Page 1

R O N 2018

P A S T I K TH

NORTH KITSAP Special Supplement to the North Kitsap Herald


STAY & PLAY TONIGHT!

PLAY WITH PASSION. RELAX IN STYLE. THAT’S THE POINT! Our hotel is where comfort meets luxury. The hotel offers 94 guest rooms and suites and is a great place to stay and play on the Kitsap Peninsula. • Each room has in-room coffee and a refrigerator • A 100-person conference/reception room is available with breakout doors to courtyard area with fire-pit • Fitness Center • The Point Julia Cafe • Outdoor courtyard for receptions • Adjacent to 24-Hour Casino with enclosed access

Kingston, Washington www.the-point-casino.com 360.297.0070 The Point Casino & Hotel is proudly owned and operated by The Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe.

2

|

N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

201 8

You must be at least 21 years old to participate in gaming activities, attend entertainment events and to enter lounge/bar areas. Knowing your limit is your best bet—get help at (800) 547-6133.


WELCOME

Enjoy the North Kitsap experience

A

typical day in North Kitsap: Spend the morning exploring a forested trail, take in a bucolic rural landscape on your way to a seaside town for lunch, spend the afternoon at the beach, catch an evening cultural presentation, movie or stage production. If you already live here, you’re familiar with the North Kitsap experience. If you are considering making North Kitsap your home, welcome to the family. It’s a diverse family, comprised of the Suquamish and S’Klallam peoples who have lived here since time immemorial; the descendants of Scandivanians who The Leikarringen Dancers help open the the 2017 Viking Fest celebration, at Muriel Iverson Williams Waterfront Park in downtown Poulsbo. Richard Walker

N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

201 8

|

3


Grandparents Grandma and Grandpa always supported us...

At Liberty Shores I know the support will continue. At Liberty Shores Assisted Living Community and Harbor House Alzheimer’s Community, we understand the needs of your loved ones.

Liberty Shores

SENIOR LIVING

Harbor House MEMORY CAR E

360-779-5533

19360 Viking Avenue N.W., Poulsbo

WELCOME arrived here beginning in the mid-1880s, drawn by abundant natural resources and an environment that reminded them of their places of origin; peoples of Mexican and Asian ancestry, now two of the largest demographics in Poulsbo; and others. Despite our diversity, we have a lot in common. Like you, all were drawn here by economic opportunity, good schools, safe neighborhoods and natural spaces. And we all respect this place we share. It’s evident in local efforts to balance development with the needs of our environment. It’s evident in workplace innovations that are generating new products and creating new jobs. It’s evident in the fundraising and volunteerism that ensures neighbors can meet their basic needs when faced with financial crisis. No matter where you are from, once you move here, you become part of that culture. The magazine you are holding tells North Kitsap’s story. Within these pages, you’ll find profiles of our communities: Hansville/Eglon, Indianola, Keyport, Kingston, Little Boston, Port Gamble, Poulsbo, Suquamish. You’ll find information you need to know: arts and entertainment venues, civic organizations, events and festivals, farmers markets, government offices, museums and heritage sites, parks and recreation, schools, and a handy keepsake map. You’ll also find charts and graphics that tell you a little bit about who we are: Demographics and population, economic data, employment data, housing costs, and weather. The North Kitsap Almanac is published by the North Kitsap Herald, which has been published since 1901. The Herald is part of Sound Publishing’s Kitsap News Group. Read our daily news site, KitsapDailyNews.com, to stay up to date on news and events here. Enjoy the North Kitsap Almanac. And welcome home. Terry Ward, publisher Richard Walker, editor

LIKE US ON

www.libertyshores.com 4

|

N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

201 8


INSIDE

What you’ll find in the NK Almanac Welcome to North Kitsap Inside Quick reference Culture Poulsbo Hansville Indianola Keyport Kingston Port Gamble Map Port Gamble S’Klallam Suquamish Art Entertainment Faith Taste Get involved Be active Parks and trails Fitness and fun Education Weather Advertiser index

3-4 5 8-12 13-14 14-15 16-20 21-22 23-24 25-27 28-29 30-31 32-33 34-37 38 39-40 41-44 45 46-48 49 50 51-53 54-56 57 58

Before the raising ceremony: The Watchman, a story pole carved by S’Klallam artist Jimmy Price, now stands at Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe park overlooking the bay. Richard Walker

North Kitsap Almanac

is an annual publication of the Sound Publishing's Kitsap News Group 19351 8th Ave. NE, Suite 106, P.O. Box 278, Poulsbo WA. 98370 360-779-4464 | 360-779-8276 (fax) ADMINISTRATION Terry Ward, publisher tward@soundpublishing.com Donna Etchey, general manager detchey@soundpublishing.com Richard Walker, managing editor rwalker@soundpublishing.com Brian Judge, circulation manager bjudge@soundpublishing.com

Copyright 2018 Sound Publishing Inc.

N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

201 8

|

5


POULSBO VILLAGE

NORTH KITSAP’S SHOPPING CENTER SPECIALTY SHOPS | RESTAURANTS | GROCERY | SERVICES | LOTS OF PARKING! Thank You for 34 Years of Support!

Ballet • Pointe

THE SPORT HAUS

Jazz • Modern

Specialists in running shoes... we make happy feet!

Running Walking Baseball

Soccer Tennis Football

• Tap • Hip-Hop

Dance & Performing Arts

Basketball Volleyball Lacrosse

Poulsbo Village Shopping Center

360-779-1122

(360) 697-2311

Lyrical • Acting • Voice Wedding Choreography Sr. Company Member Becky Darrow

www.gallettadance.com

Mon-Fri 9:30am-7:00pm • Sat 9:30-6:00pm

19351 8th Ave NE Suite 100 Poulsbo WA, 98370

An Authentic Taste of Vietnam

PHO (Vietnamese Noodle Soup)

Spring & EggRolls • Stir Fried Egg or Rice Noodles • Vermicelli Noodle Bowl Rice Platters • Fried Rice • Bubble Tea Stop in today for a great experience! Visit www.photnpoulsbo.com to view our variety of dishes!

Toys Hobbies Kites Art Supplies Windsocks

Puppets Games Books Puzzles and more...

19425 7th Ave. NE #101 • Poulsbo, WA 98370 • (360) 779-8797

(Please call ahead for groups of 8 or more)

360-394-1601 Mon-Sat 10:30am-9pm • Sun Closed

In the Poulsbo Village

MASSAGE THERAPY

• Rehabilitation & Sport Massage • Pediatric Massage • Evening & Weekend Appointments Available

Eric Thanem CPMT, LMP #MA 22333

Open 7 days a week • Located in Poulsbo Village

360-440-3555 • 360-779-3285

Poulsbo Athletic club

Most Insurances Accepted

19611 - 7th Ave. NE

ERICSMASSAGEROOM.COM

Off Hwy 305 • Poulsbo • www.poulsbovillage.com 6

|

N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

201 8


POULSBO VILLAGE NORTH KITSAP’S SHOPPING CENTER SPECIALTY SHOPS | RESTAURANTS | GROCERY | SERVICES | LOTS OF PARKING!

POULSBO VILLAGE NORTH KITSAP’S SHOPPING CENTER

SPECIALTY SHOPS | RESTAURANTS | GROCERY | SERVICES | LOTS OF PARKING! Allen’s Cleaners

Dollar Tree

North Kitsap Herald

Superior Pet Food

American Financial Network Inc.

Domino’s Pizza

Papa Murphy’s Pizza

Sound Publishing

El Huarache Restaurant

Peninsula Outfitters

Sound Classifieds

Artisan Salon

Pho T&N Restaurant

Sunrise Dental

Bebe Nails

Elmer’s Restaurant

Poulsbo Animal Clinic

Sway Salon

Burger King

Gallery of Hair Design

Poulsbo Village Chiropractic

The New You

Chung’s Teriyaki

Galletta School of Dance

RGI Insurance Specialty

The UPS Store

Rite Aid

The Wild Bird

RPC Solutions Ltd

Toys Etc.

Second Season

Village Laundromat

St Charles Anglican Church

West Sound Treatment Center

Sport Haus

Woodwork Tattoo

Chrysalis Physical Therapy

Go2Marine.com

Cinco de Mayo Meat Market

Golden Lion Restaurant

Coast Do It Best Hardware

Harrison’s Comfort Footwear

Cobbler Shoppe

Island Hammer LLC

Cut it Again Sam

Kitsap Martial Arts

Defensive Driving School

Liberty Tax Service

Sprint Store

Off Hwy 305 • Poulsbo • www.poulsbovillage.com

Visit Your Locally, Family Owned Store For all your Shopping Needs

VOTED #1 Hardware Store for 8 years 2010-2017 Customer Service is our Specialty

SHOP LOCAL!

COAST

HARDWARE

360.779.2000

Visit us on

22

Poulsbo Village - 19494 7th Ave NE

We post all of our great in-store specials all month long www.facebook.com/coasthardware

Off Hwy 305 • Poulsbo • www.poulsbovillage.com N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

201 8

|

7


Quick reference guide to public services

NUMBERS Animal/Wildlife

Kitsap Animal Control 800-827-7387 Kitsap Humane Society 360-692-6977 | www.kitsaphumane.org Department of Fish and Wildlife 360-902-2200 | http://wdfw.wa.gov West Sound Wildlife Shelter 206-855-9057 | www.westsoundwildlife.org

Chambers

Commerce

of

Kingston Food Bank (Kingston) 360-297-4861 ShareNet (Kingston) 360-297-2266 | www.sharenetfoodbank.org

Courts

Poulsbo Chamber of Commerce 19735 10th Ave. NE, Suite S100, Poulsbo 98370 360-779-4848 | www.poulsbochamber.com Greater Kingston Chamber of Commerce 11201 Highway 104 Kingston 98346 360-297-3813 | www.kingstonchamber.org

Poulsbo Municipal Court 200 NE Moe St. Poulsbo 98370 360-779-9846

G ov e r n m e n t

Crisis Services Domestic Violence Hotline 800-799-7233 Sexual Assault 24-hour Hot Line 360-479-8500 Suicide Prevention Helpline 800-273-8255 Washington Poison Center 800-222-1222

Food Banks North Kitsap Fishline (Poulsbo) 360-779-5190 | www.nkfishline.org

CITY Poulsbo City Hall 200 NE Moe St. Poulsbo 98370 360-779-3901 | www.cityofpoulsbo.com Mayor and City Council Becky Erickson, mayor. Connie Lord, Jeff McGinty, Mayor Becky David Musgrove, Gary Erickson Nystul, Ed Stern, Kenneth Thomas COUNTY Kitsap County 614 Division St. Port Orchard 98366 360-337-5777 | www.kitsapgov.com Board of County Commissioners 614 Division St., Port Orchard 98366 360-337-7146 n District 1 (North Kitsap): Rob Gelder rgelder@co.kitsap.wa.us n District 2 (South Kitsap): Charlotte Garrido cgarrido@co.kitsap.wa.us n District 3 (Central Commissioner Kitsap): Edward E.Wolfe Rob Gelder ewolfe@co.kitsap.wa.us STATE Gov. Jay Inslee (D) P.O. Box 40002 Olympia 98504-0002 360-902-4111 | www.governor.wa.gov

Kindergarten through Fifth Grade

Rich, Engaging Curriculum

Small Class Sizes

We’re just across the bridge 8553 NE Day Road • Bainbridge Island • 206-842-0400

TheIslandSchool.org WHERE EVERY CHILD MATTERS

8

|

N o r t h

K i t s a p

Sen. Christine Rolfes (D) 230A John A. Cherberg Building P.O. Box 40423 Olympia 98504-0423 360-786-7644 | rolfes.chris- Sen. Christine tine@leg.wa.gov Rolfes

A l m a n ac

201 8


Award Winning Schools Dedicated, High Quality TEACHERS and SUPPORT STAFF Variety of LEARNING OPTIONS including a Highly Capable Program, K-5 Spanish Dual Language Program, Parent Assisted Learning Program, K-8 Options Program

COMPETITIVE Advanced Placement Program Robust, HIGH QUALITY Career and Technical Education (CTE) Offerings

Enrollment is always open N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

201 8

|

9


Quick reference guide to public services

NUMBERS

man; Bardow Lewis, vice chairman; Nigel Lawrence, Sammy Mabe, Luther “Jay” Mills, Rich Purser, Robin Sigo.

Libraries Rep. Sherry Appleton

Rep. Drew Hansen

Rep. Sherry Appleton(D) 132F Legislative Building P.O. Box 40600 Olympia 98504-0600 360-786-7934 | appleton.sherry@leg.wa.gov Rep. Drew Hansen (D) 369 John L. O’Brien Building P.O. Box 40600 Olympia 98504-0600 360-786-7842 | hansen.drew@leg.wa.gov FEDERAL Sen. Maria Cantwell (D) 206-220-6400 (Seattle) www.cantwell.senate.gov Sen. Patty Murray (D) 206-553-5545 (Seattle) www.murray.senate.gov Rep. Derek Kilmer (D) 360-373-9725 (Bremerton) www.kilmer.house.gov TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe 31912 Little Boston Road Kingston 98346 360-297-2646 | www.pgst. nsn.us Council members: Jeromy Sullivan, chairman; Chris Tom, vice chairman; Donovan Jeromy Sullivan Ashworth, Talia DeCoteau, Lena Tunkara, Renee Veregge. Suquamish Tribe 18490 Suquamish Way P.O. Box 498 Suquamish 98392 360-598-3311 | www. suquamish.nsn.us Council members: Leonard Forsman, chair-

1 0

Kitsap Regional Library www.krl.org Kingston branch 26159 Dulay Road NE 360-297-3330 Little Boston branch 31912 Little Boston Road NE 360-297-2670 Poulsbo branch 700 NE Lincoln Road 360-779-2915

Leonard Forsman

|

Ports

M e d i ca l C a r e ALL EMERGENCIES: 911 North Kitsap Family Practice (urgent care) 20730 Bond Road, Poulsbo 360-779-7011 | www.immediateclinic.com/ poulsbo-urgent-care The Doctors Clinic (urgent care) 19245 7th Ave. NE, Poulsbo 360-782-3500 | www.thedoctorsclinic.com Harrison Medical Center 866-844-9355 (WELL) www.harrisonmedical.org Peninsula Community Health Services 360-779-1963 (Poulsbo) www.pchsweb.org HIV-AIDS Information 800-874-AIDS Hospice of Kitsap County 360-698-4611 | www.hospiceofkitsapcounty. org Kitsap Public Health District 360-377-5235 | www.kitsappublichealth.com Shellfish Water Quality Hotline 800-223-9355

Parks

and

R e c r e at i o n

Kitsap County Parks and Recreation 360-337-5350 | www.kitsapgov.com/parks City of Poulsbo Parks and Recreation 360-779-9898 | www.cityofpoulsbo.com/

N o r t h

K i t s a p

parks/parks.htm Village Green Metropolitan Park District 360-930-9242 | www.myvillagegreen.org Commissioners: Bobbie Moore, Position 1;Tracy Darlene Harris, Position 2; Jason Manges, Position 3; Patrick Pearson, Position 4; Jim Moore, Position 5.

Port of Eglon P.O. Box 451, Hansville 98340 360-297-4542 | nklaw1@gmail.com Commissioners: Timothy Holbrook, District 1; David A. Roberts, District 2; C. Joyce McClain, District 3. Port of Indianola P.O. Box 496, Indianola 98342-0496 www.portofIndianola.com Commissioners: Jeff Henderson, District 1; Eric Cookson, District 2; John Lane District 3. Port of Keyport P.O. Box 195, Keyport 98345 360-627-0594 | www.portofkeyport.com Commissioners: John M.Thompson, Position 1; Brian Watne, Position 2; Gene Warden, Position 3. Port of Kingston 25864 Washington Blvd. P.O. Box 559, Kingston 98346 360-297-3545 | www.portofkingston.org Commissioners: Vacant, District 1; Mary McClure, District 2; Laura Gronvoll, District 3. Port of Poulsbo P.O. Box 732, Poulsbo 98370 360-779-9905 | www.portofpoulsbo.com Commissioners: Steve Swann, Position 1; Mark DeSalvo, Position 2; Jonothan Saunders, Position 3.

