Page 1

SNOHOMISHOVERDOSEPREVENTION A COMMUNITY COMING TOGETHER TO STOP SNOHOMISH COUNTY’S OPIOID EPIDEMIC

10 Things to Know About Opioids What they are, why they can be dangerous, and what you can do to prevent abuse.

GUIDE

OVERDOSE PREVENTION

RESOURCE SNOHOMISH COUNTY 2018- 2019

PLUS…

Who to call and how to help someone struggling with addiction Talking to your kids, your parents and your provider about opioids


10 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT OPIOIDS “DO THE BEST YOU CAN UNTIL YOU KNOW BETTER. THEN WHEN YOU KNOW BETTER, DO BETTER.” -- MAYA ANGELOU

This guide was developed to help you know better and do better when it comes to opioids. Equip yourself with the information and resources to help you. To help your friends and family. To help your community.

2

KNOW YOUR MEDS, LOCK YOUR MEDS See page 6

TALK TO YOUR PROVIDER See page 18

TAKE BACK UNWANTED MEDS See page 8

TALK TO SENIORS See page 20

LEARN ABOUT ADDICTION See page 10

TALK TO YOUR KIDS See page 22

KNOW HOW TO HELP See page 12

GET INVOLVED See page 24

KNOW WHO TO CALL See page 16

GIVE RESPONSIBLY See page 26

OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE | 2018-2019


Editor’s Corner In this fight, what you know can save a life. Maybe it will be the guy with the nice smile who makes room on the bus during your morning commute. Maybe it will be a friend, a neighbor, or a classmate. It could be somebody in your own family: a son, a daughter, brother, sister, mom, dad, grandchild. An epidemic of addiction to heroin and other opioid drugs is hitting Snohomish County where it hurts most: among its people. Paradoxically, that’s the same place where the community’s best hope for tackling the crisis can be found. Education is key to the cure. This Overdose Prevention Resources Guide contains what you need to know to connect with resources and information that can make a difference. Learn more about crisis support and hotlines; counseling and recovery groups; treatment options, programs and providers; housing; outreach services for veterans and efforts geared toward reaching young people. There’s practical advice on securing pain medications so they don’t wind up in the wrong hands, and options for safely disposing of prescription drugs when the need for them has passed. You’ll learn how addiction affects people, how best to talk with those in your life who are at risk, and where to obtain naloxone, the compound that can reverse the often lethal effects of an opioid overdose. On behalf of the Snohomish Health District, Snohomish County, the Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office and others involved in the Opioid Response Multi-Agency Coordination (MAC) Group who helped make this guide a reality, we hope you find it useful. Please share what you learn, pass along the resources, and get involved. We are a community coming together to stop Snohomish County’s opioid epidemic. We can’t do it without you! For more information, we invite you to visit our website at www.snohomishoverdoseprevention.com and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

This publication was supported by the Grant or Cooperative Agreement Number, U17 CE002734, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the Department of Health and Human Services.

 2018-2019 | OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE

3


TABLE OF CONTENTS 10 things to know about opioids Know Your Meds, Lock Your Meds...............................................................6 Take Back Unwanted Meds...........................................................................8 Learn About Addiction.................................................................................10 Know How To Help......................................................................................12 Know Who To Call.......................................................................................16 Talk To Your Provider..................................................................................18 Talk To Seniors............................................................................................20 Talk To Your Kids.........................................................................................22 Get Involved................................................................................................24 Give Responsibly........................................................................................26

RESOURCE DIRECTORY Behavioral Health........................................................................................27 Case Management......................................................................................28 Crisis and Support Hotlines.........................................................................29 Education and Outreach.............................................................................29 General Resources.....................................................................................29 General Housing Resources.......................................................................30 Hospitals......................................................................................................30 Inpatient Treatment.....................................................................................30 Legal Services.............................................................................................31 Outpatient Treatment...................................................................................31 Recovery and Emergency Housing.............................................................33 Support Groups...........................................................................................33 Transportation.............................................................................................34 Veterans Services.......................................................................................34 4

OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE | 2018-2019


 2018-2019 | OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE

5


Know Your Meds, Lock Your Meds You may hear the word “opioid” thrown around a lot, and news headlines about the opioid epidemic are now commonplace. While you may be familiar with the word, can you spot an opioid in your own home? If they are in your home, what should you to help prevent opioid misuse and abuse? Knowing more about your medications, or the medications used by your loved ones, is the first step to becoming more aware of the risks that opioids present.

The basics on opioids

Opioids versus heroin

Opioids are a class of drugs that include prescription

Heroin was created in the late 1800’s, as what was

medications and illegal substances, such as hero-

thought to be a “safer” alternative to morphine. Heroin

in. There are three categories of opioids: opiates,

is typically injected, rather than swallowed, snorted

semi-synthetic, and synthetic opioids. Opiates are

or smoked like other opioids. However, the molecular

naturally occurring drugs that are derived directly from

structures of heroin and prescription opioids are so

the opium poppy plant. Semi-synthetic opioids are a

similar that the brain cannot tell the difference. What

combination of these naturally occurring drugs and

can? Your wallet. Prescription opioids can be $80 or

man-made components. Synthetic opioids are pro-

more per pill on the street, while heroin may be as low

duced entirely by people in a lab.

as $10 per hit.

The majority of opioids prescribed by healthcare pro-

How overdoses happen

viders are semi-synthetic. These include hydrocodone (Vicodin), oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet), hydromorphone, and oxymorphone (Opana). All opioids interact with the body in the same way. By attaching to receptors in the brain and other organs, opioids

Too much of an opioid — which varies based on the individual, length of time using, and what the drug is made out of — overwhelms those brain receptors and depresses the central nervous system. This slows the breathing to the point that vital

can block pain signals from reaching the brain. That’s why these medications often are prescribed for chronic pain, including pain associated with cancer, or for acute pain, like that following a surgery. Along

Taking a prescription opioid puts you at risk for prescription theft.

organs begin to shut down. If an overdose is not reversed in time, a person’s body will simply shut down and breathing will stop. It can be difficult to tell if a person is just very high or

with reducing pain, opioids increase pleasure by releasing the “feel good chemicals”

experiencing an overdose. If you’re having a hard time

in the brain. This increase in pleasure provides the

telling the difference, it is best to treat the situation like

basis for the slippery slope toward addiction.

an overdose — it could save someone’s life.

6

OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE | 2018-2019


scription opioids before trying heroin. If you have an opi-

Dangerous drug interactions

oid prescription, it is important to take your medication

It is important to know whether the medication you have been prescribed is an opioid. Individuals taking opioids can have negative interactions with other drugs being taken, specifically benzodiazepines and alcohol.

exactly as prescribed and as directed by your doctor. Improperly using your own prescription is called “prescription misuse” and when that prescription is for opioids, this

Benzodiaze-

practice can be

pines, including

very dangerous.

Xanax and

Taking too many

Valium, often

pills, taking

are prescribed

your medication

for anxiety and

too frequently,

insomnia. They

and taking your

slow down

medication for

body functions.

longer than pre-

When benzo-

scribed all can

diazepines are

be considered

combined with

prescription

opioids, the

misuse. Taking

risk of over-

pills that are not

dose drastically

prescribed to

increases. This

you or seeking

is because both types of medications suppress breathing. When mixed together, they may cause you to stop breathing entirely. Alcohol acts in a similar way, so be sure to restrict alcohol use while taking prescription opioids.

prescriptions for fake conditions would be examples of prescription abuse. Misusing and abusing opioid prescriptions can lead to substance use disorder, as well as an increased risk of overdose.

Another thing to know about your opioid prescription

Safely storing your medications

is the proper dosage. Talking to your doctor or phar-

Taking a prescription opioid puts you at risk for pre-

macist will help you know exactly when to take your

scription theft. Prescription opioids are commonly

medication and how much you should take. It is recom-

abused. Safely storing your medications can prevent

mended that you should take the lowest dose possible

them from falling into the wrong hands. A great way to

for the shortest amount of time to reduce the chance of

ensure that your prescriptions are secure is by placing

your body building a tolerance to the medication.

them in locking medicine cabinets, small lock boxes, and portable lock bags or locking pill bottles. These

Prescription misuse and abuse

can be purchased at some local pharmacies, large

A study conducted by the University of Washington’s

retailers including Amazon and Walmart, as well as

Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute found that of those drug

independent online businesses such as Safer Lock Rx,

injectors who had used heroin within the past three

LockMed and Cardinal Bag Supplies.

months, 57 percent reported being “hooked on” pre-

 2018-2019 | OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE

7


Take Back Unwanted Meds How many times have you looked at a leftover bottle of prescription medication and thought, “I’ll keep these just in case I get sick again later?” Or maybe you know a person whose medicine cabinet looks like a commercial pharmacy? Perhaps you felt like getting rid of medications was more of a hassle, and just stuck the expired or unused bottle back on the shelf? The enormity of the opioid crisis can feel overwhelming, especially with headlines warning of increased overdoses and deaths. As simple as it sounds, however, keeping current medication safely stored or locked away and quickly disposing of unused medication is a way for you to help fight the opioid epidemic.

Risks of improper storage or disposal

Pharmaceutical stewardship programs

About one-third of medicines sold to consumers go

Under the oversight of the Snohomish Health District,

unused. Storing unwanted or expired medicines in our

MED-Project implements the local pharmaceutical

homes contributes to the epidemic of medicine abuse

stewardship program in Snohomish County. Dispos-

and preventable poisonings in our community. Improp-

ing of unwanted medication is as simple as entering a

er disposal of medicines down the drain or in the household trash adds to pharmaceutical pollution in the environment. Taking unused, unwanted, or expired medications to a secure medicine return kiosk

zip code on the MED-Project

About one-third of medicines sold to consumers go unused.

