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Quake: Lessons from Mexico City • 4 DECEMBER 2017 | VOL. 20, NO. 9

Haunted by recession A decade later, what’s better and what isn’t • 6-8 Supplement to The Daily Herald

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2 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2017


DECEMBER 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 3

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Helping small businesses go BIG.

COURTESY OF REID MIDDLETON

A team of engineers from Everett’s Reid Middleton traveled to Mexico City to help with recovery and learn how to prevent damage from future earthquakes. Page 4

COVER STORY Recession 10 years later: ‘We saw too many of our friends and neighbors go bankrupt for it not to affect us,’ 6-8

BUSINESS NEWS Reid Middleton engineers study damage from Mexico City quake. . . 4 Businesses will soon be required to give sick leave. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 How people can turn their land into for-profit campgrounds. . . . . . . . . . . 9 Everett call center key cog for better customer service for Comcast. . . . . 10 Snohomish business owner envisions ‘next-generation signage’. . . . . 11-12

Everett clothing maker uses spaceage fabrics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

BUSINESS BUILDERS James McCusker: Energy, optimism can prevent business failure . . . . . . 14 Tom Hoban: How to prepare for next recession. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Monika Kristofferson: How to clear your mind of clutter. . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 BUSINESS BRIEFS . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 PUBLIC RECORDS . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 BANKRUPTCIES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 BUSINESS LICENSES . . . . . . . 20-21 ECONOMIC DATA . . . . . . . . . 22-23

NEWSROOM

ADVERTISING SALES

Editor: Jim Davis 425-339-3097; jdavis@heraldnet.com; businessnews@heraldnet.com

Sally Cravens 425-374-0758 — Fax 425-339-3054 scravens@soundpublishing.com

Contributing Writers: Jennifer Sasseen, Emily Hamann, Adam Worcester, Brandon Fralic Contributing Columnists: James McCusker, Tom Hoban, Andrew Ballard Publisher Josh O’Connor 425-339-3007 joconnor@soundpublishing.com

COVER PHOTO The former headquarters for Cascade Bank sits empty on a prominent corner in downtown Everett. Andy Bronson / The Herald

SUBSCRIPTIONS 425-339-3200 www.theheraldbusinessjournal.com

Commercial Loans & Lines of Credit Treasury Management | Merchant Services Local Bankers

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4 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2017

Lessons learned from catastrophe Everett’s Reid Middleton engineers traveled to Mexico to help with earthquake, study the damage By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

EVERETT — Kobe in 1995. Wenchuan in 2008. Christchurch in 2010. Dave Swanson rattles off the names and dates like well-remembered lines. The Everett engineer has traveled the globe chasing earthquakes during the past three decades, helping with recovery and learning what he can to minimize damage from future ones. “Failure teaches us a lot about good design,” Swanson said. “So if we see how something breaks and doesn’t perform we can figure out ways to make it perform better. “Our building codes get improvements in them, by and large, because of the investigative work that engineers do and building officials and public officials do after these catastrophes.” Swanson, who works for Reid Middleton in Everett, has mostly crisscrossed the Pacific Ocean on these expeditions, heading to Japan, China, Chile and New Zealand. He also worked on the Nisqually earthquake in the south Puget Sound area and journeyed to Haiti in Dave Swanson 2010. Most recently, he and a team of other engineers traveled to Mexico City for the Sept. 19 earthquake that killed hundreds and injured thousands. At least 40 buildings collapsed and thousands of others Erik Bishop were damaged. He and other engineers lend their expertise and skill volunteering to inspect buildings. That usually includes placing red, yellow and green tags to alert people about the safety of the buildings. “You don’t just want to show up and be a disaster tourist and take a bunch of pictures and then leave,” Swanson said. “That’s not cool. You need to participate in some ways that are meaningful.” In their free time, the engineers travel around the region learning from the damage. Why does one building collapse but another stays upright? Which building designs worked and which failed? What materials proved safe and which proved to be hazardous? These questions can be answered in laboratory tests, but it’s more efficient heading into the field, Swanson said. “A test in the lab at the University of Washington can cost between $20,000 to $150,000,” Swanson said. “If you’re

PHOTO COURTESY OF REID MIDDLETON

Rubble sprawls across a street in Jojutla, a city southwest of Mexico City, after an earthquake struck the region in September. Everett’s Reid Middleton engineers traveled to help with recovery efforts and to learn to prevent damage from future quakes.

Earthquake talk A symposium on lessons learned from the Central Mexico Earthquake is planned for 3:30 p.m. Dec. 7 at the University of Washington HUB-Lyceum. The event is being hosted by UW and the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

PHOTO COURTESY OF REID MIDDLETON

Reid Middleton engineer Darin Aveyard (center left) talks with a Jojutla emergency response team member (center right) while engineers Kenny O’Neill (left), Erik Bishop (foreground) and Oregon State University professor Erica Fisher (right) watch.

witnessing earthquake damage firsthand in another community, you’re literally looking at hundreds, if not thousands, of tests.” Reid Middleton engineer Erik Bishop has traveled to three earthquake sites, the first in Wenchuan, China, in 2008. He was a graduate student at UW at the time, taking classes from Swanson. Witnessing the aftermath helped take his studies from the abstract to the tangible, he said. “It certainly changed how I thought about the building code requirements and how I interact with contractors,” Bishop said. Building codes can seem onerous, especially to those footing the bills, Swanson said. He jokes that the perfect building for an engineer is square with no win-

dows on really good, flat soil. Traveling to a disaster zone reinforces why codes are so stringent. In Mexico City, the team included Swanson, Bishop and six other Reid Middleton engineers, two other Puget Sound-area engineers and an Oregon State University professor. They went in two groups and stayed 12 days. Swanson has paid his own way on some of these trips. On this one, Reid Middleton paid to send its engineers. There were parallels from Mexico City and the Nisqually earthquake in 2001, Bishop said. The earthquakes were of similar magnitude — 6.8 for Nisqually and 7.1 for Mexico City. Both occurred outside of the main population area, but the cities suffered extensive damage. And

Mexico City, built on an ancient lake bed, has soft soil through which earthquake damage can be amplified, much like the soft soil found in this region. There are differences, as well. Mexico City has a confined masonry architectural style that is vulnerable to earthquakes. The U.S. doesn’t have that type of architectural style. Mexico has an early warning system in place; it’s not fully rolled out in the U.S. ShakeAlert is the early alert system designed for the West Coast. It’s being developed by the U.S. Geological Survey with UW, University of California, Berkeley and Caltech, along with several scientists. The system is “in transition between being a researchy test thing and an actual operating system,” said Bill Steele, the Seismology Lab coordinator at UW. Right now, the ShakeAlert system is beginning to send messages to water districts. Water is needed for drinking and fighting fires after disasters, Steele said. Next year, they’d like to send alerts to schools, first responders, transportation QUAKE Continued on Page 8


REPORT REPORT Port of EVERETT

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 5

DECEMBER 2017

CALENDAR CALENDAR

December 2017

REPORT REPORT Port of EVERETT Creating Economic Opportunities

The Schuster Group Secures Bulk Retail at Creating Economic Opportunities the Port's Waterfront Place Development On October 24, the Port Commission authorized the CEO to sign a long-term lease with Waterfront Place Retail, LLC, an entity associated with The Schuster Group, to build restaurants and retail in Fisherman’s Harbor at Waterfront Place. On October 24, the Port Commission The long-term ground includeslease five authorized the CEO to signlease a long-term with Waterfront Place Retail, LLC, an entity parcels tucked between Seiner Drive and the associated The Schuster build Esplanade, with two parcels at theGroup, entry oftoWarestaurants and retail in Fisherman’s Harbor terfront Place, and the Port Gardner Landingat Waterfront Place.location of the historic Weyparcel (previous The long-term ground lease includes five erhaeuser Building). The Schuster Group longparcels tucked between Seiner Drive and the term land lease will bring ofof dollars Esplanade, two parcels at millions the entry Wa- a year in new business to the local economy. terfront Place, and the Port Gardner Landing The(previous Schuster location Group isof a nationally recogparcel the historic Weynized and award-winning developer. Overlongthe erhaeuser Building). The Schuster Group term will bring millions of dollars a years,land the lease company has earned recognition year in new business to the local for their work in restaurant, retail,economy. multiThe Schuster Group is a nationally recogfamily and mixed-use developments. Some nized and award-winning developer. Over the recent well-known mixed-use projects they years, the company has earned recognition have worked on include Mosler Lofts, Joseph for their work in restaurant, retail, multiArnolds Lofts, and Muriel’s Landing. Some family and mixed-use developments. “We’re very excited to be part of this recent well-known mixed-useaprojects they landmark project for the Port of Everett,” have worked on include Mosler Lofts, Joseph President of The Schuster Holly GardArnolds Lofts, and Muriel’sGroup Landing. “We’re very excited to be a part of this ner said. “The Waterfront Place project fits landmark project for the Port of Everett,” within our focus on emerging markets and President of The of Schuster Group Holly most Gardour wheelhouse expertise. Perhaps

WEST MARINE VIEW DRIVE

DRAWING LEGEND

WHARF

DEVELOPMENT PARCEL

ESPLANADE AT FISHERMAN’S HARBOR

3 4

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5

SEINER PIER

6

CLOCKTOWER COURTYARD

7

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8

TIMBERMAN TRAIL

9

CHAMFER WOORNERF

and capital budget for 2018. View Budget Guide @ portofeverett. The Port is happy to com/budget.

SEAPORT

report it recently SEAPORT wrapped up construcThe is happy tion Port on Phase II ofto its report it recently $5.25M terminal rail wrapped up construcproject adding a 3,300 tion on Phase II of its lineal foot rail siding. $5.25M terminal rail project adding a 3,300 lineal foot rail siding.

MARINA

The Port's new Guest Dock 5 project (to be MARINA The Port's new Guest constructed in 2018) Dock 5 project (to be received a $1.44M constructed in 2018) Recreation and Conreceived a $1.44M servation Office (RCO) Recreation and ConBoating Infrastructure servation Office (RCO) Grant from the state. Boating Infrastructure Grant from the state.

2007805

REAL ESTATE

In the fall, ESTATE the Port REAL In the fall, theauthoPort Commission Commission authorized a Purchase and rized a Purchase with and Sale Agreement Sale Agreement with Kimberly-Clark to acquire Kimberly-Clark to acquire 2.2-acres of parking 2.2-acres of parking lot parcels lot parcels along along West West Marine View Marine View Drive. Drive. Commissioners Bruce Fingarson/District Fingarson/District 1 1 Bruce Tom Stiger/District 2 Tom Stiger/District 2 Glen Bachman/District 3 Glen Bachman/District 3

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N-B N-G

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22

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importantly, it aligns with our mission of creating distinctive, sustainable projects of enduring value.” Fisherman’s Harbor, the first phase of the importantly, aligns with our mission of Port’s 65-acreit Waterfront Place development, creating distinctive, sustainable projects of is located on 12 acres adjacent to West Maenduring value.” rineFisherman’s View Drive.Harbor, The project schedule the the first phasefor of the parcels65-acre in Fisherman’s Harbor is set to align Port’s Waterfront Place development, with the residential and hotel developments, is located on 12 acres adjacent to West Mawith View an anticipated opening rine Drive. Thedelivery project and schedule for date the parcels in Fisherman’s Harbor is set to align of mid-to-late 2019. The Schuster Group is acwith residential hotel developments, tivelythe marketing theand development and seeking with an anticipated delivery date high-quality local tenants forand theopening restaurant of mid-to-late 2019. The Schuster Group is acand retail spaces.

JETTY LANDING & BOAT LAUNCH

P15 SURFACE

BOXCAR PARK

N-C

NORTH DOCKS

P11 SURFACE

B9

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GUEST DOCK 7

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N-D

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Commission authorized an $85.7M operating EXECUTIVE and capital budget for On Nov. 14,Budget the Port 2018. View Commission authorized Guide @ portofeverett. an $85.7M operating com/budget.

D6

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View full at Port Onevent Nov.line 14,upthe www.portofeverett.com/holidayonthebay

5

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FREE, Family-Fun from 12 - 5:30 p.m.

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Port of Everett on December 2!

A5

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View full event line up at Kick-off the holidays at the www.portofeverett.com/holidayonthebay

14TH STREET

D7

CRAFTSMAN DISTRICT

FREE, Family-Fun from 12 - 5:30 p.m.

A4

The Schuster Group Secures Bulk Retail at the Port's Waterfront Place Development ROW / PUBLIC PARKING

Kick-off the holidays at the Port of Everett on December 2!

