Page 1

Music

Hoops

Visiting artist unites sound, visuals

Area teams ready for state tourney

Arts/A8

Sports/A6

CLARION

Breezy 45/35 More weather on Page A2

P E N I N S U L A

Thursday, March 21, 2019 Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

Vol. 49, Issue 146

In the news Board nominee Shaw withdraws nomination JUNEAU — A former Ketchikan school board president has withdrawn his nomination for a state judicial conduct commission. Gov. Mike Dunleavy nominated Trevor Shaw for the Alaska Commission on Judicial Conduct. Shaw faced questioning over his relationship to a former Ketchikan teacher accused of sexual abuse and a recall effort. Shaw said former teacher Doug Edwards was his childhood pastor and officiated his wedding but said he didn’t know about any allegations against Edwards until Edwards’ arrest. Edwards faces sentencing next month. Shaw resigned from the school board amid what he called a convoluted recall process. The Ketchikan Daily News reported the recall effort addressed his alleged treatment of a student representative who wanted to be heard regarding a board appointment. Shaw’s withdrawal was announced Wednesday. He didn’t immediately return a message.

Bail denied to man fighting extradition to Alaska AUBURN, Maine — A Maine judge denied a bail request Wednesday for a man who is wanted in Alaska for killing a woman more than two decades ago. Steven Downs, 44, of Auburn, Maine, is charged with the sexual assault and murder of 20-year-old Sophie Sergie at the University of Alaska Fairbanks in 1993, when Downs was a student and Sergie was a former student. The case went unsolved for years before DNA evidence led to Downs’ arrest in February. Since then, he has been held without bail on a fugitive from justice charge while he fights extradition to Alaska. Downs’ lawyer, James Howaniec, said his client “adamantly denies” any involvement in the crime, the Sun Journal reported. Assistant District Attorney Patricia Reynolds Regan argued that Downs wasn’t entitled to bail and that the judge should use his discretion to hold the local man until he is sent to Alaska. — Associated Press

Index Local................A3 Opinion........... A4 Sports..............A6 Arts..................A8 Classifieds.... A10 Comics.......... A12 Check us out online at www.peninsulaclarion.com To subscribe, call 283-3584.

$1 newsstands daily/$1.50 Sunday

Hundreds rally for ferry system By MOLLIE BARNES Juneau Empire

Hundreds gathered outside the Alaska State Capitol on Wednesday shouting cries to “Save our state!” The Alaska Public Employees Association held a Save the Alaska Marine Highway System rally to protest the governor’s proposed plan to stop public funding for the ferry system in October. Gov. Mike Dunleavy’s proposed budget would cut the ferry system’s funding by 75 percent in the next fiscal year, and he has commissioned another study to look into options for privatizing the service. “They might as well produce a bill that sends us back to territorial days because that’s what they’re trying to do,” said City and Borough of Juneau Assembly member Michelle Bonnet Hale. Several legislators and public officials spoke on the steps of the Capitol, leading chants and preaching the im-

Corps sees no reason to extend Pebble comment period By BECKY BOHRER Associated Press

Irene Morris, with her sign, attends the Alaska Public Employees Association’s Save the Alaska Marine Highway System rally in front of the Capitol on Wednesday. (Michael Penn/Juneau Empire)

portance of the Alaska Marine Highway System. Rep. Louise Stutes, R-Kodiak, took to the megaphone,

and told the crowd, “Our job is to get the message through loud and clear to the administration: We’re not giving up

our ferries.” Last week, a record number number of people testiSee FERRY, page A2

JUNEAU — An official with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said Wednesday that the agency has not received any compelling reason to extend the 90-day comment period on a draft environmental review of a major mine project in southwest Alaska. Shane McCoy is project manager for the corps’ review of the Pebble Limited Partnership’s permit application. The Pebble partnership wants to develop a gold-andcopper mine near a major salmon fishery in Alaska’s

See CORPS, page A3

Henu court judge shares success stories By BRIAN MAZUREK Peninsula Clarion

At the Kenai Chamber of Commerce Luncheon on Wednesday, representatives from the Henu Community Wellness Court gave a presentation outlining their treatment and rehabilitation program. The presentation also featured testimony from one of the court’s graduates about the impact that Henu Community Wellness Court had on his recovery. Judge Susan Wells, a Kenaitze Tribal Court Judge, spoke about how the program was started and the inspiration behind it. A few years ago Wells went to Minnesota to attend a con-

Judge Susan Wells gives a presentation about the Henu Community Wellness Court during the Kenai Chamber of Commerce Luncheon at the Visitor’s Center in Kenai on Monday. (Photo by Brian Mazurek/Peninsula Clarion)

ference with the National American Indian Court Judges Association, and while there she learned of a

Minnesota Superior Court judge who was struggling with high rates of recidivism in his community. He

reached out to his local tribal court judge on the Leech Lake Indian Reservation and they formed an informal partnership where they would hear cases together. Not long after, Wells said that recidivism for both Natives and non-Natives in the community dropped significantly. After hearing that story, Wells thought to herself, “If that can happen in Minnesota, I know Alaska can do it better.” Wells eventually helped form the Henu Community Wellness Court, which was organized about two years ago as a collaboration between the Kenaitze Indian Tribe and the Alaska State Court System. Henu is a Dena’ina word

meaning “hard work,” and Wells said that the program — while intensive at times — is meant to transform lives. The Henu Court is designed for people with a history of nonviolent criminal offenses that are tied to substance abuse. Shera Burg, project coordinator for the court, says that they mainly look for people who have families and children and people who are facing long jail sentences or felony convictions. For example, the Henu Court can serve as a diversion program for those with felony DUI convictions to make it possible to get their driver’s license back after it has been revoked. Violent ofSee HENU, page A2

Wild and Scenic Film Festival returns to Kenai By JOEY KLECKA Peninsula Clarion

The Kenai Watershed Forum will be treating ticket holders to dinner and a show Saturday evening at Snug Harbor Seafoods, where it hopes a series of nationally

acclaimed films will inspire the audience. The Wild and Scenic Film Festival — “Where Activism Gets Inspired” — is an environmental- and adventurethemed film festival that takes place at locales across the country.

A Kenai Peninsula festival event, hosted by the Kenai Watershed Forum, will take place from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday night at Snug Harbor Seafoods and feature 12 different films. Tami Murray, Watershed development direc-

tor, referred to the event as a “friend-raiser.” “There were hundreds (of films) to choose from, and all will be outdoor environmental movies,” Murray said. The Kenai Watershed Forum is a nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving a

healthy watershed of streams and rivers surrounding the Kenai and Soldotna communities. Saturday’s event will help raise funds for the organization’s educational programs. Murray said the ticket includes food and a brew from See WILD page A2

Peninsula residents question Pebble reps By MEGAN PACER Homer News

Questions and accusations flew during a community meeting Tuesday hosted by Pebble Limited Partnership at Land’s

End Resort in Homer. A Homer Police officer stood at the doorway of the conference room. The Partnership sent Vice President of Public Affairs Mike Heatwole and Vice President of Permitting James

Fueg to speak with residents of Anchor Point and Homer in two separate meetings. The gatherings were to brief people not only on the permitting and environmental impact statement progress of the proposed

Pebble Mine, but to go over activities in the proposed project that would impact the two local communities. But the crowd at Tuesday’s meeting was more concerned with details of the proj-

ect, the EIS process and what the potential fallout from the mine could mean for water and salmon in the state. Heatwole and Fueg presented the history of the Pebble See REPS, page A3

Deadline extended for ferry study Preliminary results show By MOLLIE BARNES Juneau Empire

The Department of Transportation and Public Facilities has extended the deadline for applications for consultants to come in and study the ferry system. Government officials previously called the period an “aggressive” timeline, one which proved to be a bit too fast after the department received only one application in the short 10-day period

from March 1 to March 11. “DOT&PF heard from interested parties, e.g., economists, legislators and the general public, that a longer time frame and larger budget were required. Based on this feedback, the timeline has been extended and the budget is increased,” said Aurah Landau, a DOT&PF public information officer in an email. Based on new feedback, the timeline was extended with a deadline of April 2 for

proposals and the budget was increased to a quarter million dollars. The final Alaska Marine Highway System report will be due to DOT&PF on October 15, 2019, according to Landau. The budget maximum is $250,000. The target date for implementation of changes to AMHS remains the end of June 2020. Landau said the department never made a final determination on awarding the See STUDY, page A3

Seward opting in to PERA By KAT SORENSEN Peninsula Clarion

The city of Seward narrowly approved the Public Employment Relations Act (PERA) at the polls on Tuesday, but absentee and questioned ballots could change the results. Preliminary results show 129 votes in favor of PERA to 107 “no” votes. With 47 absentee and five questioned

ballots, results won’t be official until the canvass board meets on Thursday in the council chambers. Currently, the Seward City Council has control over the city’s labor policy, including employee organizing activity. If the election results hold, an ordinance exempting Seward from PERA would be repealed and the See PERA, page A3


A2 | Thursday, March 21, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

AccuWeather® 5-day forecast for Kenai-Soldotna Today

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Monday

Mainly cloudy; breezy in the p.m.

Rather cloudy, breezy and mild

Cloudy, a shower in the afternoon

A shower in spots in the afternoon

Times of sun and clouds

Hi: 45

Hi: 47

Lo: 35

Lo: 33

RealFeel

Hi: 44

Lo: 28

Lo: 28

Hi: 45

Kotzebue 14/11

Lo: 27

Sun and Moon

The patented AccuWeather.com RealFeel Temperature® is an exclusive index of the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m.

27 31 33 35

Today 8:04 a.m. 8:21 p.m.

Sunrise Sunset

Last Mar 27

New Apr 4

Daylight Day Length - 12 hrs., 16 min., 42 sec. Daylight gained - 5 min., 36 sec.

Alaska Cities Yesterday Hi/Lo/W 38/30/sf 43/31/r -8/-18/s 22/11/sn 38/32/c 59/45/r 46/20/pc 50/13/s 33/23/sn 39/35/sn 39/11/c 26/-7/sn 48/28/r 47/25/pc 57/38/c 50/32/r 52/35/c 66/36/pc 16/2/pc 47/24/i 65/48/pc 44/35/r

City Adak* Anchorage Barrow Bethel Cold Bay Cordova Delta Junction Denali N. P. Dillingham Dutch Harbor Fairbanks Fort Yukon Glennallen* Gulkana Haines Homer Juneau Ketchikan Kiana King Salmon Klawock Kodiak

Hi: 46

Moonrise Moonset

Today 9:39 p.m. 8:56 a.m.

Unalakleet 34/29 McGrath 42/28

Albany, NY Albuquerque Amarillo Asheville Atlanta Atlantic City Austin Baltimore Billings Birmingham Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo, NY Casper Charleston, SC Charleston, WV Charlotte, NC Chicago Cheyenne Cincinnati

55/27/s 60/41/pc 63/37/s 59/27/s 63/41/s 52/23/s 76/42/pc 52/28/pc 58/29/s 66/37/s 47/29/s 68/34/pc 51/31/pc 50/28/pc 46/23/s 59/36/sh 64/28/pc 62/29/pc 44/39/r 51/25/s 58/32/pc

46/36/r 60/44/r 64/41/pc 53/35/r 61/40/pc 51/41/r 77/47/pc 52/41/r 57/30/s 65/38/pc 44/16/s 61/43/pc 49/42/c 47/34/sh 51/25/c 68/44/pc 52/37/r 61/38/c 48/33/pc 55/30/pc 49/36/sh

City

Cleveland Columbia, SC Columbus, OH Concord, NH Dallas Dayton Denver Des Moines Detroit Duluth El Paso Fargo Flagstaff Grand Rapids Great Falls Hartford Helena Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Jackson, MS

Precipitation

From the Peninsula Clarion in Kenai

Anchorage 44/37

Glennallen 45/34

53/29/r 61/30/pc 55/28/c 50/15/s 66/49/pc 55/32/pc 57/27/s 56/33/pc 50/30/r 41/35/c 70/44/c 36/24/pc 56/26/pc 42/30/sn 51/23/s 56/25/pc 39/12/pc 82/63/s 77/46/pc 51/35/r 71/33/s

49/36/c 66/40/pc 52/37/sh 47/34/c 75/49/s 48/35/sh 57/36/pc 55/31/s 51/34/pc 46/27/pc 74/50/c 40/21/s 39/19/sn 47/31/c 44/24/s 49/38/r 44/24/s 82/70/pc 77/49/s 44/35/c 70/41/s

Jacksonville Kansas City Key West Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Midland, TX Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Norfolk Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix

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The Peninsula Clarion is a locally operated member of Sound Publishing Inc., published Sunday through Friday. P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611 Street address: 150 Trading Bay Road, Suite 1, Kenai, AK Phone: (907) 283-7551 Postmaster: Send address changes to the Peninsula Clarion,

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Kodiak 44/41

Main number ........................................... 283-7551 Fax .......................................................... 283-3299 News email.................. news@peninsulaclarion.com

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Publisher ...................................................... Jeff Hayden Production Manager ............................ Frank Goldthwaite

86 at Eloy, Ariz. -13 at Daniel, Wyo.

Sitka 52/45

State Extremes

Ketchikan 58/43

High yesterday 66 at Klawock, Ketchikan and Petersburg Low yesterday -18 at Barrow

Today’s Forecast

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

71/51/pc 58/41/pc 78/69/pc 68/60/c 60/40/r 67/58/c 64/40/pc 65/41/r 80/64/pc 63/41/pc 46/34/c 49/33/c 67/31/pc 70/44/s 53/37/s 51/42/sh 61/44/pc 60/34/s 74/58/pc 54/31/pc 83/60/c

74/46/s 52/33/s 78/66/pc 63/47/c 68/39/s 62/49/pc 50/38/r 63/39/pc 77/57/pc 68/53/c 48/34/pc 48/30/s 56/38/r 71/52/s 48/42/r 60/47/r 66/41/s 57/29/s 75/50/pc 51/44/r 72/51/pc

City

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Pittsburgh Portland, ME Portland, OR Rapid City Reno Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Santa Fe Seattle Sioux Falls, SD Spokane Syracuse Tampa Topeka Tucson Tulsa Wash., DC Wichita

54/25/c 42/18/pc 72/46/pc 54/24/s 61/43/c 62/51/pc 63/40/pc 75/55/c 66/57/t 62/50/r 55/34/pc 79/55/pc 49/32/pc 64/37/s 53/23/pc 76/59/pc 61/42/pc 82/52/pc 62/46/pc 57/38/pc 63/38/s

. . . Wild Continued from page A1

Cooper Landing Brewery, as well as a selection of wines from the Odom Corporation. With its beginning in Grass Valley, California, the Wild and Scenic Film Festival reaches audiences at many community events across the

. . . Henu Continued from page A1

Kenai Peninsula’s award-winning publication

Juneau 51/44

High yesterday Low yesterday

51/36/sh 46/36/c 61/45/pc 56/26/s 56/33/sh 64/45/c 55/41/sh 76/53/pc 63/54/sh 61/48/pc 54/37/r 64/50/pc 51/26/s 58/35/s 46/32/r 73/55/pc 55/34/s 71/46/pc 65/39/s 53/44/r 63/39/s

City

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Acapulco Athens Auckland Baghdad Berlin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Magadan Mexico City Montreal Moscow Paris Rome Seoul Singapore Sydney Tokyo Vancouver

89/74/pc 65/48/pc 73/60/pc 72/45/s 54/28/pc 81/72/sh 66/52/s 84/61/s 56/48/c 61/34/s 8/-14/s 77/47/pc 45/21/c 41/36/pc 55/36/pc 63/43/s 58/36/r 93/81/pc 77/67/c 66/52/s 57/36/s

86/74/pc 62/50/c 79/62/pc 74/47/s 60/42/pc 79/69/c 65/46/pc 87/58/s 60/47/pc 61/33/s 16/8/sn 73/47/pc 42/32/c 38/33/c 61/38/s 68/45/s 54/27/pc 90/78/t 78/69/pc 67/57/r 59/42/pc

fenders, sex offenders and people charged with drug distribution are not eligible for the program. Burg said that referrals to the program can be made by anyone, and potential participants meet with the court’s probation officers and treatment providers to assess whether they would be a fit for the program. After a decision has been reached by the court as a whole, treatment for the participant begins immediately and takes 18-24 months to complete. Wells said that the Henu

. . . Ferry Continued from page A1

fied before the House Transportation committee on the ferry system. According to numbers provided by Stutes, on Tuesday, 484 Alaskans signed up to testify to the committee, the highest recorded on any topic since the Legislative Information Office began tracking testimony. Another 133 testified on Thursday, bringing the total to 617. There were so many people in attendance that an overflow room was needed at times. Additionally, 241 submitted written testimony. “Thank you all for coming out and setting a record for public testimony in the Alaska Legislature,” said Sen. Jesse Kiehl, D-Juneau, as he spoke at the rally. “Traveling freely around our country, and in this case our state, is part of who were are. It connects our

A strengthening storm will cause rain over the Northeast today into tonight. A change to snow is in store over the northern tier and in the mountains. Rain and snow will spread inland in the West.

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation

Cold -10s

Warm -0s

0s

Stationary 10s

20s

Showers T-storms 30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

70s

Flurries 80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2019

Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

P

Valdez 46/36

National Extremes

World Cities City

24 hours ending 4 p.m. yest. . Trace Month to date .......................... 0.09" Normal month to date ............ 0.46" Year to date .............................. 1.47" Normal year to date ................ 2.30" Record today ................ 0.51" (1979) Record for March ......... 3.18" (1963) Record for year ........... 27.09" (1963) Snowfall 24 hours ending 4 p.m. yest. . Trace Month to date ............................ 0.1" Season to date ........................ 32.7"

Seward Homer 45/41 47/42

Kenai/ Soldotna Homer

Dillingham 40/36

National Cities City

Fairbanks 47/30

Talkeetna 49/32

Bethel 40/34

Today Hi/Lo/W 14/11/pc 42/28/pc 54/44/c 15/15/sf 46/30/pc 48/18/pc 48/38/c 60/44/c 1/-8/sf 29/25/sn 45/41/r 52/45/c 52/41/c 49/32/pc 39/25/pc 46/17/c 34/29/sf 46/36/r 49/37/pc 41/39/r 51/34/pc 50/42/c

High .............................................. 44 Low ............................................... 32 Normal high ................................. 36 Normal low ................................... 17 Record high ....................... 51 (1998) Record low ...................... -22 (1975)

Kenai/ Soldotna 45/35

Cold Bay 38/33

Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Almanac From Kenai Municipal Airport

Tomorrow 11:12 p.m. 9:09 a.m.

Unalaska 35/32 Yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Internet: www.gedds.alaska.edu/ auroraforecast

Anaktuvuk Pass 4/-1

Nome 15/15

Full Apr 19

Yesterday Hi/Lo/W 7/6/pc 29/13/c 55/42/pc 14/5/pc 42/13/c 40/17/pc 51/28/r 66/34/pc 2/-16/pc 33/26/sn 45/36/r 63/56/pc 64/33/pc 46/26/pc 23/-9/pc 38/18/pc 30/11/sn 47/33/r 50/31/r 47/35/r 47/27/sh 58/35/r

City Kotzebue McGrath Metlakatla Nome North Pole Northway Palmer Petersburg Prudhoe Bay* Saint Paul Seward Sitka Skagway Talkeetna Tanana Tok* Unalakleet Valdez Wasilla Whittier Willow* Yakutat

Today’s activity: LOW Where: Auroral activity will be low. Weather permitting, low-level displays will be visible overhead from Barrow to Fairbanks and visible low on the northern horizon from as far south as Anchorage and Juneau.

Prudhoe Bay 1/-8

Temperature

* Indicates estimated temperatures for yesterday Today Hi/Lo/W 36/27/c 44/37/c -8/-19/c 40/34/sn 38/33/r 49/41/r 52/34/pc 43/31/pc 40/36/c 35/32/sf 47/30/pc 35/12/c 45/34/c 48/26/pc 50/41/c 47/42/r 51/44/c 58/43/c 15/12/pc 48/38/r 61/43/c 44/41/r

Aurora Forecast

Readings ending 4 p.m. yesterday

Tomorrow 8:01 a.m. 8:23 p.m.