These new kiosks are located in pharmacies, grocery stores and police stations near you. Don’t have a location nearby, or can’t drive? You can call

ensures they will not fall in to others’ hands or end up polluting local waters.

website to locate a kiosk.

the hotline at 1-844-MEDPROJ or visit the mail-back page of the MED-Project

Here in Washington, 26 percent of poisonings and

website to request a pre-paid envelope to return

deaths were caused by someone else’s over-the-

your unwanted or expired medicine. Home health-

counter medications. Another 32 percent were caused

care professionals providing services to differential-

by someone else’s prescription medications. In Sno-

ly-abled or home-bound residents may also request

homish County, overdoses are the leading cause of

an envelope on behalf of their client(s).

unintentional injury deaths, and two-thirds of those involved opioid prescription drugs or heroin.

The do’s and don’ts of secure medicine return Before disposing of your medicines, be sure to remove

8

OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE | 2018-2019


all personal identification from the bottle such as your name and prescription number. Medications can be

MED-Project Locations

disposed of in their original packaging or in a sealed bag. If you transfer your medications to a sealed bag, recycle all remaining packaging. MED-Project kiosks do not accept herbal remedies, vitamins, supplements, cosmetics, other personal care products, compressed cylinders, aerosols, inhalers, medical devices, pet pesticide products, illicit drugs and iodine-containing medications. Sharps are also not accepted and should be properly disposed of in a sharps container. Safely disposing of your unwanted or expired medication can make a difference in your community. Visit med-project.org/locations/snohomish for more information.

ARLINGTON PHARMACY 540 N West Ave., Arlington, WA 98223 ARLINGTON POLICE DEPARTMENT 110 E 3rd St., Arlington, WA 98223 BRIER POLICE DEPARTMENT 2901 228th St. SW, Brier, WA 98036 DARRINGTON PHARMACY 1200 Seeman St., Darrington, WA 98241 EDMONDS PHARMACY 7631 212th St. SW, Ste D-100, Edmonds, WA 98026 SWEDISH MEDICAL CENTER 21601 76th Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98026 FAMILY PHARMACY 7315 212th St. SW, Ste 100, Edmonds, WA 98026 EDMONDS POLICE DEPARTMENT 250 5th Ave. N, Edmonds, WA 98020 QFC PHARMACY #851 22828 100th Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98020 CHC OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, EDMONDS PHARMACY 23320 Highway 99, Edmonds, WA 98026 PROVIDENCE MEDICAL CENTER PHARMACY 1321 Colby Ave., C Wing 1st Floor, Everett, WA 98201 CHC OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, NORTH PHARMACY 1424 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201 KAISER PERMANENTE, EVERETT PHARMACY 2930 Maple St., Everett, WA 98201 QFC PHARMACY #853 2615 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201 SNOHOMISH COUNTY SHERIFF, COURTHOUSE 3000 Rockefeller Ave., 4th Floor, Everett, WA 98201

CHC OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, SOUTH PHARMACY 1019 112th St. SW, Everett, WA 98204 PHARM-A-SAVE, GRANITE FALLS 207 E Stanley St., #A, Granite Falls, WA 98252 GOLD BAR POLICE DEPARTMENT 107 5th St., Gold Bar, WA 98251 LYNNWOOD POLICE DEPARTMENT 19321 44th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036 SERK APOTHECARY 19410 36th Ave. W, #3, Lynnwood, WA 98036 KAISER PERMANENTE, LYNNWOOD PHARMACY 20200 54th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036 LAKE STEVENS POLICE DEPARTMENT 2211 Grade Road, Lake Stevens, WA 98258 MARYSVILLE POLICE DEPARTMENT 1635 Grove St., Marysville, WA 98270 HILTON PHARMACY LLC 220 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270 QFC PHARMACY #856 926 164th St. SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012 MILL CREEK POLICE DEPARTMENT 15728 Main St., Mill Creek, WA 98012 PHARM-A-SAVE, MONROE 17788 147th St. SE, Monroe, WA 98272 PROVIDENCE PHARMACY MONROE 19200 N Kelsey St., Monroe, WA 98272 MOUNTLAKE TERRACE POLICE DEPARTMENT 5906 232nd St. SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043 MUKILTEO POLICE DEPARTMENT 10500 47th Place W, Mukilteo, WA 98275 SNOHOMISH POLICE DEPARTMENT 230 Maple Ave., Snohomish, WA 98290

EVERETT POLICE DEPARTMENT, SOUTH PRECINCT 1121 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208

QFC PHARMACY #879 27008 92nd Ave. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292

QFC PHARMACY #852 4919 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98203

STANWOOD POLICE DEPARTMENT 8727 271st St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292

SEA MAR COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTERS 1920 100th St. SE, Bldg. B, Everett, WA 98208

SULTAN POLICE DEPARTMENT 515 Main Street, Sultan, WA 98294

 2018 | OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE

9


Learn About Addiction Getting a fix. Chasing the dragon. These are just some of the street terms for using heroin, but they illustrate a thought process that perfectly describes what it means to struggle with addiction. The drugs become your singular focus. Research also shows that 1 in 4 people who try heroin becomes addicted. So why is it that opioid addiction—or as it’s more appropriately referred to, opioid use disorder—becomes so all-consuming? To answer that question, we reached out to Dr. Caleb Banta-Green, principal research scientist with the University of Washington’s Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute to help us unpack a little more about the science of addiction.

Opioids and Your Brain It took several decades before

creating drowsiness, mental confusion, and nausea, as well as euphoria.

researchers learned that opioids

Naloxone, also known as Nar-

caused permanent changes to

can, is the life-saving drug that

the brain’s opioid receptors.

can reverse an overdose. It is

Your brain becomes hard-wired

not addictive, nor can it cause

to seek opioids to maintain its

harm if administered. Some

new normal. For some people,

skeptics believe that naloxone is

this happens in a matter of days.

a crutch that just enables users to keep using. Not so, says Ban-

“Opioid use disorder causes

ta-Green.

measurable changes in the brain. It’s a real thing that you

“Naloxone puts them in sudden,

can see,” says Banta-Green.

acute withdrawal. This is the last

“It’s a biological condition

thing they want, and precisely

that’s driving behavior. While it

why they use opioids…to avoid

looks like a person making bad

withdrawal.” Banta-Green also

choices over and over, it’s really about the brain being hijacked by the drug.” Prescription opioids release much higher levels of the chemicals than what our bodies naturally produce, so they can overwhelm our system and bind to places they shouldn’t. Binding to some of these other receptors can completely eliminate the sensation of pain,

10

points to a recent study done at Harborview that showed “no evidence that providing naloxone increases overdose or opioid use risk behaviors.”

Dependence vs. Addiction A person who uses opioids on a regular basis can develop a tolerance, feeling like they need to take more

OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE | 2018-2019


in order to feel “normal.” Dependence is when a per-

For others, they were born and genetically geared to ei-

son’s body has begun to develop a tolerance to a drug,

ther like opioids and feel “normal” on them, or they sim-

and more and more of that drug is needed to get the

ply don’t. The tricky part is that you won’t know which

same effect. If the drug were to be stopped, the body

camp you fit into until you try an opioid for the first time.

would begin to go through withdrawal. This can happen even if the drug is taken as directed by a doctor.

Opioid use disorder is 100 percent preventable, but it’s

Addiction, however, is when an individual becomes

also 100 percent treatable. The first and most effective

physically unable to stop taking a drug even though that drug use is causing negative consequences. It is important to note that opioid addiction is not a moral failing, but a chronic disease. Just as you would do for a heart condition or cancer, finding the right mix of

is medication assisted treatment (MAT) with buprenorphine and methadone. People can be on those medications and in recovery, with an added bonus of reducing death by 50 percent. “With illicit opioids, you don’t know what you’re getting

treatment options and services is crucial.

and they’re short-acting. You’re brain and body have

Another similarity to heart conditions or cancer is the random nature of how addiction can happen. For some, there were adverse experiences in child- or adulthood that caused emotional or physical trauma (current or past). These events lead to an increased risk of any substance use disorder.

Treating Addiction

been hijacked, and you are in a life that is a physical, mental and emotional roller coaster,” says Banta-Green. “MAT gets you to a steady ground to help get you through the day, rather than looking for a fix every few hours. Medications don’t fix everything, but they’re a big start.”

Washington State Approved Agency Since 1996

Helping & Healing

DUI Program Substance use disorder program Domestic violence perpetrator programs Pathological/problem gambling program Anger management

Multicultural Specific Treatment Program

Mental health/ behavioral

www.actsrehab.org Tacoma Center

Lynnwood Center

8811 S. Tacoma Way Ste. #106 Lakewood, WA 98499

5116 196th St. SW Suit101 Lynnwood, WA 98036

(253) 302-3826

(425) 776-1290

Korean Language Line

(253) 941-2287

 2018-2019 | OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE

11


Know How To Help When someone you care about is struggling with a substance use disorder, it can be difficult to know how to help. Here are some tips and information to help you with that person struggling in your life.