A3

13TH STREET

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BOXCAR PARK

S-C

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CENTRAL GUEST DOCK 4 & FUEL DOCK

S-A

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CENTRAL DOCKS

GUEST DOCK 1

SOUTH DOCKS

ner said. “The Waterfront Place project fits tively marketing the development and seeking within our focus on emerging markets and Port of Everett Commission Appoints Retired Boeing Supply Chain high-quality local tenants for the restaurant our wheelhouse of expertise. Perhaps most and retail spaces. Manager Bruce Fingarson to District 1 Seat

Port of Everett Commission Appoints Retired Boeing Supply Chain On November 1, 2017, could be an asset in growing and stabilizing Manager Bruce Fingarson to District 1the Seat the Port Commission apPort’s Seaport operations. He said he isn’t

On 2017, pointed retired supply chain OnNovember November 1,1,2017, the the Port Commission apmanager Bruce Fingarson Port Commission appointed to pointed retired supply fill the supply vacant District 1chain seat. retired chain manager manager Bruce Fingarson to Fingarson graduated Bruce Fingarson to fill the fill the vacant District 1 seat. from Washingtonvacant State University with a District 1graduated seat. Fingarson Fingarson degree in Business Administration, and spent graduated from Washington State University from Washington State University with a 36-years working in Everett in supplier manwith a degree in Business Administration, and degree in Business Administration, and spent agement for The Boeing Company. spent 36-years working in Everett supplierman36-years working in Everett in in supplier agement for for The Boeing Company. Fingarson said he applied for the appointmanagement The Boeing Company. Fingarson said heapplied applied for appointment becausesaid hehe has always aappointment fondness Fingarson forhad thethe ment because he has always had a fondness for the Port of Everett, particular on the because he has always had a fondness for the Port for the Port oftrade Everett, particular on the While international side the business. of Everett, particular on theof international trade side international trade side of the business. While hethe was at Boeing, hehewas part of theheteam of business. While was at Boeing, was he was at Boeing, he was part of the team that worked to get a direct port of call part the team get aofdirect port of thatof worked tothat get worked a directtoport call for for the 777 airplane program from Japan. With call for the 777 airplane program from Japan. With the 777 airplane program from Japan. With hisvarious variousroles roles at Boeing, he believes believes he his at at Boeing, he believes he could his various roles Boeing, he he

CEO/Executive Director Les Reardanz Reardanz Les

could be an asset in and growing and or stabilizing an advocate for any major policy be an asset in growing stabilizing thestrategic Port’s the Port’s Seaport operations. He said he changes, he believes thehe Port headed inisn’t the Seaport operations. He said isn’tisan advocate for an advocate for any major policy or strategic right direction, and is an active listener to its any major policy or strategic changes, he believes changes, he believes the Port is headed in the constituents, and responsible steward the Port is headed in athe right direction, and isof an right direction, and is an active listener to its the environment and managing Port assets. active listener to its constituents, and a responsible constituents, and a responsible steward of appointment until the next regusteward of the environment and managing Port theHis environment andlasts managing Port assets. lar Port election in 2019, at which time anyassets. His appointment lasts until the next reguone seeking to run for the will have His appointment until the nexttime regular lar Port election in lasts 2019, atposition which anyone seeking to run at for the position will have to stand forinelection for the balance ofseeking the Port election 2019, which time anyone torun stand forterm. election forhave theto balance ofelection the unexpired Thereafter, anyone seeking to for the position will stand for unexpired term. Thereafter, anyone seeking to run for the position will stand for election for the balance of the unexpired term. Thereafter, to run for position will stand election in 2021 forthe theto next 6-year term.for anyone seeking run for the position will stand for in 2021 for the next 6-year term. Theinoffice vacant August 29, election 2021 became for the next 6-yearon term. The office became vacant on August 29, 2017 when former Port Commissioner The officeformer becamePort vacant on August 29,Troy 2017 2017 when Commissioner Troy McClelland resigned after relocating for when former Port Commissioner Troy McClelland McClelland resigned after relocating for a a job job assignment Massachusetts. resigned after in relocating. assignment in Massachusetts.

D AT E @ L E A R N M O R E & S TAY U P TO DAT

WW W W.P W. P O OR R TO TO F W FE EV VE ER RE ET T T.C T.C O OM M S TAY U P D AT E D D A I LY ! S TAY U P DAT E D DA I LY! Follow the Port of Everett on Follow Port of Everett on& Instagram Twitter,the Facebook, YouTube

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6 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2017

COVER STORY

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

The vacant former headquarters for Cascade Bank in downtown Everett. The bank was acquired by Opus Bank during the recession, but Opus moved to a smaller location a block away last year.

Pain lingers decade after recession By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

T

he world was a little less bright, the future a little more bleak. A decade ago, the U.S. slipped into the worst recession in a generation after the collapse of the real estate market. People lost their jobs, their homes, their savings. It led to a wholesale reshuffling of industries across the country and locally. Large national banks and small community ones shut down. Frontier Bank and Cascade Bank in Everett and City Bank in Lynnwood closed their doors, their assets sold to healthier banks. Home builders were hit the hardest. About one in 20 jobs disappeared in most industries in Snohomish County. Construction lost more than one in three jobs in the county. The stock market plummeted and unemployment skyrocketed. At its worse, in early 2011, 43,419 people were on unemployment assistance in Snohomish County — 11.2 percent of the workforce. Since then, the economy has recovered, slowly and haltingly and have finally made up ground. Home prices in the Puget Sound area are higher than before the recession. The stock market is break-

“We saw too many of our friends and neighbors go bankrupt for it not to affect us.” — Mike Pattison, Master Builders Association of King and Snohomish Counties ing records. The unemployment rate is well below 5 percent. Still, the recession haunts many of those who suffered through it. “We’re booming, but we’re doing so looking over our shoulder because the scars of the Great Recession are so profound,” said Mike Pattison, government affairs manager of the Master Builders Association of King and Snohomish Counties. “People are moving forward, but they’re doing so cautiously. We saw too many of our friends and neighbors go bankrupt for it not to affect us.” No matter how better things get, the recession sticks in people’s minds today. “I think it will always be in the back of people’s memories, but I think the economy has been strong and people are more willing to expand and do things they weren’t going to do a few years ago,” said Mark Duffy, president and CEO of Mountain Pacific Bank. “I tell people I

learned a lot in the recession and I hope I never have to use what I learned again.”

More jobs, stagnant wages The recession began in December 2007 and ended in June 2009, according to the National Bureau of Economic Research, a private, nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that tracks recessions and expansions. The number of jobs has increased in Snohomish County. There were 363,731 people employed in the county in September 2007 and there were 424,271 people employed in September, according to the Employment Security Department. But the unemployment rate was lower 10 years ago. It was at 3.5 percent in October 2007; 10 years later, it was at 4.1 percent. While there are more jobs, there also are more people. Snohomish County’s population has grown by more than 100,000 in the past decade, since the

start of the recession — from 689,314 in 2007 to 789,400 this spring, according to Washington Office of Financial Management. While jobs are back, wages have grown slowly. Typical workers in the county have seen their salaries increase just 6.9 percent over the past decade, said Anne Vance-Sherman, the state’s labor regional economist. At the same time, costs have risen. Rents went up 20 percent during the same period, according to the U.S. Census’ American Community Survey. “That’s the squeeze,” Vance-Sherman said. Only the top wage earners have seen substantial wage growth since the recession. In Snohomish County, people in the top 10 percent income bracket have seen their salaries grow 30 percent over the past decade. Salaries for those workers went up from an average $80.54 an hour in 2007 to $104.46 an hour in 2016, according to Employment Security Department. (The 2007 hourly wages are adjusted for inflation.) That’s likely changing right now, said Eric Sprink, president and CEO of Everett-based Coastal Community Bank. Pressure has mounted in the past year to increase wages to retain and attract qualified employees, he said.


COVER STORY

DECEMBER 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 7

Recession by the numbers Unemployment

3.5

Unemployment rate (percent) in Snohomish County in October 2007, just before the recession started.

11.2

The rate (percent) of unemployment at the height of the recession. It stayed there for January and February 2010.

4.1

Unemployment rate (percent) in October this year. It has fallen steadily over the past 10 years, but it’s still higher than a decade ago.

Construction jobs ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Frontier Bank occupied the prominent corner of Hewitt and Colby avenues until it was shut down and its assets sold during the recession. The number of banks headquartered in Snohomish County dropped from 13 to six since the recession.

“I know it hit a lot of our business owners as we talk to them,” Sprink said. “The employee question is one of the biggest questions they’re facing. We talk to our customers about that right now. Can they find employees? What’s it cost to get their employees? How do they keep their employees?” As a whole, Snohomish County was sheltered somewhat from the recession by the growing population but also by a surge in aerospace employment and proximity to Canada. During the height of the recession, the Canadian dollar proved strong compared to the U.S. dollar. And Canadians traveled south to spend money. “The Canadians were great,” said Sprink of Coastal Community. “Their dollar was so strong and the U.S. dollar was so weak that they were coming down here to shop, buy, stay and gamble.” Boeing added thousands of workers during the first years of the recession, many in Everett. In January 2007, the company employed 68,570 workers in Washington, according to the company’s website. The workforce went up to 81,978 in the state by December 2011, or 13,408 additional workers. In the past year, Boeing has shed thousands of jobs. “We’ve got a very large manufacturing industry and aerospace manufacturing was hiring very rapidly,” said regional economist Vance-Sherman.

Industries suffered, thrived The housing industry suffered the most during the recession. In September 2007, the construction industry employed 26,100 in Snohomish County. That dropped to 15,800 by September 2011, or a 39 percent drop. At its lowest point, in January 2012, the construction industry employed only 14,100, but construction work is seasonal and often sees lower employment figures in winter.

“We know eventually a dip will come. When and how bad are the questions.” — Eric Sprink, president and CEO of Coastal Community Bank A decade later, the construction industry still employs less than it did before the recession in Snohomish County. This past September, the industry employed 2,400 fewer employees than 10 years before. It’s not because of lack of work. It’s because so many left construction and didn’t come back, said Pattison of the Master Builders Association. “When it comes to labor, there are definitely many who left the industry and did so permanently,” Pattison said. “It’s one of our biggest challenges — finding construction workers and skilled laborers to fill open positions.” Now, Master Builders are doing outreach to younger workers to get them to enter the industry, which pays well and is rewarding, Pattison said. “There is no question that the recession left an indelible scar, not only on builders and developers but everyone who worked in the industry,” Pattison said. “It made people gun-shy, and I don’t blame them for being gun-shy. Things are better and seem to be pretty stable. It’s safe to get back in the water.” Peter Cattle is a real estate agent who is affiliated with Sterling Johnston Real Estate. He’s worked in the business in the county since 1983. He’s seen ups and downs, but nothing like the recession. “It was like a faucet had been shut off or a light switch had been turned off,” Cattle said. “The typical regular business I would get, which would be repeat or referral business, just dried up.” And it did so for the thousands of real estate agents. Many quit the business. The Northwest Multiple Listing Service

tracks agents in the county. In December 2007, there were 3,867 agents in the county. That fell to 2,568 in December 2012 — a drop of more than a third. Cattle continued as a real estate agent, although he saw his income drop dramatically. The real estate firm he worked with at the time started handling foreclosed properties. “The first foreclosure house where I had to go up and knock on the door, literally the young mother opened the door holding a baby and a toddler was on the floor,” Cattle said. “That was disheartening.” The only bright spot he could find is there was some money available to people to help with moving expenses. One industry that did not suffer was health care. About 26,300 people were employed in the industry in 2007 in Snohomish County. Since then, the county added 7,800 jobs to grow to 34,100. That’s a whopping 30 percent increase in just a decade. (One caveat: The state lumps health care and private school education jobs together. Those numbers primarily are health care jobs, but some are private school workers.) The increase in health care workers in the county tracked what happened nationally, said Bianca Frogner, an associate professor of family medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine. She said health care issues don’t go away during recessions and, if anything, health issues get worse, with more stress and depression. RECESSION Continued on Page 8

26,100

Number of people employed in the construction industry throughout the county before the recession.

14,100

Number of people employed in the construction industry in the county at the lowest point, in January 2012.

23,700

The number of people employed in the county in construction in September this year.

Real estate agents

3,867

Number of licensed real estate agents in the county at the start of the recession.

2,568

Number of real estate agents in the county in 2012. More than 1,000 real estate agents left the industry by five years into the recession.

3,391

Current number of real estate agents in the county. Despite a roaring housing market, the number still lags behind a decade ago. SOURCE: EMPLOYMENT SECURITY DEPARTMENT; NORTHWEST MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE


8 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2017

Hourly wages Hourly have wages Wages been stagnant for all but the top 10 The top 10 percent of Snohomish County wage earners percent incomes in Snohomish County in the last had by far the biggest gain in the last 10 years: 29.7 percent 10 years. Dollars from 2007 adjusted for inflation. $100/hr

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RECESSION Continued from Page 7

The population is also aging and requires more medical care, Frogner said. Most of the new jobs in health care are lower-salaried jobs that require only a high school education.

Hardship to remember The recession dramatically changed the banking landscape. When Mountain Pacific opened in 2006, there were 99 banks headquartered in Washington and now there are 46 — less than half, said Duffy, Mountain Pacific’s president and CEO. There were 13 banks headquartered in the county. Now there are six. He thinks there might be more bank consolidation in the future. With increased regulation and scrutiny and worries from the recession, very few banks have been started in the past 10 years, Duffy said. He said it’s fewer than 10 nationally and might be less than five. Mountain Pacific is one of just two QUAKE Continued from Page 4

agencies such as WDOT, utilities and some major employers, such as Boeing and Amazon. Why not send text alerts to everybody? That many messages would clog telecommunication systems, and people wouldn’t get the messages in time for them to be of help. “We’re working our way down that path, but it’s not there yet,” Steele said. The system is also underfunded. It costs $16 million a year, but the federal government only allocated $10 million this year. That’s a large number, but Steele points out that a massive earthquake could cost hundreds of billions of dollars in damage. An early alert could give time to shut off utilities to prevent damage such as flooding or electrical fires. Swanson said early warning systems save lives. “We saw that in Japan,” he said. “I believe that happened in Mexico City. The investments we’re making at the federal level and state level, I think, are also going to do the same thing in the U.S.” The U.S. is on a good trajectory, making schools, hospitals and military instal-

‘13

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HIGHEST 10% OF WAGE EARNERS THE HERALD

Everett-headquartered banks left. The other is Coastal Community Bank. Coastal’s CEO Sprink said his bank tracks how much business it does in construction, how many dentists it does business with, how many lawyers it does business with and how many restaurants it does business. “As a small business ourselves, we diversified, because we’re trying to be more resilient when the next time comes,” Sprink said. “We carry more capital. We carry more liquidity. We can’t time the market, and we’re not trying to. We know eventually a dip will come. When and how bad are the questions.” The lessons from the recession are worth remembering, Sprink said. “As bad as it is, there’s a silver lining, hopefully,” Sprink said. “For the next 40 years, I pray for our leaders and I pray for our business owners and myself included that there was a lesson there, learn from it.” Jim Davis: 425-339-3097; jdavis@ heraldnet.com; @HBJnews. lations more earthquake resistant, Swanson said. Building codes make modern buildings earthquake resistant, as well. Still, many buildings were constructed before modern seismological standards, Swanson said. “We have a lot of buildings in our communities that appear to be very strong and stout,” Swanson said. “They’re made out of brick and mortar and they’re massive, and you’re, like, ‘Wow that’s a big strong building.’” “But they’re not really that tough if they start to bend, they’ll break, and if they start to break they’ll fall apart. I don’t think our public by and large fully appreciates that like engineering and architecture community does.” The team included: Swanson and Bishop; Reid Middleton engineers David Gonzalez; Nicole Trujillo; Darin Aveyard; Kenny O’Neill; Kevin Galvez; Drew Nielson; and Humberto Caudana, a postdoctoral researcher with UC San Diego; Mark Pierepiekarz, president, MRP Engineering in Newcastle; Brian Knight, president, WRK Engineers, Vancouver, Wash.; and Oregon State University assistant professor Erica Fisher. Jim Davis: 425-339-3097; jdavis@ heraldnet.com; @HBJnews.


