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OLYMPIC PENINSULA NORTH

2017-2018 FALL/WINTER EDITION

discoverm OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK PORT TOWNSEND/JEFFERSON COUNTY SEQUIM/DUNGENESS VALLEY PORT ANGELES FORKS/WEST END NORTHWEST COAST VICTORIA, B.C.

An advertising supplement produced by Peninsula Daily News, Sequim Gazette and Forks Forum


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WELCOME TO PARADISE W

hether you’re a first-time visitor, a returning visitor or a new resident, you’re sure to fall in love with the North Olympic Peninsula. Whatever you imagined it to be, look forward to an experience that exceeds your imagination. You’ll find the Olympic Peninsula, filled with glorious surprises, is home to beautiful beaches, majestic mountains, natural lakes, salmon-bearing rivers, temperate rain forests and the wilderness of the Olympic National Park. This North Olympic Peninsula Guide encourages residents and visitors alike to savor all that is a natural part of our environment and enjoy the multitude of pleasures that transform the ordinary into the extraordinary. Included in this guide is a wealth of information about the goods, services and activities available on the Peninsula. You’ll find sections representing each of the

unique communities and regions: Port Angeles, Sequim and the Dungeness Valley, Port Townsend and Jefferson County, Forks and the West End, the North/West Coast and, just across the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Victoria., B.C. We combine all the adventures of wilderness recreation with the comforts of a premier resort destination. While you’re here, we encourage you to read our three newspapers — Peninsula Daily News and the weekly Sequim Gazette and Forks Forum. They contain updated information about community and entertainment events throughout the year. You can also keep in touch 24/7 by logging onto their websites with a smartphone or computer: www.peninsuladaily news.com, www.sequimgazette.com and www. forksforum.com. Welcome to the wonderland of the North Olympic Peninsula.

Terry R. Ward, Regional Publisher

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2017-2018 REGIONAL PUBLISHER Terry R. Ward GENERAL MANAGER Steve Perry SPECIAL SECTION EDITORS Brenda Hanrahan Laura Lofgren CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Emily Hanson Allison McGee ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Holly Erickson CREATIVE SERVICES MANAGER Sam Nugent CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Michelle Lynn CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Christi Baron Michael Dashiell Paul Gottlieb

Brenda Hanrahan Erin Hawkins Laura Lofgren Jonel Lyons Jesse Major Cydney McFarland Keith Thorpe ADVERTISING SALES Christi Baron Jeanette Elledge Vivian Hansen Harmony Liebert Jonel Lyons Joylena Owen Marilyn Parrish

The North Olympic Peninsula Guide is a biannual publication of Peninsula Daily News, Sequim Gazette and Forks Forum. Copies are distributed at locations throughout the Olympic Peninsula. All content ©2017-2018, Peninsula Daily News, Sequim Gazette and Forks Forum.

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Brittney Berglund Keith Curtis Mary Field Kevin Franklin Roger Hammers Nicole Harrison Leah Rathwell Raquee Rivera Leticia Sparkman

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The editors of this guide make every attempt to be accurate at the time of its compilation and publication. Report any errors to 360-452-2345 or llofgren@peninsuladailynews.com.

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Contents GETTING HERE/INFORMATION

06

PENINSULA VISTAS

08

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK

11

ELWHA RESTORATION

15

EMERALD TOWNS

19

PENINSULA SPIRITS

24

PORT TOWNSEND

25

SEQUIM

37

CANNABIS

48

FLAVORS OF THE PENINSULA

63

PORT ANGELES

65

OLYMPIC DISCOVERY TRAIL

70

WATERFALLS

73

FORKS/WEST END

89

PENINSULA TRIBES

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Find the best route to the North Olympic Peninsula Find a new favorite site for your sights Discover what the beautiful park has to offer you Learn about the largest dam removal project in history Explore these tiny gems and find art, science and more If you’re looking for a winery, brewery or cidery, the Peninsula has plenty The Victorian-infused port city is teeming with opportunity There’s much to see and do in town and around the Dungeness Spit area Washington is a legal state. Find out the rules and where to buy Hungry? Find out about the edibles that live and grow out here The busy hub boasts a downtown revitalization worth seeing This amazing trail is making strides in connecting us all Find your way to one or more of the dazzling falls on the Peninsula Fishing, hiking, hunting, rain forests and more await you Learn about the different cultures that make our Peninsula so diverse

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VICTORIA & BEYOND

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS

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Treasure hunters delight at what they find along our shores Just across the water, you’ll find even more history and adventure Tune in to what’s coming up on the North Olympic Peninsula 4

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ON THE COVER Clockwise, from top left: Cross-country skiers make their way up a hill at Hurricane Ridge; a sea star clings to a rock at Rialto Beach; sunlight filters through maple leaves along Fifth Street in Port Angeles; trees stretch toward the sun in Olympic National Park near the Elwha River.


/ SEATAC Bus To SEATTLE KINGSTON / EDMONDS

Serving:

Port Angeles • Sequim Port Townsend • Discovery Bay Kingston • Edmonds • Greyhound Amtrak • Downtown Seattle Sea Tac Airport • Seattle Hospitals Olympic Bus Lines is an independent agent of Greyhound. You can now purchase your Greyhound tickets locally at your only nationwide reservation location on the Olympic Peninsula. • Free WiFi on board • Providing complimentary home-made chocolate chip cookies and bottled water.

(360) 417-0700

7A1679434

Late night or early morning flight? Ask us about special hotel rates!

Port Angeles/Sequim Outside the area toll free

(800) 457-4492

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GettInG Here Victoria 2:10h • 25m

Neah Bay

15.5m

0:30h

• 21m

2:5

5h

Forks

1:1

5h

0:40h • 34m

La Push

• 37m

Lake Crescent

Port Townsend Sequim

Kalaloch

North Olympic Peninsula

2:4

101/20 Junction

• 67

m

•7

m 0:22h • 13

• 0:22h

0:42h

• 71m

Coupeville Port Angeles

13m

1:45h

Joyce

5h

3m

•1

0:2 2h •

Sekiu/ Clallam Bay

Port Hadlock Chimacum Port Ludlow

Quilcene

Edmonds Ferry

26

m

Bainbridge Ferry

5h

1:2

SeaTac

5m

•2

Tacoma Aberdeen

Hood Canal Bridge

Most visitors to the North Olympic Peninsula cross the Hood Canal Bridge, the longest floating bridge over salt water in the world at 7,869 feet (6,521 feet of it floating). The bridge connects the Kitsap Peninsula to the Olympic Peninsula along

Weather

state Highway 104. Note that the bridge opens for marine vessels that are too large or tall to pass underneath its trusses, causing traffic to come to a standstill. It is not an uncommon sight to view a submarine surface to pass through the opened bridge thanks to Hood Canal’s proximity to Naval Base Kitsap Bangor.

short-lived. Last winter, the North Olympic PeninThe North Olympic Peninsula is one of sula saw quite a bit of snow thanks to a the most temperate spots you’ll find in the solid snowpack. United States, as the cool waters of the As for that notable Pacific Northwestern Pacific Ocean to the west and the Strait of rain, Sequim overall averages only about 18 Juan de Fuca to the north keep away the inches of rain per year. heat waves in the summer and the Port Angeles gets about 27 inches of rain extended freezing periods in winter. per year, but for every mile you drive west In the winter, high temperatures from there and away from the rain shadow, typically reach the mid 40s, with overnight lows dropping into the low 30s as the water you add about 1 inch of additional rain per year. Once you reach Forks about 75 miles acts a bit like a warming blanket. Snow events are just a handful of times a to the west, you’re in a town that averages year, and hard freezes are rare and typically about 100 inches of rain per year. 6 NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE F FALL/WINTER 2017-2018

Vessel openings can take about 30 minutes to complete. Sign up for Hood Canal Bridge text messages by sending a text message to 468311 with the words “wsdot hood,” and follow on Twitter @wsdot_tacoma. Visit www.wsdot.com/traffic/hoodcanal/ for more information.

Planning your trip

The key to being comfortable on the Peninsula is preparing for cloudier days, cool and damp weather, wind and rain and that famous Northwest mist that isn’t really rain but slowly dampens everything around you. Layering is key; bring long sleeves, sweatshirts/hoodies and a water-repellant raincoat for the winter months. Jeans, thermals, winter hiking boots and extra socks are must-haves. Bring gloves, a warm hat and sunscreen for those days when you’re out and about.


Information Visitor Centers and Chambers of Commerce BRINNON VISITORS CENTER 306144 U.S. Highway 101, Brinnon 360-796-4350 www.emeraldtowns.com CLALLAM BAY/SEKIU CHAMBER 16795 state Highway 112, Clallam Bay 360-963-2339 www.clallambay.com FORKS CHAMBER 1411 S. Forks Ave., Forks 360-374-2531 or 800-443-6757 www.forkswa.com HOH RAIN FOREST VISITOR CENTER Approximately 31 miles south of Forks and east of U.S. Highway 101. Take Highway 101 to Upper Hoh Road. Turn left and follow road. 360-374-6925 for hours HURRICANE RIDGE VISITOR CENTER 17 miles south of Port Angeles on Hurricane Ridge Road. 360-565-3131 for hours and road conditions

NEAH BAY CHAMBER neahbaycofc@gmail.com www.neahbaywa.com OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK VISITOR CENTER 3002 Mount Angeles Road, Port Angeles 360-565-3130 www.nps.gov/olym OLYMPIC PENINSULA GATEWAY VISITORS CENTER Intersection of state Highway 19 and state Highway 104 (93 Beaver Valley Road), Port Ludlow 360-437-0120 www.olympicpeninsula.org OLYMPIC PENINSULA VISITOR BUREAU 618 S. Peabody St., Suite F, Port Angeles 360-452-8552 or 800-942-4042 www.olympicpeninsula.org PORT ANGELES REGIONAL CHAMBER 121 E. Railroad Ave., Port Angeles 360-452-2363 www.portangeles.org

Ferries

ROCKET TRANSPORTATION 360-683-8087 or 1-877-697-6258 www.gorocketman.com Door-to-door airport shuttle service to and from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport for Clallam and East Jefferson counties.

BLACK BALL FERRY/MV COHO 101 E. Railroad Ave., Port Angeles 360-457-4491 www.cohoferry.com Year-round car and passenger walk-on ferry service between Victoria and Port Angeles. WASHINGTON STATE FERRIES 800-843-3779 www.wsdot.wa.gov/ferries State ferries depart from Port Townsend for Coupeville on Whidbey Island daily or from Seattle areas to Bainbridge Island or Edmonds so passengers can visit the North Olympic Peninsula via car.

Taxi Services

Airline

PORT ANGELES Northwest Cabs — 360-406-0210 Steady Cabs — 360-912-5666 PORT TOWNSEND & E. JEFFERSON COUNTY Peninsula Taxi — 360-385-1872 SEQUIM Sun Taxi — 360-681-4090

RITE BROS. AVIATION 1406 Fairchild Airport Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 360-452-6226 or 800-430-7483 www.ritebros.com Charter flights, sightseeing, plane rentals, pilot training, plane repairs and inspections.

Transit CLALLAM TRANSIT 360-452-4511 or 800-858-3747 www.clallamtransit.com Public transportation serving Clallam County; operates county’s public specialized paratransit service. JEFFERSON TRANSIT 360-385-4777 or 800-371-0497; 711 for the deaf or hard-of hearing www.jeffersontransit.com Serves East Jefferson County; connects with Clallam, Kitsap and Island Transit. OLYMPIC BUS LINES 111 E. Front St., Port Angeles 360-417-0700 or 800-457-4492 www.olympicbuslines.com Operates Dungeness Line; provides two trips daily among Port Angeles, Sequim, Discovery Bay and Kingston, to and from Edmonds, downtown Seattle and Seattle-Tacoma International Airport; charter service.

JEFFERSON COUNTY CHAMBER 2409 Jefferson St., Port Townsend 360-385-2722 or 888-365-6978 www.jeffcountychamber.org NORTH HOOD CANAL VISITORS CENTER 295142 U.S. Highway 101, Quilcene 360-765-4999 www.emeraldtowns.com SEQUIM-DUNGENESS VALLEY CHAMBER 1192 E. Washington St., Sequim 360-683-6197 or 800-737-8462 www.sequimchamber.com

Hospitals FORKS COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 530 Bogachiel Way, Forks 360-374-6271 www.forkshospital.org JEFFERSON HEALTHCARE 834 Sheridan Ave., Port Townsend 360-385-2200 www.jeffersonhealthcare.org OLYMPIC MEDICAL CENTER 939 Caroline St., Port Angeles 360-417-7000 www.olympicmedical.org

NORTH HOOD CANAL VISITORS CENTER

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PENINSULA VISTAS Winter can be damp on the North Olympic Peninsula, but that shouldn’t stop anyone from visiting all the amazing landmarks of the area. Here, we spotlight just some of the many panoramic sites visitors and hometowners alike can wander during the wintry months ahead.

1

HURRICANE RIDGE

A good winter on Hurricane Ridge means astounding views of the Olympic Mountains, snowshoeing, snowboarding and lots of other fun cold-weather activities. Weather permitting, Hurricane Ridge Road opens Fridays through Sundays and holiday Mondays during the winter season, but storms or avalanche hazards can lead to road closures at any time. For the 2017-18 winter season, winter operations at the ridge begin Nov. 24, which also is when the visitors center will reopen with staff members.

2

Come see the bigleaf maple leaves turn to glorious autumnal colors along the Sol Duc River during the fall. About 5 miles down the Sol Duc Road are the Salmon Cascades, a popular destination during late October and early November. Visitors come to watch the determined coho salmon leap over the falls on their way to spawn upstream in the roaring river. Bring rain gear for this visit.

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SOL DUC VALLEY

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3

LAKE CRESCENT

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A crown jewel on the North Olympic Peninsula, Lake Crescent is a must-see and a will-see if you’re heading to our West End communities. During the fall and winter, the leaves of the trees surrounding the lake turn to hues of gold and burnished red. Stop at one of the many pullouts and snap photos as fog lifts from the lake’s surface to reveal majestic peaks and valleys. Stop at the beautiful Lake Crescent Lodge (open through Jan. 1) for dinner and a view, or sit by the cozy fire with your favorite drink and recharge before venturing off to explore around the lake. An easy hike with views takes you from the lodge to Marymere Falls. Trek through green forests on a dirt trail. After crossing a bridge, hike up a steeper incline to your reward — an enchanting Pacific Northwest waterfall.

5

DOSEWALLIPS RIVER

RIALTO BEACH

Talk about dramatic. You’ll want to make your way to La Push and head to Olympic National Park’s Rialto Beach. Once there, clamber onto the breathtaking beach and, if you’re up for it and it’s low tide, make your way to Hole-in-the-Wall. Look south to the forested James and Little James islands, while waves crash over Gunsight Rock and numerous offshore sea stacks. Once at the hole, scramble through the rocky, slippery archway and explore the adjacent tide pools, teeming with small oceanic critters. Not up for the hike? Wander among the driftwood and catch glimpses of more wildlife.