Be Supportive, With Boundaries There is a difference between supporting (helping) and enabling. Supporting someone in recovery requires clear boundaries to be set with both the user and non-user. Clear communication on what the boundaries are and sticking to them will help eliminate enabling. You can also help by:

helping a loved one struggling with opioid use disorder can often feel guilty, isolated and ashamed. You don’t need to be trained to help, you just need to be there. In a recent article, The Partnership for Drug-Free Kids’ president and CEO Fred Muench shared what he hoped others had done for his family while he was actively using. “When I was in the grips of active heroin addiction, I wish people who knew would have reached out to

• Encouraging recovery and treatment

my family. It would have meant the world to them. They

• Being honest without blaming

wouldn’t have felt so alone.” Dr. Muench goes on to sug-

• Respecting privacy

gest that “if you know a family touched by active addic-

• Communicating clearly

tion, reach out and offer them the support you would for

• Having realistic expectations and realizing there may

any family with a chronic medical condition.”

be difficulties • Learning about resources that can be a help to the

Connect with Treatment Options

person that is struggling

Another way to help is to learn about harm reduction. For

• Always loving and never giving up

those still using or waiting on treatment openings, learn more about the AIDS Outreach Project/Snohomish Coun-

Help Yourself Self-care is an important aspect of helping someone with a substance use disorder. What are things that you like to do? Read, take a walk, have coffee with a friend, or have a massage. Perhaps attending Al-Anon, Alateen, or Nar-Anon, or attending some counseling for yourself would be beneficial. If we don’t take care of ourselves and allow our needs to go unmet, it is difficult to help someone else.

Help Others While we are working to reduce the stigma around addiction, it still exists. Families and friends that are

12

ty Syringe Exchange. They offer health care services for drug users, as well as treatment referrals. There is evidence that people with an opioid use disorder are more successful in recovery if they have treatment combined with medication assisted treatment (MAT), like suboxone, Vitrol and methadone. Being supportive of the persons treatment needs is important and can improve the chance of their success. Gaining understanding of resources is valuable to be able to support a person seeking treatment assistance. In Snohomish County, the ACCESS line is available for a person to call to set up both a mental health and

OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE | 2018-2019


a substance use disorder assessment. That number is 1-888-693-7200. Encouraging the person seeking help to call can be instrumental in them taking that first step to finding the help they need.

START YOUR RECOVERY TODAY

How to Stop an Overdose Learning the signs and symptoms of an overdose is also helpful (see below), as well as having naloxone in your home. Naloxone, also known as Narcan, is an opioid overdose reversal drug that can be purchased at many pharmacies in the county. It can be administered through a nose spray or injection, and improves the chance for the person overdosing to breathe until

425258Having Narcan in the house is similar to having a fire extinguisher; 7390you hope to never need it but will be glad emergency services arrive and transport the person so

If you or someone you know is ready to fight their addiction, we're here to help.

they can receive the medical care they need.

Our comprehensive drug and alcohol treatment program includes a hospital-based inpatient detox and outpatient services.

to have it if you do.

To learn more, call 425-258-7390

Signs and Symptoms of an Overdose The typical signs of an overdose include:

• • • • • • • • • • •

Loss of consciousness Unresponsive to outside stimulus Awake, but unable to talk Breathing is very slow and shallow, erratic, or has stopped Bluish purple skin tone (light skin), or grayish/ashen (darker skin) Choking sounds, or a snore-like gurgling noise (sometimes called the “death rattle”) Vomiting Body is very limp Face is very pale or clammy Fingernails and lips turn blue or purplish black Pulse (heartbeat) is slow, erratic, or not there at all

If someone is making unfamiliar sounds while sleeping, it is worth trying to wake him or her up. Many loved ones of users think a person was snoring, when in fact the person was overdosing. These situations can be a missed opportunity to intervene and save a life.

Opioid Overdose: What to do? NALOXONE LIFE SAVED

Northwest HIDTA

Snohomish County

SnohomishCountyWa.gov/Naloxone

 2018-2019 | OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE

13


Where To Find Naloxone AIDS Outreach Project/Snohomish Syringe Exchange (MON/WED) 1625 E Marine View Dr., # 4, Everett, WA 98201 (425) 258-2977 facebook.com/aidsoutreachproject

ALBERTSON'S PHARMACY 301 Marysville Mall #60, Marysville, WA 98270 (360) 659-8952 3322 132nd St. SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012 (425) 338-1891 12811 Beverly Park Rd., Lynnwood, WA 98037 (425) 347-3145 17520 SR 9 SE, Snohomish, WA 98296 (360) 668-2742 4301 212th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043 (425) 775-5011 520 128th St. SW, Everett, WA 98204 (425) 347-1007

Arlington Pharmacy 540 N West Ave., Arlington, WA 98223 (360) 435-5771

SAFEWAY PHARMACY 1715 Broadway Ave., Everett, WA 98201 (425) 339-9448 4128 Rucker Ave., Everett, WA 98203 (425) 252-1911 7601 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98203 (425) 595-3223 1258 State St., Marysville, WA 98270 (360) 659-2882 11031 19th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208 (425) 337-0684 5802 134th Place SE, Everett, WA 98208 (425) 332-6179 14826 Hwy 99 N, Lynnwood, WA 98087 (425) 743-6808

Swedish Edmonds - Walgreens 20725 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98036 (425) 712-0512 TULALIP CLINICAL PHARMACY

CVS Pharmacy

8825 34th Ave. NE, Suite A, Tulalip, WA 98271 (360)716-2660

11918 Airport Rd., Everett, WA 98204 (425) 353-7687

WALGREENS PHARMACY

19507 WA-99, Lynnwood, WA 98036 (425) 640-0646 9601 Market Pl., Lake Stevens, WA 98258 (425) 397-8944 16818 Twin Lakes Ave., Marysville, WA 98271 (360) 386-4021 18305 Alderwood Mall Pkwy., Lynnwood, WA 98037 (425) 673-1395

Pharm-A-Save Monroe

17788 147th St SE, Monroe, WA 98272 (360) 794-7351

13110 Bothell Everett Hwy, Everett, WA 98208 (425) 379-7274 6807 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98203 (425) 438-9380 2205 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201 (425) 252-5213 11216 4th Ave. W, Everett, WA 98204 (425) 355-9940 718 91st Ave. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258 (425) 334-1523 20725 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98036 (425) 712-0512

Providence Pharmacy - Monroe 19200 North Kelsey St., Monroe, WA 98272 (360) 794-7994

404 State Ave. Marysville, WA 98270 (360) 658-5375

QFC Pharmacy - Stanwood

10200 Mukilteo Speedway, Mukilteo, WA 98275 (425) 315-9213

27008 92nd Ave NW, Stanwood, WA 98292 (360) 629-0662

14

OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE | 2018


The Path to Recovery is in Reach The Recovery Center at EvergreenHealth Monroe We believe chemical dependency is a disease—with its own set of progressive symptoms—and that recovery is a dynamic process unique to each individual and family. The Recovery Center at EvergreenHealth Monroe tailors treatment to each person and their needs, working collaboratively with clients and families throughout the recovery process.

We provide treatment in a therapeutic environment, which includes clinic-centered care and a licensed residential center. Our caring and dedicated team of experienced physicians, nurses, counselors and support staff guide our clients throughout their recovery journey, from taking the first step in seeking help, to providing ongoing support at our outpatient Addiction Medicine Care practice. We’ve successfully treated thousands of patients in our community since 1973, helping them return to their families and a productive life, free from dependence on drugs or alcohol.

Our Services On-Site Assessment, Evaluation & Referral Medical Detoxification Rehabilitation Residential Treatment Day or Partial Treatment Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT)— Buprenorphine/Naloxone (Suboxone) CUP (Chemically Using During Pregnancy) Family Program & Counseling Outpatient Services Outpatient Addiction Medicine Consultation

For more information, please visit

recoverycentermonroe.com or call us at 360.794.1405

The Recovery Center Monroe is licensed by the Washington State Department of Health and Department of Behavioral Health and Recovery.

20180258_Snohomish_OD_Prevent_To_Print.indd 1

8/1/18 4:13 PM

 2018-2019 | OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE

15


Know Who To Call Assessment? Detox? Inpatient or outpatient? It can be hard to navigate the various services and treatment options available to those who struggle with addiction. Here’s how to make sense of the services and resources available in Snohomish County.

Substance use disorder treatment professionals Many different kinds of professionals provide treatment for substance use disorders (addiction). In most treatment programs, the primary caregivers are specially trained, certified and/or licensed as substance abuse treatment counselors. Most treatment programs assign patients to a treatment team of professionals. Depending on the type of treatment, teams can be made up of social workers, counselors, doctors, nurses, psychologists, psychiatrists, or other professionals.

Clinical assessment

Detox services or Withdrawal management Acute medical detox is often the first stage of care. Detox facilities provide services for those suffering from the effects of opioid abuse and other chemical intoxications. Withdrawing from opiates without medical assistance is not only uncomfortable, it can also be dangerous. Most detox programs provide 24-hour monitoring by professionals who are trained to identify and treat the signs and symptoms of drug or alcohol withdrawal.

Inpatient treatment Provided in special units of hospitals or medical clinics, inpatient treatment offers both detoxification and rehabilitation services.

A complete assess-

Because of changes

ment of an individual

in insurance cover-

is needed to help

age, inpatient treat-

treatment profession-

ment is no longer as

als find the right type

common as it used

of treatment. The as-

to be.

sessment also helps counselors work with an effective treat-

Residential programs

ment plan. Although

These provide a liv-

clinical assessment

ing environment with

continues throughout

treatment services.

a person’s treatment,

Several models of

it starts at or just

residential treat-

before a person’s

ment (such as the

the person to design

admission to a treatment program.

therapeutic community) exist, and treatment in these programs lasts from a month to a year or more. Resi-

16

OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE | 2018-2019


dential programs are best for people who do not have

ipants can go to school or work and the programs last

stable living or employment situations and/or have

from about 2 months to 1 year.

limited or no family support.

Treatment programs or Opioid substitution treatment

Partial hospitalization or Day treatment programs

Many primary care providers in Snohomish County

Provided in hospitals or free-standing clinics, these

have completed special training to offer medication

programs provide treatment for 4 to 8 hours per day for

assisted treatment (MAT). These providers and clin-

people who usually live at home. These programs usu-

ics use medication, such as suboxone, Vivitrol or

ally last for at least 3 months and work best for people

methadone to help with cravings, as well as provide

who have a stable, supportive home environment.

counseling and other services to complement the medication treatment.

