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Make a splash Your guide to summer fun

DARRINGTON

The offbeat destination

BEAUTY BENEATH

Put underwater diving on your bucket list

Display until August 2018

Supplement to The Daily Herald © 2018

SUMMER ISSUE $3.99


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WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE · SUMMER 2018


Quil Ceda Village

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World’s Foremost Outfitter

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Quil Ceda Village is conveniently located on the I-5 corridor. Use exit 200 or 202 and turn west.

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SUMMER 2018 · WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

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WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE · SUMMER 2018 2097210


24 FEATURES

SUMMER 2018

Contents

24

SORTICULTURE

Be inspired at Everett’s 21st annual garden arts festival.

25

IN THIS ISSUE 10 SIGNATURE DISH

31

ARLINGTON FLY-IN

This festival at Arlington Municipal Airport offers high-flying fun.

Lynnwood Convention Center’s chef shares his recipe for smoked salmon and asparagus flatbread.

59

13 HISTORIC HOME

An Everett couple renovates their 100-year-old Craftsman bungalow.

VERY BERRY

25 VISIT DARRINGTON

A Silvana family traded in dairy cows for blueberries.

This timber town is worth a weekend road trip.

53 PORT’S STORY

A new book chronicles Port of Everett’s first 100 years.

55 UNDERWATER PARKS

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Local waters are a mecca for divers near and far.

63 FARMS & MARKET

The new year-round farmers market gathers local produce under one roof.

ON THE COVER TOP: Venus fly traps are seen at the Sorticulture Festival in Everett. IAN TERRY / COAST WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE · SUMMER 2018

MIDDLE: Katelyn Williams (left) bites into an ice cream bar while her sister, Brooklyn, buys ice cream from Beverly England’s (center) ice cream pickup truck. DAN BATES / COAST

Make a splash Your guide to summer fun

DARRINGTON

The offbeat destination

BEAUTY BENEATH

Put underwater diving on your bucket list

BOTTOM: A longfin sculpin found at the Keystone Jetty stares into the camera.

IN EVERY ISSUE 8 Editor’s Note 28 Our Favorite Events 66 Why I Love It Here

PHOTO COURTESY OF DAN CLEMENTS

Display until August 2018

Supplement to The Daily Herald © 2018

SUMMER ISSUE $3.99

THIS ISSUE ONLY: EXTENDED SUMMER LISTINGS!

Kids splash in the waves at Edmonds’ Marina Beach. ANDY BRONSON / COAST

SUMMER 2018 · WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

5


CRAFT VENDORS • FOOD VENDORS • PARADE • SPECIAL EVENTS 108thYear!

JUNE 8 and 9

Sunshine, lavender, small town charm, and so much more!

Find Us On The Courthouse Lawn in Ephrata!

“Best Northwestern Small Town” USA Today 10Best

www.sagensun.org

2093219

2109675

CLALLAM COUNTY PARKS

Dungeness & Salt Creek RECREATION AREAS

clallam.net/parks

360-417-2291 • parks@co.clallam.wa.us Camping Year-Round Campside Reservations Full-Service Restrooms Birding Opportunities

Playgrounds Picnic Sites Beach Recreation Hiking Trails

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Celebrating 50 years

at the top of the hill Tuesday – Sunday 11 am to 5 pm 501 S 4th St, La Conner

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museum@co.skagit.wa.us www.skagitcounty.net/museum WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE · SUMMER 2018

EVER CHANGING SURF • AWESOME SUNSETS SAND DOLLARS • AGATES • EAGLES • SEASHELLS

DAY | CABINS | TENTS | RVs (w/e/s) LAUNDRY – HOT SHOWERS – RESTROOMS

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WASHINGTON NORTH

COAST magazine

EDITOR

Sara Bruestle

COPY EDITOR

Mark Carlson

WRITERS

Mike Benbow Sara Bruestle Gale Fiege Zac Hereth Sharon Salyer Aaron Swaney Evan Thompson

PHOTOGRAPHERS

MAGAZINE DESIGN & LAYOUT

ADVERTISING

Dan Bates Andy Bronson Kevin Clark Ian Terry Fawn Floyd-Baltzer Margi Hartnett

Sally Cravens Carrie Radcliff

AD DESIGN

Sound Publishing Creative

CIRCULATION

Tim Williams

SUBSCRIPTIONS

Amy Stephenson

DISTRIBUTION

Jere Grubb

CONTACT INFO For advertising inquiries, subscriptions, change of address, and back issues, please call: 425.339.3200 Washington North Coast Magazine is published quarterly by The Daily Herald, a division of Sound Publishing, Inc. and may not be reproduced without express written permission, all rights reserved. No liability is assumed by Washington North Coast Magazine, The Daily Herald or Sound Publishing regarding any content in this publication. Subscriptions to Washington North Coast Magazine are $14 annually. Single copies are available at select locations throughout Snohomish County and the Puget Sound region. www.WashingtonNorthCoast.com © 2018 The Daily Herald

www.heraldnet.com

One-Tank-of-Gas

GETAWAYS Summer Fun on the Road

CABINS • RV CAMPING GIFT SHOP

2634 W Sequim Bay Rd. Sequim, WA 98382

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GRANT COUNTY

2110993

Josh O’Connor

WA S H I N G T O N

Just Natural Ingredients Fishing • Hunting • Camping Hiking • Watchable Wildlife Grant County Tourism Commission P.O. Box 37, Ephrata, WA 98823 • 800.992.6234

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PUBLISHER

TourGrantCounty.com SUMMER 2018 · WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

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SUMMER ISSUE: Your guide to summer fun.

I

I know what I want to do this summer. On June 21, I’ll visit the Schack Art Center in Everett to see the works of Jan and Chris Hopkins, the 2018 artists of the year. Their joint project is titled “With Liberty and Justice for All: Executive Order No. 9066 and the Japanese American Internment.” I plan say hi to Chris at the artists reception. We met in 2013 when he was showing his paintings that pay tribute to the Tuskegee Airmen. I want to sign up for the Amazing Race Mukilteo on July 14. Two-person teams compete to be the fastest at finishing challenges around the city in order to win a grand prize. My team placed third last year, so my goal is to at least finish second this time. I’ll also check out the Darrington Bluegrass Festival on July 21-23 at Darrington Bluegrass Music Park. The event bills itself as the granddaddy of Darrington music festivals. I’ve been told I need to see The Combinations, the band led by Darrington’s Bertha Nations. Then I’ll watch “The Last Jedi” on Aug. 11, the last screening of the summer for Marysville’s Popcorn in the Park. I still haven’t seen the latest “Star Wars” movie, where Mark Hamill reprises his role as Luke Skywalker. Watching it at Jennings Park Ballfield will be more fun than in a theater. This issue of Washington North Coast Magazine invites you to start your summer with a splash. Attend Sorticulture, Everett’s garden arts festival June 8-10 at Legion Memorial Park, featuring garden art, specialty nurseries, display gardens, music, food and children’s activities — plus a talk by gardening guru Ciscoe Morris. Maybe you’ll be inspired to add a flower trellis or a fire pit to your yard. Go for a dive in Puget Sound. Thousands of divers travel from out of state to visit underwater parks right in our back yards: Brackett’s Landing in Edmonds, the Mukilteo T-Dock and

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the Keystone Jetty on Whidbey Island. After you become a certified diver, you can explore sunken vessels, follow man-made trails and watch marine life in their habitat. Pick your own blackberries, blueberries, raspberries and strawberries at a number of local berry farms. Hazel Blue Acres alone has 13,000 bushes and three varieties of blueberries to choose from. Meet the Fuentes family, who have been operating the 10-acre blueberry farm in Silvana for a decade. Or fly in a helicopter or biplane above Snohomish County at the Arlington Fly-In on July 6-8. The festival, now in its 50th year, is a celebration of general and sports aviation at the Arlington airport. The festival includes air shows, flying skills contests, a military parade and fireworks. Kids get to ride in an airplane for free; the others are for purchase. But that’s not all. In this magazine you’ll also find everything you loved about Splash — The Daily Herald’s former annual guide to summer happenings in Snohomish County — and much more. I think it’s safe to say it’s our best summer guide yet. We’ve revamped each summer-themed section so that it reads more like an extended list of Our Favorite Events, a regular feature in these pages. Instead of the top 30 local events of the season, we’re letting you know about hundreds of fun things to see, places to go and things to do. Hang on to this issue of Washington North Coast Magazine. It’s your guide to summer fun.

Sara Bruestle Editor editor@washingtonnorthcoast.com

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE · SUMMER 2018

Sara Bruestle looks forward to summer as the cherry blossoms reach peak bloom in Everett. ANDY BRONSON / COAST

READ US ONLINE! Read Washington North Coast Magazine online at washingtonnorthcoast.com.


COAST XTRA

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SUMMER 2018 · WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

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Dish Favorite recipes from local chefs

This appetizer from the Lynnwood Convention Center’s executive chef will complement your spring lamb dinners.

Chef Michael Felsenstein Lynnwood Convention Center

S TORY BY E VA N T HOMP S ON PHOTOS BY IAN TERRY

Y

ou can serve it as an appetizer at a cocktail party or to feed hundreds at the Lynnwood Convention Center. Michael Felsenstein knows that his smoked salmon asparagus flatbread is going to be a hit in either scenario — especially during this time of year. “It’s a nice seasonal appetizer for spring,” said Felsenstein, the executive chef at the convention center.

Lynnwood Convention Center’s Michael Felsenstein puts the finishing touches on a smoked salmon and asparagus flatbread.

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WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE · SUMMER 2018

The dish is one of the featured hors d’oeuvres on the Lynnwood Convention Center’s menu through June, complementing meals like herbed lamb chop and parmesan-crusted halibut. The event venue caters for conventions, weddings, fundraisers, auctions and more. Felsenstein, 54, has been the driving force behind the center’s culinary direction since 2005. The center has four seasonal menus — spring, summer, autumn/winter and the


holidays — while there also are special menus for celebrations, executive meals and quinceaneras.

Felsenstein said working in restaurants that demand high-quality production has made him a more well-rounded chef.

Felsenstein, who grew up in Brooklyn, didn’t always know he wanted to be a chef. He was studying political science at Binghamton University when he was struck with the realization that he would rather cook food than analyze politics.

“You get introduced to a lot of ingredients, a lot of cuisines, a lot of different personalities and techniques and chefs,” Felsenstein said. “You always learn from each other.”

“I was just like, ‘This is what I want to do,’” Felsenstein said. “I really didn’t know what the hell I was talking about. I still don’t really have a clear explanation, other than I knew I had to make a decision and something felt right about it.” Felsenstein doesn’t come from a long line of chefs. His grandfather owned a kosher restaurant in Manhattan, while his grandmother was a “phenomenal baker.” His father, uncles and aunts didn’t want anything to do with the food industry, though. “It kind of skipped a generation,” Felsenstein said. Felsenstein visited the university’s career office the next day and made his epiphany into reality. He graduated from The Culinary Institute of America four years later. Felsenstein spent the first half of his 30-year career working in fine-dining restaurants. He’s worked in five-star hotels in New Orleans and Chicago and four-star restaurants in New York and Seattle. He also was the executive sous chef at the Museum of Pop Culture (formerly called EMP) in Seattle.

Felsenstein has the same mentality with his cooking staff. He might guide the culinary direction on the menu, but he believes in giving the staff equal opportunity to contribute ideas. “It can kind of spark an idea that turns into something entirely different,” Felsenstein said. “It helps me, because like any creative person, you get writer’s block sometimes.” For example, the sous chef, Andy Hirth, suggested the smoked salmon asparagus flatbread. Felsenstein liked it so much that he put it on the menu. Space at the center is rented for a variety of events, meaning Felsenstein and his six-person staff could be cooking for a wedding one day and an auction fundraiser the next. In all situations, Felsenstein wants the food to taste like it came from a four- or five-star restaurant. That’s easier said than done when there are 400 mouths to feed. The menu is crafted so that it appeals to the masses, but is also creative and cookable on a large scale. “You don’t want to be so esoteric that you ruin it for people,” Felsenstein said.

“There is a nice balancing act.” Felsenstein said smoked salmon asparagus flatbread is an ideal fit because of its appearance, fresh ingredients and simplicity. There also is room for personal modification from a cooking perspective. The flatbread can be soft or crispy, but Felsenstein usually goes for the latter. It’s best served in bite-sized pieces and comes with a crunch from either the bread, the veggies or both. The smoked salmon should strike the taste buds first, followed by the creme fraiche spread on the flatbread; the sour cream variant neutralizes the saltiness of the fish. “The more delicate flavors will come through afterward,” Felsenstein said. Sliced, cut and placed on top of the salmon are red onions, asparagus, red peppers, pecorino cheese and chopped parsley. “You can go to Costco and get all of your ingredients,” Felsenstein said. “It’s a pretty good bang for your buck.” Best of all, it takes no more than 15 minutes to prepare. It can be one of three main appetizers at a party, but is good enough to stand on its own, Felsenstein said. The flatbread goes with anything, but a big green salad is his top choice for an accompanying main course. “You don’t need much more than that,” Felsenstein said.

SMOKED SALMON AND ASPARAGUS FLATBREAD

INGREDIENTS: 1 7½-by-8½-inch piece naan flatbread

DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

2 tablespoons creme fraiche

Spread the creme fraiche evenly on the naan.

3 ounces hot-smoked salmon, fully cooked

Evenly distribute the vegetables and salmon on the naan.

2 ounces asparagus, thinly cut on bias 1 ounce red onion strips

Top with the shaved cheese and bake in the oven about 10 minutes so that the vegetables are just cooked through and the naan is nicely browned.

2 ounces shaved pecorino or Parmesan cheese

Remove from oven and sprinkle with parsley. Cut into 8 pieces and serve.

1 tablespoon chopped parsley

Makes 8 pieces (4 servings if an appetizer, 1 serving if the main course).

1 ounce red pepper strips

Smoked salmon and asparagus flatbread made with red pepper and onion on a creme fraiche base.

SUMMER 2018 · WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

11


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STORY BY SARA BRUESTLE

Clinton and Alyssa Seal are pictured in the living room of their Craftsman home in Everett.

PHOTOS BY IAN TERRY

A bungalow is reborn Clinton and Alyssa Seal not only renovated their 1918 north Everett Craftsman, they uncovered some history of the home’s first owner.

C

linton and Alyssa Seal’s home just turned 100 years old.

Their 1918 Craftsman bungalow was one of seven featured in last year’s Historic Everett Home Tour. The 856-square-foot house features a low-pitched roof, covered porch, overhanging eaves and exposed rafters. It still has its original exterior siding, moulding, fir floors, doors and a clawfoot tub. “I’ve always wanted to live in a historic home,” Clinton Seal said. “The preserved Craftsman-style features really drew me to this property. I love that it still retains many of its original features and have enjoyed restoring it to its original beauty.” Through research, Clinton learned that the original owner was Caroline “Carlie” Blakely. The 68-year-old widow bought the home on Oakes Avenue in 1919 for $900 — about $13,600 in today’s money. She lived there with her youngest of two sons, daughter-in-law and grandson until she died in 1926. She was 75 years old. Seal went as far as to meet some of her relatives — who showed him her Bible and hymnal — and visited where she is buried in the Evergreen Cemetery.

“These houses have stories,” said Seal, a Historic Everett member since 2015. “You feel like it’s your home but it really isn’t your home — you’re more like a caretaker. I was really interested in the stories behind the property; who these people were and how they lived.” The couple, both 36, have worked to renovate the home over the past eight years. They have restored the front porch, repainted the interior and exterior and updated the electrical and plumbing. The bathroom and breakfast nook were updated, and the gardens in the front and back yards were refurbished. Alyssa works from home three days per week, so they turned the breakfast nook into her home office. The Blakely house was Pepto Bismol pink when Clinton bought it. Now it’s antique red — his favorite color — with white trim and a forest green door for contrast. Most recently, the Seals restored the hardwood in the kitchen. The original flooring was hiding under five layers of vinyl. A curious Clinton chiseled at it with a crowbar and eventually uncovered wood. SUMMER 2018 · WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

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Memorial Day Sale!

SOFA, Retail $4,725, SALE $2,699 CHAIR, Retail $4,125, SALE $1,999

Alyssa and Clinton Seal’s Craftsman home as seen in Everett.

SECTIONAL, Retail $8,883, SALE $4,599

*ALSO AVAILABLE IN SOFA, LOVESEAT AND CHAIR.

