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life

Spring 2018 The time of your ESOURCES

OLDER AMERICANS MONTH E N G A G E AT E V E R Y A G E : M AY

orts and services for staying independent YOUR GUIDE TO MATURE LIVING, HEALTH, FINANCES AND LIFESTYLE

age, it’s important to engage the services we need to stay well, involved, dependent in our communities. There are many federally supported ces available. This list can help you know where to start.

TIA: The Alzheimer’s and related Dementias Education & Referral Center (ADEAR) has a staff of on Specialists who can provide answers to your dementia-related questions, free publications, and o local services. Visit alzheimers.gov or call 1-800-438-4380.

ARE LOCATOR: The Eldercare Locator is a nationwide service that connects older adults and their s with trustworthy local resources. Whether help is needed with meals, home care, transportation, or support, it can point you in the right direction. Visit eldercare.acl.gov or call 1-800-677-1116.

INSURANCE: State Health Insurance Assistance Programs (SHIPs) provide free, in depth, one-onance counseling and assistance to Medicare beneficiaries, their families, friends, and caregivers. Find SHIP at shiptacenter.org.

ERM CARE: While insurance may be part of your strategy, long-term care encompasses everything ices and finances to where you will live and how to navigate the legal, family, and social dynamics way. Get resources at www.nia.nih.gov/health/planning-long-term-care.

N COUNSELING: Currently serving 30 states, the Pension Counseling and Program 27thInformation annual e legal assistance to individuals experiencing a problem with their pension, profit sharing, or t savings plans. Visit pensionrights.org/find-help for a list of projects.

Older Americans C O N F E R E N C E

AL ACTIVITY: Go4Life is an exercise and physical activity campaign designed to help older adults fit and physical activity into daily life. It offers exercises, motivational tips, andMay free23, resources Wednesday, 2018 to help eady, start exercising, and keep going. Learn more at go4life.nia.nih.gov. Silverdale United Methodist Church

Visit the MOBILE COMMUNITY 8:45know a.m. is- 12:45 p.m. • Doors OpenOtherwise, at 8:00 a.m. PROTECTION: 9-1-1 if you or someone you in immediate danger. SERVICEAlways OFFICEdial (DSHS) Stop by to find out what services you(APS). or your family maydon’t need proof of abuse to report a concern. If you notice dultbe Protective Services You eligible for. Experienced staff will be present to accept and process for these programs as well as g, speak up.applications Go to ncea.acl.gov/resources/state.html to find your local APS.

FREE TO THE PUBLIC • LIMITED CAPACITY

complete changes to current cases, complete eligibility reviews or just to simply answer questions.

CALL NOW TO REGISTER 360-337-5700 OR 1-800-562-6418

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE BAINBRIDGE ISLAND REVIEW, NORTH KITSAP HERALD, CENTRAL KITSAP REPORTER AND PORT ORCHARD INDEPENDENT NS: The U.S. Department of AVeterans Affairs offers a range of services to those who have served,

2018


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TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

YOUR BACKGROUND NOISE AND TINNITUS EXPERTS

Do you have trouble hearing in background noise? Bothersome tinnitus? Our professionals can help identify your specific hearing and tinnitus issues and help you hear your best in all situations while managing troublesome tinnitus. CALL US TODAY FOR A CONSULT

MAY 18, 2018


MAY 18, 2018

TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

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OLDER AMERICANS MONTH

Kitsap County to observe Older Americans Month with conference

This year’s conference theme is meant to inspire people of all ages to improve health By LESLIE KELLY

