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families today PENINSULA

An advertising supplement produced by the Peninsula Daily News and Sequim Gazette

WINTER FUN Daddy & Daughter Dance set in Sequim — Page 3 Reading suggestions from area librarians — Page 4 Skiing and snowshoeing at Hurricane Ridge — Page 6

January 2018 volume 8, issue 1


Peninsula Families Today is looking for story ideas, news tips and more Peninsula Families Today is a family-focused publication and is inserted into the Peninsula Daily News and Sequim Gazette. Please let us know what you’d like to see in the next issue of Peninsula Families Today. This publication welcomes input and new contributors. Educators, parents and professionals in their fields are invited to contribute informative and educational articles or columns for consideration. We cannot guarantee publication due to space and content considerations. If your submission is accepted, we reserve the right to edit it. Send articles, columns and photos (JPEGs at 200 dpi minimum) to section editor Brenda Hanrahan at bhanrahan@peninsuladailynews.com. For details, phone 360-452-2345.

families today PENINSULA

Published by the Peninsula Daily News and Sequim Gazette advertising department Peninsula Daily News 305 W. First St. Port Angeles, WA 98362 360-452-2345

Sequim Gazette 147 W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-3311

Terry R. Ward, regional publisher Steve Perry, general manager Brenda Hanrahan and Laura Lofgren, special sections editors

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Daddy & Daughter Dance set for Feb. 10 in Sequim Dinner can be purchased separately, especially for those attending with more The Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic than one child. Peninsula will host the seventh annual The Boys & Girls Club will be transDaddy & Daughter Dance at the Carroll formed with black and white glitz and C. Kendall Unit, 400 W. Fir St., in Sequim glamour décor, and lively music will get on Saturday, Feb. 10. dancers up and on their feet. The theme of the dance is “Ties & Music will include classics from all Tiaras.” Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and the generations and promises to inspire Congo last dance will happen around 8:30 p.m. lines, the limbo and more. Girls younger than 18 will receive free The dance is a community outreach admission to the dance, while their dad, event to bring youth and families together. stepfather, grandfather, uncle or other The photo area is always a popular male guardian pays $15 for an advance attraction, and the pairs line up to get ticket or $20 at the door. their picture taken and take it home to Advance tickets are available online at remember the magical night. www.bgc-op.org and at the Sequim Boys & People interested in donating a dance Girls Club. ticket for a family to attend also can To make the date night complete, purchase a ticket online or phone the club dinner is served in the “Bistro” during the to make arrangements. first part of the evening. Club staff will offer donated tickets to a A dancer package can be purchased, family who might not otherwise have the which includes meals for one adult and means to attend. one child, dessert, raffle tickets and a For more information, phone the Boys & commemorative photo. Girls Club in Sequim at 360-683-8095. by PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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Port Angeles School District Levy News

This workshop is also helpful for people who are caring for a friend, family member or significant other with a challenging health condition. To register contact Mitzi Hazard at 360.385.2200 extension 1210 or Kathleen Spangler extension 4952. 812026874

PASD Board Directors ask voters to consider a Capital Projects Levy on the February 13, 2018 ballot that would renovate and add classrooms at Stevens Middle School. The additional classrooms would allow 6th grade to be moved from elementary schools to the middle school, thereby creating much needed space at all five elementary schools. In this way, new state mandates calling for lowering class sizes can be addressed. The Capital Projects Levy will create safer schools, smaller class sizes and room to increase learning opportunities. The Capital Projects Levy would allow the District to begin rebuilding one of our oldest schools, which does not meet today’s fire and earthquake standards. The 6-year, $46.7 million Capital Projects Levy would cost $2.47 per $1,000 of assessed property value. There is no interest with a Capital Projects Levy. Additionally, with a complete modernization project at Stevens Middle School, our District can qualify for state assistance funds up to $14 million.