Clinton Seal keeps a box full of trinkets found inside his home.

2-PIECE SECTIONAL- Retail $5,615, SALE $2,999 SLEEPER SOFA- Retail $3,757, SALE $1,799

POWER DUAL RECLINING SOFA WITH POWER ADJUSTABLE HEADRESTRetail $5,950, SALE $2,929 WALL HUGGER RECLINERRetail $4,291, SALE $1,999

“I was like, ‘Whoa! There’s wood down there!’ ” Seal said with a laugh. “I just kept going, and those floors were fine.”

All of the wood had rotted so much that the porch was failing. It slanted to one side.

This is the Seals’ first house. Clinton bought the home in 2010, and Alyssa moved in after they were married last year. He is a second-grade teacher at Everett’s Olivia Park Elementary School. She works for an environmental consulting firm in Redmond.

So father and son jacked up the porch, removed all the old wood and put in new, then sanded and stained the fir flooring. They also built a new set of stairs.

“It’s a project,” Alyssa Seal said of living in a century-old home. “There’s always something to do, to make better. We had a long list to get done before the home tour.” The couple enjoy their living room, which has a fireplace that sports original tilework and a new mantel made in the Craftsman style.

RECLINING POWER HOME THEATER WITH POWER ADJUSTABLE HEADRESTRetail $11,190, SALE $5,999

Their chocolate Lab, Reese, also loves the living room. Reese’s dog bed is right next to the fireplace.

Lynnwood Superstore:

The Seals still have more projects to do. Next, the couple want to replace the windows in the house so that they resemble the originals, and replace the kick plates below the kitchen cabinets. Now that the floor is lower, the molding doesn’t cover the gap.

Southcenter/Tukwila:

“The house has good bones,” Clinton Seal said. “All it needed was some love and attention.”

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Of all their home projects, Clinton is most proud of the work he and his father did on the front porch.

“My dad can pretty much do anything,” Seal said. “He’s a really good handyman because he did a lot of projects on my childhood home. “It’s the Seal way to do it ourselves to save money.” When the Seals were working on the porch, they found an artifact. Stuck in the mud below the house was an old makeup compact circa 1920. It still has its mirror and some rouge inside. Again, Clinton did some research. “I really believe it is the original owner’s,” he said. “She was the only woman in the house in the 1920s.” He keeps the compact in his greatgrandmother’s glove box with other artifacts he’s found at the house, most of them from the ’50s and ’60s. Also in the box is a necklace, marbles, buttons and a ball. “I like history,” said Seal, who added that he’s likely the 14th owner of the house, “and I like knowing that I’ve been in a place that other people have been in for 100 years.”


Memorial Day Sale– Going on Now! See Us Today!

SOFA- Retail $2,875, SALE $1,399 LOVESEAT- Retail $2,850, SALE $1,349 CHAIR- Retail $1,960, SALE $999

DUAL RECLINING SOFA- Retail $4,185, SALE $1.999 LOVESEAT- Retail $4,135, SALE $1,949 WALL HUGGER RECLINER- $2,895, SALE $1,499 SLEEPER SOFA- RETAIL $4,835, SALE $2,599

Available in a variety of configurations

SWIVEL RECLINER AND OTTOMAN- Retail $3,840, SALE $1,999

POWER 4-SEAT HOME THEATRE WITH LED LIGHTSRetail $8,376, SALE $4,999

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Your Purchase of $25 or More

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19922 Highway 2, Monroe, WA 98272 | monroefireplace.com Monday - Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. | Sundays - Closed

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Great Design Begins With Great Floors

99

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Installation on Our Stocking LVP & Hybrid Flooring

Savings applies to in-stock waterproof LVP’s and Hybrid water resistant laminates. 99¢ s/f basic installation, stairs and floor base removal and replacement additional charge. Moving of appliance and furniture is an additional charge. Expires 06/30/2018.

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Aloha from the beautiful Garden Island of Kaua’i, and thank you for your interest in our vacation rentals.

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SUMMER 2018 · WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

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WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE · SUMMER 2018


RE VIEW BY GALE FIEGE

THE EVERETT

Sorticulture

SKETCHER

Sorticulture is Everett’s annual garden arts festival at the stunning Legion Memorial Park on the very northern edge of Everett. Gardening expert Ciscoe Morris (Mr. “Ooh La La”) was speaking when I rounded a corner near the wine garden, so I had to capture the moment. I volunteered at the information booth for a few hours, and loved discovering where visitors were from: Kirkland, Spokane, Edmonds, Ballard, down the street on Rucker. You name it. My favorite part of the festival, however, is watching the parade of vehicles departing the neighborhood. Each vehicle features an ingenious configuration of passengers, pets, plants and oversized trellises. This year’s Sorticulture will be June 8-10.

— Elizabeth Person

M O R E : E L I Z A B E T H P E R S O N . E T S Y. C O M O R E L I Z A B E T H P E R S O N . C O M

SUMMER 2018 · WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

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S T O R Y B Y S H A R O N S A LY E R PHOTOS BY IAN TERRY

Back to the

garden S T O R Y B Y S H A R O N S A LY E R PHOTOS BY IAN TERRY

Some 18,000 people flocked to Sorticulture in 2017.

Sorticulture returns in June for three days of garden art, music and more in Everett’s Legion Memorial Park.

W

ith its music, fun and (most likely) sun, Sorticulture, Everett’s three-day garden arts festival, is set for June 8-10.

Start making your plans for the event, which last year drew a record-breaking 18,000 people to Legion Memorial Park in north Everett — a jump of 20 percent over the previous year. Now in its 21st year, the event’s name came from the mix of activities it offers — “sorta art and sorta horticulture,” said Lisa Newland, the city of Everett’s cultural arts coordinator.

She tries to feature some of the creations by the show’s garden artisans so that people can see how they might use art in their own landscapes. Roy said she always tries to incorporate “some fun water feature” into her designs. Those coming to Sorticulture should expect just to have fun, she said. It’s an opportunity for people to get inspired about what they could create in their own yard.

The hope is that people come and make it a weekend-long event and “to show people how beautiful Everett is,” she said.

Some 20 speciality nurseries from throughout the Puget Sound region are expected to participate, providing lots of new plants to try out.

About half of those who attended Sorticulture last year were from outside Snohomish County.

There will be three days of live music with local and regional musicians playing bluegrass, alternative folk and country.

“We had people from West Seattle and the east side who had never been to Everett,” Newland said.

On June 9, there will be strolling musicians, The Tarantellas, whose repertoire of 100 songs include “That’s Amore” and “Mona Lisa.”

This year’s show will feature 140 vendors, including specialty nurseries and artisans who may create granite benches, trellises or custom fire pit tables for customers. The display garden will be created by Pam Roy of Planscapes in Everett. She has designed a display garden at the event every year since 2006. “I like to just feature something new and interesting that people could learn from every year,” Roy said.

Also June 9, Ciscoe Morris, KIRO-FM’s gardening expert, is scheduled to speak on the main stage at 2 p.m. on “Show and Tell — Great Plants,” followed by a question and answer session. The event isn’t just for adults. Kids’ activities will include face painting, flower pot painting and a scavenger hunt. The Everett Animal Shelter will have dogs and cats on site SUMMER 2018 · WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

23


Sorticulture Garden Arts Festival

June 8-10 Legion Memorial Park 145 Alverson Blvd., Everett Hours: June 8: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. June 9: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. June 10: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: Free Transportation: Catch the free Everett Transit shuttle near Everett Community College’s fitness center at 2206 Tower St. ADA parking in the park. Glass art by Merrilee Moore at Sorticulture.

Things to do: For kids: Flower pot painting, face painting, sandbox play and a kid’s scavenger hunt — all free activities provided by Everett Parks and Community Services.

for adoption. Housing Hope volunteers will operate a package hold and pick up service. When people buy big plants, artwork or glass creations, they can leave it with Housing Hope volunteers, take a shuttle back to their car, then drive back to the park to pick it up.

For adults: Informational resources from local groups including Master Gardeners, Northwest Perennial Alliance, Snohomish County Noxious Weed Control Board and QuilCeda Carvers. Presentation by gardening expert Ciscoe Morris at 2 p.m. June 9. Wine garden; live music with local and regional musicians, including a performance by local blues artist Mark DuFresne at 5:45 p.m. June 8.

Buyers are given a green flier allowing them quick access to pick up their purchases. Donations for the service go to the Everett nonprofit, which provides emergency, transitional and affordable housing, among other services, in Snohomish County.

Gwen Keilman, of Everett, sits in a gigantic chair at Sorticulture.

If you go, do know one thing: The most experienced Sorticulture shoppers take the day off, often are armed with a wagon to help transport their finds, and, well, let’s say bend the rules a bit on when the event opens. “It doesn’t open until 10 a.m.” Newland said. “But there’s no way to keep people out. It’s a park.” She said she often tells vendors: “If you want to make a sale, be there by 8:30.”

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Destination

Darrington

Peggy Cairns, of Concrete, plays her fiddle near the entrance to the Darrington Bluegrass Festival.

STORY BY GALE FIEGE P H OTO S BY DA N B AT E S

T

his town has been through a lot.

The economy-crushing downturn in the logging industry, flooding that wiped out riverside roads and the landslide west of here that claimed the lives of 43 people are among the sad events Darrington folks have lived through in recent decades. Still, a stick-together ethic rules this community — as evidenced, for example, by the free memorial dinners offered with love for families grieving the deaths of anybody who has lived in Darrington. The truth is, Darrington has a lot going for it. Start with the stunning view of nearby Whitehorse Mountain, any time of year.

Mountain Loop Books and Coffee owner Tony Gobroski (back) kids with Snohomish County Deputy Sheriff John Kaczka (left) while he and Sheriff’s Lt. Scott Parker (center) and Deputy Sheriff Mike Wilson have coffee together at the popular meeting place.

But especially in the summer, Darrington is a terrific day trip, overnighter or weekend camping destination.

SUMMER 2018 · WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

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Take note, with details at discoverdarrington.com, of all the summer events this town hosts: National Trail Day, sponsored by Friends for Public Use, calls for work on Eight Mile Trail. To volunteer, meet at 8:30 a.m. June 2 at the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest’s Darrington Ranger District office, 1405 Emens Ave. N., Darrington. Celebrate your contribution at a potluck dinner late in the afternoon. Ever notice the tall archery sculpture in town? Made by former Darrington art teacher Marvin Kastning, it celebrates the activities of the Darrington Archers organization, which every few years hosts the National Field Archery Outdoor National Championships on its wooded archery range. The next one is scheduled for June 7-10 at the Darrington Archery Range. For more, go to darringtonarchers.com.

At the Darrington Bluegrass Festival campground, John Slostad, of Mount Vernon (left), plays a doghouse bass, Betty Lampinen, of Everett, sings and plays guitar, and Arlene McCowan, of Port Orchard, plays her dobro with a group of bluegrass musicians from all over the region, and as far away as Marathon, Florida.

The Darrington Timberbowl Rodeo returns this year with shows at 6 p.m. June 23 and 2 p.m. June 24 at the rodeo grounds, 42109 Highway 530. See bronc riding, bull riding and barrel racing. More at darringtonrodeogrounds.com. The Spur Festival, June 21-24, at the Darrington Music Park, on Highway 530, west of town, brings in regional and national country music bands. More at thespurfestival.com. Darrington Day is 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 14 on Darrington Street and elsewhere around town, featuring a street fair, a visit by Smokey Bear, art, music, activities for kids, vendors and tours of Hampton Mill. The 42nd annual Darrington Bluegrass Festival, July 20-22, at the Bluegrass Association’s music park west of town on Highway 530, features nationally known and regional bluegrass bands. Be sure to see The Combinations, the band led by Darrington’s Bertha Nations. More about the granddaddy of Darrington music festivals is at darringtonbluegrass.com. The Summer Meltdown music festival rocks the music park Aug. 2-5. Go to summermeltdownfest.com to learn all about the festival’s lineup of national and regional bands. The Darrington Rock & Gem show and sale is 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 4-5 at Mansford Grange, 1265 Railroad Ave. It features kids’ activities, free rocks, rock collecting maps, door prizes and custom rock cutting.

The old Town Hall on Clear Creek Road in Darrington is the new home of River Time Brewing.

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WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE · SUMMER 2018

The second annual Darrington Car Show, sponsored by the Historic Red Top Tavern, is 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 25 on Darrington Street. Two outdoor recreation businesses in Darrington


The tight-knit town in the hills is a worthy place for an excursion. are worth checking out. Go horse packing or take trail rides into the wilderness with The Pack Station, 1225 Darrington St. Call 360-631-7219 for more information. If you would rather take a scenic float trip or paddle through whitewater on the Sauk or Suiattle rivers, contact Adventure Cascades at 360-393-6815, adventurecascades.com or stop by the office at 1055 Seeman St. If you are in town during the high school basketball season, make a point to watch a game in the gym of the community center, built by people in town in the early 1950s. The Darrington gym is considered by some to be one of the finest old athletic facilities in Western Washington, with its all-wood interior and built-in seating for 1,200 people, who all look down on the action on the gym floor. In the adjacent dining room, see old photos of Darrington and landscape paintings by the late historian Nels Bruseth. Hungry? On the way to or from Darrington, stop at The Restaurant at Rhodes River Ranch, 22016 Entsminger Road near Oso. Call 360-474-8313 to make a reservation. Enjoy musical entertainment on the weekends. Some seats overlook the busy horse arena. Stop in for a burger at the old reliable Burger Barn at 1018 Emens Ave. N. Call 360-436-2070. Across the street is the Darrington IGA, 1090 Seeman St., 360-436-0141. The Ashe family’s grocery store also has a deli and a bakery. Frequently the store staff will grill outdoors, too. If you just need an Americano or a latte, Mountain Loop

Books & Coffee, at 1085 Darrington St., is the place to go. Owner Tony Gobroski also offers treats and free use of his WiFi, and the guidebook collection there is good. River Time Brewing, serving craft beers, is located in the old Town Hall at 660 Emens Ave. N. and is open Thursdays through Sundays. The Hawks Nest Bar & Grill, offering traditional American food, is located near the west entrance to town at 1215 Highway 530. Call 360-436-1500. The Hometown Bakery Cafe at 1180 Cascade St. makes great pizza and cinnamon rolls. Before heading out into the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, check in at the Darrington Ranger Station (fs.usda.gov) on the highway heading north out of town. There, also be sure to carefully cross the highway to see the display of old Sauk-Suiattle dugout river canoes once used by the native people of the area. Inside the ranger station find all sorts of materials, including information about wildflowers, the Darrington Tourism area’s recreation map, and get some knowledgeable advice about drives and hikes to waterfalls and lakes, as well as camping off Mountain Loop Highway or Suiattle River Road. If you have kids, try a stay at Buck Creek Campground. Last on this list of suggestions, when the weather turns cold, there is nothing like taking kids out into the forest to cut down a Christmas tree. Obtain a permit at the ranger station.