P o l i c e , F i r e P rot e c t i o n ALL EMERGENCIES: 911 Kitsap County Sheriff’s Department 360-337-7101 (non-emergency) Poulsbo Police Department 200 NE Moe St. Poulsbo 98370 360-779-3113 (non-emergency) Port Gamble S’Klallam Police

A l m a n ac

201 8


Kimbril Moore Branch Manager

Hallie Deboodt Customer Sales & Service Manager

Chelsea Adams Universal Banker

Karen Molinari Angela Engle Universal Banker

Universal Banker

Bainbridge Branch

Now Open 323 NE High School Road

Live Customer Service M-F 7:00am - 7:00pm ourfirstfed.com > 800.800.1577

N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

201 8

|

11


Quick reference guide to public services

NUMBERS

31912 Little Boston Road NE Kingston 98346 360-930-9061 (non-emergency) Suquamish Police Department 18490 Suquamish Way NE Suquamish 98392 360-598-4334 (non-emergency) Washington State Patrol 360-779-9111 North Kitsap Fire & Rescue 360-297-3619 (non-emergency) Poulsbo Fire Department 360-779-3997 (non-emergency) Burn Ban Information 360-297-4888

School Board North Kitsap School District 18360 Caldart Ave. NE Poulsbo 98370 360-396-3001 | www.nkschools.org

clean • calm • constant

And they’re always glad you came ... North Kitsap Fishline volunteers are an important part of the local safety net. File photo Superintendent: Dr. Laurynn Evans Board members: Beth Worthington, president; Jim Almond, Rick Eckert, Glen Robbins, Cindy Webster-Martinson.

T r a n s p o r tat i o n • REMODELS • NEW CONSTRUCTION • WATER HEATERS • GAS PIPING • BACKFLOW TESTING

(360) 394-7702 www.kimcoplumbing.com

Hood Canal Bridge 800-419-9085 (status) 800-695-ROAD (conditions) Kitsap Transit Bus service, carpool, fast ferries, RideShare 800-422-2877, 800-501-7433 | www.kitsaptransit.org Washington State Ferries 206-464-6400 | www.wsdot.wa.gov/ferries

Utilities POWER OUTAGES: CALL 211 Bainbridge Disposal (solid waste)

12

|

N o r t h

K i t s a p

206-842-4882 www.bainbridgedisposal.com Brem-Air Disposal (solid waste) 800-592-9995 | www.wm.com City of Poulsbo (sewer, water, trash) 200 NE Moe St., Poulsbo 98370 360-394-9881 | www.cityofpoulsbo.com Kitsap Public Utilities District 1431 Finn Hill Road, Poulsbo 98370 360-779-7656, 800-739-6766 www.kpud.org Puget Sound Energy 888-225-5773 | www.pse.com

Vehicle/Vessel Licensing Driver’s License Examiner 19045 Highway 305, No. 140, Poulsbo 98370 | 360-779-5547 Vehicle and Vessel Licensing JRO, Inc. (for the State of Washington) 227 NW Lindvig Way, Poulsbo 98370

A l m a n ac

201 8


CULTURE

Get to know the cultures of Kitsap

Left, this monument identifies Point No Point as the place where representatives of the United States and area indigenous nations signed the Treaty of Point No Point in 1855. Right, two Norwegian kings and one queen have visited Poulsbo: Olav V in 1975, and Harald V and Sonja in 1995. Here, Harald reviews the day’s headlines with Poulsbo Mayor Mitch Mitchussen. Above, Richard Walker. Right, Brad Camp

T

he cultures of the First Peoples of this land are a prominent part of our landscape. A mill town established in the 1850s by New Englanders is a reminder that North Kitsap timber helped build communities all along the west coast. The Scandinavians who settled here beginning in the 1880s are remembered in the names of local streets and in public art. The U.S. Navy, which has been a presence in North Kitsap for more than a century, is an important part of our nation’s defense as well as our local economy. Take a day trip and get to know the cultures of North Kitsap. They’re all located within a 20- by 10-mile area reachable by ferries from downtown Seattle and Edmonds. At Point No Point, a monument marks the place where representatives of the United States and the Chemakum, S’Klallam and Skokomish peoples signed the Treaty of Point No Point on Jan. 26,

N o r t h

1855, opening the region to newcomers. The lighthouse dates to 1879 and is open for tours. The U.S. Lighthouse Society is headquartered in the lighthouse keeper’s duplex, one side of which it rents out as a vacation rental. Next to the light station is a salt marsh that attracts one of the largest bird lists in Washington state. The forested trails of Hansville Greenway and Wildlife Preserve provide a fairly level hike from Puget Sound to Hood Canal. In Little Boston, the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe’s Point Casino & Hotel is a showcase of Northwest Coast Native art; the hotel grounds features a courtyard with a spindle whorl pattern and several story poles and totem poles created by noted Northwest Coast Native artists. A visit to the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe’s House of Knowledge, next to the government center, is a must. The longhouse, veterans memorial, welcome poles and an honor pole help tell the story of the S’Klallam people’s culture of welcoming, teaching and serving.

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

Nearby is Heronswood Gardens, founded by noted horticulturalist Dan Hinkley and now owned by the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe (Hinkley is on staff and frequently gives presentations). Tour 15 acres of botanical gardens featuring plants Hinkley collected from all over the world, as well as plants native to the region. Across Port Gamble Bay, the town of Port Gamble resembles the founders’ hometown of East Machias, Maine. A mill operated here from 1853 until 1995. Today, the community is a National Historic Landmark District and a popular events venue. Restored mid-1800s buildings now house a variety of stores and shops. The Port Gamble Historical Museum is located on the lower floor of the general store. The center of Suquamish Village is a cultural district, with important sites within walking distance. Visit the Suquamish Museum and view the exhibit, “Ancient Shores, Changing Tides,” presenting Suquamish history from the beginning of

201 8

|

13


time to present day. Nearby are Chief Seattle’s gravesite at the Suquamish Cemetery; Old Man House Park, once the site of the largest winter longhouse in the Salish Sea; the Suquamish Veterans Memorial; and the stunning House of Awakened Culture overlooking Port Madison. The Suquamish Clearwater Casino Resort overlooking Agate Pass is also appointed with Coast Salish art. Downtown Poulsbo’s building fronts and street names reflect the heritage of the Norwegians who settled here beginning in the 1880s. Downtown is cultural district of sorts, with art galleries, bookstores, a live theater, a marine science center, a historical museum, a maritime museum, and restaurants that reflect the diversity of the city. At the U.S. Naval Undersea Museum in Keyport, study sea life with a microscope, peer into a torpedo tube, operate a control panel in a recreated submarine control room. and check out the deep-sea diving equipment. Admission is free.

COMMUNITIES

Poulsbo is known as Viking City, Little Norway

Poulsbo celebrates its Norwegian heritage the weekend closest to May 17. Called “Viking File photo Fest,” the event coincides with Norway’s Constitution Day.

F

rom “tcu tcu lats” to “Viking City,” Poulsbo’s history is as unique as its landscape. Here’s an abbreviated look at Poulsbo’s evolution.

Pre-contact to the 1880s

This photo of Sami ancestors was on display at a Sami gathering in Poulsbo in 2016. The Sami are the indigenous people of Scandivania’s Arctic region. Poulsbo is home to many descendants of Sami herders who led reindeer to Alaska Native villages 100 years ago as an alternative source of food and economy.

14

|

The Suquamish people were present on the shores of what is now Liberty Bay for thousands of years before lumber and fishing companies began using the area as a safe harbor for their operations. The Suquamish had communities throughout the Kitsap Peninsula and on Bainbridge Island. A Suquamish community at the head of Liberty Bay, ho-cheeb, was described in a report of the Indian Claims Commission as having “one or

N o r t h

K i t s a p

two large [55-foot by 150-foot] buildings and about four smaller [25-foot by 50-foot] ones.” The Suquamish signed the Treaty of Point Elliott in 1855, making land available for newcomers. The Suquamish reserved land for themselves and their descendants — the Port Madison Indian Reservation — and reserved the right to harvest resources, including fish and shellfish, in their usual and accustomed grounds, including Liberty Bay.

1880s to 1940s Jorgen Eliason (1847-1937) rowed into Dog Fish Bay — now Liberty Bay — in September 1883 and became Poulsbo’s first permanent non-Native settler. He

A l m a n ac

201 8


MAYORS OF POULSBO Seven of Poulsbo’s 21 mayors were foreign-born. 1. Andrew Moe: From incorporation to Jan. 11, 1910 (born in Norway). 2. Peter Iverson: Jan. 11, 1910 to Jan. 10, 1922 (born in Odda, Norway). 3. Otto K. Strizek: Jan. 10, 1922 to Jan. 7, 1924 (born in Bohemia). 4. Paul Paulson: Jan. 8, 1924 to Nov. 19, 1924 (born in Numedahl, Norway). 5. Elmer A. Borgen: Nov. 19, 1924 to Jan. 5, 1925. 6. Selmer Myreboe: Jan. 20, 1925 to Jan. 4, 1926. 7. Elmer A. Borgen: Jan. 20, 1926 to Jan. 9, 1928. 8. John Ryen: Jan. 10, 1928 to Jan. 7, 1932 (born in Lillestrom, Norway). 9. Selmer Myreboe: Jan. 8, 1932 to Jan. 5, 1938. 10. S.P. Jensen: Jan. 6, 1938 to June 4, 1952 (born in Sylstrip, Denmark). 11. Martin Anderson: June 18, 1952 to June 1, 1960. 12. Frank Raab: June 1, 1960 to Feb. 5, 1969. 13. Hal Hoover: Feb. 6, 1969 to Dec. 3, 1969. 14. Maurice Lindvig: Dec. 3, 1969 to March 10, 1976. 15. Clyde C. Caldart: March 10, 1976 to Dec. 31, 1981 (born in Meloy, Norway). 16. June E. Atack: Jan. 1, 1982 to March 12, 1985. 17. Curtis G. Rudolph: March 13, 1985 to Nov. 20, 1985. 18. Richard Mitchusson: Nov. 27, 1985 to Jan. 5, 1999. 19. Donna Jean Bruce: Jan. 6, 1999 to Dec. 31, 2005. 20. Kathryn H. Quade: Jan. 1, 2006 to Dec. 31, 2009. 21. Rebecca Erickson: Jan. 1, 2010 to present.

settled here after visiting Ole Stubb (1821-1916) who, like Eliason, was from Nautsdal, Norway and had settled on the other side of the bay at what is now Keyport in 1876. Waves of Norwegian settlers followed, drawn here from Norway or the Midwest by availability of land, and a landscape that was reminiscient of the land of their birth. They farmed, fished and logged. In 1886, I.B. Moe spearheaded an effort to establish a post office here. He named the town “Paulsbo,” after his home village in Norway. “Paulsbo” roughly translates to “Paul’s place.” But a postal official in Washington, D.C. misread an “a” for an “o” and spelled the town’s name in “Poulsbo.” The spelling stuck. The population of Poulsbo was about 300 when the town incorporated in 1907. The Norwegian language was widely spoken here until the 1940s, when World War II resulted in more jobs and attracted new residents.

Post-war to the 21st century Poulsbo’s population grew in the ensuing years: from 639 in 1940 to 1,014 in 1950, 1,505 in 1960, 1,856 in 1970, 3,453 in 1980, 4,848 in 1990, 6,813 in 2000, and 9,200 in 2010.

21st century In 2016, Poulsbo’s population was estimated at 10,100. The city is an ethnically diverse community, with people of Mexican and Asian ancestry comprising the second- and third-largest demographics in the city. Poulsbo is economically diverse as well, with five retail zones: Historic Downtown Poulsbo, the Viking Avenue Corridor, Highway 305 Corridor, the Downtown Area (outside of historic downtown), and College Marketplace, the home of big box retailers. Store fronts, street names and public

art in Historic Downtown Poulsbo reflect the Norwegian heritage of the city, but restaurants and stores reflect the city’s 21st century diversity. The Port of Poulsbo, a separate entity from the City of Poulsbo, operates Poulsbo Marina on the waterfront, making the town an easy destination for boaters.

AT A GLANCE Population

Population: 9,806 Median age: 40.2 Number of females: 5,493 Number of males: 4,313 Average household size: 2.45 Average family size: 3.16 Veterans: 1,016

Education Earned college degree:

Employment and Income Unemployment rate: Median family income: Median individual income: Families below poverty level:

4.8 percent $78,431 $32,141 6.4 percent

Housing Number of housing units: Owner-occupied: Renter-occupied: Median home value: Median rent:

4,188 2,514 1,411 $288,200 $970

— For 2016, the last for which figures are available from the U.S. Census Bureau.

Building Relationships Building Relationships Building Relationships Building Relationships That Strengthen Building Relationships That Strengthen Strengthen Building Relationships That Strengthen That Strengthen OurOur Community Community Community OurStrengthen Community That Our Community Our Community TM

TM TM

TM

TM

TM

(360) 779-4567

(360) 779-4567

N o r t h

3,053

K i t s a p

libertybaybank.com

libertybaybank.com

(360) 779-4567 libertybaybank.com (360) 779-4567 libertybaybank.com (360) 779-4567 libertybaybank.com A l m a n ac 201 8 | 15


COMMUNITIES

Hansville: The inlet is your backyard

Homes face Admiralty Inlet from Hansville to Point No Point. “There is no noise, just the rushing of waves on the beach,” said Anthony Nick Twietmeyer Catania, who lives part time at Hansville’s Point No Point neighborhood.

T

ime seems to slow in Hansville. That, and its unchanging beauty, is part of the allure of this seaside community. Stand on the beach and enjoy uninterrupted views of Whidbey Island and Admiralty Inlet. It’s quiet but for the call of an eagle, the squawk of a heron, song birds singing, and the mewing of gulls. “There is no noise, just the rushing of waves on the beach,” said Anthony Catania, who lives part time at Hansville’s Point No Point neighborhood. “The people who live here have longevity. I don’t know if it’s the salt air, but their lifespan is a lot longer.” Hansville is not incorporated, but

1 6

|

there’s a strong sense of community here. What you see in this seaside village — from the upkeep of Norwegian Point Park, to the restoration of Point No Point Lighthouse, to the trails that wind from Puget Sound to Hood Canal — is due to the work of residents. “Everybody knows everybody, and everybody watches out for everybody else,” said Jo Nelson, who with her husband Fred manages the Hansville Cemetery. “And there’s plenty to do if you’re retired.” Indeed. Local organizations include (take a deep brath): Boot Scootin’ Grannies,

N o r t h

K i t s a p

Eglon Improvement Club, Flotsam and Jetsam Garden Club, Friends of Norwegian Point Park, Friends of Point No Point Lighthouse, Greater Hansville Community Center, Hansville Greenway, Hansville Helping Hands and Cemetery, Hansville Historical Society, Men’s Koffee Klatch, Native Plant Garden Association, North Kitsap Puget Sound Anglers, and the ROMEOS (Retired Old Men Eating Out; they meet at 8:15 a.m. Thursdays at The Point Hotel deli). In addition, Nature Conservancy volunteers help care for Foulweather Bluff Preserve. Hansville has hundreds of acres of greenways and open space for biking,

A l m a n ac

201 8


COMMUNITIES hiking, and wildlife watching. Hansville Greenway Wildlife Corridor and Community Trails wind from Norwegian Point Park to Hood Canal in the west and Point No Point Lighthouse in the east. The Greater Hansville Community Center (www.hansville.org) is a center of community life. Located at Buck Lake Park, the center hosts regular events, including bingo nights, holiday gatherings, an annual rummage sale, and socials. The community center also hosts a candidates forum every general election. The Hansville Grocery is a gathering place too; you’ll have to drive 7.5 miles to get to the nearest store. The Hansville Grocery is a general store where you can get groceries, goodies, fishing gear and souvenirs. Located in the store is the HansGrill restaurant.