DECEMBER 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 9

All workers to receive sick leave in state By Emily Hamann

The Bellingham Business Journal

A new year, a new wage hike. On Jan. 1, the next phase of the Washington minimum wage law goes into effect. Employers will now have to pay workers at least $11.50 per hour, as well as provide paid sick leave. The new minimum wage is a 50-cent increase, relatively small compared to the beginning of 2017, when it shot up from $9.47 to $11. The paid sick leave requirement is new. All workers, full-, part-time and seasonal, will accrue at least one hour of paid leave for every 40 hours worked. It must be paid at their normal hourly wage. Workers can use that paid leave if

they get sick or if they need to care for a sick family member, if their workplace or child’s school or childcare is closed for a health-related reason, or to flee a domestic violence situation. Eric Grimstead, of the Small Business Development Center, has been helping small businesses through the process of implementing this new phase of the law, Initiative 1433, which Washington voters passed in 2016. The center, part of Western Washington University, advises local small businesses. Grimstead has been helping clients break down the numbers for the new changes. “The smartest thing to do is look at the real dollar and cents impact of what

might be the maximum exposure,” Grimstead said. He recommends that businesses build it into their budgets assuming employees will take their maximum sick leave. “Prepare for the worst case scenario,” he said. “And then if it winds up being slightly different than that, then you’re going to be better off.” It’s possible that employees might not use all their sick leave. Grimstead said it’s common that employees don’t use all of their sick days. After calculating how much it could cost, Grimstead said, business owners need to look at where that money is going to come from, whether they can streamline their business somehow or raise prices.

“Paid sick leave and other mandates are beyond the control of the business owner,” Grimstead said. “But there are plenty of things they can do that are within the business operations.” Grimstead said he doesn’t know whether the sick leave will help or hurt business’ bottom line. “The assumption is if people are sick they’re not going to show up for work,” he said. That’s not always true, however. Some workers may not be able to afford any loss in pay, and come in to work even when they’re sick. That could mean a loss in productivity. They might also spread their sickness to the other employees, eventually leading them to lose productivity or take time off as well.

Cashing in on your slice of heaven By Brandon Fralic

For The Herald Business Journal

Finding a place to camp can be frustrating. Public parks fill up quickly during peak season, and many campgrounds book out months in advance. For these reasons — and because she once wasted several hours researching a single place to stay online — Hipcamp founder Alyssa Ravasio launched her own website to make camping easier for everyone. And one of her favorite campsites is in Snohomish County. Think of Hipcamp as the Airbnb of camping. Hosts list their land online, opening up thousands of campsites on private lands nationwide. For campers, this means previously unobtainable access to camping at nature preserves, farms, and ranches. For landowners, it’s an opportunity to list your property on a booking site boasting 3.5 million users — for free. The trend is just beginning to catch on in Snohomish County. Currently, five properties are available countywide, representing a quarter of Hipcamp’s 20 Best Camping Spots Near Seattle. Snohomish County campsites range from lakeside RV-ready properties to more primitive, tent-only camping in the woods. Finding a place to stay is simple. Simply plug “Everett Washington” (or your destination) into the search bar on Hipcamp.com to turn up sites like The Landing at Index. Situated on the Skykomish River, The Landing is Snohomish County’s most popular Hipcamp site with a 100 percent rating based on 60 camper responses. It’s temporarily closed for winter, but will reopen in spring 2018. The Landing owner is David Thompson. “We chose Hipcamp to eliminate the hassle of maintaining a website and dealing with collecting payment,” Thompson explains. That’s the beauty of Hipcamp for hosts. In addition to providing a platform with millions of users, Hipcamp offers landowners everything they need to get started including payment processing, customer support and liability insurance. It’s free to list a property, and Hipcamp

COURTESY OF HIPCAMP

Under the Cedars is one of the private properties that have signed up to lease camping space under the website Hipcamp. Under the Cedars is located northwest of Duvall.

collects a 10 percent commission from bookings. Hosts set their own prices for camping. “My experience in dealing with their staff from the founder on down to the photographers has been great,” Thompson says. Thompson hosted Hipcamp founder Ravasio at The Landing over the summer. Based in San Francisco, Ravasio describes her Snohomish County escape as paradise: “Amidst ferns and pines, your perfect campsite — complete with soft flat spot to pitch your tent, amazing table, and great fire ring and creative log seating — is right on the edge of the Skykomish River. Great swimming, paddle boarding and fishing are right outside your tent.

The privacy is excellent, the stars are bright, and listening to the river as you sleep makes for an unforgettable experience. I can’t wait to go back, hopefully for a whole week this time!” Hipcamp’s mission is to get more people outside. This is how they differ from other sharing economy startups like Airbnb — the focus is exclusively on camping and connecting users with the outdoors. Of course, sharing recreation sites creates a shared responsibility for conserving them. With 60 percent of U.S. land privately owned, Hipcamp is easing some of the pressure on public lands (like state and national parks) by dispersing users onto private campgrounds. It’s a win-win-win: campers benefit from an exclusive, private site. Landown-

ers gain funds to put back into the land. And land sharing benefits the environment by alleviating some of the overcrowding at public campgrounds. So next time you’re considering a camping trip, check Hipcamp for a place to stay. It’s a great way to discover your own little slice of Snohomish County, like Ravasio did at The Landing. “I hear this is a region where people from Seattle tend to whiz by on their way to Eastern Washington,” Alyssa says. “Little do they know they’re driving by the best part! Granite cathedrals and sparkling rivers make Index and this section of the Skykomish an incredible destination.” Interested in hosting? For more information and to sign up, visit http://bit.ly/2zzg3zF.


10 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2017

Dialing up better service for Comcast Everett-based Technician Support Center troubleshoots problems for 10,000 Comcast technicians By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

EVERETT — A Comcast call center in south Everett plays a key role in keeping “Jeopardy!” on in Phoenix, the internet up in San Francisco and home security sensors active in Minneapolis. The telecom giant has dedicated its call center here to working exclusively with 10,000 technicians in the field across a dozen states. The Technician Support Center helps techs with troubleshooting and account questions on the “day of the job” — from the time the techs knock on a customer’s door to the time they leave. “We knew if we make that technician’s day run smoothly and give them a great experience, that’s going to translate right to the customer,” said Jon Fleischmann, senior director of the Technician Support Center. Comcast measures customer satisfaction through what’s called a “net promoter system,” based on how many people would recommend a company to family and friends. “We used to have more customers saying bad things than good things, but now that has shifted,” Fleischmann said. “We have more customers saying good things than bad. And we want to keep on that trend.” The call center at 900 132nd St. SW in Everett took its first call two years ago and has been receiving about 2 million calls or texts from techs a year. It’s received buy-in from the people who are doing the work. Call agent Danielle Flatto worked at the call center before the switch and continues there today. “We have a lot more control with our techs to create a better customer experience,” Flatto said. “It makes me proud to be a Comcaster.” Comcast has two major call centers in Snohomish County — one in Everett and one in Lynnwood. Those centers employ more than 1,300 workers. The centers are part of the Philadelphia-based company’s West division, which includes a dozen mostly, contiguous states that stretch as far east as Texas, Minnesota and Wisconsin. About 9 million Comcast customers are in those states. In the past, call centers throughout the division handled calls from customers and technicians alike. With this move, Comcast plucked support calls from techs and shifted them to Everett. “It’s all about standardization, best practices and processes to get to our best product goal,” Fleischmann said. Everett was selected because the site was about the right size but also because it was the highest-rated call center in the

PHOTO COURTESY OF COMCAST

Comcast call agent Danielle Flatto, who works at the Technician Support Center in Everett, believes that her work makes for a better customer experience. “It makes me proud to be a Comcaster,” she said.

PHOTO COURTESY OF COMCAST

Comcast’s Technician Support Center in south Everett handles calls from a dozen states, including those as far away as Texas and Wisconsin.

West division, Fleischmann said. Comcast kept all of the agents at the center and shifted their jobs. Their pay is about the same. A typical agent receives about nine weeks of training. Only a handful of jobs were added, mostly through transfers, Fleischmann said. They handle all calls from techs working on residential voice, video, data and home security. Call agents also meet weekly to talk about policy changes and new products and tools. Part of the agents’ job is to educate the techs in the field — most are in-house, but some are business partners — on what they can already do. “And that’s really the goal to empower

the techs to not have to call, quite frankly,” Fleischmann said. Most of the calls are about account changes, Flatto said. Many are about troubleshooting problems that techs can’t handle themselves. Call agents have a couple of internal tools, including a web page, to help them diagnose problems. Call agents who notice unusual problems point them out to supervisors. Flatto remembers one error code that techs in the field were seeing one day recently. “Because we were getting that call … and pushing it up the ladder, we got it fixed within 24 hours,” Flatto said. While customer feedback has been

improving, there are still challenges, Fleischmann said. “I would say the biggest challenge is the standardization piece,” he said. “When somebody in Minnesota thinks they have the best practice, but truly, as a division, we decide that California’s the better way … managing through that change as humans is difficult.” Comcast has been making a concerted effort to improve customer experience. The company has narrowed the window for arrival time for technicians to twohours, for instance. Another thing, the company has gone so far as to put the word “customer” on chairs around the office as a constant reminder that the customer is in the room. “I think historically customer experience or customer service has been somewhat of negative out there in the public — that’s where our total focus is right now,” Fleischmann said. “How do we get this awesome customer experience to match our awesome product experience? With that, we’ll have the whole package.” For the past several years, Comcast has seen a drop in cable subscribers but an increase in internet users. “The goal isn’t really to compare ourselves with the Frontiers and the CenturyLinks of the world,” Fleischmann said. “We’re playing in the ballpark of the Apples, Amazons and Googles of the world. “We’re there from a technology standpoint and now you’re looking at things that we’re doing in the customer service space of those companies. Those are our competitors in the future and now.” Jim Davis: 425-339-3097; jdavis@ heraldnet.com; @HBJnews.


DECEMBER 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 11

Rethinking the sign of the future By Jennifer Sasseen For The Herald Business Journal

The owner of a Snohomish sign company is an engineer from the tech industry with big ideas on how to grow his tiny startup. Manifest Sign owner David Green, 57, wants to change the way Americans think about signs with “next-generation signage” more sensitive to the environment. “Why can’t we produce signs that are a little bit smarter, that can sense the environment and self-adjust and do things along that nature?” Green said. He dreams of a research-and-development side of his business that would explore such questions and lead to new technologies, he said. And he’s looking for investors to help him build it. “I think there is a huge world out there that has yet to be tapped,” he said. “And I want to be part of that.” Green said he also wants to create a robotics division at Manifest Sign, to design robots able to perform tasks humans often can’t do, such as the challenge a manufacturer recently put to him. It requires building a prototype of a robot able to coat materials quickly, accurately and repetitively in a reasonable time, with very little to no human interaction. Complications have come up as he’s delved into it. It’s usually between the hours of 3 to 6 a.m., he said, when he spontaneously wakes and ponders solutions. “And I’m not there yet on this first prototype,” he said. “I’ve got most of it, but not all of it. When I get all of it, then I will build it.” In the meantime, he’s working on growing his customer base for his existing sign business. He needs to establish positive cash flow to keep the company solvent. He’s not there yet either, he said, though he’s close to breaking even. He opened Manifest Sign last year, Green said, but only got really serious about operating it

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

David Green, founder and owner of Manifest Sign in Snohomish, wants to develop a research-and-development side of his business to create the “next-generation signage.”