SUMMER 2018 · WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

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JUNE EVENTS Edmonds Waterfront Festival EDMONDS

3 to 10 p.m. June 1, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. June 2, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. June 3, Port of Edmonds Marina, 336 Admiral Way. Children’s activities, arts and crafts vendors, entertainment, beer garden, food court, hydroplanes, classic yacht show. Admission is $4, children get in free. edmondswaterfrontfestival.org Cascadia Art Museum EDMONDS

190 Sunset Ave.; 425-336-4809. Closed Mondays and Tuesdays. Admission is $7 to $10. Through July 1, see “Modern Alaska: Art of the Midnight Sun, 1930-1970” and “Travelogue: Views Beyond the Northwest.” cascadiaartmuseum.org Artists’ Garage Sale EVERETT

9 a.m. to 3 p.m., June 2, Schack Art Center, 2921 Hoyt Ave. Deals on artwork and art supplies. schack.org

Sophie Warren barges through the columns of an inflatable obstacle course at the Edmonds Rotary Waterfront Festival at the Port of Edmonds Marina. COAST PHOTO Healthy Communities Challenge Day

Snohomish Wedding Tour

MARYSVILLE

Free activities and more, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 2, Allen Creek Elementary, 6505 60th Drive NE; 360363-8400. Fitness demos, entertainment, healthy living information. marysvillewa.gov/456

Pacifica Chamber Orchestra

SNOHOMISH

EVERETT

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 3. Self-guided tour of wedding venues. Registration required. mysnohomishwedding.com

Summer Concert, 3 p.m. June 3, First Presbyterian Church, 2936 Rockefeller Ave. pacificachamberorchestra.org

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WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE · SUMMER 2018

Father’s Day Weekend

JUNE 15-17

Artists in Action

Children’s Art Activities and Student Art Exhibit

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Gallery Exhibition and Sale


Sorticulture EVERETT

Everett’s garden arts festival is 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. June 8, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. June 9 and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 10, Legion Memorial Park, 145 Alverson Blvd. Garden art, nurseries, gardening experts, food, music and a wine garden. Free. everettwa.org/823 Arlington Show & Shine ARLINGTON

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 9 on Olympic Avenue, downtown. Car show featuring antiques, hot rods and muscle cars. arlingtonwa.org Sno-King Community Chorale EDMONDS

“Ticket to Broadway”: A concert version of the musical “Bye Bye Birdie,” 3 and 7 p.m. June 9, Edmonds Center for the Arts, 410 Fourth Ave. N. sno-kingchorale.org Health & Safety Fair LAKE STEVENS

Hosted by Lake Stevens Fire and Police, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 9, Saar’s Super Saver Foods parking lot, 303 91st Ave. NE. Each booth has a different health safety focus. Children’s activities. lschamber.org

AquaSox Opening Day

EVERETT

EVERETT

“What a Wonderful World: Songs of Peace and Harmony,” 3 p.m. June 10, Everett Performing Arts Center, 2710 Wetmore Ave. Artistic director Lee Mathews’ final concert with the chorale. everettchorale.org

The hometown minor league team faces the Hillsboro Hops at an evening game June 15, followed by fireworks, Everett Memorial Stadium, 3802 Broadway; 425-258-3673. aquasox.com Edmonds Arts Festival

Center for Wooden Boats Youth Fishing Derby

EDMONDS

10 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 10, Cama Beach State Park, 1880 S. West Camano Drive; 360-387-9361. For kids 16 and younger. No fishing license or Discover Pass required this day. Sign up in the boathouse, win prizes. camabeachfoundation.org/youth-fishing-derby

10 a.m. to 8 p.m. June 15-16, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. June 17, at Frances Anderson Cultural Center, 700 Main St.; 425-771-6412. More than 240 artists share and sell fine art, artisan crafts and photography. Features a juried art show and sale, student art exhibit, a variety of performing arts, food and kids’ activities. edmondsartsfestival.com

Marysville Strawberry Festival

Whidbey Island Garden Tour

EVERETT

MARYSVILLE

WHIDBEY ISLAND

Most activities are June 9-17. Call 360-659-7664. Festival sites include Asbery Field at Sixth Street and Alder Avenue. Activity costs vary, festival admission free. Events include a road run, talent show, fashion show, beer garden, carnival, market, car show, shortcake-eating contests, kiddie parade, and the State Street grand parade and fireworks June 16. maryfest.org

10 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 16; 360-321-4191. Tickets, which typically sell out, cost $10 in advance for youth and $20 in advance for adults. wigt.org

Schack Art Center EVERETT

Jan and Chris Hopkins, 2018 artists of the year, exhibit their own works and their joint project “With Liberty and Justice for All: Executive Order No. 9066 and the Japanese-American Internment” from June 14 through Sept. 1. Opening reception is 5 to 8 p.m. June 21 at the Schack, 2921 Hoyt Ave. schack.org

YMCA OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY Camps offered at all six branches: Everett Marysville Mill Creek Monroe Mukilteo Stanwood-Camano

MARYSVILLE

5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on third Thursdays, June 21-Aug. 16, the Marysville Opera House, 1225 Third St.; 360-363-8400. Cost is $5. Local wine, beer, pop and snacks for purchase. June 21 is Uncle Reverb, July 19 is Soulevard, Aug. 16 is The Done Goners. marysvillewa.gov Backyard Wildlife Habitat Garden Tour CAMANO ISLAND

Features landscaping for wildlife, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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Live at the Opera House

June 23; at the Camano Multipurpose Center, 141 NE Camano Drive. Free. camanowildlifehabitat.org Mill Creek Garden Tour MILL CREEK

11 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 23 at six gardens. Benefits Mill Creek Garden Club’s “Giving through Gardening” program. millcreekgardenclub.com Darrington Timberbowl Rodeo DARRINGTON

Shows at 6 p.m. June 23 and 2 p.m. June 24, 42109 Highway 530. Bronc riding, bull riding, barrel racing and more. darringtonrodeogrounds.com Varoom Mukilteo Car Show MUKILTEO

10 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 24, Historic Flight Foundation, 10719 Bernie Webber Drive; 425-347-1456. Register at the website. Free to attend. More than 150 cars, vintage aircraft and more. mukilteochamber.com Twin City Idlers Show & Shine STANWOOD

June 24 in downtown; 360-387-3663. twincityidlers.org Tayla Lynn at the Opera House MARYSVILLE

Country music legend Loretta Lynn’s granddaughter returns to the Northwest with this concert at 7:30 p.m. June 29, Marysville Opera House, 1225 Third St. Tickets are $15. Call 360-363-8400. marysvillewa.gov

Affordable pricing based on income. The Y is for everyone.

Beer - Wine Garden MUSIC Kids Area 5K RUN 2110925

DARRINGTON

June 7-10, Darrington Archery Range, 300 Sauk Ave. darringtonarchers.com

Everett Chorale

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FOOD COURT HYDROPLANE CLASSIC YACHTS... AND MORE ! $4 Adults - Children under $4 Adults - Children under 12 Free12 Free

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SUMMER 2018 · WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

29


2107919


For the love of

flying STORY BY MIKE BENBOW

Stunt pilot Doug Jardine makes some spectacular moves in his Sbach 342 at the Arlington Fly-In. DAN BATES / COAST

SUMMER 2018 · WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

31


Stephanie Loff sits in the shade offered by a B-17 wing while watching the air show with her children. DAN BATES / COAST

David Orr (right) stands next to his Berkut 360 airplane as his granddaughter Taylor Orr, takes a sip of her juice from the rear seat at the Arlington Fly-In. IAN TERRY / COAST

Aviation enthusiasts will promote their hobby at the 50th annual Arlington Fly-In

L

ike most pilots, Jim McGauhey really loves flying. And he has the added enjoyment of piloting a plane he helped build.

He equates flying to boat ownership, and said that forming a group helps make the costs of things like maintenance and hangar fees quite reasonable.

What’s planned at the Arlington Fly-In

“It has always been a bucket-list item,” McGauhey said of building his own plane.

“Most planes are owned by middle-class people,” he said. “It’s a good hobby.”

Saturday includes an afternoon air show and military parade, and glowing hot air balloons at night.

It took his group of five a couple of years of working many nights and weekends to finish the Zenith CH 650, a lightweight, two-seat aircraft that he likens to a sports car with wings. They finished the plane at Harvey Field in Snohomish in a building that serves as headquarters for Chapter 84 of the Experimental Aircraft Association. McGauhey is the chapter president this year. While now fascinated with flying, McGauhey wasn’t always that way. He once owned a dive shop in California and his job was his passion. He added flying after taking lessons partly to help an instructor friend who needed the work. McGauhey earned his pilot’s license and his friend later became a corporate pilot. These days, McGauhey likes working on his bucket list and also promoting general aviation. The EAA has a Young Eagles program that provides free airplane rides for kids age 8-17 and also helps them to begin pilot training. In addition to promoting aviation, McGauhey works to counter some of the myths about flying.

McGauhey and hundreds of other pilots will join thousands of visitors and aviation buffs at the Arlington Fly-In on July 6-8. The event, in its 50th year in 2018, is a celebration of general and sport aviation held at Arlington’s Municipal Airport. Arlington Mayor Barb Tolbert said the event started with a group of people flying experimental aircraft who would stop in Arlington while on their way to an air show in Abbotsford, B.C. “Now it’s the third-largest (general) aviation event,” Tolbert said. She said about 30,000 people attended the event last year, with nearly 1,000 airplanes. Tolbert, who is a pilot herself, said her father had an airport business for experimental aircraft and encouraged the growth of the event. She now works with some 480 volunteers to make the event successful, but said she can always use more volunteer help. Tolbert said there will be a variety of events and activities all three days of the fly-in, with a special focus on pilot education and flying contests. A schedule of events is available at www. arlingtonflyin.org.

“I want to dispel the idea that airplanes are rich boy toys,” he said.

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Friday evening includes an air show followed by a fireworks display.

Sunday has a variety of flying skills contests, including one for flour bombing. Tolbert says those with tickets can come and go for different events, and that children under age 16 will be admitted for free. She notes that there will be an outdoor movie and classes on things like flying drones. Also planned is an enclosed area where people can try flying drones and not have to worry about them getting out of control and flying off. Helicopter and biplane rides can be taken for a fee, and EAA Chapters like McGauhey’s group will offer free rides for kids.

IF YOU GO Date: July 6-8 Location: Arlington Airport 4700 188th St. NE Phone: 360-435-5857 Email: info@arlingtonflyin.org Experimental Aircraft Association, Chapter 84 Provides a free airplane ride for youngsters age 8-17 Location: Harvey Field, Snohomish Phone: 425-750-1509 Website: 84.eaachapter.org


INDEPENDENCE DAY EVENTS Arlington’s Fourth of July July 4, primarily along Olympic Avenue and at Haller Park, 1100 West Ave.; 360-403-3448. Events: pancake breakfast; Pedal-Paddle-Puff Triathlon; noon to 4 p.m. Old Fashioned Fourth at Legion Memorial Park, 114 N. Olympic Ave.; kids’ parade at 4:30 p.m. and grand parade at 5 p.m. along Olympic Avenue; the Rotary Duck Dash at Haller Park at 7:30 p.m and fireworks at 9 p.m. at Boys & Girls Club, 18513 59th Ave. NE. arlingtonwa.gov

An Edmonds Kind of Fourth All events on July 4; free. Events: 10 a.m. Beat Brackett 5K & Baby Bracket 1K; 11:30 a.m. Children’s Parade from Fifth and Walnut; noon grand parade from Sixth and Main; 2:30 p.m. firefighters waterball competition at City Park, Third and Pine; 6 p.m. entertainment and food vendors followed by fireworks at 10 p.m. at Civic Field, Sixth and Bell. People stake out their spots well in advance, so arrive early. edmondsfourth.com

Bothell’s Fourth of July Freedom Festival Grand parade starts at noon July 4 on Main Street. People mark their parade spots days in advance. ci.bothell.wa.us

Everett Colors of Freedom Celebration Free events July 4; 425-257-7117. Colors of Freedom Parade, 11 a.m. on Colby and Wetmore avenues, between Wall and 26th streets with marching bands, drill teams, stilt walkers and clowns. Festival is 1 to 11 p.m., Legion Memorial Park, 145 Alverson Blvd. Live music, food fair, beer garden, kids’ activities, fireworks. No parking at Legion Park, so ride free Everett Transit shuttles from Everett Station. Thunder on the Bay Fireworks, 10:20 p.m. Other good viewing locations are Grand Avenue Park, 1800 Grand Ave., and the Everett Marina, 1205 Craftsman Way. everettwa.gov/790

Darrington’s Old Fashioned Fourth of July Parade starts at noon July 4 on Darrington Street, followed by the Mansford Grange community fair at Old School Park, 1026 Alvord St. Games include tug of war, water balloon toss and racing turtles. Fireworks at dusk at Darrington High School’s football field, 1085 Fir St. discoverdarrington.com

50th Annual Arlington Fly-In July 6-8, 2018 The Arlington Fly-In, known as the West Coast Premier Recreation Aviation Event, on the first weekend after the 4th of July each year at the Arlington Municipal Airport. Our mission to share the joy of flight comes alive during this three day celebration!

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Everett YMCA Yankee Doodle Dash 1 mile, 5K, 10K and kids’ races on July 4 at Everett Family YMCA, 2720 Rockefeller Ave. Races start at 8:30 a.m. ymca-snoco.org/yankee-doodle-dash

Everett First Baptist’s Fun in the Sun Street Fair Noon to 3 p.m. July 4 at Pacific and Wetmore avenues. Activities for kids, antique car show, free cotton candy and more. fbc-everett.org

Everett Imagine Children’s Museum Celebration 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 4 at 1502 Wall St. Admission is $5 for everyone older than 1; free admission for military families with military ID; patriotic hat-making, trivia wheel and floor puzzles; 425-258-1006. imaginecm.org

Everett AquaSox Baseball Game 7:05 p.m. July 4, Everett Memorial Stadium, 3900 Broadway; opponent is Eugene Emeralds; post-game fireworks and patriotic hat auction. aquasox.com

Everett Public Safety Open House Noon to 4 p.m. July 4, 3200 Wetmore Ave. Meet Everett police officers and see the equipment they use to solve crime; kids’ activities and Colby the Crime Dog. everettwa.org/1500 Everett Community Ice Rink’s Fire on Ice 8:15 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. July 4, 2000 Hewitt Ave.; $4 admission includes skate rental; 425-322-2653. angelofthewindsarena.com

50 Years!

Oak Harbor’s Old Fashioned Fourth of July June 30-July 4, Windjammer Park, SW Beeksma Drive; 360-675-3755. Carnival, street fair, parade and fireworks show. oakharborchamber.chambermaster.com Stanwood Fourth of July Parade and Ice Cream Social 11 a.m. July 4, from Josephine Sunset Home parking lot, 9901 272nd Place NW, to the Floyd Norgaard Cultural Center, 27112 102nd Ave. NW, for ice cream. sahs-fncc.org

1969-2018

Drone Night Light Show on Friday and Saturday HELICOPTER & AIRPLANE RIDES EVENING AIR SHOW FRIDAY BALLOON GLOW FRIDAY AIR SHOW SATURDAY LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT VINTAGE AIRPLANES MILITARY VEHICLES DRONE FLYING WARBIRDS

360-435-5857 • www.arlingtonflyin.org SUMMER 2018 · WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

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Junk in the Trunk MARYSVILLE

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. July 14, Municipal Court parking lot, 1015 State Ave.; 360-363-8450. Vendors with toys, clothes, collectibles, furniture and more. marysvillewa.gov

JULY EVENTS

Mill Creek Festival and Street Fair MILL CREEK

11 a.m. to 6 p.m. July 14 and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 15, Mill Creek Boulevard and 161st Street SE. Live entertainment, children’s activities, basketball tournament, arts and crafts, main stage and beer garden. Free shuttle available from Jackson High School. millcreekfestival.com

Jetty Island Days

Darrington Day

EVERETT

Ferries from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sundays, July 5 to Sept. 4 at 10th Street and W. Marine View Drive; $3 fee for parking; suggested donation $2 for adults, $1 for kids; 425-257-8304. everettwa.gov/jettyisland Arlington Fly-In ARLINGTON

Celebrating its 50th year, opening 8 a.m. July 6-8 at the west entrance to the Arlington Airport, 4700 188th St. NE; 425-435-5857. More than 1,000 aircraft, military displays and parades, daily air shows, hot air balloons, workshops, forums, fly mart, kids’ day, food, beer garden, entertainment and exhibits. “The Last Jedi” shown at 9 p.m. July 6. arlingtonflyin.org

DARRINGTON

Visitors enjoy Jetty Island, a short ferry ride from Everett. ANDY BRONSON / COAST

Vintage manual typewriters on tables embellished by artists. Type your answer to the question of the day. Sponsored by Everett Cultural Arts Commission. everettwa.gov/833/Word-on-the-Street

entertainment, food, farmers market and 190 vendors. arlingtonwa.org

All-Comers Track Meets

4 to 9:30 p.m. July 14, Boxcar Park, 615 13th St. waterlanternfestival.com

MARYSVILLE

For all ages, $5 per meet, 5:30 p.m. registration, July 12, 19, 26 and Aug. 2, Marysville Pilchuck High School track, 5611 108th St. NE. marysvillewa.gov

Word on the Street

Arlington Street Fair

July 11 to Aug. 1 in downtown; 425-257-7101.