First Apr 12

Utqiagvik -8/-19

country. Various filmmakers and amateur adventurers produce short films that typically tell a story to “inform, inspire and ignite solutions and possibilities to restore the earth and human communities while creating a positive future for the next generation,” according to the film festival website. Ranging anywhere from two to 20 minutes, each film

to be shown Saturday in Kenai was hand-picked by staff members from the Watershed Forum, and Murray said she hopes they will strike a familiar chord with guests. “We chose films that touched on what we’re doing here in our area,” Murray said. “Some are just fun stories and others (showcase) issues that resonate with us. We’re just bringing that awareness to

people.” After staging the event at Snug Harbor last year, Murray said Watershed Forum returned to venue because of its ties to the area’s economic and cultural values. “Using the seafood plant is a nice twist,” she said.

Wellness Court incorporates traditional Dena’ina values into an intensive outpatient treatment, with supervised transitional living and weekly drug tests. Patients are rewarded for continued participation with small gifts such as candy, movie tickets, clothing and gift cards that are donated by the community. Eli Darien, the Henu Community Wellness Court’s first graduate, closed out the presentation by sharing his struggles with substance abuse and the criminal justice system and how the program helped him turn his life around. Before joining the program, Darien said he was in and

out of Wildwood regularly and was addicted to heroin and meth. “I was dying fast,” Darien said. His probation officer helped him get into the program once it had started, and Darien described his experience with Henu as “lifechanging.” Since Darien graduated from the Henu Community Wellness Court he has stayed involved as a mentor for new participants, started working at the tribe’s fishery, and got a job at Carr’s. He also expressed a desire to become a drug and alcohol counselor and has already taken a few classes in Anchorage. “Today I see a future …

I’m 57 years old, and I still have a future in this community and in this tribe,” Darien said. After graduating from the program, participants are given a Dena’ina name. The name given to Darien translates to “He speaks from the heart.” “That name tells me that the court was really listening to me the whole way,” he said.

cultures… it doesn’t matter if we’re talking about commerce, if we’re talking about school kids, if we’re talking about sports, if we’re talking about culture. The AMHS is what connects us in coastal Alaska.” He said that many legislators from around the state were also in attendance at the rally, because the ferries aren’t just important for Southeast Alaska, they are for the whole state. Many young people were also holding signs and advocating for the ferry system. Helena McAlister, 14, is a student at Thunder Mountain High School. Her dad, Ryan, works for the ferry system. She said she plays flute in the band at TMHS, and they travel on the ferries for events. She’s scheduled to go to Ketchikan in April with the band. “Most of the travel for my school, they use the ferry system,” she said. “So it’s very important that we keep it

funded.” There were many Juneau officials present at the rally. Rep. Sara Hannan, D-Juneau, was also a featured speaker. “It’s not about what we pay,” said Hannan, referencing some supporters of the governor’s plan who have pointed out that the ferry system costs more than a highway. “It’s about what it will cost us if it’s gone.” Another CBJ Assembly member, Carole Triem, said in an interview with the Empire, “I think that we all know that the road system is important to all of Alaska. And we all know that the marine highway system is important to all of Alaska. It’s weak leadership to be pitting the two against each other, and to be pitting regions against each other, when what’s good for Ketchikan is good for Kenai is good for Kotzebue. A strong ferry system is going to help all of Alaska.” “Go get some food and go

trap a legislator,” said Shannon Adamson who works for Masters, Mates & Pilots and helped organize the rally. She said this will be the last public event for the next few weeks while they wait for legislators to do their jobs and hopefully work to save the ferry system. After the rally ended, several Alaska Native women led a group in singing the “Canoe Song,” which they said was a spontaneous decision. “We were thinking, we always call the marine highway the big blue canoe, so it was impromptu,” said Nancy Barnes, who is Alutiiq and Tsimshian. “We’re all connected. Living here in Juneau, I just worry about our rural communities.” Barnes and her friends Della Cheney, a Haida woman from Kake, and Nancy Keen, who is Tlingit, led the song. “We’re just happy to be here for the blue canoe,” said Cheney.

Tickets to Saturday’s event are $25, which includes food and beverages.

The Henu Community Wellness Court will be celebrating a new round of graduates on April 5 at the Dena’ina Wellness Center. Anyone interested in learning more about the program can contact Project Coordinator Shera Burg at 907-283-8552.


Peninsula Clarion | Thursday, March 21, 2019 | A3

Christopher Banas Sunrise December 14, 1949 Sunset February 22, 2019 Christopher Banas, a longtime resident of Kenai, passed away at home enveloped by the enduring love of his family. The serenity of his transition struck those who knew him best as unlikely. Chris was a man up to the challenge of a lifelong conversation with the universe, a banter that tapped into a vast reservoir of perception, knowledge, and humor. He was a wily prankster with a mischievous charm, endless charisma, and a laugh whose volume was exceeded only by the joy it spread. A magnet for friends, strangers, and community, he was always on call to help anyone in need, the neighbor you wish for. His positive, buoyant nature, perseverance, pursuit of goodness, gratitude for life, love of music, delight, and deep concern for the welfare of others stayed with him to the end. Chris’ career as a teacher began on the Hopi and Apache lands in Arizona. It was a beautiful beginning, not least because it was there that he met a fellow teacher, love of his life and future wife, Gigi. Generations of students at Soldotna High and Middle Schools came to know and benefit from his wealth of talent and keen eye. He was an exceptional wood shop mentor, giving practical and life skills to his “woodchucks.” Breaking the standard teacher mold, Chris was a rogue and rugged individual questioning most things. Not affected by dictum, he applied his own brand of creative interaction and humor with his students and cohorts. Chris was born in Detroit, grew up in Southern California and knew the land well, but it was the ocean he loved, and it called to him. As a teenager, he worked the abalone fisheries as a deckhand. Years later, he and Gigi acquired a commercial salmon fishing permit and chased salmon. True to his nature and his love of good conversation, he found his next seafaring adventure by establishing a water taxi service out of Homer. His love of cultural history, geology, native flora and fauna made him a popular guide around Kachemak Bay. Captain of The Retriever, Chris took ultimate care with every passenger lucky enough to come aboard. An exceptional boatbuilder, woodworker, and artist, Chris was never without a project to channel his creative energy and unique vision. For his grandsons, he built cribs that will transform to full size beds, craftsmanship meant to keep pace with both these beloved boys as they too grow and transform. Any material was fair game for his inventive, whimsical sculptures and drawings that capture the essence of local scenery with bold and confident strokes that evoke a mystifying simplicity. Chris is survived by Gigi Banas, his soulmate and wife of 42 adventuresome years, his daughter Jessie of Anchorage, (husband Chris McConnell), grandson Whit; son Andy of White Salmon, WA (wife Porsha), grandson Orion, and a large circle of close friends. An avid reader, Chris asked that any donations be made to the Friends of the Kenai Community Library. A celebration of life will be held May 25.

LIO Schedule Thursday, March 21 9 a.m.: The Senate Education Committee will hold a public hearing to discuss SB 30 College Credit For High School Students SB 6 Pre-elementary Programs / Funding. Testimony will be taken. 1:30 p.m.: The Senate Labor & Commerce Committee will hold a public hearing to discuss Confirmation: Chuck Collins and Sarah Lefebvre, Workers’ Compensation Board, Dr. Enlow Walker, Board of Physical Therapy & Occupational Therapy, SB 69 Exempt Charitable Gaming from Permit / Fees and SJR 8 U.S.- Mexico Canada Agreement on Trade. Testimony will be taken. 3:30 p.m.: The Senate Community & Regional Affairs Committee will hold a public hearing to discuss SB 63 Fish Tax: Repeal Municipal Refunds / Revenue Share. Testimony will be taken.

Friday, March 22

3:15 p.m.: The House Labor & Commerce Committee public hearing to discuss Confirmation: Charlie Cross, Alcohol Beverage Control Board and HB 79 Peace Officer / Firefighter Retirement Benefits HB 44 Automated Teller Machines: Fees has been removed from the agenda. Testimony will be taken.

Saturday, March 23

5:30 p.m.: House Finance Committee Member Rep. Gary Knopp, Speaker of the House Bryce Edgmon and House Finance Committee Vice-chair Rep. Jennifer Johnston will sponsor a community meeting to discuss the FY20 Operating Budget & Permanent Fund Dividend at the Soldotna Sports Center. 3-minute time limit on comments. All teleconferences are held at the Kenai LIO 145 Main St Lp #217, Kenai, AK 99611 unless otherwise noted. To confirm call 283-2030 or email Kenai.LIO@ akleg.gov. To listen / watch online go to http://alaskalegislature.tv/

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act would be implemented in the city. PERA’s role in Alaska employee relations is to protect the organizing and bargaining rights of

public employees, unions and employers, according to the Alaska Labor Relations Agency, the agency responsible for implementing the act. Official election results will be presented to Seward City Council on March 26.

Anchorage Funeral Funeral Anchorage Home & & Crematory Crematory Home 1-800-478-3353 • • 907-345-2244 1-800-478-3353 907-345-2244

Around the Peninsula KPC Showcase: An Alaskan Doctor’s Perspectives on Antarctica Dr. Kristin Mitchell will present An Alaskan Doctor’s Perspectives on Antarctica on Thursday, April 4 at 6:30 p.m. in the McLane Commons, Kenai Peninsula College.

Kenai/Soldotna Fish & Game Advisory Committee election meeting The Kenai/Soldotna Fish & Game Advisory Committee will hold an election meeting on Thursday, April 4 at the Kenai River Center at 6 p.m. Also on the agenda will be preparing BOF proposals, and any other business that may come before the committee. For more information contact Mike Crawford at 252-2919.

Canine Good Citizen Advanced test

Kenai Kennel Club will be offering a Canine Good Citizen Advanced (CGCA) test on Sunday March 31 at 10:30 a.m. at Kenai Kennel Club, 11312 Kenai Spur Hwy Unit 21 (behind Home Gallery in the mall Job Center is in). Your dog must have successfully passed the CGC test before testing for CGCA. To register for the CGCA test or with any questions, contact Paula at paulalovett@yahoo.com.

Caregiver Support workshop, open house

Kenai Peninsula Family Caregiver Support Program Workshop and Open House will take place in the Blazy Mall, Suite # 209 on Tuesday, March 26 from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Workshop Presentation 1-2 p.m.: “The Family Guide to Alzheimer’s Disease” focuses on strategies to help deal with behavior issues such as perception of reality, agitation, hallucinations, sleeplessness, sundowning, wandering and incontinence. Call Sharon or Judy at (907) 262-1280, for more information.

CIRCAC board of directors meeting

Cook Inlet Regional Citizens Advisory Council (CIRCAC) represents citizens in promoting environmentally safe marine transportation and oil facility operations in Cook Inlet. CIRCAC is holding its Board of Directors Meeting on Friday, April 5 at 9 a.m. at the Cook Inlet Aquaculture Association building, 40610 Kalifornsky Beach Road, Kenai,

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one bidder who applied — whose name the department did not release — because the department had begun contemplating a longer, more expensive procurement due to the feedback being received. The fact that only one proposal was received further increased their concern. “Governor Dunleavy, in consultation with DOT&PF and (the Office of Management and Budget), decided it was in the State’s best interest to focus a longer and more comprehensive effort on this topic,” Landau said.

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project from mineral discovery in the 1980s to the most current permitting process after a settlement was reached with the EPA to allow that process. If it came to fruition, Pebble would be a primarily copper mine operating for 20 years on a site 17 miles from Iliamna Lake across Cook Inlet. It would also involve five other minerals, including gold. The Pebble representatives touted the redesigned project, especially its smaller footprint, lack of waste rock piles and the fact that it would no longer use cyanide for secondary gold recovery. During the question and answer period of the meeting, Carly Wier, executive director of Cook Inletkeeper, expressed doubts by calling the presentation “a lovely fairytale” of no impacts to fish or subsistence culture. Crowd members asked about the road leading from a port for barges to the mine site, and whether Pebble could guarantee it wouldn’t affect bears native to the area. Steve Albert, a retired Department of Fish and Game fisheries biologist, said he was concerned about the road leading to the site, and the fact that it’s about 1 mile from the McNeil River State Game Sanctuary, where there are bears. “There’s no way in the

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Brian Lervold JeffH. Creech Funeral Director Director Funeral

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Bristol Bay region. McCoy told reporters that while 45 days is standard for such reviews, the corps decided 90 days was appropriate for the Pebble project given the nature of the project and level of interest in it. The corps has received requests to extend the 90-day period and is considering

AK 99611. The public is welcome to attend. For an agenda, directions or more information, call 907-283-7222 or toll free 800-652-7222. Meeting materials will be posted online at www.circac.org.

LeeShore Center monthly board meeting

The LeeShore Center will be holding its monthly board meeting at The LeeShore Center on Wednesday, March 28. The meeting is open to the public and begins at 6 p.m. For further information call 283-9479.

Trauma workshop

A Trauma Workshop will take place on March 30, 1-4 p.m. at Soldotna United Methodist Church with Trauma Specialist, Lisa Schmitter. This workshop will explain trauma and the physiological and psychological impact it can have. Visit the Facebook page for the Trauma Workshop at https://www.facebook.com/events/2327680134135110/.

Kenai Peninsula Foundation grant cycle

Kenai Peninsula Foundation 2019 competitive grants cycle is open from March 6 to April 3. We are currently accepting applications. Please direct general questions to KPF’s Program Manager, Hadassah Knight, at hknight@alaskacf. org. Please direct eligibility and technical questions about the online grant system to The Alaska Community Foundation at grants@alaskacf.org.

SPEAK meeting

SPEAK (Support Group for families of children who live though disabilities) will be meeting the third Thursday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at the Love Inc. building 44410 K-Beach Rd. Parents, Grandparents, Guardians, and care givers service providers and resource representatives are encouraged and welcome to come and participate. This is great way to connect with others through their overcoming successes as parents, grandparents, and caregivers. SPEAK is a resource-based group. Please no children, childcare is not available. Questions call 907-252-2558 or 907-953-6325.

Al-Anon support group meetings

Al-Anon support group meetings are held at the Central Peninsula Hospital in the Kasilof Room (second floor) of the River Tower building on Monday at 7 p.m., Wednesday at 7 p.m. and Saturday at 9 a.m. Park around back by the ER and enter through the River Tower entrance and follow the signs. Contact Tony Oliver at 252-0558 for more information.

The report is being prepared for the administration, she said, but will be shared with the Legislature and the public. The report will provide the governor with options to consider when submitting a budget and/or legislation changes. The Legislature may use it when considering the governor’s proposals or in proposing its own actions. Bringing in a consultant is part of Gov. Mike Dunleavy’s proposed plan for the ferry system. Dunleavy’s proposed budget would cut the ferry system’s funding by 75 percent in the next fiscal year, and would use a maximum of $250,000 of this year’s and 2020’s AMHS budget to pay for the consultant’s report, ac-

cording to Landau. In order to come up with the quarter million dollar maximum, DOT&PF looked at the time frame of approximately six months to review existing studies, synthesize relevant information and research reshaping options not previously evaluated, Landau said. Then, the department estimated the cost of two profesasionals, an economist and a marine consultant, along with support staff for the six months effort. There have been numerous studies over the years on making the ferry system more efficient and financially viable, including a current AMHS Reform Project that has examined

solutions in the past two and a half years including running the highway system as a public corporation. That reform study has been done through Southeast Conference. Some legislators have criticized this new directive, saying that another study doesn’t need to be done because they all say the same thing. Landau said the new consultant will use these studies to inform their work. “The state-funded AMHS studies are the minimum we want the contractor to evaluate before proposing possible solutions,” Landau said. “If the consultant finds other relevant studies, so much the better.”

world you can ever convince me that having that road … essentially adjacent to that bear refuge, that you’re not going to have any affect on bears,” Albert said. Fueg said the bear passage through the area of the road will be managed by managing the traffic on the road, with things like setting speed limits and training the drivers. This response drew a round a laughter from the crowd. They asked about what materials would be used for the road and where those materials would come from. Others inquired about the level of testing and study done to design a project that can withstand earthquakes and major weather events in the face of climate change. While there is not a fault under the proposed site, Heatwole said that in creating a project design, Pebble used the 1964 earthquake, a 9.2 magnitude tremblor, as its baseline. The issue the site would have to contend with is ground acceleration. “So we begin with the ground acceleration generated by a 1964 size earthquake,” Heatwole said. “What would that do? If we had one in the subduction zone at Pebble, the ground acceleration at site would only be about 0.2 g’s (the acceleration due to Earth’s gravity) of ground acceleration.” Fueg also described 75 years of weather reports from the area and how they informed the mine design in terms of water treatment and handling.

Others were skeptical about the EIS process itself, asking how many staff at the Army Corps of Engineers would be allocated to respond to citizen questions, and how Pebble Partnership arrived at the list of contractors it gave to the corps to choose from for the EIS. Fueg explained that Pebble started with the pool of contractors in the United States that were eligible to handle a project like this. Then, Pebble had to exclude any contractor that had worked on the project in any capacity in the past. The remainder is what was given to the corps to choose from, he said. One of the biggest concerns? Potential impact to salmon and fisheries in the area. “Our fundamental principal as an operation is to coexist,” Heatwole said. “So, if we do our job correctly, we’re not going to impact fishing jobs.” He cited environmental studies which he said point to Pebble not having an impact on fish outside of the mine site area. “We know there’s going to be localized impacts from where we put our facilities and all of that, but beyond the boundaries of the mine, … we have no … impact on fish and wild resources. That’s what the EIS says.” Local resident Kate Finn asked what kind of measures have been taken to make

the proposed facility resistant to the effects of volcano eruptions. Fueg said he didn’t think volcano activity would affect the mine any differently than any other environmental disruption. He said mining operations would be shut down in the case of a volcano eruption. He also said volcanic ash isn’t very different than the materials being put into tailing facilities to begin with. “Those facilities are far better designed to handle that kind of material, if you will, than an average water retaining structure,” Fueg said. When it comes to local impact, Pebble is planning two to five days of drilling in Anchor Point for geotechnical information that will aid the project in researching the pipeline crossing it also plans to put in Cook Inlet. Based on the east side of the Inlet in Anchor Point, the pipe’s purpose would be to bring natural gas to the site on the other side for power. In Homer, Pebble Limited Partnership plans to have people based there to do marine studies regarding the potential pipeline across the Inlet. The Army Corps of Engineers will host a public meeting to accept comments about the Pebble Mine at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, April 11 at Homer High School. The final EIS is currently slated for early 2020. The draft EIS is available to download and read at pebbleprojecteis.com.

those, but so far it has not received a strong reason for an extension, he said. The corps also has received comments saying 90 days is sufficient, he said. Critics of the project have criticized the substance of the review and say the process has been rushed. When the draft review was released last month, Pebble partnership CEO Tom Collier said the partnership saw “no significant environmental challenges that would preclude the

project from getting a permit.” McCoy said the draft review is not a rubber stamp of the project. If there’s evidence contrary to what the corps’ draft analysis shows, “absolutely provide it to us and allow us to use that to inform a revision if necessary,” he said. A spokesman for the Pebble partnership said the project will need dozens of permits, approvals and authorizations as it seeks to advance. Last month, Republican

U.S. Sen. Dan Sullivan questioned the adequacy of the 90-day comment period. Sullivan spokesman Mike Anderson said by email Wednesday that Sullivan’s comments stand, but he did not respond to questions on whether Sullivan had formally requested a longer comment period. Representatives for U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski did not immediately respond to an email asking her position on the 90-day period.