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Small folding signs at

“I think there is a huge world out there that has yet to be tapped. And I want to be part of that.” — David Green, owner of Manifest Signs this past spring. Prior to that, he was busy learning the equipment — including a large printer, cutter and laminator used in sign-making — as well as the basics of running a business. He never intended to be a business owner. Born and raised in Utah, Green said he moved to Silicon Valley for a job after college and met his wife there in 1985. He worked in the

semiconductor industry, he said, before moving up here in 2000 with his wife and four daughters, fleeing the Bay Area’s congestion and high cost of living for Snohomish. Continuing to work in the corporate environment for a semiconductor company in Lynnwood, Green said he fell in love with the beauty of the area when asked to volunteer with the Boy Scouts. In

doing so, he “discovered the hidden treasures of the Puget Sound,” he said, hiking mountains including Mount Pilchuck. After the Lynnwood company, Green transitioned to Microsoft, working on the Xbox and related products for several years. The project ended, however, and Green was out of a job. When someone at the unemployment office suggested he look into owning a franchise, Green dutifully took a class on the topic. A full franchise didn’t appeal to him, he said, but his research led him to consider sign-making. And so he became a business owner. His wife, an elementary school

teacher, came up with the name, Green said, and the two invested their retirement savings in Manifest Sign. He hired someone to help him set up a website, but Green is his company’s only employee at the moment, he said. Much of his business is in subcontracting work out to other companies. Manifest Sign operates under a “contract agreement,” he said, as “part of a family of national sign-makers here throughout the United States. It is not a franchise, but I have access to tools much like you’d have with a franchise.” That enables him to find companies he can trust to handle work in other areas of the country. So when a business in Southern California wanted an “Inciseon” sign, similar in looks to neon but using new LED technology, Green ordered the sign and arranged to have it shipped to an installer. “I’ll never see that sign,” he said. “But we’ll do it and my hope is to develop that enough here with enough interest that we become a distributor, where we actually start making the sign, we start producing the technology here under license agreement.” That’s for some day in the future, he said. In the

here-and-now, jobs that Green has taught himself to do on his own include installing cut-vinyl signs on the sides of vehicles. “I love the look and the feel and the touch of vinyl,” he said. “And when you put it on vehicles. There’s something about placing down vinyl that’s kind of an art. It really is an expression of art.” Sign-making can elicit emotions in customers that Green likens to the process of falling in love. As an example, Green cited Randy Little, of home-remodeler Little’s Construction in Stanwood. Little wanted a particular style and look for his red work truck, Green said. “So we spent a lot of time, quite frankly, in developing that image and creating that artwork,” he said. He was “very excited and happy” with the result, Little said. He’d been wanting signage done in the same font as that on his business cards and billing forms, he said, but could find no one willing to take the time to do that for him. Then he met Green, who completed the signage to his specifications on a trailer he uses for work. So when he bought a new truck, going to Green was “a no-brainer,”he said. Green “went the extra mile” to create the look he wanted, Little said, and he’s since gotten “nothing but compliments” on his truck. “He’s real passionate about what he’s trying to create for people,” Little said of Green. “He’s a stickler. And he’s a pretty good artist.” Happy customers are important to him, Green said, which is why he won’t do any jobs he doesn’t feel capable of doing, or that he feels won’t turn out the way people envision. “I mean, part of the art, I guess of anything, is to try to figure out what your customer wants,” he said. “And you get certain vibes, like I think this person probably wants something that’s beyond either my SIGNS Continued on Page 12


12 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2017

Clothing company keeps your dog cool Everett business uses space-age fabrics to regulate temperatures of pets, people By Adam Worcester

For The Herald Business Journal

Everett’s Zentek Clothing Company arose from a near-death experience. Several years ago, Janice Kajanoff almost lost her pet bulldog, Butchie, to heat exhaustion. So when she learned of a space-age fabric that can control body temperature, her first thought was “Oh my God. Dogs!” The fabric warms or cools its wearers via sewn-in phase-change materials, substances that store and release energy. Developed by NASA to protect astronauts, phase-change materials play a key role in the construction, refrigeration, HVAC, textiles and electronics industries. They are used, for example, to control the temperature of drug shipments to hospitals and to keep homes at comfortable temperatures. But Kajanoff had a different vision. The former professional clothing designer devised a process that integrates phasechange materials into a growing line of clothing products — for both canines and humans. She began with dog vests, for which she patented a design, then added mats and a cooling canine quick wrap. Now there are vests for people, as well as bedding, shoe insoles and blankets. “We started it kind of innocently. You can kind of say we tested it on dogs,” Kajanoff said. “We knew they needed it.” Taking a page from Nike’s marketing book, Kajanoff targeted the four-legged superstars of agility trials, professional discus, fly ball, dog shows, and searchand-rescue missions to be her advertising models. She soon realized her creations had broader applications. One night at a restaurant, Kajanoff fell into conversation with Adrian Laprise, a retired military engineer and mine operator, who would become her chief operating officer. Laprise urged her to expand into the medical and emergency management fields. “When those women died in Florida, I was extremely upset,” Laprise said, referring to eight residents of a nursing home who perished from overheating in September when the home’s air conditioning failed. “If they had one of our vests or blankets, they’d be alive today.” At a November dog show, Laprise sold a vest to a Monroe woman with multiple SIGNS Continued from Page 11

capacity or knowledge to do. Let’s refer that. And I don’t have any qualms about doing that.” Signage in the future needs to include more eco-friendly products, Green said. He has visions of a printer that could print directly onto surfaces and eliminate the

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Teddy, an English bulldog, models Zentek Clothing’s heat regulating dog jacket. The company, which moved from Seattle last year, space-age fabrics to regulate temperatures for pets and people.

sclerosis. Since the vest moderates body temperature, he explained, it will lessen her chances of having tremors. Phase-change materials essentially regulate heartbeat, Kajanoff said. Zentek products can warm and cool wearers in temperatures ranging from -30 to 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Zentek is angling to negotiate contracts with FEMA and other government agencies. It has also sold vests to Boeing

employees at Paine Field, who work in humid summer temperatures at the top of hangars, and has a few small wholesale accounts. Eventually, it might branch into retailing. Kajanoff, a widower who grew up in Okanagan and majored in clothing design at the University of Washington, started Zentek with private funding. In the company’s first year, 2007, it had revenues of $13,000. For 2018, Kajanoff is targeting

$1.5 million to $2 million. She moved the operation — herself, Laprise and eight contract sewers — from Seattle last year when Colleen Wyllis, founder of Emerald City Textiles, offered 1,000 square feet in her Everett warehouse. Zentek is currently hiring in-house sewers. “It’s inspiring what she’s come up with, and how hard she works,” said Wyllis, a dog lover who does volunteer search and rescue. “She’s really pretty brilliant.” Kajanoff, who has a new dog named Teddy Bear, imports phase-change fabric from Europe, adding insulation and waterproof fabric to fashion various Zentek products. She’s developing new vests for hunting, fishing, and rowing, and experimenting with different materials such as Gore Tex and Mylar. Meanwhile, she and Laprise rigorously travel the U.S. dog-show circuit to market their products. “I don’t believe in retirement. My hands are always busy,” Kajanoff said. “I live from passion. I have always been lucky enough to do my passion. “My husband died 12 years ago. When your partner dies, you realize you’re mortal. You ask, when you’re on your deathbed, will you be sorry you didn’t do this? “My answer was yes.”

need for the vinyls used in sign-making, so much of which ends up in the landfill. In the meantime, he’s encouraged that Hewlett Packard has developed ink-recycling programs and seems to be getting even more serious about sustainability. He called it as an “organic movement” for commercial signage products. Hewlett Packard is now working on a program

where participants can become certified to use company materials, he said. When they’re done with the materials, Hewlett Packard will dispose of them. “It’s not just putting it in the landfill,” Green said. “They actually grind it up and reconfigure the material so it can be used.” As for Manifest Sign, it’s poised to grow

in any number of ways, he said, depending on where a breakthrough occurs. “I really want Manifest to be known nationally, as not just a consumer of a product,” Green said, “but actually a manufacturer of materials and products that help create the right signs, if you will. Or new sign concepts that we perhaps have not seen yet.”

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Adrian Laprise (left), COO of Zentek Clothing, cuts clothing as Janice Kajanoff, CEO of Zentek Clothing, looks on at the company’s headquarters in Everett.


DECEMBER 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 13

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14 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2017

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Optimism of Churchill, Elon Musk

A

new movie, “The Dark Years,” depicts Winston Churchill during the perilous times he faced in 1940 when he first became prime minister. The country he then led faced a Nazi war machine that controlled almost all of Europe and was intent on invading England. Churchill, who was unpopular with the king as well as many in his own party, commanded a defeated, nearly non-existent army, a royal navy fully occupied with a German (U-boat) force that threatened to starve the British Isles of food and supplies, and a total absence of powerful allies. All that stood between Britain and its future as Hitler’s vassal state was a pitifully small number of planes and pilots. If ever an individual had a right to feel all alone and beset with problems, it was Churchill. And yet his energy, optimism, and relentless good cheer carried the day. Tesla Corp. is not England, and its CEO, Elon Musk, is not Churchill. But they both have something in common … and we can learn something from it. Some people seem to flourish under pressure. Adversity seems to bring out their best qualities so that instead of being worn down or crushed by setbacks they stiffen their resolve. Equally important, their energy and confidence are contagious and would allow a country or a business to succeed when all the signs point to failure. Tesla faces a serious problem. There is no doubt that Musk has innovative

ideas that capture the imagination of consumers and investors alike. The problem he faces, though, is in delivering the finished product and collecting the James cash that these ideas McCusker promised. The current estimate for Business production output of the company’s 101 Model 3 sedan, is a small fraction of what was originally forecast. The problem this creates is that Tesla’s business model is built on a diversity of products, from rockets to cars, and operations in markets at home and abroad. The plan includes production of a chain of successive products so that the profits from the first would finance the second, and so on. The production problems are creating a problem because there are no profits from the sale of the cars to finance anything. Tesla continues to spend large amounts of cash, domestically and for its commitment to the market for electric cars in China. The result is a cash flow problem of significant proportions — in other words the company would run dry in the near future unless something changes. The obvious solution would be to go to the market for more funds. Tesla’s production problems have received a lot

When things start to go terribly wrong, we have to remember that our demeanor, even our expressions, are factors in our success or failure. of publicity, though, and that probably has reduced somewhat the appeal of the company to investors. A setback is never an ideal time to take a stock or bond issue to the financial markets. CEO Musk’s response has been a combination of energy, honesty, and optimism. The production problems of the Model 3 sedan have been disclosed and discussed freely. His latest media announcements, though, have concentrated on achievements — such as bringing in the world’s biggest lithium ion battery backup system for 30,000 homes in Australia—and new product ideas such as the electric semitruck for long distance freight hauling. What can we learn from Winston Churchill and Elon Musk? The first lesson is from both men: when things start to go terribly wrong, we have to remember that our demeanor, even our expressions, are factors in our success or failure. If we go around moping, blaming ourselves or others — it doesn’t matter which — investors, creditors, suppliers, and even our own team will believe that it is a hopeless situation and start looking for the nearest exit. If we are honest about the situation and yet are energetic, cheerful, and opti-

mistic, our team will pull together and the company’s confidence will often win the day. The second lesson we can learn is from Tesla alone and it has two parts. The first is that that cash flow shortfalls are an inherent by-product of growth. The second is that managing cash flow is a critical factor in a business’s success. The simplest explanation of the relationship between cash flow and growth can often be found in your own business’s income statement. Start down the list of variable cost expenses — those that vary with sales volume. Most will have to be paid before you collect the money for your goods or services delivered. The simple fact is that growth devours cash and if you don’t manage that element of your business, healthy growth could leave you unable to pay all your bills. We can be neither Winston Churchill nor Elon Musk. And we shouldn’t really try to imitate them. But we can learn a few lessons from their leadership. It couldn’t hurt. James McCusker is a Bothell economist, educator and consultant. He writes a column for the monthly Herald Business Journal.

Be prepared for the downturn to come E

ric Sprink is not your typical bank president, so it was no surprise that Coastal Community Bank’s annual Fall Economic Forecast event was atypical in both content and style. Normally such forecasts are delivered by professional economists. Sprink, who has been the bank’s president through a remarkable decade of growth, believes that business owners prefer a different approach. “We are not economists, we are business owners. If we get it wrong, we lose money and potentially our business,” he said to a room full of customers and business owners as he delivered the bank’s forecast himself. “Economists can be wrong and they keep their jobs. We can’t.” Sprink’s forecast for Snohomish County is a mix of optimism and caution. At a time when consumer and business confidence are high, he urges some restraint. “Do not forget about the most recent recession, learn the lessons from it. History can be one of our greatest teachers,” he said, adding, “We very well may lack

the imagination of what might cause the next recession, so you need to be prepared.” The real estate market is hitting new highs again and that is causing Sprink and others some pause. That last time the gap between wages and the cost of housing was this wide was 2007 and we all know what Tom happened after that. Hoban Sprink’s forecast suggests business Realty owners keep investing in the future Markets “but hold enough cash to get through a down cycle if one comes our way.” In a style uniquely his own, Sprink asked the audience to participate at his forecast events, polling them in small groups to identify what they think might trigger the next recession. Answers varied from a change in Fed

“We are not economists, we are business owners. If we get it wrong, we lose money and potentially our business.”

— Eric Sprink, CEO of Coastal Community Bank policy linked to the appointment of a new Fed Chair to military action overseas. Sprink suggests that it really doesn’t matter what triggers the next recession — his advice to business owners is to be prepared for one regardless. “Don’t try to time the market, make sure your business plan is resilient for ups and the downs.” A healthy real estate market should see prices rise about 3 percent per year on average, on pace with average wage growth. After the re-setting of the market in 2008-09, real estate values have been increasing well above that level and prices now far surpass their highs from a decade ago while wages remain largely flat outside of the urban core of Seattle/Bellevue.

No one wants to have a repeat of the recession, but it’s also not healthy for the community to have the cost of housing out pace incomes by so much. Business owners and real estate investors ought to pay close attention to tax reform as a result. If wages get a boost from tax reform and can catch up a bit with housing costs, the real estate market will likely hold up while supply tries to catch up to demand. Without tax reform, wages can’t keep supporting the increasing prices and an adjustment is likely to follow. Tom Hoban is CEO of The Coast Group of Companies. Contact him at 425-339-3638, or tomhoban@coastmgt.com or visit www. coastmgt.com. Twitter: @Tom_P_Hoban.


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16 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2017

BUSINESS BUILDERS

The best ways to unclutter your brain “Clutter is not just physical stuff. It’s old ideas, toxic relationships and bad habits. Clutter is anything that does not support your better self.” — Eleanor Brownn, public speaker and educator

you to redo tasks which will take even more time. Another bad habit is focusing on low-value activities to avoid work we don’t want to do. This is really just a tactic to postpone the inevitable. I’ve found this is a natural human condition. Strengthen your good habits. Never stop learning new ones by reading books and listening to experts speak on this topic. Let’s look for the positive and look at four solutions to help you deal with brain clutter. Keep a notepad handy: If you’re in the middle of working on something and you have an idea pop into your head or you remember something you’re supposed to do, just jot it down on paper. This will allow your brain to relax knowing nothing will be forgotten. Make sure you’re only using one notepad for ideas and to do’s so you don’t have scraps of paper and Sticky Notes all over your office causing visual clutter. Create an idea-capturing net: Many business professionals are pretty creative and find that new ideas for anything from marketing to collaborations pop into their heads. But we can’t let future ideas and projects take precedence over what’s in front of us. When I have an idea for something I want to work on I record it in a yearly planner. I can plug it in to work on later

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that day, the next day or the next week. The point is I keep working on what I have in front of myself first. Untangle ideas in your brain: If you have a lot of ideas jumbled in your brain bouncing off of each other, learn how to mind map to get them out of your head and make it easier to record and separate them. When I write an article or column, I put a big circle in the middle of a piece of paper and write the topic in the middle of the circle. Then I make spokes off of the circle and write ideas for the content on the spokes along with details to add to the article. Creating order can put your mind at ease once again. Create a dump list: Simply get ideas onto a piece of paper as a brain dump. Just let it all flow out and onto the paper without a lot of thought. Once you see the list, you can then analyze each item to prioritize, delegate tasks or even cross things off of the list. Create systems that you can depend on so brain clutter can be tamed and you have a constructive way to deal with the creative ideas that come to you when you least expect them. Monika Kristofferson is a professional organizer and productivity consultant who owns Efficient Organization NW in Lake Stevens. Reach her at 425-220-8905 or monika@efficientorganizationnw.com.