Visit www.portangelesschools.org to learn about the Capital Projects Levy, email info@portangelesschools.org or call the District Office at 360.457.8575. SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO PENINSULA DAILY NEWS AND SEQUIM GAZETTE

PENINSULA FAMILIES TODAY  JANUARY 2018  3


Looking for a good book this winter? Try one of these Local librarians recommend a few gems you might have overlooked by NORTH OLYMPIC LIBRARY SYSTEM STAFF

You heard about “Astrophysics for People in a Hurry” by Neil deGrass Tyson, Dan Brown’s “Origin” and the other bestsellers and big names from 2017. North Olympic Library System (NOLS) Librarian Sarah Morrison has a few suggestions for hidden gems — books from 2017 that are moving, exciting, tender or sharp yet didn’t make bestseller lists. Each title suggested deserves a wider audience: • “Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body” by Roxane Gay Through difficult self-reflection, the author uses her own emotional and psychological struggles to explore our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance and health. A difficult, emotional book but absolutely worth it, “Hunger” tells a story that hasn’t been told but needs to be.

• “Caesar’s Last Breath: Decoding the Secrets of the Air Around Us” by Sam Kean With every breath, you literally inhale the history of the world. In 44 BC, Julius Caesar died of stab wounds on the Senate floor, but the story of his last breath is still unfolding; in fact, you’re probably inhaling some of it now. Of the sextillions of molecules entering or leaving your lungs at this moment, some might well bear traces of Cleopatra’s perfumes, German mustard gas, particles exhaled by dinosaurs or emitted by atomic bombs, even remnants of stardust from the universe’s creation. Relatable stories of small events make the huge, impossible idea of our atmosphere a little more understandable. • “The End of the World Running Club” by Adrian J. Walker Edgar is not a great guy — an inattentive father, an

out-of-touch husband and not particularly healthy. After a natural disaster makes travel near-impossible, Edgar is separated from his wife and children. They’re safe and waiting in southern England to take a boat to relative safety on the continent. Edgar, left behind 500 miles in the north, has only weeks to find them.

SOMETHING FOR YOUNGER READERS

If you’re looking for something for a younger audience, here are a few of NOLS Youth Services specialist Jennifer Lu’Becke’s favorite (not-sopopular) reads from 2017: • “Not Quite Narwhal” by Jessie Sima Kelp assumes he is a narwhal like the rest of his family, but he has noticed a few differences. >> GOOD READS continued on Page 5 812045509

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<< GOOD READS continued from Page 4

One night, a strong current sweeps him to the surface where he meets creatures just like him — unicorns! Learning this, he struggles with his identity — is he a land narwhal or a sea unicorn? A sweet and clever story about accepting differences and learning how to fit in while staying true to oneself. Beautifully illustrated by the author. • “Long Way Down” by Jason Reynolds Fifteen-year-old Will sees his older brother gunned down and killed in the streets. Will plans to avenge his brother but is interrupted by “ghosts” of friends and relatives who were victims of gun violence in the elevator. Written in free verse, this young adult novel is raw and powerful. • “Curious Kids Nature Guide: Explore the Amazing Outdoors of the Pacific Northwest” by Fiona Cohen Filled with fun facts and beautiful, scientifically accurate illustrations by Marni Fylling, this nature guide will excite kids to explore the great outdoors. Organized by habitat — forest, beach, fresh water,

backyards and urban parks — this book will teach kids about interesting flora and fauna in the Pacific Northwest.

for a book in print or an audiobook or eBook, simply visit www.nols.org to request a title online or visit your local library branch.

NOLS LOCATIONS

The North Olympic Library System operates the following locations: • Clallam Bay Library, 16990 state Highway 112 • Forks Library, 171 S. Forks Ave. • Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St. • Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave. For more location information, visit www.nols.org.