Opinion

A4 | Thursday, March 21, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

CLARION P

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Serving the Kenai Peninsula since 1970 Jeff Hayden Publisher ERIN THOMPSON......................................................... Editor DOUG MUNN........................................... Circulation Director FRANK GOLDTHWAITE......................... Production Manager

A sustainable fiscal plan, reliable funding crucial for K-12 education By NORM WOOTEN, LISA SKILES PARADY AND SARAH SLEDGE

Last month, Gov. Mike Dunleavy unveiled his proposed FY 2020 operating budget, which among other drastic cuts, slashed $330 million from education funding. This budget would devastate public education and leave a bleak future for our children and communities. These severe proposed budget cuts have damaged Alaska’s reputation as a desirable place to live. Thankfully, they’ve also galvanized many citizens across the state, who realize that now is the time, more than ever, for Alaska’s budget to prioritize the things we value. The deep cuts proposed to K-12 education are at a level not seen in other states. This is because public education has always been a priority for successful communities, states and countries. The people of Alaska also value their local schools and understand the critical role they play in their communities, as confirmed in a new survey conducted by a coalition of education advocacy groups called “The Great Work of Alaska’s Public Schools.” A majority of Alaskans polled believe public education is the No. 1 priority for government funding. Alaskans who participated in this survey know that young people are our future leaders, innovators, educators, investors, philanthropists, doctors, engineers, writers, welders and builders. Survey results also show that Alaskans support elected officials who will invest in public education and work to make it better for all children. This investment is not possible without a long-term fiscal strategy that moves away from the roller coaster ride of budgeting based on oil prices and production. It’s not possible without a diversification of revenue streams. Already, we’ve heard concerns from families with children, from kindergartners to seniors preparing for high school graduation, that the uncertainty over education funding each year presents a huge negative check mark against Alaska when it comes to the livability and economic health of our state. Alaska must be a great place to work, raise families and have our children graduate from high school prepared for career or college. If elected officials do not embrace this as a priority policy for the state, what kind of future do we face? Who is going to lead Alaska’s businesses, new industries, technology, infrastructure and future if not the next generation of Alaskans? The devastating cuts proposed by the Dunleavy administration, which economists predict will deepen the ongoing recession and lead to more people leaving the state, have many Alaskans now demanding real solutions. The hard work of putting together a longterm sustainable fiscal plan is imperative and takes real leadership to accomplish. Our economic health and the future of the state depend on it. Timely, reliable and predictable funding notification for education should be an important part of this plan. Timely notification would allow K-12 school districts across the state to have certainty and stability in budget planning, so that budgets can be submitted to their local governments as required by late March, early April. It would eliminate the nonproductive work of preparing various budget scenarios and pink slips, while wild swings in education funding levels are debated to the bitter end of each legislative session. Senate Joint Resolution 9, introduced by Sen. Mia Costello of Anchorage, would provide for that timely funding notification. It’s the kind of common sense solution that would go a long way toward bringing some stability to our state. Coupled with a long-term and sustainable fiscal plan that considers new revenues, we could begin to see an economic recovery in Alaska and possibly even some population growth and prosperity. Our shared vision for Alaska’s students includes a long-term fiscal plan that ensures sustainable education funding for current and future generations. It’s the only viable alternative before us. A budget isn’t just about what certain things cost; it’s about what people value. Let’s start a truly honest budget discussion that offers a vision for a positive future. Norm Wooten is executive director of the Association of Alaska School Boards. Dr. Lisa Skiles Parady is executive director of the Alaska Council of School Administrators. Sarah Sledge is the executive director of the Coalition for Education Equity.

Our children must read by 9

Right now, Alaska’s public school children are ranked dead last in the nation in fourth-grade reading proficiency, a key indicator used to measure academic success. In terms of school years, they are up to a full year behind their counterparts in other states. This means many of our fourth-graders cannot read “Charlotte’s Web” or “The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe.” While it may seem like such a simple, basic issue, the ability to read is actually the foundation of a child’s educational success; the value of reading cannot be stressed enough. By not guaranteeing that gradeschool students become proficient readers, we are failing our children. We must do everything in our power to ensure that every child is able to read well enough so that when they enter middle school and begin learning harder material, they can read to learn. Through the third grade, students learn to read. As they enter the fourth grade, they read to learn. If a child does not develop this skill, he or she will also fall behind in social studies and science. Word problems in math will be unsolvable, navigating the rich world of literature impossible, and communicating complex ideas in written and spoken word unthinkable. Students who cannot read well

A laska V oices J odi T aylor almost never catch up and their future is in peril. Statistics compiled by groups like ExcelinEd are sobering. Students who cannot read by the end of the third grade are four times more likely to drop out of high school. High school dropouts make up 75 percent of food stamp recipients and 90 percent of those on welfare. Nearly 85 percent of teenagers in the juvenile justice system cannot read to learn and seven out of 10 adult prisoners cannot read above a fourth-grade level. Evidence-based research shows that a strong reading initiative can make a big difference. The Alaska Policy Forum supports a “Read by 9” policy which provides a commonsense and proven solution. It starts by making sure kindergartners know the A-B-Cs and the sounds they make. Strategies, guided by science, focus on developing critical skills through the third grade so students can read with ease, understand the material, and are

starting to think critically. We need to implement a system of instruction that places a heavier emphasis on making sure our children leave third grade with the ability to read. We want each child entering the fourth grade to do so with confidence and with the skills he or she needs to learn. As a final safeguard, students unable to read proficiently at their grade level may be retained and given an extra year of enhanced instruction so that before promotion to the next grade, they can learn to read well. Because learning to read is so important and catching up so difficult to do, students must be proficient readers before they move on to more difficult materials. Regardless of where they go to school, every child deserves the opportunity to reach his or her full potential and to fully embrace the American dream. Let’s work together: parents, teachers, administrators and policy makers to ensure that Alaska implements the Read by 9 reading initiative so that all our children can read to learn and love to learn. Jodi Taylor is an Alaska Policy Forum board member, a lifelong Alaskan who attended public school, an entrepreneur at heart, and mother of five children.

30 years later, applying hard-learned lessons in Prince William Sound March 24, 2019 marks the 30th anniversary of the day Exxon Valdez fetched up on Bligh Reef and spilled almost 11 million gallons of oil into Prince William Sound, Alaska. Like most Alaskans and Americans, the disaster shocked and angered me. The massive harm to the marine ecosystems of Prince William Sound, deaths of thousands of seabirds, marine mammals and other wildlife, devastation of fisheries I knew Alaskan fishermen and families depended upon, and the failures of multiple organizations and individuals to prevent such an event was a gut-wrenching, transformative experience. Three decades on, the only real good to come from the spill were hard-learned lessons that improved how marine oil transportation is conducted and regulated in Alaska and globally. The Exxon Valdez spill fundamentally changed the way industry, regulators, states and nations looked at the inherent risks of marine oil transportation. New laws and regulations following the spill locked multiple new safeguards into place — safeguards that are still in place and continue to evolve today. Oil is transported in double-hulled tankers; in Valdez, tanker captains face mandatory pre-departure alcohol testing; the Coast Guard coordinates and enforces tanker lanes, limits tanker speeds, sets ice routing and entrance closures. The Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation now approves stringent contingency response plans for the Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) pipeline, terminal and tankers. The Ship Escort/ Response Vessel System (SERVS) was put in place to prevent spills and provide response capabilities for Alyeska

A laska V oices T om B arrett

powerful tugs with improved winches and fit-for-purpose barges with improved skimmers that Alyeska brought to Valdez last year. The escort tugs are the most powerful in the world for escort service. In addition to more than 200 annual drills and exercises, tanker and tug captains and pilots train for the demands of escort operations in stateof-the-art simulators. These efforts unfold with oversight from regulators and with input from stakeholders like the Prince William Sound Science Center, the Oil Spill Recovery Institute and the Prince William Sound Regional Citizens Advisory Council. I know, and Alyeska leadership, employees and contractors know the safety of our people and environmental stewardship of Alaska lands and waters along TAPS rests in our hands. We are directly accountable for safely moving TAPS oil with a deep-vested stewardship. We take great pride in the work we do every day, and how well and safely we do it. Our workforce spans generations of Alaskans who live, work and play in Alaska. Prince William Sound is our home water. The 30th anniversary of Alaska’s greatest ecological disaster reminds us of the need for us to manage our risks with tight discipline and the greatest care. A former Coast Guard boss of mine, Admiral Jim Loy, would repeatedly stress, “Preparation Equals Performance.” We adhere to that perspective. We know our accountabilities and understand our obligation to make oil transportation along TAPS and across Prince William Sound safe for Alaska lands, waters and citizens.

Pipeline Service Company, which operates TAPS. SERVS has staged large response barges and a vast supply of equipment around Prince William Sound to use in an emergency. In 1989, a single tug accompanied tankers through the Valdez Narrows and a single response barge provided storage capacity of 12,000 barrels. Today, two powerful tugs escort each laden tanker through Hinchinbrook Entrance, and seven large recovery barges provide more than 600,000 barrels of on-water storage. Every year, Alyeska employees conduct annual Fishing Vessel of Opportunity Program training in classrooms and on the water with Alaska-based fishing captains and crews — almost 1,600 people and 400 vessels that are on contract to SERVS to assist if needed with any response. Our systems are much improved from 1989. But we are not naïve about the inherent risks our business entails. Our personnel are extremely proud of the work we do and its importance to everyone in Alaska. We continuously assess our protection layers and our capabilities. We listen hard to our own employees, contractors, regulators, partners in the Alaska Native community and other stakeholders about our planning and readiness. We continue Tom Barrett is president of Alyeska to innovate with advances like the Edison Chouest Offshore fleet of more Pipeline Service Company.


Peninsula Clarion | Thursday, March 21, 2019 | A5


A6 | Thursday, March 21, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

Sports

Brown Bears ready to host Ice Dogs Kenai River concludes home slate with 3 games against rivals By JEFF HELMINIAK Peninsula Clarion

Kenai River Brown Bears interim head coach Dan Bogdan has any number of motivational ploys at his disposal as his squad gets ready to host its final home series of the season this weekend. Bogdan plans to avail himself of none of them in a series against the Fairbanks Ice Dogs that starts Thursday at 7 p.m. and concludes with 7:30 p.m. games Friday and Saturday at the Soldotna Regional Sports Complex. Some possible motivations Bogdan is turning down: • The playoff chase. Kenai River hasn’t been to the playoffs since the 2013-14 season and still has a slim chance at the final playoff spot out of the North American Hockey League Midwest Division. The Bears are 21-27-3-3, good for 48 points and 11 points behind the Janesville (Wisconsin) Jets in the race for the final playoff spot. With six games left and a win

counting for two points, Kenai River’s playoff chances can’t afford losses. • The Ravn Cup. This is the battle for supremacy each season between the Brown Bears and Ice Dogs, Alaska’s lone teams in the NAHL. The Ice Dogs have won the first six Ravn Cups and have a 5-1 lead in this season’s Ravn Cup with six games remaining between the two teams. • The rivalry. Even with a playoff berth and the Ravn Cup being heavy lifts at this point, there’s always a genuine dislike for in-state rivals to get a locker room fired up. Bogdan is having none of it. “It’s just the first shift on Thursday, that’s really it,” he said. “To focus on the rest of it would just put us backward. “We’re just going to focus on the process. That’s what’s led to us having success. Not focusing on the Ravn Cup or the playoffs.” As for the rivalry? “It’s one of those things you try not to overplay,” Bogdan said. “It’s one of those things that’s

great saying out loud, but what it comes down to on the ice is it’s just another team you are playing, though it means more with the only two Alaska teams out there. “It’s still about going shift to shift, period to period.” In addition to focusing on each shift, Bogdan has encouraged the players to have more fun, be more creative and not be afraid of making mistakes with the puck. Kenai River is 6-4-1-1 thus far under Bogdan, and is 3-1-0-1 on the current home stand. Last weekend, the Bears nearly had a three-game sweep of the Minnesota Magicians, the second place team in the division. Saturday, the Brown Bears came from two goals down in the third period to tie the game at 2 with 1:20 remaining on a goal by JJ Boucher. With 2:00 to play, Minnesota iced the puck and Kenai River called timeout. Normally a timeout is not a good idea when the other team ices the puck, because the other team can’t change players before the faceoff.

But Bogdan called timeout because he wanted to pull the goalie and wanted his six best players on the ice fully rested to chase the equalizer. It paid off, though the Bears would lose in a shootout. “I brought out my best six on the ice and everyone trusted my decision,” Bogdan said. The close bond on the team is something Eagle River forward Zach Krajnik talked about after Friday’s win. It will be needed against the Ice Dogs, who lead the division and are tied for fourth in the league with a 33-15-3-3 record. Goalie Mattias Sholl has the top goals-against average in the league at 1.84 and has a 13-1-3-1 record. Fairbanks, under head coach Trevor Stewart and assistant coach Scott Deur, has won five straight and seven of eight. “They’re really well-coached. Trevor and Scott do a good job up there,” Bogdan said. “At the same time, we’ve had something special going on here the last couple of

weeks. “We can speak all we want about Fairbanks, but it’s what our guys do on a daily basis, and we clearly outperformed another team in the division that is tight with them.” The Bears have a goalie of their own playing great in Gavin Enright, who is committed to Division I Bemidji State. This home stand has featured a string of highly regarded goalies in both nets. Bogdan also paid tribute to the job forward Michael Spethmann is doing on the offensive and defensive sides of the puck to create chances. “It’s playoff hockey,” Bogdan said. “Game to game, Gavin has played lights out. I can’t speak highly enough of him. “With their goalie playing well, we know we’re going to have to get to the gritty areas to score goals. Goals won’t be scored from 40 or 50 feet out. I’m sure they’re thinking the same thing on their side.” All Bears players are healthy and ready to go.

Stars making state returns SoHi girls, boys both face West in 4A’s opening round By JOEY KLECKA Peninsula Clarion

The trajectories that have taken the Soldotna boys and girls basketball programs to the Class 4A state tournament have been markedly different, but with March Madness in full swing, their postseason paths are eerily similar. Both SoHi teams punched their tickets to the big dance with triumphant conference tournament semifinal victories on their home court, but both lost the title games the next day to finish second. Both teams also start their state runs with the same opponent in West Anchorage. In the 4A girls bracket, the fourth-seeded Stars match up with fifth-seed West Anchorage today at 9:30 a.m., while in the boys bracket, the fifth-seeded SoHi boys also match up with the West Eagles, the No. 4 seed, for an 11 a.m. opener. Both SoHi first-round games are also rematches from earlier this year. It was even the same day, Feb. 9 — the SoHi girls prevailed 60-52 over West at the Lady Lynx Prep Shootout in Anchorage, while the SoHi boys fell agonizingly short

58-57 in a nonconference contest across town. Those two seesaw affairs have set the stage for first-round battles with the Eagles at the Alaska Airlines Center. The eight-team tournaments for both boys and girls will end Saturday with championship games at 6 p.m. (girls) and 8 p.m. (boys), but both Soldotna coaches are not looking past their opening tilts against West. “We’re focusing on taking it one game at a time,” said girls coach Kyle McFall. “We’re not looking past West, we’ve been preparing for them. That’s really our whole mentality right now.” SoHi boys coach Nolan Rose echoed that same cliche, adding that SoHi is one of the greener teams at the tournament. The girls team hasn’t been to state since 2014, and hasn’t won it all since 1993, while the boys haven’t gotten to state since 2010 and have never won the big prize. In the bright lights and cavernous arena of the Alaska Airlines Center, Rose said his team needs a fast start. “It might take our kids See 4A, page A7

Nikiski girls head coach Rustin Hitchcock talks to his team early this season against Kotzebue at the Craig Jung Kenai River Challenge at Kenai Central High School. (Photo by Joey Klecka/Peninsula Clarion)

Kenai, Nikiski girls chase titles By JOEY KLECKA Peninsula Clarion

Two peninsula programs travel to the Class 3A girls state championship tournament this weekend with dreams of cutting down the nets Saturday, but both enter with vastly different perspectives. For the Nikiski Bulldogs, a lineup of experienced and savvy skills guide a team of veterans seeking to break a 13-year team title drought. For the Kenai Central Kardinals, who haven’t danced on the big stage in 17 years, a long overdue moment will

come to fruition today. Kenai head coach Cary Calvert said the moment hasn’t been lost on the team, adding that his own daughter, senior guard Jaycie Calvert, has anticipated a state run for years. “There won’t be a girl more excited to be there (than her),” Calvert said. “This is a dream come true for her, she’s been on cloud nine all week, and all these kids are proud to get there.” The eight-team bracket tips off today at the luxurious Alaska Airlines Center in Anchorage when top-seeded Anchorage Christian Schools plays eighth-seeded Kotzebue in pursuit of

a third straight state crown. ACS has beaten Sitka in each of the last two state championship finals. The No. 5 Kenai girls open their tournament with a 12:30 p.m. matchup with No. 4 Mt. Edgecumbe, while the No. 3 Nikiski girls face No. 6 Valdez in the late game at 8 p.m. While Kenai Central owns just one girls state hoops title in its history (1991), the Nikiski girls have a large case full of championship trophies. From 1992 to 2006, the Bulldogs played in the state title game nine out of 15 years, winning eight of them. See 3A, page A7

Nikiski’s Carstens repeats as Class 3A Player of Year Staff report Peninsula Clarion

Nikiski senior Bethany Carstens repeated as the Class 3A Player of the Year in Knight’s Taxidermy/Alaska Association of Basketball Coaches All-State balloting announced Thursday. The Kenai Peninsula sent seven teams to state basketball this season, so it’s no surprise the area had a large roster of players honored in the announcement. In addition to Carstens, Nikolaevsk’s Michael Trail earned first-team Class 1A boys honors and Nikolaevsk’s Elizabeth Fefelov earned first-team Class 1A girls honors. Carstens led her team to second in the Southcentral Conference and a state berth, while Trail led the Warriors to state via a Peninsula Conference title and Fefelov helped her team finish second in the Peninsula Conference for a state bid. At the Class 4A level, Ituau Tuisaula earned girls first-team honors, Brittani Blossom earned girls third-team honors and Jersey Truesdell locked down boys third-

team honors. Both the Stars girls and boys teams finished second in the Northern Lights Conference to wrap up state berths. At Class 3A, Kenai Central’s Jaycie Calvert made girls second team and teammate Brooke Satathite made girls third team. The Kards finished third in the Southcentral Conference and were awarded an at-large berth to state. Also at Class 3A, Nikiski’s Jace Kornstad made the third team. The Bulldogs did not make state, meaning Kornstad really had to stand out to earn the honor. Same goes for Ninilchik’s Garrett Koch, who made the Class 1A boys second team even though the Wolverines came up a game short of state. Adara Warren led Cook Inlet Academy to a Peninsula Conference title and a state berth, and for that she was awarded a spot on the Class 1A girls second team. Nikolaevsk’s Markiana Yakunin made the girls Class 1A third team, teaming with Fefelov all season to spark Nikolaevsk’s state run. Knight’s Taxidermy/Alaska Association of Basketball Coaches All-State

4A Boys Player of the Year: Sullivan Menard, Colony Coach of the Year: Chuck Martin, East Anchorage First team: Sullivan Menard, Colony; Daniel Headdings, Wasilla; Kaeleb Johnson, East Anchorage; Patrick McMahon, Colony; Isaiah Moses, Dimond. Second team: Diques Esaw, West Anchorage; Evan Hoosier, Dimond; Chris Lee, Ketchikan; Marcus Lee, Ketchikan; Jaron Williams, East Anchorage. Third team: Jeremiah Hersrud, Colony; Rashad King, Bartlett; Jamari Lawrence, West Anchorage; Bishop Tosi, Bartlett; Jersey Truesdell, Soldotna. 4A Girls Player of the Year: Alissa Pili, Dimond Coach of the Year: Clarence Smith, Bartlett First team: Alissa Pili, Dimond; Chasity Horn, Chugiak; Sierra Tate, West Valley; Ituau Tuisaula, Soldotna; Amelia Uhila, Bartlett. Second team: Bella Hays, Wasilla; Nyeniea John, West Anchorage; Skye Miller, East Anchorage; Eva Palmer, Chugiak; Ellen Silva, West Valley Third team: Brittani Blossom, Soldotna; Arianna Camacho-Villafuerte, Dimond; Olivia Davies, Wasilla; Caitlin Pusich, Juneau-Douglas; Ella Roberts, Lathrop. 3A Boys Player of the Year: Orlando Lozano, Anchorage Christian Coach of the Year: Todd Wegner, Valdez First team: Orlando Lozano, Anchorage Christian; Isaac Garcia, Monroe Catholic; Danilo Guzman, Anchorage Christian; Logan Heckathorn, Valdez; Bennett Hinkle, Valdez. Second team: Jalen Freeman, Valdez; Izak Lohrke, Monroe; Brandon Matthews, Barrow; Fredrick Onochie, Anchorage Christian; Matthew Scarboro, Eielson.