Outpatient programs Outpatient programs provide treatment at a program site, but the person lives elsewhere (usually at home). Outpatient treatment is offered in a variety of places: health clinics, community mental health clinics, counselors’ offices, hospital clinics, local health department offices, or residential programs with outpatient clinics.

Some of this information is from “What is Substance Abuse Treatment? A Booklet for Families” by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Association (SAMHSA).To find out more about programs available in our area, visit snohomishoverdoseprevention. com/treatment-options.

Many meet in the evenings and on weekends so partic-

Bridging Addictions & Mental Health to Self Discovery Through Mindfulness

Programs We Offer

Individual and Family Counseling • Continuing Care Phase III Group • Drug and Alcohol Assessments Relapse Prevention Phase II Group • Intensive Outpatient Program Phase I Group Two Year Deferred Prosecution • Alcohol and Drug Information School ADIS

425-283-5315

2180416

www.BridgewayTreatment.com  2018-2019 | OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE

17


Talk To Your Provider Opioid-based medications can be useful for pain management — especially for the severe pain someone may experience directly after surgery. However, opioid medications such as Vicodin, Percocet and OxyContin are powerful and can be deadly if not taken properly. Even if taken as directed, any opioid-based medication can have serious side effects, including addiction and overdose.

Consider other pain management options first While opioids can help to control pain at first, they are usually not necessary. Dr. Caleb Banta-Green, the principal research scientist at the University of Washington’s Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute, cautions

exercise, and professional help coping with the emotional effects of pain.

Be honest about your situation You need to be upfront about other medications you are taking, or whether you have had a history of addiction. This will help your pro-

people to consider

vider work with you to

medications, and opi-

find the right treatment

oids in particular, as a

plan. If you believe

part of the treatment

you’re struggling with

toolkit. Opioids should

substance use disorder,

be at the bottom, not

ask your provider for

the top.

guidance and referrals for help. Many pro-

“Adults — and kids

viders in Snohomish

— should understand

County are either able

that it’s not a victory

to offer medication

to come out of the

assisted treatment (like

doctor’s office with

buprenorphine or Sub-

opioids,” says Ban-

oxone), or recommend

ta-Green. “Your goal

a colleague in the same

is to come out with a

clinic who can.

plan and tools.” Instead, consider other options that may work just as

When opioids are prescribed

well but have far fewer risks. For short-term pain that

If opioids are the best course of treatment, start with

will likely only last a week or two, it’s always best to

the smallest dose and supply available. Prescribing

start with non-opioid pain treatments. These can in-

guidelines for adults indicate an initial prescription

clude over-the-counter pain relievers, physical therapy,

should be no more than three to seven days of medica-

18

OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE | 2018-2019


tion. You should take the medicine as indicated; taking more or using opioids more frequently can increase your risk of dependence or overdose.

Find a new provider if needed The bottom line is that patients should feel comfortable talking with their provider. If you aren’t, or your provider insists on prescribing opioids,

If you or a family member are using opioids for chronic pain or struggling with heroin or opioid addiction, ask you provider about keeping naloxone on hand. Naloxone — or

Any opioid-based medication can have serious side effects.

Narcan — is an overdose-re-

looking for a new provider. Ask friends or family members for recommendations, call your insurance company for a list of providers in your area, or visit the Washington State

versal drug, and your provider can give you a prescription so that it can go through your insurance. Another option is to purchase naloxone directly from a local pharmacy.

Health Care Authority site at hca.wa.gov. If you believe your provider has violated a law, or has demonstrated unprofessional conduct or actions that

Lastly, see our sections "Know Your Meds, Lock Your Meds" and "Take Back Unwanted Meds" in this guide for other tips and resources.

you may want to consider

mislead or harm you, another avenue is to file a complaint with the Washington State Department of Health. For more information, visit doh.wa.gov/LicensesPermitsandCertificates.

We’re here to support your recovery

Evidence-based, outpatient treatment for substance use Offering methadone and suboxone for the treatment of opioid addiction

It’s more than just a word – it’s your life

2175464

 2018-2019 | OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE

19


Talk To Seniors Last year, AARP Bulletin’s special report “America’s Addiction to Pain Pills” put a spotlight on a side of the opioid epidemic that isn’t always mentioned: opioids and older adults. The report highlighted that nearly one-third of all Medicare patients, or close to 12 million people, were prescribed opioid painkillers by their physicians in 2015. That same year, 2.7 million Americans over 50 abused painkillers, meaning they took them for reasons or in amounts beyond what their doctors prescribed. In 2014, Washington had the second-highest rate of opioid-related hospital stays when looking at data nationally for those 65 and older. Prescription monitoring program data in Snohomish County, meanwhile, show that among those with at least one opioid prescription in the last quarter of 2017, the number markedly increases among those 55 and over. This points to the need to talk with seniors about potential risks of opioid prescriptions, and what they can do to prevent misuse and abuse in their home.

Understand the increased risk of falls and injuries

fire district this year, focusing his search on falls involv-

Falls are the leading cause of death among older

their injuries.

adults in Washington, claiming nearly 900 lives each

ing people 65 and over. He found 20 cases where the patients had been prescribed pain medications prior to

year. Now, evidence suggests that older adults taking opioids are 4-5 times more likely to fall than people taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) such as aspirin and ibuprofen.

It's important to know what other medications seniors are taking.

Ask questions about medications The Washington Health Alliance encourages treating short-term pain with overthe-counter pain relievers, physical therapy and exer-

Scott Dorsey has spent 27

cise. If prescribed an opioid

years responding to medi-

pain reliever, the Alliance

cal emergencies in Snohomish County. The deputy

recommends taking the lowest dose possible for the

chief at Fire District 7 knows how medications taken

shortest period of time and talking with your doctor

by people – blood thinners, for example – can affect

about options.

patients and make them more susceptible to falls and related injuries. He recently examined data from medical calls in the

20

It is always a good idea to ask questions, Dorsey said. Pharmacists can be particularly helpful. So can the relatives of those who are prescribed prescription

OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE | 2018-2019


pain medications, he said. “We just really have to watch what our loved ones are on and ask questions,” he said, adding that advocacy is “often what makes the difference.” In addition to taking the prescription as indicated, it’s important to know what other medications seniors are taking. Opioids can have dangerous interactions with muscle relaxers, some antibiotics, benzodiazepines (like Xanax and Valium) and others.

Monitor opioid treatments In some cases, the opioids are both necessary and beneficial to helping older adults maintain their health and independence, according to Carla Perissinoto, a geriatrician at the University of California San Francisco. “I have patients who, unless they take their opioid, really cannot get out of bed,” she said in a recent interview with Kaiser Health News. “And if that small dose of opioid is going to help them get out of bed and move around their house and cook for themselves, then that is absolutely something worth doing. Their biggest risk is going to be if they stop moving and [decline more]. That’s going to have a bigger consequence on their health than prescribing an opioid at a reasonable dose and with close supervision.”

Prevent misuse and abuse in the home Many times, older adults are more susceptible to theft in the home due to the number of medications laying around. There is also an increased risk of poisonings, either from patients confusing medications or from young children getting into prescriptions. These risks can all be reduced by following three simple steps: clearly marking medications; locking them up in cabinets, bags or boxes; and safely disposing of them through MED-Project once they are no longer needed.

Opioid Overdose: What to do? NALOXONE LIFE SAVED

Northwest HIDTA

Snohomish County

SnohomishCountyWa.gov/Naloxone  2018-2019 | OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE

21


Talk To Your Kids Half of the drug overdoses in the United States are a result of opioids. Having conversations about opioids with your kids is one way you can make an impact in the opioid crisis today.

Start the conversation early Parents can start as early as preschool when it comes to talking about medication. A great way of introducing the topic is if your child takes vitamins. Explain that vitamins are medicine, too; while they are good for you and help you grow, they can also be harmful if you take too many. The key is helping your children understand that medicine can be useful, but it can also be harmful if taken the wrong way. If you take medication or vitamins yourself, there’s a good chance your child watched you take them. Being transparent about your usage reminds children that medications are taken for a specific reason, not for fun.

Be their advocate For many children, their first experience with opioids begins after a dental procedure, a broken bone, or other serious injury. Some healthcare

from the Bree Collaborative indicate that youth under 20 should not be prescribed more than a three-day supply of opioids (less than 10 pills).

Encourage conversations often Talking about proper use of medication should be ongoing as your child gets older. As a parent, your child looks to you for help and guidance in working out problems and in making decisions, including the decision not to use drugs. By engaging them in conversation, you are creating a safe space for them to talk to you about issues they come across throughout their adolescence. It’s important to discuss why people abuse drugs and alternative ways to cope with those impending

Youth under 20 should not be prescribed more than a 3-day supply of opioids.

providers prescribe opioids as a standard method for pain management. While opioid medications may be effective for treating pain in the short-term, they have an extremely high tendency for addiction and do nothing to address the underlying cause of pain. Research has shown that opioids are no better than over-the-counter medications. As your child’s advocate, you can inform the dentist or health care provider that you prefer an alternative treatment for pain management. If opioids are the best course of treatment, prescribing guidelines

22

issues. Remind your child that they have a support system in their friends and family. Be honest about current or past drug use in the family Deciding whether to tell your

child about your past drug use is a personal decision. However, your experiences and the lessons you’ve learned can better equip you to teach others. Your honesty encourages your children to also be open and honest about their own curiosities and possible experimentation with drugs. Talking about your experiences can build the foundation for ongoing conversations around this topic. You can speak the truth about addiction because you’ve survived it.

OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE | 2018-2019


they should not be shared with anyone else. Supervise the dispensing of the medication by keeping count of the number of pills in the bottle ensure they are being taken as prescribed. Monitor your child’s level of pain and be sure to look for signs of dependence. Medications should be kept in a safe place where they cannot be accessed by other family members or friends. And it’s always important to dispose of any unused medication at your local MED-Project disposal

If there is a family member or close friend who is actively using, it’s important to explain this person’s struggles to your child in an age-appropriate way.

kiosk. Find your nearest kiosk here: med-project.org/ locations/snohomish.

Share what you’re doing to get that individual the help they need to make healthier choices. Consider reaching out to a counselor, your community church, or a group like Alateen or Al-Anon. This allows your child to find a space to share feelings about a friend or family member’s use.

Monitor opioid prescriptions carefully It’s important to tell children and adolescents that prescribed pain medications are medically appropriate to take under the supervision of a health care provider.

Services Include: DUI Assessment Outpatient Services Intensive Outpatient Services

Substance Use Disorder Individual Counseling Treatment Groups Recovery Support Groups

If you have agreed for your child to take opioids, it’s important to discuss the risks of misuse and be clear

Other Resources Here are a few websites with additional information:

• Partnership for Drug-Free Kids - drugfree.org • Operation Prevention - operationprevention.com • National Institute of Drug Abuse - drugabuse.gov

Contact Us

425-493-5800 or 4change@sunriseemail.com Mental Health Treatment Services also available

 2018-2019 | OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE

23


Get Involved As the opioid epidemic devastates families, neighborhoods, and communities in Snohomish County, it’s difficult to know how to aid others or where to get involved. Here are a few resources and ideas that can help you keep your neighborhood safe as we fight the epidemic together:

Pick up a needle clean-up kit Used needles left in public and private places are both a nuisance and a potential safety concern. Regardless of whether they’re used to inject medicine like insulin or an illegal drug like heroin, a used needle can be potentially dangerous if found lying on the ground. While the risk of contracting a disease like Hepatitis C from a needle-stick injury is low, you can further reduce

as drug use and/or trafficking, prostitution, storage of stolen property and vehicles, occupation of RVs or other structures not permitted for residence, and more. To report a nuisance property, call the Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office non-emergency line at 425-407-3999. You can also file a complaint through the Snohomish Health District online at snohd.org or by emailing swtquestions@snohd.org.

that risk by using the right equipment and clean up pro-

Talk to your faith leader

cedures. It’s also important to teach children to never

Local faith communities have charity and non-profit en-

pick up needles found on the ground and to report

tities who provide services and outreach to vulnerable

them immediately to a trusted adult.

populations, including those who struggle with addic-

Free needle clean-up kits and drop off locations can

tion and/or homelessness. Some of these include:

be found here: snohomishoverdoseprevention.com/

• The Interfaith Association of Northwest Washington

clean-up.

• Salvation Army

Lock up your meds Half of all opioid-related deaths in the U.S. involve a

• MercyWatch • Lutheran Community Services Northwest • Catholic Community Services

prescription opioid. If you have medications in your home — whether they’re prescribed by a doctor or

Talk to the members of your congregation or your faith

over-the-counter — lock them up. See "Know Your

leaders to see which organization they recommend.

Meds, Lock Your Meds" in this issue for details.

Report nuisance properties

Connect with a community coalition The key to success in tackling any community-wide

Nuisance properties pose a public safety risk and can

problem is involvement and partnerships. Several pub-

potentially impact neighborhood property values by un-

lic agencies in Snohomish County have existing com-

checked criminal activity as well as violate county and

munity coalitions that meet regularly and are engaged

Snohomish Health District codes. These properties are

in the challenges our neighbors, friends and families

also magnets for squatters and criminal behavior, such

face. The following is not a complete list, but includes

24

OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE | 2018-2019


coalitions that focus on prevention/intervention, a specific community, or Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs):

Share your story If you or someone you love has struggled with addiction, consider sharing your story. Drug users and addicts have long been stigmatized. Until people in

• Monroe Community Coalition

the community begin to see themselves (or their sis-

• Marysville Together Coalition

ters, brothers, daughters, sons, and spouses) in the

• Darrington Prevention Intervention Community

problem and addiction is viewed as a disease, rather

Coalition

than a moral failing, we will never win the battle. Visit

• Granite Falls Community Coalition

snohomishoverdoseprevention.com/share-your-

• Snohomish County Children’s Wellness Coalition

story to learn more.

• Casino Road Stakeholders • ACEs Quarterly/NEAR Collaborative • Children’s Commission

Volunteer for crisis support Consider actively engaging with agencies providing support and outreach. United Way of Snohomish County (uwsc.org) has dozens of volunteer opportunities, including serving as a 2-1-1 operator who can connect people in need to vetted health and human services in our community.

EMPLOYMENT • TRAINING • JOB SEARCH SERVICES FOR PEOPLE AFFECTED BY THE OPIOID CRISIS

GET CONNECTED TODAY ❱❱ http://www.worksourceonline.com/ WorkSource Everett • 3201 Smith Ave • Everett, WA • ert@workforcesnohomish.org

WorkSource and Workforce Snohomish are equal opportunity employers/programs. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Washington Relay 711.

 2018-2019 | OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE

25


Give Responsibly The opioid crisis is impacting our community in both subtle and obvious ways. We see the homeless camps and dirty needles. We also see family members, neighbors, and friends struggling to overcome debilitating addictions. For most of us, we want to help. Compassionate donations of food and clothing often end up discarded when they are not well matched with recipients. Did you know that city and county workers spend several hours each week clearing heaps of wasted donations from public spaces? So how should we help? Here are suggestions for how you can give responsibly.

Give your time It’s important you get involved in a way and at a level you are comfortable with. Unfortunately, some well-meaning efforts aren’t effective. For example, compassionate donations of food and clothing often are unused when they are not well suited for recipients’ needs.

Donate to an organization that can provide appropriate support to those suffering from addiction or experiencing homelessness. Many of our local partners also have donation wish lists online that you can purchase items from and ship directly to them, or community events, including clothing drives. That way, there is no doubt that your generosity will be

By giving responsibly and with the guidance of non-

used to help someone. There are food banks, reli-

profits or public agencies that work with individuals

gious institutions and government agencies that can

in need, you can ensure that your donation will be di-

help direct your help to areas of greatest need in

rected to the places it is most needed. Call a church,

your community.

community-based organization, or government agency to find out how you can be of service. Volunteers

Connect others with resources

are always needed. Take your individual sense of

If someone you know is in need of immediate help

compassion and join it to a larger effort.

with rent assistance, job training, food, shelter, or

Donate with care

support services, we encourage you to contact 2-11, which is managed by the Volunteers of America

One of the best ways to get involved and have an

of Western Washington. The 2-1-1 information and

immediate impact is to make a donation to a non-

referral specialists are available around the clock to

profit organization. Since money given directly to

connect people with resources in their community.

someone in need may not be used to purchase food or other basic items, your donation is not helping them create real change in their life. All of our goals should be to do what we can to end suffering and

For additional information, look in the pages of this resource guide to find an organization that could use your help. Together, we will beat this crisis.

help guide people to a healthier future.

26

OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE | 2018-2019


RESOURCE DIRECTORY BEHAVIORAL HEALTH Asian Counseling Treatment Services (425) 776-1290 5516 196th St. SW #101 Lynnwood, WA 98036 www.actsrehab.org The agency provides substance use disorder treatment and pathological gambling and domestic perpetrator treatment programs. Additional Services: Outpatient treatment, support groups Insurance: Medicaid/Apple Health, Sliding Fee

Bridgeway Treatment Services, LLC (425) 283-5315 2013 19th St. Everett, WA 98201 www.bridgewaytreatment.com Bridgeway is a mental health & chemical dependency treatment program that is not your standard 'disease model' style of treatment. DBT & CBT is used to develop better coping strategies for negative behavior. Additional Services: Dual diagnosis care, outpatient treatment Insurance: Medicaid/Apple Health

Canyon Park Treatment Solutions (425) 672-7293 22026 20th Ave. SE, Suite 101 Bothell, WA 98021 www.westernwashingtonctc.com Canyon Park Treatment Solutions is part of Acadia Healthcare, providing outpatient services for those individuals who suffer from substance abuse disorder. Additional Services: Outpatient treatment, medication assisted treatment Insurance: Medicaid/Apple Health, Private Pay, Kaiser PPO and HMO, Beacon Health (Value Options), Regence of WA

Compass Health (425) 349-6800 3322 Broadway Ave. Everett, WA 98201 www.compasshealth.org Compass Health, Northwest Washington’s behavioral healthcare leader, integrates behavioral health and medical care services to support clients and communities when and where they need us. Additional Services: Outpatient treatment, case management, crisis/support hotline, support groups, emergency housing, medication assisted treatment, youth services Insurance: Medicare, Medicaid/Apple Health

National Alliance on Mental Illness Snohomish County (425) 339-3620 www.namisnohomishcounty.org No-cost classes and support groups for people living with mental illness and their families. Additional Services: Educational resources, presentations, advocacy

Sea Mar Community Health Centers: Lynnwood (425) 977-2560 4111 Alderwood Mall Blvd. Lynnwood, WA 98036 www.seamar.org Additional Services: Support groups, military services, youth services, dual-diagnosis care, outpatient treatment Insurance: Sliding Fee/Income Scale, Medicaid/Apple Health, Private Insurance