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Best known as the location of Dosewallips State Park and the city of Brinnon, the Dosewallips River offers some awesome hikes and gorgeous views in the Olympic National Park. Dosewallips River via the Abandoned National Park Road is a moderate day hike of 11 miles. This hike parallels the Dosewallips River and showcases the fall foliage. It is an easy hike along the abandoned national park road that offers many opportunities for photos. Visit Dosewallips State Park to see the river empty into the sparkling waters of Dabob Bay. You can visit for free in November; Discover Pass Free Days are Nov. 11 and Nov. 24.

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FORT WORDEN HISTORICAL STATE PARK

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HOH RAIN FOREST

Hidden gun emplacements, expansive parade lawns and restored Victorianera officers homes place history front and center at Fort Worden Historical State Park. The park has 2 miles of saltwater shoreline, from which on a clear day you can see Mount Baker in the distance over the waters of the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Spot small marine creatures and even some otters playing in the surf. Walk a bit down the beach to check out the Point Wilson Lighthouse. A Discover Pass is required for vehicle access for day use.

>

Looking for the Pacific Northwest rain forest you’ve read about often? Now’s your chance to take in one of the best. The road leading to the Olympic National Park Hoh Rain Forest lets you take peeks of the ice-blue waters of the Hoh River. Throughout the winter, rain falls frequently in the Hoh Rain Forest, contributing to the total of 140 to 170 inches of precipitation each year. The result is a lush, green canopy of both coniferous and deciduous species. Mosses and ferns that blanket the surfaces add another dimension to the enchantment of the rain forest. Park at the visitors center and take a stroll through the Hall of Mosses, where you’ll take in every hue of green imaginable and become entranced with the forest. Feel free to explore farther past this trail to see more vistas. 10

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CAPE FLATTERY

It’s worth the drive to Neah Bay (located on the Makah Reservation) via Highway 112 to take in the spectacular views offered at Cape Flattery, the northwestern-most point in the contiguous United States. Once parked at the trailhead, take the brief walk (0.75 miles) over dirt paths and boardwalks to a major overlook, accessed via a very steep but short stepladder, where you will see Tatoosh Island in the distance, along with tree-speckled sea stacks, basking sea lions and maybe even some gray whales spyhopping near the horizon line. Be sure to bring binoculars and a long lens for your camera. Four observation decks on the Cape Flattery Trail provide dramatic views of the rugged rocks, birds and emerald waters of the Pacific Ocean. Preserve your future visits here by remaining on trail during this visit. A Makah Recreation Pass is required to access this trail.


Klahhane Ridge in Olympic National Park

HIKE YOUR HEART OUT IN

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK Often called “three parks in one,” where else can you view breathtaking mountain vistas, colorful tide pools and some of the largest remnants of ancient forests remaining in the nation in just one day? Did you know?

The park protects 922,651 acres encompassing three distinctly different ecosystems — rugged

glacier-capped mountains, more than 70 miles of wild Pacific coast and magnificent stands of old-growth trees and

temperate rain forest. A United Nations World Heritage Site and International Biosphere Reserve, the park is

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celebrated for its dramatic variety and untamed beauty. About 3 million people visit the park each year.

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Before you start exploring

Stop by the temporary Olympic National Park Visitor Center, 600 E. Park Ave. in Port Angeles, to pick up a map, buy a park pass and talk to a ranger about what there is to see and do during your visit. The main visitor center is undergoing renovations and is expected to be completed in April 2018. An Olympic National Park pass is good for up to seven consecutive days at any Olympic National Park entrance. The pass costs $25 for non-commercial vehicles, $20 for non-commercial motorcycles and $10 for hikers, bicyclists or pedestrians. Children 15 and younger are admitted to the park free of charge. An annual pass costs $50 and is good at any Olympic National Park entrance for one year from the month of purchase. The America the Beautiful annual pass — available to everyone — costs $80 and allows admission to all national parks for one year from the month of purchase. These also can be obtained by calling 1-888-275-8747. A lifetime America the Beautiful pass is available for seniors (62 and older) for $80. This pass can only be obtained in person at the park or through the mail using an application form. An annual senior pass is $20. An annual America the Beautiful pass is available free of charge to U.S. military members and dependents in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard, plus Reserve and National Guard members. This pass must be obtained in person at a federal recreation site by showing a Common Access Card or Military ID. For additional pass information, including other discounted and volunteer pass options, visit www.tinyurl.com/ONPpasses.

For those who prefer to see some of this nearly 1-million-acre park by car, there are 168 miles of paved and gravel roads that Olympic National Park can be easily provide access to various points. visited on foot or by car. More than 600 All park roads are “spur roads” off U.S. miles of trails weave throughout the park, Highway 101. Remember: No roads from short, easy loop trails to rigorous, traverse the Olympic wilderness. primitive hikes along high passes or ocean The rugged wilderness is a fragile beaches. For most of the arduous trips environment. To help protect animal and inside the park, you’ll need a topographic plant life, waterways and each person’s map, which you can buy at visitor centers wilderness experience, the National Park and ranger stations. 12 NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE F FALL/WINTER 2017-2018

Getting around the park

Counterclockwise from top: Snowboarders use a rope tow at Hurricane Ridge. Snow blankets the Elwha River valley during the winter of 2016. Camp riverside up at the Hoh Campground on the West End. Hikers explore Rialto Beach.

Service creates and enforces a variety of regulations. The Olympic National Park Visitor Center on the way to Hurricane Ridge in Port Angeles is fully accessible, as is the Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center on the West End. Other centers and ranger stations provide varying levels of accessibility and hours of operation. For more information, visit www.nps. gov/olym.


Hurricane Ridge

Hurricane Ridge is the most easily accessed mountain area within Olympic National Park. It is 17 miles south of Port Angeles off Mount Angeles Road, the southern extension of Race Street that intersects with U.S. Highway 101 in Port Angeles. Follow Race Street out of town and follow signs leading to the ridge. Hurricane Ridge is the focal point for snow and winter recreation, with opportunities for snowshoeing, cross-country and downhill skiing, snowboarding and tubing. Weather permitting, Hurricane Ridge Road opens Fridays through Sundays and holiday Mondays during the winter season, but storms or avalanche hazards can lead to road closures at any time. Stop at Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center for brochures, maps, snacks and tips regarding your visit. Downhill and cross-country skis and snowshoes are available to rent from the Hurricane Ridge Rental Shop in the center. Ranger-led snowshoe walks will take place Dec. 17-March 26. Call 360-565-3130 for more information. The Hurricane Ski and Snowboard Area is operated by the Hurricane Ridge Ski Club. The ski area includes two rope tows, a Poma lift and tubing area.The ski area is generally open from mid-December through the end of March, weather permitting. Visit www.hurricaneridge.com for more information about prices and hours. All vehicles are required to carry tire chains when traveling above the Heart Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; the Hills entrance station during the winter season. Call the Road & Weather Hotline at 360-565-3131 for current information or follow @HRWinterAccess on Twitter for road updates.

Trees, moss, falls and more

Old-growth forest and subalpine lakes populate the Sol Duc landscape. The Sol Duc River serves as a key highway for coho salmon, running through the valley and ascending toward the lakes and headwaters in the mountains. Chinook and coho salmon ascend the Sol Duc in late summer and spawn in late fall, while cutthroat trout and steelhead run in the fall and winter and spawn into the spring. The Sol Duc is one of the few places where salmon run in every season.

Snowy Hurricane Hill

Hurricane Ridge Road

Sol Duc River

To get to the Sol Duc area of Olympic National Park, take U.S. Highway 101 west from Port Angeles or east from Forks. Turn southeast on Sol Duc Hot Springs Road and follow it 12 miles. Ancient Groves is a self-guided nature trail found off this road. The loop is less than a mile. Sol Duc Falls, a 1.6-mile round trip, is a hike that wanders through the forest to a cascading falls. The trailhead parking lot is off Sol Duc Hot Springs Road. The longer, 6-mile Loverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lane Trail is a

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loop that meanders through old-growth forest and past the falls. The trail links Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort to Sol Duc Falls. It can be reached from the Sol Duc Falls trail or campground trail. After a day of hiking, relax in the Sol Duc Hot Springs at Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort, where you will find three mineral soaking pools and one freshwater pool. Even if you are not a guest at the resort, you can still pay for day-use access to the springs. The resort (and the hot springs) are open from March to October.

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The Olympic Mountains

The Olympic Mountains are not very high — Mount Olympus, the tallest, is just under 8,000 feet — but they rise almost from the water’s edge. The mountains intercept moisture-rich air masses that move in from the Pacific Ocean. As this air is forced over the mountains, it cools and releases moisture in the form of rain and snow. At lower elevations, rain nurtures the forests, while at higher elevations snow adds to glacial masses that relentlessly carve the landscape. The mountains wring precipitation out of the air so effectively that areas on the northeast corner experience a rain shadow and get very little rain. For eons, wind and rain washed sediment from the land into the ocean. Powerful forces fractured, folded and overturned rock formations, which help explain the jumbled appearance of the Olympics. Ice Age glacial sheets from the north carved out the Strait of Juan de Fuca and Hood Canal, isolating the Olympics from nearby land masses. Surrounded on three sides by water and still crowned by alpine glaciers, the Olympic National Park. Olympics retain the distinctive character This coastline looks much as it did when that developed from their isolation. Native Americans built their first villages thousands of years before Europeans arrived. Glaciers The coast is where the land meets the Glacial ice is one of the foremost scenic sea, vibrating with life and energy — arches and scientific values of Olympic National and sea stacks; the roar of crashing waves; Park. There are about 266 glaciers crowning the calls of gulls, bald eagles, cormorants the Olympic peaks. and black oystercatchers; dramatic sunsets The most prominent glaciers are on and the vastness of the ocean. Mount Olympus, covering about 10 square miles. Beyond the Olympic complex are the Into the forest There are four basic types of forests on the glaciers of Mount Carrie, Bailey Range, North Olympic Peninsula: temperate rain Mount Christie and Mount Anderson. forest, lowland, montane and subalpine. In the company of these glaciers are Temperate rain forest is found at low perpetual snowbanks that have the elevations along the Pacific Ocean coast and superficial appearance of glacial ice. in the western-facing valleys of the Peninsula, Travel on the Olympic Mountains’ glacial where lots of rain, moderate temperatures ice is a specialized skill of mountaineering and summer fogs exist. requiring the basic use of climbing rope, ice About 90 miles west of Port Angeles, the ax, crampons and good judgment by a climber accompanied by experienced leaders. Hoh Rain Forest has a visitor center, campground and picnic area. Land meets sea The lowland forest grows farther inland More than 70 miles of Pacific Ocean from the coast and above the rain forest coastline form a vital component of valleys. The lowland forest gives way to the

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Olympic Mountains montane forest. As elevation increases, temperatures cool and more moisture falls as snow; growing seasons get shorter and the subalpine zone takes over. The lower portion of the subalpine zone consists of continuous forest, but in the upper part of this zone, the forest thins out. Increasing elevation causes even more severe climatic conditions. Trees become fewer, shorter and more misshapen. This example can be seen when one takes a day to trek around the Hurricane Ridge area (p. 13).

Visit the park for free

The National Park Service offers several days throughout the year when admission into Olympic National Park is free. This year, the following days allow free access to ONP: •  Nov. 11-12: Veterans Day Weekend We recommend getting to an ONP kiosk early in order to avoid any major crowds. For more information, visit www.NPS.gov/ findapark/feefreeparks.htm.


Glines Canyon Spillway Overlook

Elwha River Restoration

The Elwha River Restoration is a National Park Service project that began in midSeptember 2011. The project, the largest dam removal project in history, entailed tearing down the 108-foot Elwha Dam and the 210-foot Glines Canyon Dam and restoring the Elwha River watershed. The removal of both dams was completed in August 2014. The ongoing restoration work has allowed the Elwha River to flow through its native channel for the first time in more than 100 years and will allow salmon to migrate upstream to spawn in the nutrient-rich habitat. In September 2014, the first reported sighting of chinook in the Upper Elwha River above the Glines Canyon Dam site in 102 years was confirmed. Much of the fine sediment that built up in the dams’ reservoirs, the former Lake Aldwell and Lake Mills, was released by the removal process and has changed the shape of the river and caused changes in the habitat at the mouth of the river and in Freshwater Bay. There is a link to a series of webisodes on the National Park Service Elwha River Restoration page that chronicle the removal of the Elwha and Glines Canyon dams. The videos begin with the history of the dams

and continue through their deconstruction and restoration of the ecosystem. Visit the National Park Service site at www.nps.gov and search for “Elwha River Restoration.”

Dam removal history

During the early 1900s, Port Angeles entrepreneur Thomas Aldwell sought to harness the energy of the Elwha River and spearheaded construction of the hydroelectric Elwha Dam, which was completed in 1913. The growing economy soon led to the decision to build a second dam — Glines Canyon Dam, completed in 1927. The two dams blocked much of the 70-mile Elwha River, which had one of the most productive salmon runs in the Pacific Northwest. Spawning runs were reduced from 400,000 fish before the dams were completed to only 3,000. In 1992, Congress passed the Elwha River Ecosystem and Fisheries Restoration Act, which called for full restoration of the ecosystem and fisheries. An environmental impact statement concluded that removal of both dams was the only way to achieve restoration.

View the ever-changing river

At the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribal Center, located off Lower Elwha Road, walk the 0.7-mile Warrior Path loop to the Elwha

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River estuary. Cross the double-deck Elwha River Road Bridge to get a bird’s-eye view of the river. Take U.S. Highway 101 to Laird Road and turn onto Elwha River Road. The Elwha Dam Viewpoint features a short trail to an overlook at the former Elwha Dam site. The parking area is off Lower Dam Road via state Highway 112. At the Elwha River Viewpoint, one can observe the changing landscape where the river flows through the site of the former Lake Aldwell reservoir. A turnoff is found off Highway 101 just west of Port Angeles. Olympic Hot Springs Road is open to visitor access at the Glines Canyon Spillway Overlook, which provides a view of the site of the former Glines Canyon dam and views of the Elwha River running free through the canyon and the bed of the former Lake Mills. A 0.3-mile trail built by the Elwha revegetation crew leads from the parking area to the lakebed, where adventurers of all ages can see the progress of the Elwha restoration. The twisty and narrow Whiskey Bend Road offers a 10-space parking area where visitors can then walk out to another overlook of the canyon. The turnoff is just past the Elwha Ranger Station on Olympic Hot Springs Road. Roads might close during winter months. Visit www.nps.gov/olym for updates.