Hansville’s history For millennia, what is now Hansville was the home of the S’Klallam, Suquamish, Twana and other Coast Salish peoples. Indigenous leaders and representatives of the U.S. signed the Treaty of Point No Point here in 1855, making land available for newcomers. Now, two versions of how Hansville got its name. Story No. 1: The earliest non-Native settlers were Anton Husby, a teetotaller, and Hans Zachariasen, who reportedly enjoyed a snort now and then. When

KITSAP CURIOSITIES Gusher under Buck Lake? Hansville’s Buck Lake froze over In the 1930s and 1940s, the ice sometimes six inches thick and lasting long enough for two weeks of ice skating. Another Buck Lake phenomenon was reported by E.E. Riddell in the Jan. 12, 1932 issue of the Bremerton News: “Apparently, there is underground gas or hydraulic pressure, for at different times, water in the lake has been seen forced up in a

N o r t h

some loggers, their workday done, were looking to unwind, they were told by a local, “Husby von’t drink with you, but Hans vill.” Story No. 2: Local columnist Donna Lee Anderson wrote, “The story goes that because ships couldn’t get in close to shore at Point No Point, every day someone from this community had to row out to the ship that carried mail, gather the communications and bring them back to the post office. ”One day, the seas were particularly rough and they were looking for someone to do this rowing-out deed. They chatted about it for a while then someone said in their best Scandinavian accent, “Don’t worry, Hans vill do it.” And sure enough he did, and was very reliable thereafter. And so the town was named Hansville in appreciation for his services.” Construction began on the lighthouse in 1879. A road was established from Point No Point to Port Gamble to provide access to trade and other services. In the 1930s, four fishing resorts were developed in Hansville, prompted in part by a 1925 article by Frank L. Crosby Jr., who wrote in “Taft’s Sportsman’s Guide” that Hansville was the place for “surething fishing.” Three fishing cabins at Norwegian Point Park remain from that era and are under the care of Friends of Norwegian Point Park. Volunteers hope one cabin can be restored and used as a museum.

The park features a gazebo built by Friends of Norwegian Point Park. The state Department of Fish and Wildlife bought the former Point No Point fishing resort nearby and redeveloped it into a park; a boat launch is proposed there. If installed, it would be one of six public boat launches in North Kitsap; the others are at Salsbury Point County Park and the ports of Eglon, Kingston, Keyport and Poulsbo.

Hansville’s boundaries The Greater Hansville area is defined as the very northern tip of Kitsap County south to Little Boston Road and east to Eglon. Neighborhoods include Cliffside, Driftwood Key, Point No Point, Shore Woods and Sterling Highlands. If you want to put living in Hansville to the test, you can stay at the Milky Way Farm Guest House (www.milkywayfarm guesthouse.com), the Point No Point Light keeper’s quarters, or the Maggs Cottage, also at Point No Point (www. uslhs.org/about/society-headquarters).

BTW, Eglon is not Hansville “We don’t want to be Hansville; we’re Eglon,” Jacque Thornton once said in response to a county plan that lumped Eglon in with neighboring Hansville for the purposes of community planning. Indeed, Eglon is an independent community with its own history. A dock was built here in 1912, when

column as high as the tallest trees with a great roaring sound.”

Buck Lake froze over for a week or two in the 1930s and 1940s, and residents ice skated till midnight. Photo courtesy of Lyn Peterson

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

201 8

|

17


Eat, Shop, Play... Antiques & Collectibles • 20 Vendors with Unique Treasures • Jim Shore Disney Collectibles

HOTSHO TSJAVA.COM

All our Coffee choices are 100% Organic & Fair Trade

Voted Best Coffee & Espresso for 8 years

18911 Front St • Downtown Poulsbo (360) 697-1902

Voted Best Barista for 9 years

Open Daily Since 1994

Downtown Poulsbo • Front St. • 360-779-2171

Designer Consignments Poulsbo 360-598-2515 • 18940 Front Street Bainbridge Island 206-842-1515 • 562 Bjune Dr.

gifts • goods 360-930-0600 18925 Front Street www.nordiskashop.com

Savor the Northwest Flavor!

YO

U

R

RY

Food and Drink from Local Businesses and Our Own Smokehouse

LO

CAL

R GOURMET G

OC

E

360-697-1767 • 10am - 6pm

• • • • • • •

Smoked Salmon Smoked Cheeses Smoked Nuts Smoked Sea Salts Smoked Gourmet Oils Northwest Wines & Beers Custom Made Gifts & Gift Boxes

www.crimsoncove.com

18928 Front St NE, Historic Downtown Poulsbo

PHOTOGRAPHY & STYLING - DEANNA DUSBABEK PHOTOGRAPHY: HAIR & MAKEUP - ALISON HANFORD: MODEL - CARLY DANIELS; WARDROBE - CLOSET TRANSFER.

We are proud to be your local independent bookstore offering books, ebooks, cards, gifts, games, book clubs and events with favorite authors. 18881 D Front St, Poulsbo, WA 98370 Phone: 360-779-5909 libertybaybooks@embarqmail.com www.libertybaybooks.com

VOTED #1 BEST MEXICAN MENU in the 2014 - 2017 Best of North Kitsap

• Family Dining Lunch & Dinner • Banquet Room for Parties KITCHENWARE  BARWARE  GRILL/PICNIC 18864 Front Street, Poulsbo 360-598-4411

1 8

|

N o r t h

K i t s a p

asa Luna Mexican Restaurant

In the Alley • 18830 Front St. Downtown Poulsbo

(360) 779-7676

Open Wed - Sat: 11am to 9pm • Sun: 12-7

A l m a n ac

201 8


...It’s a Poulsbo Kind of Day! RUSTIC FOOD & FINE SPIRITS DECK DINING! Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner • Full Bar European Fare • Craft Brew • Fine Whiskeys

ulsbo o P ing 84 Servsince 19 Legendary Chocolates, Candies, Gifts, Toys & Seasonal Home Decor

18928 Front St. Downtown Poulsbo • (360) 394-0080 www.tizleys.com or follow us on facebook!

VISIT US TO ENJOY POULSBO’S BEST BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND DINNER! We are family friendly. We also serve beer,winde, wine, cocktails beer, cocktailsand anddrinks drinks from our retro soda fountain!

18820 Front St. • Poulsbo 360-697-3449 www.greenlightdiner.com Veteran Owned and Operated

Always beautiful. Always unique. Western Red Brewing's mission is to brew and serve the best craft beers ever made in the Pacific Northwest. We are motivated to create and share our quality craft brews and celebrate Northwest life with those that share our passions.

Since 1989

CREATING CUSTOM DESIGNS FOR KITSAP AND BAINBRIDGE ISLAND CUSTOMERS FOR OVER 30 YEARS

Open Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday: 12-8pm, Thursday, Friday, Saturday: 12-9pm Sunday: 12-8pm

FRONT STREET IN HISTORIC DOWNTOWN POULSBO

(360) 779-3322 BLUEHERONJEWELRY.COM

N o r t h

K i t s a p

19168 Jensen Way NE, Poulsbo, Washington Call (360) 626-1280 • westernredbrewing.com

A l m a n ac

201 8

|

1 9


COMMUNITIES

Participants carve elaborate sand sculptures in an Indianola Days contest.

File photo

The view from the lantern room of Point No Point Light: the same as when Lightkeeper John S. Maggs reported for duty in 1879.

Richard Walker

the Mosquito Fleet, trails and wagon roads were the only means in and out of the community. The dock is gone, but the Eglon Port District owns a boat launch, parking lot, picnic area, and beach. Wendy Tweten wrote in the Kingston Community News in 2008: “It remains a small town with roots that go back more than 100 years. Community amenities include a church, meeting hall, cemetery, a fire truck (kept in one family’s garage), and the beach, where residents of Eglon still gather for bonfires and summer picnics just as they have for the last century.” Eglon voters elect port district commissioners to six-year terms. Current commissioners are Timothy Holbrook, C. Joyce McClain and David A. Roberts.

20

|

AT A GLANCE

Families below poverty level:

Population

Housing

Population: 3,783 Median age: 54.7 Number of females: 2,115 Number of males: 1,668 Average household size: 2.24 Average family size: 2.61 Veterans: 470

Education Earned college degree:

Number of housing units: Owner-occupied: Renter-occupied: Median home value: Median rent:

N o r t h

K i t s a p

1,988 1,487 202 $288,200 $870

— For 2016, the last for which figures are available from the U.S. Census Bureau.

1,285

Employment and Income Unemployment rate: Median family income: Median individual income:

5.2 percent

1.2 percent $79,609 $42,489

A l m a n ac

201 8


COMMUNITIES

The Indianola dock is a community icon. It was built in 1916 to accommodate the Mosquito Fleet, and was restored by the community in 2015. At the end of the dock is a float where small boats can tie up temporarily. Richard Walker

Indianola: Dock, sea and local life are intertwined

T

o understand the soul-enriching experience you can have on Indianola’s iconic dock, let’s take a stroll with Kathy Dickerson, who contributed the following to the December 2017 edition of the Indianola Breeze newsletter: “Migrating ducks are here. Wigeons, buffleheads, golden eyes and mallards are hanging out with the grebes, cormorants and ever-present great blue herons, crows, eagles and gulls along the shorelines. “A couple of weeks ago, while walking the dock, I noticed a harbor seal cruising along the water with only the head vis-

N o r t h

ible. It dove down, showing the beautiful mottled gray black pattern of fur as it slid under the water. A minute later, six raggedy salmon leapt straight out of the water. Soon after, the harbor seal surfaced, moving off to deeper water.” The Indianola dock is a centerpiece of community life, a connection to the sea and neighbors and history. For more than a century, the dock has accommodated fishermen and women, swimmers, strollers, and travelers — in the beginning, those traveling on the Mosquito Fleet ferries, today by boat tied up to the float at the end of the dock. As long as there has been the commu-

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

Joy-filled education on Bainbridge Island. Grades 1-8 • Kindergarten Preschool • Parent-Child 206-855-8041 • madronaschool.org

201 8

|

21


COMMUNITIES nity of Indianola, there has been the dock. Some history: Indianola is located on the Port Madison Indian Reservation, but a court decision in the early 1900s, after the death of a Suquamish woman who was married to a non-Indian, led to much of the land falling under non-Indian ownership. The Indianola Beach Land Company formed in 1916 and established Indianola as a summer community. The dock was built in 1916 and passenger boats transported people to and from Seattle every day by 1929. Voters created the Port of Indianola in 1933 to maintain the dock, and Mosquito Fleet ferries visited here until 1951, when the Agate Pass Bridge was completed and Washington State Ferries took over ferry service on Puget Sound. Despite the dock’s role in the community’s development, “Indianola never grew large,” Charles P. LeWarne wrote on HistoryLink.org. “It remained a small community that embraced families from Seattle and other towns with vacation cabins and other retreats situated amidst the trees in a careful grid of roads that climbed the hill from the beach. Several generations of some families helped create a close knit community of folks who returned each summer and at other times.” It still beckons and embraces newcomers. The beach is open to members of the Indianola Beach Improvement Club (www.indianola.club), but you don’t have to be a resident of Indianola to join. The Indanola dock is open to the public. The 80.91-acre Indianola Waterfront and Woodland Preserve is open to the public and features forested walking trails, a seasonal stream, and beach access. Camp Indianola (www.campindianola.org) is a year-round camp and retreat; it also offers summer camps in July and August Each summer, the community celebrates Indianola Days. There is no set date; it’s held on whichever weekend coincides with the lowest minus tide. Indianola Days features a car show, dance, pet parade, salmon bake, tennis tournament and talent night. Beach activities include a sand castle contest, kids’ dash and tug-of-war competition.

2 2

|

Local leadership

The Port of Indianola (www.portof indianola.com) owns the property and tidelands 50 feet to the left and right of the dock. Port assets include the dock, the mooring float and the access stairs to the beach. Port commissioners, elected by port district residents to six-year terms, meet once a month and are unpaid. Current commissioners are Eric Cookson, Jeff Henderson and John Lane. The Indianola Beach Improvement Club was incorporated in 1928 to raise money for local capital projects, among them the Indianola Clubhouse. The club owns and manages the Indianola Clubhouse; Rose Marie’s Park and boat storage rack; Gill Park, a grassy and forested park with an outdoor stage and benches; and the Bud Merrill Pavilion. Clubhouse and pavilion rentals help provide funding for community projects and maintenance of community amenities.

AT A GLANCE

Ed Carriere

Population

Population: 3,573 Median age: 43.9 Number of females: 1,842 Number of males: 1,731 Average household size: 2.56 Average family size: 2.96 Veterans: 379

Education Earned college degree:

1,099

Employment and Income Unemployment rate: Median family income: Median individual income: Families below poverty level:

4.5 percent $81,078 $34,556 8.1 percent

Housing Number of housing units: Owner-occupied: Renter-occupied: Median home value: Median rent:

1,633 1,066 331 $251,500 $1,277

— For 2016, the last for which figures are available from the U.S. Census Bureau.

N o r t h

K i t s a p

INDIANOLA PROFILE Ed Carriere, culture bearer

Sophie Bonomi/2016

Suquamish master carver and weaver Ed Carriere was born and raised in Indianola on land that once belonged to his great-grandparents, Wa’hal’chu and Wesidult. He learned to make clam baskets from his great-grandmother and he started making baskets when he was 12. He became an expert weaver of several styles of baskets, including twined cedar bark and cattail baskets, and coiled cedar root baskets. Several of his baskets are in the Burke Museum collection. Works are exhibited locally at the Suquamish Clearwater Casino Hotel. His most recent significant works: Weaving baskets based on 2,000-year-old fragments found at a village site on the Snoqualmie River. His work revealed that the beauty and functionality of the ancestors’ baskets were similar to those created centuries later, a testament to the endurance of cultural knowledge passed down generation by generation.

A l m a n ac

201 8


COMMUNITIES

Keyport: Strong tie to Navy and bay

Kayakers arrive in Keyport during the Keys to Keyport Paddle in June 2016. Like many North Kitsap communities, local life is centered on the water. Terryl Asla/2016

K

eyport was established as a community in 1896, and the Pacific Coast Torpedo Station was established here 18 years later, cementing Keyport’s role as a bulwark in the nation’s defense. Keyport is proud of its role, but it’s as much a community as it is Torpedo Town USA. Keyport is part of the Kitsap Penisula National Water Trails, and is a destination in two kayaking and paddleboarding events: the Keys to Keyport Paddle and the Poulsbo to Keyport Paddle. Residents can set their clocks by the National Anthem, played over Naval Base Kitsap Keyport’s base loudspeakers every morning at 8. You’ll likely find some of your neighbors at Keyport Coffee Hour, 9-10 a.m. Wednesdays at the Keyport Mercantile.

N o r t h

The Mercantile is also a popular lunch spot. At night, you might catch some jazz — or hear nonagenarian trumpeter Yvonne McAllister playing the blues — at Cafe Mexico. Many local residents worship at the Keyport Bible Church, which was established in the early 1900s. Each Independence Day, residents gather for the local Fourth of July celebration, which includes a community pancake breakfast, parade, and free barbecue and old-fashioned family games. One writer penned that Keyport offers “a Norman Rockwell setting and friendly folks.”