Third team: Anthony Fruean, Barrow; Demarcus Hall-Scriven, Anchorage Christian; Gareth Hansen, Nome; Nathan Ivanoff, Grace Christian; Jace Kornstad, Nikiski. 3A Girls Player of the Year: Bethany Carstens, Nikiski Coach of the Year: David Wightman, Galena First team: Bethany Carstens, Nikiski; Pearle Green, Galena; Mary Kate Parks, Anchorage Christian Destiny Reimers, Anchorage Christian; Jordan Todd, Anchorage Christian Second team: Jordan Ahgeak, Barrow; Sanora Bell, Mt. Edgecumbe; Tessa Binder, Grace Christian; Jaycie Calvert, Kenai; Abby Forrester, Sitka. Third team: Alanna Conwell, Kotzebue; Elizabeth Green, Galena; Kastyn Lie, Nome; Mykalla Pickard, Anchorage Christian; Brooke Satathite, Kenai. 2A Boys Player of the Year: Aidan Ivanoff, Unalakleet Coach of the Year: James Fields, Glennallen First team: Aidan Ivanoff, Unalakleet; Christian Adams, Cordova; Aidan Fields, Glennallen; Desmond King, Metlekatla; Trevor Wilson, Unalaska Second team: Jalen Cannon, Tikigaq; Kirby Faverty, Haines; Connor Hudson, Metlekatla; Henry Kowunna, Tikigaq; Landon Sandhofer, Petersburg. Third team: Revyn Almquist, Tok; Riley Blatchey, Wrangell; Kaiden Graves, Cordova; Gabe Jones, Glennallen; Trevor Miller, Wrangell. 2A Girls Player of the Year: Bridgett Oviok, Tikigaq Coach of the Year: Brad Sjostedt, Cordova First team: Bridget Oviok, Tikigaq; Abby Bourgeois, Cordova; Kaylyn Easterly, Wrangell; Julie Frankson, Nenana; Alexis Russell, Metlekatla. Second team: Ashley Agwiak, Nenana; Helen

Decker, Wrangell; Anna Lorence, Glennallen; Anecia Rivers, Scammon Bay; Kayla Villamor, Unalaska. Third team: Ashley Hansen, Craig; Kendra Kapotak, Dillingham; Angela Lane, Tikigaq; Jewel Wilson, Unalakleet; Hailey Wilson, Unalaska. 1A Boys Player of the Year: Edward Kokeok, Shishmaref Coach of the Year: Steve Klaich, Nikolaevsk First team: Edward Kokeok, Shishmaref; Malachi Bradley, Tanana; Elijah Kulowiyi, Savoonga; Graydon Severian, King Cove; Michael Trail, Nikolaevsk. Second team: Eric Daniels, Elim; Gary Gould, King Cove; Garrett Koch, Ninilchik; Trevor Savetilik, Shaktoolik; Fred Sinnok, Shishmaref. Third team:; Ian Dewey, Koyuk; Jacob Duarte, King Cove; Brendon Gregory, Lumen Christi; Karl Smith, Sand Point; Joel Swanberg, Birchwood. Fourth team: Randy Bruns, Brevig Mission; Ray Egoak, Akiak; Darin Morry, Nunimuit; Russell Saccheus, Elim; Alvin Washington, St. Michael. 1A Girls Player of the Year: Elaina Mack, King Cove Coach of the Year: Gary Lamar, King Cove First team: Elaina Mack, King Cove; Jalaya Duarte, King Cove; Elizabeth Fefelov, Nikolaevsk; Sarah Stenek, Shishmaref; Allyson Takak, Shaktoolik. Second team: Felicia Ione, White Mountain; Shea Matthias, Stebbins; Emma Nakak, St. Michael; Sonja Ningeulook, Shishmaref; Adara Warren, Cook Inlet Academy. Third team: Jazmyn Byfuglien, Tri Valley; Sharlyna Gologergen, Savoonga; Renae Matthias, Stebbins; Kayla Morgan, Aniak; Markiana Yakunin, Nikolaevsk. Fourth team: Angel Commack, Noorvik; Taya Marvin, Klawock; Johanna Prince, St. Mary’s; Malory Smith Turpin, Klawock; Lindsay Weyanna, Teller.


Peninsula Clarion | Thursday, March 21, 2019 | A7

. . . 4A Continued from page A6

a minute or two to adjust because none have played there before,” Rose said. “West is there annually, it seems like.” The Stars left the school Wednesday morning to great fanfare, receiving a police escort as they bussed up to Anchorage for early shoot-arounds. On the heels of a 24-4 season, including endowment and tournament games, the SoHi girls are looking to put a successful period on what has been a

successful season. The Northern Lights Conference championship loss could be a big motivator. The Wasilla Warriors rallied from an early hole to beat Soldotna 57-39 after losing both regular season contests to the Stars. “We got up early (in the game), and it was like the moment became too big and we froze up,” he said. “We definitely weren’t moving, the offense wasn’t running anything like it was supposed to, and the girls recognized that.” McFall said after reviewing game film, the team came out with renewed hope in practice over spring

break. “Last week was probably some of the best practices of the year,” he said. “We didn’t rise to the challenge (of the NLC) in the moment, but we’re determined not to let it happen again.” The Soldotna girls’ lone title-game appearance in program history was 1993, when the Molly Tuter-led Stars won it all in a classic battle against Kenai Central. The program’s most recent state appearance was 2014. That year’s Stars also matched up with West in the first round, a mighty clash that ended with SoHi falling 58-55 in overtime. This year, the SoHi sys-

tem is mostly predicated on the success of seniors Brittani Blossom and Danica and Aliann Schmidt, and junior Ituau Tuisaula. Blossom’s perimeter shooting has fueled SoHi’s offense to many wins this year, while Tuisaula — the conference MVP — has provided a stubborn post presence that few opponents have solved, and the ballhandling guard skills of both Schmidts have helped the offense. That helped SoHi defeat West the first time around on Feb. 9, but McFall is wary of the Eagles, who now have one of their star players back in the fold in senior Nyeniea John, who

Scoreboard Basketball

NCAA Tournament

NBA Standings

FIRST FOUR

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB x-Toronto 51 21 .708 — x-Philadelphia 47 25 .653 4 Boston 43 29 .597 8 Brooklyn 37 36 .507 14½ New York 14 58 .194 37 Southeast Division Miami 35 36 .493 — Orlando 34 38 .472 1½ Charlotte 31 39 .443 3½ Washington 30 42 .417 5½ Atlanta 24 48 .333 11½ Central Division x-Milwaukee 53 19 .736 — Indiana 44 28 .611 9 Detroit 36 34 .514 16 Chicago 21 52 .288 32½ Cleveland 19 53 .264 34 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division Houston 45 27 .625 — San Antonio 42 30 .583 3 New Orleans 31 43 .419 15 Memphis 29 42 .408 15½ Dallas 28 43 .394 16½ Northwest Division x-Denver 47 22 .681 — Portland 44 27 .620 4 Utah 42 29 .592 6 Oklahoma City 42 30 .583 6½ Minnesota 32 39 .451 16 Pacific Division x-Golden State 48 22 .686 — L.A. Clippers 42 30 .583 7 Sacramento 34 36 .486 14 L.A. Lakers 31 40 .437 17½ Phoenix 17 55 .236 32 x-clinched playoff spot Wednesday’s Games Cleveland 107, Milwaukee 102 Orlando 119, New Orleans 96 Philadelphia 118, Boston 115 Utah 137, New York 116 Chicago 126, Washington 120, OT Memphis 126, Houston 125, OT Miami 110, San Antonio 105 Toronto 123, Oklahoma City 114, OT Portland 126, Dallas 118 Thursday’s Games Denver at Washington, 3 p.m. Minnesota at Charlotte, 3 p.m. Utah at Atlanta, 3:30 p.m Dallas at Sacramento, 6 p.m. Detroit at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Indiana at Golden State, 6:30 p.m. All Times ADT

Tuesday, March 19 Fairleigh Dickinson 82, Prairie View A&M 76 Belmont 81, Temple 70 Wednesday, March 20 North Dakota State 78, N.C. Central 74 Arizona State 74, St. John’s 65 EAST REGIONAL First Round Thursday, March 21 LSU (26-6) vs. Yale (22-7), 8:40 a.m. Maryland (22-10) vs. Belmont (27-5), 11:10 a.m. Louisville (20-13) vs. Minnesota (21-13), 8:15 a.m. Michigan State (28-6) vs. Bradley (20-14), 10:45 a.m. Friday, March 22 Duke (29-5) vs. North Dakota State (19-15), 3:10 p.m. VCU (25-7) vs. UCF (23-8), 5:40 p.m. Mississippi State (23-10) vs. Liberty (28-6), 3:27 p.m. Virginia Tech (24-8) vs. Saint Louis (23-12), 5:57 p.m. SOUTH REGIONAL First Round Thursday, March 21 Villanova (25-9) vs. Saint Mary’s (22-11), 3:20 p.m. Purdue (23-9) vs. Old Dominion (26-8), 5:50 p.m. Friday, March 22 Mississippi (20-12) vs. Oklahoma (19-13), 8:40 a.m. Virginia (29-3) vs. GardnerWebb (23-11), 11:10 a.m. Cincinnati (28-6) vs. Iowa (2211), 8:15 a.m. Tennessee (29-5) vs. Colgate (24-10), 10:45 a.m. Kansas State (25-8) vs. UC Irvine (30-5), 10 a.m. Wisconsin (23-10) vs. Oregon (23-12), 12:30 p.m. MIDWEST REGIONAL First Round Thursday, March 21 Kentucky (27-6) vs. Abilene Christian (27-6), 3:10 p.m. Wofford (29-4) vs. Seton Hall (20-13), 5:40 p.m. Auburn (26-9) vs. New Mexico State (30-4), 9:30 a.m. Kansas (25-9) vs. Northeastern (23-10), noon Friday, March 22 Utah State (28-6) vs. Washington (26-8), 2:50 p.m.

. . . 3A Continued from page A6

The only championship loss came to Valdez in 1994. Now, 13 years removed from their last title-game appearance, the Bulldogs are primed for a return showing, and the 2018-19 squad is likely the best shot they have. “They understand that it’s a survive-and-advance mentality,” said head coach Rustin Hitchcock. If there’s any team that can push aside the nerves, it’s this Nikiski team. The senior class of Emma Wik, Bethany Carstens and Kelsey Clark are on their third trip to state, having earned finishes of fourth and fifth the last two years, and Carstens is the reigning Class 3A Alaska Player of the Year. The top names in the junior class includes America Jeffreys, Kaycee Bostic, Kaitlyn Johnson and Angela Druesedow, who are also part of the experienced lineup. Those seven players are also not strangers to the vast arena that houses the tournament. Just over four months ago, the group of friends and teammates came through to win the school’s first state volleyball championship in almost 20 years on the same court that will stage Saturday’s state basketball final. On that November day, the Bulldogs summoned a gutsy performance to topple the defending state champion Valdez Buccaneers, the same team that will see the Bulldogs in tonight’s quarterfinal. “Valdez probably hasn’t

North Carolina (27-6) vs. Iona (17-15), 5:20 p.m. Houston (31-3) vs. Georgia State (24-9), 3:20 p.m. Iowa State (23-11) vs. Ohio State (19-14), 5:50 p.m. WEST REGIONAL First Round Thursday, March 21 Florida State (27-7) vs. Vermont (27-6), 10 a.m. Marquette (24-9) vs. Murray State (27-4), 12:30 p.m. Nevada (29-4) vs. Florida (1915), 2:50 p.m. Michigan (28-6) vs. Montana (26-8), 5:20 p.m. Gonzaga (30-3) vs. Fairleigh Dickinson (21-13), 3:27 p.m. Syracuse (20-13) vs. Baylor (19-13), 5:57 p.m. Friday, March 22 Texas Tech (26-6) vs. Northern Kentucky (26-8), 9:30 a.m. Buffalo (31-3) vs. Arizona State (23-10), noon All Times ADT

NIT

First Round Wednesday, March 20 Wichita State 76, Furman 70 Harvard 71, Georgetown 68 Norfolk State 80, Alabama 79, OT Xavier 78, Toledo 64 TCU 82, Sam Houston State 69 Nebraska 80, Butler 76

Hockey NHL Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA z-Tampa Bay 74 57 13 4 118 292 195 Boston 73 44 20 9 97 221 185 Toronto 74 44 25 5 93 263 221 Montreal 73 38 28 7 83 215 213 Florida 73 32 29 12 76 236 246 Buffalo 73 31 33 9 71 202 237 Detroit 73 26 37 10 62 198 249 Ottawa 73 25 42 6 56 217 270 Metropolitan Division Washington 74 43 23 8 94 256 231 N.Y. Islanders 73 42 24 7 91 206 178 Pittsburgh 74 39 24 11 89 251 223 Carolina 72 40 25 7 87 215 198 Columbus 73 40 29 4 84 222 214 Philadelphia 73 35 30 8 78 223 244 N.Y. Rangers 73 28 32 13 69 204 244 New Jersey 74 27 38 9 63 205 253

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division

forgot that,” Hitchcock said. “But experience on that stage is huge.” Hitchcock is also no stranger to the bright lights. Although coaching his first year with the Nikiski girls, Hitchcock spent a handful of seasons coaching the girls program at Cook Inlet Academy, which competed both at Class 1A and 2A during Hitchcock’s tenure. Hitchcock helped CIA to the 2012 title game at the 2A level, losing to Point Hope, then hoisted the Class 1A state trophy with the Eagles in 2013 after a wild, tripleOT game over Nikolaevsk. Hitchcock said experiences like that for players and coaches alike serve a great purpose in staying within the game. “If one thing goes difficult, it’s not this insurmountable panic,” he said. “It’s like, yeah, there’s ups and downs on this.” The Bulldogs are 24-4 this year in all competitions, with two of those losses coming to ACS, including the Southcentral Conference title game March 9. Nikiski lost to ACS 86-56 in the first meeting of the year at home, but played the Lions closer in a 67-52 loss in the conference final. With the Lions on the opposite side of the 3A bracket, Hitchcock and the Bulldogs are hoping for a third clash that could prove to be the undoing of the ACS dynasty. “We want another shot at them for sure,” Hitchcock said. “Not only have we collected enough data to prepare ourselves for that, but the tools in the belt the girls have (include) that positive mentality to use it.” Nikiski’s first opponent, Valdez, captured the Aurora

Winnipeg 73 44 25 4 92 249 213 Nashville 74 42 27 5 89 222 195 St. Louis 73 38 27 8 84 214 200 Dallas 73 38 29 6 82 185 180 Minnesota 74 34 31 9 77 200 217 Colorado 73 32 29 12 76 232 224 Chicago 72 32 30 10 74 243 263 Pacific Division x-Calgary 73 45 21 7 97 260 208 x-San Jose 73 43 22 8 94 261 229 Vegas 73 41 27 5 87 227 203 Arizona 73 36 31 6 78 196 204 Vancouver 74 32 32 10 74 206 229 Edmonton 73 32 34 7 71 206 244 Anaheim 75 30 36 9 69 173 230 Los Angeles 72 25 39 8 58 170 230 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Top three teams in each division and two wild cards per conference advance to playoffs. x-clinched playoff spot z-clinched conference Wednesday’s Games Toronto 4, Buffalo 2 Tampa Bay 5, Washington 4, OT Vancouver 7, Ottawa 4 Winnipeg 3, Anaheim 0 Thursday’s Games Tampa Bay at Carolina, 3 p.m. Boston at New Jersey, 3 p.m. Arizona at Florida, 3 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Montreal, 3:30 p.m. Detroit at St. Louis, 4 p.m. Pittsburgh at Nashville, 4 p.m. Colorado at Dallas, 4:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Chicago, 4:30 p.m. Columbus at Edmonton, 5 p.m. Ottawa at Calgary, 5 p.m. Winnipeg at Vegas, 6 p.m. San Jose at Los Angeles, 6:30 p.m. All Times ADT

Baseball ALResults

Wednesday’s Games Seattle 9, Oakland 7 Thursday’s Games Seattle (Kikuchi 0-0) vs. Oakland (Estrada 0-0) at Tokyo, 1:35 a.m. ADT

Transactions BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS — Released RHP Tyler Clippard and signed him to a minor league contract. Re-assigned RHP A.J. Cole. DETROIT TIGERS — Optioned LHP Ryan Carpenter to Toledo (IL). HOUSTON ASTROS — Agreed to terms with RHP

Conference championship two weeks ago to cap a 1610 season record. Hitchcock reviewed the game film on the Bucs and saw a group of “very defensive-minded” guards, including 6-footer Ally Seiber. But Hitchcock said he believes the Bulldogs’ outside shooting, led by Wik and Bethany Carstens, combined with the inside presence of Bostic, Johnson and Lillian Carstens, can get the job done against Valdez. Kenai’s quarterfinal date with Mt. Edgecumbe today will be the first state hoops contest for the Kardinals girls since 2002, so the community is celebrating it accordingly. Calvert said the team received a send-off from the KCHS drumline and student body Wednesday morning as the bus departed with an escort from the Kenai police and fire departments. “I think we earned it,” Calvert said. “We belong there. We’ll find out.” In their first season at the 3A level following years of trying to keep up with the biggest schools in the state, the Kardinals finished third in the Southcentral Conference tournament and had to rely on the one at-large berth awarded for the 3A state tournament. Calvert said that because he wasn’t “100 percent” certain that Kenai would be awarded the spot, the team did not host a viewing party for the Alaska School Activities Association Selection Show that was streamed live March 10. “I’m just proud that these kids made it,” he said. Now that they have arrived, Calvert said the Kards are ready to make some noise.

Ryan Pressly on a three-year contract. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Agreed to terms with OF Mike Trout on a 12-year contract. MINNESOTA TWINS — Released 1B Lucas Duda. Reassigned RHPs Ryan Eades and Jake Reed, LHP Justin Nicolino and C Wynston Sawyer to minor league camp. TAMPA BAY RAYS — Agreed to terms with INF/OF Brandon Lowe on a six-year contract. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Optioned OF Anthony Alford and C Reese McGuire to Buffalo (IL). National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Optioned OF Tim Locastro to Reno (PCL). LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Optioned RHP Jaime Schulta to Oklahoma City (PCL). optioned RHP JT Chargios to their minor league camp. MIAMI MARLINS — Optioned LHP Jarlin Garcia to New Orleans (PCL). MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Released RHP Josh Tomlin. Signed RHP Josh Fields to a minor-league contract. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Optioned RHP Jake Barrett to Indianapolis (IL). Reassigned INF Alfredo Reyes to minor league camp. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Optioned LHP Austin Gomber and RHP Daniel Ponce de Leon to the Memphis (PCL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association DETROIT PISTONS — Assigned Gs Khyri Thomas and Svi Mykhailiuk to Grand Rapids (NBAGL). FOOTBALL National Football League CHICAGO BEARS — Resigned P Pat O’Donnell to a two-year contract and QB Tyler Bray to a one-year contract. HOUSTON TEXANS — Signed QB A.J. McCarron. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Re-signed S Clayton Geathers. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Signed OL Josh Kline. OAKLAND RAIDERS — Resigned LS Trent Sieg.