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Olympic National Forest

The Olympic Peninsula features more than 2.13 million acres of federal lands to enjoy. Of these, more than 633,600 acres are managed by Olympic National Forest, which blankets the foothills of the Olympic Mountains and surrounds much of Olympic National Park. Most of the forest is within Clallam and Jefferson counties, with parts in Grays Harbor and Mason counties. Olympic National Forest features 17 developed campgrounds on first-come, first-served basis, five boating sites, four nature trails and one viewpoint. Visitors should know which agency

manages the site or lands they plan to visit, because opportunities and regulations differ among agencies. A recreation pass is needed for visiting Olympic National Forest. Recreation passes do not cover fees for cabin rentals or climbing and wilderness permits. Passes also do not cover fees at developed campgrounds. A National Forest Recreation Day Pass costs $5 per day and is honored at all Forest Service entrances or day-use fee sites in Washington and Oregon. An annual Northwest Forest Pass is available for $30; an Interagency Annual Pass is available for $80. Visit www.fs.usda.gov/olympic for more

Riverview RV Park

PENINSULA RVS

The Place to Be

• Full Service RV Park • Cabin Rental • Wi-Fi • Propane • Guest Bathroom/Showers • Laundry Facilities • Spacious & Quiet • RV & Boat Storage • Fish Cleaning Station • Ice, Bait & Fishing Tackle

“Newest” RV Park • 28 sites, 19 pull-thru on the • Full hookup Peninsula

360-452-1324 • 1-888-445-4251

www.forksriverviewrv.com 33 Mora Road Forks, WA 360-640-4819 360-640-4820

7A1964413

www.gilgaloasisrvpark.com

Jefferson County Fairgrounds

58 Full & Partial hook-ups 24+ Tenting sites Showers Close to Fort Worden RV Group Camping Available 4907 Landes Street Port Townsend 360-385-1013

7A1963650

(behind Econo Lodge, across from QFC)

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• Paved pads & roads • Clubhouse, laundry showers 400 S. Brown Rd., Sequim

information about Olympic National Forest and permits and passes.

e-mailjeffcofairgrounds@olypen.com www.jeffcofairgrounds.com

CABINS, RV SPACES, TENTS & GIFT STORE

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7A1963654

2634 West Sequim Bay Rd., Sequim, WA 98382 • 360-681-DUKE www.johnwayneswaterfrontresort.com


Crescent Beach & R V Park EVERCHANGING SURF • AWESOME SUNSETS • SAND DOLLARS AGATES • EAGLES • SEASHELLS

R V PA R K

OPEN ALL YEAR

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Public Laundromat • Full Hookups Tent Sites • Showers/Bathrooms Long Term • Month to Month available

DAY • TENTS • RVS (w/e/s) • Cabins

LAUNDRY • HOT SHOWERS

200.021 Hwy 101 N. Beaver (360) 327-0714

Located on Washington’s Beautiful Olympic Peninsula

Elwha Dam RV Park

www.olypen.com/crescent • E-mail: crescent@olypen.com

Clallam County Parks

Dungeness & Salt Creek Recreation Areas

Port Angeles, WA

On beautiful Scenic By-way Highway 112

7A1963999

• Conveniently located for exploring the Olympic National Park • 10 minutes to quaint downtown shoppes • 10 minutes to Victoria ferry • Quiet wooded setting

HALF MILE SAND BEACH

7A1963647

53802 Hwy. 112 West Port Angeles (360) 928-2488 www.olypen.com/scrv

(360) 928-3344

15 miles west of Port Angeles off Hwy 112

7A1963655

PROPANE

• 9 Hole Golf Course • Clubhouse • Pull Thrus • Propane • Group Discounts

Offering: Camping Year-Round Campsite Reservations Full-Service Restrooms Birding Opportunities

360-452-7054

www.ElwhaDamRVpark.com

Campground & RV Park Shadow Mountain

Playgrounds Picnic Sites Beach Recreation Hiking Trails

Close to Olympic National Park 15 miles W. of P.A. on Hwy. 101 Across from Lake Sutherland

7A1963643

Full Hookups, Tent Spaces, Laundry, Store, Deli, Fuel

WiFi Hot Spot

Discounts for Active Military, Police & Firemen www.shadowmt.com

7A1963998

232951 Hwy. 101 Port Angeles (360) 928-3043 (877) 928-3043

360-417-2291

www.clallam.net/parks • email parks@co.clallam.wa.us FALL/WINTER 2017-2018

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Clallam Transit

Clallam Transit

Explore Clallam Clallam County County by by transit transit — — Explore

your convenient, inexpensive way to go! your convenient, inexpensive way to go! 



Daily service between Port Angeles

Daily service between Port Angeles

and Bainbridge Island Ferry Terminal!

and Bainbridge Island Ferry Terminal! Plan your Clallam County adventure:

Plan your Clallamor County adventure: (360) 452-4511 (800) 858-3747 NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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(360)www.clallamtransit.com 452-4511 or (800) 858-3747 www.clallamtransit.com


Lake Leland near Quilcene

THERE ARE BIG PAYOFFS IN OUR LITTLE

EMERALD TOWNS Discovering the â&#x20AC;&#x153;emerald townsâ&#x20AC;? of Quilcene and Brinnon is like finding a rare gem. These quiet whistle-stops offer visitors a place to relax and experience life the way it should be lived: peacefully. Did you know?

Well-known for its clams and oysters, this Hood Canal region also offers seasonal crabbing, shrimp-

ing and fishing opportunities. For those who would rather let others do the hunting and gathering, there are many seafood

retailers and restaurants throughout the region. Nearby are pristine scuba diving opportunities. For those who prefer the

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RV life or bike or tent camping, opportunities exist in several federal, state, county or private campgrounds.

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OLYMPIC PENINSULA CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Clallam County Gem & Mineral Association General Meeting: 3rd Tuesday, 7 p.m. “The Fifth Ave.”, 500 W. Hendrickson, Sequim Shop offers lapidary & jewelry making classes 81 Hooker Rd. #5, Sequim/ Call for times Rock Show Sept. 2018 Scott Thornhill 360-912-2987 Kathy Schreiner 360-681-3811 www.sequimrocks.org

Port Angeles Senior Center 328 E. 7th Street, Port Angeles 98362 Business Hours: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday-Friday, Closed Holidays D Bellamente, 360-457-7004 www.portangelesseniorcenter.com paseniorcenter@olypen.com Puget Sound Anglers - North Olympic Peninsula Chpt. Trinity United Methodist Church 100 S. Blake Ave., Sequim 3rd Thursday of month @ 6:30 p.m., Free Kids Fishing Derby in May - Carrie Blake Park Sherry Anderson, Secretary 360-681-4768 psanopc.org

Clallam County Republican Party Republican Headquarters, 509 S. Lincoln, P.A. 4th Monday each month at 6:30 p.m. Mon - Fri 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. • 360-417-3035 or Matthew Rainwater 360-460-7652 Disabled American Veterans, Chapt. 5 Port Angeles Senior and Community Center 328 E. 7th St., Port Angeles NW Corner 7th & Peabody St. Wednesdays, 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. John Joseph, 360-460-6707

Rotary Club - Nor’wester Seasons Café - Olympic Medical Center Friday @ 7 a.m. Vivian Hansen, President, 360-460-8191 www.rotarynorwester.org Sequim City Band Swisher Hall, 350 N. Blake Rd., Sequim Wednesdays 7 pm - 9 pm Richard Greenway 360.207.4722 www.sequimcityband.org

Fraternal Order of Eagles #483 2843 E. Myrtle St., Port Angeles Aerie - 1st & 3rd Mondays @ 6:00 p.m. Auxiliary - 2nd & 4th Mondays @ 7:00 p.m. Naomi Donaway - 360-452-3344

Sequim Elks Lodge #2642 143 Port Williams Road, Sequim 2nd & 4th Wednesday of the month, 7 pm 360-683-2763, seqelks@qwestoffice.net

International Footprint Association Olympic Peninsula, Chapter 74 Dinner meeting 2nd Monday, 6 p.m. Sequim Elks Lodge, 143 Pt. Williams Gene Mattson 360-681-0533

Sequim Prairie Grange 290 Macleay Road, Sequim 2nd Wednesday at 7 p.m. - Business Meeting 4th Wednesday with 6:30 Potluck & program Robert Clark 360 808-2364

Kiwanis Club of Port Angeles Joshua’s Restaurant 113 Del Guzzi Dr. Noon on Thursdays President Dave Moffitt 360-452-8672

Sequim Valley Lions Paradise Restaurant, 703 N. Sequim Ave., Sequim 2nd & 4th Thursday at 6:30 p.m. Betty Wilkerson (360) 461-6090

Naval Elks Lodge BPOE #353 131 East First Street, Port Angeles 1st & 3rd Thursday of the month Exalted Ruler John Pearce 360-457-3355 navallodge@gmail.com

FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT® FOR HEALTHY LIVING FOR SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

Sequim Visitor & Information Center Sequim Dungeness Valley Chamber of Commerce 1192 E. Washington Street Sequim, WA 98382 360.683.6197, 800.737.8462

Olympic Peninsula YMCA YMCA of Port Angeles 302 S. Francis St., Port Angeles 360.452.9244 YMCA of Sequim 610 N. 5th Avenue, Sequim 360.452.9244 Open 7 days a week www.olympicpeninsulaymca.org

Shipley Center 921 E. Hammond St. Sequim Mon. thru Fri. 9am - 4pm (360) 683-6806 shipleycenter@olypen.com www.shipleycenter.org Soroptimist Int’l Port Angeles Jet Set Senior Center Corner of 7th & Peabody 7:00 a.m., Every Thursday Marsha Robin 360.452.7925 sijetset.com

Port Angeles Business Association Joshua’s Restaurant 113 DelGuzzi Rd., Port Angeles Tuesdays 7:30 a.m. Kevin Hoult, President 360-865-4939 www.paba.com Pacific Northwest Wood Artisans All forms of wood art. General Meetings, 2nd Thursdays, 9:30 11:00 am, Port Angeles Senior Center. Weekly workshops, instructions, every Tuesday, 12:00 -3:00 pm, Carlsborg. President: Ken Davis, 360-477-6454 Publicity: Gary Cummins, 360-379-0771 Information at www.woodartisans.net

Soroptimist Int’l of Sequim PO Box 126, Sequim, WA Meets 2nd & 4th Tuesday of the Month – 7:30 a.m. Sunland Golf and Country Club Strait Air Volksgrüppe VW Car Club 1st Sunday of each month at noon We alternate between Port Angeles & Sequim locations Check website for next meeting and location www.straitairvw.com email: straitairvolksgruppe@earthlink.net

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If you would like to have your club or organization listed on this page in our Fall Olympic Peninsula Guide call (360) 417-7685 or email jelledge@peninsuladailynews.com


Quilcene and Brinnon

Quilcene and Brinnon are nestled among the trees near Olympic National Forest. Some campsites are in the seclusion of quiet forests, while others are adjacent to or within easy walking distance of Hood Canal and the three main rivers that flow out of the Olympic Mountains to Hood Canal — the Dosewallips, Duckabush and Hamma Hamma. While exploring the beaches, riverbanks and forest roads or trails, visitors can observe an abundance of wildlife including a variety of bird species, seals and perhaps a glimpse of one of the several bands of majestic elk that roam throughout Brinnon’s Dosewallips and Duckabush valleys.

Coyle

Take a side trip over to Coyle, where you can experience an all-ages Concert in the Woods at the Laurel B. Johnson Community Center, 923 Hazel Point Road (www.coyleconcerts.com), located 14 miles out on the end of the Toandos Peninsula. The Toandos Peninsula is occasionally called the “Dabob Peninsula” or the “Coyle Peninsula.” There are no services, such as gas stations or markets on this Peninsula, so come prepared. Additional details and information are available from the North Hood Canal Chamber of Commerce at www.emerald towns.com.

Port Hadlock and Tri-Area

Port Hadlock and the Tri-Area of Chimacum, Nordland and Irondale are at the crossroads of the most populated area in Jefferson County, near Port Townsend. This commercial hub is also the gateway to Marrowstone and Indian islands. Port Hadlock and the Tri-Area have a history of building business and community. In the 20th century, agriculture, smelting and lumber were the primary industries.

Chimacum

Chimacum is known for its dairy farms spreading across Chimacum Valley. H.J. Carroll Park, off state Highway 19, is a county park that offers a playground, BMX track, disc golf course and other amenities.

Dosewallips State Park

Port Ludlow

Port Ludlow is a residential and recreational community built up around the shores of Ludlow Bay. The natural environment and developed facilities offer hikes on wooded trails and paths, digs for clams and oysters along the beach, drives through scenic countryside, bicycling and jogging. Explore the gravelly shores at low tide at Shine Tidelands, a state park property next to the Hood Canal Bridge.

Marrowstone Island

Located southeast of Port Townsend, Marrowstone Island is a narrow piece of land that houses the small community of Nordland along with Fort Flagler State Park. Despite its small population, the island’s community has plenty to offer visitors. Those looking to camp or fly some kites can find the perfect spot at Fort Flagler as well as Mystery Bay State Park, a 10-acre marine state park located at 7875 Fort Flagler Road. Here and at the fort, campers can partake in clamming, crabbing, fishing, diving and more. A Discover Pass is required for both parks as well as corresponding licenses for recreational activities. Take the turnoff for Port Townsend off U.S. Highway 101. Turn right onto Anderson Lake Road, left on Rhody Drive and right onto Highway 116.

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Waterfalls, salmon and trails

The Emerald Towns boast several beautiful waterfalls, all of which are within easy hiking distance and can be seen and enjoyed in the span of a single day. Falls View Falls and Murhut Falls are located in Olympic National Forest. A recreation pass is not required. Dosewallips Falls is in Olympic National Park, and a recreation pass is required. Rocky Brook Falls is on private land but is accessible to the public. On a day of enjoying the waterfalls, don’t forget to take a drive to the top of Mount Walker for incredible views of Seattle and Puget Sound to the east or magnificent views of the mountains within Olympic National Park to the west. The road to the top of Mount Walker is open seasonally and may be closed due to weather. A year-round option is to park at the base for a 2-mile hike. Learn about salmon at the Quilcene National Fish Hatchery, which is 2 miles south of Quilcene where the Big Quilcene River crosses under U.S. Highway 101. Dosewallips Road is a popular eastern portal to Olympic National Park for hikers and equestrians. Stay over and camp out in a tent or a cabin at Dosewallips State Park off U.S. Highway 101 along the saltwater shoreline of the Hood Canal and the freshwater shoreline of the Dosewallips River. This park boasts fishing, clamming, crabbing and more.

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Everyday Value Wines from 2 for $799

Wine Tastings 1st & 3rd Fridays

Est. 1982

1010 Water St., Port Townsend, WA

7A1963542

Wine “Champagne” Beer Cheese-Deli Chocolate

Oct-June

Check Store or Website for Other Events

PENINSULA WINERIES

Open 7 days a week 11-7ish Weekdays/10-8ish Weekends

Just a few short blocks from the Ferry! 360-385-7673 www.PTwineSeller.com

Even Later Summer & Holiday Hours

Propolis Brewing PropoliS

“Artisan Ciders, Ales, Elixirs

BrewinG

& Wines...