Sea Mar Community Health Centers: Monroe Behavioral Health (360) 805-3122 14090 Fryelands Blvd SE, Suite 306 Monroe, WA 98272 www.seamar.org

ing medication assisted treatment for opioids, adult outpatient substance use disorder (SUD) counseling, youth SUD counseling, mental health services, child & family. Additional Services: Inpatient treatment, case management, outpatient treatment, child/family counseling, veterans services, medication assisted treatment, dual-diagnosis Insurance: Sliding Fee/Income Scale, Medicaid/Apple Health

Snohomish Health District (425) 252-5443 3020 Rucker Ave. Everett, WA 98201 www.snohd.org Maternal & Child Health: First Steps (Pregnant women, mothers & infants), children & youth with special health care needs (e.g. infants exposed to substances in utero), technical guidance on adverse childhood experiences & resilience. Additional Services: Case management, community organizing, public health technical advising, public health nurses and behavioral health specialists

Sunrise Behavioral Health Services, Inc. (425) 493-5800 1021 N Broadway Ave. Everett, WA 98201 www.sunriseservicesinc.com Individualized outpatient substance use disorder treatment and assessments including DUI and intensive outpatient services. Additional Services: Outpatient treatment, support groups, case management, veterans services, dual diagnosis care Insurance: Sliding Fee/Income Scale, Medicaid/Apple Health, Private Insurance

Our Monroe Behavioral Health site offers a number of services includ 2018-2019 | OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE

27


BEHAVIORAL HEALTH continued Therapeutic Health Services (425) 347-5121 9930 Evergreen Way, Building Z150 Everett, WA 98204 www.ths-wa.org Therapeutic Health Services provides a complete range of evidence based mental health and substance use treatment and counseling, including medication assisted treatment for opioid addiction. Additional Services: Outpatient treatment, case management, support group, veterans services, youth services, dual diagnosis care, medication assisted treatment, pregnancy/parenting Insurance: Sliding Fee, Medicaid/Apple Health

CASE MANAGEMENT

Pacific Treatment Alternatives/Safe Babies Safe Moms (425) 259-7142 ext 200 1721 Hewitt Ave #200 Everett, WA 98201

Sunrise Behavioral Health Services, Inc. (425) 493-5800 1021 N Broadway Ave. Everett, WA 98201 www.sunriseservicesinc.com

We host the Parent-Child Assistance Program in Snohomish County. This case management program works to connect mothers who used alcohol/ drugs during pregnancy to community services to meet the needs of them and their children. Additional Services: Pregnancy/parenting support Insurance: Medicaid/Apple Health

Individualized outpatient substance use disorder treatment and assessments including DUI and intensive outpatient services. Additional Services: Outpatient treatment, support groups, case management, veterans services, dual diagnosis care Insurance: Sliding Fee/Income Scale, Medicaid/Apple Health, Private Insurance

Sea Mar Community Health Centers: Monroe Behavioral Health (360) 805-3122 14090 Fryelands Blvd SE, Suite 306 Monroe, WA 98272 www.seamar.org

The Hand Up Project www.thehandupproject.org

The mission of Cocoon House is to empower young people, families, and the community to break the cycle of homelessness through outreach, housing, and prevention. Additional Services: Crisis/support hotline, youth services (ages 12-24)

Our Monroe Behavioral Health site offers a number of services including medication assisted treatment for opioids, adult outpatient substance use disorder (SUD) counseling, youth SUD counseling, mental health services, child & family. Additional Services: Inpatient treatment, case management, outpatient treatment, child/family counseling, veterans services, medication assisted treatment, dual-diagnosis Insurance: Sliding Fee/Income Scale, Medicaid/Apple Health

Compass Health (425) 349-6800 3322 Broadway Ave. Everett, WA 98201 www.compasshealth.org

Snohomish Health District (425) 252-5443 3020 Rucker Ave. Everett, WA 98201 www.snohd.org

Northwest Washington’s behavioral healthcare leader, integrates behavioral health and medical care services to support clients and communities when and where they need us. Additional Services: Outpatient treatment, case management, crisis/support hotline, support groups, emergency housing, medication assisted treatment, youth services Insurance: Medicare, Medicaid/Apple Health

Maternal & Child Health: First Steps (Pregnant women, mothers & infants), children & youth with special health care needs (e.g. infants exposed to substances in utero), technical guidance on adverse childhood experiences & resilience. Additional Services: Case management, community organizing, public health technical advising, public health nurses and behavioral health specialists

Cocoon House (425) 259-5802 2929 Pine St. Everett, WA 98201 www.cocoonhouse.org

The vision of The Hand Up Project is to assist people struggling with substance abuse and destructive behavior that has led to homelessness. We provide support from those who have had the same experience and are now enjoying a new way of living. Additional Services: support resource referrals (including: transportation, housing, assessments, treatment, and education)

Therapeutic Health Services (425) 347-5121 9930 Evergreen Way, Building Z150 Everett, WA 98204 www.ths-wa.org Therapeutic Health Services provides a complete range of evidence based mental health and substance use treatment and counseling, including medication assisted treatment for opioid addiction. Additional Services: Outpatient treatment, case management, support group, veterans services, youth services, dual diagnosis care, medication assisted treatment, pregnancy/parenting Insurance: Sliding Fee, Medicaid/Apple Health

Tulalip Healing to Wellness Court (360) 716-4773 6103 31st Ave NE Tulalip, WA www.tulaliptribes-nsn.gov/Home/Government/Departments/TribalCourt.aspx Comprehensive services to promote ac-

28

OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE | 2018-2019


countability and provide support to criminal defendants charged with non-violent offenses to avoid criminal prosecution. Additional Services: Legal services Insurance: Available to Tulalip Tribal Citizens

CRISIS & SUPPORT HOTLINES Care Crisis Chat Line (800) 584-3578 www.voaww.org www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org 24 Hour telephone emotional support and crisis intervention.

Cocoon House (425) 259-5802 2929 Pine St. Everett, WA 98201 www.cocoonhouse.org The mission of Cocoon House is to empower young people, families, and the community to break the cycle of homelessness through outreach, housing, and prevention. Additional Services: Crisis/support hotline, youth services (ages 12-24)

Compass Health (425) 349-6800 3322 Broadway Ave. Everett, WA 98201 www.compasshealth.org Northwest Washington’s behavioral healthcare leader, integrates behavioral health and medical care services to support clients and communities when and where they need us. Additional Services: Outpatient treatment, case management, crisis/support hotline, support groups, emergency housing, medication assisted treatment, youth services Insurance: Medicare, Medicaid/Apple Health

Partnership for Drug-Free Kids (855) DRUG-FREE www.drugfree.org Additional Services: Parent coaching, online resources, recovery/family support groups

Veterans Crisis Line (800) 273-8255, Press 1 Free, confidential resource available to anyone, even if you're not registered with the VA.

WA 211 (211) www.win211.org Washington 211 is a free statewide service that connects Washington residents to local community services and resources by dialing 2-1-1 or by searching on www.win211.org. Additional Services: Information/referrals

WA Recovery Helpline (866) 789-1511 www.warecoveryhelpline.org The Recovery Help Line is a statewide information and referral service for those seeking behavioral health treatment, including medication assisted treatment and information about other recovery supports. Additional Services: We Provide I&R support to all populations in WA State

EDUCATION & OUTREACH Mental Health First Aid (888) 244-8980 ext. 1 www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org The National Council for Behavioral Health develops curriculum and supports instructors for Mental Health First Aid classes aimed to help participants handle a mental health or substance abuse crisis. Additional Services: Mental health education, veterans services, youth services

National Alliance on Mental Illness Snohomish County (425) 339-3620 www.namisnohomishcounty.org No-cost classes and support groups for people living with mental illness and their families. Additional Services: Educational resources, presentations, advocacy

Center for Opioid Safety Education (206) 685-5632 www.stopoverdose.org We provide training and education on opioids and overdose response via stopoverdose.org and in-person trainings. Additional Services: Education

AIDS Outreach Project/Snohomish County Syringe Exchange (425) 258-2977 1625 E Marine View Drive, #4 Everett, WA 98201 Started in 1988, The AIDS Outreach Project serves Snohomish County by conducting a 1-to-1 needle exchange to lower the risk of infection for people who inject as well as providing a number of other harm reduction services. Additional Services: HIV testing, Heptatitis C Testing, Hepatitis A and B Vaccinations, education, referral to resources

GENERAL RESOURCES Care Coordination (425) 265-2289; (425) 265-2221 4100 Alderwood Mall Blvd, Suite 1 Lynnwood, WA 98036 www.homage.com Provides individuals discharged from hospital with advocacy and health management resources.

Department of Social and Health Services (877) 501-2233 See Website for Snohomish County Locations www.dshs.wa.gov Determines eligibility for programs such as Basic Food Program and Apple Health.

Health Systems Quality Assurance (800) 633-6828 P.O. Box 47857 Olympia, WA 98504 www.doh.wa.gov Investigates complaints about healthcare facilities and professionals.

 2018-2019 | OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE

29


GENERAL RESOURCES continued

Victim Support Services (888) 288-9221 www.victimsupportservices.org

Lifelong AIDS Alliance (206) 957-1600 Peer support and advocacy for victims www.lifelong.org of crime. Offers food, housing, and health services to the community.

Lifespan Respite (425) 740-3788 11627 Airport Rd, Suite B Everett, WA 98204 www.lifespanrespite.org

WorkSource Everett: (425) 258-6300 Lynnwood: (425) 412-6867 Monroe: (360) 799-3421 See Website for Snohomish County Locations www.worksourcewa.com

Voucher program for unpaid family caregivers in need of a short break while supporting an individual who has a special need or disability.

Job search and placement assistance for displaced workers, veterans and people with disabilities.

Relatives as Parents (425) 290-1240 11627 Airport Rd, Suite B Everett, WA 98204

GENERAL HOUSING RESOURCES

Support program for relatives raising another relative's child full time. Includes peer support, information, and advocacy.