“I keep telling them they belong,” he said. “They’re a resilient team. We’ll get after people.” Mt. Edgecumbe is the team’s first opponent, the Southeast Conference champs that went 16-10 overall this season, and Calvert said he saw in game film a group that reminds him of his own squad — athletic, fast, a group of shooters that can defend with the zone and man schemes. “They’re a four-seed for a reason,” he said. Calvert said he will relay on his seniors — Jaycie Calvert, Hayley Maw, Maddie Galloway and Brooke Satathite — to maintain a consistent game tempo that he hopes will allow Kenai to flourish. Over the recent spring break, Calvert said the Kardinals have found a renewed energy in practices, and if the team can get buckets to go their way, a surprise state run may be in the cards. “If we hit shots, we’ll do OK,” he said. Class 3A State Basketball Tournament At Alaska Airlines Center GIRLS Thursday’s games Game 1 — ACS (1) vs. Kotzebue (8), 11 a.m. Game 2 — Mt. Edgecumbe (4) vs. Kenai Central (5), 12:30 p.m. Game 3 — Galena (2) vs. Barrow (7), 6:30 p.m. Game 4 — Nikiski (3) vs. Valdez (6), 8 p.m. Friday’s games Game 5 — Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser, 11 a.m. Game 6 — Game 3 loser vs. Game 4 loser, 12:30 p.m. Game 7 — Game 1 winner vs. Game 2 winner, 6:30 p.m. Game 8 — Game 3 winner vs. Game 4 winner, 8 p.m. Saturday’s games Game 9 — Game 5 winner vs. Game 6 winner, 9:30 a.m. (4th place) Game 10 — Game 7 loser vs. Game 8 loser, 10 a.m. (3rd place) Game 11 — Game 7 winner vs. Game 8 winner, 1 p.m. (Championship)

McFall said was out of the lineup in their first clash. “She’s a really athletic forward for them,” McFall said about John. “She’s a slasher attacker, a good defender, and obviously she’ll make a difference.” That earlier game with West was preceded by two losses in the Lady Lynx tournament — one to Dimond and another to West Valley, both of which are seeded first and second at this weekend’s state tourney. On the boys side, the Stars look to avenge not only a region tourney loss, but their regular-season loss to West. In that game, Soldotna got 22 points from junior guard Jersey Truesdell and 16 from Ray Chumley, both of whom have played integral roles in leading the offense in 2018-19, but after a big third quarter led to a 51-46 Soldotna lead entering the fourth, the Stars could only get six points over the final eight minutes as the Eagles escaped with the win. “If it was a typical NLC, grind-it-out, 45 to 44 type slugfest, that would help us,” Rose said about Thursday’s rematch. Rose is making his first state tournament appearance as a coach in his third year with the SoHi boys, and anticipates another close game with the Eagles. “We’ll recap things after the season and congratulate ourselves on a good year, but right now, we’re thinking only about West,” Rose said. “We’re not going up there just happy to be there. We’ve got a young group, and we want to go up there and beat a tea m we know we can beat.” Rose acknowledged that the Eagles feature a deep lineup full of talented guards and shooters, but he said that the Stars have shown they have the topend talent to equal that, most notably in Truesdell. Truesdell has led the Stars this year with multiple 20-plus point games, and typically finds his best

shooting from beyond the 3-point line. Rose pointed to Truesdell as being one of the most underrated 4A players in the state. “I don’t think he gets a lot of publicity because we’re down here on the peninsula,” Rose said. “The talking heads don’t see a lot of him, but he’ll play really well and he’s ready to go.” Rose added that Chumley is also a big shooter who complements Truesdell’s game, and as long as SoHi gets contributions from players like David Michael, Tyler Morrison, Zach Hanson and Brock Kant, he feels confident about moving on. “We don’t need 20 (points) from all of them, but if they chip in four to six to eight, that’ll go a long way for us,” Rose said. Class 4A State Basketball Tournament At Alaska Airlines Center GIRLS Thursday’s games Game 1 — Dimond (1) vs. Ketchikan (8), 8 a.m. Game 2 — Soldotna (4) vs. West (5), 9:30 a.m. Game 3 — West Valley (2) vs. Chugiak (7), 3:30 p.m. Game 4 — Bartlett (3) vs. Wasilla (6), 5 p.m. Friday’s games Game 5 — Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser, 8 a.m. Game 6 — Game 3 loser vs. Game 4 loser, 9:30 a.m. Game 7 — Game 1 winner vs. Game 2 winner, 3:30 p.m. Game 8 — Game 3 winner vs. Game 4 winner, 5 p.m. Saturday’s games Game 9 — Game 5 winner vs. Game 6 winner, 11 a.m. (4th place) Game 10 — Game 7 loser vs. Game 8 loser, 8:30 a.m. (3rd place) Game 11 — Game 7 winner vs. Game 8 winner, 6 p.m. (Championship) BOYS Thursday’s games Game 1 — West (4) vs. Soldotna (5), 11 a.m. Game 2 — East (1) vs. Ketchikan (8), 12:30 p.m. Game 3 — Colony (2) vs. West Valley (7), 6:30 p.m. Game 4 — Dimond (3) vs. Palmer (6), 8 p.m. Friday’s games Game 5 — Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser, 11 a.m. Game 6 — Game 3 loser vs. Game 4 loser, 12:30 p.m. Game 7 — Game 1 winner vs. Game 2 winner, 6:30 p.m. Game 8 — Game 3 winner vs. Game 4 winner, 8 p.m. Saturday’s games Game 9 — Game 5 winner vs. Game 6 winner, 12:30 p.m. (4th place) Game 10 — Game 7 loser vs. Game 8 loser, 10 a.m. (3rd place) Game 11 — Game 7 winner vs. Game 8 winner, 8 p.m. (Championship)

Today in History Today is Thursday, March 21, the 80th day of 2019. There are 285 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On March 21, 2006, the social media website Twitter was established with the sending of the first “tweet” by co-founder Jack Dorsey, who wrote: “just setting up my twttr.” On this date: In 1556, Thomas Cranmer, the former Archbishop of Canterbury, was burned at the stake for heresy. In 1685, composer Johann Sebastian Bach was born in Eisenach, Germany. In 1788, fire broke out in New Orleans on Good Friday, destroying 856 out of more than 1,100 structures; one death was reported. In 1918, during World War I, Germany launched its Spring Offensive on the Western Front, hoping to break through the Allied lines before American reinforcements could arrive. (Although successful at first, the Spring Offensive ultimately failed.) In 1925, Tennessee Gov. Austin Peay (pee) signed the Butler Act, which prohibited the teaching of the Theory of Evolution in public schools. (Tennessee repealed the law in 1967.) In 1935, Persia officially changed its name to Iran. In 1945, during World War II, Allied bombers began four days of raids over Germany. In 1963, the Alcatraz federal prison island in San Francisco Bay was emptied of its last inmates and closed at the order of Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy. In 1976, champion skier Vladimir “Spider” Sabich was shot and killed by his girlfriend, actress-singer Claudine Longet, in the home they had shared in Aspen, Colorado; Longet, who maintained the shooting was an accident, served 30 days in jail for negligent homicide. In 1981, Michael Donald, a black teenager in Mobile, Alabama, was abducted, tortured and killed by members of the Ku Klux Klan. (A lawsuit brought by Donald’s mother, Beulah Mae Donald, later resulted in a landmark judgment that bankrupted one Klan organization.) In 1990, Namibia became an independent nation as the former colony marked the end of 75 years of South African rule. In 2007, former Vice President Al Gore made an emotional return to Congress as he pleaded with House and Senate committees to fight global warming; skeptical Republicans questioned the science behind his climate-change documentary, “An Inconvenient Truth.” Ten years ago: In Oakland, Calif., parolee Lovelle Mixon shot and killed two motorcycle officers, then killed two SWAT team members while holed up in an apartment before he was killed by law enforcement. A busload of activists representing working- and middle-class families paid visits to the lavish Connecticut homes of American International Group executives to protest the tens of millions of dollars in bonuses awarded by the struggling insurance company after it had received a massive federal bailout. Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei (hah-meh-neh-EE’) dismissed overtures from President Barack Obama, saying Tehran did not see any change in U.S. policy under its new administration. Five years ago: A federal judge ruled that Michigan’s ban on gay marriage was unconstitutional, striking down a law widely embraced by voters a decade earlier. (More than 300 same-sex couples in four Michigan counties wed the next day before an appeals court suspended the decision; two Detroit-area nurses are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn the marriage ban.) Character actor James Rebhorn, 65, died in South Orange, New Jersey. One year ago: As a SWAT team moved in on his SUV, Mark Conditt, the suspect in the deadly bombings that had terrorized Austin, Texas for three weeks, used one of his own devices to take his own life. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg apologized for a “major breach of trust;” the apology came after it was revealed that the data mining firm Cambridge Analytica, whose clients included the Trump campaign, may have used data improperly obtained from Facebook users to try to sway elections. The fourth nor’easter in three weeks dumped more than a foot of snow on some parts of the East Coast. Today’s Birthdays: Actress Kathleen Widdoes is 80. Songwriter Chip Taylor (“Wild Thing”) is 79. Folk-pop singer-musician Keith Potger (The Seekers) is 78. Actress Marie-Christine Barrault is 75. Singer-musician Rose Stone (Sly and the Family Stone) is 74. Actor Timothy Dalton is 73. Singer Ray Dorset (Mungo Jerry) is 73. Singer Eddie Money is 70. Rock singer-musician Roger Hodgson (Supertramp) is 69. Rock musician Conrad Lozano (Los Lobos) is 68. Rhythm-andblues singer Russell Thompkins Jr. is 68. Comedy writer-performer Brad Hall is 61. Actress Sabrina LeBeauf is 61. Actor Gary Oldman is 61. Actress Kassie Depaiva is 58. Actor Matthew Broderick is 57. Comedian-actress Rosie O’Donnell is 57. Actress Cynthia Geary is 54. Rock musician Jonas “Joker” Berggren (Ace of Base) is 52. Rock MC Maxim (Prodigy) is 52. Rock musician Andrew Copeland (Sister Hazel) is 51. Hip-hop DJ Premier (Gang Starr) is 50. Actress Laura Allen is 45. Rapper-TV personality Kevin Federline is 41. Actress Sonequa Martin-Green (TV: “The Walking Dead”) is 34. Actor Scott Eastwood is 33. Actress Jasmin Savoy Brown is 25. Actor Forrest Wheeler is 15. Thought for Today: “Never lose your temper with the press or the public is a major rule of political life.” -- Dame Christabel Pankhurst, English suffragist (1880-1958).


A8 | Thursday, March 21, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

Arts&Entertainment

What’s Happening Events and Exhibitions

n KPC will host “American Music, American Myth” on Thursday, March 21 at 6:30 p.m. in the McLane Commons at Kenai Peninsula College. American music, where has it been, where is it going, and how is it tied to American myth? A presentation by Mike Morgan PhD, local musician and KPC instructor. This will be followed by a panel discussion, hosted by Dave Atcheson and featuring Dr. Morgan; Dr. Alan Boraas, KPC Anthropology Professor; and Bill Tappen, 1960s concert promoter. Panelists will share tales, myths and personal stories of rock & roll history, music & fantasy, and how they influence the very idea of America. n Current and former Girl Scouts in Service Unit 941, formerly named Kalgin Service Unit on the Kenai Peninsula, are invited to a Girl Scout Reunion Tea to observe the 60th Anniversary of our Service Unit on Sunday, March 31 from 2:30-5:30 p.m. at Soldotna Methodist Church, Binkley Street. Bring your Scouting memorabilia. For more info contact Rosemary Pilatti at 907-776-8916 or wrangell86@ gmail.com. n The public is invited to the new River City Books building for a ‘tour and tutorial’ at 1 p.m. on Saturday, March 23, offered by Ben May of Anchorage Solar. This event will help launch a four-month Book to Action Climate Series (based on the book Drawdown) at the Soldotna Library starting on Thursday, March 28, 6-8 p.m. Info: 260 7722. n Join the Kenai Watershed Forum at Snug Harbor Seafoods on K-Beach for the Wild and Scenic Film Festival on Saturday, March 23 from 6-9 p.m. This year’s films combine stellar filmmaking, beautiful cinematography and first-rate storytelling to inform, inspire and ignite solutions and possibilities to restore the earth and human communities while creating a positive future for the next generation.The Wild & Scenic Film Festival is a fundraiser for the Kenai Watershed Forum and a way to support our mission of working together for healthy watersheds on the Kenai Peninsula. Price is $25, includes a Cooper Landing Brew, food and fun! n The Performing Arts Society is pleased to announce the return of pianist Eduard Zilberkant, who has charmed our audiences several times in the past. Joining him are Bryan Emmon Hall, violin; Gail Johansen, viola; and Ryan Fitzpatrick, cello. They will be performing works by Beethoven, Turina, and Arensky. Please join us for this classical chamber music on Saturday, April 6, at 7:30 p.m. at Soldotna Christ Lutheran Church. Tickets are $20 general admission and $10 for students and may be purchased in advance in Soldotna at River City Books and Northcountry Fair or in Kenai at Already Read Books and Country Liquor or at the door. n Forever Dance Alaska will present “The Best of Broadway” annual showcase on March 29-30 at 7 p.m. at the Renee C. Henderson Auditorium. Tickets are $15, includes $1 KPBSD seat charge. Call 2621641 or email info@foreverdancealaska.com.

Visiting artist interprets place through sound By Emilie Springer For the Homer News

Bunnell Street Art Center’s latest Artist in Residence, Anna Pidgorna, presents a diverse array of interests and accomplishments as a composer, a musician, vocalist, and a visual artist. She also brings elements of creative writing and carpentry into contemporary practice. Pidgorna visits for a twopart residency with Bunnell Street Arts Center through a newly commissioned work. During her initial twoweek residency this month, Pidgorna began innovations to a Wild Shore/Bunnell commissioned work. In the fall of 2019, Pidgorna will return to Alaska combining the Wild Shore Trio (Katie Cox, flute; Andie Springer, violin and Mary Kouyoumdjian, piano and co-artistic director) and violin-voice duo CIPHER (soprano Justine Aronson and violinist Sarah Goldfeather) to provide a world premiere of her work. On Thursday, March 7, Bunnell hosted a composer’s talk and potluck reception to introduce Pidgorna to the community and provide a venue for her to share some of her past

Anna Pidgorna’s “Snow White,” made of linoleum cuts and handmade elements of yarn, watercolor and crafted paper. (Photo provided)

experience through an extensive presentation on past projects and a general overview of some of her diverse interests and inspirations. The setting was intimate, with a small group of local artists and musicians eager to hear about her practice and experiences. In addition to a brief introductory residency that brought her to Homer, Pidgorna is completing a doctorate degree in music

composition at Princeton University. The dimensions that inspired her into that field and what she is pursuing there have many features. To start with, Pidgorna is Ukrainian born, and folklore from that culture is an earnest point of inspiration for her compositions. At the Bunnell reception, she displayed an array of acoustic pieces starting with an example of Ukrai-

See EVENTS, page A9

Poet’s

Corner Moose In Town By Marty Myre Walking down the road or taking a nap in the trees I’m the one that bends backwards at the knees Life is sustained through each branch I eat I’ll jump your fence and use your lilac tree as a treat Winter is long wading through the snow I spend my time in town where the wolves won’t go When driving down the street make sure to look around I’m big, brown and furry I’m the moose in town Poems must include the writer’s name, phone number and address. They should be kept to no more than 300 words. Submission of a poem does not guarantee publication. Poems may be e-mailed to news@peninsulaclarion.com, faxed to 283-3299, delivered to the Clarion at 150 Trading Bay Road or mailed to P.O. Box 3009, Kenai, AK 99611.

See ART, page A9

‘This Chair Rocks’ encourages ‘olders’ to embrace their years

Entertainment n The Place Motel Bar & Grill will will have Karaoke starting at 9 p.m. on Saturday March 23. n Acapulco, 43543 Sterling Highway in Soldotna, has live music at 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. n A bluegrass jam takes place on the first Sunday of the month at from 1-4 p.m. at the Mount Redoubt Baptist Church on South Lovers Loop in Nikiski. n The Flats Bistro in Kenai presents live dinner music every Thursday thru Saturday from 6:30 8:30pm, featuring Garrett Mayer on Thursdays, Mike Morgan on Fridays, and Derek Poppin on Saturdays. The Flats Bistro also presents after-dinner music on alternate Fridays and Saturdays from 9:00 - 11:00 pm. On Friday, March 15th and 29th, from 9:00 to 11:00 pm, “Open Mike” Morgan hosts “Friday Night Live” with special guests Matt Boyle, Mark Hutton, Lee Johnson and many more. On Saturday, March 23rd, The Caper (Ryan, Wade and Ryan) headline “Later on Saturday” from 9:00 to 11:00 pm.Watch this space for more music at The Flats. For reservations call The Flats Bistro at 907 335-1010.

nian women that Pidgorna recorded in a casual kitchen space in the northern part of the country in 2012. Pidgorna had the opportunity to travel there when she received a Canada Council Grant to research Ukrainian folk vocal performance. Later, she talked about the absence of men and some of the ways gender influences repertoire:

c.2019, Celadon Books

The Bookwork Sez There’s another candle on your birthday cake. Whatever. Your back hurts, your knees hurt, and it was

hard getting up this morning, then you lost your glasses and spent 10 minutes looking for them. One stupid candle won’t make you feel enlightened but in “This Chair Rocks” by Ashton Applewhite,

you’ll see how to grow older without aging. Ashton Applewhite hates the way we talk about people over 50. Specifically, she hates “the elderly” and “seniors,” as well as “elders”

because those terms have generally bad connotations. Instead, she suggests we change our language to “olders,” because the word “emphasizes that age is a continuum.” Aging, you see, is what she knows — not just because she’s sixty-something, but because she writes about the subject. She knows there are lots of myths about aging, and that the truth is better than we think. A mere 3 percent of Americans over age 65 live in nursing homes, for one, and most of them “can think just fine,” which means they don’t have any problems with dementia. Most olders, in fact, remain active, independent, and enjoy fashion, dating, sex and travel. To think differently is indulging in ageism. Once you know how to spot ageism, Applewhite See BOOK, page A9

‘Triple Frontier’ — a solid action flick worthy of the big screen R eeling It In C hris J enness

This month marks another major release from Netflix, which is going relatively unnoticed. Not to say that this movie, Ben Affleck’s latest action thriller, “Triple Frontier,” is a landmark of cinema or anything, but it is the kind of solid, Rrated actioner that would have been a box-office success and a nice balance to the kids movies and superhero flicks dominating the relatively few screens we have access to here on the peninsula. I go back and forth on Netflix. I’m glad they are producing quality content and it certainly is convenient, but there’s definitely a cost to the moviegoing experience. I would have liked to see “Triple Frontier” on the big screen. It would

have made the experience much more impressive and affecting. As it is, the movie is good, but confined to the small screen, I’m afraid it’s destined to be forgotten. Oscar Isaac is Santiago ‘Pope’ Garcia, an ex-soldier and current military contractor working with the Bolivian government to try and catch one of the most vicious cartel leaders in the country. When a key piece of information — the location of the criminal’s hideout and, more importantly, his stash of vast wealth, is revealed, Pope heads to the states to recruit a group of his old colleagues to go in and get the man and the money. Affleck plays reluctant strategist Redfly Davis, while the rest of the team is filled out by Charlie Hunnam as Bill Miller, Garrett Hedlund as Bill’s brother and MMA fighter, Ben, and Pedro Pascal as See REEL, page A9

(Netflix)


Peninsula Clarion | Thursday, March 21, 2019 | A9

. . . Events

n Veronica’s in Old Town Kenai has Open Mic from 6-8 p.m. Continued from page A8 Friday. Call Veronica’s at 283-2725. n The Alaska Roadhouse Bar and Grill hosts open horseshoe tournaments Thursday nights at the bar on Golddust Drive. For more information, call 262-9887. n An all acoustic jam takes place every Thursday. The jam takes place at Christ Lutheran Church in Soldotna on the first Thursday of the month, and at the Kenai Senior Center during the rest of the month. Jam starts at 6:30 p.m. n AmVets Post 4 has reopened in its brand new building on Kalifornsky Beach across from Jumpin’ Junction. Eligible veterans and their families are invited to stop by to find out more about AmVets and their involvement in the Veteran community. For members and invited guests, Friday night dance to “Running with Scissors,” and Saturday Burn your own steak and karaoke with Cowboy Don. n Odie’s Deli in Soldotna has live music Friday from 6-8 p.m. and Pub Quiz night every Wednesday from 6-8 p.m. n The Bow bar in Kenai has karaoke at 9 p.m. Thursdays. n Vagabond Inn has live music Saturday starting @ 9pm

. . . Book

says, you can combat it. Forgetting that olders are still consumContinued from page A8 ers is ageism. Howling that near-retirement-age employees take jobs from younger workers is ridiculous — and ageism. Getting shamed for needing a wheelchair is ageism. Being scolded for wearing something you love but that someone has decided is “too young for you”… ageism. Absolutely. Furthermore, says Applewhite, your brain is probably fine; cognition declines to a certain extent in older years, but aging enhances thought processes and besides, younger people forget things, too. You can keep your brain sharp by working your body. Remember that “aging is not a disease,” and you shouldn’t be ashamed of it because “Sixty isn’t the new forty, but it is a new sixty.” Oh, and those aches…? You shovel, you garden, you walk, you dance. Maybe the aches came from living. Your next birthday is arriving soon, and you’re not sure whether to dread it, admit to it, or lie about it. You’re not sure what to think, but after reading “This Chair Rocks,” you’ll know exactly. Author Ashton Applewhite is, as you can imagine, a proponent of embracing your years, an action that she shows is beneficial in many ways for both quality of life and longevity. Those are happy words for the person who seizes their existence and wrings every ounce from it. They’re a shoutout to anyone who uses a hearing aid or wheelchair without embarrassment, and a comfort to those who struggle to ignore the “shouldas” that other people fling. They’re advising words of the MYOB sort: enjoy your years because whose business is it what you do? That’s counsel that could turn your thinking around, or it could make a great 50th birthday gift to someone with dread on their mind. “This Chair Rocks” proves that getting older is icing on the cake.