July 13-15, along Olympic Avenue. Activities for kids,

EVERETT

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 14 on Darrington Street and around town. Street Fair, Smokey Bear, art, music, activities for kids, vendors and tours of Hampton Mill. discoverdarrington.com

ARLINGTON

Water Lantern Festival EVERETT

Summer Shindig

Amazing Race Mukilteo MUKILTEO

9 a.m. to 1 p.m. July 14; 425-347-1456. Two-person teams compete to be the fastest at finishing challenges around the city in order to win a grand prize. Challenges are a mix of physical, mental and creative tasks. Event ends at Diamond Knot. mukilteochamber.org Edmonds in Bloom EDMONDS

SULTAN

4 p.m. to dusk July 13, 9 a.m. to dusk July 14, and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 15 at River Park on corner of First and Main streets; 360-793-0983. Street fair, parade, car show, entertainment, food and logging contests. skyvalleychamber.com

Garden tour, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 15 at a variety of private gardens. Tickets sold at local businesses and online starting in June. edmondsinbloom.com

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Edmonds Walk Back in Time

Flying Heritage’s Skyfair

Tour de Terrace

The 29th annual open house is 1 p.m. July 19, with historical tour by the Cemetery Board, Edmonds Memorial Cemetery and Columbarium, 820 15th St. SW; 425-771-4741. edmondswa.gov

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 21 at Flying Heritage & Combat Armor Museum, 3407 109th St. SW. Admission is $15 for youth, $25 for adults, children 5 and younger free, $60 family pass. See vintage aircraft fly and watch tanks cruise the grounds. Includes admission to the museum. flyingheritage.com

July 27-29, Evergreen Playfield, 22289 56th Ave. W.; 425-791-5956. Parade at 7 p.m. Friday. Pancake breakfast, car show, carnival, live entertainment, beer garden, arts, crafts and food booths. tourdeterrace.org

Arlington Brew Fest

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 28 at Viking Hall, 1331 Pioneer Highway. Live music, food, farm animals, demonstrations, indoor exhibits, kids’ games and petting zoo. Free. silvanafair.com

EDMONDS

Kla Ha Ya Days SNOHOMISH

5 to 10 p.m. July 18, 4 to 10 p.m. July 19, 2 to 11 p.m. July 20, 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. July 21, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. July 22 at various locations; 425-493-7824. Carnival rides, street fair, frog jumping and pie-eating contests, airplane rides and more. Frogtastic Kids Fair 3 p.m. July 20. Grand Parade, First Street, 10:30 a.m. July 21. Car and Motorcycle Show & Shine starts 9 a.m. July 22. Free. klahayadays.com Whidbey Island Fair LANGLEY

9:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. July 19, 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. July 20-21, 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. July 22, 819 Camano Ave.; 360-221-4677. Art displays, 4-H activities, parade, live entertainment, concessions. $5 (youth, military seniors) and $8 (16-64) daily, $15 and $25 four-day passes, ages younger than 5 free. Camping available. fair.whidbeyislandfair.com Gold Dust Days GOLD BAR

3 to 8 p.m. July 27, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. July 28, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 29; 360-793-0983. Live music, parade, car show, vendors, food, Civil War re-enactors. skyvalleychamber.com

EVERETT

MOUNTLAKE TERRACE

ARLINGTON

4 to 9 p.m. July 22, Legion Memorial Park, 114 N. Olympic Ave. Beer, cider and wine booths, food trucks, games, raffles, music. For 21 and older. Tickets $25 in advance, $30 at the door, $10 for designated drivers. Fundraiser for Vision for a Cure. visionforacure.com Edmonds Sand Sculpting Contest EDMONDS

10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. July 24 at Marina Beach, 470 Admiral Way S.; 425-771-0230. Form a team or build your own castle. Amateur contest open to all ages. Sign-up begins at 10 a.m., judging at noon, awards at 12:30 p.m. Bring buckets and shovels. Free. edmondswa.gov Aquafest

LAKE STEVENS

July 27-29, mostly in downtown along Main Street. Grand Parade 1 p.m. July 28, fireworks 10 p.m. July 28, carnival, entertainment, movie night, teen dance, pet show, water sports, car show, vendors. Festival information, map and directions available online. aquafest.com

Silvana Community Fair SILVANA

GenCare Annual Car Show and Family Picnic GRANITE FALLS

11 a.m. to 2 p.m. July 28, 302 N. Alder Ave.; 360-691-1777. Vintage classics and muscle cars on even ground for easy walking. Entertainment and barbecue. Free. Always the last Saturday in July. Call to sign up. granitefallswa.com

Nubian Jam EVERETT

11 a.m. to 7 p.m. July 28 at Forest Park, 802 E. Mukilteo Blvd. Celebration of African-American culture with speakers, dance, live performances, food and vendors. Free. everettwa.org/parks Quilts on the Beach CAMANO ISLAND

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 28, Cama Beach State Park, 1880 W. Camano Drive. Open-air quilt show, sale and raffle by Cama Beach Quilters, with quilt-related activities for all ages. Free. Discover Pass required for parking. camabeachfoundation.org Lora Chiorah from Zimbabwe leads her band, Maya Soleil, in an African rhythm at the Nubian Jam. COAST PHOTO

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AUGUST EVENTS Everett Street Tunes EVERETT

Aug. 1-21 in downtown. Artists decorate pianos that are then placed on the street for anyone to play. Find piano locations online. Vote for your favorite piano. everettwa.gov/824/Street-Tunes Darrington Rock & Gem Show and Sale DARRINGTON

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 4-5, Mansford Grange, 1265 Railroad Ave. Kids’ activities, free rocks, rock collecting maps, door prizes, custom rock cutting. discoverdarrington.com Granite Falls Show ‘n’ Shine GRANITE FALLS

9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Aug. 4 on Granite Avenue; 425-3459970. More than 100 cars, trucks and motorcycles. Food and craft vendors. Free. granitefallswa.com

Julia Mooney, of Snohomish, plays a piano outside Narrative Coffee in Everett. A number of pianos are installed around downtown Everett for Street Tunes. IAN TERRY / COAST

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Aug 27 Roots & Boots Tour: featuring Sammy Kershaw, Collin Raye, and Aaron Tippin Aug 28 American Idol Live Tour 2018 – the top 8 from Season 16 will perform Aug 29 Spike and the Impalers (Classic Rock Tribute) Aug 30 Randy Houser with special guest Michael Ray (Hot Country) Aug 31 Skillet (Christian Rock)

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Community Fair

Index Arts Festival

Art by the Bay

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9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Aug. 3 and 4, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 6, Stanwood-Camano Fairgrounds, 6431 Pioneer Highway; 360-629-4121. Youth agriculture exhibits and competitions, live entertainment, carnival food and more. Free parking at Stanwood High School, 7400 272nd St. NW, free shuttle every 15 minutes during fair hours. Admission $7 to $10 daily, free for ages 5 and younger. Season pass is $20. stanwoodcamanofair.org

The 15th annual event is 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., with music until 10 p.m. Aug. 11, Doolittle Park, 200 Fifth St. Arts, crafts, music, poetry. Free admission and parking. indexartsfestival.com

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug 18-19, east downtown; 360-629-2787. Concerts, fine arts, garden art. Free admission and parking. stanwoodcamanoarts.com

11 a.m. Aug. 25 on Main Street in downtown; 360794-5488. Free. evergreenfair.org

Stillaguamish Festival of the River and Powwow

Everett Dahlia Show

SeaScare Porchlight Parade BRIER

6 p.m. Aug. 8 on Brier Road between 232nd Street SW and 238th Street SW. Theme is scary sea creatures, octopi, pirates, boats. KidsScare at 11 a.m. Aug. 3 at the Brier Library, where kids can make something for the parade. Free. seascare.com EDMONDS

11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Aug. 10 and 11, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Aug. 12, Civic Playfield, 310 Sixth Ave. N. Food and drink vendors, live music on four stages, informal Edmonds School District alumni meet-up, kids’ activities. Cost is $4, 12 and younger free. atasteofedmonds.com Antique Tractor Show and Threshing Bee MONROE

The 30th annual show is Aug. 10-12, Frohning Farm, 1524-A Tualco Loop Road. Tractor pulls for garden and farm tractors. Allis Chalmers is the featured tractor. skyvalleyantiquetractor.com

Moonlight Beach Adventure EDMONDS

7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Aug. 25 at Marina Beach, 470 Admiral Way S. Interpretive program. See and touch live creatures brought to shore by volunteer SCUBA divers. Dress warm and bring a flashlight. Free. edmondswa.gov

EVERETT

ARLINGTON

Hosted by the Stillaguamish Tribe, opens at 11 a.m. Aug. 11 and 12 at River Meadows County Park, 20416 Jordan Road. Environmental education booths, entertainment, powwow, logging show, fun run, New Old Time Chautauqua circus, live music, children’s activities, vendors, traditional alder salmon bake. Free, but $10 fee for parking. festivaloftheriver.com Maplewood Rock & Gem Sale EDMONDS

A Taste of Edmonds

Monroe Fair Days Parade

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 11, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 12, 8802 196th St. SW. Rough rocks, minerals, fossils, jewelry. Free rocks for kids. maplewoodrockclub.com Fresh Paint EVERETT

This festival of artists at work is 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 18-19, Port of Everett Marina, 1700 W. Marine View Drive. The Schack Art Center turns the Everett waterfront’s promenade into a huge outdoor studio and sidewalk gallery. Free admission. More than 100 artists involved. Live music on two stages, food. schack.org/events/fresh-paint

Colorful display of more than 2,500 dahlias, 1 to 6 p.m. Aug. 18, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Aug. 19, Floral Hall at Forest Park, 802 E. Mukilteo Blvd. Free. Prizes awarded to winning entries. Vote for your favorites. everettwa.org/632

ARLINGTON

ARLINGTON

Aug. 18-19 around Arlington, mostly on Centennial Trail. Longboard/skateboard races of various lengths, prizes, food, music, art, lawn games, vendors. Register to race online. centennialsk8fest.com Evergreen State Fair

9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Aug. 25, 18204 59th Ave. NE. Free airplane rides, face painting, helicopter tours, flight simulators, inflatables, tractor rides, ice cream, fly overs, free food and more. arlingtonwa.gov Darrington Car Show DARRINGTON

MONROE

Aug. 23 through Sept. 3, Evergreen State Fairgrounds, 14405 179th Ave. SE. Equestrian shows, rodeo, lumberjack shows, fireworks, speedway events, animal barns and judging, petting zoo, duck races, pony rides, special displays, contests, roving entertainment, stadium concerts, courtyard concerts and vendors. Cost is $8 to $12, kids 5 and younger free. One-day parking is $10. evergreenfair.org

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Centennial Sk8 Festival

This second annual event, sponsored by the Red Top Tavern, is 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 25 on Darrington Street. discoverdarrington.com/festivals-events/ darrington-cruise-in

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Arlington Drag Strip Reunion Car Show ARLINGTON

SEPTEMBER

EVENTS

8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 8 at the Arlington Airport, 18204 59th Drive NE; 360-652-6910. Benefits local charities. arlingtondragstripreunion.com

Edmonds Car Show

Puget Sound Bird Fest

EDMONDS

MARYSVILLE

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 9 in downtown; 425-6701496. More than 300 classic cars. Awards ceremony at 4:30 p.m. edmondswa.com

Sept. 14-16, Frances Anderson Center, 700 Main St.; 425-771-0227. Guided field trips to other sites. Free general admission. Opening reception Friday at Edmonds Plaza Room, 650 Main St. pugetsoundbirdfest.org Pioneer Days ARLINGTON

1 to 4 p.m. Sept. 15, Stillaguamish Valley Pioneer Museum, 20722 67th Ave. NE; 360-435-7289. Try out an old-fashioned water pump, toys, butter churner, wool-spinning. stillymuseum.org

Mukilteo Lighthouse Festival MUKILTEO

Return of the Salmon Celebration

4 p.m. to midnight Sept. 7, 11 a.m. to midnight Sept. 8, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 9, Lighthouse Park, 609 Front St.; 425-353-5516. Live entertainment, food, children’s activities, parade on Harbour Pointe Boulevard at 11 a.m. Saturday, fireworks, fishing derby and more. mukilteolighthousefestival.com

SULTAN

10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 22 at Osprey Park, 801 First St.; 360-793-0983. Activities and 5K salmon run at 9 a.m. skyvalleychamber.com Friendship Walk ARLINGTON

Touch-A-Truck

8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sept. 23, Legion Memorial Park, 114 N. Olympic Ave. Donate $30 and receive a T-shirt, hat or water bottle. Features 5K or 1-mile walk, car wash, food truck, music by Voices of the Village. villagecommunitysvcs.org

MARYSVILLE

10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sept. 8 at Asbery Field, 1605 Seventh St. NE. Exhibition of trucks, fire engines and police vehicles; horns and sirens from 10 a.m. to noon. marysvillewa.gov/674 Art in Legion Park

Sissy Bouchard (left) and Nancy Joao clean up the front yard of the Mukilteo Lighthouse during a work party. COAST PHOTO

ARLINGTON

Snohomish Classic Car and Hot Rod Display SNOHOMISH

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 8 and 9, Legion Park, 114 N. Olympic Ave. Art of many kinds, live music, beer and wine garden. arlingtonartscouncil.net

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 30 in downtown. More than 600 cars and trucks. snohomishcoc.com/classiccardisplay

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Arlington Outdoor Movies Free flicks on July 12 and 19, with karaoke at 7 p.m. and movies starting about 9, Terrace Park, 809 Fifth St.; 360-403-3448. arlingtonwa.gov/recreation

July 12: “Early Man” July 19: “Peter Rabbit” Music on the Terraces Free concerts by regional bands, 6:30 to 8 p.m. Thursdays, Aug. 2-23, Terrace Park, 809 Fifth St.; 360-403-3448. arlingtonwa.gov/recreation

Aug. 2: Mojo Cannon, rhythm & blues Aug. 9: Hillary & Kate, Americana, bluegrass and gospel Aug. 16: Metal Shop, heavy metal spoof Aug. 23: Harvey Creek Band, local country

Raymond Hillaire takes a break from dancing during a Stillaguamish Powwow at the annual Festival of the River at River Meadows Park in Arlington. IAN TERRY / COAST

Remedy Drive Concert Legion Memorial Park, 114 N. Olympic Ave., 7 p.m. July 19. Alt rock band from Nashville joined by Northwest natives Weak Sheep. Sponsored by Calvary Church. Free. calvaryarlington.com

Shakespeare in the Park Free performance of “King Lear” by Last Leaf Productions at 6 p.m. June 30, Terrace Park, 809 E. Fifth St. arlingtonwa.gov

Stillaguamish Festival of the River and Powwow Hosted by the Stillaguamish Tribe, opens at 11 a.m. Aug. 11 and 12 at River Meadows County Park, 20416 Jordan Road. Regional and national bands, powwow, logging show, fun run, New Old Time Chautauqua circus, children’s activities, vendors. Free, $10 parking. festivaloftheriver.com

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SUMMER 2018 · WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

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Finger pickin’ good. Arlene McCown practices on her dobro at the Darrington Bluegrass Festival. DAN BATES / COAST DARRINGTON

Darrington Bluegrass Festival The 42nd annual festival is July 21-23, Darrington Bluegrass Music Park, 3 miles west of town on Highway 530; 360-436-1006. Features nationally known and regional bluegrass bands. Be sure to see the Combinations, the band led by Darrington’s Bertha Nations. More about the granddaddy of Darrington music festivals, admission, camping, etc. online. darringtonbluegrass.com The Spur Festival June 21-24; Darrington Bluegrass Music Park, 3 miles west of town on Highway 530; live music, rodeo, helicopter rides, camping. Features regional and national country music and blues bands. thespurfestival.com Summer Meltdown Music festival is Aug. 2-5 at Darrington Bluegrass Music Park, 3 miles west of town on Highway 530. Festival admission information, camping details and the national and regional music lineup available online. summermeltdownfest.com

The Gothard Sisters will perform a free concert on Aug. 19 as part of Summer Concerts in City Park in Edmonds. KEVIN CLARK / COAST

2090205

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EDMONDS

Edmonds Outdoor Movies Films shown at about 9 p.m. July 27 and Aug. 3, Frances Anderson Center field, 700 Main St. Bring blankets, lawn chairs. Free. Refreshments sold.