History The first non-Native settler, Norwegianborn Ole Stubb (1821-1916), settled here in 1875 after sojourns in Stony Lake,

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

Michigan; Union County, South Dakota; and Camano Island. A wharf was built for the Mosquito Fleet in the mid-1890s. Keyport caught the attention of the United States Navy in 1910. The Navy had been searching for a site to build a Pacific Coast torpedo station; Keyport had the advantage of being close to Puget Sound Navy Yard in Bremerton, and so the Pacific Coast Torpedo Station was established in 1914. Navy divers trained here as well. Among those making an official visit in 1921: future president Franklin D. Roosevelt, serving at the time as assistant secretary of the Navy. The base was renamed the United States Naval Torpedo Station in 1930, and during World War II Keyport was home to 2,000 civilians and 800 military personnel.

201 8

|

2 3


COMMUNITIES

Two-acre Keyport Saltwater Park has beach access, a playground, and a picnic area. In the 1990s, the base was renamed the Naval Undersea Warfare Engineering Station. It is now Naval Base Kitsap – Keyport, one of the Navy’s two undersea warfare engineering stations. The Naval Undersea Museum in Keyport is one of 14 official U.S. Navy museums and is open to the public. Among the reminders of the base’s development: The Keyport Mercantile, which was built in 1903 and moved to its current location to make way for development of the Navy base.

Local leadership

Voters created the Port of Keyport in 1923, and the first order of business was constructing a public dock. Today, the Port of Keyport (www. portofkeyport.com) manages a marina with 14 private slips, 250 feet of guest

2 4

|

moorage in five 50-foot slips, and a boat launch ramp. There is water and power at all slips. The port commission meets at 6 p.m. the first Monday of each month in the marina office. Commissioners are elected for six-year terms. Current port commissioners are John Thompson, Gene Warden and Brian Watne.

File photo

Education Earned college degree:

158

Employment and Income Unemployment rate: Median family income: Median individual income: Families below poverty level:

0 percent $64,028 $28,606 0 percent

Housing

AT A GLANCE Population

Population: 442 Median age: 35.8 Number of females: 261 Number of males: 181 Average household size: 2.34 Average family size: 2.47 Veterans: 55

N o r t h

K i t s a p

Number of housing units: Owner-occupied: Renter-occupied: Median home value: Median rent:

189 124 65 $306,900 $1,204

— For 2016, the last for which figures are available from the U.S. Census Bureau.

A l m a n ac

201 8


COMMUNITIES

Kingston’s Fourth of July celebration is a two-day event that draws visitors from throughFile photo out the region.

Kingston: Gateway to the peninsulas, Seattle

W

ashington State Ferries’ Edmonds-Kingston route io the second-busiest in the state ferry syetem. The addition of Kitsap Transit’s passenger-only ferry service between Kingston and Seattle this summer will further cement Kingston as the Gateway to the Olympic Peninsula for visitors and, for Kitsap and Olympic peninsula residents, the gateway to Seattle. But Kingston is hardly a pass-through. The unincorporated community, referred to as the Little City by the Sea, has an eclectic downtown, a thriving marina, quiet beaches, seaview parks and natural places worth exploring. If that’s not enough to get you to stop and rest a while, the Port of Kingston

N o r t h

and several local businesses have placed reminders to do so — reminders that you can’t miss: colorful, ginormous Adirondack chairs, on which you’re welcome to sit (actually, there’s room for you and your family). “When you see an Adirondack chair, you think of sitting back, breathing in and kicking back,” Cleo’s Landing owner Susan Rodgers said in an earlier story about the chairs. “It’s a good idea for Kingston. Part of our goal is to have people stop and stay here, to make us the first stop on the Peninsula instead of just driving through. ‘Stop, relax, sit a while and get your bearings.’ That’s the story.” There’s a strong sense of community in Kingston that beckons visitors to consider

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

201 8

|

2 5


COMMUNITIES making the Little City by the Sea their home. Appletree Cove is a popular destination for boaters, fishers, kayakers and paddle boarders. Take in the views of the Puget Sound and beauty of the peninsula with a local hike. Walk along North Beach or Arness Park for spectacular views of Puget Sound, or along the marsh at Carpenter Lake. Hikers can find six miles of trails beginning at the North Kitsap Heritage Park. The Billy Johnson Skate Park is a popular venue for skateboarders. Along Highway 104, there’s a wide variety of galleries, restaurants, services, shops and stores. Nearby is award-winning White Horse Golf Club. The course has a 22,000-square-foot clubhouse with fullservice pro shop, restaurant and bar. It is owned and operated by Port Madison Enterprises, the economic development arm of the Suquamish Tribe. A farmers market and live music at Mike Wallace Park, the community

Fourth of July celebration, and various waterfront events all contribute to the unique flavor of community life.

‘Kingston grit’

Nothing, perhaps, exemplifies sense of community like the Village Green Community Center, which opened in April 2016. The Village Green was a grand vision requiring many partners. The Village Green was the site of dilapidated military housing when residents formed the Village Green Foundation in 1999 to redevelop the site. First, voters created the Village Green Metropolitan Park District to develop and manage a park on the site. Next, Martha & Mary, a Poulsbo-based organization providing services for children and older residents, purchased a portion of the property for senior apartments. Money from that sale was used for site preparation for the new community center, for which the foundation raised more than $8 million. The community center has a branch library and a Boys & Girls Club. Kitsap

County pledged the proceeds from the sale of its current community center building on Highway 104; the 104 site is now owned by Coffee Oasis. “The community center stands as a testament to the ‘Kingston grit’ that is fueling the charge to build it,” foundation director Daniel Johnson wrote in the Kingston Community News. “Twelve dedicated board members and an army of volunteers are delivering on the promise. The thousands of volunteer hours, endless meetings and millions raised represent the community’s skin in the game that will ensure its completion.”

Local leadership

Kingston is unincorporated, but the community largely governs itself through a variety of public and non-profit agencies. The Port of Kingston owns Port of Kingston Marina, which has 262 slips, a fuel dock, and a kayak and small-boat facility. The port district also owns the ferry landing, which it leases to Washington State Ferries; the passenger-

STATSHOT: EDMONDS-KINGSTON FERRY ROUTE

Washington State Ferries’ EdmondsKingston route had the second-highest total ridership in 2017, with number of customers up 0.5 percent and vehicles up 1 percent. All told, the Edmonds-Kingston route had 4,135,698 passengers in 2017, and

26

|

carried 2,147,822 vehicles. Those numbers are second only to the Seattle-Bainbridge Island route. Washington State Ferries is the largest ferry system in the United States (24.5 million passengers), and the secondlargest ferry system in the world for

N o r t h

K i t s a p

number of vehicles carried (10.5 million). Above, the M/V Puyallup is one of the ferries serving the Edmonds-Kingston route.

A l m a n ac

Photo: Joe Mabel/Courtesy

201 8


COMMUNITIES ferry facility, which it leases to Kitsap Transit; Mike Wallace Park, the venue for several community events; and other public park land. Commissioners are elected to six-year terms; current commissioners are Mary McClure and Laura Gronvoll. There was one vacancy on the commission at the time the Almanac went to press; McClure and Gronvoll were scheduled to accept applications and appoint someone to complete the term. Online: www.port ofkingston.org. The Kingston Citizens Advisory Council is appointed by the Kitsap County Board of Commissioners to provide a forum for discussion of community interests and issues, and to provide input to county government on issues of local importance. The advisory council meets 7-9 p.m. on the first Wednesday of February, April, June, August, October and December at North Kitsap Fire & Rescue, 26642 Miller Bay Road NE. Online: www.kitsapgov. com/boards/CAC/kingston/kcac.htm Voters created the Village Green Metropolitan Park District to develop and manage Village Green Park; property owners with the park district pay a property tax levy to support the park district. Commissioners are publicly elected to six-year terms; current commissioners are Tracy Darlene Harris, Jason Manges, Bobbie Moore, Jim Moore, and Patrick Pearson. Online: www.myvillagegreen. org. The Greater Kingston Chamber of Commerce advocates on behalf of the business community. The executive director is Colleen Carey; the president of the 13-member board of directors is Shelby Nelson. Online: www.kingstonchamber. com.

AT A GLANCE Population

Population: 1,859 Median age: 48.7 Number of females: 940 Number of males: 919 Average household size: 2.07

N o r t h

Kingston’s Mike Wallace Park, which overlooks Apple Tree Cove, is an ideal venue for Kites Over Kingston, every March (www.wka-kiteflyers.org/calendar.php). Richard Walker/2015

Average family size: Veterans:

2.72 221

Education Earned college degree:

678

Employment and Income Unemployment rate: Median family income: Median individual income: Families below poverty level:

K i t s a p

5.4 percent $75,965 $31,935 6.0 percent

A l m a n ac

Housing Number of housing units: Owner-occupied: Renter-occupied: Median home value: Median rent:

1,010 559 340 $252,800 $991

— For 2016, the last for which figures are available from the U.S. Census Bureau.

201 8

|

27


COMMUNITIES

Port Gamble: Past informs the present

A remnant from the past and a site restored: An anchor from a sunken lumber schooner is backdropped by the former Pope and Talbot mill site, which was the subject of a massive upland and nearshore cleanup that was completed in 2017. The mill operated here from 1853 to 1995. Nick Twietmeyer/Kitsap News Group

I

f there were a theme for 2017 in Port Gamble, it might be this: Restoration. In 2017, the cleanup of the former mill site nearshore was completed, funded by Pope Resources. The cleanup removed thousands of creosoted pilings and 150 years of wood waste from the bay; it was, according to the state Department of Ecology, the largest piling removal project in Puget Sound. Concurrently, Pope Resources assisted community partners — including Forterra. the Port Gamble S’Klallam

2 8

|

Tribe, Suquamish Tribe and Kitsap County — in the Kitsap Forest & Bay Project, through which Kitsap County obtained title to 4,000 acres of former timber harvest land for public use. Proponents of the cleanup and land conservation say the result will be a cleaner bay, which in turns means a healthier marine environment for all those who depend on the bay. “It’s a long-term vision that will be here for generations,” Jon Rose, president of Olympic Property Group, the real estate arm of Pope Resources, said after the last

N o r t h

K i t s a p

acquisition was completed. “This region is facing unprecedented growth pressure. The one thing that we can take comfort in is that a huge piece of North Kitsap is going to stay unchanged forever.” Now, Pope Resources is focusing on transforming the 1850s New Englandstyle company town into a year-round community. The company has filed a plan with Kitsap County to build homes, commercial buildings, a hotel and a dock. Homes currently owned by the company will be sold.

A l m a n ac

201 8


COMMUNITIES Today, visitors enjoy many of the amenities that the early mill-town families enjoyed: a New England-style town with tree-lined streets, a community theater, a general store, a variety of shops and stores, and scenery ideal for a wedding or an evening out. Pope Resources hopes to expand on that.

Evolution of a community

Port Gamble has a rich history. The S’Klallam people knew the site as Teekalet, but today the town bears the name of a naval officer named Gamble, given when the Wilkes Expedition mapped the region in 1841. William Talbot and Andrew Pope established a sawmill on the sand spit at the mouth of the bay in 1853. Talbot’s business partner, Josiah Keller, struck a deal with the S’Klallam people living there — if they moved to the other side of the bay, to Point Julia, the mill would give them jobs, lumber for homes and firewood. Those families lived at Point Julia until the 1930s, when the U.S. government destroyed the village, moved the families inland, and established the Port Gamble S’Klallam Reservation. The Puget Mill Company’s workforce included S’Klallam people and transplants from East Machias, Maine, Pope and Talbot’s hometown. The town of Port Gamble grew around the sawmill to house its workers, and the homes and other buildings have architectural features similar to those in Maine. Buried at Port Gamble’s cemetery is Gustave Englebrecht, a Navy sailor killed in 1856 in a battle between crewmembers of the USS Massachusetts and a Haida First Nation raiding party. Englebrecht was the first U.S. Navy sailor to die in action in the Pacific. The first school in the county was built in Port Gamble in 1859. The first Masonic Lodge in the state was established in Port Gamble the same year. When the mill closed in 1995, it was the oldest continuously operating sawmill in the United States. But the company town dynamic is partially still in place. Port Gamble is owned by Pope Resources, a corporate descendent of Pope & Talbot’s Puget Mill Company.

Port Gamble today

Port Gamble has a full-time popula-

N o r t h

Gustave Englebrecht is interred in Port Gamble’s Buena Vista Cemetery. A coxswain aboard the USS Massachusetts, he was killed in 1856 during a battle with a Haida landing party that was believed to be preparing for a raid on S’Klallam land. Englebrecht is the first U.S. military casualty in the Pacific. Nick Twietmeyer/Kitsap News Group

tion of 45 but its own zip code. Despite its small population, Port Gamble has the daytime hustle and bustle of a tourist destination. Downtown shops include the general store, restaurants, and outdoor recreation providers. Port Gamble is a stop on the Kitsap Water Trail, a part of the federally designated system of national water trails. St. Paul’s Church, built in 1879, and Hood Canal Vista Pavilion, built on the site of the old Hotel Puget, are popular wedding venues. The Quilted Strait sells quilting materials, offers classes, and hosts the annual Port Gamble Fiber & Fabric Show. Port Gamble is also popular with those interested in paranormal phenomena. Ghost tours are offered annually, taking visitors through old homes associated with reported paranormal activity. (Port Gamble was the setting of and filming location for the 2010 film “ZMD: Zombies of Mass Destruction.” It’s also the setting for author Gregg Olsen’s “Empty Coffin” series of novels. Online: www.portgamble.com.

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

STATSHOT Former governor and senator Daniel J. Evans has Port Gamble roots. Evans’ great-grandfather settled in Port Gamble in 1859. The home is identified by signage. Evans (1923) grew up in Seattle, graduated from the University of Washington, and served twice in the U.S. Navy. He Daniel J. Evans served as a state Public domain representative from 1957-1965, governor from 1965-1977, and as U.S. senator from 1983-89.

201 8

|

2 9


o

201 8

?

C

A l m a n ac

d

K i t s a p Hood Canal Bridge

Chamber & Visitor Info

WA State Ferry

Marina or Dock

Golf Course

Brewery

Hotel

Casino

Nursery

Park

Lighthouse

an

N o r t h

al

Puget Ave

104

?

View Dr

PORT GAMBLE

Wheeler 104

Hansville Greenway

Buck Lake

NE Twin Spits Rd

Salish Lane

int N oP o i nt R d

Skallam Point Casino & Pavilion

Po

Point No Point

HANSVILLE

Puget Sound

Paddle Bainbridge

VisitKitsap.com/WaterTrails for info & download map

Water Trails Map

HOME OF THE

NORTH KITSAP PENINSULA REGION NE Buck Lake Rd

| Hansville Road NE

3 0 Rainier Ave


A l m a n ac

BANGOR

3

Li NW n W dvi ay g

3

Big Valley Rd

?

7th Ave

Front St.

de y An Pkw

or

3rd Ave Jensen Way n rso

NW Bovella Lane Moe St

8th Ave 6th Ave

Fj

Li dD

r be r

ty

201 8

Silverdale Kitsap Mall

Bond Rd

POULSBO

Ba

|

y

Fi

N

31 KEYPORT

Raab Park

NE Hostmark St

Hood Canal Brewery

Rd

Co lu

305

Kiana Lodge

Agate Pass Bridge

Clearwater Casino & Resort

305

South ay St W

SUQUAMISH

Lincoln Ave.

NE Gunderson Rd

307

Bo

nd

H

K i t s a p

Vikin gA ve

ill 10th Ave S

Caldart Ave NE

E

Dulay Rd

Kingston-Edmonds Ferry

Kingston Ferry Terminal

BAINBRIDGE ISLAND

Bainbridge Island Seattle Ferry

Port Madison Bay

?