. . . Reel

pilot Francisco “Catfish” Morales. Originally, the plan is for the Continued from page A8 Americans to assist the Bolivian army in seizing the funds for a fee. But, as happens in cases like this, greed begins to take over. The payout that each man has the potential to receive is substantial but, as Pope reasons, why let the Army take the majority of the money. He has no faith they won’t be corrupted by it, so why not take it all and use it for good? You know what they say about the road to hell? This film embodies that aphorism perfectly. When our heroes get to the climax of the first part of their mission, they discover that the $75 million they were expecting was a serious underestimate. The house contains untold cash — hundreds of millions, lining the interior of each wall of the mansion. The first crack in the plan happens when the men decide to take extra time in order to grab as much of the cash as they can. They pile $250 million into duffels and race to their awaiting transport helicopter, having to shoot their way out, creating havoc that was never intended. Then the chopper they’ve bought cannot handle the weight of the extra money, causing a crash in the Andes. One thing after another goes wrong and the one by one the good intentions are washed away in blood and fire. These are good men, but even good men struggle to retain their humanity when faced with circumstances such as these. There’s a lot going on here underneath the typical shoot-‘em-up structure that director J.C. Chandor employs. Not only do we deal with the corrupting influence of the money, but overlaid is the desperation and ennui felt by these soldiers who are no longer in the position they were so highly trained for. This is a standard theme in films about warriors during peacetime. See “First Blood” for a good example of the same kind of internal conflict. “Triple Frontier” also owes a debt to both Sam Raimi’s underrated “A Simple Plan” which sees Billy Bob Thornton and Bill Paxton unravel under similar financial pressure, and David O. Russell’s Iraq War heist film, “Three Kings.” Both of these films are darker and more interesting that “Triple” ends up being, but they all are cut from the same cloth. The acting and writing are both fine in the film, without any particular gaps, though without anything particularly distinguishing, either. The cinematography is excellent, however, and Chandor has proved that he knows how to shoot action. The film is kind of a slow burn, in some ways. As the trouble for our heroes just keeps ratcheting up, their task becoming more and more impossible as they approach the finale. “Triple Frontier” is, in some ways, the perfect kind of movie to come out on TV, despite the fact that I wanted to see it in theaters. There’s enough going on that you don’t feel like you’re completely wasting your time, but enough action and competent filmmaking to make it imminently rewatchable. Grade: B “Triple Frontier” is rated R for language and violence throughout.

Disney closes $71B deal for Fox entertainment assets

Cars enter and leave Fox Studios, Tuesday, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello) By MAE ANDERSON AP Technology Writer

Disney has closed its $71 billion acquisition of Fox’s entertainment business, putting “Cinderella,” ”The Simpsons,” ”Star Wars” and “Dr. Strange” under one corporate roof. The deal is likely to shake up the media landscape. Among other things, it paves the way for Disney to launch its streaming service, Disney Plus, due out later this year. It will also likely lead to layoffs in the thousands, thanks to duplication in Fox and Disney film-production staff. By buying the studios behind “The Simpsons” and X-Men, Disney aims to bet-

ter compete with technology companies such as Amazon and Netflix for viewers’ attention - and dollars. Disney needs compelling TV shows and movies to persuade viewers to sign up and pay for yet another streaming service. It already has classic Disney cartoons, “Star Wars,” Pixar, the Muppets and some of the Marvel characters. With Fox, Disney could add Marvel’s X-Men and Deadpool, along with programs shown on such Fox channels as FX Networks and National Geographic. Fox’s productions also include “The Americans,” ”This Is Us” and “Modern Family.” The deal helps Disney further control TV shows

and movies from start to finish - from creating the programs to distributing them though television channels, movie theaters, streaming services and other ways people watch entertainment. Disney would get valuable data on customers and their entertainment-viewing habits, which it can then use to sell advertising. Disney CEO Bob Iger said in an earnings call in February that Disney Plus and other direct-to-consumer businesses are Disney’s “No. 1 priority.” Cable and telecom companies have been buying the companies that make TV shows and movies to compete in a changing media landscape. Although internet providers like AT&T and Comcast directly control their customers’ access to the internet in a way that Amazon, YouTube and Netflix do not, they still face threats as those streaming services gain in popularity. AT&T bought Time Warner last year for $81 billion and has already launched its own streaming service, Watch TV, with Time Warner channels such as TBS and TNT, among other networks, for $15 a month.

In addition to boosting the Disney streaming service, expected to debut next year, the deal paves the way for Marvel’s X-Men and the Avengers to reunite in future movies. Though Disney owns Marvel Studios, some characters including the X-Men had already been licensed to Fox. Disney also gets a controlling stake in the existing streaming service Hulu, which it plans to keep operating as a home for more general programming. Family-friendly shows and movies will head to Disney Plus. No pricing has been disclosed for Disney Plus. The streaming service will feature five categories of material: Disney, Pixar, Marvel, Star Wars and National Geographic. Disney charges $5 a month for ESPN Plus, a service that offers programming distinct from the ESPN cable channel. Meanwhile, Fox Corp. — the parts of 21st Century Fox that are not part of the deal, including Fox News, Fox Sports and Fox Broadcasting — started trading on the Nasdaq under the “FOX” and “FOXA” tickers on Tuesday.

Lori Loughlin loses starring roles on Hallmark Channel By LYNN ELBER AP Television Writer

LOS ANGELES — The Hallmark Channel cut ties Thursday with favored star Lori Loughlin, a day after her arrest in a college admissions scam put the family-friendly network and extended Hallmark brand in uncomfortable proximity to a national scandal. “We are saddened by the recent allegations surrounding the college admissions process,” Hallmark Cards Inc., parent company of the Crown Media Family Networks group that includes the Hallmark Channel, said in a statement. “We are no longer working with Lori Loughlin” and have stopped devel-

. . . Art Continued from page A8

sometimes separated and sometimes mutual. Dimensions vary. Born in the Ukraine, Pidgorna grew up in Canada. She completed undergraduate studies at Mount Allison University in Sackville, New Brunswick, in the field of music and followed with a master’s degree, also in music, at the University of Calgary. In a second presentation example, she explained her contribution to an opera entitled “Wild Dogs,” based on a novel of the same name by Canadian author Helen Humphreys. Pidgorna described a bit of the story behind the project that involves a young girl, Lily, suffering from brain damage from a burning home. Lily traveled into the woods in search of her lost dog, lost herself and received nourishment from a feral dog pack who adopted and sheltered her. When composing the score for this piece, Pidgorna explored vocal and instrumental sounds she could use to imitate a natural soundscape of the forest. In her presentation, she included videos of herself imitating howls, barks and whines of a canine pack, and a communal chorus of frogs. Her explanation suggests how words can be inherently elusive or difficult to find an accurate recreation of natural sound. Interpretation and expression sometimes need elements beyond the boundaries of human language. Another project shared was a piece called “Through Closed Doors.” Working

opment of all productions with the actress for Crown Media channels, the statement said. The company initially took a wait-and-see approach after a federal investigation of the scam involving more than 30 parents, many of them prominent, was revealed Tuesday. Loughlin and her husband, fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli, are accused of paying bribes to gain their daughters’ college admissions. Loughlin’s career and the Hallmark Channel were deeply intertwined. She’s been among its socalled “Christmas queens” who topline a slate of popular holiday movies, and also starred in the ongoing “Garage Sale Mysteries” movies and the series with family on the renovation of a heritage home and restoring wood work, Anna found inspiration in a violently damaged door. Her composition was fully instrumental and its eventual established intention was structured to capture the storyline of passionate communication between two individuals through the door. Arrangement of music on the door is designed so that musicians performing the piece must physically move around the door to act out dramatic dimensions of the piece. Though this large and heavy musical score of the door is difficult to coordinate shipping, it will make its way to Homer to be featured at the Wild Shore Festival in September 2019. Another piece shared was a re-creation of the original Grimm fairytale of “Snow White.” For this piece, Pidgorna worked carefully with linoleum cuts and hand-made elements of yarn, watercolor and crafted paper. “I was very particular about the texture, feel and color of the visual elements for this in order to capture the violence and gore of this dark fairy tale,” she said. The visual pieces explore the mother and daughter relationship of the story features: a poisoned comb, a lace corset and an apple. In a later interview, Pidgorna explained how this field of work provides her the opportunity to observe places she would not otherwise attend and or focus on directly. She explained a visit she made to the community of Russell, Kansas, to participate in the Ad Astra Festival.

“When Calls the Heart.” “It’s a feel-good, family values-type channel, and obviously scandal is the opposite of that,” said Atlanta-based market strategist Laura Ries. There was more at stake than image. “When Calls the Heart” tapes in Canada, and a judge ordered Loughlin’s passport to be surrendered in December after grudgingly allowing her to cross the border for work until then. Loughlin has not yet entered a plea in the case, and her attorney declined comment Wednesday after her first appearance in a Los Angeles federal court. Loughlin’s publicist and attorney declined comment Thursday on Hallmark’s decision to drop her.

Fallout from the arrests also affected their daughter, Olivia Jade Giannulli, a social-media star who pushes products on her accounts. The 19-year-old University of Southern California student was dropped Thursday from advertising deals with cosmetics retailer Sephora and hair products company TRESemme, the companies said in statements. Loughlin wasn’t exclusive to Hallmark. She’s reprised her role as Aunt Becky for Netflix’s “Fuller House” reboot of the popular series that originated in 1987 on ABC. But the sitcom represents a fraction of the streamer’s flood of programs, while Loughlin has occupied an increasing amount of Hallmark real estate since she starred in “Meet My Mom” in 2010.

Artist and composer Anna Pidgorna (Photo provided)

“It is always very fulfilling to meet locals, visit homes, share their generosity in creating and supporting festivals,” Pidgorna said. “Kansas provided an opportunity to visit a place I probably would never go, otherwise. It was very beautiful in its own way with the rolling hills and grasslands.”. Another example was a recent visit to Rockport, Massachusetts, “a small fishing town,” she explained. “It was an adorable community with a beautiful concert hall facing the Atlantic Ocean,” she said. Next, she is waiting to hear about a work opportunity that would include a

visit to Ireland. On a walk through the crusty snow around Homer’s Hornaday Park Campground, she said, “Doing things like this, being outside, is one of the things I love about my job. I’m really just looking to absorb the elements of being here and investigating Alaska interpretations of landscape experience, through poetry, legends or other formats.” For an audible example of her work, Pidgorna has many compositions that can be found via her online website: http://www. annapidgorna.com/. Emilie Springer is a freelance writer living in Homer.


Peninsula Clarion | Thursday, March 21, 2019 | A9

. . . Events

n Veronica’s in Old Town Kenai has Open Mic from 6-8 p.m. Continued from page A8 Friday. Call Veronica’s at 283-2725. n The Alaska Roadhouse Bar and Grill hosts open horseshoe tournaments Thursday nights at the bar on Golddust Drive. For more information, call 262-9887. n An all acoustic jam takes place every Thursday. The jam takes place at Christ Lutheran Church in Soldotna on the first Thursday of the month, and at the Kenai Senior Center during the rest of the month. Jam starts at 6:30 p.m. n AmVets Post 4 has reopened in its brand new building on Kalifornsky Beach across from Jumpin’ Junction. Eligible veterans and their families are invited to stop by to find out more about AmVets and their involvement in the Veteran community. For members and invited guests, Friday night dance to “Running with Scissors,” and Saturday Burn your own steak and karaoke with Cowboy Don. n Odie’s Deli in Soldotna has live music Friday from 6-8 p.m. and Pub Quiz night every Wednesday from 6-8 p.m. n The Bow bar in Kenai has karaoke at 9 p.m. Thursdays. n Vagabond Inn has live music Saturday starting @ 9pm

. . . Book

says, you can combat it. Forgetting that olders are still consumContinued from page A8 ers is ageism. Howling that near-retirement-age employees take jobs from younger workers is ridiculous — and ageism. Getting shamed for needing a wheelchair is ageism. Being scolded for wearing something you love but that someone has decided is “too young for you”… ageism. Absolutely. Furthermore, says Applewhite, your brain is probably fine; cognition declines to a certain extent in older years, but aging enhances thought processes and besides, younger people forget things, too. You can keep your brain sharp by working your body. Remember that “aging is not a disease,” and you shouldn’t be ashamed of it because “Sixty isn’t the new forty, but it is a new sixty.” Oh, and those aches…? You shovel, you garden, you walk, you dance. Maybe the aches came from living. Your next birthday is arriving soon, and you’re not sure whether to dread it, admit to it, or lie about it. You’re not sure what to think, but after reading “This Chair Rocks,” you’ll know exactly. Author Ashton Applewhite is, as you can imagine, a proponent of embracing your years, an action that she shows is beneficial in many ways for both quality of life and longevity. Those are happy words for the person who seizes their existence and wrings every ounce from it. They’re a shoutout to anyone who uses a hearing aid or wheelchair without embarrassment, and a comfort to those who struggle to ignore the “shouldas” that other people fling. They’re advising words of the MYOB sort: enjoy your years because whose business is it what you do? That’s counsel that could turn your thinking around, or it could make a great 50th birthday gift to someone with dread on their mind. “This Chair Rocks” proves that getting older is icing on the cake.

. . . Reel

pilot Francisco “Catfish” Morales. Originally, the plan is for the Continued from page A8 Americans to assist the Bolivian army in seizing the funds for a fee. But, as happens in cases like this, greed begins to take over. The payout that each man has the potential to receive is substantial but, as Pope reasons, why let the Army take the majority of the money. He has no faith they won’t be corrupted by it, so why not take it all and use it for good? You know what they say about the road to hell? This film embodies that aphorism perfectly. When our heroes get to the climax of the first part of their mission, they discover that the $75 million they were expecting was a serious underestimate. The house contains untold cash — hundreds of millions, lining the interior of each wall of the mansion. The first crack in the plan happens when the men decide to take extra time in order to grab as much of the cash as they can. They pile $250 million into duffels and race to their awaiting transport helicopter, having to shoot their way out, creating havoc that was never intended. Then the chopper they’ve bought cannot handle the weight of the extra money, causing a crash in the Andes. One thing after another goes wrong and the one by one the good intentions are washed away in blood and fire. These are good men, but even good men struggle to retain their humanity when faced with circumstances such as these. There’s a lot going on here underneath the typical shoot-‘em-up structure that director J.C. Chandor employs. Not only do we deal with the corrupting influence of the money, but overlaid is the desperation and ennui felt by these soldiers who are no longer in the position they were so highly trained for. This is a standard theme in films about warriors during peacetime. See “First Blood” for a good example of the same kind of internal conflict. “Triple Frontier” also owes a debt to both Sam Raimi’s underrated “A Simple Plan” which sees Billy Bob Thornton and Bill Paxton unravel under similar financial pressure, and David O. Russell’s Iraq War heist film, “Three Kings.” Both of these films are darker and more interesting that “Triple” ends up being, but they all are cut from the same cloth. The acting and writing are both fine in the film, without any particular gaps, though without anything particularly distinguishing, either. The cinematography is excellent, however, and Chandor has proved that he knows how to shoot action. The film is kind of a slow burn, in some ways. As the trouble for our heroes just keeps ratcheting up, their task becoming more and more impossible as they approach the finale. “Triple Frontier” is, in some ways, the perfect kind of movie to come out on TV, despite the fact that I wanted to see it in theaters. There’s enough going on that you don’t feel like you’re completely wasting your time, but enough action and competent filmmaking to make it imminently rewatchable. Grade: B “Triple Frontier” is rated R for language and violence throughout.

Disney closes $71B deal for Fox entertainment assets

Cars enter and leave Fox Studios, Tuesday, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello) By MAE ANDERSON AP Technology Writer

Disney has closed its $71 billion acquisition of Fox’s entertainment business, putting “Cinderella,” ”The Simpsons,” ”Star Wars” and “Dr. Strange” under one corporate roof. The deal is likely to shake up the media landscape. Among other things, it paves the way for Disney to launch its streaming service, Disney Plus, due out later this year. It will also likely lead to layoffs in the thousands, thanks to duplication in Fox and Disney film-production staff. By buying the studios behind “The Simpsons” and X-Men, Disney aims to bet-

ter compete with technology companies such as Amazon and Netflix for viewers’ attention - and dollars. Disney needs compelling TV shows and movies to persuade viewers to sign up and pay for yet another streaming service. It already has classic Disney cartoons, “Star Wars,” Pixar, the Muppets and some of the Marvel characters. With Fox, Disney could add Marvel’s X-Men and Deadpool, along with programs shown on such Fox channels as FX Networks and National Geographic. Fox’s productions also include “The Americans,” ”This Is Us” and “Modern Family.” The deal helps Disney further control TV shows

and movies from start to finish - from creating the programs to distributing them though television channels, movie theaters, streaming services and other ways people watch entertainment. Disney would get valuable data on customers and their entertainment-viewing habits, which it can then use to sell advertising. Disney CEO Bob Iger said in an earnings call in February that Disney Plus and other direct-to-consumer businesses are Disney’s “No. 1 priority.” Cable and telecom companies have been buying the companies that make TV shows and movies to compete in a changing media landscape. Although internet providers like AT&T and Comcast directly control their customers’ access to the internet in a way that Amazon, YouTube and Netflix do not, they still face threats as those streaming services gain in popularity. AT&T bought Time Warner last year for $81 billion and has already launched its own streaming service, Watch TV, with Time Warner channels such as TBS and TNT, among other networks, for $15 a month.

In addition to boosting the Disney streaming service, expected to debut next year, the deal paves the way for Marvel’s X-Men and the Avengers to reunite in future movies. Though Disney owns Marvel Studios, some characters including the X-Men had already been licensed to Fox. Disney also gets a controlling stake in the existing streaming service Hulu, which it plans to keep operating as a home for more general programming. Family-friendly shows and movies will head to Disney Plus. No pricing has been disclosed for Disney Plus. The streaming service will feature five categories of material: Disney, Pixar, Marvel, Star Wars and National Geographic. Disney charges $5 a month for ESPN Plus, a service that offers programming distinct from the ESPN cable channel. Meanwhile, Fox Corp. — the parts of 21st Century Fox that are not part of the deal, including Fox News, Fox Sports and Fox Broadcasting — started trading on the Nasdaq under the “FOX” and “FOXA” tickers on Tuesday.