July 27: “Moana” Aug. 3: “Wonder”

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Hear the acoustic duo Ivan Lee and Elaine Skeffington (shown) of IvyLane at the Hazel Miller Plaza in Edmonds on Aug. 2. COURTESY PHOTO

Hazel Miller Plaza Concerts Noon to 1 p.m. for Tuesday shows and 5 to 6:30 p.m. for Thursday shows, July 17 through Aug. 23; Fifth Avenue S. and Maple Street. Free. Concerts take place rain or shine. edmondswa.gov/summer-concerts

July 17: Cascade Percussion Ensemble July 19, Rouge, music of Paris July 24: Tears of Joy Puppet Theatre July 26: Classic Klezmer Trio July 31: Choroloco, Brazilian jazz Aug. 2: IvyLane, acoustic duo Aug. 7: Cosmos Dream, Americana Aug. 9: Ben Hunter and Joe Seamons, American roots music Aug. 14: Harmonica Pocket, kiddie rock Aug. 16: Maya Solieil Traditions, African Aug. 21: The Misadventures of Cap’n Arrr!, pirate comedy Aug. 23, Tiller’s Folly, Americana, folk, roots, bluegrass Summer Concerts in City Park 3 to 4 p.m. Sundays, July 15 to Aug. 26 in the park, Third Avenue S. and Pine Street. Free. Concerts canceled at 2:30 p.m. in case of rain. edmondswa.gov/summer-concerts

July 15: Cliff Perry Band, bluegrass July 22: Seattle Shakespeare Co., “The Merry Wives of Windsor” July 29: Richard Allen & Louisiana Experience, zydeco Aug. 5: Global Heat, neo-soul, R&B, funk Aug. 12: Jazz Underground, contemporary big band Aug. 19: The Gothard Sisters, Celtic Aug. 26: Scott Lindenmuth Group, jazz

Medical

Dental

Chronic Disease Management Diabetes Family Practice Immunization Internal Medicine Medical Walk-In Nutrition Obstetrics Pedatrics Prenatal Care Well-Child Checkups

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EVERETT

Everett Children’s Concerts Free shows, 10 to 11 a.m. Thursdays, July 12 through Aug. 23, Thornton A. Sullivan Park, 11405 Silver Lake Road.

SNO-KING COMMUNITY CHORALE Under the Direction of Dustin Willetts Accompanist: Debra DeMiero

July 12: Recess Monkey, laugh out loud lyrics July 19: Brian Waite Band, rock ‘n’ roll adventures July 26: The Not-Its!, power-pop danceable hits Aug. 2: Tim Noah, Emmy-winning Northwest favorite Aug. 9: Mister G, Grammy-winning, kid-friendly, bilingual rock star Aug. 16: Caspar Babypants, toe-tapping, sweet, lovable tunes Aug. 23: Eric Herman & Puppy Dog Dave, cool tunes for kids

Ticket to Broadway A Concert Version of

BYE BYE BIRDIE

Cinema Under the Stars Free movies at dusk Fridays, July 20-Aug. 17, Camp Patterson Field, Sullivan Park, 11405 Silver Lake Road. Bring blankets and chairs. Pre-show entertainment for kids by Imagine Children’s Museum and others starts at 7:30 p.m.

July 20: “Early Man” July 27: “Coco” Aug. 3: “Wonder” Aug. 10: “Moana” Aug. 17: “Guardians of the Galaxy, Vol. 2”

SATURDAY, JUNE 9, 2018 | 3:00 and 7:00 p.m.

Sail-In Cinema Free, family-friendly outdoor movies at the Port of Everett Marina’s Boxcar Park on Friday nights (9:30 p.m. to start, 8:30 p.m. by the end of summer), July 20-Aug. 24, 503 Millwright Loop W. portofeverett.com

EDMONDS CENTER FOR THE ARTS 410 Fourth Avenue North | 425-275-9595 | ec4arts.org TICKETS: Adults: $25 | Senior/Student: $22 | Children 12 & under: $15 Special Discount for Senior Groups of 10 or more: $20

Funded in part by Edmonds Arts Commission Tourism Promotion Award through City of Edmonds Lodging Tax Funds.

July 20: “Jaws” July 27: “Grease” Aug. 3: “E.T.” Aug. 10: “Up” Aug. 17: “Wonder Woman” Aug. 24: “Top Gun”

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Caravan Theatre Ship Aug. 30-31 and Sept 1-2, Port of Everett Boxcar Park. caravanstage.org Music at the Marina Free outdoor concerts, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursdays, June 28 through Aug. 30, Port Gardner Landing, 1700 W. Marine View Drive. everettwa.gov/812

We know Sno Co

June 28: Clinton Fearon, Jamaican roots reggae July 5: Eldridge Gravy & the Court Supreme, psychedelic funk July 12: Dusty 45s, honky tonk, jump blues, swing July 19: Nick Drummond & Friends, upbeat alt-folk July 26: LeRoy Bell and His Only Friends, rock ‘n’ soul Aug. 2: Chance McKinney, country Aug. 9: Shaggy Sweet, pop, rock and blues Aug. 16: Bochinche, tropical salsa Aug. 23: Stacy Jones Band, rockin’ blues Aug. 30: Randy Oxford Band featuring Aury Moore, powerhouse trombone blues

We’re pretty awesome in King County too!

Port Gardner Landing Saturday Evening Waterfront Concerts Free outdoor concerts, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Saturdays, June 30 through Aug. 25, except Aug. 18 during Fresh Paint Festival of Working Artists, Port Gardner Landing, 1700 W. Marine View Drive. everettwa.gov/810

866.372.1200 | ffnwb.com Renton – Main Office 201 Wells Ave S. Renton, WA 98057

Smokey Point 2639 172nd St NE, 101 Marysville, WA 98271

Lake Stevens 303 91st Ave NE, E-502 Lake Stevens, WA 98258

Woodinville 17641 Garden Wy NE Woodinville, WA 98072

Clearview 17512 SR 9 SE Snohomish, WA 98296

Renton – The Landing 1002 Park Ave N. Ste F Renton, WA 98057

Bellevue 15600 NE 8th St. Ste K8 Bellevue, WA 98008

Mill Creek 15021 Main St., Ste F Mill Creek, WA 98012

Edmonds 184 Sunset Ave S. Edmonds, WA 98020

Bothell 18505 Bothell Way NE, 104 Bothell, WA 98011

2110032

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WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE · SUMMER 2018

June 30: Longstride, reggae rock July 7: Aaron Crawford, Americana, country July 14: Stickshift Anne with Kimball & the Fugitives, roadhouse blues, swing July 28: Doctorfunk, funk and soul Aug. 4: Del Vox, original old-school rock, soul Aug. 11: EntreMundos Quarteto, Brazilian roots, world rhythms Aug. 25: Massy Ferguson, raucous rock with twang


SPARKLE UNDER THE SUMMER SUN!

Dazzle with Summer Sizzle! LAKE STEVENS

Music by the Lake Free concerts, 1 to 5 p.m. Sundays, July 7 and 22, at North Cove Park, behind City Hall, 1812 Main St.; 425-3341012. lakestevenswa.gov

July 7: Air Force and National Guard Concert Bands July 22: The Georgetown Orbits and Michael vs Prince Movies in the Park Titles to be determined, 8:30 p.m. Aug. 10 and 8:15 p.m. Aug. 24, at North Cove Park, 1803 Main St.; 425-3341012. lakestevenswa.gov

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Caspar Babypants will perform an Everett Children’s Concert at Thornton A. Sullivan Park on Aug. 16. COURTESY PHOTO

Theater in the Park Free performances by Last Leaf Productions at 4 p.m. Eagle Ridge Park, 2420 Soper Hill Road.

Aug.12: Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night” Aug. 26: Shakespeare’s “ King Lear”

Hours Monday - Saturday 11:00 am - 5:00 pm Closed on Sunday Full Service Catering & Events Off Site

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360-435-4488 318 North Olympic Ave ≈ Arlington WA 98223 Chance McKinney will perform a free concert Aug. 2 as part of Music at the Marina in Everett. COURTESY PHOTO

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MARYSVILLE

Marysville Children’s Concerts Noon Wednesdays at Lions Centennial Pavilion in Jennings Memorial Park, 6915 Armar Road; free; 360-363-8400. marysvillewa.gov

July 11: Eric Herman and the Puppy Dogs July 25: Harmonica Pocket Aug. 8: Recess Monkey Popcorn in the Park Free movies at dusk, about 9 p.m. Saturdays, July 14 through Aug. 11 Jennings Park Ballfield, intersection of 55th Avenue NE and 70th Street NE; 360-363-8400. Refreshments for purchase. Bring blankets and lawn chairs. marysvillewa.gov

July 14: “Despicable Me 3” July 21: “Jumanji” July 28: “Cars 3” Aug. 4: “Wonder Woman” Aug. 11: “The Last Jedi” Marysville Sounds of Summer Concert Series Free music at 7 p.m. Fridays, July 13 through Aug. 10, Lions Centennial Pavilion in Jennings Memorial Park, 6915 Armar Road; 360-363-8400. Bring lawn chairs and blankets. Free. marysvillewa.gov

July 13: Whiskey Fever July 20: Gin Gypsy July 27: Richard Allen & the Lousiana Experience Aug. 3: Ranger & the Re-Arrangers Aug. 10: Old Town Tonic

Local favorites Recess Monkey will perform a Marysville Children’s Concert on Aug. 8 at Jennings Memorial Park. COURTESY PHOTO Tulalip Amphitheater Concerts Concerts start at 7 p.m., June 23 through Sept. 8; concerts for ages 21 and older; tickets on sale online or at the Tulalip Resort Casino. tulalipcasino.com

June 23: Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons June 29: Creedence Clearwater Revisited and Eric Burdon and The Animals

July 14: Melissa Etheridge and Leann Rimes Aug. 3: The Isley Brothers and The Pointer Sisters Aug. 18: Huey Lewis and The News Aug. 23: Styx Sept. 8: Dwight Yoakam and Joe Nichols

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MONROE

Evergreen State Fair Concerts Aug. 27-31. Evergreen State Fairgrounds, 14405 179th Ave. SE. evergreenfair.org

Aug. 27: Roots and Boots Tour with Sammy Kershaw, Collin Raye and Aaron Tippin Aug. 28: American Idol Live 2018, featuring the top eight winners from the TV show Aug. 29: Spike & the Impalers Aug. 30: Randy Houser with Michael Ray Aug. 31: Skillet MUKILTEO

Summer Movies in the Park 8:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Wednesdays in August. First and third Wednesdays near the clock tower at Bella Terra, 12101 Green Haven, Mukilteo, and second and fourth Wednesdays in the plaza at Rosehill Community Center, 304 Lincoln Ave., Mukilteo. Bring lawn chairs and blankets. Free. mukilteochamber.org

Spike & the Impalers will perform at the Evergreen State Fair on Aug. 29. COURTESY PHOTO

Aug. 8: “Despicable Me 3” Aug. 15: “Coco” Aug. 22: “Cars 3” Aug. 29: “Lego Batman” SNOHOMISH

MILL CREEK

June 19: Cougar Park Party July 17: Buffalo Park Party Aug. 21: Heron Park Party

2109199

Party in the Park 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays, June through August at Cougar Park, 3221 148th St. SE; Buffalo Park, 13401 44th Ave. SE, Heron Park, 2701 155th St. SE. Free, neighborhood block party with yard games, activities, food and music. cityofmillcreek.com

Snohomish Taste of Music Aug. 18-20. Details at info@historicdowntownsnohomish.org. historicdowntownsnohomish.org

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ANIMALS

4-H and FFA Farm Animal Exhibitions A great way to see farm animals is to visit the local fairs. Silvana Fair, July 28; Stanwood Camano Community Fair, Aug. 3-5; Evergreen State Fair, Aug. 23 through Sept. 3.

DOG EVENTS Poochapalooza MARYSVILLE

Animal Farm at Forest Park EVERETT

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. from June 23 to Aug. 19 at Forest Park, 802 E. Mukilteo Blvd. Ponies, ducks and hens, rabbits, goats, pigs. Free, but donations accepted. everettwa.gov/773/Animal-Farm Outback Kangaroo Farm ARLINGTON

10030 Highway 530 NE; 360-403-7474. Guided tours 10 a.m., noon, 2 and 4 p.m. Cost is $8 to $10. Closed Mondays and Tuesdays. Open through Oct. 30. outbackkangaroofarm.com Reptile Zoo MONROE

22715 U.S. 2; 360-805-5300. Open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Cost is $6 to $9.50; 2 and younger free. thereptilezoo.org

Outdoor dog event 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 14, Asbery Field, Fourth Street and Alder Avenue; 425-268-5285. A county fair for dogs. Fashions and rescues runway show, agility course, dog dancing demonstration, weiner dog races. Pet vendors and rescue booths. A $5 entry donation includes goodie bags to first 500 people. poochapalooza.org

DOG PARKS

Double Bluff FREELAND

Cavalero Hill Community Dog Park LAKE STEVENS

Three-acre off-leash dog area with one-quarter-acre shy-dog area at 27032 79th Ave., Lake Stevens; 7 a.m. to dusk; bring your own bags to pick up after your dog. 425-388-6600. snohomishcountywa.gov Clover Valley OAK HARBOR

Beach access with waste bags, water fountain and rinse station, 6325 Double Bluff Road; off-leash area begins 500 feet from parking lot where a windsock on a flagpole marks the boundary; 360-321-4049. fetchparks.org/doublebluff.html Eagle Park GRANITE FALLS

Dog park with grassy area, shade and separate small dog area at 701 E. Galena St. ci.granite-falls.wa.us

Off-leash area at 799 Ault Field Road; 360-321-4049. bit.ly/24gpb1B

AquaSox Bark in the Park EVERETT

Bring your dogs to the matinee game against the Vancouver Canadians, July 24; 425-258-3673. aquasox.com Mutt Strut EVERETT

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Aug. 11 at Langus Riverfront Park, 400 Smith Island Road. Community dog walk, competitions, pet adoptions, food trucks, police K-9 demonstration and prizes. Free admission. Dogs must be on a leash. everettwa.gov/656 Odie, a chocolate Lab, sniffs at Luna, a Nubian dwarf goat, during Bark in the Park night at Everett Memorial Stadium. ANDY BRONSON | COAST

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WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE · SUMMER 2018

ARLINGTON HISTORIC DOWNTOWN

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Ebey Island

Lowell Park

EVERETT

EVERETT

MARYSVILLE

Privately owned dog park open to all, 1 mile east of I-5 and downtown; 425-257-8300. bit.ly/1VEE2lh

Fenced off-leash area north of tennis courts at 4605 S. Third Ave.; 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. through Oct. 31 and 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. after Nov. 1; 425-257-8300. everettwa.gov

Off-leash 3-acre fenced park at southeast corner of the Strawberry Fields Athletic Complex, 6100 152nd St. NE; 7 a.m. to dusk daily. m-dog.org

Marguerite Brons Memorial Park

Tails and Trails Dog Park

Off-Leash Area Edmonds EDMONDS

Off-leash dog park with swimming area and agility equipment at 498 Admiral Way. olae.org Gold Bar Off-Leash Dog Park GOLD BAR

Small, unfenced field along U.S. 2 at Sixth Street; 360-793-1101. bit.ly/1TC8HvG Howarth Park EVERETT

Off-leash area with beach access at 1127 Olympic Blvd.; 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. through Oct. 31, 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. after Nov. 1; north beach only; 425-257-8300. everettwa.org Lake Stickney Park LYNNWOOD

Fully fenced 1-acre off-leash dog area; 13521 Manor Way; 425-388-6600. snohomishcountywa.gov Loganberry Lane EVERETT

Off-leash woodland trails at 18th Avenue W.; 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. through Oct. 31, 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. after Nov. 1; 425-257-8300. everettwa.gov

Strawberry Fields for Rover

CLINTON

MUKILTEO

Fenced area with a large, open meadow, wooded trails and small-dog area at 2837 Becker Road. Includes a water station, information kiosk, toys and waste bags; 360-321-4049. fetchparks.org/brons.html

Fenced three-quarter-acre park with agility equipment and more, 1130 Fifth St. japanesegulch.org

Mountlake Terrace Off-Leash Dog Park

Off-leash dog area, 17217 35th Ave. SE. snohomishcountywa.gov

MOUNTLAKE TERRACE

Tambark Creek Park BOTHELL

Wiggly Field

Three-quarter-acre fenced off-leash dog park in the woods with double-gate system, benches, information kiosk and waste disposal container at 5303 228th St. SW; dawn to dusk daily. http://bit.ly/231Ytau

Off-leash 2.5-acre fenced area with agility equipment at Sky River Park, 413 Sky River Parkway. monroewa.gov

Osprey Park

Willis Tucker Park

MONROE

SULTAN

SNOHOMISH

Fenced dog park, daylight to dusk, daily, more features planned soon, 707 First St.; 360-793-2231. http://bit.ly/231Ytau

Off-leash fenced dog area with 6-acre meadow, more than 1 acre of forest area and shy-dog area at 6705 Puget Park Drive; 7 a.m. to dusk; 425-388-6600. snohomishcountywa.gov

Patmore Pit COUPEVILLE

Partially fenced off-leash area with separate, fenced agility area and small-dog area at 530 Patmore Road; toys, water and waste bags provided; 360-321-4049. bit.ly/26pJ9ce

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FEATURES AND AMENITIES: Swim, dive and surf lessons Recreation pool Competition pool FlowRider® surf-simulation machine Diving boards Wibit floating play structure Lazy river

Visit our website at www.snohomishaquatic.com for fees, schedules and poolspecific open and close times.