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cross the country, older Americans — a rapidly growing population — are taking part in activities that promote wellness and social connection. They are sharing their wisdom and experience with future generations, and they are giving back to enrich their communities. They’re working and volunteering, mentoring and learning, leading and engaging. For 55 years, Older Americans Month (OAM) has been observed to recognize older Americans and their contributions to our communities. The month of May was designated as Older Americans month in 1963, when President John F. Kennedy and the members of the National Council of Senior Citizens delegated May as “Senior Citizen Month,” a prelude to “Older Americans Month.” The annual event recognizes and honors the contributions of all our nation’s seniors, past and present, and in particular to those that defended our country. Led by the Administration for Community Living’s Administration on Aging, every May offers opportunity to hear from, support and celebrate our nation’s elders. As a part of the celebration, Kitsap County Division of Aging and Long Term Care, in cooperation with the Long Term Care Alliance, is hosting the 27th annual Older Americans Conference. This year’s event will be May 23 at Silverdale United Methodist Church, 9982 Silverdale Way NW, in Silverdale. Doors will open at 8 a.m. and the conference is set to end at 1 p.m. There is no fee to attend. The 2018 theme, Engage at Every Age, emphasizes that you are never too old (or young) to take part in activities that can enrich your physical, mental and emotional well-being. It also celebrates the many ways in which older adults make a difference in our communities. Older people are not only living longer, but are staying healthier and more active much later in life. Participating in activities that promote mental and physical wellness,

Kitsap County Division of Aging and Long Term Care, in cooperation with the Long Term Care Alliance, is hosting the 27th annual Older Americans Conference. File Art offering your wisdom and experience to the next generation, seeking the mentorship of someone with more life experience than you — those are just a few examples of what being engaged can mean. No matter where you are in your life, there is no better time than now to start. We hope you will join in and Engage at Every Age! This year’s OAM theme, “Engage

at Every Age,” emphasizes the importance of being active and involved, no matter where or when you are in life. It is becoming more apparent that remaining socially engaged can improve the quality of life for older adults. For more information about the conference, or to register, go online to http://kitsapgov.com/hs/hs_altc/

aging.htm. As a part of the national observance, join ACL and AoA in celebrating by participating in the Selfie Challenge. They want to see how you’re engaging. Simply take a selfie (or have someone take your photo) and tweet it with the hashtag #OAM18. Visit the Official OAM Website for more.


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TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

MAY 18, 2018

OLDER AMERICANS CONFERENCE

Conference to include five speakers

All different kinds of backgrounds from the speakers cover a wide range of conference topics By LESLIE KELLY

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he 2018 Older Americans Conference will include five speakers on topics important to seniors. The conference, on May 23, is presented by Kitsap Aging and Long Term Care Division.

MARI VAN COURT will speak on “Interacting with the Health Care System.” She is a registered nurse, with a master’s degree in nursing and is the owner of OnSite Health, Inc.; an Aging and Healthcare Advocacy firm. She has a bachelor’s degree in Comparative International Studies from the University of Washington and a master of Science in Nursing from Seattle University. She is board certified by the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. She uses her extensive knowledge built upon a 32-year healthcare career to inform her role as a business owner and community volunteer.

Mari Van Court

She provides educational programs on Navigating Healthcare, Caregiving and Aging in Place as well as customized presentations and classes for varied public and private organizations. In addition to her keynote speaking engagements, Van Court is often invited to participate as a panelist at many workshops and conferences. As an advocate, she attends legislative lobbying sessions in Olympia and she serves as the chairman of the Kitsap County Division of Aging and Long Term Care Citizens Advisory Council.

CAROL RAINEY will speak on “Advance Directives, Power of Attorney and Durable Power of Attorney.” She is a long time Kitsap County attorney working primarily in the areas of guardianship and elder law. She was raised in Wenatchee and received her bachelor’s degree from Washington State University in 1976 and Carol Rainey her juris doctor degree from the University of Washington School of Law in 1979. She resides in the Illahee/ Brownsville area with her two Corgis. She has three grown children and two grandchildren. MIKE CAIN will speak on “Cyber Security for Seniors Explaining Dangerous Internet.” Cain, a Kitsap native, is owner of IT Northwest, based in Bremerton and has been in business since 2014. He has a background in engineering and has been doing computer and IT work for more than 20 years, specializing in Field and Security operations. He started off working for several national companies including Qwest Communications. Cain has done many projects including working for Mike Cain Microsoft and Walmart, and has managed security operations for car dealerships in the area. He is continuing to work on many projects and is hoping to fulfill a need in the development of a remote camera system. He enjoys the challenge of having something new to work on from day to day. SCHON MONTAGUE will speak about “Driver

Safety When One Ages.” Montague is a proud parent of two, a senior in high school and a preschooler, and a Deputy Sheriff with the Kitsap

County Sheriff’s Office. He spent nine years as a patrol deputy, responding to 911 calls for service. His most recent eight years have been as the Community Resource Officer where his focus on crime prevention, community problem solving and public education promote the mission of the Sheriff’s Office to create community partnerships.