Lori Loughlin loses starring roles on Hallmark Channel By LYNN ELBER AP Television Writer

LOS ANGELES — The Hallmark Channel cut ties Thursday with favored star Lori Loughlin, a day after her arrest in a college admissions scam put the family-friendly network and extended Hallmark brand in uncomfortable proximity to a national scandal. “We are saddened by the recent allegations surrounding the college admissions process,” Hallmark Cards Inc., parent company of the Crown Media Family Networks group that includes the Hallmark Channel, said in a statement. “We are no longer working with Lori Loughlin” and have stopped devel-

. . . Art Continued from page A8

sometimes separated and sometimes mutual. Dimensions vary. Born in the Ukraine, Pidgorna grew up in Canada. She completed undergraduate studies at Mount Allison University in Sackville, New Brunswick, in the field of music and followed with a master’s degree, also in music, at the University of Calgary. In a second presentation example, she explained her contribution to an opera entitled “Wild Dogs,” based on a novel of the same name by Canadian author Helen Humphreys. Pidgorna described a bit of the story behind the project that involves a young girl, Lily, suffering from brain damage from a burning home. Lily traveled into the woods in search of her lost dog, lost herself and received nourishment from a feral dog pack who adopted and sheltered her. When composing the score for this piece, Pidgorna explored vocal and instrumental sounds she could use to imitate a natural soundscape of the forest. In her presentation, she included videos of herself imitating howls, barks and whines of a canine pack, and a communal chorus of frogs. Her explanation suggests how words can be inherently elusive or difficult to find an accurate recreation of natural sound. Interpretation and expression sometimes need elements beyond the boundaries of human language. Another project shared was a piece called “Through Closed Doors.” Working

opment of all productions with the actress for Crown Media channels, the statement said. The company initially took a wait-and-see approach after a federal investigation of the scam involving more than 30 parents, many of them prominent, was revealed Tuesday. Loughlin and her husband, fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli, are accused of paying bribes to gain their daughters’ college admissions. Loughlin’s career and the Hallmark Channel were deeply intertwined. She’s been among its socalled “Christmas queens” who topline a slate of popular holiday movies, and also starred in the ongoing “Garage Sale Mysteries” movies and the series with family on the renovation of a heritage home and restoring wood work, Anna found inspiration in a violently damaged door. Her composition was fully instrumental and its eventual established intention was structured to capture the storyline of passionate communication between two individuals through the door. Arrangement of music on the door is designed so that musicians performing the piece must physically move around the door to act out dramatic dimensions of the piece. Though this large and heavy musical score of the door is difficult to coordinate shipping, it will make its way to Homer to be featured at the Wild Shore Festival in September 2019. Another piece shared was a re-creation of the original Grimm fairytale of “Snow White.” For this piece, Pidgorna worked carefully with linoleum cuts and hand-made elements of yarn, watercolor and crafted paper. “I was very particular about the texture, feel and color of the visual elements for this in order to capture the violence and gore of this dark fairy tale,” she said. The visual pieces explore the mother and daughter relationship of the story features: a poisoned comb, a lace corset and an apple. In a later interview, Pidgorna explained how this field of work provides her the opportunity to observe places she would not otherwise attend and or focus on directly. She explained a visit she made to the community of Russell, Kansas, to participate in the Ad Astra Festival.

“When Calls the Heart.” “It’s a feel-good, family values-type channel, and obviously scandal is the opposite of that,” said Atlanta-based market strategist Laura Ries. There was more at stake than image. “When Calls the Heart” tapes in Canada, and a judge ordered Loughlin’s passport to be surrendered in December after grudgingly allowing her to cross the border for work until then. Loughlin has not yet entered a plea in the case, and her attorney declined comment Wednesday after her first appearance in a Los Angeles federal court. Loughlin’s publicist and attorney declined comment Thursday on Hallmark’s decision to drop her.

Fallout from the arrests also affected their daughter, Olivia Jade Giannulli, a social-media star who pushes products on her accounts. The 19-year-old University of Southern California student was dropped Thursday from advertising deals with cosmetics retailer Sephora and hair products company TRESemme, the companies said in statements. Loughlin wasn’t exclusive to Hallmark. She’s reprised her role as Aunt Becky for Netflix’s “Fuller House” reboot of the popular series that originated in 1987 on ABC. But the sitcom represents a fraction of the streamer’s flood of programs, while Loughlin has occupied an increasing amount of Hallmark real estate since she starred in “Meet My Mom” in 2010.

Artist and composer Anna Pidgorna (Photo provided)

“It is always very fulfilling to meet locals, visit homes, share their generosity in creating and supporting festivals,” Pidgorna said. “Kansas provided an opportunity to visit a place I probably would never go, otherwise. It was very beautiful in its own way with the rolling hills and grasslands.”. Another example was a recent visit to Rockport, Massachusetts, “a small fishing town,” she explained. “It was an adorable community with a beautiful concert hall facing the Atlantic Ocean,” she said. Next, she is waiting to hear about a work opportunity that would include a

visit to Ireland. On a walk through the crusty snow around Homer’s Hornaday Park Campground, she said, “Doing things like this, being outside, is one of the things I love about my job. I’m really just looking to absorb the elements of being here and investigating Alaska interpretations of landscape experience, through poetry, legends or other formats.” For an audible example of her work, Pidgorna has many compositions that can be found via her online website: http://www. annapidgorna.com/. Emilie Springer is a freelance writer living in Homer.


A10 | Thursday, March 21, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

Contact us; www.peninsulaclarion.com, classified@peninsulaclarion.com • To place an ad call 907-283-7551 EMPLOYMENT CITY OF SOLDOTNA EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Provisional Operator Operator I Operator II The City of Soldotna has an immediate opening for an Operator in the Utility Department. Provisional Operator- Range 13 $25.70-$33.23, or Operator I- Range 14 $27.22-$35.20, or Operator II- Range 15 $29.32-$37.93, DOE. Preference may be given to candidates with a valid class B Alaska Commercial Driver’s License. A complete job description is available on the City’s website at www.soldotna.org/jobs. Must submit City application, resume and cover letter to Human Resources at 177 N. Birch Street, Soldotna, by email lmetcalf@soldotna.org, or fax 866-596-2994. The position will be open until filled with a first review date of April 3, 2019. The City of Soldotna is an EEO employer.

BEAUTY / SPA LEGALS NOTICE TO PUBLIC OF A FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT ON THE ENVIRONMENT Alaska Housing Finance Corporation (“Corporation”) on behalf of the State of Alaska 4300 Boniface Parkway, PO Box 101020, Anchorage, Alaska, 99510-1020. In Anchorage telephone is 338-6100, outside of Anchorage telephone is (800)478-2432 Bryan D. Butcher, Executive Director/CEO TO ALL INTERESTED AGENCIES, GROUPS AND PERSONS The above-named Corporation on behalf of the State of Alaska proposes to request the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to release Federal funds under the Home Investment Partnerships Program for the following project: East End Cottages (Project Title or Name)

SHE MAY NOT LIVE TO SEE HER CHILD GROW UP She is running out of breath and running out of time… Thousands of young women are living with a deadly lung disease called LAM — and don’t know they have it. LAM is often misdiagnosed as asthma or chronic bronchitis. There is no known cure. But there is hope. Learn more about LAM.

thelamfoundation.org

New Construction of Low-Income Rental Housing (Nature of Project)

Savadi. Traditional Thai Massage by Bun 139A Warehouse Dr, Soldotna 907-406-1968

Kachemak City, Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska (Location-City, Borough / Census Area, State of Project)

COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL SPACE FOR RENT WAREHOUSE / STORAGE 2000 sq. ft., man door 14ft roll-up, bathroom, K-Beach area 3-Phase Power $1300.00/mo. 1st mo. rent + deposit, gas paid 907-252-3301

$6,077,094 (Estimated Cost of Project) It has been determined that such requests for release of funds will not constitute an action significantly effecting the quality of the human environment and, accordingly, the above-named Corporation on behalf of the State of Alaska has decided not to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. An Environmental Review Record pertaining to this project has been made by the above-named Corporation on behalf of the State of Alaska which documents the environmental review of the project and more fully sets forth the reasons why such statement is not required. This Environmental Review Record is on file at the above address and is available for public examination and copying, upon request, in Room 480 (the Planning Department) between the hours of 8:30am and 4:30pm on regular business days. No further environmental review of such project is proposed to be conducted, prior to the request for release of funds. All interested agencies, groups and persons disagreeing with this Finding of No Significant Impact decision are invited to submit written comments for consideration by the Corporation on behalf of the State of Alaska to the Planning Department. All such written comments so received at AHFC, PO box 101020, Anchorage, AK 99510-1020 on or before April 5, 2019 will be considered and the Corporation on behalf of the State of Alaska will not request the release of Federal funds or take any administrative action pertaining to this project prior to the date specified in the preceding sentence. NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST RELEASE OF FUNDS - TO ALL INTERESTED AGENCIES, GROUPS AND PERSONS On or about April 8, 2019 the Corporation on behalf of the State of Alaska will request the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to release Federal funds for the project described above. The Corporation on behalf of the State of Alaska is certifying to HUD that the Corporation and the chief executive officer, in his/her official capacity as Executive Director/CEO, consent to accept the jurisdiction of the Federal courts if all action is brought to enforce responsibilities in relation to environmental reviews, decision making, and action; and that these responsibilities have been satisfied. The legal effect of the certification is that upon its approval, the Corporation, on behalf of the State of Alaska may use the HOME Investment Partnership funds, and HUD will have satisfied its responsibilities under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and related laws and authorities. HUD will accept an objection to its approval of the release of funds and acceptance of the certification only if it is on one of the following bases: (a) That the certification was not in fact executed by the chief executive officer or other officer of the responsible entity approved by HUD, or (b) that the responsible entity’s Environmental Review Record for the project indicates omission of a required decision, finding or step applicable to the project in the environmental review process. Objections to the Release of Funds must be prepared and submitted in accordance with the required procedure (24 CFR Part 58) and may be addressed to HUD at 3000 C Street, Suite 401, Anchorage, AK 99503. Objections on bases other than those stated above will not be considered by HUD. All objections must be received by HUD within 15 days from the time HUD receives the Responsible Entity’s request for release of funds and certification, or within the time period specified, whatever is later. Pub: March 21, 2019

849341

Glaciers appear blue because the ice aborbs all of the colors of the spectrum except for blue which is reflected.

Manufactured Homes/Lots For Rent LEGALS

EMPLOYMENT

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF ALASKA THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT AT KENAI In the Matter of the Estate of MILDRED JEAN KOSKI, Deceased. Case No. 3KN-19-00060 PR NOTICE TO CREDITOR NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned Personal Representative of the estate, at DOLIFKA & ASSOCIATES, P.C., ATTORNEYS AT LAW, P.O. Box 498, Soldotna, Alaska, 99669. DATED this 12th day of March, 2019. PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE /s/ GARY JOE KOSKI Pub:Mar 14,21 & 28, 2019 848401 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF ALASKA THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT AT KENAI In the Matter of the Estate of ROBERT LOUIS SCOTT, Deceased. Case No. 3KN-19-00059 PR NOTICE TO CREDITOR NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned Personal Representative of the estate, at DOLIFKA & ASSOCIATES, P.C., ATTORNEYS AT LAW, P.O. Box 498, Soldotna, Alaska, 99669. DATED this 12th day of March, 2019. PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE /s/AUDREY JOHNSON Pub:Mar 14,21 & 28, 2019 848400 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF ALASKA THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT AT KENAI In the Matter of the Estate of ARTHUR M. SPONSEL, Deceased. Case No. 3KN-19-00053 PR NOTICE TO CREDITOR NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned Personal Representative of the estate, at DOLIFKA & ASSOCIATES, P.C., ATTORNEYS AT LAW, P.O. Box 498, Soldotna, Alaska, 99669. DATED this 12th day of March, 2019. PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE /s/CHARLOTTE ELAINE SPONSEL Pub:Mar 14,21 & 28, 2019 848399

283-7551

Families welcome,Nikiski 2 Bed, family room utilities included 2 pets ok $925/mth Call Wenda 776-7655

Alaska Trivia

At 20,320 feet, Denali (Mt. McKinley) is the tallest peak on the North American continent.

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT

Now hiring the following full-time positions: - Assistant Branch Manager I or II - Universal Banker I (2 positions available) - Business Banker I, II, or III Apply online at Northrim.com

OFFICE SPACE RENTAL AVAILABLE 609 Marine Street Kenai, Alaska 404 and 394sq,ft, shared entry $1/sq.ft 240sq.ft.Shared conference/Restrooms $0.50/sq.ft 283-4672

283-7551

Northrim Bank is an Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer, which included protected veterans and individuals with disabilities.

EMPLOYMENT Alaska Steel Co. Office Assistance/ Inside Sales The position requires excellent customer service skills and a strong work ethic. Basic math and computer skills a plus. Must have current driver license Drug test mandatory Hourly DOE Plus benefits

EMPLOYMENT ** EXPERIENCED ROOFERS ** Rain Proof Roofing is seeking low-sloped roofers with at least 2 years of verifiable roofing experience. We pay top wages, offer health insurance, & 401K options. Safety must be first priority followed closely by quality, we maintain a drug-free work environment for our employees, potential employees must also participate in pre-employment as well as random drug testing. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer. Contact Misty @ (907) 344-5545 or send a resume via fax : (907) 349-3386 or email to: info@rainproofroofing.com Now Hiring! Service Associates. Service Associates are responsible for providing direct program services related to skill development, treatment, and care in home, school, and community based settings. Training provided, parttime/fulltime positions available. Flexible hours available.To apply, turn in a completed application with resume in person at 3948 Ben Walters Lane, Homer, AK 99835, email to hr@spbhs.org or fax to (907)235-2290. Applications can found at www.spbhs.org. The Pratt Museum is looking to fill positions for an Exhibit/Artifact Technician and a Visitor Services Coordinator. Detailed job descriptions and employment applications can be found on the Pratt Museum’s website or picked up at the back offices M - F, 10 AM to 4 PM. www.prattmuseum.org/join-the-team/

! ! D D L L O SSO Classifieds Sell!

www.peninsulaclarion.com

Alaska Trivia

Call 283-7551 today!

The onset of eye disease may not be as visible as the appearance of new wrinkles. An eye doctor can spot the early warning signs of vision problems like glaucoma and macular degeneration, as well as other serious health conditions such as diabetes and hypertension. Early detection is key. For men and women over 40, it might be wise to look into your eyes. For more information, visit checkyearly.com. A public service message from Vision Council of America and AARP.


Peninsula Clarion | Thursday, March 21, 2019 | A11

THURSDAY AFTERNOON/EVENING A B (3) ABC-13 13 (6) MNT-5 5 (8) CBS-11 11 (9) FOX-4 4 (10) NBC-2 2 (12) PBS-7 7

A = DISH

B = DirecTV

MARCH 21, 2019

4 PM 4:30 5 PM 5:30 6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30 Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud ABC World ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ News

Wheel of For- Grey’s Anatomy “Add It Up” tune (N) ‘G’ Maggie introduces mood rooms. (N) ‘14’ Chicago P.D. “Called in How I Met How I Met Last Man Last Man The Good Wife Alicia turns to Dead” Suspects hold Olinsky’s Your Mother Your Mother Standing ‘PG’ Standing ‘PG’ Colin Sweeney for help. ‘14’ wife hostage. ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ (3:00) 2019 NCAA Basketball Tournament 2019 NCAA Basketball Tournament First Round: Teams TBA. (N) (Live) First Round: Teams TBA. (N) Two and a Entertainment Funny You Funny You The Big Bang The Big Bang Gotham “I Am Bane” Barbara Should Ask Should Ask Theory ‘PG’ Theory ‘PG’ turns to Lee for help. (N) ‘14’ 4 Half Men ‘PG’ Tonight ‘PG’ ‘PG’ Judge Judy Judge Judy Channel 2 NBC Nightly Channel 2 Newshour (N) Superstore A.P. Bio (N) ‘PG’ News 5:00 News With “Blizzard” (N) ‘PG’ 2 ‘PG’ Report (N) Lester Holt ‘14’ NOVA “Wild Ways” Wildlife BBC World Nightly Busi- PBS NewsHour (N) Father Brown A body is News ‘G’ ness Report removed from the graveyard. 7 corridors. ‘PG’ ‘G’ ‘PG’

CABLE STATIONS

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’

(:01) Station 19 “Crazy Train” For the People Sandra works ABC News at (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live ‘14’ (:37) Nightline (N) People are stuck in a subway on a kidnapping case. (N) ‘PG’ 10 (N) train. (N) ‘14’ The Good Wife “Affairs of Dateline ‘PG’ DailyMailTV DailyMailTV Impractical Pawn Stars State” Alicia defends a Tai(N) (N) Jokers ‘14’ “Stalled Deals” ‘PG’ wanese national. ‘14’ To Be Announced KTVA Night- (:35) The Late Show With James Corcast Stephen Colbert ‘PG’ den The Orville The crew mem- Fox 4 News at 9 (N) TMZ (N) ‘PG’ TMZ ‘PG’ Entertainment Two and a bers open a time capsule. Tonight Half Men ‘14’ (N) ‘14’ Brooklyn Will & Grace Law & Order: Special Vic- Channel 2 (:34) The Tonight Show Star- (:37) Late Nine-Nine (N) ‘14’ tims Unit A defense attorney News: Late ring Jimmy Fallon (N) ‘14’ Night With (N) ‘14’ is raped. (N) ‘14’ Edition (N) Seth Meyers Death in Paradise “Erupting Doc Martin “Mysterious In Their Own Words Queen Amanpour and Company (N) in Murder” The team faces a Ways” Wedding plans con- Elizabeth II’s life. ‘PG’ difficult case. ‘PG’ tinue. ‘PG’

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Last Man Last Man Last Man (8) WGN-A 239 307 Standing Standing Standing Down Home with David (N) (Live) ‘G’ (20) QVC 137 317