Splashtacular waterslide Hot tub Spray play/zero-entry area Party rooms Locker rooms and family changing area The possibilities are endless! 50

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE · SUMMER 2018

Look for us on Facebook! 360.568.8030 www.snohomishaquatic.com Located at 516 Maple Avenue in downtown Snohomish

2111050


LAKE STEVENS

Lundeen Park 10020 Lundeen Park Way; 425-334-1012. Closed until August for upgrades. Swimming, picnic tables, playground and wetland viewing areas.

WATER PLAY BEACH PARKS ARLINGTON

Twin Rivers Park 8003 Highway 530 NE. Disc golf, open fields for jogging or walking pets, picnic tables, restrooms and recreation fields for soccer and baseball. Open 7 a.m. to dusk; 360-403-3448. arlingtonwa.gov BOTHELL

The Park at Bothell Landing Sammamish River, 9919 NE 180th St. Historical museum, amphitheater, play areas and walking paths. Open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; 425-806-6760. bothellwa.gov CAMANO ISLAND

Cama Beach State Park 1880 West Camano Drive. Features a cafe and great hall, boat-building classes, cabins and hiking trails. Open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; 360-387-1550. parks.state.wa.us/483/Cama-Beach Camano Island State Park 2269 Lowell Point Road. Forest loop trails, shoreline strolls, crabbing. Open 6:30 a.m. to dusk; 360-387-3031. parks.state.wa.us/484/Camano-Island EDMONDS

Brackett’s Landing 509 Railroad Ave N. Picnic tables, marine sanctuary and SCUBA diving. Open 24/7; 425-771-0230. Marina Beach 498 Admiral Way S. Playground, picnic tables and off-leash dog area. Open 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.; 425-771-0230. Meadowdale Beach Park 6026 156th St. SW; 425-388-6600. Forest trails, picnic tables and beach access. Open 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Olympic Beach 200 Admiral Way; 425-771-0230. Includes a boardwalk, fishing pier and cycling paths. Hours from dawn until dusk. Picnic Point 7231 Picnic Point Road. Offers picnicking and beach activities. Open 7 a.m. to dusk; 425-388-6600. EVERETT

Howarth Park 1127 Olympic Blvd. Secluded 28-acre park with off-leash area for dogs, playground and restrooms. Open 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.; 425-257-8300.

North Lakeshore Swimming Beach N. Lakeshore Drive. Waterfront park with lake access and views of the Cascade Range. Open 5 a.m. to dusk; 425-334-1012. Sunset Cove Park E. Lake Stevens Road; 425-314-1723. Fish, picnic or swim 7 a.m. to dusk. Wyatt Park 10508 Chapel Hill Road. Boat launch, picnic tables, restrooms and water skiing. Open 7 a.m. to dusk; 425-388-3411. lakestevenswa.gov LYNNWOOD

Martha Lake Park 16300 E. Shore Drive. Picnic shelters, playground and a wetland boardwalk. Open 7 a.m. to dusk; 425-741-8537. ci.lynnwood.wa.us MARYSVILLE

Gissberg Twin Lakes Park 16324 Twin Lakes Ave.; 425-388-6600. Features fishing, model boat racing, swimming and more. Open 7 a.m. to dusk. marysvillewa.gov MUKILTEO

Lighthouse Park 609 Front St.; 425-263-8180. Beach access, playground, boat launch, Mukilteo Light Station tours. Open 4 a.m. to 10 p.m. mukilteowa.gov SNOHOMISH

Ferguson Park 1330 Ferguson Park Road, near Blackman’s Lake; 360-282-3164. Includes recreation activities, fishing, picnic tables and more. Open dawn to dusk. Flowing Lake Park 17900 48th St. SE, Lakefront recreation, boat launch and campground with cabins and RV parking. Open 7 a.m. to dusk; 360-568-2274. Hill Park 1610 Park Ave., also near Blackman’s Lake. Features two shelters with picnic tables, barbeque grill and power and lighting. Open dawn to dusk. Lake Roesiger Park 1608 Lake Roesiger Road; 425-388-6600. Offers swimming beach access, picnic tables, hiking trails. Open 5 a.m. to 9 p.m. STANWOOD

Kayak Point County Park 15610 Marine Drive. Playground, picnic shelters, swimming and more. Open 7 a.m. till dusk; 360-652-7992. Lake Goodwin Community Park 4620 Lakewood Road; 425-388-6600. Offers lake access, picnic tables, play areas and more. Open 7 a.m. to dusk. Wenberg County Park is closed this summer for upgrades. ci.stanwood.wa.us

’ n i f r Su S H !

SNOHOMI

The Snohomish Aquatic Center is home to the only indoor FlowRider® surfsimulation machine in all of Washington. Stand-up riders and body boarders have access to our perfect surf conditions year round – day or night – rain or shine. The FlowRider® surf-simulation machine crosses snowboarding, skateboarding and wakeboarding into an exciting ride with plenty of challenges and a whole lot of fun! We offer open surf, surf lessons, private rentals, competitions and more!

Visit our website at www.snohomishaquatic.com for FlowRider® schedules, rules and fees.

Thornton A. Sullivan Park at Silver Lake 11405 S. Silver Lake Road; 425-257-8300. Swimming, playground, wooded trails. Open 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. everettwa.org Children play in the sand at Jetty Island. ANDY BRONSON / COAST

2111052

Jetty Island July and August, ferry from boat launch at 10th Street and W. Marine View Drive; 425-257-8304. Manmade island just off the Everett waterfront.

516 Maple Avenue in Snohomish 360.568.8030 www.snohomishaquatic.com


SPRAY PARKS & POOLS

North Lynnwood Park Spray Park LYNNWOOD

This 6.3-acre neighborhood park, also known as Dragon Park, is north of Lynnwood Elementary School; spray park hours are 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. from June to Labor Day; 18510 44th Ave. W. ci.lynnwood.wa.us

Comeford Park Spray Pad MARYSVILLE

Water jets, sprinklers, dueling spray cannons and more; 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. through Labor Day; open 10 to 11 a.m. Tuesdays for children with special recreational needs; Comeford Park, 514 Delta Ave.; 360-363-8400. Splish Splash Summer Bash is 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 27. Games, face painting and concert by the Not-Its! marysvillewa.gov

Snohomish Aquatic Center SNOHOMISH

Competition pool, dive area, recreation pool, warm-water pool, spray play area, surf-simulation machine, lazy river and slide; 5:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. weekdays; 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays; noon to 6 p.m. Sundays; $4.50 to $6; $20 for families; 2 and younger free; 516 Maple Ave.; 360-568-8030. snohomishaquatic.com

Daleway Park Spray Park LYNNWOOD

Open 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. from June to Labor Day; 19015 64th Ave. W. ci.lynnwood.wa.us Forest Park Swim Center EVERETT

The swim center has a 25-yard lap pool with an attached diving tank, an outdoor tot pool, hot tub and sauna. Open from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. year-round; admission $3.50 to $4.25, $8.75 for families. Swim times vary; call 425-257-8309 or 425-257-8312 for a recording of schedule and admission information. Forest Park is at 802 E. Mukilteo Blvd. everettwa.org Forest Park Water Playground EVERETT

Play area with 16 interactive features and an area designed for toddlers. Open 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. through late September; 802 E. Mukilteo Blvd. everettwa.org

Isaias Komok (center) and Zakary Wagner (right) pool their efforts to aim a water cannon and spray other youngsters at Marysville’s Spray Pad in Comeford Park, downtown. DAN BATES / COAST Lynnwood Recreation Center

McCollum County Park

LYNNWOOD

EVERETT

Includes shallow, lap and wellness pools and water playground, inner-tube slide, body slide and lazy river; indoors; 5:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. weekdays, 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturdays, 9:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Sundays; admission $5.25 to $5.75, $20 families; 18900 44th Ave. W.; 425-670-5732; schedule available online. playlynnwood.com

Outdoor swimming pool with water slide is open daily all summer when the temperature is above 65 degrees. Admission is $4.75, free for children 2 and younger; 600 128th St. SE. 425-357-6036. snohomishcountywa.gov/1369/swimming

Marysville Pilchuck Pool

The Terrace Recreation Pavilion has a warm-water indoor leisure pool with lazy river, spray toys, water basketball, floats and water toys; 5303 228th St. SW; 425-776-9173. cityofmlt.com

Mountlake Terrace Pool MOUNTLAKE TERRACE

MARYSVILLE

Three heated pool sections for all swimming levels; $2 to $3.25; $8.50 for families; 5611 108th St. NE. msd25.org/domain/130

Located in one of the largest marinas on the West Coast, Port of Everett, South Marina. Listin Need gs ed

1720 West Marine Drive, Everett, WA Office 425-903-3883; Mobile 425-422-3149 www.crosswateryachtsales.com

M-F 10-6 Sat. 10-5:30 2615 Colby Ave., Everett 425.258.2287 jmatheson.com

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○ Clothing & Accessories ○ Educational Toys ○ Children’s Clothing ○ Greeting Cards ○ And so much more

Gifts, Kitchen & Gourmet

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE · SUMMER 2018

Open every day of the year 2113566

○ Gifts ○ Home Décor ○ Jewelry ○ Gourmet Foods ○ Cook & Bake Ware

SNOHOMISH

Water playground has soakers, cannons, spinners, domes and other dousing equipment; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily through September; 6705 Puget Park Drive. snohomishcountywa.gov Yost Pool EDMONDS

Outdoor pool with a diving board offers swim lessons, aerobics, open swim and party rental; 9535 Bowdoin Way; 425-775-2645 for daily schedules (line will not be active until the pool opens); 425-771-1346 for general information. edmondswa.gov

A Garden for all Seasons

Everett’s Professional and Friendliest Yacht Brokerage offering the highest level of customer service possible to boat owners and soon to be boat owners.

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Willis Tucker Park Spray Pad

butchartgardens.com


Everett port’s first 100 years S T O R Y B Y S H A R O N S A LY E R

O

ver the century of the Port of Everett’s existence, a waterfront once dominated by the world’s largest shingle mill has evolved to become the home of the West Coast’s largest public marina. Its heritage, though, includes more than ships, docks, and shingle and lumber factories. In the 1920s, the port opened an airport on the tip of Ebey Island. Aviators were guided to the spot by simple directions written on the roof of what was then North Junior High School at 25th Street and McDougall Avenue in Everett. “If you’re driving along Highway 529, you cross over what would have been the runway when you’re northbound between Everett and Marysville,” said Karalynn Ott, primary researcher and writer of a new book, “Port of Everett: The First 100 Years.” “Tiny nuggets like that were so much fun to uncover,” Ott said. It’s just one example of the hidden pieces of history she and project manager Mary Jane Anderson discovered while writing the book. It took 18 months of research, meticulously sifting through 100 years of port meeting minutes and resolutions. Everett voters approved the creation of a public port July 13, 1918. The election took place just 18 months after one of the most infamous events in the city’s history. On Nov. 5, 1916, a confrontation at City Dock between the Industrial Workers of the World and deputized citizens during a shingle weavers’ strike left at least five union members and two deputies dead. It was the bloodiest labor confrontation in Pacific Northwest history. The event soon came to be called the Everett Massacre. It took a century for a historic plaque describing the incident to be installed at the junction of Bond Street, Federal Avenue and Hewitt Avenue. The port’s history book includes two pages of photos and text describing the massacre. The port acquired its first properties — the 14th Street Dock, Jetty Island and Preston Point — in 1929. The International L ong shoremen’s and Warehouse-

men’s Union was formed in 1937, with three of its locals now serving the port. “I interviewed a longshoreman who was fourth generation who had worked at the port,” Ott said. The manufacturer of Boeing’s 747, “the queen of the skies,” was a huge development for the port, Ott said. Those shipments were sent to Boeing on a rail line. In 2008, the port’s Mount Baker terminal was opened to accommodate the parts needed for the 777. Now, an average of 62 ships and 48 barges come to the port annually, transporting inbound and outbound aerospace cargoes. The port handles all the oversize ocean-going aerospace parts for the 747, 767, 777 and, most recently, 777X airplane production lines, said Catherine Soper, a port spokeswoman. Terminal upgrades are now under way to accommodate the larger cargo ships delivering parts for the 777X. “We are also a backup facility for the 787 Dreamliner in the event those parts cannot be brought in via the Dreamlifter,” she said. In 1994, Naval Station Everett opened on the 110 acres the port

This photo is of the dedication of the Ebey Island Airport in 1928. PHOTO COURTESY OF EVERETT PUBLIC LIBRARY, PHOTOGRAPHER J.A. JULEEN

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A new book chronicles the agency’s history, from pre-war heavy industry to today’s recreation-focused development.

The book

sold to the Navy in 1987. With the port’s growth comes change. In 2010, board members decided to demolish the historic Collins building — over community protest — after hearing estimates that its renovation could cost $11.1 million.

“Port of Everett: The First 100 Years,” will be on sale for $39.95 at The Daily Herald, 1800 41st St. Suite S-300, Everett.

The former casket company building was added to state and national historic registers as the last example of the type of industries that once lined the city’s waterfront. More than 800 pieces of the building, mostly beams, timber and windows, were salvaged and auctioned off. Some parts were used on historic preservation projects, including 15 in Washington, Ott said. With the marina’s capacity for 2,300 boats, a 13-lane boat launch — the largest in Western Washington — and its waterfront restaurants, the port has become a recreational and tourist destination.

SPECIAL EVENTS Waterfront History Tours in partnership with Historic Everett include a bike tour 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 2 and harbor tours from 6:30 to 8 p.m. July 26, Aug. 9, 16 and 23. More at portofeverett.com.

Jetty Island, with its long finger of sandy beach, and the free ferry service from July 5 through Labor Day, has developed into a favorite summer destination for both locals and visitors to the city.

The Water Lantern Festival is 4 to 10 p.m. July 14 at the Port of Everett’s Boxcar Park, 1200 Millwright Loop W. LED lanterns will be launched into the water to float around the park, beginning at sunset. Bring notes and photos to place in a time capsule to commemorate the port’s 100th anniversary. There will be food, games, a photo booth, music and activities. More at waterlanternfestival.com.

“I’ve become so fond of the Port of Everett,” Ott said. “I think it’s really a gem that probably a lot of people drive by on I-5 and don’t even know what’s down there.”

Experience of a Lifetime

300 Smith Island Rd. • Everett • 425.345.5138 2097272

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For more information visit

EverettRowing.com

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PROGRAMS FOR ALL AGES!


beauty

The that lies beneath

Copper rockfish

STORY BY Z AC HERETH PHOTOS COURTESY OF DAN CLEMENTS

V

iews above the water — the mountains, forests, lakes and rivers — are part of what gives the Puget Sound region its scenic charm, but some of the most interesting sights to see lie beneath the surface. Washington is home to a plethora of underwater diving sites, and some of the most popular and easily accessible sites are right in our back yard. Thousands of divers travel from across the state and country to visit sites such as Brackett’s Landing Shoreline Sanctuary in Edmonds, the Mukilteo T-Dock and the Keystone Jetty on Whidbey Island to take in the scenic underwater life here.

Water jelly

“You see some of the most beautiful and interesting things while (diving),” said Brenna Nicholson, a 29-year-old with three years of diving experience. “It’s like seeing an entirely different part of the state.”

Diver Jay Sprenger, with a sea star on his face mask. SUMMER 2018 · WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

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Thousands of divers converge on these three underwater destinations in the region. A SCUBA class gets ready for a dive at the Mukilteo T-Dock.

2. Mukilteo T-Dock The T-Dock is an easy-to-get-to dive site near the Mukilteo ferry, and is another good place for beginning divers. “It’s one of the places that you can just park and go walk to the water and have a fun dive,” Beach said. The site also gets deep quick, and is a good place for crabbing, Beach added. A couple of the park’s most notable features are the pilings and the geodome structure. The geodome is about 50 feet below the water’s surface and is popular with undersea creatures.