Schon Montague

ROBERT LAW will be the final speaker of the conference. He will speak about “Situational Awareness.” He is a Kitsap County native and is a retired Division Chief with Central Kitsap Fire and Rescue. Initially hired as a Paramedic/Firefighter in 1985, Law spent his first 12 years as a first line medic in Silverdale. Eventually he was promoted through Lieutenant, Captain, Battalion Chief and eventually retiring as the Medical Division of CKFR. Robert Law

In addition to emergency response, he has also been a public educator for his 31 years in the fire service. His private business is Life Savers Northwest, a CPR/First Aid company. Law presents training throughout the state. He holds a Certificate of Paramedicine and a degree in Fire Command Administration. He has also completed several courses at the National Fire Academy in Maryland.

Currently, Robert is consulting with the Department of Emergency Management on assisting Adult Care Facilities in crisis situations.


TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

MAY 18, 2018

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KITSAP COUNTY DIVISION OF AGING AND LONG TERM CARE

County Agency Makes Aging Easier Kitsap County Division of Aging and Long Term Care Givens Community Center 1026 Sidney Ave. Port Orchard, WA, 98366 360-337-7068 or 360-337-5700 https://www.kitsapgov.com/hs/Pages/Aging-Landing.aspx

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itsap County Aging and Long Term Care is a Division of Kitsap County Human Services Department and is the locally designated Area Agency on Aging for Kitsap County. The ALTC’s mission is to work independently and through community partnerships to promote well-being of older adults and adults with disabilities. Nationally, there are 10,000 individuals a day celebrating their 65th birthday. In Kitsap County that equates to roughly 1:4 individuals. ALTC utilizes a variety of state, federal and local funding sources including the Federal Older Americans Act, Medicaid, the National and State Family Caregiver Support Program, the State Senior Citizens Services Act, and Kitsap County, as well as individual and community donations. “We are available to answer questions and help people make decisions that will positively impact their lives,” Administrator Stacey Smith said. “We provide unbiased information and referrals to local services that support citizens making informed choices. There are often

relatively simple and low-cost options available to help people remain living in their own homes and communities. We’re here as a free resource for Kitsap residents to get the information they need as they make important life decisions.”

AT A GLANCE Aging and Long-Term Care program service numbers for 2018 are to be facilitated or provided by staff. INFORMATION AND ASSISTANCE & COMMUNITY LIVING CONNECTIONS 1,800 individuals served. FAMILY CAREGIVER SUPPORT PROGRAM 300 caregivers served; +6,000 hours of respite care; 50 counseling sessions; free trainings to 150 individuals; 50 individuals received home-delivered meals, legal services or durable medical equipment. LONG-TERM CARE OMBUDSMAN 500 investigations

or interventions; 2,500 individuals served; 3,000 volunteer hours.

MEDICAID LONG-TERM CARE CASE MANAGEMENT SERVICES 950 individuals served, daily. STATEWIDE HEALTH INSURANCE BENEFITS ADVISORS (SHIBA) 1,750 direct consumer contacts

for assistance. Last year, SHIBA volunteers helped Kitsap residents save a combined, estimated $180,000 in premiums and prescription co-payments.

CONGREGATE MEALS 31,000 meals for 800

individuals.

HOME-DELIVERED MEALS 41,500 meals for 370

individuals.

KINSHIP CAREGIVERS SUPPORT PROGRAM

Support for 60 caregivers raising other family members’ children.

MENTAL HEALTH/SUBSTANCE ABUSE COUNSELING 500 hours of counseling for 40

individuals

SENIOR DRUG EDUCATION Four to eight community events providing expert information regarding the safe use of prescribed medications for older adults and their caregivers. SENIOR FARMERS’ MARKET NUTRITION PROGRAM 650 individuals receiving about $40 worth of

fresh food and produce.