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lutter can appear in many different forms. When we’re distracted by brain clutter, it can affect our productivity which can, in turn, affect our business and personal goals. Have you ever experienced any of the following road blocks? Physical Clutter: Being surrounded by piles of paper, stacks of files and old paperwork can be distracting and make it hard to focus on the tasks you have in front of you. The solution is to invest the time, money and energy that it takes to get rid of the old stuff, keep the current stuff, save the resources and reference materials and create clearly labeled systems. Old Ideas: Having a lot of ideas for your business is always a good thing. If you’re holding on to thoughts and projects that didn’t pan out, you could be holding yourself back from exploring new ideas. Don’t feel guilty about letting something go that sounded good at one point or something that you tried that didn’t work out.

Toxic Relationships: Relationships aren’t perfect and we all experience ups and downs in both our personal and professional lives. If you have an issue with someone and you’re feeling stressed, worried, anxious or angry, a great deal of your focus and energy may go toward mulling over Monika conversations and Kristofferson feelings. You may also Office experience situations where people Efficiency take too much of your time and energy with their issues and needs. If it becomes a problem on a regular basis, you may be forced to evaluate whether to end the relationship, distance yourself, be direct about your own needs and create boundaries. Bad Habits: We may fall into habits that seemed to make sense when we first started doing them. Multitasking, for instance, sounds good. But there’s been research that proves this isn’t an effective way to work. We can’t actually do two tasks at the same time. Trying to do too much can lead to mistakes and forcing

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DECEMBER 2017

BUSINESS BRIEFS EVERETT — Nominate young professionals to be recognized with the Emerging Leaders award. The annual contest seeks to recognize and celebrate people who are doing good at their profession or in the community. Deadline to nominate is Jan. 7. To make a nomination, visit www.heraldnet.com/ emergingleaders.

PORT OF EVERETT SHIPPING SCHEDULE

nizations in developing leaders and organizational performance.

Ship port calls 2017 YTD: 81

MARYSVILLE — A developer has plans to build a 121,000-squarefoot Lowes Home Improvement store on the southeast side of town. Zoke Group has filed an application to build the store on about 16 acres at the northwest corner of Highway 9 and Soper Hill Road.

Dec. 12: Swire, Siangtan

EVERETT — Manor Hardware has broken ground for a 13,000 square-foot warehouse and retail showroom near Everett Station and Pacific Ave. in Everett. Located at 3310 McDougall Ave., the new store more than doubles the space of the company’s current Rucker Avenue location, which opened in 1990.

EVERETT — Last month, the Port of Everett Commission adopted an $85.7 million 2018 operating and capital budget. It’s designed to support the Port’s strategic initiatives such as modernization and

Ship port calls 2016: 85 Barge port calls 2016: 57 Dec. 3: Naodan/Formark, Xing Ning Hai Dec. 5: ECL, Cosmic Ace Dec. 7: Westwood, Westwood Olympia Dec. 12: Westwood, Balsa Dec. 16: ECL, Asian Naga Dec. 19: Westwood, Westwood Rainier Dec. 26: Westwood, Bardu Dec. 28: ECL, Asian Naga Source: Port of Everett the Waterfront Place Central Development. Details can be found at www.portofeverett.com/your-port/ financial-information. EVERETT — The Everett Clinic received the Washington State Medical Association’s highest award for patient safety in the category of excellence for their chronic opioid therapy work. The number of clinical staff adhering to safe opioid best practices guidelines has increased more than 45 percent year-to-date. EVERETT — Snohomish Health District’s Board of Health members Donna Wright and Kurt Hilt have been recognized by Gov. Jay Inslee and the Washington State Board of Health. Wright, a

long-time Marysville city councilmember and Board of Health member, was recognized for her nine years of dedicated and outstanding service. Hilt, a city councilmember in Lake Stevens, founded the Disaster Medicine Project, an initiative that prepares health care providers and facilities for emergencies. SNOHOMISH — Bill Cooper, president of The Cooper Management Institute in Snohomish, has been named to the National Small Business Association Leadership Council. Cooper is a retired chief of police, a former senior manager in two Fortune 200 corporations, and a university professor. He started The Cooper Management Institute to assist orga-

MUKILTEO — Last month, the Institute of Flight in Mukilteo was presented with a Brewer award from the Washington State Civil Air Patrol. The award is given annually for significant contributions to aerospace education. Since 2007, the Institute of Flight has conducted many education programs, camps, workshops and tours to help the next generation ignite their passion for the future of aerospace. MONROE — For the second year, Monroe-headquartered Canyon Creek Cabinet Co. is continuing its tradition of donating assorted hardwood and plywood cut-offs to Emerald Heights Retirement Community’s Wooden Toys for Charity group located in Redmond. The wood pieces are crafted into toys by the community residents and then are donated to local charities and shelters.

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LYNNWOOD — How to lead through change will be the focus of the annual Pacific Northwest Aerospace Alliance conference in Lynnwood. The conference is planned from Feb. 12-15 at the Lynnwood Convention Center. Register at http:// bit.ly/2iYKow6. For more information, go to www. pnaa.net/events/annual-conference/2018-conference or email events@ pnaa.net for more information.

Barge port calls 2017 YTD: 39

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 17

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18 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2017

PUBLIC RECORDS Bankruptcy filings The following Snohomish County businesses or individuals filed business-related bankruptcies with U.S. Bankruptcy Court for Western District of Washington from Oct. 1-31. 17-14789-MLB: Chapter 7, Rhonda L. Foster; attorney for debtor: Thomas D. Neeleman; filed: Oct. 31; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual

Snohomish County tax liens Tax liens are gathered from online public records filed with the Snohomish County Auditor’s Office. These federal and state liens were filed between Oct. 1-31.

Federal tax liens 201710040209: Oct. 4; Bauer, Lynn Dee, 17611 83rd Drive NE, Arlington 201710040210: Oct. 4; Johnson, Lisa M., 23307 65th Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace 201710040211: Oct. 4; Krasucki Paul P., 23307 65th Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace 201710040212: Oct. 4; Franklin, Nancy L., 20821 Jordan Road, Arlington 201710040213: Oct. 4; Sweeney, Deborah L., 102 181st St. SW, Bothell 201710040214: Oct. 4; Phillips, Megan E., 3210 96th Place SE, Everett 201710040215: Oct. 4; Alpine Plumbing Services Inc., PO Box 538, Stanwood 201710040216: Oct. 4; Fixed-Up Maintenance, 15609 26th Ave. NW, Stanwood 201710040217: Oct. 4; Watson, James M. Jr., 918 Cleveland Ave., Snonomish 201710040218: Oct. 4; Hatch, Anthony, 8209 Marine Drive, Tulalip 201710040219: Oct. 4; City Builders Inc., PO Box 5128, Lynnwood 201710040220: Oct. 4; Amigo Stanwood Inc., 6996 265th St. NW, Suite 101, Stanwood 201710040221: Oct. 4; Crosson Trucking Inc., 4405 S Machias Road, Snohomish 201710110106: Oct. 11; Giggling Childcare, 1327 112th St. SE, Suite 1, Everett 201710110107: Oct. 11; Crosson, Shellie J., 4405 S Machias Road, Snohomish 201710110108: Oct. 11; Chaput, Kathryn L., 28822 160th St. SE, Monroe 201710110119: Oct. 11; Hernandez, Rebecca L., 6110 64th St. NE, Apt J-205, Marysville 201710110120: Oct. 11; Varghese, Celine, 1921 33rd St., Everett 201710110121: Oct. 11; Varghese, Joseph, 1921 33rd St., Everett 201710110122: Oct. 11; Paquette, Ronald, 1919 152nd St. SW, Lynnwood 201710110123: Oct. 11; Pazhampassery, Joy, 4817 Wilmington Ave., Everett 201710110124: Oct. 11; Halmsteiner, Christie A., 4310 116th Street NE, Apt. A, Marysville 201710110125: Oct. 11; Myers, Emily E., 22529 73rd Place W, Edmonds 201710110126: Oct. 11; Foy, David Todd, 1701 First St., Snohomish 201710110127: Oct. 11; Anderson, Richard B. Jr., 7423 204th St. SW, Lynnwood 201710110128: Oct. 11; Hact Construction Corp., 13410 Highway 99, Suite 201, Everett 201710110129: Oct. 11; Hac Maintenance, 13410 Highway 99, Everett 201710110130: Oct. 11; Singleton, Daylynne, 3229 134th St. SE, Mill Creek 201710110131: Oct. 11; Brisbin, Annette M, 20714 Lake Riley Road, Arlington 201710110132: Oct. 11; Brisbin, Jerry M., 20714 Lake Riley Road, Arlington 201710120129: Oct. 12; Home Inspirations, 1502 Hewitt Ave., Everett

201710120130: Oct. 12; Bravata, 15117 Main St. Suite B104, Mill Creek 201710120131: Oct. 12; Jones, Ann Marie, 18117 42nd Place W, Lynnwood 201710120132: Oct. 12; Stewart, Elizabeth A., 9910 Marine View Drive, Mukilteo 201710120133: Oct. 12; Alaska Cascade Financial Services Inc., 2005 SW 356th St., Federal Way 201710120134: Oct. 12; Alaska Cascade Financial Services Inc., 2005 SW 356th St., Federal Way 201710120135: Oct. 12; Alaska Cascade Financial Services Inc., 2005 SW 356th St., Federal Way 201710120136: Oct. 12; Anderson, Darcie A., 22321 36th Ave. SE, Bothell 201710170292: Oct. 17; McLaughlin, Sean P., 4823 100th Place SW, Mukilteo 201710170293: Oct. 17; Brisbin, Annette M., 20714 Lake Riley Road, Arlington 201710170294: Oct. 17; Rogers, Paul, 1000 Harborview Lane, Everett 201710170295: Oct. 17; McIlrath, Carla K., 8611 Vistarama Ave., Everett 201710170296: Oct. 17; Fitchitt, Paul D., 405 169th St. SE, Bothell 201710170297: Oct. 17; Goetz, Paul D., 15415 35th Ave. W, Apt E203, Lynnwood 201710170298: Oct. 17; Randall, Rodney L., 5510 S Second Ave., Everett 201710170299: Oct. 17; Raptis, Nikolaos, 9100 Olympic View Drive, Edmonds 201710170300: Oct. 17; Raptis, Paula, 9100 Olympic View Drive, Edmonds 201710170301: Oct. 17; Batten, Suzanne M., 4007 Sunnyside Blvd., Marysville 201710170302: Oct. 17; Dennis, Susan E., 10800 Treosti Road, Snohomish 201710250231: Oct. 25; Scotsman Bistro, 11601 Harbour Pointe Blvd. Suite 101, Mukilteo 201710250232: Oct. 25; American Drywall, 12308 Mukilteo Speedway, Suite 5, Mukilteo 201710250233: Oct. 25; Edwards, Antonio, 14228B Beverly Park Road, Edmonds 201710250234: Oct. 25; Solumntech Inc., 7213 54th Place NE, Marysville 201710250235: Oct. 25; Tompkins, Richard L., 23427 12th Place W, Bothell 201710250236: Oct. 25; Tuss, Michael A., 6404 Highland Drive, Apt. B, Everett 201710250237: Oct. 25; Hollinger, Gretchen W., 3015 185th Place NE, Arlington 201710250238: Oct. 25; Fletcher, Jefferson, 22206 32nd Ave. SE, Bothell 201710250256: Oct. 25; Buckardt, Elmer J, PO Box 1142, Stanwood 201710250257: Oct. 25; Buckardt, Elmer J., PO Box 1142, Stanwood 201710250258: Oct. 25; Buckardt, Elmer J., PO Box 1142, Stanwood 201710250259: Oct. 25; McAllister, Deana M., 12031 Seventh Place SE, Lake Stevens 201710250260: Oct. 25; Jansen, Shari, 8915 188th St. SW, Edmonds 201710250261: Oct. 25; Purple Haze Collective, 4218 Rucker Ave., Everett 201710250262: Oct. 25; MNO Corporation, PO Box 246, Sultan 201710250263: Oct. 25; Buckardt, Elmer J., PO Box 1142, Stanwood 201710310360: Oct. 31; Dreewes, Christopher A., 27325 Florence Acres Road, Monroe 201710310361: Oct. 31; Neuman, Linda, 3405 172nd No. 5-392, Arlington 201710310362: Oct. 31; Lomakin, Lyudmila V., 8203 74th Place NE, Marysville 201710310363: Oct. 31; Brashear, Sheila R., PO Box 880, Everett 201710310364: Oct. 31; Reis, Kim S., 4201 Mission Beach Road, Tulalip 201710310365: Oct. 31; Cho, Sandy P., 3310 160th Place SE, Mill Creek 201710310370: Oct. 31; Nelson, E. Shelley, 24130 95th Place W, Edmonds 201710310371: Oct. 31; Lomakin, Piotr, 8203 74th Place NE, Marysville 201710310372: Oct. 31; Grounds Professionals Inc., 4804 84th St. SW, Mukilteo

201710310373: Oct. 31; NexGenMD Health Inc., 15712 Mill Creek Blvd., Suite 6, Mill Creek 201710310374: Oct. 31; Jackson, Kathi, 2731 Wetmore Ave., Suite 240, Everett 201710310375: Oct. 31; Seattle Asbestos Environmental, 13802 Chain Lake Road, Monroe 201710310376: Oct. 31; Monet Painting Of Washington Inc., 196th St. SW, Suite B, PMB 244, Lynnwood 201710310377: Oct. 31; Birkeland, John M., 125 164th St. SE, Bothell 201710310378: Oct. 31; Nickel Creek Construction Inc., 526 N West Ave., PMB 14, Arlington