3. Brackett’s Landing The underwater park just north of the Edmonds ferry might be the most popular dive site in the area. Underwater photographer Pat Gunderson with Keystone Jetty in the background.

1. Keystone Jetty This Whidbey Island dive site is at Fort Casey State Park near the Coupeville ferry terminal and features an abundance of wildlife, including lingcod, octopus and starfish. Keystone Jetty is a personal favorite of Whidbey Island Dive Center owner Pat Beach, whose shop in Oak Harbor is about 15 miles north. “It’s a short dive,” Beach said. “It’s a simple, easy dive, but there’s really a great representation of just about everything here in the Pacific Northwest that we really have to look at.” Beach also notes the accessibility of this dive site as another redeeming quality. And, with campgrounds nearby at Fort Casey, it offers divers the chance to get the full outdoors experience.

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The site features plenty of marine life, but the biggest draw is the artificial features that have been added to the area over the past 20-plus years. Sunken vessels, man-made trails and concrete rubble are a few of the highlights for sightseers. The site has a maximum depth of about 40 feet and is regularly maintained by a group of volunteer divers, according to the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife. Like most parks in the area, Brackett’s Landing does not allow recreational or commercial fishing. In other words, if it’s in the water, leave it be. Nicholson said the site is busy because of its popularity, but that it’s an easy dive and a must-see. “Edmonds is one of the spots you’ve gotta check out when you first start,” Nicholson said. “Almost like a rite of passage.”


Getting started To experience what Puget Sound has to offer, prospective divers must first become certified. “If you’re not certified and you come in my shop and want to get an air tank filled, I can’t even fill your air tank,” Beach said. “I can’t take you diving, I can’t rent you gear, I really can’t have anything to do with you.” The certification classes are in place to ensure safety and educate new divers on the nuances of diving. “It’s not that it’s that hard or that dangerous or anything,” Beach said. “There are just things you need to take into consideration.” Tube worm

Certification classes are offered at dive shops around the state, and the length and price varies. Most classes involve online courses, class time in the shop, pool training and an open-water dive to test. At Beach’s shop, the standard course consists of two night classes for three weeks and two days of diving on the third weekend. After completing those two dives, you receive a license to dive. After becoming certified, divers can contact local shops to find scheduled dives to attend, or use online forums or “buddy boards” to meet up with other divers in the area. Beach recommends you check the conditions of the water online or with your local dive shop before descending on your next adventure.

2109646

Giant Pacific octopus

“We worry around here about currents. Tides and currents are a big consideration of diving in Puget Sound,” Beach said. “You want to check dive charts and current charts and stuff like that to plan your dive.”

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Flying Heritage & Combat Armor Museum EVERETT

MUSEUMS

3407 109th St. SW (Paine Field); 206-342-4242. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, Memorial Day through Labor Day; Tuesdays through Sundays, after Labor Day through the rest of the year. Cost is $10 to $14, ages 5 and younger free. flyingheritage.com Future of Flight Aviation Center & Boeing Tour MUKILTEO

Blackman House Museum SNOHOMISH

118 Ave. B; 360-568-5235. Noon to 3 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays; free but donations accepted. snohomishhistoricalsociety.org Cascadia Art Museum EDMONDS

11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday, 190 Sunset Ave.; 425-336-4809. On third Thursdays, the museum is open until 8 p.m. and is free during Art Walk Edmonds, 5 to 8 p.m. Otherwise, admission is $10, with discounts for seniors and students. cascadiaartmuseum.org Edmonds Historical Museum EDMONDS

118 Fifth Ave. N.; 425-774-0900; 1 to 4 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays. Suggested admission $5 for adults, $2 for students. historicedmonds.org

8415 Paine Field Blvd.; 425-438-8100, information and reservations at 800-464-1476. Aviation Center open 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. daily. Boeing Tour on the hour, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Children must be 4 feet tall for tours. futureofflight.org Granite Falls Historical Society Museum GRANITE FALLS

109 E. Union St.; 360-691-2603. Noon to 5 p.m. Sundays; free but donations accepted. gfhistory.org Heritage Park LYNNWOOD

19921 Poplar Way; Heritage Resource Center: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays; 425-775-4694. Humble House, Sno-Isle Genealogical Society’s library: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, noon to 4 p.m. Sundays, May 26 through Sept. 1; 425-775-6267. Interurban Car 55: tours 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. second Saturdays June through August; 425-670-5502. Wickers Building, South Sno-

homish County Visitor Information Center: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays, Saturdays; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sundays; 425-670-5502. alderwood.org Hibulb Cultural Center TULALIP

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and noon to 5 p.m. weekends. Free on first Thursdays until 8 p.m.; 6410 23rd Ave. NE; 360-716-2635. Learn about culture and history of the Tulalip Tribes. hibulbculturalcenter.org Imagine Children’s Museum EVERETT

1502 Wall St.; 425-258-1006. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays. Admission is $10.20; $5.10 from 3 to 5 p.m. Thursdays; free for children younger than 1. imaginecm.org Lake Stevens Historical Museum LAKE STEVENS

1802 124th Ave. NE; 1 to 4 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays; 425-334-3944. facebook.com/lakestevenshistoricalmuseum Monroe Historical Society Museum MONROE

Old City Hall, 207 E. Main St.; 360-217-7223. Noon to 3 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays. Donations accepted. monroehistoricalsociety.org

Schack Art Center EVERETT

10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday; 2921 Hoyt Ave.; 425-259-5050. Free admission to see the exhibits. Schack art classes also available. schack.org Sky Valley Historical Society Museum SULTAN

Fourth and Main streets, above the post office, first and third Tuesdays and third Saturdays from 1 to 4 p.m. Free; 360-793-0534. skyvalleyhistory.wordpress.com Stanwood Area History Society Museum STANWOOD

27112 102nd Ave. NW; 360-629-6110. 1 to 4 p.m. Wednesdays or by appointment; donations welcome. sahs-fncc.org Stillaguamish Valley Pioneer Museum ARLINGTON

20722 67th Ave. NE; 360-435-7289. 1 to 4 p.m. Saturdays, Sundays and Wednesdays through October; check website for holiday closures; cost is $5 for adults and $2 for children 12 and younger. stillymuseum.org Western Heritage Center MONROE

East side of the Evergreen State Fair grounds, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday through Sunday; 360-805-6700. All about agriculture, logging, mining and transportation. evergreenfair.org/177/Western-Heritage-Center

It’s a Schack summer

100+ artists selling old and new stock, glass, ceramics, paintings, garden art, art supplies and more.

Americans Interned: A Family’s Story of Social Injustice Artists: Chris & Jan Hopkins

STARTING JUNE 23 Art Camps

AUG. 18 & 19 Fresh Paint Art Festival

Friendly and imaginative instructors offer projects to foster creativity in 6-17 year olds.

2921 Hoyt Ave. Downtown Everett 425-259-5050

Purchase art fresh off the easel at Everett’s wildly popular waterfront festival.

M-F 10-6, Sa 10-5, Su 12-5, Free admission schack.org

Made possible in part by the City of Everett Hotel/Motel Tax Fund

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JUNE 14–SEPT. 1 Art Exhibit

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JUNE 2 Artists Garage Sale


Hazel Blue Acres is a family farm owned and operated by Karen and Spencer Fuentes with their children, Simon, Everett and Phoebe. The family has operated the certified organic blueberry farm since 2008. ANDY BRONSON / COAST

s e i r r e b e u Bl T

with a family’s touch

S TORY BY E VA N T HOMP S ON

blueberries as a crop,” he said.

he dairy cattle Spencer Fuentes tended to as a boy have been replaced by blueberries.

The soil and sunshine in the Stillaguamish Valley are ideal for growing the fruit. It’s also sustainable because blueberry bushes can live and produce for up to 50 years.

Lots and lots of blueberries. He and his wife, Karen, own and operate Hazel Blue Acres on 430 Hevly Road in Silvana with the help of their three children — Simon, 15, Everett, 13, and Phoebe, 9. Together, the family harvests between 50,000 to 75,000 pounds of berries on the 10.5-acre farm. They also grow hazelnuts, hay, wheat, barley and various other crops.

And unlike dairy cattle, the berries aren’t sassy. “Cows all have personalities, and you have to deal with a whole bunch of cows,” Spencer said. The Fuenteses operate Hazel Blue Acres as a small, family-run business with a niche market — and they aim to keep it that way.

They sell blueberries fresh and frozen, organic jams and syrups, blueberry soap, blueberry ice cream made by Lopez Island Creamery in Anacortes, blueberry salsa, shelled hazelnuts and sockeye salmon.

That’s why you won’t find their berries at any big chain stores. They’re sold in local stores and markets, or they can be purchased directly from the farm, which are sold beneath a tent in front of the barn.

Spencer purchased the farm from his mother in 1998, but had no interest in keeping it a dairy farm.

In the summer, during the U-pick hours of 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday, people like to grab a bucket and pick their own berries from any of the 13,000 bushes. It’s $3 per pound, or

“There were a lot of pros to growing

$2.75 per pound if you pick 10 pounds or more. Picking berries straight from the source is both a reward and a luxury, Spencer said. “In the summertime it’s a beautiful spot,” he said. “You can see mountains over there and the (Stillaguamish) river is surrounding the farm. “They can come out and see the fruit on the bush and know where it came from. That’s as local as you can get.” The berries come in three varieties: reka, draper and liberty. Each has their own flavor profile: Reka is juicy and tart, draper is sweet and liberty is sweet and spicy, like cinnamon. “We don’t want them to all taste the same,” Spencer said. “Some are sweeter or tarter, juicier or firm.” The family’s operation — which involves all the kids in varying ways — works like a well-oiled machine today, but it took a leap of faith to get it going more than a decade ago.

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Berry Farm Directory

Liberty blueberries from Hazel Blue Acres sit in buckets.

BIRINGER FARM

PHOTO COURTESY OF

Mike and Dianna Biringer 21412 59th Ave. NE, Arlington 425-259-0255 • biringerfarm.com 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday Stawberries, raspberries, tayberries, blackberries and black caps. Farmstand and U-pick mid-June through mid-August.

JENNIFER FUENTES

The Fuentes family of Silvana transitioned from dairy cattle to blueberries — and they’re not looking back.

BLUEBERRY BLOSSOM FARM Dave and Sandy Baer 8628 Fobes Road, Snohomish 360-568-4713 • blueberryblossomfarm.com Four U-pick varieties July through August/early September, in ripening order: dukes, spartans, sierras and bluecrop.

Purchasing blueberries was a financial gamble. Ten acres of plants cost about $50,000, while sawdust, irrigation and other necessities racked up even more bills. It takes two to three years for the fruit to be ready for harvest and seven for the fields to fully produce.

BOLLES ORGANIC FARM Kelly and Judy Bolles 17930 Tualco Loop Road, Monroe 425-876-9878 • kellybolles@gmail.com U-pick strawberries mid-May and raspberries in July, depending on weather.

“It’s an investment,” Karen said. Like her husband, Karen was also raised on a dairy farm. Spencer and Karen learned from an early age how to grow grass, corn, feed and make hay. But they knew next to nothing about symbiosis between berries, roots, soil and organisms, for example.

BROERS FARMS 18228 Tualco Road, Monroe 360-794-8125 U-pick strawberries, marionberries, blueberries and thornless blackberries from June to August, depending on weather.

Little by little, they picked up the skills and knowledge needed to move forward.

BRYANT BLUEBERRY FARM

The plants went in the ground in 2008, but they weren’t harvested until 2010. Spencer’s income from commercial fishing in Bristol Bay, Alaska, helped keep them afloat financially when they weren’t making any money from the berries.

Lana and Jamie Flint 5628 Grandview Road, Arlington 360-474-8424 • bryantblueberries.com Fifteen varieties per season, including duke, bluecrop and darrow. U-pick berries July through mid-September.

The yield of berries started small — just a few thousand pounds. U-pick began several years later when the supply was right.

DONNELLY’S RIVERBANK BLUEBERRIES

The family spends the fall, winter and spring cultivating the blueberry bushes, maintaining equipment and spreading mulch and sawdust.

11827 Reiner Road, Monroe 360-793-2114 U-pick blueberries July through August. Pirate ship with swords and a sandbox for children on site.

“There is no true downtime,” Spencer said. “There’s always something to do.” In the summer, the kids will do everything from pick berries, work retail, fold boxes and help monitor irrigation.

C blu ome p eberr ick ies!

“It’s a good, solid two months-plus of being in business,” Spencer said. “Having a family farm is like any other small business. You have to wear many different hats.” They also hire teens through the state’s Labor and Industries Department. The Fuenteses’ days are long — sometimes 18 hours — and busy. But it’s important to relish the little things, Spencer said.

For specifics about the upcoming blueberry season and prices for berries, go to www.hazelblueacres.com.

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“It’s very fulfilling to see a field full of blueberries and know that we did that,” he said. “I can look out and remember cows in the field.”

WSDA Certified Organic Blueberries along the picturesque Stillaguamish River in the little town of Silvana.

430 Hevly Rd. • Silvana hazelblueacres.com

360-770-7261


Berry Farm Directory GARDEN TREASURES NURSERY & ORGANIC FARM Mark Lovejoy 3328 Highway 530 NE, Arlington 360-435-9272 • gardentreasuresfarm.com U-pick strawberries and tayberries in June, raspberries and blackcap berries in July.

HAZEL BLUE ACRES BLUEBERRY FARM Spencer and Karen Fuentes 430 Hevly Road, Silvana 360-770-7261 • hazelblueacres.com

LIFE MOUNTAIN ORGANIC BLUEBERRIES

9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday-Sunday U-pick June through August. Two varieties of raspberries (tulameen and Cascade delight), black diamond blackberries and a small patch of Cascade gold raspberries, tayberries and blueberries.

710 May Creek Road, Gold Bar 360-799-0600 Call ahead in July and August.

MARSHLAND ORCHARDS Liesa and Marijke Postema 8102 Marsh Road, Snohomish 360-563-1200 • 425-481-7565 marshlandorchards.com Farm-grown strawberries.

RED RANCH BERRY FARM

MOUNTAINVIEW BLUEBERRY FARM

9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Saturday

U-Pick reka, draper and liberty blueberries starting in July.

JOHNSON’S BLUEBERRIES Lori Johnson 17520 187th Ave. SE, Monroe 425-345-4538 facebook.com/JohnsonsBlueberries Three varieties of U-pick blueberries (toro, duke, and spartan) from July through early August.

Keith and Janet Stocker 7617 E. Lowell-Larimer Road, Snohomish 360-668-3391 mountainviewblueberryfarm.com U-pick July through August. Seven varieties available, including stanley, rancoccas and concord, depending on the season.

RAISING CANE RANCH Nichlos Pate and Melissa Denmark 5719 Riverview Road, Snohomish 360-348-5804 • raisingcaneranch.com

Charles Redford 15130 294th St. NE, Arlington 425-346-7653 facebook.com/RedRanchBerryFarm U-pick or we-pick blueray, earliblue, bluecrop, toro and draper blueberries June through August, depending on weather.

WHITEHORSE MEADOWS FARM Valerie and Tom Wall 38302 Highway 530 NE, Arlington 206-369-1456 • 360-436-1951 whitehorsemeadowsfarm.com 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday- Saturday U-pick three varieties of highbush blueberries (spartan, rubel and jersey), starting in July.