LEGAL SERVICES 400 hours of (non-criminal) legal services for up to 150 individuals. FREE COMMUNITY CONFERENCES May 23rd Older

Adults and November Caregiver

“If any of our services interest you or could assist you to continue to live independently in Kitsap County, please give us a call”, Smith reiterated. “Folks don’t realize ALTC is their local free resource. Citizens have contributed to our existence their entire working lives. Now, we are here to support you in their golden years.” Source: Kitsap County Aging and Long Term Care, Stacey Smith


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MAY 18, 2018

PENINSULA HEARING

Hearing care is health care Hearing and tinnitus’ effects on the brain

associated with attention, emotion and stress. What results is an overly distributed and stimulated network leading to irritation and in worse cases, depression and lack of sleep.

By MEGAN NIGHTINGALE, AUD PENINSULA HEARING, POULSBO AND PORT TOWNSEND, WA

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ccording to the latest research, hearing problems and tinnitus aren’t just a minor inconvenience, they can have real world negative consequences for brain health. To date, over 2,000 research articles have been published about how living with untreated hearing problems and bothersome tinnitus can change Megan Nightingale, AUD the critical nerve pathways and junctions in the auditory system of the brain. Our brain works with rapid-fire conduction and transfer of information by neurons conducting billions of bits of information to and from the various processing centers of our brain. One of the parts of our brain that allows for rapid-fire processing is the nerve Synapse, or junction between nerve fibers. Information in the form of electro-

Untreated hearing loss can ultimately lead to greater cognitive decline. File Art chemical transmissions take place at these junctions, allowing for incredibly fast transfers of information.

1. Having untreated hearing loss can lead to greater cognitive decline and faster decline over the years.

We do know that as we get older, these transmitters of information start to slow down and while a healthy, older brain is just as capable of processing information as a young, healthy brain, the older brain is just slower at it. This is called normal cognitive decline.

2. There was no difference in the rate of cognitive decline between normal hearing subjects and those with hearing loss who wear hearing devices.

Studies from Johns Hopkins University here in the U.S. and from various universities around the world are finding the same conclusions:

In the case of tinnitus, studies in the U.S. and China have found that with today’s advanced brain imaging technology, people with reported bothersome tinnitus show an excess of neural activity connecting the auditory processing system to other regions of the brain that are

Many studies investigating the adverse effects of hearing and tinnitus issues are coming from our own Veteran’s Administration. This is due to the fact that the number one and two disabilities for veterans coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan are hearing loss and tinnitus. Findings from the VA state that the most effective treatment for tinnitus is hearing devices to treat hearing loss. This is because in about 90 percent of cases where tinnitus is reported, there is also a hearing problem, usually unnoticed. Stimulating auditory neurons through the use of hearing devices helps the brain focus its attention on hearing the outside world better while also decreasing the brain’s attention to the extra neural activity involved with tinnitus. Over time the brain learns to tune out the bothersome tinnitus as it focuses and interprets sound from the world around us. There have never been better treatments for hearing and tinnitus issues than what we have available today, so be sure to ask you doctor to screen your hearing at your next physical or visit your local hearing health care center for a free hearing screening. Remember, hearing care is health care!

CALENDAR RESOURCES

Making new friends when you’re over 55 It’s not that easy to reach out and make friends when you’re older, but there are plenty of places around Kitsap to try By LESLIE KELLY

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hen younger, making friends seemed to be a natural thing. You met people at work, at social functions or even online. But after age 55, the opportunities to meet new people and make new friends can be problematic. If you’re not a church-goer and you feel you’re too young for the community senior centers or the “Red Hat” society, here’s a handful of suggestions of places, events and activities where you might find new friends, and maybe even find that special person to spend time with.