KINGSTON

White Horse Rd

INDIANOLA

North Kitsap Heritage Park

NE West Kingston Rd

104

NE

Kitsap Memorial Park

Port Gamble Rd

Rd N

W Augusta A ve

ook

Division St

and yH

nn

H mbia S t

Viking W ay NW

Miller Bay Rd

Suqua mi sh

NE ola Rd

An g eli ne Av e

N o r t h Indian


COMMUNITIES

History comes full circle for S’Klallam Tribe

H

istory came full circle Sept. 8, 2017 at Point Julia, when a pole carved by S’Klallam artist Jimmy Price was raised at Jake Jones Park overlooking the point. The pole is visible from Teekalet, which became Port Gamble, where S’Klallam ancestors lived until the mill and town were built and the people moved across the bay to Point Julia. The pole overlooks the point, where Price’s great-great-grandfather, Richard Purser, carved canoes that carried the people on the water here and elsewhere in the Salish Sea, carried them on the marine highways to harvest resources and visit relatives. The U.S. government destroyed the village at Point Julia in 1939, and the people moved upland to Little Boston and to Coontown, so named because of the large raccoon population there. But Point Julia remains part of the continuum of S’Klallam culture, a holder of memories, a center of community and family life, a connection to the bay where the people have fished and clammed forever. Price’s pole depicts all of that: an octopus holding a crab, representing sea life; a killer whale, a symbol of the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe; and a watchman, a human figure watching for the safe return of those harvesting in the bay and on the sea.

3 2

|

Workers raise a pole, “The Watchman,” at Jake Jones Park on the Port Gamble S’Klallam Reservation, Sept. 8, 2017. Richard Walker/Kitsap News Group “It really takes you back. That’s how it was a long time ago,” said Sue Hanna, a great-granddaughter of Purser and a cousin of Price. “There was always someone watching, always someone keeping an eye out for the fishermen, so to me that’s why [the pole] is so important. When [the watchman] would see the canoes and the boats come in, there would be a big celebration. I’m so glad there’s going to be that [again], someone watching over the fishermen who have left to put their lives on the line to bring food to the people.” Regarding “The Watchman” pole, some context: The pole was carved from an 800-year-old western red cedar log. People indigenous to this place had been living off the gifts of the sea for at least two centuries here when this cedar was

N o r t h

K i t s a p

a sapling, according to shell midden dating by the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe’s archeologist. The cedar was alive during centuries of births and passings, centuries of ceremonies and celebrations, centuries of gatherings and harvests. It was alive during the time of change, when men from Maine built the mill across the bay and persuaded the First People to move to this marshy place that became known as Point Julia. It was alive when the people of Teekalet greeted family members who arrived here to visit by canoe, their songs arriving first, carried over the water. In 2012, as he watched canoes arrive at Point Julia during the Canoe Journey, Joe Waterhouse remembered visiting here in the 1930s with his relative, Lach-ka-nim, son of

A l m a n ac

201 8


COMMUNITIES Klallam leader Chetzemoka. Waterhouse and Lach-ka-nim traveled by canoe from Tsetsibus, which means “Where the sun rises” — you know the place as Port Hadlock. The cedar was alive when the U.S. government burned down the place where families had lived for 80 years, and bought 1,234 acres for a reservation. Now, the cedar stands at this place, a 15-foot blessing to those who leave the bay to harvest at sea and a testimony to all who see it that, despite a century and a half of change, “Our culture is still alive,” Price said.

A top jobs provider

Today, the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe is one of the 15 top jobs providers in Kitsap County, according to the Kitsap Economic Development Alliance. The Tribe owns The Point Hotel & Casino, which has four restaurants, a nightclub, an RV park and an events center; Heronswood Garden; Gliding Eagle Market; and Kountry Korner gas station and store. The Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe is a signatory to the Treaty of Point No Point in 1855. In the treaty, the United States obtained land in exchange for certain payments and obligations. The indigenous signatories reserved land over which they have jurisdiction, and retained certain cultural and natural resource rights within their historical territories. As an indigenous nation and a treaty signatory, the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe has a government-to-government relationship with the United States. The Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe

is governed by an elected six-member council. The Tribal Council exercises full governmental authority over the Tribe’s land and resources. As a member of the Point No Point Treaty Council and the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, Port Gamble S’Klallam works to protect the environment that has sustained its people for millennia and protect rights contained in the treaty, among them the right to fish, hunt and gather in traditional areas.

Telling the S’Klallam story

Public art helps tell the story of the S’Klallam people. The Point Hotel courtyard features several story and honor poles. The hotel and casino are showcases of Coast Salish art. Welcome figures are seen on Little Boston Road leading into Little Boston. Visitors to Heronswood Garden are greeted by a welcome pole near the garden entrance. In Little Boston, the House of Knowledge houses a career and education center, elders’ center, the S’Klallam Longhouse, a Northwest Indian College satellite classroom, and the Little Boston branch of the Kitsap Regional Library. The Tribe has also been a partner in restoring the health of Port Gamble Bay. The Tribe partnered with the Kitsap Forest & Bay Coalition, which raised money to buy from Pope Resources as much several thousand acres and two miles of shoreline for public open space. The Tribe received up to $3.5 million to help acquire shoreline; the money is part of a settlement from the Navy for salmon habitat impacts from the second explosive

weapons-handling wharf under construction at Kitsap Naval Base — Bangor. “(The) bay has been our source of economic growth, and sustained us as a culture and as a people,” Chairman Jeromy Sullivan said in an earlier interview. “We need to keep it going for future generations.”

AT A GLANCE Population

Population: 846 Median age: 38.1 Number of females: 445 Number of males: 401 Average household size: 3.24 Average family size: 3.22 Veterans: 38

Education Earned college degree:

180

Employment and Income Unemployment rate: 7.8 percent Median family income: $52,000 Median individual income: $27,386 Families below poverty level: 15.2 percent

Housing Number of housing units: Owner-occupied: Renter-occupied: Median home value: Median rent:

317 213 48 $258,000 $567

— For 2016, the last for which figures are available from the U.S. Census Bureau.

THE CANOE JOURNEY The Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe participates annually in the Canoe Journey, a gathering of Northwest indigenous peoples. The canoes, many of them hand-carved and decorated to reflect the indigenous nation from which they come, are works of art. Traditional foods, dances, songs and stories are shared. The Canoe Journey takes place in July and August. File photo

N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

201 8

|

3 3


COMMUNITIES

Suquamish Tribe: a regional influence

Suquamish Tribe Chairman Leonard Forsman introduces Miss Chief Seattle Days Quelisha Brealan-Bayes, who gifts a paddle to the youngest worker at Vigor Shipyards during the christening ceremony of the MV Suquamish at Vigor Shipyards in Seattle, Jan. 4. The vessel will begin operation summer/fall 2018. April Leigh/Suquamish Tribe

E

very day, you likely feel the influence of the Suquamish Tribe. Come summer, you might catch a ride on the M/V Suquamish, the newest

state ferry. Chances are, you or someone you know works for a business managed by Port Madison Enterprises, the economic development arm of the Suquamish Tribe (Port Madison Enterprises is one of the largest employers in Kitsap County). You’ve likely dined or enjoyed some

3 4

|

entertainment at the Suquamish Clearwater Resort, or golfed at White Horse Golf Club (an LPGA tournament will take place here this summer). If you watched the Golden Globes on Jan. 7, you saw Calina Lawrence, a Suquamish Tribe member, singer, and social activist, introducing herself in the Suquamish language and speaking out for justice for women. (She was a guest of actress Shailene Woodley.) If you go to a meeting of the North Kitsap School Board, you might exchange

N o r t h

K i t s a p

views with board member Cindy WebsterMartinson, a Suquamish Tribe member and the first Native American elected to public office (outside of Tribal government) in Kitsap County. Leonard Forsman, Suquamish’s chairman, is president of the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians. He’s also vice chairman of the U.S. Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. (He was appointed to the advisory council by President Obama.) During the Obama administration, Port

A l m a n ac

201 8


COMMUNITIES Community members of all ages participate in a Lushootseed version of the game, “Jeopardy,” Dec. 15, 2015 at Chief Kitsap Academy. Participants test their knowledge of the Suquamish language. Sophie Bonomi/2015

Madison Enterprises general counsel Rion Ramirez served on the Commission on White House Fellowships (he, too, was an Obama appointee). The Suquamish Tribe is a force in the region. The Suquamish Tribe is a sovereign indigenous nation and a signatory to the Treaty of Point Elliott of 1855. In the treaty, the United States obtained land for non-Native settlement, in exchange for certain payments and obligations. The indigenous signatories reserved land over which they have jurisdiction, and retained certain cultural and natural resource rights within their historical territories. The Tribe’s economic success since the 1990s has enabled it to reacquire land lost during the allotment era, and “the Tribe and Tribal members now own more than half of the land on the reservation for the first time in recent history,” Suquamish Tribe communications director April Leigh said. Major acquisitions include White Horse Golf Club in 2010, placed into trust in March 2014; and 200 acres known as the Place of the Bear, in the Cowling Creek watershed, in November 2015. Suquamish Clearwater Casino Resort, which opened more than 20 years ago,

N o r t h

has evolved into an events and entertainment destination, with 15,000 square feet of meeting space, 183 hotel rooms, a showcase of Coast Salish art by such prominent artists as Ed Carriere and Andrea Wilbur-Sigo, fine dining, a spa, golf at White Horse, and a summer concerts-on-the-lawn series. Completion of the Suquamish Museum in 2012 helped solidify Suquamish Village as a walkable cultural district which includes Chief Seattle’s grave, the Old Man House site, the Suquamish Veterans Memorial, and the House of Awakened Culture. The Tribe owns and operates an accredited school for grades 6-12, Chief Kitsap Academy, which offers regular public school curriculum as well as culturally-oriented classes. According to the state Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, only four of 10 schools in North Kitsap met Adequate Yearly Progress goals in reading and math proficiency in 2014 — one of those was Chief Kitsap Academy. Suquamish Seafoods built a new 16,000-square-foot seafood processing plant, eight times larger than its previous plant. It has chilled processing rooms, live-product holding areas, larger cold

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

storage and air-blast freezers. Suquamish Seafoods formerly concentrated on geoduck. “With the new plant, we have the ability to deliver fresh clams, crab and salmon to our commercial customers,” Suquamish Seafoods general manager Tony Forsman said when construction began. “We also plan to develop our product lines further, making them available directly to the consumer.” The Tribe also built a 34,000-squarefoot fitness and youth center, on Totten Road near the Tribe’s early learning center and a sports field. The Suquamish Tribe government has a preliminary master plan for Suquamish Shores, a neighborhood of 80 lots on 36 acres, midway between the government center and the House of Awakened Culture. Leases there expire in 2018, and Chairman Forsman said the Tribe is looking at restoring the area to accommodate cultural activities, recreation, and, possibly, housing for elders.

Not just about gaming Among Port Madison Enterprises’ ventures and subsidiaries: Suquamish Clearwater Casino Resort, White Horse Golf Club, Kiana Lodge, Port Madison Enterprises Construction Corporation, PME Retail, Property Management, and

201 8

|

3 5


COMMUNITIES Agate Dreams. Port Madison Enterprises annually awards grants to organizations that “[improve] the lives of community members” and “support worthy programs in the region.” More than $600,000 is awarded annually. Culture has a role in all that Suquamish’s enterprises do. For example, Suquamish Clearwater Casino Resort is not just about gaming. It’s about connecting visitors to cultural, entertainment and recreational experiences. Guests often visit the Suquamish Village cultural district, and the resort features Coast Salish art throughout as well as traditional foods on restaurant menus. Suquamish is a regular stop on the Canoe Journey, an annual gathering of Northwest indigenous peoples and other canoe cultures, in July. Chief Seattle Days takes place the first weekend in August. The celebration includes canoe races, a commemoration at Chief Seattle’s grave, a powwow, and sports competitions.

Leadership The Suquamish Tribe is governed by an elected seven-member council. Current members are Leonard Forsman, chairman; Bardow Lewis, vice chairman; Nigel Lawrence, secretary; Robin Sigo, treasurer; and council members Sammy Mabe, Luther “Jay” Mills, and Rich Purser. Government departments: Administration, child support enforcement, community development, court, early learning center, education, fisheries, human services, legal, natural resources, and police. (The Tribe contracts with local fire districts for fire protection service.)

AT A GLANCE Population

Population: 4,259 Median age: 44.2 Number of females: 2,140 Number of males: 2,119 Average household size: 2.40

Average family size: Veterans:

Education Earned college degree:

Number of housing units: Owner-occupied: Renter-occupied: Median home value: Median rent:

Voted “Best Burger” in North Kitsap 2009-2016

• Grass fed Burgers • Home-made veggie patties • Smoked brisket and pork sands • Philly Cheese Steak • Gyros, Salads, Shakes & More • Gluten Free Available

Call in orders welcome! 360-881-0147 11130 NE State Hwy. 104 • Kingston

www.Peaceloveandgrub.com

K i t s a p

1,992 1,323 452 $208,600 $1,033

— For 2016, the last for which figures are available from the U.S. Census Bureau.

The Grub Hut

N o r t h

4.2 percent $68,417 $32,843 6.3 percent

Housing

A Great Place to do Business

|

1,219

Employment and Income Unemployment rate: Median family income: Median individual income: Families below poverty level:

Kingston

3 6

2.97 426

A l m a n ac

201 8


COMMUNITIES

M/V SUQUAMISH The newest state ferry is named in honor of the Suquamish Tribe. M/V Suquamish will carry 144 cars and 1,500 passengers, and wiil primarily serve the MukilteoClinton route.

Amy Scarton, assistant secretary of the state Department of Transportation, christens the M/V Suquamish Jan. 4. April Leigh/Suquamish Tribe

PLAY WITH PASSION. RELAX IN STYLE. THAT’S THE POINT!

Hotel Meeting Room • 94 Guest Rooms • Business Center All Your Favorite Games 700+ Slots • Blackjack • Craps Live Music & Entertainment Center Bar • Cutter Cigar Club • Boom Room Lounge Dining Market Fresh Buffet • Little Boston Bistro • Point Julia Cafe

Kingston, Washington www.the-point-casino.com 360.297.0070 The Point Casino & Hotel is proudly owned and operated by The Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe. You must be at least 21 years old to participate in gaming activities, attend entertainment events and to enter lounge/bar areas. Knowing your limit is your best bet—get help at (800) 547-6133.

N o r t h

TPC-6723-1 NKA Inside 7.25 x 4.4.indd 2

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

201 8

|

3 7

1/26/18 2:42 PM


SCENE

See Kitsap through a local artist’s eyes Nature photographer Bonnie Block of Kingston won the 2016 Audubon Photography Award for her photo of eagles and herons feeding in a Seabeck oyster bed. “It’s been kind of an amazing ride,” Block said. “It’s quite an honor. It’s one of the largest wildlife contests in the United States.” Her work is frequently exhibited locally.

Michelle Beahm/ Kitsap News Group

T

he North Kitsap community prides itself on its diverse arts culture. From Native American art to a contemporary art in local galleries, there’s an eclectic mix that’s visually pleasing to everyone. EVENTS POULSBO SECOND SATURDAY ART WALK: Second Saturday of each month on Front Street in downtown Poulsbo. www.historicdowntownpoulsbo.com. KITSAP ARTS & CRAFTS FESTIVAL: July 27-29, in Kingston. www.kitsaparts andcrafts.com. POULSBO ARTS FESTIVAL: third weekend in August, at Muriel Iverson Williams Waterfront Park in Poulsbo.