Welcome to 87th Annual Marysville Strawberry Festival ENTERTAINMENT

Schedule of EVENTS

Schedule

Performance Stage, Asbery Field – Market in the Park Friday, June 15 4:00-6:00 pm........................ Petty Differences – Mixed Rock 7:00-9:00 pm...............Jenny & the Blue Moon Boys – Blues Saturday, June 16 12:00-2:00 pm...........................The “A” Band – Rock & Rock 1:00-5:00 pm...... Pennies for Puppies – Sno County Sheriff’s 2:30-3:30 pm...... Patrick McHenry & the Chinooks – Country 4:00-6:00 pm............................. Aardvarks Utd. - Rock & Roll Sunday, June 17 11:30 am-12:30 pm ............................... Voices of the Village 1:00-3:00 pm......................................No Rules – Rock & Roll

June 9-17

Saturday, June 9 Kids Day Party in the Park, Asbery Field 10:00 am-4:00 pm .......................Kids Tuesday, June 12 Noon-2:00 pm .............................. Fashion Show Luncheon, Leifer Manor Thursday, June 14 6:30 pm ......................... Talent Show, Marysville-Pilchuck HS Auditorium 10:00 am-10:00 pm ............Funtastic Carnival, Marysville Middle School Friday, June 15 2:00-9:00 pm........................................... Market in the Park, Asbery Field 5:00-10:00 pm......................................Beer & Wine Garden, Asbery Field 10:00 am-10:00 pm ............Funtastic Carnival, Marysville Middle School Saturday, June 16 8:00 am-3:00 pm ...................................................Car Show, Asbery Field 2:00-3:00 pm............. Strawberry Shortcake Eating Contest, Asbery Field 10:00 am-7:30 pm .................................. Market in the Park, Asbery Field 11:00 am-5:00 pm ...Creative Kids Art Celebration, Totem Middle School Noon-9:00 pm .....................................Beer & Wine Garden, Asbery Field 10:00 am-10:00 pm ............Funtastic Carnival, Marysville Middle School 5:00-7:00 pm...................................Kiddies Parade, Totem Middle School 7:45pm ..........................Twilight Grand Parade, Downtown State Avenue Sunday, June 17 10:00 am-5:00 pm...Market in the Park, Asbery Field Noon-5:00 pm.........Beer & Wine Garden, Asbery Field 10:00 am-5:00 pm....Funtastic Carnival, Marysville Middle School

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FARMERS MARKETS Arlington Farmers Market ARLINGTON

10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturdays, June 30 to Sept. 8 at Legion Park, 200 N. Olympic Ave.; 425-330-6105. facebook.com/afmwa Bayview Farmers Market LANGLEY

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays through Oct. 20 at Bayview Corner, Highway 525 and Bayview Road; 360-321-4302. bayviewfarmersmarket.com Bothell Farmers Market BOTHELL

Noon to 6 p.m. Fridays, June 1 through Sept. 28, 23718 Bothell-Everett Highway; 425-483-2250. countryvillagebothell.com Clinton Thursday Market CLINTON

4 to 7 p.m. Thursdays, July 12 through Aug. 3 at Clinton Community Hall, 6411 S. Central Ave. whidbeycamanoislands.com

Cousins Joseph Rojas (left) and Daniel Mendez bag vegetables harvested from their grandparents’ farm at the Everett Farmers Market. COAST PHOTO

Coupeville Farmers Market

Lake Forest Park Farmers Market

Oak Harbor Farmers Market

LAKE FOREST PARK

OAK HARBOR

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays through October next to the library, 788 Alexander St. coupevillemarket.com

10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sundays through Oct. 15, Highway 522 and Highway 104; 206-366-3302. thirdplacecommons.org/farmers-market

Edmonds Garden Market

Langley Second Street Market

4 to 7 p.m. Thursdays through Sept. 27 next to Greater Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center, Highway 20 and NE Fourth Avenue. facebook.com/FarmersMarketOakHarbor

COUPVILLE

EDMONDS

9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays through June 9 on Bell Street and Fifth Avenue; 425-774-0900. historicedmonds.org/summer-market Edmonds Summer Market EDMONDS

9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays, June 16 through Oct. 6 (except Aug. 11 for Taste of Edmonds), Fifth Avenue and Main Street; 425-774-0900. historicedmonds.org/summer-market Everett Station Farmers Market EVERETT

3 to 7 p.m. Fridays, June 23 to Sept. 8, at the Everett Station, 3201 Smith Ave.; 425-422-5656. everettfarmersmarket.com Everett Sunday Farmers Market

LANGLEY

2 to 6 p.m. Fridays through October, 118 Second St. facebook.com/langley.farmers.market Marysville Farmers Market MARYSVILLE

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays, June 23 to Sept. 29, 1035 State Ave. marysvillefarmersmarket.org Mill Creek Farmers Market MILL CREEK

Noon to 5 p.m. Fridays, May 25 through Aug. 31 in the City Hall parking lot, 15720 Main St. millcreekfarmersmarket.org Monroe Farm to Table Farmers Market MONROE

11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays through Oct. 14 at a new location at Boxcar Park, Port of Everett, 615 13th St. everettfarmersmarket.com

3 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays, June 27 to Sept. 5 at Lake Tye Park, 14964 Fryelands Blvd. snohomish.org/explore/detail/farm-to-tablefarmers-market

Gold Bar Farmers Market

Mukilteo Farmers Market

EVERETT

GOLD BAR

11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays, June 2 through Oct. 6, 428 Croft Ave.; 425-418-1484. goldbarfarmersmarket.com

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MUKILTEO

3 to 7 p.m. Wednesdays, June 6 through Sept. 26 at Lighthouse Park, 609 Front St.; 425-320-3586. mukilteofarmersmarket.org

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE · SUMMER 2018

Port Susan Farmers Market STANWOOD

2 to 6 p.m. Fridays, June 1 to Oct. 12 in the parking lot next to the Amtrak train platform, 8727 271st St. NW. portsusan.org Snohomish Farmers Market SNOHOMISH

3 to 7 p.m. Thursdays through Sept. 27 at Cedar Avenue and Pearl Street, downtown Snohomish; 425-280-4150. snohomishfarmersmarket.org

South Whidbey Tilth Farmers Market LANGLEY

11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays through October at South Whidbey Tilth’s Sustainable Agriculture Center, 2812 Thompson Road. southwhidbeytilth.org Whitehorse Market DARRINGTON

9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Friday through Sunday through October; 1180 Cascade St.


From farmers to market

The newly opened Farms & Market in Everett is part of the Grand Avenue Marketplace.

Farms & Market in Everett a year-round link to homegrown goods STORY BY A ARON SWANE Y PHOTOS BY KE VIN CL ARK

T

he days when longshoremen and lumberjacks ruled Everett’s waterfront aren’t that long ago. The machine shops, boat builders and taverns are still around, occupying crumbling brick buildings and storefronts along Marine View Drive, Grand Avenue and Everett’s west downtown, just blocks from the water. Talking about Everett to outsiders, that hardscrabble past is the first thing they mention. It’s a cliche, but Everett is still thought of as gritty compared to Seattle and the eastside. Slowly, that image is changing. In the mind of those building the city’s future, it’s becoming something different: a place to stroll, relax and venture. Downtown shops and restaurants focusing on bespoke and craft culture are helping Everett shed that old label. Craft breweries and bottleshops, organic delis and upscale restaurants give the city a new vibe. The newest entrant to that collective is Farms & Market, an innovative market and restaurant concept along Grand Avenue that connects local farmers directly with consumers. Forget gritty. It hopes to make Everett synonymous with different “G” words: green, growing, gourmet. “Farms & Market is seen as a place for community members

and visitors to come and experience the bounty of our region,” Farms & Market general manager Alicia Moreno said. “It’s what’s growing right here, right now, and highlights the best produce our farmers have to offer.” Set among the squat historical buildings along Grand Avenue that house auto mechanics and metal fabricators, Farms & Market makes its home on the bottom floor of a shiny new condominium, as part of the Grand Avenue Marketplace. Wide sidewalks funnel visitors into a small courtyard dotted with benches, chairs and tables. One can envision relaxing with a coffee or light breakfast, people-watching and enjoying the sunrise over the downtown buildings to the east. Or kicking back in the evening with a bite of dessert as the sun sets over the Navy ships to the west. “I’m hearing from people all the time that they’re so glad we’re here,” said Moreno, who has been working on bringing Farms & Market to life for the past three years. “They say it’s nice to see the city coming back to life, to see these neighborhoods with folks out walking again.” Just down the street from Everett’s longtime organic and bohemian grocer Sno-Isle Co-op, Farms & Market fits a similar mold, working in tandem with the co-op and the spring and summer Everett Farmers Market on the waterfront. Yearround as opposed to the waterfront farmers market, it provides more of a leisurely shopping experience than the hustle and bustle of the co-op. SUMMER 2018 · WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

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MAY 13 - OCTOBER 2018 • SUNDAYS 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. PORT OF EVERETT • 615 13th St. – Boxcar Park

MAY 23 - SEPTEMBER 26 • WEDS. 4 p.m. - 8 p.m. EVERETT STATION • 2333 32nd St.

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PAIN RELEAF PRODUCTS

PAPA’S APOTHECARY

SPROUTIFI

Naturally derived, fast-acting cannabinoid topical therapy products formulated to relieve inflammation, pain, headaches and more. Everett Station Market Only. www.painreleafproducts.com www.theweedcreamguy.com

We create all natural wellness solutions for skin care, sleep issues, stinky feet and more! Kevin Gilbert (papa@papasApothecary.com) www.PapasApothecary.com

Locally grown herbs & greens. Harvested daily. Protecting the environment while we grow. 21st Century Farming. Sproutifi.com • Instagram:Sproutifi.farm Carol Mastrofini 425-218-0473 cmastrofini@sproutifi.com

BEARS BREATH KETCHUP FOR THE BOLD

SAMFUEGO FOODS

GOTHBERG FARMS

We asked a simple question: “Does Ketchup Have to Be Boring?” Taylor Rausch taylor@bearsbreath.com www.bearsbreath.com

Super Wicked Twisted Salsa & Habitual Hot Sauce. All Natural & Locally Processed Samfuegofoods@gmail.com samfuegofoods.com Michael Samphire 425.443.9782

Farmstead goat cheese from amazing LaMancha Dairy goats in Skagit Valley. Animal Welfare Approved. Rhonda Gothberg rhonda@gothbergfarms.com www.gothbergfarms.com • 360-202-2436

GOOD TO GO MEAT PIES

FAT DRAGONFLY COLLECTION

SCHMIDT’S BLUEBERRY FARM

Farm to Table classic Cornish Pasties offered hot and frozen! We love the Everett Market! 360-966-2400 goodtogomeatpies.com

Decorative Home-goods for kids and grown-ups. Shanni Welsh (360) 303-5650 fatdragonfly@comcast.net www.fatdragonfly.com

At Farmers Markets and Upick. Berries are always fresh and of the highest quality. Berry season is July and August. Bill Susie Kyle & Mikala Schmidt 1217-128thNE Marysville 360-659-1423

425.422.5656 • facebook.com/TheEverettFarmersMarket


BIG SAW PRODUCTIONS

Farms The concept of Farms & Market is based on the simple premise of directing regionally grown food to a central hub for purchase, enjoyed either on-site or at home. The relationship is symbiotic: Farmers help the market provide quality, homegrown products to an urban clientele, while the market gives the farmers a centralized, seven-day-aweek farmstand to sell from. Farmstands within the market are available for farmers to lease, giving them a dedicated showcase for their produce, flowers, plants and more. The cafe on site also fills its menu using as much produce from regional farms as possible. Four farms are leasing space at the market, Moreno said, with more to come: Golden Glen Creamery, Bow: All-natural cheese, butter and dairy products from this family-owned dairy farm and its legion of hard workers: a faithful herd of Holstein, Guernsey and Jersey cows. Alm Hill Gardens, Everson: Choose from a variety of flower bundles with pops of color courtesy of tulips, hyacinths and peonies. Puget Sound Shellfish, Samish Bay: Kumamoto, Olympia, Virginica. Grab a bag of fresh oysters to go with that bottle of champagne. SnoValley Gardens, Everett: Grown just down the road on a family-run farm, these microgreens and other fresh vegetables are organic and delicious. Don’t be surprised to find them in a number of the menu items at the cafe.

Market There are two main components of Farms & Market: a collection of farmstands full of produce, cheeses and other items reminiscent of an open-air farmers market, and a restaurant, kitchen and deli counter that sell housemade foods along with a shelf of ready-to-go items. Along with fresh produce, dairy products and bunches of carefully wrapped flowers, the market area is full of small wonders. Chocolate bars from Alma Chocolate and sweet treats from Quin Candy, bottles of locally made craft beer and cider, whimsical votives and pots holding a variety of succulents and air plants. It’s a great place to search out something special for that hard-to-buyfor loved one. Chef Kate Johnson, who was at Langley’s The Tipsy Gourmet prior to Farms & Market, oversees the ever-changing menu. It has a good mix of light and flavorful as well as hearty meat- and vegetable-focused dishes. Order the crispy roast chicken with roasted carrots and potatoes or the nourish bowl with edamame, tofu and vegetables on rice noodles — and don’t forget the pickled egg. It’s a versatile dining experience. Treat it like a deli counter and take a lunch to go or sit down, order off the menu and relax with a glass of wine from the restaurant. A wall of ready-made salads, sandwiches, dips, olives and more offers quick snacks. All of it is made with the season and region in mind. Johnson, a Northwest native, uses seasonal fruits and vegetables to craft the menu; squashes and pears in the fall and winter, berries and snap peas in the spring and summer. Just as the items each farmer brings to market will change based on what is in season, so will the restaurant’s menu.

CASCADE SHRUB FARM Organic & Raw Washington State Apple Cider Vinegar infused with local organic fruit. aloha@mauishrubfarm.com www.cascadeshrubfarm.com

HONEY MOON MEAD & CIDER Unique meads and ciders crafted in Bellingham from pure Washington honey and fruits. Murphy Evans, owner info@honeymoonmeads.com www.honeymoonmeads.com 360-734-0728

PANDA DIM SUM A taste of Hong Kong on Sundays. Noodles & dumplings fresh cooked at booth.. Jovy So jso22@yahoo.com www.pandadimsumtruck.com

FIRST CHURCH OF PIZZA Have a catered event with a Flame! The essence of a party starts with great food. Imagine the glow of a wood-fired pizza oven on wheels at your next party. Chris Weiss 360 941-5604 www.firstchurchofpizza.com

425.422.5656 • facebook.com/ TheEverettFarmersMarket

2110704

Andrea Guerrero shares a laugh at the newly opened Farms & Market in Everett.

The most comfortable wooden Adirondack, Patio and Garden furniture made in the Northwest. 206-769-4347 Jason@bigsawproductions.com www.bigsawproductions.com


Why I love it here

Steve Smith A

s an avid gardener — who has gardened on both the East Coast and West Coast — there is one reason I love living in Snohomish County: It’s a horticultural paradise. I grew up in the San Diego area, where the palm trees never changed colors, the only evergreens you could grow were pines or junipers, and bulbs had to be put in the fridge for 12 weeks before you could plant them. Sure, we could grow bougainvillea, tropical hibiscus and geraniums all year long, but if we wanted to create that cottage garden look, it just wouldn’t work. In California, perennials need a distinct dormant period to rest for the next season, and fruit trees like apples, cherries and pears also need the same chilling requirements to set fruit. Granted, I came to love lots of tropicallooking plants, but the kind of garden we have come to appreciate here just wasn’t possible. When I moved to Snohomish County in 1989, a whole new palette of plant material came available. Instead of a few evergreens, suddenly I could choose from Hinoki cypress, Japanese umbrella pines, spreading yews,

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Canadian hemlocks and oh-so-manymore varieties that the numbers make my head spin. The same was true for perennials. I had no idea that there even existed so many choices. I was like a kid in a candy store. The maritime climate we live in is perfect for growing almost anything. There is enough winter chill to successfully grow fruit trees and flowering bulbs. Perennials can go dormant and then come back twice as large as the previous season. Even my beloved tropicals from my childhood will flourish in our summers — I just have to remember to treat them as annuals. I would be lying if I didn’t admit that I miss the warmth of that Southern California sunshine. I especially miss the much warmer ocean waters that didn’t require a wetsuit to go for a simple swim, but the natural beauty of our coasts and majestic mountains more than makes up for it. The absolutely glorious parade of blooming trees and shrubs in the spring is unsurpassed by anything I have ever witnessed. Tons of summer blooming perennials, respectable fall colors and decent

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE · SUMMER 2018

“One reason I love living in Snohomish County? It’s a horticultural paradise,” says gardener Steve Smith. ANDY BRONSON / COAST

winter interest (with some occasional snow) all combine to give me year-round interest in my garden. OK, it’s not perfect here. The glacial till soils we have are dreadful to garden in, and the transition from winter to spring seems to take an eternity, but I wouldn’t trade gardening in Snohomish County for any other place on Earth. It is a veritable horticultural paradise. If you are a gardener like me, you probably feel the same way. That’s why I love it here. n

MORE ON STEVE Steve Smith, 69, is a certified professional horticulturist and has been gardening for most of his life. His favorite plant in his yard right now is his hardy banana. He and his wife, Pauline, own the Sunnyside Nursery on a 2-acre farm in Marysville. Steve also writes a weekly column for The Daily Herald under the moniker The Whistling Gardener. For more information, go to sunnysidenursery.net.


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Washington North Coast Magazine - Summer 2018  

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Washington North Coast Magazine - Summer 2018  

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