ATTEND A WINE TASTING With wine tasting rooms in every part of the county, this is the perfect place to drop in and meet new people. Eagle Harbor Wine Co. on Bainbridge Island at 278 Winslow Way E, is a popular one. Call 206-842-4669 or go to their website at www.ehwineco.com. Or try Olalla Valley Vineyard & Winery, 13176 Olalla Valley Road SE, Olalla, call 253-851-

4949. Website: www.olallavalleyvineyard.com Listen to our local talent at a community concert. During the summer, there are plenty to choose from with concerts at the waterfront gazebo in Port Orchard, on the waterfront in Bremerton and in the parks on Bainbridge Island and in Poulsbo. Check the parks department websites for specifics. Get outside. Olympic Outfitters is a place to go to learn about fly fishing. See more at www.peninsulaoutfitters.com/ product-category/fly-fishing-classes/. If you’ve never been in a kayak and want to try, check out the classes offered at Olympic Outdoor, www.olympicoutdoorcenter.com. There are also standup paddle boards to try. For those who want a hike, try the Kitsap Outdoors group on MeetUp.com. The Kitsap Outdoors Meetup Group is an outdoors group dedicated to bringing introductory hikes, snow travel, camping, backpacking and biking to the citizens of Kitsap County. Starting where the Clear Creek Trail leaves off, they know area parks, the Olympics and Mount Rainier. Go to www. meetup.com/Kitsap-Outdoors/ for more. The North Kitsap Trails Association at www.northkitsaptrails.org, is where you can work outdoors, assisting with keeping up our local trails. Learn something new. Sign up for an adult education class with your local parks department or classes offered at Olympic College. If you’re really committed, check out the See FRIENDS, Page 7

Getting outside is a great way to meet new people. File Art


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Friends

Continued from page 6 culinary program at Olympic College. Game nights can bring individuals or teams together with knowledge as well as laughter. Try bingo, bunco or trivia night at a local pub. A local group, called the Bunco Divas love playing Bunco, drinking responsibly, bringing a variety of food and beverage, having fun conversation, enjoying a wonderful host who prepares a delightful event and the social aspect of being able to have fun for one night a month. Find them at www.meetup.com/ The-Bunco-Divas. For bingo, all the local casinos offer it and there is the ARC Bingo at 3243 Perry Ave. in Bremerton. Call 360-377-5074 for hours and more information. Check out what’s happening around our area on www.bainbridgereview.com and www.kitsapdailynews.com under the “Calendar” listings or submit your own event. Sign up for a cooking class. There are always cooking demonstrations at Central Market in Poulsbo, and Town & Country on Bainbridge Island. Or try Heyday Farm on Bainbridge Island. Find more at www.heydayfarm.com. Do you prefer to geek out? Check out Kitsap Computing Seniors at www.kitsapcomputingseniors.org. This group is a place where you can go to get your techie questions answered while meeting others. The group meets at Sheridan Park Community Center, 680 Lebo Blvd., Bremerton. Volunteer at a nonprofit you support. There’s the Kitsap Humane Society shelter for the animal lover in you, Habitat for Humanity if you know your way around a tool box, and there’s always a need for more hands at all the local food banks. Find out more about local nonprofits by visiting www. kitsapgreatgive.org. The Kitsap County website has a list of volunteer opportunities and county boards that have vacancies at www.kitsapgov.com/volunteer/default.htm. Teach an early reader to read better. Many of the elementary schools have a “grandparent” program where you will be matched to a student and meet to read or do other projects. Want to start your search online? Visit www.meetup. com and look for the Kitsap Singles group or the Peninsula Boomer Zoomers group. Kitsap Singles is for people of any age and provides a purpose is to get out and do things, not necessarily find someone to date. Their schedule is filled with things like Happy Hour at the Boat Shed in Bremerton, Trivia Time at Whiskey Creek Steakhouse, Hike 4 Miles, and even a weekend white water rafting trip. They also offer “Rock and Bowl” in Silverdale. The Peninsula Boomer Zoomers is a singles activity group for ages 50 and above on the Kitsap Peninsula. Members come from Gig Harbor to Port Angeles and all points in between. Quilting or sewing on your list? Join a group or class. Visit the Kitsap Quilters at www.kitsapquilters.com for details. They meet at 7 p.m. every fourth Tuesday of the month in Poulsbo and beginners are welcome. For sewing and craft classes, give JoAnn’s a try. Located at 2886 NW Bucklin Hill Road in Silverdale, classes are posted at the store and can be found online, or call 360-692-1300. Sign up to become a Master Gardener. Through the Washington State University Extension Service and Kitsap County, there’s the opportunity to learn all you need to know to garden beautifully while helping the environment. Visit www.ext100.wsu.edu/kitsap/gardening/master-gardeners/ become-a-master-gardener/ and read about the classes and seminars that are available. Learn something new or teach someone else something you know. The goal is to get out and play. Dinner, movies, hiking, camping, traveling, parties, playing cards, dancing, bike riding, wine tasting, museums, bowling, mini golf, rafting, kayaking, boating, coffee, plays, outdoor concerts and indoor concerts. It’s all abundant in Kitsap County.