Employment security liens 201710090392: Oct. 9; US Enterprises Inc., State of Washington (Department of) 201710200418: Oct. 20; K&T We Do Dirt, State of Washington (Department of)

Partial release of federal tax liens 201710130298: Oct. 13; Paul, Darin and Michelle, PO Box 118, Snohomish

Release of federal tax liens 201710040222: Oct. 4; Deangelis, Kevin J. (Estate of), 19409 Seventh Ave. SE, Bothell 201710040223: Oct. 4; Guaymas Lynnwood Dox Inc., 3805 196th St. SW, Lynnwood 201710040224: Oct. 4; Orr, Sarah, 8102 76th Place NE, Marysville 201710040225: Oct. 4; Millcreek Adult Family Home Inc., 16000 75th Place W, Edmonds 201710040226: Oct. 4; Orr, Sarah, 8102 76th Place NE, Marysville 201710040227: Oct. 4; Brossard, Jeffrey B., 17607 84th Ave. NE, Arlington 201710040228: Oct. 4; Brossard, Jeffrey B., 17607 84th Ave. NE, Arlington 201710040229: Oct. 4; Macomber, Chad R., 1102 122nd Ave. NE, Lake Stevens 201710040230: Oct. 4; Elliott, Nancy L., 14212 N Creek Drive, Apt. 2112, Mill Creek 201710110133: Oct. 11; Brossard, Lisa N., 17607 84th Ave. NE, Arlington 201710110134: Oct. 11; Jenkins, Mathew D., 120 W Casino Road, Apt. 30-D, Everett 201710110135: Oct. 11; Top Secret Paint & Coatings, 18935 59th Ave. NE, Arlington 201710110136: Oct. 11; Shea Edwards Furniture, 32615 Cascade View Drive, Suite A-1, Sultan 201710110137: Oct. 11; Schiffner, Jan, 11713 51st Drive SE, Everett 201710110138: Oct. 11; Bumb, Milita, PO Box 14815, Mill Creek 201710110139: Oct. 11; Braaten, Dale S. Jr., 16610-48th Ave. W, F-102, Lynnwood 201710110140: Oct. 11; Ramirez, Maria R., 13532 25th Ave. W, Lynnwood 201710110141: Oct. 11; Sure You Can, 8010 212th St. SW, Edmonds 201710110142: Oct. 11; Hayes Roofing Enterprises Inc., PO Box 3633, Everett 201710110143: Oct. 11; Dickey, Debbie L., 618 19th St., Snohomish 201710170303: Oct. 17; Jacola, Jaye, 1823 Highway 530, Arlington 201710170304: Oct. 17; Lake, Kent, PO Box 1236, Lake Stevens 201710170305: Oct. 17; Sieb, Donald J. and Donna A., 8124 209th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201710170306: Oct. 17; Alf, Lee W., 418 82nd Ave. SE, Everett 201710170307: Oct. 17; Severson, Terry A., 4817 182nd Place SW, Lynnwood 201710170308: Oct. 17; Cavins, Jeffrey M., 11029 Totem Pole Lane, Woodway 201710170309: Oct. 17; Sieb, Donna A.,

4914 139th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201710250239: Oct. 25; Haywood, Gerald R. II, 31603 Swede Heaven Road, Arlington 201710250240: Oct. 25; Spectrum Services Inc., 2720 Rucker Ave., Suite 101, Everett 201710250241: Oct. 25; Jones, Shelley K., 7213 289th Place NW, Stanwood 201710250242: Oct. 25; Quintet Mortgage, 19031 33rd Ave. W, Suite 211, Lynnwood 201710250243: Oct. 25; Graver, Wendi, 415 Ave. G, Snohomish 201710250244: Oct. 25; Jarjour, Antoine, 13817 NE, 40th St., Bellevue 201710250245: Oct. 25; Sterling, Angela, PO Box 1498, Kenmore 201710250246: Oct. 25; Murray, Michael and Tiffany D., 2003 73rd St. SE, Everett 201710250247: Oct. 25; Dahl, Michael T., 6219 NE, 202nd St., Kenmore 201710250248: Oct. 25; Calderon, Augustina D., 4430 58th Drive NE, Marysville 201710250249: Oct. 25; Barrier Fire & Security, 17607 84th Ave. NE, Arlington 201710250250: Oct. 25; Barrier Fire & Security, 17607 84th Ave. NE, Arlington 201710250251: Oct. 25; Harris, Gregory S., 4528 142nd Place SE, Snohomish 201710250252: Oct. 25; Jones, Mickey, 3911 Friday Ave., Everett 201710250253: Oct. 25; Korzynek, Mirjana M., PO Box 610, Manson 201710250264: Oct. 25; Perry, Lori E, 6823 126th St. NW, Marysville 201710250265: Oct. 25; Hall, Crystal J., 15485 Heintz Ave. SE, Monroe 201710250266: Oct. 25; Engels, John D., PO Box 33, Silvana 201710250267: Oct. 25; Perry, Lori E., 6823 126th St. NW, Marysville 201710250268: Oct. 25; Martinez-Doroteo, Rodrigo, 17 112th St. SW, Everett 201710270578: Oct. 27; Bluff, John J., Po Box 2331 McCall, Idaho 201710310366: Oct. 31; Josephson, Noma J., 14500 Admiralty Way, Apt. H106, Lynnwood 201710310367: Oct. 31; Thayer, Donna J., 5729 60th Drive NE, Marysville 201710310379: Oct. 31; Yourist, Harry R., 20202 Highway 99, Lynnwood 201710310380: Oct. 31; Yourist, Harry R., 20202 Highway 99, Lynnwood 201710310381: Oct. 31; Maude’s Happy Adult Family Home Inc., 916 93rd St. SE, Everett 201710310382: Oct. 31; Worldwind Helicopters Inc., 17804 48th Drive NE, Suite A, Arlington 201710310383: Oct. 31; Highland Texaco, 20202 Highway 99, Lynnwood 201710310384: Oct. 31; John H. Chun, 1225 183rd St. SE, Apt B204 Bothell 201710310385: Oct. 31; Wick, Michelle, 105 185th Place SW, Bothell 201710310386: Oct. 31; Stuart B. Lervick Company, Po Box 1299, Stanwood 201710310387: Oct. 31; Kratovil, David A., 7012 74th Drive NE, Marysville 201710310388: Oct. 31; Herrera, Jose M., 11702 Seventh Ave. SE, Everett

Satisfaction of employment security lien 201710200419: Oct. 20; G&S Greenery, State Of Washington (Dept Of)

Withdrawal of federal tax liens 201710120137: Oct. 12; Gallegos, Jessica L., 8823 47th Drive NE, Marysville 201710170310: Oct. 17; Mercado, Joseph Homer C., 7909 212th St. SW, Unit 1 Edmonds 201710310389: Oct. 31; Lewis Jennifer R, 7019 Lake Ballinger Way Edmonds 201710310390: Oct. 31; Lewis Jennifer R, 7019 Lake Ballinger Way Edmonds


DECEMBER 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 19

Snohomish County Employers

20,500 287,000 businesses

2

workers

By Employee Size share of employment

1

share of businesses

7.7%

0-4

66.6%

5-19

16.2%

29.4%

500+

9.0%

total jobs

Tulalip

3,200

29%

2,950

Top 10 Employers

Everett

Lake Stevens

Snohomish County Monroe

home to these corporations and brands fujifilm sonosite • philips healthcare • premera blue cross

6

Sultan

Lynnwood Edmonds snohomish county government

9

10

2,617 walmart 8 locations

2,312

Source: WA Employment Security Department

cascade coffee • electric mirror • funko • fortive

washington state government

includes colleges and Monroe Correctional Complex.

Marysville

goods-producing

Agriculture & Fishing 1% Fabricated Metal 5% Computer and Electronic 6% Other Manufacturing 12% Const., Mining & Logging 26% Aerospace 50%

5

Arlington

24% Trade, Transport, Utilities 20% Government 17% Education & Health Services 13% Leisure & Hospitality 13% Prof. & Business Services 5% Financial Services 5% Other Services 3% Information

287,000

2,987

Darrington

By Industry

serviceproviding

naval station everett

the tulalip tribes

Stanwood

0.2%

71%

3

34,500

100-499 1.4%

19.3%

4,775

the boeing company

22.8%

20-99

27.4%

4

providence regional medical center

the everett clinic

2,255

rick steve’s europe • SEATTLE GENETICS • zumiez

8 premera blue cross

2,600

7 edmonds school district

2,605

Snohomish County capitalizes on HQ2 RFP By: Patrick Pierce

OUR MISSION Economic Alliance Snohomish County exists to be a catalyst for economic vitality resulting in stronger communities, increased job creation, expanded educational opportunities, and improved infrastructure.

advocate • develop • connect (P) 425.743.4567 • info@economicalliancesc.org 808 134th St SW, Suite 101 • Everett, WA 98204 economicalliancesc.org

The dust has settled after the flurry caused by Amazon’s Second Headquarters (HQ2) search; amongst the 238 proposals was the Puget Sound Regional Proposal. Economic Alliance Snohomish County (EASC) partnered with counties, cities, educational institutions, and Tribes to showcase Snohomish County’s numerous assets. You may be thinking why bother? EASC recently conducted hundreds of interviews and surveys from business owners and community leaders. Two reoccurring themes emerged: continue to diversify our economy and promote our county’s growing number of assets. Capturing a share of the booming tech economy exploding in the region was not lost on anyone as both a means and ends to these goals. HQ2 provided an opportunity to promote our assets and exceptional sites in regional and national media, including a broadcast from the Arlington-Marysville Manufacturing Industrial Center, one of the largest

industrial properties in the entire region. Snohomish County is respected for its forthcoming commercial air service at Paine Field, the strength of our college and university system, over multi-billion road and transit investments, the relative affordability of our region, and our natural beauty. Our county continues to have strong aerospace and medical device industries, with over 36 and 12 times the national average of jobs, respectively. These industries make Snohomish County the center of innovation and help attract new industries (tech companies) which diversify our industry base and help our businesses compete globally. Submitting a proposal for HQ2 allowed us to highlight key sites for not only Amazon but other tech companies and leverage our assets. Yes HQ2 may be a long shot, but if we don’t “play” the game, we will never win. 2005294


20 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

PLEASE NOTE: Business license information is obtained monthly from the Washington Secretary of State’s Office through the paid commercial services of InfoUSA. For the complete list, please go online to www. theherald businessjournal. com.

Arlington Doll House Luxury Hair: 4526 195th St. NE, Arlington WA 98223-4755; Salons Ethertide Studio: 524 N Olympic Ave., No. 459, Arlington WA 98223-0618 Garnik Services: 6804 188th St. NE, Arlington WA 98223-8908 Holly’s Happy Houses: 101 Stanwood Bryant Road, Arlington WA 98223-5525 J&B Farms Family: 15328 Highway 530 NE, Arlington WA 98223-5358; Farms LCB Properties: 3324 199th St. NE, Arlington WA 98223-4256; Real Estate No Worries At All House: 2310 Freestad Road, Arlington WA 98223-5420 NW Social Chameleon: 8315 172nd Place NE, Arlington WA 98223-9844 R&R Products: 17410 73rd Ave. NE, Arlington WA 98223-8192; General Merchandise Rabourn’s Home Maintenance: PO Box 462, Arlington WA 98223-0462; Home Improvements Revgen Assets: Sean Gallagher 18815 42nd Drive N, Arlington WA 98223 Seven Lakes Custom Homes: 1630 200th St. NE, Arlington WA 98223-9646; Home Builders Smokey Point Laundry Services: 3131 Smokey Point Drive, No. 10, Arlington WA 98223-7706; Laundries Stilly Valley Farm: 31201 Boulder Creek Drive, Arlington WA 98223-9246; Farms Terra Vista NW: 3204 Smokey Point Drive, Arlington WA 98223-8476; 360-691-9256 Toy Storage: 8920 84th St. NE, Arlington WA 98223-7587

Edmonds Allied Studio Group: 8605 242nd St. SW, Edmonds WA

DECEMBER 2017

98026-9042 Ash & Oak Consulting Services: 614 Sixth Ave. N No. 36, Edmonds WA 980203057; Consultants FFECL Games: PO Box 965, Edmonds WA 980200965; Games and Game Supplies Flores Towing: 20720 80th Ave. W, Edmonds WA 980266707; Wrecker Service Gretchen’s Place: 14326 55th Ave. W, Edmonds WA 98026-3856 INCA Renovation & Design: 9606 241st Place SW, Edmonds WA 98020-6511; Contractors J Filbrun Home Services: 20102 83rd Ave. W, Edmonds WA 98026-6727 Jessica England, ARNP: 6123 139th Place SW, Edmonds WA 98026-3311; Nurses-Practitioners Jom Press: 8418 240th St. SW No. A303, Edmonds WA 98026-9148; Publishers (Manufacturers) King County Renew: 9606 Wharf St., Edmonds WA 98020-2362 Littles Navigator: 901 12th Ave. N, Edmonds WA 98020-2936; Navigation Consultants Lularoe Ashley Rogers: 7215 213th Place SW No. A307, Edmonds WA 980267741; Clothing-Retail Mt Sports Performance: 8504 215th St. SW, Edmonds WA 98026-7319 Mining Colo: 7907 212th St. SW No. 102, Edmonds WA 98026-7571; Mining Companies OMI Hardwood Flooring: 9525 Firdale Ave. No. 4, Edmonds WA 98020-6525; Hardwood Flooring Plant Match: 130 Second Ave. N No. 1761, Edmonds WA 98020-2123 Sora Son CPA: 8127 212th St. SW No. 3, Edmonds WA 98026-7467; Accountants Rich’s Travel Services: 520 Pine St. No. 201, Edmonds WA 98020-4077; Travel Agencies Seble Tesfay Nursing Services: 6529 141st St. SW, Edmonds WA 98026-3515; Nurses and Nurses’ Registries New Era Entertainment: 5428 158th Place SW, Edmonds WA 98026-4743; Entertainment Bureaus