LIBRARY INFORMATION All of these titles can be found in various formats at North Olympic Library System locations. Whether you’re looking

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Hurricane Ridge provides winter fun for all ages by PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

On a clear winter day, the Olympic Mountains can be seen towering over Port Angeles, reminding residents and visitors alike that a winter wonderland awaits just 17 miles up Hurricane Ridge Road. At 5,242 feet, wind and snow transform Olympic National Park’s Hurricane Ridge into a magical place for winter activities. Early snowfall and hurricane-force winds have sculpted trees and snow drifts into spectacular formations that will inspire people of all ages to snap a photograph or two. Hurricane Ridge provides the chance to snowshoe, cross-country or downhill ski or slide down a hill on a tube for a day of fun.

SNOWSHOEING = FAMILY FUN

Trekking around Hurricane Ridge on snowshoes can be a fun activity for the entire family. For families with small children or for novice snowshoers, the park’s ranger-guided snowshoe walk is a treat. Through the end of March — snow permitting — families can join a ranger-guided snowshoe walk.

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Celia Thompson of Port Angeles leads a group of cross-country skiers at Hurricane Ridge in December 2016.

During the walk, attendees will learn about winter at Hurricane Ridge, including weather conditions, wildlife that remains active during the snowy months and other educational facts about Olympic National Park. People on the walk might see ravens and gray jays or the tracks of snowshoe hares, weasels and bobcats. Walks are offered at 2 p.m. weekends and holiday Mondays. The walk lasts 1.5 hours and covers less than a mile. Snowshoes and instructions are provided. The cost for snowshoe walks is $7 for adults, $3 for youth 6 to 15 years old and free for children 5 years old and younger. Snowshoers should sign up at the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center information desk by 1:30 p.m., 30 minutes before the walk, and be dressed for cold weather. Advance reservations are required for group snowshoe walks, which begin at 10:30 a.m. Saturdays, Sundays and holiday Mondays. A group is limited to 25 people. Reservations can be made by phoning the park at 360-565-3136.

SKI, SNOWBOARD OR TUBE

The Hurricane Ridge Ski and Snowboard Area is a family-oriented ski zone

offering a winter sports experience without the high cost and congestion of ski resorts. The Ridge offers some groomed spaces, but for the advanced skier or snowboarder, the steeps, bowls and glades are worth the effort that it takes to hike there. The Hurricane Ridge Winter Sports Club is a nonprofit organization that operates both rope tows and the Poma lift atop the mountain. During the winter season — usually mid-December through March — the rope tows and Poma lift operate on Saturdays, Sundays and some holidays. Sledding is permitted for children ages 8 and younger at the Small Children’s Snowplay Area west of the visitor center. You can bring a sled or tube from home, but sleds with runners are not allowed. For children ages 9 and older, sledding is permitted only at the Hurricane Ridge Winter Sports Area tubing park. Only tubes furnished by the Hurricane Ridge Winter Sports Club are allowed in the park. Tube rental costs $10 per hour. The Hurricane Ridge Ski and Snowboard Area is open through March — weather permitting — from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. >> RIDGE continued on Page 7

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<< RIDGE continued from Page 7

SOMETHING TO REMEMBER

For up-to-date information and rates about the Hurricane Ridge Ski and Snowboard Area, visit the Hurricane Ridge Winter Sports Club’s website at www.hurricaneridge.com.

HOW TO REACH THE RIDGE

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Entrance passes are required to reach Hurricane Ridge, the road for which is located off Race Street south of Port Angeles. The street becomes Mount Angeles Road. Olympic National Park Visitor Center, which is undergoing renovations, will be located on the right. An adjacent temporary center is open to visitors and can provide information about road and snow conditions, maps and activities. From Mount Angeles Road, watch for Hurricane Ridge Road on your right. You will reach the park’s entrance gate at Heart O’the Hills, about 5 miles south of the visitor center. Before heading up to Hurricane Ridge, be sure to check on weather conditions. The road may be closed due to unsafe icy conditions mid-December through March. Call the Road & Weather Hotline at 360-565-3131 for current road conditions, or follow @HRWinterAccess on Twitter for road updates. Carrying tire chains is required during the winter. An Olympic National Park pass is good for up to seven consecutive days at any park entrance. The pass costs $25 for vehicles. An annual pass costs $50 and is good for Olympic National Park entrance for one year from the month of purchase. A lifetime America the Beautiful pass is available for seniors ages 62 and older for $80. An active-duty military member or dependent pass is available for free. Photo by JESSE MAJOR/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS For more information, including other discounted and Snowboarders use a rope tow at Hurricane Ridge to enjoy an afternoon of fun. volunteer pass options, visit www.nps.gov/olym.