Join us this Season for a Spirited Adventure!”

www.instagram.com/drinkthedragon #DrinktheDragon

PROPOLIS BREWING Wed-Fri 2-8pm Sat/Sun 12-8pm 2457 Jefferson St Port Townsend, WA www.propolisbrewing.com (360) 344-2129

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ALPENFIRE CIDER Fri-Sun 12-5pm (Or by Appointment) 220 Pocket Ln. Port Townsend, WA www.alpenfirecider.com (360) 379-8915

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360-877-9894 360-877-9508

wine@hoodsport.com www.hoodsport.com

7A1963964

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FINNRIVER FARM Sun-Thurs 12-6pm Fri/Sat 12-9pm 124 Center Road Chimacum, WA www.finnriver.com (360) 732-4337

www.facebook.com/drinkthedragon #DragonPeninsula

7A1964403

EAGLEMOUNT WINE & CIDER Wed-Sun 12-5pm 1893 S. Jacob Miller Rd. Port Townsend,WA www.eaglemountwine andcider.com (360) 385-1992

SIP & SAVOR

OUR LOCAL LIBATIONS


7A1963543

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Peninsula Spirits The North Olympic Peninsula is home to several award-winning wineries, cideries and breweries.

Wine

Many of the wineries use grapes from Eastern Washington, although some grow their own cool-climate grapes or use berries and fruit from local farms. Often you’ll find the winemakers themselves pouring in the tasting rooms and greeting visitors. A handful of the wineries banded

together to form the Olympic Peninsula Wineries Association (www.olympic peninsulawineries.org). The website provides a suggested tour map and directions. Starting in Port Angeles, the eclectic Harbinger Winery is located at 2358 W. U.S. Highway 101. Camaraderie Cellars, 334 Benson Road in Port Angeles, is surrounded by the forests of Olympic National Park. Heading east on U.S. 101 toward Sequim, stop in at Olympic Cellars (255410 U.S.

Highway 101) for a true wine treat. FairWinds Winery, located at 1984 W. Hastings Ave., Port Townsend, relies on growers in the Yakima Valley to produce small-batch wines. In Port Townsend, visit Lullaby Winery, located at 274 Otto St., Suite S. New to the wine scene is Port Townsend Vineyards, 2640 W. Sims Way, which also offers a downtown tasting room. Marrowstone Vineyards, 423 Meade Road, Nordland, presents red, white and fruit wines within the vineyard.

Cider

Fall is the season for cider! Make your way over to Port Townsend for a stop at Eaglemount Wine & Cider at 1893 S. Jacob Miller Road for a glass. If you use GPS, don’t rely solely on it when trying to find the winery; use your eyes and look for the sign. Alpenfire, 220 Pocket Lane, has a certified organic orchard. For more options, travel to Chimacum’s Finnriver Farm & Cidery, located at 142 Barn Swallow Road, for some local brews.

Port Townsend Vineyards welcomes guests to experience each of our three locations created to take you on a sensory wine journey.

Winery•Tasting Room•Event Pavilion•Custom Crush Facility

215 Taylor Street

Vineyard on Portuguese Hill (by appointment) 3405 Jackman Street

www.PortTownsendVineyards.com 24

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7A1964475

2640 W. Sims Way

Downtown Tasting Room

Beer

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Who doesn’t love a trip to a local taproom where hops are turned into amber ales, IPAs and stouts? Port Townsend Brewing Company, 330 10th St., Port Townsend, opened its doors in 1997 with only two beer offerings. Today, it has more than 10 ales. Propolis Brewing, 2457 Jefferson St., Port Townsend, brews ales using 100 percent certified organic Pacific Northwest malted barley and wheat. 101 Brewery is located at 294793 U.S. Highway 101 in Quilcene and offers housemade microbrews at the familyowned Twana Roadhouse. In Port Angeles, check out Barhop Brewing & Taproom, 124 W. Railroad Ave. It brews small-batch microbrews made from Olympic Mountain water, including rye ales, IPAs, porters and more.


Ferry from Coupeville

FIND HINTS OF THE VICTORIAN ERA IN

PORT TOWNSEND Established in 1851, Port Townsend’s character comes from its boom in the 1880s and 1890s as a major seaport, fishing and lumber area. The architecture of the Victorian era peppers the city. Did you know?

At the eastern end of the Peninsula, Port Townsend takes pride in being a cultural hub. It is the seat

of Jefferson County. Artists of all disciplines gravitate to the town of 9,100 that relishes its eclectic personality. The city boasts film

festivals, homages to wooden boats and a plethora of music and theater performances throughout the year. The seaport won

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fourth Best Northwestern Small Town distinction by USA Today 10Best Reader’s Choice travel award contest in April 2017.

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ART

Galleries

PORT TOWNSEND 1. Pacific Traditions & Aloft Images

MARITIME

637 Water St. 360-385-4770 Local & nationally recognized Native Artists of distinction. www.pacifictraditions.com

Daily 10-6

CENTER MEMORIAL MADISON ST.

ATHLETIC FIELD

2. Forest Gems Galler y

807 Washington St. Daily 10-6 360-379-1713 Port Townsend’s destination woodcraft gallery featuring over 30 local artists, and our own work in figured and burl Redwood, Myrtlewood, and Western Quilted Maple. Expanded inventory of raw materials such as live edge planks, book matched table tops, turning stock, slabs, and natural bases of all sizes. Our full woodshop can assist with your projects from shelves to dining tables. www.forestgems.com

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WATER ST.

JEFFERSON ST.

Open Daily 10am

WASHINGTON ST.

2

Corner of Taylor & Water St (in the Undertown) Mon - Sat 10-5 360-385-3809 A fun & efficient framing studio featuring a gallery of local and regional artists. www.frameworksnw.com 715 Water St. 360-379-8110 Fine Arts Cooperative Gallery in Port Townsend for 20 years. www.porttownsendgallery.com

7

ADAMS ST.

3. Frame Works

4. Port Townsend Galler y

1

QUINCY ST.

TO UPTOWN

TAYLOR ST.

TYLER ST.

5. The Red Dragonfly

6

751834710

211 Taylor St. Suite B2 (in the Undertown) Mon - Sat 11-5; Sun 12-5 360-385-1493 Port Townsend’s unique alternative art & gift gallery, with original work by local artists, unusual handmade gift items, artisan jewelry, souvenirs, psychic readings and more! In Undertown, downstairs at the green pergola, corner of Taylor & Water Steets. www.reddragonflypt.com

701 Water St. Wed - Mon 11:30am-5:30pm 360-379-1086 A non-profit center connecting the arts and community. We feature juried and invitational exhibits, workshops, lectures, a venue for writers, and a yearly studio tour and arts festival. www.northwindarts.org

8. LaughinGnome Pottery

2009 4th St Suite B. Wed - Fri 12-5 360-301-5646 Artist Production Studio and Gallery. Elevating art to everyday ware, all handmade on site. Find us Saturdays 9-2 at the Jefferson County Farmer’s Market. LaughinGnome.com

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4TH ST.

W SIM

7. Northwind Arts Center

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TO INSERT

S ST.

1012 Water St Daily 10-6 360-379-8881 Browse a diverse collection of beautiful 2D and 3D art by 20+ artist members from the Olympic Peninsula. Celebrating 13 years of inspiring paintings, prints, cards, jewelry, woodworking, textiles, glasswork and more. www.gallery-9.com

TO FERRY

6. Galler y 9

8

Art Walk first Saturday evening of every month.

www.EnjoyPT.com

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A port’s pinnacle

Port Townsend’s heyday as a lateVictorian seaport brought wealth and style to the community as upwardly mobile captains and merchants built fine homes for themselves. A leisurely drive around the “uptown” area overlooking Admiralty Inlet reveals about 30 homes built between 1860 and 1900, restored to their late 19th-century glory in a variety of styles, including classic Victorian and Victorian Gothic, Italianate, Italianate Villa and Italianate Renaissance, Queen Anne and Georgian. Most are private residences and not open to the public. Port Townsend will once again pay homage to its background with the Victorian Heritage Festival, slated for March 23-25, 2018. For more information about next year’s event, visit www.2017.vicfest.org. Port Townsend shined in the 1880s and 1890s with the promise of a railroad. So many of the homes reflect the style of the waning Victorian Age, with massive construction and elaborate ornamentation. Tasteful plaques and signs give a mini-history lesson with the original owners’ names and dates built. The state’s oldest Methodist church, from 1871, has a museum open to the public, and the Episcopal church, built in 1860, remains a place of worship today.

Jefferson County Courthouse

But the most magnificent Port Townsend structure overseeing Port Townsend Bay and the entrance to Admiralty Inlet is the classical Victorian Jefferson County Courthouse, built in 1890-1892 of red brick with its 124-foot clock tower. The county’s business still is conducted in the building, a National Historic Landmark and one of the two oldest courthouses in the state. Port Townsend was designated a National

Historic District in 1976. After 15 years with an active Main Street program, Port Townsend was honored in 2000 with the Great American Main Street award from the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Several blocks of buildings restored to their late-Victorian facades and tree-lined streets make ambling downtown a pleasurable activity. Don’t forget to visit the downtown wharf for another great photo opportunity.

PORT TOWNSEND ANTIQUES/ARTS Lau g

• Vintage Boutique • Whimsical Wear • Beautiful Things

(Daily Bird Pottery)

Taste the difference for yourself!

n orthwi n d arts center

&

connecting arts

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360.301.5646

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7A1963712

www.laughingnome.com

7A1840774

2009 4th Street, Suite B Port Townsend, WA 98368

and

community

artist showcase

Saturdays - Port Townsend Farmers Market Sundays - Ballard Farmers Market - Seattle 7A1963658

360.379.4691 936 Washington St., P.T.

ery tt

Wandering Wardrobe

om nGn e Po i h

701 Water Street 360-379-1086 Wed. – Mon. 11:30 am – 5:30 pm northwindarts.org

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Exploring Port Townsend

Top: Taylor Street in downtown Port Townsend has plenty of fun options for visitors to explore. Left: The Haller Statue and Fountain is at the base of the Taylor Street stairs and was presented to Port Townsend in 1906.

JEFFERSON COUNTY CANNABIS 1ST PLACE

Best Cannabis Store

Jefferson County

DISCOVERY BAY CANNABIS 282023 US-101 PORT TOWNSEND 360-316-6148 www.discoverybaycannabis.com This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

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Once within the city limits of Port Townsend, you might have difficulty deciding what to do first. If you’re looking to shop, the downtown area has a plethora of businesses to fit any family member’s wants and needs. From high-class boutiques to sporting goods stores to consignment shops, spice shops to art galleries, the family could spend a whole day just in the downtown. Enjoy the waterfront views and the sounds of the sea gulls as you take in the historical architecture on the main drag. Manresa Castle was completed in 1892 as the home of Charles and Kate Eisenbeis. This then-30-room private residence went through several changes before becoming what it is today — a castle/hotel that can accommodate anywhere from a couple to a wedding party. The Waterstreet Hotel is another one that offers old-world charm near the port. Built in 1889 and completely renovated, Port Townsend’s N.D. Hill Building was designed by Seattle architect Elmer H. Fisher. His work also included Port Townsend’s Hastings Building and Seattle’s famous Pioneer Building. If you happen to be in town on a Saturday, swing by the Port Townsend Farmers Market between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. (now through December 2017) for an amazing selection of fresh vegetables, fruits, handcrafted goods and more. More than 70 vendors come each week. There are about 40 farms, four artisan cheesemakers and three cideries, plus bakers, espresso and coffee masters, soap and salve sellers and crafters post up for the day to sell their wares. The farmers market is in uptown on Tyler Street, between Lawrence and Clay streets. Because Port Townsend is on a little peninsula of its own, visitors might want to stay a night or two or seven at local accommodations. Whether you’re into camping or RV-ing, long-term or short-term vacation rentals, bed-and-breakfasts or motels and hotels, families and friends have myriad choices on places to stay.


trIo

of

from 1897 to 1953 and became a state park in 1955. A number of its Victorian buildings remain and can be toured by calling the park office at 360-385-3701. Visitors also can explore the military museum with its interactive, interpretative display. It maintains weekend hours from October through May. For more information about the park or camping, visit www.fortflagler.net.

Fort Worden State Park To uncover the best places to romp with your dog on the beach, hike to your heart’s content, be lullabied by waves slapping on the shore and fling open your tent flap to the sun sparkling over the mountains, just ask some Olympic Peninsula residents for their favorite parks. More than likely, they’ll direct you to a trio of former forts — now state parks — that are destinations unto themselves. Fort Flagler State Park, Fort Townsend State Park and Fort Worden State Park and Conference Center all are within a short drive from the Hood Canal Bridge and Port Townsend on the eastern side of the North Olympic Peninsula. A Discover Pass is required to visit these sites.

Fort Flagler State Park

namesake, faded into Jefferson County history for decades. There are 6.5 miles of forested hiking trails, including a self-guided nature trail and one highlighting the park’s fort history. The park is open year-round for day use.