3 8

|

www.cafnw.org. ART IN THE WOODS TOUR: Nov. 9, 10, 11, a self-guided tour of 23 North Kitsap artists’ studios featuring more than 70 local artists. GALLERIES ALMOST CANDID PHOTO, FRAME & FINE ARTS 10978 NE Highway 104, Kingston 360-297-1347 | www.almostcandid.net

THE ART FARM 9321 Highway 104, Kingston 360-297-4223 | www.theartfarm.org CARRIE GOLLER GALLERY 18801 Front St., Poulsbo

N o r t h

K i t s a p

360-779-2388 | www.carriegollergallery.com FRONT STREET GALLERY 1881 Front St., Poulsbo 360-598-6133 | www.frontstreetgallerypoulsbo.com LIBERTY BAY GALLERY 18830 Front St., Poulsbo 360-930-0756 | www.libertybaygallery.com VERKSTED GALLERY 18937 Front St., Poulsbo 360-697-4470 | www.verkstedgallery.com

A l m a n ac

201 8


SCENE

World of entertainment close to home

The Jewel Box Theatre in Poulsbo is a popular venue for comedies and dramas — and sometimes a mix of both. Here, the cast performs A.R. Gurney’s comedy “Black Tie,” in June 2017. Richard Thornton/Jewel Box Theatre

F

ilms, gaming, literary events, live music and theater — all are a short distance from your front door, but will take you worlds away. This list is not all-inclusive. Check the calendar on KitsapDailyNews.com.

CASINO RESORTS

THE POINT CASINO & HOTEL 7989 NE Salish Lane, Kingston. 360-2970070. Games, dining, live entertainment. www.the-point-casino.com.

CINEMA

SUQUAMISH CLEARWATER CASINO RESORT 15347 Suquamish Way, Suquamish. 360598-8700. Games, dining, live entertain

N o r t h

ment. www.clearwatercasino.com.

FIREHOUSE THEATER 11171 NE Highway 104, Kingston. 360-2974849. Independent theater featuring new films. www.firehouse-theater.com

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

REGAL CINEMAS 750 NW Edvard St., Poulsbo. 360-697-5642. The latest releases on 10 screens. www. removies.com.

LITERARY

AWAY WITH WORDS 18954 Front St., Poulsbo. 816-709-5750. Book store opening in 2018. LIBERTY BAY BOOKS 18881 Front St., Poulsbo. 360-779-5909.

201 8

|

3 9


SCENE

Nonagenarian trumpeter Yvonne McAllister performs jazz at Casa Mexico in Keyport.

An independent bookstore with new books; frequently hosts author events. www.libertybaybooks.com.

A children’s theater producing a variety of musicals at the North Kitsap Auditorium. www.kcmt.org.

THE KINGSTON BOOKERY 10978 Highway 104, Kingston, 360-2977380. A range of used books from all genres.

JEWEL BOX THEATRE 225 NE Iverson St., Poulsbo, 360-697-3183. Community theater productions featuring local talent. www.jewelboxpoulsbo.org.

SPOKEN WORD POULSBOHEMIAN COFFEEHOUSE 19003 Front St., Poulsbo. 360-779-9199. Monthly poetry readings and open mic. www.poulsbohemian.com.

STAGE KITSAP CHILDREN’S MUSICAL THEATRE 1881 NE Hostmark St., Poulsbo.

4 0

|

PORT GAMBLE THEATER View Drive, Port Gamble. 360-977-7135. Community theater productions featuring local talent. www.portgambletheater.com.

VENUES

CASA MEXICO 1918 NE Poulsbo Ave., Keyport. 360-5982727. Restaurant with live jazz. THE FILLING STATION 11200 Highway 104, Kingston. 360-297-

N o r t h

K i t s a p

Nick Twietmeyer/Kitsap News Group

7732. A bar with food and 20 beers on tap. Frequent live music, pool, darts, fire pit. MAIN STREET ALE HOUSE 11225 Highway 104, Kingston. 360-8810412. Frequent open mics, jams and trivia. SLIPPERY PIG BREWERY 18801 Front St. NE, Poulsbo, 360-941686. A craft brewery and family friendly restaurant featuring local bands, karaoke, and trivia nights. www.slipperypigbrewery. com. TIZLEY’S EUROPUB 18928 Front St., Poulsbo, 360-394-0080. A wide beer selection and food with frequent trivia, Celtic music and jams. www. tizleys.com.

A l m a n ac

201 8


FAITH

Where to worship in North Kitsap

Poulsbo’s First Lutheran Church is a prominent part of the local landscape —and of local life. The church has been ministering to the community for more than 100 years. It’s chimes can be heard throughout downtown. Nick Twietmeyer/Kitsap News Group This list may not be all-inclusive. Check the internet or local directories for your denomination.

CALVARY CHAPEL OF POULSBO 23300 Stottlemeyer Road NE, Poulsbo 360-697-3795 | www.calvarypoulsbo.org

FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH 26736 Miller Bay Road NE, Kingston 360-297-2736 | www.faithkingston.org

ALIVE COVENANT CHURCH 18563 11th Ave. NE, Poulsbo 360-697-4321 |www.kitsapalive.com

GATEWAY FELLOWSHIP 18901 8th Ave., Poulsbo 360-779-5515 | www.gatewayfellowship. com

FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH AND CHRISTIAN CENTER 18920 4th Ave. NE, Poulsbo 360-779-2622 | www.poulsbofirst lutheran.org

BAYSIDE COMMUNITY CHURCH 25992 Barber Cut Off Road NE, Kingston 360-297-2000 | www.baysidecommunity church.org BIBLE BAPTIST CHURCH 2490 NE Jacobson Road, Poulsbo 360-779-5665 | www.bbcpoulsbo.com BREIDABLIK BAPTIST CHURCH 251458 State Highway 3, Poulsbo 360-779-6844

N o r t h

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 2138 NE Mesford St., Poulsbo 360-779-9197 | www.lds.org EGLON COMMUNITY CHURCH 33690 Eglon Road NE, Kingston 360-638-2020

HANSVILLE COMMUNITY CHURCH 7543 NE Twin Spits Road, Hansville 360-638-2335 | www.hansvillechurch. com JEHOVAH’S WITNESSES 4861 NE Lincoln Road, Poulsbo 360-779-9410 | www.jw.org

FAITH EPISCOPAL CHURCH 20295 Little Valley Road NE, Poulsbo 360-471-7522 | http://faith-episcopal.org

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

201 8

|

41


Port Gamble Shopping • Dining • Romance Culture • Entertainment • Recreation

O

n November 30, 1995, the mill whistle blew its last time in Port Gamble. Pope & Talbot made the decision to close the mill; until its closure, the mill was the oldest continuous operating mill in North America. In 1996 new life was brought into the town of Port Gamble. Pope Resources reacquired the town and set about refurbishing it to its glory days. In this long-term commitment to Port Gamble, Olympic Property Group is in charge of maintaining the houses, buildings, all common lawn areas, cemetery, church, museum and the water/sewage treatment plants. This is the long-term commitment that the founding fathers made to the ten men from

Maine who trusted them enough to make that first journey. Today Port Gamble is still a company town. The family homes are available for lease, as are company offices. The quaint New England church is the site of many destination weddings, along with the new outdoor Hood Canal Vista Pavilion. Today, when you visit Port Gamble you can enjoy the many shops that line the street or stop in one of the dining establishments. You can also enjoy the Port Gamble trails whether you are an avid biker or hiker or just want to take stroll.

Rhea Schneider Proprietor

Tango Zulu Fair Trade, Well Made

Gifts, Cards, Jewelry, Home Decor Port Gamble: 32239 Rainier Ave NE Bainbridge: 160 Winslow Way West

tangozuluimports.com 42

|

N o r t h

“For Something Different” K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

32220 Rainier Ave. NE Port Gamble

360.297.4114

201 8


Local news. Wherever you are. In print & online.

kitsapdailynews.com

@kitsapdailynews

KitsapDailyNews.com | BainbridgeReview.com 360-779-4464 CENTRAL KITSAP REPORTER | KITSAP WEEKLY | BAINBRIDGE ISLAND REVIEW | 98110 NORTH KITSAP HERALD | PORT ORCHARD INDEPENDENT | KINGSTON COMMUNITY NEWS

COMMUNITYDELIVERED

N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

201 8

|

4 3


FAITH

We Deliver Peace of Mind...

Worldwide

The Hill family takes the business of moving personally Find out why many families on the move look to us, whether their journey is across town or around the world. We take care of every step and enjoy a long list of repeat customers. • Drug Free Professional Business • FREE No-Obligation Estimates • Our people and our materials set us apart

KINGSTON CHRISTIAN CHURCH 11255 NE 2nd St., Kingston 360-297-2551 | www.kingstonchristian. org LIBERTY BAY PRESBYTERIAN 18561 9th Ave. NE, Poulsbo 360-779-7545 | www.libertybaypca.com LIFE FOURSQUARE CHURCH 20789 NE Division, Indianola 360-297-2340 | www.indianolachurch. net NEW COVENANT FELLOWSHIP 705 NE Lincoln Road, Poulsbo (Gateway School Gym) 360-598-2555 | www.ncfpoulsbo.com NEWLIFE CHURCH Meets at North Kitsap High School 1780 NE Hostmark St., Poulsbo 360-337-1300 | www.newlife.tv NORTH KITSAP BAPTIST CHURCH 20516 Little Valley Road NE, Poulsbo 360-779-4689 | www.nk-bc.org

Another Generation Moving Up Pictured: Emma Hill & Sarah Hill Cook

“our name is on our trucks our reputation is on the line!”

206-842-6715 • 360-697-3969 26394 Pioneer Way NW Poulsbo WA, 98370 US DOT 534666 HG 43090

hillmoving.com

4 4

KEYPORT BIBLE CHURCH 15270 Washington Ave. NE, Keyport 360-779-4235 | www.keyportbible.org

|

NORTH KITSAP FAMILY CHURCH 20965 Cindy Court NE, Poulsbo 360-779-1060 NORTH POINT CHURCH 1779 NE Hostmark, Poulsbo 360-779-0800 | www.northpointpoulsbo. org POULSBO CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 22097 Viking Way NW, Poulsbo 360-626-1053 | www.poulsbonaz.org POULSBO COMMUNITY CHURCH 651 Finn Hill Road, Poulsbo 360-598-5377 | www.poulsbocc.com REDEEMER UNITED METHODIST 9900 NE Shorty Campbell Road, Kingston 360-297-4847 | www.redeemer-umc.org

N o r t h

K i t s a p

ST. CHARLES ANGLICAN CHURCH 19351 8th Ave. NE, Suite 205, Poulsbo 360-779-3524 | www.stcharlesanglican. org ST. ELIZABETH ORTHODOX CHURCH 26580 Breidablik Place NW, Poulsbo 360-598-9700 | www.saintelizabeth poulsbo.org ST. OLAF’S CATHOLIC CHURCH 18943 Caldart Ave. NE, Poulsbo 360-779-4291 | www.stolafschurch.org ST. PETER CATHOLIC MISSION 7076 NE South St., Suquamish 360-779-4291 | www.seattlearchdiocese. org SCANDIA BIBLE CHURCH 16748 Scandia Road NW, Poulsbo 360-697-1113 | www.scandiabible church.org SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH 1700 NE Lincoln Road, Poulsbo 360-779-4746 | www.poulsbo22. adventistchurchconnect.org S’KLALLAM WORSHIP CENTER 32274 Little Boston Road NE, Kingston 360-297-5505 STOREHOUSE CHURCH 20714 Highway 305, Suite 2C, Poulsbo 360-698-5987 | email storehousepoulsbo 13@hotmail.com SUQUAMISH CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST 18732 Division Ave. NE, Suquamish 360-598-4434 | www.suquamishucc.org UNITY OF NORTH KITSAP 18732 Division Ave NE, Suquamish 360-626-1084 | www.unitynorthkitsap. com VINLAND LUTHERAN CHURCH 2750 Finn Hill Road, Poulsbo 360-779-3428 | www.vinlandlc.org

A l m a n ac

201 8


TASTE

Enjoy a taste of North Kitsap

F

Dave Lambert of Slippery Pig Brewing in Poulsbo.

rom craft beers to local wines to locally grown foods, North Kitsap is home to a variety of unique flavors. Here’s where you can get a taste of the North Kitsap Peninsula.

FARMERS MARKETS KINGSTON FARMERS MARKET At Mike Wallace Park on the Kingston waterfront. Saturdays, May through October. | www.kingstonfarmersmarket.com POULSBO FARMERS MARKET At Gateway Fellowship, 18901 8th Ave. NE, Poulsbo. Saturdays, April through December. | www.poulsbofarmersmarket.org. SUQUAMISH FARMERS MARKET Across the street from the Suquamish Tribe Administration Offices, 3:30-7 p.m. Wednesdays, May through September. | www.suquamishfarmersmarket.org.

BREWERIES DOWNPOUR 10991 NE Highway 104, Kingston. 360881-0452 | www.downpourbrewing.com. HOOD CANAL BREWERY 26499 Bond Road NE, Kingston. 360297-8316 | www.hoodcanalbrewery.com. RAINY DAZE 650 NW Bovela Lane, Suite 3, Poulsbo. 360-692-1858. | www.rainydazebrewing. com.

Courtesy photo

WESTERN RED BREWING 19168 Jensen Way NE, Poulsbo. 360-6261280 | www.westernredbrewing.com.

LOCALLY ROASTED COFFEES

SLIPPERY PIG 18801 Front St. NE, Poulsbo. 360-3941686 | www.slipperypigbrewery.com.

AVIATOR COFFEES & TEAS 25876 Washington Blvd. NE, Kingston (adjacent to the ferry landing). 206-6177765. GROUNDS FOR CHANGE INC. 15773 George Lane NE, No. 204, Poulsbo. 360-779-040 | www.groundsfor change.com.

SOUND BREWERY 19815 Viking Ave NW, Poulsbo. 360-9308696 | www.soundbrewery.com.

HOT SHOTS JAVA 18881 Front St. NE, Poulsbo. 360-7792171 | www.hotshotsjava.com.

VALHÖLL BREWING 18970 3rd Ave. NE, Poulsbo. 360-9300172 | www.valhollbrewing.com.

PUGET SOUND COFFEE ROASTERS 655 NE Owl Hill Way, Poulsbo. 360-2654144 | www.pugetcoffee.com.

N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

LOCAL ICE CREAM MORA ICED CREAMERY 18801 Front St. NE, Poulsbo. 206-3470740. www.moraicecream.com. VIKING FEAST ICE CREAM 20373 Viking Ave. NW, Poulsbo. 360509-9571.

NUT ROASTERS CB’S NUTS 6013 NE Highway 104, Kingston. 360297-1213 | www.cbsnuts.com/wp/.

LOCAL WINES

LIBERTY BAY CELLAR 4250 Emerald Lane NE, Poulsbo. 206910-2588. By appointment only. The winery produces more than 1,000 cases each year.

201 8

|

4 5


GET INVOLVED

Make a difference in your hometown POULSBO AMERICAN LEGION POST NO. 245 Meets at 7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month at 19068 Jensen Way, Suite 3A. Open to veterans and active-duty members of U.S. Armed Forces. Also: Sons of Veterans and the Ladies Auxiliary. 360-7795456 | email alpost245vso@gmail.com CULTURAL ARTS FOUNDATION NORTHWEST Volunteer group dedicated to furthering the arts in Kitsap County. Presents Art in the Woods and the Poulsbo Arts Festival. 360-697-6342 | www.cafnw.org. DAUGHTERS OF NORWAY The Nina Grieg Lodge No. 40 meets at 10 a.m. the second Saturday of each month in

the Sons of Norway Lodge, 18891 Front St. 360-779-5209. EAGLES AERIE NO. 3586 The North Kitsap Fraternal Order of Eagles No. 3586 meets in the group hall, 4230 NE Lincoln Road. Bingo 12:30 p.m. every Sunday. 360-779-7272 | www.foe3586.com.

LITTLE NORWAY TOASTMASTERS Public speaking and leadership skills. Meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month at Martha & Mary, 19160 Front St. NE, Poulsbo. 360-297-2845 | www.littlenorway-tm.com.

HISTORIC DOWNTOWN POULSBO ASSOCIATION Works to preserve and promote downtown. | www.historicdowntown poulsbo. com.