For the past seven years, a shuttle from Port Angeles to Hurricane Ridge was provided by All Points Charter & Tours. The company is no longer in business following the retirement of owner and operator Willie Nelson. At the time of publication, the only way to reach Hurricane Ridge was for individuals to drive their personal vehicles.

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PENINSULA FAMILIES TODAY  JANUARY 2018  7


Kids Create Art back at the Sequim Library Monthly free art program continues through April 21 by PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The popular Kids Create Art series at the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave., will continue into winter and spring. These introductory art workshops take place from 10:30 a.m. to noon on the third Saturday through April 21.  Led by local artists, each Kids Create Art session — recommended for ages 7 to 12 — will offer participants an opportunity to explore various artistic media. All workshops in the series are free, but with class sizes limited, pre-registration is required. To register, visit the Sequim Library events calendar at www.nols.org, phone 360683-1161 or send an email to youth@nols.org. All materials will be provided.  

CLASS SCHEDULE

l Feb. 17 — Artist Tricia Murphy will have participants design and draw their own robot while exploring the effects of light and shadow; the elements of line, shape and form; and the principles of symmetry and variety. Robot painting promises to be a fun tempera painting art project.  l March 17 — Artist Janie Brackney will present Zentangle. Zentangles are not only beautiful, they are fun and relaxing to create. The process of creating a Zentangle is a form of “artistic meditation.” The Zentangle Method “increases focus and creativity, and provides artistic satisfaction along with an increased sense of personal well-being.”                          l April 21 — Closing out the Kids Create Art series for the season, artist Carrie Rodlend will be celebrating Earth Day. 

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For more information about the Kids Create Art series, contact the Sequim Library at 360-683-1161, send an email to Youth@nols.org, or visit www.nols.org. This program is supported by the Friends of Sequim Library.

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Expert advice for handling a whining child Try these pro-approved methods the next time your child whines by LISA

McSWEENEY, a child mental health therapist and clinical supervisor for Children and Family Services at Peninsula Behavioral Health in Port Angeles

activity, attention, assistance, etc.), and we’re pretty sure the person with the power (mom, dad, our boss) will say “no.” So, what to do? There is no perfect cure for whining, but there are tricks and tools that can help.

PREVENTION

Our darling offspring come into this world wailing, and over time, they become adept at fine-tuning this skill, matching pitch and timbre to the various disagreeable situations in which they find themselves. If there’s one thing kids know how to do (and do well), it’s whine. What is a whine? According to the dictionary, it’s a prolonged high-pitched complaint. Children often use it to replace a more direct plea for help. There are few things that irritate adults more than a whining child … and children know it. Little ones complain when they don’t want to do something; they persistently and repeatedly beg when they want something; they interrupt us when we’re on the phone or talking with a friend; and they whine when they are hungry, agitated, lonely, tired or bored. Whining seems to be a behavior most children exhibit during their younger years, but it’s important to remember, especially when losing perspective and patience, that we all whine at every age, some more and some less. My personal viewpoint is that we’re tempted to whine when we have no power in a situation. We also whine when we fundamentally don’t believe we will be successful getting what we want (candy, fun

You can prevent whining to some degree by decreasing expectations when you realize your child is hungry, agitated or tired. Loneliness and boredom also affect your child’s ability to tolerate frustration and disappointment. Be sure you are not over-scheduling your child; include “down time” in your child’s day. In addition, recognize when you are hungry, agitated or tired. Tending to your own needs will help you have the patience to also deal with your whining child.