Fort Worden State Park and Conference Center

Fort Worden State Park and Conference Center draws visitors from across the nation in large part due to Centrum, the WashingFort Townsend State Park ton state arts organization, which presents Although the Strait of Juan de Fuca and its inland bays had been explored and named workshops in the arts and seminars in the by British Capt. George Vancouver in the late sciences on site. But it’s also a day trip and camping destination with its two miles of 1790s, the settlement of Port Townsend sandy beaches. (originally Port Townshend) didn’t begin On entering the park, visitors will be until about 1850. swept back a century by three dozen Old Fort Townsend was established in 1856 on Port Townsend Bay to protect these Victorian houses that were used as barracks early settlers from surrounding Native Amer- in the fort’s early years. The park has 12 miles of hiking/biking ican tribes. Throughout the next century, the fort was trails and five miles of trails that are handicapped-compliant. on furlough more than it was in service. For more information, visit www.fort In 1895, after Port Townsend’s heyday, the worden.org. barracks burned and the fort, like its

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Fort Flagler State Park on the tip of Marrowstone Island is a bit out of the way, but definitely worth the scenic drive, as it is surrounded by Puget Sound. The state park has about 785 acres on a high bluff with vistas of Puget Sound and the Cascade Mountains. It has 12.5 miles of roads, 5 miles of hiking/biking trails and more than 3.5 miles of generous, sandy shoreline. For the intrepid, there’s swimming and waterskiing as well as saltwater fishing in the brisk water or from the shore. Fort Flagler was a working Army fort

forts

Trevor Huntingford ABR, RCC The Huntingford Team www.trevorhuntingford.com 360-621-9209 cell 360-437-4111, ext 8 office 40 Teal Lake Rd, Port Ludlow WA 98365

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EPISCOPAL

Saint Paul’s Episcopal Church An open and inclusive faith community

PORT TOWNSEND EVANGELICAL Evangelical Methodist Bible Church 2135 San Juan Ave. Port Townsend (360) 385-2076

Family Friendly. Bible Believing. Pastor James Lyman (360) 385-4544 SUNDAY 10 a.m. Bible Study 11 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m. Children’s Church MONDAY 10 a.m. Women’s Craft & Chat 3RD FRIDAY OF EACH MONTH 7 p.m. Free Movie Night Come early for the cartoons www.facebook.com/ebchurchpt emc.pt2135@gmail.com

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE First Church of Christ, Scientist Port Townsend 275 Umatilla, near Discovery and San Juan Port Townsend • (360) 379-1139 SUNDAY 10 a.m. Sunday Service 10 a.m. Sunday School WEDNESDAY Noon Testimony Meeting

1020 Jefferson Street (Corners of Jefferson & Tyler & Franklin) P.O. Box 753 Port Townsend • (360) 385-0770 Rev. Dianne P. Andrews, Rector

SUNDAY 8 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I 9:30 - 10:15 a.m. Enrichment Time for all ages 10:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II 10:30 a.m. Godly Play & Childcare 5 p.m. Evening Song 1st Sunday of the month

METHODIST

Trinity United Methodist Church

Built in 1871 609 Taylor Street Port Townsend (360) 385-0484 email: trinityumc@olympus.net Rev. Tony Brown SUNDAY 10 a.m. Worship Watch services live Sunday mornings on our website. Childcare available and handicap accessible

We welcome all persons equally. www.trinityumcpt.org

WEDNESDAY 10:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist and Healing Prayer

www.stpaulspt.org

Evangelical Lutheran Church in America 1120 Walker Street • (360) 385-1595 gracelutheranpt@gmail.com SUNDAY 10:30 a.m. Worship with Holy Communion WEDNESDAY 10:00 a.m. Lessons of the week Bible study FRIDAY 7:30 a.m. Men’s Bible & Breakfast at Seaport Landing 1201 Hancock Street, Port Townsend For current schedules, special activities and information, please call 360-385-1595 Visit us on the World Wide Web: www.gracelutheranpt.org

READING ROOM IN SUNDAY SCHOOL Mon & Fri. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wed 1:30 to 3 p.m. christiansciencechurchporttownsend.com

PRESBYTERIAN First Presbyterian Church of Port Townsend

1111 Franklin Street • (360) 385-2525 Spirit, Compassion, Justice SUNDAY 8:30 a.m. Adult Education 10 a.m. Worship & Youth Education www.fpcpt.org

ROMAN CATHOLIC

St. Mary Star of the Sea 1335 Blaine Street Port Townsend (360) 385-3700

MASS SCHEDULE SATURDAY 9:00 a.m. sabado misa en espa–ol 5:30 p.m. Vigil Mass SUNDAY 8:15 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. WEEKDAYS Mon., Thurs., Fri. 12:05 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m. COMMUNION SERVICES 12:05 Tuesday www.stmaryss.com

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331 Benton Street Port Townsend (360) 385-4831 info@ptadventist.org Pastor Collette Pekar

SATURDAY 9:30 a.m. Bible Study 11 a.m. Worship Service 2nd MONDAY EA. MONTH 5-8 p.m. Plant-Based Cooking at the Better Living Center 1505 Franklin St, Port Townsend TUESDAY 10 a.m. Bible Study (at the church) use the back door Noon Serenity Class (BLC) 2 p.m. Serenity for New Participants (BLC) TUES/ THURS 10-3 p.m. Community Service Center (BLC) WEDNESDAY 6 pm Home Bible Study Call/email for location

THURSDAY 8:30 p.m. Compline

LUTHERAN Grace Lutheran Church

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTISTS Port Townsend Seventh-Day Adventists Church

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Other Activities, Events & Updates Check out our events calendar www.ptadventist.org/calendar www.ptadventist.org/BLC

UNITY Unity Spiritual Enrichment Center Spirituality with Open Hearts ...Open Minds Rev. Pamela Douglas-Smith 3918 San Juan Ave. Port Townsend (Near Blue Heron School) Mailing Address: PO Box 1853 Port Townsend, WA 98368 (360) 385-6519 SUNDAYS 11 a.m. Inspirational Service & Children/Youth/Team Circles 5p.m. Meditation Service Check our website for classes, special events and meditation groups. Authentic Transformative Spiritual Community info@unitypt.org Visit our website at: www.unitypt.org


Ferry to Coupeville

Port Townsend offers a Washington State Department of Transportation ferry from the city to Coupeville. This quiet waterfront farming community — known to many as the heart of Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve on Whidbey Island — still reflects the character of a frontier seaport when Puget Sound was being settled. It is home to Fort Casey State Park, beaches and 91 nationally registered historical structures. Beyond its historical significance, Coupeville and Whidbey Island offer magnificent views and tranquility that inspire return visits. Throughout Ebey’s Reserve, from the Madrona Way shoreline of Penn Cove to the beach and bluff at Ebey’s Landing, visitors share space with farmers and bald eagles, gray whales and bicyclists, herons, otters and kayakers. Farming is the major industry here. Farm stands offer produce grown on small organic farms (also available in local markets). Cattle share the prairie with seed crops (not the same fields). You might also see golden grains of barley, beets and other food that might be destined for your table at an award-winning restaurant. For more information on Port Townsend ferry departure/arrival times, delays and more, visit www.wsdot.com/ferries. Reservations for the Port Townsend/ Coupeville routes are available 24/7 at www.takeaferry.com. Port Townsend is a fairly small town with limited parking in the downtown area. Street parking is limited to two hours. Ferry passengers are advised to park their cars in the Haines Place Park-N-Ride Lot. Parking is available at the nearby bank on weekends only after 1 p.m. Bicyclists should arrive 20 minutes prior to departure time to be loaded at the beginning of the loading process. Reservations are not needed.

cently restored 1892 Port Townsend City Hall building. Housed in the former municipal courtroom, fire hall and jail spaces, the museum’s exhibits illustrate the lively history of communities born in waterfront forests more than 150 years ago. Museum hours are daily from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission for adults is $6, $5 for seniors, and children 3-12 are $1. A passport to the museum and the Rothschild House is $6. The increasingly dark days of autumn can be brightened by the Wearable Art Exhibit

at the Jefferson Museum of Art & History. The exhibit opened Oct. 6 and features pieces from Wearable Art Shows from 2011 to the present. When the wearable art pieces move from the runway to the museum, they’ll transition from costumes on living models to works that will no longer have motion. Visitors also will see sketches and swatches that are submitted for entry into this juried show. For more information about the Jefferson Museum of Art & History, call 360-385-1003 or visit www.jchsmuseum.org.

PORT HADLOCK

EVANGELICAL FREE Irondale Church A Place Of Promise To Grow And Belong

681 Irondale Rd., (360) 385-1720 Port Hadlock irondalechurch@gmail.com Pastor David Hodgin SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:30 a.m. Worship 6:30 p.m. Evening Bible Study TUESDAY 4-6:30 p.m. Community Soup free meal - everyone welcome

PORT LUDLOW

COMMUNITY CHURCH Port Ludlow Community Church

Connecting Christ and Community 9534 Oak Bay Road Port Ludlow, WA 98365 (360) 437-0145 Dennis LaMance, Pastor

SUNDAY 8:45 a.m. Adult Bible Class 10:30 a.m. Service of Worship TUESDAY Home Groups

Historical Society

email: plcc@olympus.net portludlowcommunitychurch.org

The Jefferson Museum of Art & History, located at 540 Water St., is in the magnifi-

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Aero Museum

coming from contract work, rummage sales, online auctions and individual donations. After seven years of hard work by museum volunteers and contributors, along with generous support from the community and local contractors, owners opened a new $3.5 million facility to the public in the summer of 2008. Work has now begun on a restoration shop near the new building. Plans are in place for continued expansion over the next several years. At any given time, a half-dozen antique airplanes are being hand-restored by youth

If antique airplane aficionados are anything like their car-worshipping counterparts, they’ll hit every museum within a hundred miles. One not to miss on the North Olympic Peninsula is the Port Townsend Aero Museum at Jefferson County International Airport, 4 miles south of the junction of state Highways 19 and 20. The museum was originally based out of a scattering of hangars at the west end of the airport. Fundraising for a new building was a major undertaking, with proceeds

apprentices in the building’s shop, mentored by skilled volunteer craftsmen. The Port Townsend Aero Museum displays more than just airplanes. Its world-class aviation art collection provides a stunning survey of military and civil flight history. The museum is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays. Admission is $10 for adults, $9 for seniors and active military, $6 for youth 7-12 and free for kids 6 and younger. For more information, phone 360-3795244 or visit www.ptaeromuseum.com.

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Maritime Center & Wooden Boat Foundation

Port Townsend celebrates its maritime past and future with the Northwest Maritime Center, located at the town’s northeast end at 431 Water St. The Northwest Maritime Center is a nonprofit organization backed by an impressive cross-section of citizens, nonprofit groups and government agencies. Founded in 1978, the Wooden Boat Foundation operates a hands-on learning laboratory for students with a wide array of courses and activities related to nautical

science and maritime history. A mezzanine running the full length of the building provides a great vantage point to observe the Learning Lab activities. A hoist system anchored there raises small boats and materials to second-floor classrooms. The foundation offers educational courses to adults and youths. The public commons area is a popular site for concerts and craft shows. A boardwalk links a city park, the center’s dock and the Point Hudson jetty. For more information, phone 360-3853628 or visit www.nwmaritime.org.

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360-344-DOCS 141 Hudson Street Located at Point Hudson Marina www.docsgrill.com

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Kelly Art Deco Light Museum Located at 2000 Sims Way, the Kelly Art Deco Light Museum houses a grand history of art deco lights that graced the homes of a time when speakeasies were common and Prohibition was the law of the land. The museum gives a rare glimpse of the years 1928 to 1938. See more than 400 fixtures, including chandeliers, wall sconces and table lights that graced the homes of the middle and upper class during the Great Depression. Some lights are so rare that no books have ever documented them and some became obsolete before a catalog could be made to sell them. Museum opening hours are Mondays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free. Visit www.kellymuseum.org or phone 360-379-9030.

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Port Townsend Paper mill

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You might smell something a bit funny as you travel into Port Townsend. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Port Townsend Paper mill, located at 100 Mill Road, which has been in continuous operation for more than 85 years. It produces kraft pulp, paper, containerboard and specialty products by blending virgin and recycled fibers at the mill headquarters. Port Townsend Paper Corp. is the largest private employer in Jefferson County and the largest recycler on the North Olympic Peninsula, recycling one-third of all the cardboard in Washington. The mill produces about 950 tons of paper and market pulp each day, equating to 325,000 tons of paper product annually. It has a 33-acre runoff pond where water from the mill is purified and then channeled into Port Townsend Bay at a rate of 12 million gallons daily. For questions and comments, phone 360-379-4224. For more information on the paper mill, visit www.ptpc.com.


JEFFERSON COUNTY SHOPPING

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Discovery Bay

Discovery Bay is a lovely place to take a rest from the road, stay overnight or just get away from the faster pace of city living. Located at U.S. Highway 101 and state Highway 20, “Disco Bay” is the home of the first recreational marijuana business on the Peninsula. The Port of Port Townsend owns a public recreational boat launch off Gardiner Beach Road that provides access to the bay. While kayakers sometimes paddle along the shoreline, the bay is typically quiet. Discovery Bay boasts commercial enterprises, including crabbing, oystering, clamming, timbering, security training and gravel extraction.

British explorer Capt. George Vancouver found Discovery Bay in 1792 and named the body of water after his flagship, HMS Discovery. After a sawmill was built in 1853, boats carried wood in and out of the bay. The old mill is no longer standing. In 2008, the North Olympic Salmon Coalition created and restored salt marsh habitat, known as the Salmon Creek Estuary. Be sure to stop in the new Disco Bay Detour. It boasts 12 taps pouring local craft cider beer and kombucha, plus local wine. Food and live music are regularly on the menu, too. Disco Bay Detour shares a parking lot

with the Discovery Bay Village Store and Sea Change Cannabis. In August 2017, Discovery Bay Outdoor Exchange was opened next to the Discovery Bay Village Store. The shop makes accessing outdoors activities easier with consignment gear and rentals. If you’re a fan of the Olympic Discovery Trail (p. 70), you’ll be excited to learn that a new section is nearing completion at Discovery Bay. Once complete, it will bring the trail one step closer to its connection point with the Larry Scott Trail in Port Townsend. The trail marks the final phase of a restoration project along south Discovery Bay.

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John Wayne Marina

KICK BACK, RELAX AND SPEND A SUNNY DAY (OR A FEW!) IN

SEQUIM

In the rain shadow of the 8,000-foot Olympic Mountains, this city in the Dungeness Valley is one of the driest locales in Western Washington, which means summertime sun abounds. Did you know?

Sequim, also known as the “Lavender Capital of North America,” draws thousands to its Lavender Weekend in

July. About two hours from Seattle, Tacoma and Olympia, the SequimDungeness Valley is home to some 27,000 residents,

many of whom retired to the area from across the country. Pronounced “Skwim,” downtown is a destination for tourists and

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locals to eat, shop and enjoy conversation over cups of coffee or glasses of wine. Come for the sun and stay for the friendliness.

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A sunny, friendly city

Approximately two hours from Seattle, Tacoma and Olympia, the Sequim-Dungeness Valley gladly has adopted the moniker of “Sunny Sequim,” as it is blessed by an average of 300 days of sunshine per year. In the rain shadow of the 8,000-foot Olympic Mountains, Sequim receives an average of 16 inches of rain annually. Sequim won the Best Northwestern Small Town distinction in the USA Today 10Best Reader’s Choice travel award contest in April 2017. The city is home to the longest-running festival in the state. The Sequim Irrigation Festival will celebrate 123 years in May 2018 and was named “The Best Small Town Celebration” in Evening Magazine’s 2016 Best of the Northwest competition.

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We’re keeping you on the road!

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Downtown Sequim is a destination for those who enjoy eating, shopping, exploring and relaxing. The downtown is a walkable community of locally owned and operated specialty shops anchored by Sequim Avenue and Washington Street. Within its six-square-block area, there are nearly 60 small businesses that are conveniently located, offer plenty of variety and take pride in personalized customer service. Just park your car on any of the non-metered streets and stroll to one of downtown’s dozen or so restaurants for home-style cooking to gourmet fare. Once fortified, meander through downtown’s distinctive shops featuring surprising goods such as lavender products, scrapbooking supplies, scented candles, handcrafted chocolates, spices and teas, an artisan bakery and vintage and exotic clothing and linens. Take a break at one of half a dozen coffeehouses and bistros downtown or sample Washington and international wines at a wine seller. Several stores carry Northwest arts and crafts, and there’s an art gallery featuring local artists.