Check out what’s happening on www.bainbridgereview.com and www.kitsapdailynews.com under the “Calendar” listings or submit your own event. There are plenty of events throughout the year for people of all ages to enjoy. File Art

RESOURCES

OLDER AMERICANS MONTH E N G A G E AT E V E R Y A G E : M AY

2018

supports and services for staying independent As we age, it’s important to engage the services we need to stay well, involved, and independent in our communities. There are many federally supported resources available. This list can help you know where to start.

DEMENTIA: The Alzheimer’s and related Dementias Education & Referral Center (ADEAR) has a staff of Information Specialists who can provide answers to your dementia-related questions, free publications, and referrals to local services. Visit alzheimers.gov or call 1-800-438-4380. ELDERCARE LOCATOR: The Eldercare Locator is a nationwide service that connects older adults and their caregivers with trustworthy local resources. Whether help is needed with meals, home care, transportation, or caregiver support, it can point you in the right direction. Visit eldercare.acl.gov or call 1-800-677-1116. HEALTH INSURANCE: State Health Insurance Assistance Programs (SHIPs) provide free, in depth, one-onone insurance counseling and assistance to Medicare beneficiaries, their families, friends, and caregivers. Find your local SHIP at shiptacenter.org. LONG-TERM CARE: While insurance may be part of your strategy, long-term care encompasses everything from services and finances to where you will live and how to navigate the legal, family, and social dynamics along the way. Get resources at www.nia.nih.gov/health/planning-long-term-care. PENSION COUNSELING: Currently serving 30 states, the Pension Counseling and Information Program offers free legal assistance to individuals experiencing a problem with their pension, profit sharing, or retirement savings plans. Visit pensionrights.org/find-help for a list of projects. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY: Go4Life is an exercise and physical activity campaign designed to help older adults fit exercise and physical activity into daily life. It offers exercises, motivational tips, and free resources to help you get ready, start exercising, and keep going. Learn more at go4life.nia.nih.gov. RIGHTS PROTECTION: Always dial 9-1-1 if you or someone you know is in immediate danger. Otherwise, contact Adult Protective Services (APS). You don’t need proof of abuse to report a concern. If you notice something, speak up. Go to ncea.acl.gov/resources/state.html to find your local APS. VETERANS: The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs offers a range of services to those who have served, including benefit support, health programs, and crisis services. It also extends support to caregivers. Visit VA.gov or call the MyVA311 line at 1-844-698-2311. VOLUNTEERING: Senior Corps connects Americans 55+ with people that need support. Through its Foster Grandparents, Senior Companions, and RSVP programs, Senior Corps strengthens communities while providing intangible benefits to volunteers. Visit nationalservice.gov/programs/senior-corps.

More resources: oam.acl.gov/resources.html


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TIME OF YOUR LIFE SPRING EDITION

Thank you to our 2018 sponsors

MAY 18, 2018

Media Sponsor

Kitsap County does not discriminate on the basis of disability. Individuals who require accommodation should contact Vicki Hanson at 360-337-5700 or 1-800-562-6418. Email: vhanson@co.kitsap.wa.us or tdd 360-307-4280. (Please provide two weeks notice for interpreter services.)

Time of Your Life - 2018  

i20180517160704545.pdf

Time of Your Life - 2018  

i20180517160704545.pdf