Last Man Standing

Last Man Last Man Last Man Last Man Married ... Married ... Married ... Married ... How I Met How I Met Elementary ‘14’ Standing Standing Standing Standing With With With With Your Mother Your Mother G.I.L.I. with Jill Martin (N) Urban Decay Cosmetics (N) NuFACE Anti-Aging Innova- Too Faced Cosmetics (N) Calista - Hair Care & Tools Beauty We Love “NuFACE” (Live) ‘G’ (Live) ‘G’ tions (N) (Live) ‘G’ (Live) ‘G’ (N) (Live) ‘G’ (N) (Live) ‘G’ Grey’s Anatomy Derek takes Grey’s Anatomy “Disarm” Grey’s Anatomy “Start Me Bring It! The final competition Bring It! “Bring It Live! De- (:03) Little (:17) Bring It! A closer look at To Be An- (:01) Bring It! The final comUp” Arizona tries to reconcile of the season. (N) ‘PG’ tour” The Dancing Dolls hit the Women: At- the dance battles. (N) ‘PG’ nounced petition of the season. ‘PG’ (23) LIFE 108 252 Cristina on a fishing trip. ‘14’ Casualties from a school shooting. ‘14’ with Callie. ‘14’ road. (N) ‘PG’ lanta ‘14’ NCIS A 14-year-old stops a NCIS The hunt for the British “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix” (2007, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” (2009, Children’s) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint. (28) USA 105 242 home invasion. ‘14’ spy continues. ‘14’ Grint, Emma Watson. Harry prepares a group of students to fight Voldemort. New dangers lurk for Harry, Dumbledore and their friends. (3:15) 2019 NCAA Basketball Tournament (:45) 2019 NCAA Basketball Tournament First Round: Teams TBA. (N) (Live) Conan (N) ‘14’ Conan ‘14’ Brooklyn Brooklyn American American Family Guy Nine-Nine ‘14’ Nine-Nine ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ ‘14’ (30) TBS 139 247 First Round: Teams TBA. (N) (Live) 2019 NCAA Basketball Tour- (:15) 2019 NCAA Basketball Tournament First Round: Teams TBA. (N) The Last O.G. Animal Kingdom “Betrayal” Supernatural “You Can’t Supernatural “Family Mat- Supernatural “All Dogs Go to (31) TNT 138 245 nament (Live) ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Handle the Truth” ‘14’ ters” ‘14’ Heaven” ‘14’ (3:00) College Wrestling NCAA Tournament, Second Round. SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter With Scott Van Pelt (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (34) ESPN 140 206 (N) (Live) Soccer United States vs Ecuador. From Orlando City Stadium 2019 Madden Club Series NFL Live 2019 Special Olympics Basketball UFC Fight Now or Never UFC Reloaded (N) (35) ESPN2 144 209 in Orlando, Fla. (N) (Live) Championship (Taped) World Games: Abu Dhabi Flashback (N) Mariners All Mariners All Mariners All Mariners All Edgar Mar- Mariners All Undeniable With Joe Buck WCC AllThe Rich Eisen Show ‘PG’ The Dan Pat (36) ROOT 426 687 Access Access Access Access (N) tinez Access Access rick Show Mom ‘14’ Mom ‘14’ Mom ‘14’ Mom ‘14’ Mom ‘14’ Mom ‘14’ “Die Another Day” (2002, Action) Pierce Brosnan, Halle Berry, Toby Stephens. James Bond and an Ameri- “Casino Royale” (2006, Action) Daniel Craig, (38) PARMT 241 241 can spy track a North Korean villain. Eva Green, Mads Mikkelsen. (1:30) “The “Gran Torino” (2008, Drama) Clint Eastwood, Christopher Carley, Bee Vang. “Cast Away” (2000, Drama) Tom Hanks, Helen Hunt, Nick Searcy. A courier company ex- (:05) “Deep Impact” (1998) Robert Duvall, Tea Leoni. A large (43) AMC 131 254 Fugitive” comet is on a collision course with Earth. A veteran faces his longtime prejudices. ecutive is marooned on a remote island. Samurai Jack American American Bob’s Burg- Bob’s Burg- Family Guy Family Guy Rick and Robot Chick- Squidbillies The Boon- Bob’s Burg- Family Guy Family Guy Rick and Robot Chick (46) TOON 176 296 ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ Dad ‘14’ ers ‘14’ ers ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Morty ‘14’ en ‘14’ ‘14’ docks ‘MA’ ers ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ Morty ‘14’ en ‘14’ River Monsters “Alaskan River Monsters “Pack of River Monsters “Russian River Monsters “Lair of Giants” Exploring Guyana’s Esse- River Monsters “Terror in River Mon- River Mon- River Monsters “Lair of Gi (47) ANPL 184 282 Horror” ‘PG’ Teeth” ‘PG’ Killer” ‘PG’ quibo River. ‘PG’ Paradise” ‘PG’ sters sters ants” ‘PG’ Raven’s Raven’s Coop & Cami Coop & Cami Raven’s Raven’s Sydney to the Coop & Cami Raven’s Raven’s Sydney to the Coop & Cami Andi Mack ‘G’ Sydney to the Bizaardvark Bizaardvark (49) DISN 173 291 Home ‘G’ Home ‘G’ Home ‘G’ Home ‘G’ Max ‘G’ Home ‘G’ Home ‘G’ Max ‘G’ Max ‘G’ ‘G’ ‘G’ The Loud The Loud The Loud The Loud The Loud Henry Dan- SpongeBob SpongeBob “The Parent Trap” (1998, Children’s) Lindsay Lohan, Dennis Quaid, Natasha Richardson. (:10) Friends (:45) Friends (50) NICK 171 300 House ‘Y7’ House ‘Y7’ House ‘Y7’ House ‘Y7’ House ‘Y7’ ger ‘G’ Reunited twin girls try to get their parents back together. ‘PG’ ‘14’ (2:00) “Pitch “Pretty in Pink” (1986) Molly Ringwald. A poor eclectic teen “Sweet Home Alabama” (2002) Reese Witherspoon, Josh Lucas. A New Pretty Little Liars: The Per- The 700 Club “Zookeeper” (2011) Kevin (51) FREE 180 311 Perfect” is romanced by a wealthy classmate. York fashion designer has a secret in the South. fectionists James, Rosario Dawson. 90 Day Fiancé: Before the Say Yes to Say Yes to Say Yes to the Dress ‘PG’ My 600-Lb. Life “Supersized: Jeanne’s Story” Jeanne lives in Hoarding: Buried Alive ‘PG’ Hoarding: Buried Alive ‘PG’ My 600-Lb. Life ‘PG’ (55) TLC 183 280 90 Days ‘PG’ the Dress the Dress an unclean household. (N) ‘PG’ Building Off the Grid “Build- Building Off the Grid “Ozark Building Off the Grid “Bottle Building Off the Grid “Maine Building Off the Grid “Vol- Alaskan Bush People: Off Building Off the Grid “Yel- Building Off the Grid “Vol (56) DISC 182 278 ing Off the Grid” ‘G’ Paradise” ‘G’ Island” ‘G’ Straw Bale” ‘G’ cano Home” ‘G’ the Grid (N) ‘PG’ lowstone River” ‘G’ cano Home” ‘G’ The Dead Files ‘PG’ The Dead Files “Fractured: The Dead Files ‘PG’ The Dead Files ‘PG’ The Dead Files (N) ‘PG’ Kindred Spirits “The Villisca The Dead Files ‘PG’ The Dead Files ‘PG’ (57) TRAV 196 277 St. Louis” ‘PG’ Axe Murders” ‘PG’ Swamp People “Bruce’s Di- Swamp People “Cow Kill- Swamp People “Bringing the Swamp People “Cajun Cy- Swamp People “Raising the (:03) Truck Night in America (:05) Swamp People “Bring- (:03) Swamp People “Raising (58) HIST 120 269 lemma” ‘PG’ ers” ‘PG’ Heat” ‘PG’ clone” ‘PG’ Stakes” (N) ‘PG’ (N) ‘PG’ ing the Heat” ‘PG’ the Stakes” ‘PG’ The First 48 “Broken Home” The First 48 Stabbings in The First 48 A man is gunned The First 48 “Deadly Rap” The First 48 A woman is (:01) The First 48 A man is (:04) The First 48 A woman is (:03) The First 48 “Deadly Shootings in an Atlanta rap beaten and stabbed to death. killed in front of his fiancée. found strangled in her car. ‘14’ Rap” Shootings in an Atlanta (59) A&E 118 265 A young mother is ambushed New Orleans and Atlanta. ‘14’ down in his home. ‘14’ and shot. ‘14’ studio. ‘14’ ‘14’ ‘14’ rap studio. ‘14’ Flip or Flop Flip or Flop Flip or Flop Flip or Flop Flip or Flop Flip or Flop Flip or Flop Flip or Flop Flip or Flop Flip or Flop House Hunt- Hunters Int’l House Hunt- House Hunt- Flip or Flop Flip or Flop (60) HGTV 112 229 Vegas ‘G’ Vegas ‘G’ Vegas ‘G’ Vegas ‘G’ Vegas ‘G’ Vegas ‘G’ Nashville ‘G’ Vegas ‘G’ Vegas ‘G’ Vegas ‘G’ ers (N) ‘G’ ers ‘G’ ers ‘G’ Vegas ‘G’ Vegas ‘G’ Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Chopped The chefs get a Chopped Bartenders who Chopped Breakfast foods in Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Chopped Breakfast foods in (61) FOOD 110 231 Flay ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ gefilte fish. ‘G’ love to cook compete. ‘G’ every basket. ‘G’ Flay (N) ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ Flay ‘G’ every basket. ‘G’ Shark Tank ‘PG’ Shark Tank ‘PG’ Shark Tank ‘PG’ Shark Tank Tiny house rent- Shark Tank An irresistible Shark Tank A workout pro- Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program (65) CNBC 208 355 ‘G’ als; snack chips. ‘PG’ product pitch. ‘PG’ gram. ‘PG’ ‘G’ ‘G’ ‘G’ Tucker Carlson Tonight (N) Hannity (N) The Ingraham Angle (N) Fox News at Night With Tucker Carlson Tonight Hannity The Ingraham Angle Fox News at Night With (67) FNC 205 360 Shannon Bream (N) Shannon Bream Parks and Parks and (:15) The Office “Threat Level (5:50) The Of- (:25) The Of- The Office The Office The Office The Office Broad City The Other The Daily (:36) South (:06) South (:36) South (81) COM 107 249 Recreation Recreation Midnight” ‘PG’ fice ‘14’ fice ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ ‘PG’ (N) ‘14’ Two (N) ‘14’ Show Park ‘MA’ Park ‘MA’ Park ‘MA’ (2:44) “17 Again” (2009) Zac “The Fifth Element” (1997, Science Fiction) Bruce Willis, Gary Oldman, Ian “San Andreas” (2015, Action) Dwayne Johnson, Carla Gugino. A rescue Deadly Class The heroes raid The Magicians Quentin eats (82) SYFY 122 244 Efron, Leslie Mann. Holm. A New York cabby tries to save Earth in 2259. pilot must save his family after an earthquake. Chester manor. ‘MA’ a quesadilla. ‘MA’

PREMIUM STATIONS ! HBO 303 ^ HBO2 304 + MAX 311 5 SHOW 319 8 TMC 329

SATELLITE PROVIDERS MAY CARRY A DIFFERENT FEED THAN LISTED HERE. THESE LISTINGS REFLECT LOCAL CABLE SYSTEM FEEDS.

(2:45) “The (:40) “Rampage” (2018, Action) Dwayne Johnson, Naomie VICE News “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom” (2018, Adventure) Chris (:15) “Tomb Raider” (2018, Adventure) Alicia Vikander, (:15) The (:45) “My Harris, Malin Akerman. Three giant, mutated beasts embark Tonight (N) Pratt, Jeff Goldblum. Owen and Claire try to save the dino- Dominic West. Young Lara Croft seeks a fabled tomb on a Shop ‘MA’ Friend Dah504 Mummy” on a path of destruction. ‘PG-13’ ‘14’ saurs from a volcano. ‘PG-13’ mythical island. ‘PG-13’ mer” ‘R’ (3:51) Dead- (:45) Deadwood Bullock re- (:35) Deadwood “Suffer the (:35) Deadwood Swearengen (:35) Deadwood “Mr. Wu” Deadwood Swearengen Deadwood “Sold Under Sin” (:35) “Hulk” (2003, Fantasy) Eric Bana. SciLittle Children” Riders arrive calls a meeting. ‘MA’ Silas Adams arrives with bad strikes a bargain with Adams. Adams displays his loyalentist Bruce Banner transforms into a powerful 505 wood ‘MA’ turns to camp. ‘MA’ with a vaccine. ‘MA’ news. ‘MA’ ‘MA’ ties. ‘MA’ brute. ‘PG-13’ (3:35) “The Forest” (2016, (:10) “The Ring Two” (2005, Horror) Naomi Watts, Simon “Resident Evil: Apocalypse” (2004, Horror) (:35) “Van Helsing” (2004, Fantasy) Hugh Jackman, Kate Beckinsale, Rich- (10:50) Strike (:40) “SecreBaker, David Dorfman. A journalist must protect her son from Milla Jovovich. Survivors of a deadly virus ard Roxburgh. A monster-hunter battles creatures in Transylvania. ‘PG-13’ Back ‘MA’ tary” (2002) 516 Horror) Natalie Dormer. ‘PG-13’ evil Samara. ‘PG-13’ battle zombies. ‘R’ ‘R’ (3:30) “John Grisham’s The Rainmaker” (:45) “The Running Man” (1987, Science Fiction) Arnold (:25) Billions Axe sets out to (:25) “The Hunted” (2003) Tommy Lee Desus & Mero Black Mon- Desus & Mero Who Is AmerJones. A retired combat-trainer searches for a (N) ‘MA’ day “7042” ‘MA’ ica? ‘MA’ 546 (1997, Drama) Matt Damon, Claire Danes, Schwarzenegger, Richard Dawson. Athletes hunt convicted destroy Taylor. ‘MA’ Jon Voight. ‘PG-13’ prisoners on a sadistic game show. ‘R’ killer in Oregon. ‘R’ ‘MA’ (3:00) “Spotlight” (2015, (:10) “The Sense of an Ending” (2017, Drama) Jim Broad- “Monster’s Ball” (2001, Drama) Billy Bob Thornton, Heath “Pimp” (2018, Crime Drama) Keke Palmer. A “Narc” (2002, Crime Drama) Ray Liotta. A 554 Drama) Mark Ruffalo, Michael bent, Charlotte Rampling, Harriet Walter. A man confronts the Ledger, Halle Berry. A prison guard strikes up a romance with female pimp in the Bronx, N.Y., dreams of a disgraced cop probes the death of an underKeaton. ‘R’ past after receiving a letter. ‘PG-13’ an inmate’s widow. ‘R’ better life. ‘NR’ cover colleague. ‘R’

12

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A12 | Thursday, March 21, 2019 | Peninsula Clarion

Crossword

Friend sees too much risk in monitoring home remodel think you were wrong, I think you made a wise decision, and for the right reason. If anything had gone wrong with the remodel or one of the laborers was less than honest, the blame would have fallen squarely on you. Add to that the fact that Dave drops people Abigail Van Buren he feels let him down for any reason, and you have a recipe for disaster. If Pam resents you for protecting yourself, she may not be as good a friend as you assume she is. True friends should be able to say no when it’s warranted, and true friends accept a refusal with good grace. DEAR ABBY: Is it possible to “choose” to forgive someone? My 20-year-old nephew recently turned his life around. He has a good job, a nice girlfriend and a baby on the way. But when he and my sister were living with my late mother a few years ago, he trashed Mom’s basement (where he was living), and it cost her hundreds of dollars to repair the damage. He also stole money from her and once threatened my life. He smoked and drank as a teen, quit school,

and did nothing more than play video games. I’m glad he has changed his ways, but he has never apologized for the way he treated us. It seems I’m expected by everyone to forgive and forget, but I can’t. Please don’t suggest counseling. He wouldn’t go. I don’t want to be estranged from his girlfriend and my great-nephew, but I have no interest in engaging with him unless he makes amends for his past behavior. My sister always seemed oblivious to his bad behavior. In her eyes, her son can do no wrong. Is there any way to reconcile his particular past with the present? -- STILL ANGRY IN MINNESOTA DEAR STILL ANGRY: Yes, it is possible to choose to forgive. But it doesn’t appear that your nephew has completely turned his life around. Part of growing up is becoming a responsible individual. Making amends for past misdeeds is a part of that process your nephew seems to have skipped. If you would like to have a relationship with his girlfriend and their child, nothing prevents it. But it doesn’t mean you must have amnesia about the way you and your mother were treated by your nephew. Talk to him about this so you can get the closure you are seeking. Hints from Heloise

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, March 21, 2019: This year offers much more caring, financial security and well-being than you have experienced in quite a while. If single, you might have a large group of admirers. You seem to be ready to fall in love. You’ll know when you meet the right person. If you’re attached, you and your partner become even more sensitive to each other. Your caring and joint finances flourish. LIBRA gravitates toward you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Someone attempts to appeal to your gentler side. Don’t say anything; just let this person reveal what’s on his or her mind. Depending on your needs, you could be touched or want to run. Tonight: Accept a fun invitation. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH You have a lot to accomplish; you’ll follow through and complete what you must. A loved one might need to hear from you, especially if you’re away from them for any sustained period. This person often gets involved with your finances. Tonight: Go along with a suggestion. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH You could be upset at how a situation unfolds. Recognize how little control you have. Allow yourself to flow and express your feelings. Creativity surges to an unprecedented level. Allow your inner flirt out. Tonight: Get into weekend mode. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH You might feel as though you’re performing a juggling act between your personal obligations and your professional demands. When dealing with others, allow your caring to come out. You have the energy to handle what comes down your path. Tonight: Off doing errands. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH You have the space and audience to finally clear the air of an issue that has been lurking around you for a while. Express your gentle side; be less judgmental. As a result, others will feel more comfortable opening up a conversation. Tonight: Hang out. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Be aware of how much you’re spending, as well as what for and why. In order to land where you want, you might

Rubes

By Leigh Rubin

need to pull back. A discussion about money could be uncomfortable but necessary. Tonight: Make plans for the weekend. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Others admire how you express yourself and they let you know. Be aware: To you, what seems like a brutal comment is just another person’s lessthan-diplomatic style. Your smile warms others. Tonight: Let it all hang out. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Like it or not, much is going on behind the scenes. You might feel as though you cannot pursue an interest any further, at least for now. A loved one might be trying to let you know how much he or she cares. Your defenses could be so high that you don’t receive the message. Tonight: Make it early. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Right now, goodwill goes far. You smile; others respond. A meeting or gathering could be pivotal to your day as well as your near-future plans. You might have too much energy for your own good. Take a brisk walk to chill. Tonight: Doing your thing. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Pressure builds around the workplace or in your dealings with an authority figure about whom you care a lot. You see life from a different perspective, which could be the source of a problem. Don’t allow another person to crowd your space. Tonight: Tune into another person’s request. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH You’re able to detach a lot more easily than many people can. As a result, you could be forced to take a stand or act as an intermediary between two factions. Stay cool, calm and collected. Tonight: Go with an idea that leads you to a new adventure. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Today, one-on-one relating will be your strongest way of approaching others. Try to avoid groups and meetings with many people. A discussion is needed with a key loved one or friend. Tonight: A boss or co-worker pressures you to join in. Do it. BORN TODAY Actress/personality Rosie O’Donnell (1962), painter Hans Hofmann (1880), scientist Walter Gilbert (1932)

Ziggy

Is the crust a must? Dear Heloise: My granddaughter insists I CUT THE CRUSTS OFF all her sandwiches. This bothers me -- is she missing out on something by not eating the crusts? -- Sandy G., Holland, Mich. Sandy, it’s probably safe to say that your granddaughter doesn’t like the texture of bread crust. Lots of people cut the crusts off for this reason, and these folks come out just fine! A sandwich tends to look fancier with the crusts cut off, too -- don’t you agree? The crust may contain a bit more fiber and antioxidants than the rest of the bread, but surely her dietary needs are being met. -- Heloise P.S. Does your granddaughter have straight hair? There’s an old wives’ tale: Eating bread crusts will curl your hair! WASHING WORKOUT WEAR Dear Heloise: My trainer told me how to care for my workout wear: 1. Letting wet, sweaty clothes lie around in my gym bag is a bad idea. Mildew, bacteria and mold growth? No thank you! 2. Hang sweaty clothes to dry, then launder. 3. Separate colors from whites, and NO towels or fleece sweatshirts with aerobic wear. Lint city! 4. Even though the clothes are sweaty, dirty and yucky, they deserve a wash on the gentle cycle. 5. Do not use bleach or fabric softeners. These chemicals can damage the “performance fibers” in high-quality dance and aerobic gear. 6. Air-drying is best -- the clothes dryer is too hot, and the tumbling action can stretch out fibers. -- Kelly Anne in St. Louis

SUDOKU Solution

8 2 7 9 6 5 3 4 1

6 5 3 1 4 7 2 9 8

4 1 9 8 2 3 5 6 7

7 6 4 2 9 1 8 5 3

3 8 5 4 7 6 9 1 2

5 4 8 7 1 2 6 3 9

B.C.

1 3 2 6 5 9 7 8 4

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2 9

5

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3/20

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3

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5 6

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9 5 6

7 3/21

By Johnny Hart

By Tom Wilson

Tundra

Garfield

2 9 1 5 3 8 4 7 6

By Dave Green

Shoe

By Jim Davis

Take it from the Tinkersons

By Bill Bettwy

By Chad Carpenter

By Chris Cassatt & Gary Brookins

Mother Goose and Grimm

By Michael Peters

2019 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Jacqueline Bigar’s Stars

2019 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

DEAR ABBY: For several years, my husband and I were good friends with “Pam” and “David.” About a year ago, we moved to a new house just a few blocks from theirs. They decided they liked some of the features of our new home and immediately started remodeling theirs to resemble ours. Pam and David both work and I am retired, so Dave asked if I would go to their home throughout the day, while several workmen did this extensive remodel. I refused, saying I wasn’t comfortable alone in someone else’s house with a bunch of strangers milling about, not to mention the responsibility if something was broken or stolen. (The company wasn’t bonded. They are just random guys doing side jobs.) Long story short, David was extremely offended that I declined and no longer speaks to us. He has shunned other friends for lesser things since then. I’m still friendly with Pam, but I can’t help feeling that deep down she resents me, too, and thinks I should have done it because we are good friends. Was I wrong to refuse, Abby? Should I have done it to keep the friendship, even though I wasn’t comfortable? -- RESENTFUL IN THE MIDWEST DEAR RESENTFUL: I not only don’t

By Eugene Sheffer

Profile for Sound Publishing

Peninsula Clarion, March 21, 2019  

March 21, 2019 edition of the Peninsula Clarion

Peninsula Clarion, March 21, 2019  

March 21, 2019 edition of the Peninsula Clarion