WARREN G. HARDING MASONIC LODGE NO. 260 The Warren G. Harding Lodge meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of the month at 18815 3rd Ave. NE, Poulsbo. 360-633-5936 | www.nkmasons.net.

KIWANIS CLUB OF GREATER POULSBO Meets at 7 a.m. Fridays at Coffee Oasis, 780 NE Iverson St. Poulsbo | 360-535-4110, email Tombro@msn.com

POULSBO NOON LIONS The Poulsbo Noon Lions Club meets at 12:15 p.m. every Thursday in the First Lutheran Church social hall. 360-471-1573 | www.poulsbolions.blogspot.com. NORTH KITSAP FISHLINE Provides food and other assistance in cooperation with other agencies. Food bank, 787 NW Liberty Lane, Poulsbo; Second Season, 18825 Anderson Parkway; Second Season Home, 18916 3rd Ave. NE, Poulsbo. 360-779-5190 | www.nkfishline.org. OPTIMIST CLUB Meets at 6 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesday of the month in the Poulsbo Inn breakfast room. A volunteer service group dedicated to creating an optimistic future for children and older residents. Contact: Bob or Adele Heinrich, 360-7791931 | www.optimist.org.

K- 8 Grade 6974 Island Center Road

Nurturing Christian Environment—Rigorous Academic Curriculum— Small Class Sizes—Affordable Tuition—Serving K—8th Grade

206-842-6510 6974 Island Center Road

admin@cardencountryschool.org Bainbridge Island 206-842-6510 www.cardencountryschool.org

An interdenominational Christian school providing students in grades K-8 with a solid, well-rounded, structured, and rigorous academic program in a joyful, nurturing environment. Small class sizes and small group instruction ensure success for every child.

Celebrating Years of Joy in Learning Celebrating 25 Years27 of Joy in Learning www.cardencountryschool.org

4 6

|

N o r t h

K i t s a p

POULSBO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Serves as an advocate for businesses and provides leadership in the community to ensure a healthy business climate. Located at 19735 10th Ave. NE, Suite S100, Poulsbo. 360-779-4848 | www.poulsbo chamber. com. POULSBO EVENING LIONS Poulsbo Evening Lions Club meets at 6:30 p.m. the first and third Thursday in St. Olaf’s Church, 18943 Caldart Ave. NE. | www.poulsbolions.blogspot.com.

A l m a n ac

201 8


GET INVOLVED Volunteers help educate children about being good caretakers of the environment that sustains us, at Stillwaters Environmental Learning Center’s annual EcoFest.

Courtesy photo

POULSBO GARDEN CLUB To create a wider knowledge of plants and flowers, general interest in gardening, civic beauty, and organize exhibitions. Meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Saturday of the month, Poulsbo Library, 700 Lincoln Road 360-779-6234 | email poulsbogarden club@gmail.com. POULSBO HISTORICAL SOCIETY Meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Tuesday of each month in the City Council chambers, 200 Moe St. 360-440-7354 | www.poulsbohistory.org. POULSBO-NORTH KITSAP ROTARY Meets for breakfast, fellowship and informative presentation at 7 a.m. Fridays, Sons of Norway Hall, 18891 Front St. | www. poulsborotary.org. POULSBO YACHT CLUB The club hosts activities — from dinners to card games, dances to cruises — and promotes boating in the Northwest. 18129 Fjord Drive NE, Poulsbo. 360-779-3116 | www.membermanager.net/poulsboyc.

N o r t h

SONS OF NORWAY LODGE NO. 44 Located at 18891 Front St., the group offers activities and classes related to Scandinavian culture. 360-779-5209 | www. poulsbosonsofnorway.com. SOROPTIMISTS Soroptimist International of Greater North Kitsap is a group of professional women in the area, dedicated to improving the lives of children and women in the community | www.signk.org. TROUT UNLIMITED North Kitsap chapter meets at 7 p.m. the third Tuesday of the month in the Poulsbo Library community room. Chapter works to conserve, protect and restore cold-water fisheries, watersheds, and ecosystems | www.kop.tu.org.

supports conservation and scholarships. 360-638-1061 | www.flotsamandjetsam gardenclub.com. FRIENDS OF NORWEGIAN POINT PARK Norwegian Point Park is located in downtown Hansville, at the site of an old fishing resort. Jo Nelson, 360-638-0000. FRIENDS OF POINT NO POINT LIGHT Friends of Point No Point Lighthouse is a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation of the lighthouse, and educating the public on the history of this landmark | www.pnplighthouse.com.

HANSVILLE

GREATER HANSVILLE COMMUNITY CENTER The center’s Board of Trustees meets at 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of the month in the community center, at Buck Lake Park on Buck Lake Road. 360-638-1143 | www.hansville.org.

FLOTSAM AND JETSAM GARDEN CLUB Meets at 9 a.m. the second Wednesday of the month, September through June, in the Greater Hansville Community Center on Buck Lake Road. The club hosts expert speakers, field trips and workshops, and

HANSVILLE GREENWAY ASSOCIATION Provides stewardship services for the Greenway, in cooperation with Kitsap County Parks and Recreation Department | www.hansvillegreenway.org.

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

201 8

|

47


GET INVOLVED HANSVILLE HISTORICAL SOCIETY Hansville Historical Society brings together people interested in documenting and interpreting the history of the community. Tom Lee, 360-638-1973 | www.hansville. org.

Hansville Greenway volunteers cut wood for a footbridge on a greenway trail. You have volunteers to thank for the trail conditions and upkeep.

INDIANOLA

INDIANOLA BEACH IMPROVEMENT CLUB 20466 Indianola Road NE. 360-297-4242 | www.indianola.club. INDIANOLA GARDEN CLUB Meets at 12:30 p.m. on the third Wednesday of the month at the Indianola Clubhouse. 360-297-1245.

KINGSTON

DOWNTOWN KINGSTON ASSOCIATION Meets at 4 p.m. the first Tuesday of the month in American Marine Bank on Lindvog Road. The group works to revitalize downtown. KINGSTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Provides support and networking for area businesses with monthly business lunches, after-hours networking and promotes Kingston by hosting seasonal community events. 360-297-3813 | www.kingston chamber.com. KINGSTON KIWANIS CLUB Provides support of local projects and its foundation sponsors scholarships. Meets at 7 a.m. every Thursday at the Village Green Community Center. 360-297-2661, ext. 34 | www.greaterkingstonkiwanis. weebly.com. KINGSTON CITIZENS ADVISORY COUNCIL This council, appointed by the Kitsap County Board of Commissioners, meets at 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of every month at the Village Green Community Center. 360-337-4650 | ww.kitsapgov.com/boards/ CAC/kingston/kcac.htm. KINGSTON COVE YACHT CLUB Hosts events, including barbecues, boat parades, cruises, and a fall salmon derby. Monthly meetings at 8 p.m. the third

4 8

|

Courtesy photo

Thursday of each month, with a potluck dinner at 7 p.m. 360-297-3371 | www.kcyc. org. KINGSTON FOOD BANK Illinois Avenue and Highway 107, next to the Sheriff’s Office, Kingston. Serving downtown Kingston for more than 40 years. Provides food and necessities for those in need. 360-297-7100. KINGSTON FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY Meets 10 a.m. second Monday of each month, at the Kingston library, 11212 Highway 104, Kingston. 360-297-3330 | www.krl.org/kingston. KINGSTON GARDEN CLUB Meets monthly for business and special presentations by guest gardeners and horticulturists. Provides grants and scholarships | www.kingstongardenclub.com. KINGSTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY Meets at 11:15 a.m. the third Monday of every month at the Village Green Community Center to help preserve and promote the heritage of Kingston. | www.kingston history.org. KINGSTON-NORTH KITSAP ROTARY Meets at noon on Wednesdays at Village

N o r t h

K i t s a p

Green Community Center in Kingston for business and a featured presentation. Supports parks and schools in the area. Online: www.kingston-nkrotary.org. SHARENET A food bank, thrift store and social services agency located at 26021 United Road, off Bond Road, in the Cutting Edge Business Park. 360-297-2266 | www.sharenetfood bank.org.

SUQUAMISH SUQUAMISH CITIZENS’ ADVISORY COUNCIL This council, appointed by the Kitsap County Board of Commissioners, meets at 6 p.m. the first Thursday of the month at Suquamish Elementary School Library, 18950 Park Ave. NE. Works to improve the Suquamish community. | www.kitsapgov. com/boards/CAC/suquamish/scac.htm YWCA ALIVE A women’s support group focusing on healing from the effects of physical and/ or emotional abuse in relationships meets from 6-7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of the month in Suquamish. 360-551-3140. Crisis hotline: 1-800-5005513.

A l m a n ac

201 8


BE ACTIVE

Learn more about our natural spaces

Hikers explore the Grovers Creek watershed.

T

he natural beauty and resources of North Kitsap have sustained the needs of people here for millennia. Modern residents are still nurtured by the beauty and bounty of land and sea. You can learn more about our natural environment and your role as a caretaker at the following venues.

FISH PARK 228 NW Lindvig Way (between Viking Avenue and Bond Road), Poulsbo. 360394-9772 | www.cityofpoulsbo.com/ parks. Features: 40 acres on Dogfish Creek and the Liberty Bay estuary, with entrances on Bond Road and on Viking Avenue. Features: Arboretum, bird and wildlife viewing, boardwalk, nature hik-

N o r t h

ing trails, interpretive signage, pedestrian bridges, sitting areas, winding paths. GROVERS CREEK SALMON HATCHERY 23175 Indianola Road NE, Poulsbo. 360-598-3142. Call for hours. The hatchery is owned and operated by the Suquamish Tribe. Watch salmon make their way up the creek and the fish ladder into the holding ponds. Biologist Paul Dorn manages the Grover Creek Fish Hatchery and conducts salmon tours. SEA DISCOVERY CENTER 18743 Front St. NE, Poulsbo, 360-5984460 | Hours: wp.wwu.edu/seacenterpoulsbo. The Marine Science Center offers an up-close introduction to the local marine

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

Don Willott/Contributed

ecosystem, with a touch tank, exhibits of more than 100 species of marine animals and plants, and an aquarium (the resident octopus is a popular attraction). Admission is free. STILLWATERS ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER 26059 Barber Cut Off Road, Kingston, 360-297-1226 | Hours: www.stillwaters environmentalcenter.org. Stillwaters’ wetlands are part of a larger system that includes forest, freshwater and emergent salt marsh communities. The center has trails that lead to a viewing platform on the salt marsh and estuary off Puget Sound, and ponds full of sealife. Stillwaters presents numerous classes and events all year.

201 8

|

49


BE ACTIVE

Get out and explore our parks, trails

W

ith approximately 90 parks and preserves, North Kitsap is conducive to an active lifestyle. It’s also a nature lover’s paradise. Enjoy second-growth forests and beautiful beaches; wildlife you’ll see include coyotes, raptors, river otters, seals and whales. These are the largest parks in North Kitsap. For a list of all parks, go to www. cityofpoulsbo.com and www.kitsapgov. com/parks.

POINT NO POINT COUNTY PARK A 60.8-acre park, located at the end of Point No Point Road off Hansville Road. The Treaty of Point No Point was negotiated and signed here in 1855; Point No Point Lighthouse was built in 1879. The lighthouse is open noon to 4 p.m. weekends April to September. Point No Point is on Admiralty Inlet and is popular for salmon fishing, sand-castle building, kite flying, bird watching and other beach activities. Online: www.kitsapgov.com/parks.

HANSVILLE FOULWEATHER BLUFF A 101-acre preserve off Twin Spits Road, two miles northwest of Hansville. Features: A trail that meanders through a forest to a sandy beach on Hood Canal; more than 300 species of plants; stands of red alder, western hemlock, secondgrowth western red cedar; a coastal lagoon that is habitat for many bird species, including red-breasted nut hatches and winter wrens. Dogs and other pets are not allowed. Watch your step; the nearshore has several colonies of sand dollars. HANSVILLE GREENWAY Hike from Puget Sound to Hood Canal on the Hansville Greenway trails. The greenway is 245 acres. Features: west shore of Buck Lake, two beaver ponds, other wetlands, and a portion of Hawk’s Hole Creek, which flows from Lower Hawk’s Pond to Hood Canal. Most of the land is second- and third-growth forest. The main entrance to the trail system is at Buck Lake County Park. Norwegian Point Park is the Puget Sound terminus of the Hansville Greenway trail system, but is not part of the Greenway. Buck Lake Park features a boat ramp for nonmotorized watercraft, lake swimming, trout fishing, and trailheads to the Hansville Greenway Wildlife Corridor. Online: www.hansvillegreenway.org.

5 0

|

INDIANOLA INDIANOLA WATERFRONT AND WOODLAND PRESERVE An 80.91-acre preserve. Features: Undeveloped walking trails, mature mixed conifer forests, broadleaf forests, a seasonal stream that meanders to Miller Bay, public access to a low-bank beach on Puget Sound through a serene forested trail crossing over a tidal estuary. Wildlife includes bald eagles, Cooper’s hawks, ospreys, violet-green swallows, and pileated woodpeckers. Online: www.greatpeninsula.org/ where/indianola.html.

KINGSTON CARPENTER LAKE RESERVE AND WILDLIFE SANCTUARY Carpenter Lake is the center of this 67acre nature preserve. Features: Boardwalk with viewing platforms leading across a bog and a salt marsh to the lake. The trailhead is located behind Richard Gordon Elementary School on Barber Cut Off Road. NORTH KITSAP HERITAGE PARK More than 800 acres of second-growth forest, with several miles of biking and walking trails. This park has no restrooms, and is pack-it-in/pack-it-out with no trash collection.

N o r t h

K i t s a p

Online: www.kitsapgov.com/parks/

PORT GAMBLE PORT GAMBLE FOREST HERITAGE PARK A 535-acre park. Features: Biking, equestrian and walking trails; access to the bay for water trails and kayaking; parking lot. Pack-it-in/pack-it-out.

POULSBO FISH PARK 228 NW Lindvig Way (between Viking Avenue and Bond Road), Poulsbo. 360394-9772 | www.cityofpoulsbo.com/ parks/parks_parks_trails.htm. Features: 40 acres on Dogfish Creek and the Liberty Bay estuary, with entrances on Bond Road and on Viking Avenue. Features: Arboretum, bird and wildlife viewing, boardwalk, nature hiking trails, interpretive signage, pedestrian bridges, sitting areas, winding paths. ISLAND LAKE COUNTY PARK 1087 NW Island Lake Road, Poulsbo | www.kitsapgov.com/parks This 23-acre park offers swimming areas, a fishing pier, trails, picnic area, playground, community center and restrooms. KITSAP MEMORIAL STATE PARK Located on Highway 3 north of Hood Canal Bridge. Features: A 58-acre park with tent camping, cabins, 1,797 feet of shoreline, and facilities for group events and weddings. Sweeping views of Hood Canal. Grassy playfields and children’s play equipment, a saltwater beach with tide pools, and shellfish harvesting opportunities. Online: www.parks.state.wa.us/529/ Kitsap-Memorial.

A l m a n ac

201 8


BE ACTIVE

North Kitsap: It’s a fitness kind of place

M

Frisbee.

ild winters and warm, beautiful summers are conducive to indoor and outdoor activities — from golf to ultimate

The Poulsbo Pump Track was developed by the Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance. The track features berms and rolling terrain that bicycle riders can pump to produce forward momentum instead of pedaling.

GOLF WHITE HORSE GOLF COURSE 22795 Three Lions Place NE (off South Kingston Road), Kingston. 360-297-4468 | www.whitehorsegolf.com. Features: 11acre practice facility, Cedar Ridge Grill and Clubhouse.

PUMP TRACK POULSBO PUMP TRACK 20359-20699 Little Valley Road NE, Poulsbo. Features: Series of berms and rolling terrain that bicycle riders can pump to produce forward momentum instead of pedaling.