Transmissions of Marysville European • Japanese • Domestic One Day Service/Rebuilds in Stock 36 mo. Unlimited Mileage. Warranty Available Free Local Towing w/Major Repair www.edstransmissions.com

2007803

(360) 653-1835 10226 State Ave. Marysville

BUSINESS BUILDERS Everett 130 Soap Co: 4007 112th St. SE, Everett WA 98208-7769; Soaps and Detergents-Manufacturers Alex’s Yard Services: 252 Elm St. No. A, Everett WA 98203-1920; Lawn-Grounds Maintenance AA Cafe: 607 SE Everett Mall Way No. J, Everett WA 98208-3265; 425-374-8493; Restaurants A Better Me Consulting Services: 318 107th St. SW No. A, Everett WA 982047039; Consultants APJ & Associates Primerica: 9505 19th Ave. SE, Everett WA 98208-3853; 425225-6908; Insurance Adrian Landscaping: 120 W Casino Road, No. 15e, Everett WA 98204-1745; Landscape Contractors Artisticreativevolution: 1318 37th St. No. 3338, Everett WA 98201-4688 Aurora Entertainment: PO Box 4106, Everett WA 982040011; Entertainment Bureaus Bout It Bout It Entertainment: 701 75th St. SE No. 622, Everett WA 98203-5654; Entertainment Bureaus Classical Guitarist-Paul: 1610 37th St., Everett WA 98201-4903 Cludia’s Cleaning: 5711 Cady Road No. B, Everett WA 98203-3730; Janitor Service Daniel’s Auto Body: 2 W Casino Road No. C62, Everett WA 98204-7632; Automobile Body-Repairing and Painting Demello-Wells Prints: 4612 View Drive, Everett WA 98203-2430; Printers (Manufacturers) Fantastic Fashions: 11908 9th Ave. W, Everett WA 98204-5672; Clothing-Retail Fig Leaf Properties: 312 50th St. SW, Everett WA 98203-3148; Real Estate Management Hannah Nelson Beauty: 4901 Colby Ave., Everett WA 98203-3338; Beauty Salons Hatalski Stone & Construction: 10133 Meridian Ave., Everett WA 98208-3942; Stone-Retail Heights Courier & Delivery Co.: 1809 Oakes Ave., Everett WA 98201-2336; Courier Services JB1 Contracting: 2720 Hoyt Ave. No. 100-123, Everett WA 98201-2903; Contractors JDL Pro Construction: 10115 Holly Drive No. U101, Everett WA 98204-8729; Construction Companies Just Sushi: 5129 Evergreen Way No. 106, Everett WA 98203-2869; Restaurants Lil Lissa’s Cleaning Services: 2103 Gibson Road, Everett WA 98204-5528; Janitor Service Love Painting: 5120 Colby Ave. No. 2, Everett WA 98203-3345; Painters Integrated Automation Services: 2221 St.ate St., Everett WA 98201-2640; Automation Consultants JM Brothers Construction: 12526 Meridian Ave. S No. 11, Everett WA 98208-5755; Construction Companies

Made With Love Catering: 4935 Ocean Ave., Everett WA 98203-1351; Caterers Market In Motion: 14812 54th Ave. SE, Everett WA 98208-8951; Marketing Mayas Cleaning Services: 805 112th St. SE No. E301, Everett WA 98208-5097; Janitor Service Brunes Boutique: 10220 Third Ave. SE No. 1326, Everett WA 98208-8203; Boutique Items-Retail Bundle & Bounce Photography: 13106 30th Ave. SE, Everett WA 98208-6100; Photography Butler Home Improvement: 133 124th St. SE No. B201, Everett WA 982085781; Home Improvements Cafe Wylde: 2918 Hoyt Ave. No. 101, Everett WA 98201-4251; 425-374-3877; Restaurants ONK Maintenance: 7930 E Glen Drive No. B, Everett WA 98203-6328; Maintenance Contractors Oliverius Software Solutions: 2518 97th Place SE, Everett WA 98208-2928; Computer Software PSI Construction: 803 108th Place SE, Everett WA 98208-4074; Construction Companies Performance Electric: 3900 Smith Ave., Everett WA 98201-4550; 425-374-2244; Electric Contractors Platinume: 1021 120th St. SW No. 1, Everett WA 98204-5628 Pro Helping Hand: 2531 96th Place SE, Everett WA 98208-2925 Prozapas Construction: 10433 19th Ave. SE, Everett WA 98208-4261; Construction Companies Quota Share Leasing: 4824 Harbor Lane, Everett WA 98203-1508; Leasing Service SUV Construction: 801 75th St. SE No. 413, Everett WA 98203-5670; Construction Companies Sam’s Auto Services: 9330 35th Ave. SE, Everett WA 98208-3036; Automobile Repairing and Service Silvia’s Cleaning: 11030 Evergreen Way No. D121, Everett WA 98204-6645; Janitor Service Sky Construction: 8600 18th Ave. W No. D306, Everett WA 98204-4967; Construction Companies Sparkle Cleaning: 12605 E Gibson Road No. 83, Everett WA 98204-8601; Janitor Service Spotlight View Real Estate: 6208 First Drive SE, Everett WA 98203-3450; Real Estate Survival Market: 3107 York Road No. B, Everett WA 98204-5404; Survival Products and Supplies Telecom Back Office: 1427 100th St. SW No. 125, Everett WA 98204-1105; Telecommunications Services V Star Landscaping: 1925 73rd St. SE, Everett WA 98203-6833; Landscape Contractors Victoria’s Landscaping: 120 SE Everett Mall Way No. 2, Everett WA 98208-3204; Landscape Contractors

Vin+Roo: 8703 Eastview Ave., Everett WA 98208-3519 Vintage Costumers: 2101 Colby Ave., Everett WA 98201-2825; 425-512-0280

Gold Bar Bella Luna Mosaics & Garden Art: 222 17th St., Gold Bar WA 98251-9193; Mosaics (Wholesale) Kendrick Handcrafted Benches: 17126 415th Ave. SE, Gold Bar WA 982519590; Benches-Seating (Manufacturers) Timber Monster Brewing Co.: 41805 168th St. SE, Gold Bar WA 98251-9293; Brewers (Manufacturers)

Granite Falls Green Pastures Landscaping: 213 Portage Ave., Granite Falls WA 98252-8772; Landscape Contractors Loco Fruit Cravings: 213 Tompkins Place, Granite Falls WA 98252-8717; Fruits and Vegetables and Produce-Retail Monte Cristo Espresso: 22929 35th Place NE, Granite Falls WA 98252-4203; Coffee Shops

Lake Stevens Budget Remodeling: 1508 107th Ave. SE, Lake Stevens WA 98258-2059; Remodeling Come Take It Coffee: 9201 15th St. NE, Lake Stevens WA 98258-8505; Coffee Shops Creator’s Cooperative: 215 87th Ave. SE, Lake Stevens WA 98258-3300; Cooperatives Gallagher Painting: 8016 Third St. NE, Lake Stevens WA 98258-3196; Painters Healing Views: 7805 Fir Tree Lane, Lake Stevens WA 98258-9616; Holistic Practitioners Honeybee Housecleaning: 11024 20th St. NE, Lake Stevens WA 98258-8456; House Cleaning K Max Wellness: 1714 88th Ave. NE, Lake Stevens WA 98258-2463; Wellness Programs Living Tree Search: 11722 24th St. SE, Lake Stevens WA 98258-7308; Genealogists Maddox Fence & Rail: 7726 Fourth St. SE, Lake Stevens WA 98258-3133; Fence (Wholesale) Northwest Tile Experts: 20 95th Ave. SE, Lake Stevens WA 98258-3972; Contractors-Tile Ortega’s House Cleaning: 7916 14th St. SE, Lake Stevens WA 98258-7322; House Cleaning Posy Expressions Floral Design: 3505 Catherine Drive, Lake Stevens WA 98258-8071; Florists-Retail Skyline Vinyl & Sign: 326 96th Drive SE, Lake Stevens WA 98258-3955; Vinyl-Dealers Touch Point Consulting: 8705 First Place NE No. A, Lake Stevens WA 982587363; Consultants Upcycle Vinyl: 1511 117th Drive SE, Lake Stevens WA 98258-9436; Vinyl-Dealers

Lynnwood 1st Silverwood Senior Care Home: 2406 207th Place SW, Lynnwood WA 98036-7854; Home Health Service ADP Building Maintenance: 16626 Sixth Ave. W, Lynnwood WA 98037-8834; Building Maintenance AN Professional Services: 16520 Larch Way No. Aa307, Lynnwood WA 98037-8189 Accurate Home Inspections: 3003 204th St. SW, Lynnwood WA 98036-6950; Real Estate Inspection Annemarie’s Cakes: 4708 147th Place SW, Lynnwood WA 98087-1860; Bakers-Retail Bab Sarang Restaurant: 20832 66th Ave. W No. C204, Lynnwood WA 98036-7321; Restaurants Best Coast Contractors: 15319 Ash Way No. A1, Lynnwood WA 98087-8797; General Contractors CBGD Supply: 4422 Shelby Road, Lynnwood WA 98087-1837; General Merchandise-Retail Cardena’s Handyman Services: 14014 Admiralty Way No. 4b, Lynnwood WA 980875635; Handyman Services Castle Auto Sales: 20515 Highway 99, Lynnwood WA 98036-7590; 425-670-0999; Automobile Dealers-Used Cars D&R Painting: 18331 52nd Ave. W No. 145, Lynnwood WA 98037-4426; Painters D Interpreting: 3504 204th St. SW No. D101, Lynnwood WA 98036-9323; Translators and Interpreters Datascience9: 3229 169th St. SW, Lynnwood WA 980373200; Business Ferenzi Pizza: 16418 69th Ave. W, Lynnwood WA 98037; Pizza Fridenmaker Painting: 5613 169th Place SW, Lynnwood WA 98037-2850; Painters Great Herd Enterprises: 19804 24th Ave. W, Lynnwood WA 98036-6902 Gyro FEO: 20431 68th Ave. W Apt D301, Lynnwood WA 98036-7424; Restaurants Hairitage Salon: 16715 52nd Ave. W No. W, Lynnwood WA 98037-3081; Beauty Salons Handyman DBE: 1820 199th Place SW, Lynnwood WA 98036-7058; Handyman Services Harmony Place Bothell Adult: 16708 55th Place W, Lynnwood WA 98037-3097 Intensegrity Massage: 18604 52nd Ave. W No. D204, Lynnwood WA 980374568; Massage Therapists LTW Construction: 1425 161st St. SW, Lynnwood WA 98087-6500; Construction Companies Laandres Catering & Sweets: 6037 208th St. SW No. D4, Lynnwood WA 98036-7546; Caterers Lenscrafters: 18700 Alderwood Mall Pkwy, Lynnwood WA 98037-8005; 425-6405957; Optical Goods-Retail Madison Way Apartments: 14615 Madison Way, Lynnwood WA 98087-6007; 425-361-1337; Apartments


BUSINESS BUILDERS Maple Landscaping: 6208 202nd St. SW No. 35, Lynnwood WA 98036-6022; Landscape Contractors Mathnasium Of Woodinville: 19602 12th Ave. W, Lynnwood WA 98036-7173 Mellow Elements: 1026 182nd Place SW, Lynnwood WA 98037-4928 MOD: 4215 198th St. SW No. 104, Lynnwood WA 98036-6738 Meyer PID: 632 142nd St. SW, Lynnwood WA 98087-6442 Mona Media: 15001 35th Ave. W No. 16-206, Lynnwood WA 98087-2392 NW Paving & Asphalt: 18005 44th Ave. W, Lynnwood WA 98037-4651; Paving Contractors On The Spot: 2125 196th St. SW, Lynnwood WA 98036-7029 PNW Accounting: 328 198th St. SW, Lynnwood WA 98036-4308; Accounting Pena USA Tile: 16520 Larch Way No. Z311, Lynnwood WA 98037-8136; Tile-Ceramic-Contractors and Dealers Riena’s Cleaning: 6511 208th St. SW No. H2, Lynnwood WA 98036-7464; Janitor Service Rose Massage: 4707 167th St. SW, Lynnwood WA 980374547; Massage Therapists SNM Construction: 2026 147th Place SW, Lynnwood WA 98087-5932; Construction Companies Sanda Wholesale: 15615 Highway 99, Lynnwood WA 98087-1423; 425-678-8960; Wholesalers Seattle Queens Cleaning: 15907 Ash Way No. B504, Lynnwood WA 98087-5178; Janitor Service Shey Edwards Enterprises Inc.: 19800 44th Ave. W No. W, Lynnwood WA 980366739; 425-744-9944 Solvis Automation: 16825 48th Ave. W No. W, Lynnwood WA 98037-6401; 425-582-0067; Automation Consultants Star Restaurant: 18514 Highway 99 No. E, Lynnwood WA 98037-4549; Restaurants Sunwest Adult Family Home: 20503 25th Ave. W, Lynnwood WA 98036-7853; Homes-Adult Talarico Properties: 705 200th Place SW, Lynnwood WA 98036-5257; Real Estate Management Tattoo Artist: 16611 20th Ave. W, Lynnwood WA 98037-5303; Tattooing Thai Dragon: 3301 184th St. SW No. 200, Lynnwood WA 98037-8021; Restaurants Tony’s Painting: 3716 204th St. SW No. N104, Lynnwood WA 98036-9358; Painters WJC Commercial Services: 14714 Admiralty Way No. A313, Lynnwood WA 98087-4870 Wedding Incubator: 20325 21st Place W, Lynnwood WA 98036-7084; Wedding Supplies-Services Workforce Snohomish: 18009 Highway 99, Lynnwood WA 98037-4499; 425-245-7548 Y&Y Enterprise: 417

203rd St. SW, Lynnwood WA 98036-7585 Yellow Cab: 19120 68th Place W, Lynnwood WA 98036-5007; Taxicabs