Everett Housing Authority (425) 258-9222 3107 Colby Ave, P.O. Box 1547 Everett, WA 98206 www.evha.org

Salvation Army (425) 259-8129 2525 Rucker Ave. Everett, WA 98201

Affordable and subsidized housing for those who are eligible within the City of Everett.

Limited assistance in paying for prescription medication. Food bank for Everett adult-only households.

Snohomish County Case Management (425) 513-1900 3000 Rockefeller Ave, M/S 305 Everett, WA 98201 www.snoco.org Case management services for Medicaid eligible residents of Snohomish County.

St. Vincent de Paul of Snohomish County (425) 355-3504 6424 Broadway Ave, P.O. Box 2269 Everett, WA 98213

Cascade Valley Hospital (360) 435-2133 330 Stillaguamish Ave. Arlington, WA 98223 www.cascadevalley.org EvergreenHealth Monroe (360) 794-7497 14701 179th Ave. SE Monroe, WA 98272 www.evergreenhealthmonroe.com Providence Regional Medical Center (425) 261-2000 1700 13th St. Everett, WA 98201 www.washington.providence.org Swedish Edmonds (425) 640-4000 21601 76th Ave. W Edmonds, WA 98026 www.swedish.org Swedish Mill Creek (425) 357-3900 13020 Meridian Ave. S Everett, WA 98208 www.swedish.org

VA Puget Sound Health Care System Hope Options (425) 303-1116 (800) 329-8387 1660 S Columbian Way Division of Everett Housing Authority Seattle, WA 98108 dedicated to intervention and case www.pugetsound.va.gov management for those who are at risk of losing their housing due to mental health or behavioral issues.

Housing Authority of Snohomish County (425) 290-8499 12711 4th Ave. W Everett, WA 98204 www.hasco.org Housing subsidies for eligible applicants throughout Snohomish County.

Emergency assistance and limited assistance for rent and prescription medication.

30

HOSPITALS

OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE | 2018-2019

INPATIENT TREATMENT Evergreen Recovery Centers: Everett Detoxification Facility (425) 258-3255 2601 Summit Ave. Everett, WA 98201 www.evergreenrc.org Minimum 5 day withdrawal management program to prepare patients for residential or outpatient treatment. Insurance: Medicaid/Apple Health, Private Insurance


Evergreen Recovery Centers: Lynnwood Detoxification Facility (425) 258-3256 20508 56th Ave. W Lynnwood, WA 98036 www.evergreenrc.org Minimum 5 day withdrawal management program to prepare patients for residential or outpatient treatment. Insurance: Medicaid/Apple Health, Private Insurance

Lakeside-Milam Recovery Centers (425) 823-3116 10322 NE 132nd St. Kirkland, WA 98034 www.lakesidemilam.com We are a locally owned, region based alcohol and drug treatment center serving the greater Puget Sound area since 1983. Additional Services: Recovery housing, outpatient treatment, detox, medication assisted treatment Insurance: Private Insurance

Providence Drug & Alcohol Treatment Services (425) 258-7390, option 5 916 Pacific Ave., 1st Floor Everett, WA 98201 www.washington.providence.org Located in Providence Regional Medical Center Everett (Pacific Campus), our services include a medical detox, intensive outpatient treatment, and a Suboxone clinic. You can call us 24/7. Additional Services: Inpatient treatment, chemical dependency treatment, medication assisted treatment, assessments/monthly monitoring, detox Insurance: Medicare, Private Insurance

Sea Mar Community Health Centers: Monroe Behavioral Health (360) 805-3122 14090 Fryelands Blvd SE, Suite 306 Monroe, WA 98272 www.seamar.org Our Monroe Behavioral Health site offers a number of services including medication assisted treatment for opioids, adult outpatient substance use disorder (SUD) counseling, youth SUD counseling, mental health services, child & family. Additional Services: Inpatient treatment, case management,

outpatient treatment, child/family counseling, veterans services, medication assisted treatment, dual-diagnosis Insurance: Sliding Fee/Income Scale, Medicaid/Apple Health

LEGAL SERVICES Dispute Resolution Center (425) 339-1335, ext 5; (425) 259-3191 www.voaww.org/drc Conflict resolution assistance for family issues, neighborhood disputes, and landlord/tenant conflicts.

www.actsrehab.org The agency provides substance use disorder treatment and pathological gambling and domestic perpetrator treatment programs. Additional Services: Outpatient treatment, support groups Insurance: Medicaid/Apple Health, Sliding Fee

Bridgeway Treatment Services, LLC (425) 283-5315 2013 19th St. Everett, WA 98201 www.bridgewaytreatment.com

Bridgeway is a Mental Health & Chemical Dependency treatment program that Legal Services Hotline is not your standard 'disease model' (888) 201-1014 style of treatment. DBT & CBT is used www.nwjustice.org to develop better coping strategies for www.washingtonlawhelp.org negative behavior. Non-Criminal legal services for low Additional Services: Dual diagnosis care, outpatient income individuals of any age. treatment Insurance: Medicaid/Apple Health

Protection Order Assistance Office (425) 388-3638 3000 Rockefeller Ave., M/S 605 Everett, WA 98201 www.snoco.org; search "Protection Orders"

Assists individuals in obtaining court ordered domestic violence, anti-harassment, vulnerable adult, or sexual assault protection orders.

Canyon Park Treatment Solutions (425) 672-7293 22026 20th Ave. SE, Suite 101 Bothell, WA 98021 www.westernwashingtonctc.com

Canyon Park Treatment Solutions is part of Acadia Healthcare, providing out-patient services for those individuals who suffer from substance abuse Snohomish County Lawyer Referral disorder. Service Additional Services: Outpatient treatment, medication (425) 388-3018 assisted treatment Referrals to Snohomish County area Insurance: Medicaid/Apple Health, Private Pay, Kaiser PPO attorneys. and HMO, Beacon Health (Value Options), Regence of WA

Snohomish County Legal Services (425) 258-9283, ext 16 www.snocolegal.org Non-Criminal legal aid for low income residents of Snohomish County.

OUTPATIENT TREATMENT Asian Counseling Treatment Services (425) 776-1290 5516 196th St. SW #101 Lynnwood, WA 98036

Catholic Community Services Recovery Center (425) 258-5270 2610 Wetmore Ave. Everett, WA 98201 www.ccsww.org CCS-RC is an Adult/Youth Outpatient facility. We offer all outpatient services including but not limited to assessments, youth services, adult services, medication assistance therapy, co-occurring, inpatient/detox placement, and PPW programs.

 2018-2019 | OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE

31


outpatient treatment

Additional Services: Youth services, medication assisted treatment, dual-diagnosis Insurance: Sliding Fee/Income Scale, Medicaid/Apple Health, Private Insurance

Clinics offer holistic outpatient care to assist persons dealing with substance abuse disorders. Additional Services: Case management, parenting services, housing referrals, dual diagnosis care Insurance: Sliding Fee/Income Scale, Medicaid/Apple Health, Private Insurance

Compass Health (425) 349-6800 3322 Broadway Ave. Everett, WA 98201 www.compasshealth.org

Ideal Option (877) 522-1275 3624 Colby Ave. Everett, WA 98201 www.idealoption.net/everett

continued

Northwest Washington’s behavioral healthcare leader, integrates behavioral health and medical care services to support clients and communities when and where they need us. Additional Services: Outpatient treatment, case management, crisis/support hotline, support groups, emergency housing, medication assisted treatment, youth services Insurance: Medicare, Medicaid/Apple Health

Everett Treatment Services (425) 347-9070 7207 Evergreen Way Everett, WA 98203 www.everetttreatmentservices.com Additional Services: Support groups Insurance: Sliding Fee/Income Scale, Medicaid/Apple Health, Private Insurance

Evergreen Recovery Centers: Everett Outpatient (425) 259-5842 2732 Grand Ave. Everett, WA 98201 www.evergreenrc.org Clinics offer holistic outpatient care to assist persons dealing with substance abuse disorders. Additional Services: Case management, parenting services, housing referrals, dual diagnosis care Insurance: Sliding Fee/Income Scale, Medicaid/Apple Health, Private Insurance

Evergreen Recovery Centers: Lynnwood Outpatient (425) 248-4900 www.evergreenrc.org 4230 198th St. SW Lynnwood, WA 98036

32

Our office in Everett Washington offers a comprehensive Medication Assisted Treatment (Suboxone® / Buprenorphine, Vivitrol® / Naltrexone, Acamprosate and many other medications) Program. Please contact us if you are interested in learning more about our program. Insurance: Medicare, Medicaid/Apple Health, Private Insurance

Lakeside-Milam Recovery Centers (425) 823-3116 www.lakesidemilam.com 9930 Evergreen Way, Bldg. X, Suite 103 Everett, WA 98204 We are a locally owned, region based alcohol and drug treatment center serving the greater Puget Sound area since 1983. Additional Services: Recovery housing, inpatient treatment, detox, medication assisted treatment Insurance: Private Insurance

Providence Drug and Alcohol Treatment Services (425) 258-7390, option 5 916 Pacific Avenue, 1st Floor Everett, WA 98201 www.washington.providence.org Located in Providence Regional Medical Center Everett (Pacific Campus), our services include a medical detox, intensive outpatient treatment, and a Suboxone clinic. You can call us 24/7. Additional Services: Outpatient treatment, chemical dependency treatment, medication assisted treatment, assessments/monthly monitoring, detox Insurance: Medicare, Private Insurance

OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE | 2018-2019

Sea Mar Community Health Centers: Lynnwood (425) 977-2560 4111 Alderwood Mall Blvd. Lynnwood, WA 98036 www.seamar.org Additional Services: Support groups, military services, youth services, dual-diagnosis care, outpatient treatment Insurance: Sliding Fee/Income Scale, Medicaid/Apple Health, Private Insurance

Sea Mar Community Health Centers: Monroe Behavioral Health (360) 805-3122 14090 Fryelands Blvd SE, Suite 306 Monroe, WA 98272 www.seamar.org Our Monroe Behavioral Health site offers a number of services including medication assisted treatment for opioids, adult outpatient substance use disorder (SUD) counseling, youth SUD counseling, mental health services, child & family. Additional Services: Inpatient treatment, case management, outpatient treatment, child/family counseling, veterans services, medication assisted treatment, dual-diagnosis Insurance: Sliding Fee/Income Scale, Medicaid/Apple Health

Sunrise Behavioral Health Services, Inc. (425) 493-5800 1021 N Broadway Ave. Everett, WA 98201 www.sunriseservicesinc.com Individualized outpatient substance use disorder treatment and assessments including DUI and intensive outpatient services. Additional Services: Outpatient treatment, support groups, case management, veterans services, dual diagnosis care Insurance: Sliding Fee/Income Scale, Medicaid/Apple Health, Private Insurance

Therapeutic Health Services (425) 347-5121 9930 Evergreen Way, Building Z150 Everett, WA 98204 www.ths-wa.org Therapeutic Health Services provides


a complete range of evidence based mental health and substance use treatment and counseling, including medication assisted treatment for opioid addiction. Additional Services: Outpatient treatment, case management, support group, veterans services, youth services, dual diagnosis care, medication assisted treatment, pregnancy/parenting Insurance: Sliding Fee, Medicaid/Apple Health

Tulalip Tribe: Chemical Dependency Programs (360) 716-4323 www.tulaliptribes-nsn.gov/Home/Government/Departments/ChemicalDependency.aspx 7520 Totem Beach Rd. Tulalip, WA 98271 Provides culturally based programs to nurture our children families and community members by honoring our cultural teachings. Additional Services: Individual/group family counseling, intensive outpatient treatment, medication assisted treatment, case management, other Insurance: Open to Tulalip Tribal Citizens

RECOVERY & EMERGENCY HOUSING Everett Gospel Mission: Men’s Shelter (425) 740-2550 3711 Smith Ave. Everett, WA 98201 www.egmission.org Emergency housing, meals, clothing, support and recovery programs.

Everett Gospel Mission: Women and Children’s Shelter (425) 740-2501 5126 S 2nd Ave Everett, WA 98203 www.egmission.org Emergency housing, meals, clothing, support and recovery programs.

Evergreen Recovery Centers: Pregnant & Parenting Women’s Residential Program (425) 258-2407 2601 Summit Ave. Everett, WA 98201 www.evergreenrc.org Long term residential addiction treatment program. Allows mother to focus on recovery while child receives specialized care with developmental programming. Additional Services: Behavioral health, family counseling

Lakeside-Milam Recovery Centers (425) 823-3116 10322 NE 132nd St. Kirkland, WA 98034 www.lakesidemilam.com We are a locally owned, region based alcohol and drug treatment center serving the greater Puget Sound area since 1983. Additional Services: Inpatient treatment, outpatient treatment, detox, medication assisted treatment Insurance: Private Insurance

Monroe Gospel Women’s Mission (360) 863-9003 450 S Lewis St. Monroe, WA 98272 www.monroegospelmission.org Emergency housing, meals, case management and support for homeless women.

Oxford House (301) 587-2916 www.oxfordhouse.org Clean and sober group housing with locations around Snohomish county and beyond. Locations and applications can be found on the Oxford House website.

SUPPORT GROUPS Asian Counseling Treatment Services (425) 776-1290 5516 196th St. SW #101 Lynnwood, WA 98036 www.actsrehab.org

Disorder treatment, pathological gambling and domestic perpetrator treatment program. Additional Services: Outpatient treatment, support groups Insurance: Medicaid/Apple Health, Sliding Fee

Mental Health First Aid 1-888-244-8980 ext. 1 www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org The National Council for Behavioral Health develops curriculum and supports instructors for Mental Health First Aid classes aimed to help participants handle a mental health or substance abuse crisis. Additional Services: Mental health education, veterans services, youth services.

Nar-Anon (425) 258-2407 www.washingtonwestsoundareanaranon.wordpress.com Nar-Anon is a program that helps the friends and families of addicts learn to manage our own lives again. Additional Services: Behavioral health, family counseling

Narcotics Anonymous (425) 609-6170 www.everettwana.org Regular meetings for people who suffer from the disease of addiction to help each other stay clean, share their experiences, and gain strength and hope.

Sunrise Behavioral Health Services, Inc. (425) 493-5800 1021 N Broadway Ave. Everett, WA 98201 www.sunriseservicesinc.com Individualized outpatient substance use disorder treatment and assessments including DUI and intensive outpatient services. Additional Services: Outpatient treatment, support groups, case management, veterans services, dual diagnosis care Insurance: Sliding Fee/Income Scale, Medicaid/Apple Health, Private Insurance

The agency provides Substance Use  2018-2019 | OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE

33


SUPPORT GROUPS continued Therapeutic Health Services (425) 347-5121 9930 Evergreen Way, Building Z150 Everett, WA 98204 www.ths-wa.org Therapeutic Health Services provides a complete range of evidence based mental health and substance use treatment and counseling, including medication assisted treatment for opioid addiction. Additional Services: Outpatient treatment, case management, support group, veterans services, youth services, dual diagnosis care, medication assisted treatment, pregnancy/parenting Insurance: Sliding Fee, Medicaid/Apple Health

TRANSPORTATION Community Transit: Customer Information Service (425) 353-7433 7100 Hardeson Rd. Everett, WA 98203 www.communitytransit.org General transit information, including trip planning.

Community Transit: RideStore (425) 348-2350 20110 46th Ave. W Lynnwood, WA 98036 Transit information, lost and found, ORCA card purchases.

Community Transit: Travel Training Program (425) 348-2379 7100 Hardeson Rd. Everett, WA 98203 Education program to teach seniors and people with disabilities how to use the transit system.

Dial-A-Ride Transportation (425) 347-5912 11323 Commando Rd. W, Suite 215 Everett, WA 98204 www.dialaride.org Bus service for those unable to use Community Transit due to disabilities. Must meet ADA eligibility requirements.

Everett Para Transit (425) 257-8801 3225 Cedar St. Everett, WA 98201 www.everetttransit.org Transportation within Everett for those who are ADA disability eligible.

Everett Transit (425) 257-7777 3201 Smith Ave. Everett, WA 98201 www.everetttransit.org Transortation throughout the City of Everett.

Medicaid Transportation - Hopelink (855) 766-7433 14812 Main St. Bellevue, WA 98007 www.hopelink.org

Created to make sure that the men and women who have honorably servced our country have access to the resources they need during their time of need.

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (800) 827-1000 www.va.gov Information about benefits for veterans and locations of hospitals, clinics, and regional offices.

Washington Department of Veterans Affairs (800) 562-2308 www.dva.wa.gov Information for applying for federal and state services and programs.

Transportation for Medicaid recipients to and from medical services.

VETERANS SERVICES Network of Care (425) 776-1290 www.snohomish.wa.networkofcare.org Services, information, support, and advocacy for veterans and their families.

Retired Activities Office (425) 304-3775 13910 45th Ave NE, Room 817 Marysville, WA 98271 www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org Information and assistance for retired U.S. service members when applying for services and benefits.

34

Snohomish County Veterans Assistance Program (425) 388-7255 3000 Rockefeller Ave., Admin East - LL Everett, WA 98201 www.snohomishwa.gov/598/VeteransAssistance-Program

OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE | 2018-2019

The information contained in this resource directory was collected based on information submitted from various agencies as of August 2018. We will continue to update available resources on our website at www.snohomishoverdoseprevention.com/ treatment-options.


 2018-2019 | OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE

35


Compassionate. Affordable. Accessible We accept Washington AppleHealth, Medicare, Medicare Advantage and Uninsured.

High quality, affordable primary health care for your family.

Do you or a loved one struggle with dependence on prescription pain medications or heroin? Now all CHC primary care medical providers who care for adults are certified to prescribe Suboxone.

Suboxone (buprenorphine/naloxone) is a prescription medication used to treat dependence on opioids, such as heroin, OxyContin, or Vicodin.

Patients can receive care in the provider’s office, and don’t have to travel to a special treatment center.

CHC is offering Suboxone treatment to new and established patients. To make an appointment, call 425-789-3789, and ask to schedule an appointment to discuss Suboxone treatment with one of our providers. Medical

Chronic Disease Management Diabetes Family Practice Immunization Internal Medicine Medical Walk-In

Nutrition Obstetrics Pedatrics Prenatal Care Well-Child Checkups

Dental

Consultation Crowns Extractions Fillings Oral Exam and X-rays Oral Health Education

Root Canal Treatments Routine Cleanings Sealants

Pharmacy With a discount pharmacy onsite, CHC provides its patients with the convenience to fill your prescription right after your appointment.

Behavioral Health

Our Behavioral Health Specialists are trained in counseling and other behavioral therapies to work closely with your PCP and provide you with the care you need.

Locations: Arlington | Edmonds | Everett-Central Everett-College | Everett-North | Everett-South | Lynnwood 36

Call for an appointment today! 425-789-3789 | www.CHCsno.org OVERDOSE PREVENTION RESOURCE GUIDE | 2018-2019

Special Sections - Opioid Resource Guide 8.29.18  

i20180831070815800.pdf

Special Sections - Opioid Resource Guide 8.29.18  

i20180831070815800.pdf