SEQUIM LODGING

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Heart of Sequim Across from Costco

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Downtown businesses and artists joined forces several years ago to make art available to all with the 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. First Friday Art Walk. From 5 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., join the artists’ reception, which offers snacks and wine at the art co-operative, Blue Whole Gallery, at 129 W. Washington St. The walk includes more than a dozen venues highlighting more area artists. Maps are available at participating businesses. It’s a great time to mingle, nosh and appreciate all the art downtown Sequim has to offer. Take in local artwork at Blue Whole Gallery on West Washington Street. The name of the gallery comes from the term pilots use to describe the “blue hole” in the skies above Sequim. The gallery has hosted workshops, demonstrations and exhibitions, and its artists have participated in many art and community events. Sequim also has a strong community theater in Olympic Theatre Arts, 414 N. Sequim Ave. “The Explorers Club” by Nell Benjamin is the fall production, running Oct. 20-Nov. 5 on the Main Stage. Performances are held at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday evenings. Winter Main Stage shows include a Holiday Variety Show, Dec. 7-10; “The Nutcracker Ballet,” presented by the Sequim Ballet, Dec. 15-17; and “Time Stands Still” by Donald Margulies, Feb. 9-25. For more performance and ticket information, visit www.olympictheatre arts.org or phone the box office at 360-683-7326 between 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. Another downtown draw is the Sequim Farmers Market, every Saturday through Oct. 27. This pet-friendly market at Civic Center Plaza is abuzz with vendors selling locally caught fish and homegrown meats, fruits, vegetables, honey and crafts as musicians play lively tunes. For more information about visiting Sequim and the Dungeness Valley, check out www.visitsunnysequim.com.

www.OlympicViewInn.com

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Lavender history

Sequim Museum & Arts Center

Sequim Museum & Arts Center is dedicated to presenting the history and culture of the families that settled the Sequim Prairie, Dungeness and areas of eastern Clallam County. The exhibit center at 175 W. Cedar St. is home to the Manis mastodon bones that are the oldest in North America. Carbon testing and DNA testing have earned Emanual Manis and his discovery a place in the Smithsonian Institution and multiple scientific magazines for decades. On permanent exhibit is a rowing shell built by George Pocock, the man who built the boat that the University of Washington crew used to win the gold medal at the 1936 Olympics against Hitler’s team in Germany. The museum is open from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays and first

Fridays from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. For extended hours on special occasions, phone 360-683-8110 or visit www.Sequim Museum.com. The Dungeness Schoolhouse at 2781 Towne Road hosts weddings, musicals, classes, family reunions and tours that keep the 126-year-old National Historic site busy. Phone 360-681-2257 and leave a message, or visit www.sequimmuseum.com/dungenessschoolhouse.html to download a rental agreement. Visit the Veterans Memorial at 544 N. Sequim Ave., also the site of the new exhibit center. This museum building houses the administration building, research library and an artifact collection. It also has a classroom for students to see and learn about the mastodon remains. Veterans ceremonies are held throughout the year.

SEQUIM BED & BREAKFAST/ARTS G A L L E RY

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Great mountain & water views. Breakfast is served family style. Bob Clark 322 Clark Road, Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-4431

bluewholegallery.com Mon.-Sat. 10-5 • Sunday 11-3 129 W. Washington, Sequim • 360-681-6033

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The first Sequim lavender farms began more than 20 years ago as local farmers recognized that the region had the ideal growing climate for the plant. The founders of the Sequim lavender industry began with a vision of rolling purple fields to replace fallow dairy pasture, restoring the agricultural base of the fertile Sequim prairie. Cultivation of lavender in the Sequim-Dungeness Valley has grown into a strong, environmentally sound, agribusiness. Over 110,000 lavender plants are grown each year in the area. With myriad uses beyond sheer fragrance — cosmetic, culinary, medicinal, craft, decorative — the herb has fostered dozens of small, creative ventures across the Olympic Peninsula and beyond. Area lavender growers have a worldwide online presence and visitors from all over the world attend Sequim Lavender Weekend. The Sequim Lavender Festival, part of Sequim Lavender Weekend, has expanded the lavender industry in the Sequim-Dungeness Valley and increased agritourism, cultural tourism and culinary tourism on the North Olympic Peninsula. Save the date for the three-day weekend, slated for July 20-22, 2018. The festival buzzes with farm tours, a street fair with lavender products of all kinds, an arts and crafts fair, children’s activities and live music. For more information, visit www. lavenderfestival.com. As with any crop, lavender plants are dormant during the winter months, but they rejuvenate with the spring, becoming lush and green. The first purple hues tint the fields in late June. Though the local farms aren’t painted in purple during autumn and winter, the products produced from lavender can still become staples in your household. Shop hours vary by farm; visit www. sequimlavender.org to find area lavender businesses. And make sure to look for lavenderinfused food and beverages throughout your travels on the Peninsula!


John Wayne Marina

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SUPPLEMENTS & BODY CARE

GROCERY

UNIQUE MERCANTILE

• Farm-Direct • Organics • Sequim & Eastern Washington

• Vitamins • Herbal Remedies • Homeopathy • Skin, Hair, & Face Care •Natural Cosmetics

• Natural, Organic, Allergen Free and Non GMO Selections • Bulk Foods

OLDTYME BUTCHER

• Gifts & Greeting Cards • Kitchen Supply

FARM STORE

• In-Store Fresh Smoked Meats • Our Own Beef • Fresh Poultry & Seafood

COUNTRY-STYLE DELI

• Daily Soups, Salads, & Sandwiches • Espresso & Fruit Smoothies

• Animal Feeds • Hay & Straw • Pet Supplies • Birdseed

NURSERY

• Fruit & Veggie Starts • Ornamentals • Flowers • Natural Fertilizers & Soils • Potted & Bare-Root Trees

Come see our store in the Sequim Village Center

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Popular with boaters and landlubbers alike, John Wayne Marina, 2577 West Sequim Bay Road, offers a beautiful park-like area, a fuel dock, moorage, boat launches and a fine restaurant. It was constructed in 1985 on 22 acres of land donated by the John Wayne family. Located on Pitship Point in Sequim Bay (48 degrees 03 minutes 43 seconds north latitude and 123 degrees 02 minutes 18 seconds west longitude), John Wayne Marina is named for “The Duke,” but since opening in 1985, the marina has made a reputation for itself as a full-service facility in a superb location. The marina offers both permanent and guest moorage on a first-come, first-served basis, parking and a launch for smaller craft and boat rentals. Ashore, the John Wayne Marina includes a restaurant and restrooms, with showers and laundry for tenants and even a public meeting room with kitchen. Film actor John Wayne loved sailing his Wild Goose in the area of Sequim Bay, which he considered a prime place for a marina. Wayne donated the land in 1975. Owned and operated by the Port of Port Angeles, the marina is a popular stop. Boaters can take advantage of a fuel dock open seven days a week, and the marina offers electric and water hookups. Trash disposal, a sewage pump-out and waste oil disposal also are available. Award-winning chefs prepare lunch and dinner at the marina’s restaurant, The Dockside Grill. Along with fresh seafood and cedarplanked salmon, the restaurant serves steaks and poultry, salads, sandwiches and appetizers, with a full bar and great selection of wines. Lunch is served Wednesdays through Sundays from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., and dinner is from 3:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Reservations are recommended. The marina and its beautiful park areas are popular walking and picnicking places for non-boaters. Dozens of species of waterfowl make for good birding and the Olympic Discovery Trail runs nearby. Pets on leashes are welcome.

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Dungeness Recreation Area

The Dungeness Recreation Area is another of Clallam County’s favorite recreational destinations and the gateway to Dungeness Spit. The 216-acre county park has upland forest, wetlands, sandy bluffs, campsites and spectacular vistas of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Vancouver Island and Mount Baker. Picnic on the bluff, watch the shipping lanes and catch a glimpse of the upland birds. Witness northern harriers suspended in air, eavesdrop on a warbler’s serenade, and become enchanted with the melancholy cooing of the mourning dove. Park amenities include a group camp with picnic shelter, play equipment and miles of trails for pedestrians and equestrians. From U.S. Highway 101, between

Sequim and Port Angeles, turn north onto Kitchen-Dick Road (near Milepost 260). To get there, travel approximately 3.5 miles; the road takes a 90-degree turn, becoming Lotzgesell Road, and the park entrance will be on your left. For more information on the Dungeness Recreation Area, visit www.clallam.net/ Parks/Dungeness.html or phone 360-6835847.

Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge

Adjacent to the county park is the Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge, which is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and covers 631 acres. President Woodrow Wilson established the refuge Jan. 20, 1915. A trail wanders through the trees and

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eventually drops down to the Dungeness Spit. Dungeness Spit is the world’s longest natural sand spit, growing at a rate of about 20 feet per year. Pay a $3 fee at the kiosk/information center to enter the refuge. The spit is 5.5 miles long with the New Dungeness Light Station, first lit in 1857 and available for tours, near its tip. Hikers are restricted to the north shore of Dungeness Spit to reach the New Dungeness Light Station and must arrive and depart between sunrise and sunset, avoiding high tides. For a tide schedule, visit www.new dungenesslighthouse.com. If you’re not up for a strenuous hike, take your pet and stroll along the straitside bluffs of a 4-mile loop in the Dungeness Recreation Area for a bird’s-eye view of the spit. The inner shore of the spit is a wildlife refuge for nesting birds, and lucky hikers will be favored with seeing a variety of feathered critters. At its highest point, the spit is about 15 feet above sea level and parts of it are under water during winter storms. Camping and beachcombing are not permitted in the refuge. No pets are allowed on the refuge trail or the spit, but leashed pets are allowed in the recreation area. To get there, go through the recreation area to the refuge parking lot to access Dungeness Spit. For more information, phone 360-4578451 or visit www.fws.gov/refuge/dungeness.


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Why does a Steller’s jay’s feather look blue when there is no blue pigment in it? Why does the murre’s egg have that odd shape? How do you tell a lynx from a bobcat? All kinds of answers — and a wonderful place to ramble — are found at Dungeness River Audubon Center at Railroad Bridge Park, 2151 W. Hendrickson Road. With its stunning displays, hands-on exhibits and knowledgeable staff, the Audubon Center is a must-see, a focal point for study and education concerning the Dungeness River Watershed and its environs. The main room is lined with cases housing hundreds of examples of birds of the area, along with lynx, black bear, raccoons and mountain lions. Hands-on exhibits include drawers full of the fascinating and the curious: bones, feathers, eggs and teeth of species from songbird to mammoth. Check out spectacular specimens of taxidermied animals in the River Center, prepared by Claude and Edna Ritze of Sequim. Visit the Native Plant Garden, where visitors can learn about familiar foods and places Pacific Northwest animals love. Children will enjoy going on a scavenger hunt through the park, and the River Center is a great place to begin a ramble along the riverside trails through the forest or over the stony shore of the Dungeness River. Through October, the center is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays and noon to 4 p.m. Sundays. November through March, come visit from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays and from noon to 4 p.m. Saturdays. From 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. every Wednesday, take a bird walk with volunteers from the Dungeness River Audubon Center. Meet at the center in Railroad Bridge park. For more information and future event listings, visit www.dungenessriver center.org or phone 360-681-4076.

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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Recreate at Port Williams

Enjoy the autumnal leaves as you make your way out to Port Williams in Sequim. Port Williams’ official name is Marlyn Nelson County Park at Port Williams. This 1-acre gem was deeded to Clallam County Parks in 1976. This park has a saltwater boat launch (18 feet or shorter), several picnic tables (some with fire pits), public beach access, a vault toilet and a spacious parking area. Drive north out of Sequim on SequimDungeness Way. Turn right on Port Williams Road (at the roundabout) and this road will take you into the park. Bring your kayak or small boat for a trip around Sequim Bay. Walk the beach or simply park at the water’s edge to contemplate as the ships pass by. For more information, phone the Clallam County Parks, Fair and Facilities Department at 360-417-2291. Proud Heating & Air Conditioning Partner of the Seattle Seahawks

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ORyour trade-in allowances fromDealer $100 for up complete to $1,000 program valid on qualifying equipment only. vary bySpecial equipment. All sales See independent Trane program eligibility, dates, dates, details andOffers restrictions. Special financing offers See your independent Trane Dealer for complete eligibility, details and restrictions. financing offers must be to homeowners in the United States. Void where prohibited. The Wells Fargo HomeProjects Projects credit card is issued must be to homeowners in the United States. Void where prohibited. The Wells Fargo Home credit card is All issued OR trade-in allowances from $100 up to qualifying equipment only. Offers Offers varyby by equipment. sales ORWells trade-in allowances $1,000 valid on Lender. qualifying equipment only. vary equipment. All sales by Fargo Financial National Bank, an Equal Housing Special terms apply to qualifying purchases charged with by Wells Fargo Financial National Bank, an Equal Housing Lender. Special terms apply to qualifying purchases charged with must be in theterms United States. prohibited. The WellsFargo Fargo Homeare Projects credit card issued must be to to homeowners homeowners Void where prohibited. The Wells Home Projects credit card isismonthly issued approved APR continue to apply apply untilall all qualifying purchases are paidin infull. full.The The approvedcredit. credit.The The special special terms APR will will continue to until qualifying purchases paid monthly by WellsFargo Fargo Financial Special to qualifying purchases charged with by Wells Financial National Bank, an Equal Lender. Specialterms terms apply topayments qualifying purchases charged with payment for purchase will thatHousing will pay payLender. forthe thepurchase purchase fullapply inequal equal paymentsduring during the promotional payment forthis this purchase will be be the the amount amount that will for ininfull in the promotional approved credit. The special until all qualifying purchases paid inyou The monthly approved credit. The terms APR will continue apply until allsuch qualifying purchases are paid infull. full. The monthly (special period. The for applytoto toapply certain fees such asaalate late paymentare feeor orif ifyou use the card (specialterms) terms) period. The APR APR for Purchases will apply certain fees as payment fee use the card forfor payment for this this purchase purchase will be the the amount amount that pay purchase in in equal during the other For accounts, the APR Purchases is28.99%. 28.99%. you are charged interestin inany anybilling billing cycle, the othertransactions. transactions. Fornew new accounts, forwill Purchases is IfIfyou are interest cycle, the payment for will be that will pay for for the the purchase infull full incharged equalpayments payments during thepromotional promotional (special terms) period. Thewill APR for Purchases will fees as payment fee ififchange. you the card for minimum interest charge will be $1.00. accurate as of toto current minimum interest charge be $1.00. This information information accurate assuch of3/1/2017 3/1/2017 andisissubject subject change. For current (special terms) period. The APR for Purchases will apply apply to toisiscertain certain fees such asaalate lateand payment feeor or youuse useFor the card for information, callus usFor at1-800-431-5921. 1-800-431-5921. 05/30/2017. other transactions. For new accounts, accounts, the the APR for isis 28.99%. information, call at Offer expires 05/30/2017. other transactions. new APRexpires for Purchases Purchases 28.99%. IfIf you you are arecharged chargedinterest interestininany anybilling billingcycle, cycle,the the minimum interest interest charge charge will will be be $1.00. $1.00. This This information minimum information isis accurate accurate as as of of 3/1/2017 3/1/2017 and andisissubject subjectto tochange. change.For Forcurrent current information, call us at 1-800-431-5921. Offer expires 12/31/2017 05/30/2017. information, call us at 1-800-431-5921. Offer expires 05/30/2017.