N o r t h

K i t s a p

Kitsap KAOS photo

A l m a n ac

201 8

|

5 1


“Where...

is the attention of your customers?”

Reach your desired Market through our

Digital Marketing Department Social Media I Retargeting I Behavioral

Digital Advertising Solutions

Call today to schedule your digital marketing analysis Travis Moore, Digital DNA Expert 360-207-0019

KitsapDailyNews.com | BainbridgeReview. com BAINBRIDGE ISLAND REVIEW | 98110 | NORTH KITSAP HERALD | CENTRAL KITSAP REPORTER | KITSAP WEEKLY PORT ORCHARD INDEPENDENT | KINGSTON COMMUNITY NEWS

5 2

|

N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

201 8


BE ACTIVE ROWING KITSAP ROWING ASSOCIATION P.O. Box 232, Indianola 98342 | www. kitsaprowing.org, email kra.membership@ gmail.com. A competitive and recreational club for rowers 21 and older. Women’s and men’s crews. Practices weekday mornings, early evenings and weekends. Members range from experienced rowers to novices.

SAILING POULSBO PARKS AND RECREATION Beginning sailing courses during the summer at the Port of Poulsbo Marina. For all ages. 360-779-9898 | www.cityofpoulsbo. com/parks/parks.htm.

SKATEPARKS BILLY JOHNSON SKATE PARK 24700 Lindvog Road NE, Kingston.

LITTLE BOSTON SKATEPARK Little Boston Road, near the S’Klallam Tribal Center, in Little Boston. For Tribal members and guests.

NORTH KITSAP LACROSSE Competitive lacrosse league for middle school- and high school-age players, | www.nklax.org.

RAAB PARK SKATE PARK 18349 Caldart Ave NE, Poulsbo.

NORTH KITSAP SOCCER CLUB North Kitsap Soccer Club is part of a network that includes more than 1,300 soccer players throughout the state. For ages 5-18, | www.northkitsapsoccer.org.

SWIMMING NORTH KITSAP COMMUNITY POOL 1881 NE Hostmark St., Poulsbo, 360-598 1070. Lap swims, lessons, water aerobics. Competitive swim programs | www. poulsbopiranhas.com).

YOUTH SPORTS LEAGUES LITTLE LEAGUE, BABE RUTH, GIRLS SOFTBALL Snider Park, 22898 Viking Way NW, Poulsbo. Little League: 360-697-5449 | www.nkll.org.

SUBSCRIBE! Keep in touch with what’s happening in your community...

52 Issues for $25*

• Guaranteed Carrier Delivery • Includes local savings on national brands

Call today 888-838-3000 or visit: www.kitsapdailynews.com/subscribe-nkh or mail coupon to: Name __________________________________________ North Kitsap Herald Address ________________________________________ P.O. Box 94320 Phone __________________________________________ Seattle, WA 98124 To pay by credit card: ❑ Visa ❑ MC exp. _____________ # ________________________________________________ Signature _________________________________________________ *Home Delivery Only

www.kitsapdailynews.com N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

201 8

|

5 3


EDUCATION

Equipping for success in today’s world

Wolfle Elementary School students composed a symphony that was performed at Benaroya Hall in 2017.

T

he physical presence of four colleges in North Kitsap, construction of homes and apartments, and the emergence of innovative and entrepreneurial ventures are converging to create dynamic opportunities here. Our colleges offer degrees and certificates in fields that are in high demand in Kitsap; according to the Kitsap Economic Development Alliance, the biggest sources of jobs are in the defense industry, health care, education, county services and retail. In the top 8 is Port Madison Enterprises, the economic development arm of the Suquamish Tribe. Olympic College offers undergraduate degrees in digital filmmaking, information systems, nursing, and organizational leadership and technical management.

5 4

|

Students can earn a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering at OC through Washington State University. Western on the Peninsulas, a division of Western Washington University, offers undergraduate degrees in business administration, computer and information systems security, environmental policy, environmental sciences, and multidisciplinary studies. Northwest Indian College, which has a satellite campus on the Port Gamble S’Klallam Reservation, offers bachelor’s degrees in human services advocacy, Native studies, Tribal governance and business management, and Native environmental science. Our local schools work to develop in every young person the skills they need to succeed in a technology-driven world.

N o r t h

K i t s a p

File photo

Public Schools NORTH KITSAP SCHOOL DISTRICT 18360 Caldart Ave., Poulsbo 360-396-3001 | www.nkschools.org The North Kitsap School District is comprised of six elementary schools, two middle schools, two high schools and a Parent Assisted Learning Program. ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS RICHARD GORDON ELEMENTARY 26331 Barber Cut Off Road NE, Kingston Karen Tollefson, principal | 360-396-3800 HILDER PEARSON ELEMENTARY 15650 Central Valley Road NW, Poulsbo Deb Foreman, principal | 360-697-6266

A l m a n ac

201 8


EDUCATION POULSBO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 18531 Noll Road NE, Poulsbo Drew Crandall, principal | 360-779-2911

Fabian Castilleja, principal 360-394-8566 | https://suquamish.nsn.us. A school of the Suquamish Tribe Education Department.

SUQUAMISH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 18950 Park Blvd. NE, Suquamish Gwen Lyon, principal | 360-598-4219 VINLAND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 22104 Rhododendron Lane NW, Poulsbo Charley McCabe, principal | 360-779-8990

CENTRAL KITSAP MONTESSORI 10323 Central Valley Road NE, Poulsbo Diana Zegers, administrator 360-698-7620 | www.ckmontessori.com

SILVERWOOD SCHOOL 14000 Central Valley Road NW, Poulsbo Jon Torgerson, head of school 360-697-7526 | www.silverwoodschool.org Grades 1-6. WEST SOUND ACADEMY 16571 Creative Drive NE, Poulsbo Barrie Hillman, head of school | 360-5985954, www.westsoundacademy.org College preparatory school for grades 6-12.

DAVID WOLFLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 27089 Highland Road NE, Kingston Benjamin Degnin, principal | 360-394-6800

CHILDREN’S GARDEN MONTESSORI 3805 NE Sawdust Hill Road NE, Poulsbo Kristen Sundquist, director 360-779-1225 | www.cgmspoulsbo.com

MIDDLE SCHOOLS KINGSTON MIDDLE SCHOOL 9000 NE West Kingston Road, Kingston Craig Barry, principal | 360-396-3400

THE FARM MONTESSORI SCHOOL 17197 Clear Creek Road NW, Poulsbo 360-779-2620 Classes for 68 students ages 3-6.

NORTHWEST INDIAN COLLEGE, LITTLE BOSTON SATELLITE SITE 31912 Little Boston Road NE, Kingston 360-297-6216.

GATEWAY CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 705 Lincoln Road NE, Poulsbo 360-779-9189 | www.gatewaychristian schools.org Grades K-9.

OLYMPIC COLLEGE, POULSBO 1000 Olympic College Way NW, Poulsbo. 360-394-2725 | email poulsbocampus@ olympic.edu

POULSBO MIDDLE SCHOOL 2003 Hostmark St., Poulsbo Josh Emmons, principal | 360-779-4453 HIGH SCHOOLS NORTH KITSAP HIGH SCHOOL 1780 NE Hostmark St., Poulsbo Megan Sawicki, principal | 360-779-4408

GOOD SHEPHERD MONTESSORI PRESCHOOL 15439 Sandy Hook Road NE, Poulsbo 360-779-2345 | www.gscmontessori.com

KINGSTON HIGH SCHOOL 26201 Siyaya Ave. NE, Kingston Christy Cole, principal | 360-394-1200

POULSBO ADVENTIST SCHOOL 1700 Lincoln Road NE, Poulsbo 360-779-6290 | www.poulsboadventist school.com Grades 1-8.

Independent Schools SUQUAMISH TRIBE CHIEF KITSAP ACADEMY 15838 Sandy Hook Road NE, Suquamish

Colleges

WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY AT OLYMPIC COLLEGE POULSBO 1000 Olympic College Way NW, Poulsbo. 360-394-2700 WESTERN ON THE PENINSULAS 1000 Olympic College Way NW, Poulsbo. Kathy Johnson | 360-394-2733, email western.peninsulas@wwu.edu Western on the Peninsulas is a satellite campus of Western Washington University.

LARGEST WASHINGTON STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGES No. 10: Olympic College, 6,527 students. — 2018 Puget Sound Business Journal Book of Lists LARGEST EMPLOYERS IN KITSAP COUNTY No. 5: Olympic College, 429 full-time employes, 885 part-time employees. — Kitsap Economic Development Alliance, 2016

N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

201 8

|

5 5


EDUCATION

Western Washington University’s SEA Discovery Center, on the Poulsbo waterfront, has an aquarium and offers exhibits, presentations SEA Discovery Center and educational programs for all ages. SEA is the acronym for Science, Education, Aquarium.

You’ll do a lot more than look around

L

earn about local history — pre-contact, the logging era, the maritime era, and our Navy connection — at these local museums and cultural centers.

LATE 1800s/EARLY 1900s

PORT GAMBLE HISTORIC MUSEUM 1 Northeast View Drive, Port Gamble, 360-297-8078 | www.portgamble.com/ museum. Located on the lower floor of the Port Gamble General Store. Exhibits include rooms with period furnishings and items depicting life and work in this former New England-style mill town, which was established in 1853 and is now a National Historic Landmark. POULSBO HISTORICAL MUSEUM Poulsbo City Hall, 200 NE Moe St., Poulsbo, 360-440-7354 | www.poulsbohistory.org. Learn about late 1800s/early 1900s life in

5 6

|

this former fishing village. The museum’s Martinson Cabin at Viking Avenue and Lindvig Way is restored and furnished in period items, depicting life in a settlement cabin of the 1800s. Admission free at both museums. INDIGENOUS HISTORY SUQUAMISH MUSEUM & CULTURAL CENTER 6861 NE South St., Suquamish. 360-3948499 | www.suquamishmuseum.org. The museum’s architecture is reminiscent of a Coast Salish longhouse. Ancestral objects, oral histories, photographs and contemporary items tell the story of the Suquamish people. The museum gift store features traditional items made by noted Coast Salish artists.

MARITIME HISTORY POULSBO MARITIME MUSEUM 19010 Front St. NE, Poulsbo. | www.poulsbo history.com/poulsbo-maritime-museum.

N o r t h

K i t s a p

Through imaginative exhibits and interactive displays, explore Poulsbo’s diverse maritime history — from families traveling dock to dock to get to their farm products to market, to the homeporting of codfish fleets, to the tour ships and paddle boards of today. See historic boats that have been restored or are undergoing restoration. Admission: Free. MILITARY HISTORY U.S. NAVAL UNDERSEA MUSEUM 1 Garnett Way, Keyport, 360-396-4148 | www.navalunderseamuseum.org. This museum is one of 14 Naval History & Heritage Command museums in the United States. Artifacts, exhibits and hands-on displays related to the U.S. Navy’s undersea history, exploration, and technical development. Features: diving gear, mines (including one dating to the Civil War), models, ROVs, submarine equipment, submersibles, and torpedoes. Admission: Free.

A l m a n ac

201 8


WEATHER

Our weather: Pleasant temps, stunning views POULSBO 2017 MONTHLY HIGH AND LOW TEMPS January: high 55 low 20.2 February: high 60.7 low 23.6 March: high 59.7 low 31.8 April: high 67.3 low 33.3 May: high 85.1 low 37.9 June: high 93.2 low 41.3 July: high 85.1 low 46.1 August: high 92.2 low 46.9 September: high 89.2 low 42.2 October: high 70.7 low 33.6 November: high 63.1 low 29.4 December: high 54.2 low 25.4 ANNUAL RAINFALL 2017: 36.7 inches 2016: 42.91 inches 2015: 29.99 inches 2014: 37.31 inches 2013: 21.71 inches 2012: 42.59 inches 2011: 31.5 inches 2010: 42.59 inches — Source: Weather Underground; the above rainfall figures have been adjusted to reflect Weather Underground’s historical rainfall data. Earlier Almanac data was obtained from a local source.

The Olympic Mountains are always a stunning sight from North Kitsap. This is the view from Salsbury Point County Park. Annie LaValle

HANSVILLE 2017 MONTHLY HIGH AND LOW TEMPS January: high 56.2 low 26.8 February: high 60.1 low 30.7 March: high 60.4 low 33.3 April: high 62.4 low 38.2 May: high 67.3 low 43.1 June: high 70.3 low 46.3 July: high 69.2 low 50.6 August: high 74.5 low 51.2

N o r t h

September: October: November: December: 2017: 2016:

high 77.6 high 62.4 high 62.5 high 53.4

low 47.8 low 40.4 low 33.3 low 29.8

ANNUAL RAINFALL 31.25 inches 38.02 inches

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

2015: 26.55 inches 2014: 31.60 inches 2013: 19.71 inches 2012: 35.98 inches 2011: 25.40 inches 2010: 20.49 inches — Source: SkunkBayWeather.com

201 8

|

5 7


ADVERTISERS INDEX

Salsbury Point County Park.

Acupuncture & Wellness Center........................................ 59 Blue Heron Jewelry Co........................................................ 19 Boehm’s Chocolates............................................................. 19 Carden Country School....................................................... 46 Casa Luna.............................................................................. 18 Catherine Arlen.................................................................... 36 Cats Meow............................................................................. 18 Central Market....................................................................... 3 Clearwater Casino Resort................................................... 51 Closet Transfer..................................................................... 18 Coast To Coast........................................................................ 7 Doctors Clinic....................................................................... 60 Eric Thanem LMP................................................................. 6 First Federal.......................................................................... 11 Galletta School Of Dance...................................................... 6 Green Light Diner................................................................ 19 Hill Moving Services........................................................... 44 Historic Downtown Poulsbo Association..................... 18-19 Hot Shots Java....................................................................... 18 Island School........................................................................... 8 Kimco Plumbing Inc............................................................ 12 Liberty Bay Bank................................................................. 15

5 8

|

N o r t h

Annie LaValle

Liberty Bay Books................................................................ 18 Liberty Shores........................................................................ 4 Madrona School.................................................................... 21 Downtown Poulsbo......................................................... 18-19 Port Gamble.......................................................................... 42 Kingston................................................................................ 36 Poulsbo Village.................................................................... 6-7 Nordiska................................................................................ 18 North Kitsap School............................................................... 9 Northwest Land And Sea.................................................... 19 Patti Shannon........................................................................ 25 Pho’ T & N............................................................................... 6 Poulsbo Village....................................................................... 7 Salt Kettle.............................................................................. 18 Sport Haus............................................................................... 6 Tango Zulu............................................................................. 42 The Grub Hut........................................................................ 36 The Point Casino and Hotel......................................... 2 & 37 Tizley’s Europub................................................................... 19 Toys Etc................................................................................... 6 Wish....................................................................................... 42

K i t s a p

A l m a n ac

201 8


, e A es US . of hin he ard t y ne C k O est s in ac rg ic b la lin ur e C o th cal in y i t ed h M rig

TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR HEALTH

With our unique style of acupuncture and time-tested herbal formulas you can live the life you’ve always wanted—without pharmaceutical medications.

Call 360-394-4357

to schedule a consultation.

acupuncturewellness.net 18870 8th Ave NE • Suite 108 • Poulsbo, WA 98370


A part of Franciscan Medical Group

The Doctors Clinic, is a part of Franciscan Medical Group. The Doctors Clinic has 7 clinic locations and 80 health care providers that integrate primary care, specialty care and ancillary services within the Franciscan system. CHI Franciscan Health and The Doctors Clinic, work together to create a healthier community throughout Kitsap County.

Por t Orchard |

Poulsbo | Silverdale

TheDoctorsClinic.com | (360) 782-3660

Profile for Sound Publishing

Almanacs - 2018  

i20180221181230104.pdf

Almanacs - 2018  

i20180221181230104.pdf