Marysville 1st Choice Senior Care Adult: 9332 64th Ave. NE, Marysville WA 98270-2885; Day Care Centers-Adult A&D Handyman Services: 17500 25th Ave. NE No. B101, Marysville WA 982714755; Handyman Services A Plus Northwest Services: PO Box 956, Marysville WA 98270-0956; Clean Cut Lawn Care: 7510 59th Drive NE No. B, Marysville WA 982703940; Lawn and Grounds Maintenance Columbia Importation Services: 14219 Smokey Point Blvd. No. 16b, Marysville WA 98271-8906; DHOT Transport: 6110 64th St. NE No. L202, Marysville WA 98270-4897; Trucking Elucida Business Solutions: 5118 80th Ave. NE, Marysville WA 98270-6875; Business Frank Marine Services: 10125 62nd Drive NE, Marysville WA 98270-6611; Towing-Marine Kiss My Lashes: 4323 94th Place NE, Marysville WA 98270-2242; Eyelashes-Artificial Line & Grade Construction: 7122 63rd Place NE, Marysville WA 98270-8938; Construction Companies Loveocean: 14905 45th Ave. NE, Marysville WA 98271-8966 Madd Hatter Painting: 5816 74th St. NE No. A, Marysville WA 98270-3926; Painters Marysville Maid: 5907 57th Drive NE, Marysville WA 98270-9032; Maid and Butler Service G’s Residential Glass: 10727 58th Drive NE, Marysville WA 98270-6616; GlassAuto Plate and Window Huaqiang: 10013 Shoultes Road No. A, Marysville WA 98270-2394 Inclign: 8618 60th Drive NE, Marysville WA 98270-3322 Neighborhood Painting: 5720 60th Drive NE, Marysville WA 98270-9603; Painters Paragon Commercial Cleaning: 6731 114th Place NW No. A, Marysville WA 98271-9379; Janitor Service Perfect Day Projects: 7232 35th Place NE, Marysville WA 98270-7001 Shield Contracting: 17503 25th Ave. NE No. M204, Marysville WA 98271-4840; Contractors Stems Flower Co: 3409 64th Drive NE, Marysville WA 98270-7576; Florists-Retail Sweets By Z: 7014 67th St. NE, Marysville WA 98270-7775; Candy and Confectionery-Retail

Mill Creek CRD Onsite: 15008 29th Drive SE, Mill Creek WA 98012-5816

Chase Fireworks: PO Box 13473, Mill Creek WA 980821473; Fireworks (Wholesale) Custom & Modern Siding: 2620 132nd St. SE No. 2, Mill Creek WA 98012-5618; Siding Contractors Hermanson Consulting: 2116 139th Place SE, Mill Creek WA 98012-5556; Consultants Johnson Group Northwest: 15716b Country Club Drive No. B, Mill Creek WA 98012-1203 SK Painting & Restoration: 229 159th St. SE, Mill Creek WA 98012-6333; Painters Serenitea: 14616 36th Ave. SE, Mill Creek WA 98012-4277 Tamara L Hawkins Hair Design: 16926 Marmount St. SE, Monroe WA 98272-2629; Beauty Salons Trackwest: 14751 N Kelsey St. No. 105-255, Monroe WA 98272-1457

Monroe CCD: 15035 175th Ave. SE, Monroe WA 98272-2717 Calford & Oak: 13116 Bald Mountain Road SE, Monroe WA 98272-2827 Clementine’s Costuming: 18007 154th St. SE, Monroe WA 98272-1701 DK Eseller: PO Box 12, Monroe WA 98272-0012; E-Commerce Image Exterior Cleaning: 505 W Main St. No. B, Monroe WA 98272-1832; Cleaning Services-Industrial Jazmin’s House Cleaning: 13801 Chain Lake Road, Monroe WA 98272-7700; House Cleaning Maram Construction: 11614 227th Ave. SE, Monroe WA 98272-7789; Construction Companies Mt Baker Mobile Massage: 17062 Sawyer St. SE, Monroe WA 98272-2611; Massage Therapists Pawn Fathers: 19002 Lenton Place SE, Monroe WA 98272-1353; 360-805-5149; Pawnbrokers Raindrops & Moonlight: 16051 Lakeview Ave. SE, Monroe WA 98272-2854 Sky Valley Health-Weight Loss: 328 W Main St., Monroe WA 98272-1812; Weight Control Services Wecraft Workshops: 14120 Brook Lane SE, Monroe WA 98272-7264 Woodward Renovations-Custom Homes: 311 S Lewis St., Monroe WA 982722320; Contractors

Elite Window Covering: 4501 217th St. SW No. C, Mountlake Terrace WA 980436425; Window Dealers Suburban Herbal+: 24000 49th Place W, Mountlake Terrace WA 98043-5604 TU Interprete Latina: 5603 220th St. SW No. 2, Mountlake Terrace WA 98043-3173

Mukilteo Friends-Family Window Cleaning: 5400 Harbour Pointe Blvd. No. 102, Mukilteo WA 98275-5141; Window Cleaning Jenn’s Exquisite Designs: 11108 Chennault Beach Road No. 923, Mukilteo WA 98275-4901 Strategic Focused Solutions: 12172 Wilmington Way, Mukilteo WA 98275-6019 Tire Valet Services: 4463 Russell Road, Mukilteo WA 98275-5445; Valet Service Truth Bitpull Consulting: 13000 Beverly Park Road No. A, Mukilteo WA 98275-5852; Consultants

Snohomish Aleta Wellness Counseling: 7331 156th St. SE, Snohomish WA 98296-8711; Counseling Services All Tools Construction: 35 LincoLane Ave., Snohomish WA 98290-3015; Construction Companies Amazon Exteriors: 2120 Bickford Ave., Snohomish WA 98290-1705

DECEMBER 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 21

Beauty Bar Salon & Spa: 1116 Second St. No. 8, Snohomish WA 98290-2922; Beauty Salons Bobi’s Banana Bread: 10605 196th St. SE, Snohomish WA 98296-8166; Bakers-Retail Bruce Property Group: 8008 149th St. SE, Snohomish WA 98296-7706; Real Estate Management C Bailey Regulatory: 20218 127th Ave SE, Snohomish WA 98296-5441 El Tamarindo: 13201 Elliott Road, No. 30, Snohomish WA 98296-8159 Fluff Lash & Brow: 19720 27th St. SE, Snohomish WA 98290-7619; Miscellaneous Personal Gladys’s Delivery Services: 1208 First St. No. 17, Snohomish WA 98290-2737; Delivery Service J Pettos Workshop: 1429 Ave. D, No. 258, Snohomish WA 98290-1742 KANE Encaustic: 3504 161st Ave. NE, Snohomish WA 98290-4576 Leave It To Us: 324 Ave. J, No. 12, Snohomish WA 98290-2663 Pilchuck Solutions: 1001 Russell Road, Snohomish WA 98290-5644 Plants A LA Cart: 23232 E Echo Lake Road, Snohomish WA 98296-6813; Plants-Retail R&R Equipment: 1605 Holly Vista Drive, Snohomish WA 98290-1911 R Wayne Industries: 20531 129th Ave. SE, Snohomish

WA 98296-5485 Realty With Racheal: 1311 SW Lake Roesiger Road, Snohomish WA 98290-7511; Real Estate Management Salon L’Rue: 13914 228th St. SE, Snohomish WA 982963912; Beauty Salons Shay’s Sweet Treats: 228 S Tulloch Road, Snohomish WA 98290-7572; Candy and Confectionery-Retail Suchikuchi Leather Arts: 10032 214th Place SE, Snohomish WA 98296-4928; Leather Clothing-Retail

Stanwood All Heart Travel: 7121 289th Place NW, Stanwood WA 98292-8408; Travel Agencies and Bureaus Bayernmoor Nursery: PO Box 741, Stanwood WA 98292-0741 Efficient Plumbing & Heating: 28801 80th Ave. NW, Stanwood WA 98292-7415; Plumbing Contractors Grassland Farms: 2305 Norman Road, Stanwood WA 98292-9225; Farms SW Strand Welding: 18205 Clarence Ave., Stanwood WA 98292-6734; Welding Sims Cleaning Services: 3230 159th Place NW, Stanwood WA 98292-6038; Janitor Service Windshields Etc.: PO Box 772, Stanwood WA 982920772; Glass-Auto Plate and Window and Etc

Mountlake Terrace BAT Magic: 21507 48th Ave. W No. J103, Mountlake Terrace WA 98043-5945 Busy Bee Stationery: 23001 Lakeview Drive No. 106, Mountlake Terrace WA 98043-2360; Stationers-Retail Coast Garden & Lawn Care: 6305 St. Albion Way No. M303, Mountlake Terrace WA 98043-2275; Lawn and Grounds Maintenance Cyndi’s Ecommerce Design: 4514 221st Place SW, Mountlake Terrace WA 980435982; E-Commerce

1990646


22 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2017

SNOHOMISH COUNTY ECONOMIC DATA Pending sales, residential real estate

Closed sales, residential real estate

Unemployment rate, percent

Continued unemployment claims

Aerospace employment

Construction employment

Professional services employment

Local sales tax distributions, Snohomish County and incorporated cities

Consumer price index, King and Snohomish counties

10/15

1,503

1,178

4.5

5,109

43,400

20,400

25,100

$10,854,566

250.831

11/15

1,307

973

5.0

5,748

43,500

20,100

24,900

$11,503,562

12/15

1,067

1,189

5.0

6,193

43,600

19,800

25,300

$10,765,437

1/16

1,249

811

5.7

7,085

43,600

19,300

24,500

$10,477,405

2/16

1,475

848

5.3

6,388

43,500

19,600

24,500

$13,559,687

3/16

1,825

1,156

5.2

6,084

43,100

20,000

24,800

$9,496,443

4/16

1,836

1,213

4.4

5,957

43,300

19,800

25,600

$9,617,406

5/16

1,979

1,386

4.8

5,770

43,300

20,300

25,800

$11,697,044

6/16

1,862

1,493

4.7

5,396

43,800

21,000

26,400

$10,816,389

7/16

1,795

1,515

4.8

5,489

44,000

21,700

26,400

$11,102,633

8/16

1.873

1,538

4.4

5,502

43,900

22,100

26,500

$12,493,656

9/16

1,601

1,431

4.3

5,377

43,500

22,200

26,500

$12,193,233

10/16

1,561

1,364

4.0

5,502

42,100

22,800

26,700

$12,195,581

11/16

1,314

1,270

4.2

5,774

42,100

22,500

26,600

$12,515,314

12/16

1,104

1,145

3.9

6,187

42,100

22,300

26,600

$11,120,365

1/17

1,238

938

4.2

8,226

41,800

21,200

26,500

$11,114,968

2/17

1,296

904

3.7

6,551

41,200

21,500

26,200

$14,139,163

3/17

1,614

1,167

3.5

6,245

41,300

21,700

27,600

$10,378,749

4/17

1,527

1,116

3.1

6,247

40,400

22,000

28,000

$10,024,215

5/17

1,948

1,394

3.5

5,661

39,900

22,300

28,000

$12,095,386

6/17

1,957

1,558

4.1

5,445

39,200

22,900

28,400

$10,987,362

7/17

1,856

1,556

4.0

5,569

38,500

23,600

27,600

$11,646,311

8/17

1,885

1,648

4.3

5,224

37,800

23,900

27,700

$13,219,857

9/17

1,614

1,466

4.3

5,107

38,000

23,700

27,900

$12,568,212

10/17

1,710

1,428

4.1

5,336

37,300

23,200

28,200

$12,691,747

250.385

250.942

253.815

256.098

256.907

256.941

256.821

259.503

261.560

263.756

263.333

264.653

NOW OPEN!

Deadline to nominate is Sunday, Jan. 7!

NOMINATIONS NOM AWARD EVENT COMING APRIL 2018

For Greener Trees Later,

Top nominees will be honored at an event in Spring 2018 and featured in the April edition of The Herald Business Journal.

Deep Root Feed Now

The Herald Business Journal and Moss Adams – in partnership with Puget-PR, Economic Alliance Snohomish County and Leadership Snohomish County – are seeking to honor the next generation of leadership in our community. The Emerging Leaders Award pays tribute to an individual who exemplifies outstanding professional values: demonstrates the ability to go above and beyond the expectations of a leader; and serves as an inspiration to the community. All nominees must currently work or reside in Snohomish County.

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Complete the nomination form today at:

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QUESTIONS? Contact HBJ editor Jim Davis at 425.339.3097 or jdavis@heraldnet.com

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DECEMBER 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 23

ECONOMIC DATA Boeing stock price

PUD retail electricity use, kilowatt hours

Snohomish County PUD connections

New vehicle registrations

Average gas price (regular, unleaded

10/15

$148.07

477,438,877

217

6,828

$2.49

11/15

$145.45

491,536,717

221

5,631

$2.41

12/15

$144.59

686,858,030

282

6,995

$2.35

1/16

$120.13

634,697,183

333

6,910

$2.33

2/16

$118.18

655,390,592

333

7,298

$2.02

3/16

$126.94

612,151,814

288

9,209

$2.12

4/16

$134.80

514,320,049

428

8,364

$2.25

5/16

$126.15

457,566,044

342

8,906

$2.44

6/16

$129.87

463,105,233

277

10,754

$2.57

7/16

$133.66

430,295,041

435

8,268

$2.56

8/16

$129.45

467,001,501

325

8,315

$2.49

9/16

$131.74

454,085,665

394

7,628

$2.60

10/16

$142.43

452,214,305

401

6,861

$2.64

11/16

$150.56

495,372,342

331

6,360

$2.59

12/16

$155.68

658,223,433

620

6,663

$2.47

1/17

$163.42

783,258,995

512

7,048

$2.69

2/17

$180.23

653,923,271

537

6,279

$2.67

3/17

$176.86

692,459,353

533

9,462

$2.73

4/17

$184.83

530,371,921

324

8,364

$2.79

5/17

$187.63

497,975,765

579

8,869

$2.44

6/17

$197.75

463,060,012

399

10,754

$2.72

7/17

$242.46

444,943,513

330

7,303

$2.70

8/17

$239.66

460,966,682

370

7,706

$2.77

9/17

$254.21

553,580,933

421

7,012

$2.95

10/17

$257.98

473,068,687

527

6,924

$2.81

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1983490

(425) 257-3242

2006267


24 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2017

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2005308

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