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Be on the lookout for Sequim’s famous Roosevelt elk herd as you enter town from the east. Elk-crossing signal lights on U.S. Highway 101 are triggered by herd members wearing transmitting radio collars. From time to time, they do cross the road en masse, halting traffic. Roosevelt elk are native to the Olympic Peninsula, with bulls weighing up to 1,100 pounds and cows in the 600-pound range. One herd, comprising about 100 animals, considers the Sequim area part of its range. When not in the forest, they graze in farm fields and on lawns. Although the Sequim elk appear to be tame, they are not. Normally, they avoid close contact with people and move away when approached; however, they may show signs of agitation if people get too close, throw things or when people or cars block what the elk consider to be an escape route. Caution should be used at all times when viewing the herd. Favorite spots for elk viewing seem to be along Happy Valley Road, West Sequim Bay Road and Port Williams Road.


Olympic Game Farm

A family-run business, Olympic Game Farm at 1423 Ward Road in Sequim, is home to many animal species, both endangered and non-endangered. Many of its animals are veterans of television and movies. For more than 28 years, the farm worked exclusively with Walt Disney Studios and many others on features for theater and television. Today, the farm is home to more than 20 different exotic and non-exotic species, with hundreds of animals on site for families to “get face to face with wildlife” from the comfort of their vehicles on the farm’s driving tour. Also visit its historical studio barn and freshwater aquarium. On the driving tour, there are friendly llamas that eat bread from your hand, performing bears, grazing elk and buffalo. You also will see many animals that are on the endangered species list, such as timber wolves, Bengal tigers and African lions. The farm also is home to coyotes, bobcats, cougars and many more species. Driving tours are open year-round from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. There is an admission fee for the tours. Visit www.olygamefarm.com or phone 360-683-4295 or 800-778-4295 for rates.

Carrie Blake Park

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Dedicated to families and community by... Enhancing the lives of our residents by providing “personal centered care” which is unsurpassed in the industry to help those on their journey with Dementia. • Licensed nurses on-site 24/7 • Variety of activities encouraging socialization while stimulating the mind and spirit • Adult Day Stay Program 7 days a week up to 10 hours daily • Overnight Respite Stay Program (1 to 30 days) • Secured home environment with freedom to wander inside and outside our uniquely and specifically designed building

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Noted as one of the best places in the country to retire, Sequim also provides much for visitors with children: playgrounds, a skate park, animals, old bones, music and enough activities to settle even the most tireless in bed peacefully come nightfall. Carrie Blake Community Park (202 N. Blake Ave., near the QFC shopping center) has woodsy groves, trails, an off-leash dog park, a dog agility course, duck ponds, playground equipment, a skate park, ball fields and soccer fields that offer space for a game. The construction of a pickleball facility is tentatively scheduled for 2018. A new access road to the park is being built this year. Just north of Carrie Blake Park, the Water Reuse Demonstration Park has walking and biking trails, exercise stations and a pond for radio-controlled boats where children under 14 also can fish.

Olympic Game Farm cubs and employee

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Cannabis information

Here’s a quick rundown of where legal marijuana is available on the North Olympic Peninsula and how to go about procuring it.

In Clallam County: • Mister Buds, 536 Marine Drive, Port Angeles • Satori Port Angeles, 2840 E. U.S. Highway 101, Port Angeles • Sparket R&R, 1215 E. Front St., Port Angeles • Sweet Relief, 2947 E. U.S. Highway 101, Port Angeles • The Hidden Bush, 3230 E. U.S. Highway 101, Port Angeles • Muffy’s Smokin’ Greens, 3134 E. U.S. Highway 101, Port Angeles • Karma Cannabis, 131 River Road, Sequim • Nature’s Gifts, 755 W. Washington St. Suite C, Sequim • Cannabis Coast, 193161 U.S. Highway 101, Forks In Jefferson County: • Sea Change Cannabis, 282332 U.S. Highway 101, Discovery Bay • Discovery Bay Cannabis, 282023 U.S. Highway 101, Discovery Bay • Herbal Access Retail, 661 Ness’ Corner Road, Port Hadlock

• Reefer Den, 2123 W. Sims Way, Port Townsend • Chimacum Cannabis, 9034 Beaver Valley Road, Chimacum

16 ounces of solid marijuana-infused product or 72 ounces of liquid marijuanainfused product. What’s not allowed? Pot use and possession remain a criminal act on federal lands, which include Olympic National Park and Olympic National Forest. Do not take products to another state or country. Do not drive while under the influence.

Where can I smoke? On private property out of view of the general public. How much can I possess? For those 21 and older, 1 ounce of usable marijuana, marijuana paraphernalia,

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This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

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Sequim’s Premier


The Dungeness River

The 32-mile-long Dungeness River flows through the Sequim-Dungeness Valley. It begins high in the Olympic Mountains near Mystery Mountain and flows into Dungeness Bay on the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The river is home to nine different salmonid species (meaning that they are or are like salmon), including pink, chum, chinook, coho and sockeye salmon; steelhead/rainbow trout, cutthroat and dolly varden/bull trout.

At the river’s mouth, where freshwater mixes with tidal saltwater, is the Dungeness River Estuary, a region of high productivity and a wide variety of diverse creatures. The sheltered waters of Dungeness Bay provide feeding habitats for many creatures, from tiny invertebrates to majestic eagles. The estuary also provides essential nursery grounds for fish, crustaceans and many other organisms. For more information, visit www. dungenessrivercenter.org.

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NORTHWEST NATIVE EXPRESSIONS GIFT SHOP & ART GALLERY Located at Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal Center

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“Sequim’s Largest Little Herb Store”

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Take Home a Little Piece of Sequim

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Sequim’s Premiere Destination Sequim’s Premiere Destination for Northwest Souvenirs, for Northwest Souvenirs, Sweets, Treats & Treasures Sweets, Treats & Treasures Monday–Saturday 10–5 Monday – Thursday 11:00 to 5:00 Monday–Saturday 10–5 Friday – Saturday 10:00 to 5:00 and Seasonal Sundays and Seasonal Sundays Seasonal Sundays

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Nomadic Traders • Jag Jeans Keren Hart • Jag Jeans Tribal Sportswear Sportswear Tribal Exclusive Vera Vera Bradley Bradley Retailer Exclusive Retailerin inSequim Sequim QualityTanning Tanning Equipment Quality Equipment andLuxury Luxury Skincare and Skincare SmartTan Tan Certified Certified Retreat Smart Retreat &&Skincare Consultants Skincare Consultants

Gifts and Collectibles Large selection of tumbled stones Crystals -Mineral Specimens Gemstone Carvings and Spheres Sterling Silver Jewelry Czech Glass Beads

135W WWashington Washington St • Downtown Downtown Sequim 135 Sequim Monday - Friday Monday Friday9-6 9-6 •• Saturday Saturday10-5 10-5 www.solarcitysequim.com www.solarcitysequim.com

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(360) 683-1418

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511 E. Washington Street, Sequim (Next to Sequim Sunnyside Mini-Storage)

Open Tues. - Fri. 10 - 5; Sat. 10 - 4


Don’t miss Blyn

As you make your way onto the North Olympic Peninsula, chances are you’ll pass through Blyn on the shores of Sequim Bay. The area includes the Jamestown S’Klallam Indian Reservation, established in 1874 by the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe (p. 98). Coming into Blyn, visitors will find the tribal campus, which includes a gallery, carving shed and public restrooms, plus community planning buildings that overlook the impressive Sequim Bay. Stop at the Longhouse Market to fuel up your vehicle and your bellies. The 7 Cedars Casino is a hotspot for live

entertainment, festivals, seasonal events and more on the Peninsula. Swing in for poker, bingo, slots and other table games. The casino also offers plenty of dining options for the weary traveler or party-goer. The Rainshadow Disc Golf Park is adjacent to Thompson Road, off Old Blyn Highway, about 1 mile east of Blyn. The course is open to the public yearround, and there are no fees charged to play. The park opens 30 minutes before sunrise and closes 30 minutes after sunset. Parking overnight or camping in the park is prohibited.

The

Savory Drizzle

• FINE LINENS & •

UNIQUE GIFTS FROM INDIA

SEQUIM SHOPPING

Come see our new fall accessories Hats, Gloves, Scarves, Purses & More

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139 W. Washington St 360-683-2050

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119 E. Washington Street, Sequim

Olive Oils & Vinegars 7A1961475

Monday - Friday 10-5:30 • Saturday 11-5

Karen’s

Mon–Sat, 10am–5pm Call for more information www.karens-quilt-shop.com

271 S. 7th Ave #26 Sequim, WA 98382 karensquiltshop@gmail.com

SBR’s and Suppressors in Stock

(360) 683-6812

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FALL/WINTER 2017-2018

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360.681.0820 271 S. 7th Ave #26 Sequim, WA 98382 sequimsew@yahoo.com

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NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

7A1948162

FredsGuns2.0@gmail.com 261340 HWY 101, Sequim www.FREDSGUNS.com

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Family Locally &ned Ow

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FOURSQUARE

LUTHERAN

King’s Way Foursquare Church

Faith Lutheran Church

Pastor Mike VanProyen SUNDAY MORNINGS 8:15 9:30 with Children’s Ministry 11:15 with Children’s Ministry

SUNDAY 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. Worship 9:45 a.m. Bible Classes

website: www.thekingsway.net email: info@thekingsway.net 1023 Kitchen-Dick Road Sequim, WA

SEQUIM

CALVARY

Calvary Chapel Sequim 91 S. Boyce Road Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-5995

SUNDAY 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m. WEDNESDAY EVE 7:00 p.m. www.calvarychapelsequim.com

(LCMS) 382 W Cedar • (360) 683-4803 Rev. Steve Eaton Rev. Roger Stites

ASSEMBLIES OF GOD Sequim Worship Center

“Sharing Good News from the Edge of the Olympic Mountains to the Ends of the Earth” 640 N. Sequim Avenue (360) 683-7981 David Westman, Pastor

Youth Groups & Family Activities Christian Preschool HOLY COMMUNION 1st, 3rd & 5th Sundays of the month Both Services www.flcsequim.org

Dungeness Valley Lutheran Church

(ELCA) 925 North Sequim Ave. (360) 681-0946 Grace Abounds Interim Pastor Beth Orling

SUNDAY 8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Worship 9:40 a.m. Education Hour

SUNDAY 10:45 a.m. Worship Service info@sequimworshipcenter.org www.sequimworshipcenter.org

WEDNESDAY 5:45 p.m. Potluck 6:30 p.m. Education Hour

www.dvelca.org email: dvlcoffice@gmail.com

JEWISH Congregation Olympic B’nai Shalom FRIENDS/QUAKER Peninsula Evangelical Friends Church

Between Sequim & Port Angeles on Old Olympic Hwy. 1291 N. Barr Road, Pt. Angeles (360) 452-9105 Pastor Jonathan D. Fodge Ministers: The Entire Congregation SUNDAY 9:00 a.m. Meeting for Worship 10:45 a.m. Sunday School jfodge@olypen.com Families worshiping and learning together www.sermonaudio.com/pefc www.pefcpa.com

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SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Sequim Seventh-day Adventist Church

30 Sanford Lane (Off Sequim Ave.) (360) 683-7373 sequimadventist@sequimsdachurch.org www.sequimadventistchurch.org Mark Pekar, Pastor Collette Pekar, Pastor

Monthly Shabbat Services & Onegs High Holy Days and Other Jewish Holiday Services Social and Cultural Events... Bi-Monthly Newsletter Connections to Seattle and Tacoma Congregations For Information: www.obsh.org, (360) 452-2471 or write P.O. Box 553, Port Angeles, WA 98362

SATURDAY Morning 9:30 a.m. Bible Classes-all ages 10:50 a.m. Praise & Worship WEDNESDAY Evening 7 p.m. Prayer Meeting For activities throughout the year, call, email or visit our web page. Come worship with us!

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST

Looking for a different kind of “church” community?

Olympic Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Explore Spirituality. Engage Community. Transform the World.

10:30 a.m. Sunday Service and Children’s Program-Enrichment & Play Fellowship Hour following the service

FIRST TUESDAY 6:00 p.m. Contemplative Service (Excluding Dec., Jan. & Feb.)

ACTIVITIES Choir, Women’s Groups & Men’s Groups, Ted Talk tUUesday, Tuesday Brunch Between Sequim & Port Angeles 1033 N. Barr Rd., Port Angeles Agnew Area Between Hwy 101 & Old Olympic

WelcomingCongregation Email: admin@olympicuuf.org Facebook: OlympicUUFellowship www.olympicuuf.org (360) 417-2665

EPISCOPAL St. Luke’s Episcopal Church 525 N. 5th Avenue P.O. Box 896 • (360) 683-4862

SUNDAY EUCHARIST 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. WEDNESDAY SERVICE 11 a.m. All Are Welcome Here www.stlukesparish.net

METHODIST Trinity United Methodist Church

100 S. Blake Ave., Sequim (Next to Carrie Blake Park) P.O. Box 3697 • (360) 683-5367 Bill Green, Pastor SUNDAY 10 a.m. Sunday School and Nursery 10 a.m. Worship Service 11 a.m. Fellowship/ Refreshments We welcome and accept all persons equally, regardless of race, gender, or sexual orientation. Web site: www.sequimtumc.org Email: church@sequimtumc.org


BAPTIST

Faith Baptist Church

SEQUIM CATHOLIC CHURCHES St. Joseph Parish

101 E. Maple St. Sequim 360.683.6076 www.clallamcatholic.com Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil 5:00pm Sunday 8:30 and 10:30am Monday 8:30am Wednesday 12:00pm Thursday - Friday 8:30am Spanish Mass every 2nd Sunday 2:00pm Confession: 30 minutes prior to daily Masses on Wednesday & Friday Weekend Confessions: Saturday 3:30-4:30pm

Queen of Angels Parish 209 West 11th St. Port Angeles (360) 452.2351 www.clallamcatholic.com Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil: 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Tuesday evening 6:00 p.m. Wed. thru Sat. 8:30 a.m.

Confession: 30 minutes prior to daily Masses on Wednesday and Friday Weekend Confessions: Saturday 3:30-4:30 p.m.

