could’ve been off recently. You’ll witness a change. Tonight: Getting into the zest of living. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Take your time. You actually might need a lazy day in order to feel good about yourself and what’s happening in your life. For the moment, decide to do what you want. Your attitude changes. Tonight: Have a long-overdue chat with a loved one. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH You feel renewed and willing to explain yourself. For the past few weeks, you’ve been hesitant to say what’s on your mind. Now, you can open up and share without any trepidation. Still, be sensitive to the other party. Tonight: As you like it. BORN TODAY Singer/actress Lady Gaga (1986), singer Reba McEntire (1955), tennis player Stan Wawrinka (1985)

Ziggy

Where’s my doctor? Dear Heloise: I work at a busy surgery center in a medical complex. Multiple times a day, PATIENTS WANDER IN looking for their physician’s office. They don’t know the doctor’s name, phone number or address, and their ride has dropped them at the door. This leaves us in a difficult spot. I don’t have time to find a wheelchair and take the patient to a building on the far end of the complex for an appointment. Please make sure you have the doctor’s office information and phone number when you come to an appointment. I have no problem helping people, but unfortunately, I can’t help when I don’t have the information necessary. I also don’t have time to call their primary care physician to find out whom they are seeing. Along these same lines, please don’t drop people off and drive away unless you know for absolute positive that they are in the right place. -- Janey Mae, Omaha, Neb. HINT FROM HIM Dear Heloise: If you are using a dry mop and are having problems pushing the pad into the holes on back to secure it, I have a solution. An unsharpened No. 2 pencil works great for pushing the pad into the holes. I use the pencil end, not the eraser end. I keep a pencil next to the box of pads. -- Les H., Spring, Texas BE A NICE PERSON Dear Heloise: To your readers: Be a nice person and leave about 8 inches of toilet paper hanging free after use. At home or away, it’ll make it easier for the next person and eliminate feeling for the end of the roll inside large tissue holders. -- Andrew in The Villages, Fla.

SUDOKU Solution

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2 8 1 3 9 6 7 5 4

7 3 4 1 8 5 6 2 9

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By Johnny Hart

By Tom Wilson

Tundra

Garfield

8 5 2 6 7 9 4 3 1

By Dave Green

Shoe

By Jim Davis

Take it from the Tinkersons

By Bill Bettwy

By Chad Carpenter

By Chris Cassatt & Gary Brookins

Mother Goose and Grimm

By Michael Peters

2019 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Jacqueline Bigar’s Stars

2019 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

DEAR ABBY: I’m originally from El Salvador. I have been living in the U.S. for five years, have been studying English for four years and I have my GED. I want to join the U.S. Marine Corps because it is my dream. I want to do it because I think that service to this country is the best thing I can do. I want to protect this country, and I want my family to be proud of me. Here is the problem: My mom and my wife don’t want me to do it because they say it is dangerous. I love them both, but I want to achieve my dream. What should I do? -- DREAMING IN HOUSTON DEAR DREAMING: I appreciate the concern your mother and your wife feel for your safety. Because they love you, of course they worry. However, the person who must live your life is you. If joining the United States Marine Corps is your dream, then following your dream is what you should do. Now is the time to have a heart-to-heart talk with your wife because this decision will have an impact on her life as well as yours. DEAR ABBY: I raised my children to be respectful, responsible adults who are career- and family-oriented. Both are college graduates, married and successful.

By Eugene Sheffer

Profile for Sound Publishing

Peninsula Clarion, March 28, 2019  

March 28, 2019 edition of the Peninsula Clarion

Peninsula Clarion, March 28, 2019  

March 28, 2019 edition of the Peninsula Clarion