GIVE NEEDED ATTENTION

Our lives are full of distractions, and most of us have many responsibilities in addition to parenting. Children prefer negative attention rather than no attention. Look for and comment on things your child is doing right. Spend time and just be with your child each day. Turn off your phone and hang out in their world, whether it’s playing with Legos or joining in a game of pretend. You’ll be surprised to find that even 20 minutes one-on-one with your child can make a huge difference in your child’s overall behavior. >> WHINING CHILD continued on Page 11

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<< WHINING CHILD continued from Page 10

IGNORE IF POSSIBLE

Ignore the behaviors you don’t like. You can let them know that their whining is hurting your ears and that you will be happy to listen when their voice sounds like yours (be sure you are not whining when you say this). Most children will initially increase their negative behavior if you choose this method in order to get you to engage, especially if that has worked for them in the past. Stay calm, minimize eye contact and focus on something else. As soon as your child begins to display the behavior you want, positively reinforce the wanted behavior by giving your child your full attention. Be sure to provide sincere sympathy when they express disappointment appropriately. If you are open to negotiating, absolutely do not consider this option while they are still whining.

“DON’T YOU WISH ... ?”

Respond to your whining child’s request with “Don’t you wish… we could eat candy all day long and never feel sick?” or “… socks never felt bunchy?” (Insert relevant wish as needed). This technique can be surprisingly effective. It allows you to side with your child while not giving in to her when you’ve already said “no”.

BUY SOME TIME

Give yourself time to consider your answer. Let your child know you’ll “think about it.”

Be sure to get back to him or her with an answer as soon as possible, especially if he or she is young. If your child continues to whine, let him or her know that begging will ensure a “no.”

LESS IS MORE

Resist long-winded responses, lectures, explanations or moralizing. Consider writing down their request and letting them know that you will think about it. Read back what you wrote and ask your child if you got it right.

GIVE A CHOICE

Giving a choice allows your child to feel they have some power and control. For example, the hour before dinner is frequently a time when children resort to whining. They are often tired and hungry and craving something sweet. Rather than telling them why they can’t have sweets before dinner, try offering a choice: “Do you want a piece of candy after dinner or some apple slices now?” Fall back on ignoring if she continues begging for the sweets “now!” In this case you also can simply state that it sounds to you like she doesn’t want either choice, and then be sure to ignore further whining. Remember, whining is often coupled with a sense of powerlessness.

DON’T

Don’t use sarcasm, belittling or condescending

comments, or name-calling. Resist comparing your child to a sibling or a peer.

DO

And finally, regularly remind yourself to breathe and know in your heart that whining is not an indication of bad character in your child or your own failure as a parent. It’s a phase and it will pass. Who knows? Some day you might even marvel at your child’s persistence and unflagging tenacity in the face of insurmountable odds.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Lisa McSweeney is a child mental health therapist and clinical supervisor for Children and Family Services at Peninsula Behavioral Health. In addition, McSweeney is certified as a Youth Mental Health First Aid instructor. Previous to her work as a therapist, McSweeney was a Family Life Education instructor at Peninsula College, teaching early childhood development to families with children birth to 5 years. McSweeney earned a licensed mental health counselor degree from Argosy University in Seattle and a bachelor’s degree from Western Washington University.

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12  PENINSULA FAMILIES TODAY  January 2018

Nissan NVP 12-PASSENGER

seats 7

Chrysler PACIFICA

Volkswagen ATLAS

(360) 775-3950 • 888-813-8545 101 & Deer Park Rd, Port Angeles • www.wilderauto.com

812029530

WILDER AUTO You Can Count On Us!

seats 12

seats 8

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO PENINSULA DAILY NEWS AND SEQUIM GAZETTE

Profile for Sound Publishing

Special Sections - Peninsula Families Today January 2018  

i20180216114051601.pdf

Special Sections - Peninsula Families Today January 2018  

i20180216114051601.pdf