7652 Old Olympic Highway Sequim (360) 683-7303 Pastor Jeremy Fodge

SUNDAY 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Morning Worship 6 p.m. Praise & Fellowship Service WEDNESDAY 7 p.m. Night Prayer Meeting Nursery Available Family oriented ministry emphasizing Bible preaching & teaching www.faithbaptistsequim.com

NON DENOMINATIONAL Dungeness Community Church 45 Eberle Lane • 683-7333 (Off Sequim-Dungeness Way) info@dcchurch.org Lead Pastor: Tim Richards Assoc. Pastor: Wayne Yamamoto Youth Pastor: David Piper

SUNDAY Sunday Worship Services at 9:00 & 10:45 am

Nursery - 5th Grade Programs at both services Junior/Senior High Classes at 10:45 am service

BIBLE CHURCH

Sequim Bible Church

847 N Sequim Ave, Sequim WA 98382 360.683.4135 office@sequimbible.com. www.sequimbible.com Office Hrs. 8:00 am - 4:30 pm Monday-Thursday Pastor Dave Wiitala, Sr. Pastor Pastor Shane McCrossen, Family Life Pastor Pastor Patrick Lynn, Youth Pastor

Offering Hope & Developing People SUNDAY Traditional Service 9:30 a.m. (Nursery & Children’s Sunday School) Contemporary Service 11:00 a.m. (Nursery & Children’s Sunday School) Evening Service 6:00 a.m. MONDAY Adult Bible Study - 9 a.m. Women’s Bible Study 6:00 p.m. TUESDAY Sons of Issachar - 8:00 a.m. Fellowship Hall Women’s Precept - 9:30 a.m. Room 401 WEDNESDAY Bible Study & Prayer - Room 401 Middle School/High School Youth Group - Fellowship Hall THURSDAY Men’s Bible Study - Mariner Cafe Women’s Bible Study 9:15 a.m. AWANA All Clubs 6:00 p.m.

www.dcchurch.org

Olympic Bible Fellowship

SPIRITUAL LIVING Sequim Center for Spiritual Living

SUNDAY 10:00 a.m. Worship Service, Nursery & Childern’s Church

Planning a Wedding While Visiting the Olympic Peninsula?

Rev. Victoria Kelley is available to officiate your special day. Rev. Kelley is a practitioner at the Sequim Center for Spiritual Living and can be reached at 360-977-7689 or 425-785-1788. Services are held each Sunday at : 387 E. Washington St. Sequim WA 98382 Rev Lynn Osborne, Pastor

414 N. Sequim Ave (in the Olympic Theatre Arts Building) RICH HAY, Pastor

TUESDAY 10:00 a.m. Precept Bible Study FRIDAY 7:00 a.m. Men’s Study - Mariner Cafe

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE First Church of Christ, Scientist 337 West Spruce Street

SUNDAY 10 a.m. Service 10 a.m. - 11 a.m. Sunday School (in the Reading Room) WEDNESDAY 7 p.m. Testimonial Meeting CHRISTIAN SCIENCE READING ROOM at 121 N. Sequim Ave. Open Noon-3 p.m. Tues. through Sat. For more information call: (360) 683-9174

NAZARENE Port Angeles Church of the Nazarene Corner of 2nd & Race P.O. Box 2086 • (360) 457-4839 Pastor Neil Castle (360)670-2393

EVERY SUNDAY 9 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Worship Service Nursery available during AM services EVERY WEDNESDAY 6 p.m. Christian Maturity Studies (call to verify) Invite your friends & neighbors for clear, biblical preaching, wonderful fellowship, & the invitation to a lasting, personal relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ.

BAHA’I Baha’i Faith 1-800-22 Unite

We’d love for you to join us this week! Every Sunday we gather to lift our voices in song, learn from God’s Word, and look to Christ for perspective on every area of our lives.

Celebrating the 200th Anniversary of the Birth of Baha’u’llah (1817-1892). Contact your Local Baha’i Community for more information:

www.obfchurch.org 360-683-6731

(360) 683-5520 for information on - going study and devotions

Oly Bible Sequim FALL/WINTER 2017-2018 F NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE Thank you for sending me this. We are a Bible church, could you put us under that heading like Sequim Bible? I’d greatly appreciate that.

53


Department of Natural Resources

Prior to statehood, a cash-poor, landrich federal government provided Washington with more than 3 million acres to build schools and other vital public institutions. Two square miles of every 36-squaremile “township” were given to the young state to generate revenue for education. In 1957, the Legislature created the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to manage state trust lands for the people of Washington.

DNR manages seven specific trusts to generate revenue and preserve water, forests and habitat. It manages 5.6 million acres of forest, range, agricultural, aquatic and commercial lands for more than $200 million in annual financial benefit for public schools, county services and state institutions. DNR operates under an order from the Commissioner of Public Lands to ensure management of state-owned lands is done in collaboration with the 29 federally recognized tribes of Washington. A DNR Discover Pass is your gateway to exploring Washington’s great outdoors.

The annual pass is $30 and is transferable between two vehicles. A one-day pass is $10. Additional fees may apply. West End DNR-managed campgrounds include Bear Creek (off U.S. Highway 101), Cottonwood, Hoh Oxbow, Minnie Peterson and South Fork Hoh (down roads off 101), and Lyre River (off Highway 112 in the Joyce area). For more information on DNR campgrounds, visit www.dnr.wa.gov/go. For more information about the Washington Department of Natural Resources, visit www.dnr.wa.gov.

SEQUIM FARM SERVICES The Greenhouse A Growing Business

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Vinyl Coated Green Black Chain Link

Cedar Chain Link Vinyl Custom Wrought Iron Gates & Fencing CALL FOR A FREE Installation ESTIMATE! Automatic Openers 360-460-9504

get face to face with wildlife.

Gift Shop Observation Tower & Picnic Area Driving Tours Available 363 Days a Year • Snack Bar & Petting Farm in Summer

54

OLYMPIC GAME FARM 7A1963896

See our website for open days and online shopping Also open by appointment 1818 Hastings Port Townsend www.farreachesfarm.com

Family Fun Since 1972

HOME OF THE WAVING BEARS!

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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Open Daily 9:00 am • 1423 Ward Road • Sequim

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Over 3 miles of Drive-Thru Adventure!


Lighthouses

Preserving and cherishing the North Olympic Peninsula’s maritime heritage also extends to its lighthouses. In 1850, Congress authorized 16 lighthouses along the Pacific coast and Strait of Juan de Fuca as shipping and passenger traffic surged with settlement of the Northwest. Clallam County, established in 1854, has a lighthouse heritage going back to 1857, when Congress appropriated about $40,000 to build the Cape Flattery (Tatoosh Island) and New Dungeness lighthouses, both of which are functional as automated navigational aids today. The New Dungeness Lighthouse is near the tip of Dungeness Spit and is reached by a 5-mile hike. It is open to the public, and tours of the lighthouse are available daily from 9 a.m. to two hours before sunset. Boat access is permitted by reservation only through the refuge office, 715 Holgerson Road, Sequim, 360-457-8451. The lighthouses of Jefferson County — Point Wilson (1879), Destruction Island (1891) and Marrowstone Point (1912) — came considerably later and all three remain active but with automated equipment. Visit www.newdungenesslight house.com for more information. The Point Wilson Lighthouse and tower are open free to visitors from May-September on Saturdays between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. Phone 360-385-5520. The lighthouse is owned by the Coast Guard, and the U.S. Lighthouse Society manages the property. A Discovery Pass is required to park. The Cape Flattery Lighthouse on Tatoosh Island is just off the northwesternmost spot in the continental United States. The island is part of the Makah Nation. The lighthouse marks the entrance to the Strait of Juan de Fuca, that wide and deep passage from the open Pacific Ocean to Puget Sound at Point Wilson. Tatoosh Island is not open to the public, but it and the lighthouse can be seen from high cliffs at the end of Cape Flattery Trail near Neah Bay.

From top: New Dungeness Lighthouse; Cape Flattery Lighthouse; and Point Wilson Lighthouse

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PRIME Dedicated to superior customer service, communication & professionalism.

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FALL/WINTER 2017-2018

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©2016 RE/MAX, LLC. Each office is independently owned and operated.

56

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For Real Estate Buying and Selling contact

BARB BUTCHER

Don Edgmon BROKER®, GRI, ABR, CNE

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CAROLYN DAWSON Real Estate Broker

Realtor of the year 2015 Toll Free (800)

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1190 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382

Office(360)

Office: 360.683.4131 Cell: 360.461.2422

Cell: (425) 330-3532 Direct: (360) 582-5770 Office: (360) 683-4131

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Mark Macedo

UPTOWN REALTY Becky Jackson, CRS, GRI

questionmark@olypen.com

Call or Text 360.775.5975 joecroteau@olypen.com

JACE Real Estate Company 1234 East Front Street Port Angeles 360.452.1210

Jarod Kortman/Stacey Price, Realtors® (360) 417-1000 302 E 8th St Port Angeles, WA 98362 www.peninsularealty.net

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Joe Croteau

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219 W. Washington Street... In the ♥ of downtown Sequim

Dial Us at... 360. 681 .8778

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7A1965744

“Making it Better for Someone... Every Day!”

57


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Looking for the perfect home?

Terri Wood

Mortgage Loan Officer 360.417.3223

Looking for the right home loan for your dream home?

Julie Myers

Mortgage Loan Officer 360.582.5204

Strengthening our Communities Since 1923 Mortgage Loan Officer 360.316.1720

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NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

â&#x153;¦

FALL/WINTER 2017-2018

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Serving Clallam & Jefferson Counties


management or tenant acquisition with the professional expertise you expect from Windermere. Call or stop by our office today to reach our renters with your property!

Inve stor s Lack of W Rentals anIntArea ed! We’ll help you find it. Sequim-Sunland

Jennifer Felton

Broker Lic#97342 Cell: (360) 460-9513 feltys@olypen.com jenniferfelton.withwre.com

Tennette Possinger

842 E Washington St, Sequim, WA 98382 Broker Lic#41329 www.AllAboutSequimWA.com

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Office: (360)683-6880

7A1965759

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim, WA 98382

Windermere Real Estate/Sequim-East

Sequim-East 842 East Washington Sequim, WA 98382

Jenn Beckett

Managing Broker, (360) 809-0014 jenn@olypen.com jennbeckett.withwre.com

Rick Brown

Broker Lic#119519

711 E Front St, Port Angeles (360) 457-0456

FALL/WINTER 2017-2018

Cell: (360) 775-5780 Office: (360) 683-4844 rickbrown@olypen.com rickbrown.withwre.com

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7A1965757

Windermere Real Estate/Port Angeles

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7A1965761

Office: (360)457-0456

Cell: (360) 460-9363 sheryl@olypen.com

Windermere Real Estate/Sunland

Broker Lic#11040 Cell: (360) 461-7633 Fax: (360)452-2304 hcoburn@olypen.com

711 East Front St. Port Angeles, WA 98362

Helping buyers & sellers since 1995

tyler@olypen.com tylerconkle.withwre.com

Holly Coburn

Windermere Real Estate/Port Angeles

Sheryl Payseno Burley

Broker Lic#112797 Cell (360) 670-5978

7A1965762

711 E Front St, Port Angeles (360) 457-0456

360-683-6880

Tyler Conkle

Real Estate Broker Lic#117240 Cell: (360) 477-6428 tennette@olypen.com tennettepossinger.withwre.com

Windermere Real Estate/Port Angeles

www.sunland.withwre.com

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711 E Front St, Port Angeles (360) 457-0456

We’ll help you fill it. Call Dollie Sparks, Call Dollie Sparks, Dollie today!Sparks today! 360-582-7361

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Windermere Real Estate/Port Angeles

PENINSULA REAL ESTATE

Dollie Sparks 360.582.7361 360.683.6880 We’ll help you find it. winsnld@olypen.com We’ll help you fill it. sunland.withwre.com

61


Moving to the North Olympic Peninsula

Adventure awaits you right outside your front door, so why wait to experience it on vacation when you could wake up to it each day? The North Olympic Peninsula is a part of the U.S. that draws families from all over. With its misty mornings and sunny days, the Peninsula welcomes any and all who wish to call her home. Whether you’re looking for a more remote location or a family-friendly home in town, local real estate agents are here to help. They know the ins and outs of the Peninsula better than anyone and can help guide you in finding the perfect place to

Historic Railroad Bridge, Beautiful Parklands, Easy access to the Olympic Discovery Trail • Interpretive displays • Educational programs • Weekly bird walks Wednesday mornings, 8:30 - 10:30 am

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rest your head at night. Whether you’re looking to buy or rent, the Peninsula has options: downtown apartments, condominiums close to recreational opportunities, luxury homes high on the bluffs, waterfront acreage and traditional single-family residences in friendly neighborhoods close to shopping and schools. If you’re looking to relocate a business or start a new one, area real estate agents are there to assistance in such transitions, as well. The Peninsula has award-winning wineries, beautiful libraries, stellar fishing opportunities and numerous arts and entertainment venues. Olympic Medical Center has been recognized as a HomeCare Elite Top Agency for the past 11 years. Jefferson Healthcare has been named a leader in LGBT Healthcare Equality by the Human Rights Campaign Foundation for three years running. In 2015, Port Angeles was named the second best place to live in the U.S. by Outside Magazine. Other towns on the Peninsula have been in contention for best small town, best place to retire and other accolades throughout the years.

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Sequim won the Best Northwestern Small Town distinction in the USA Today 10 Best Reader’s Choice travel award contest in April 2017. Port Townsend took the No. 4 spot. Olympic National Park offers more than 600 miles of hiking trails and is filled with waterfalls, rivers, lakes and more. The North Olympic Peninsula boasts a year-round gardening and growing season, and with just a short ferry ride, you can easily visit Canada. If you’re looking for a beautiful new place to call home, love the outdoors and want to contribute to a growing community, our real estate agents are available to lend a helping hand.


Peninsula flavors

The Olympic Peninsula offers diverse culinary options for a small region. The area is known throughout the Northwest for its scrumptious berries and fresh produce. The Dungeness Valley is one of the most fertile areas to grow berries ranging from strawberries, marionberries and raspberries to blueberries and loganberries. Peninsula blackberries, which grow wild pretty much everywhere, are probably the best in the state. The Peninsula is home to a number of family-owned farms, organic farms and farm stores. Farmers markets operate throughout the year in communities across the Peninsula. In the early fall, area markets burst at the seams with garden-fresh goodies. The abundance of fresh fish and seafood from the Pacific Ocean and the area’s many rivers are a delicious delight on the Olympic Peninsula. Locally caught fish such as salmon and halibut are staples on many restaurant menus. Mussels, oysters, razor and butter clams, shrimp and highly sought-after geoducks are available seasonally on menus. One tasty crustacean — the Dungeness crab — is a popular delicacy and is the most commercially important crab in the Pacific Northwest. The crab receives its name from the community of Dungeness, approximately five miles north of Sequim and 15 miles east of Port Angeles. In autumn, seasonal rains help mushrooms of all shapes and sizes grow on forest floors. Locally harvested chanterelle and portobello mushrooms are sold at local markets and stores.

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Dog parks

After a long trip to the Peninsula, owners and their canine companions will yearn to stretch their legs. Sequim Dog Park is a perfect place to enjoy the fresh air in a safe environment. This is a community park over 1 acre on the east side of Carrie Blake Park, two blocks north on Blake Avenue from Washington Street. The park encourages people to bring their dogs for exercise and off-leash doggie play. There is a fenced area for large dogs and one for small dogs. The park is well groomed and clean and its users are self-policing and friendly. Restrooms, doggie cleanup bags and covered benches are available for visitorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; use and convenience. Park rules are posted onsite and online at www.sequimdogparks.org. A portion of the Olympic Discovery Trail runs by Carrie Blake Park and there also is a walking trail for dogs and their people around the park. Hours for both parks are from dawn until dusk. In Port Angeles, check out the PA Dog Park in Lincoln Park next to the BMX track at 1900 W. Lauridsen Blvd. The PA Dog Park provides two large fenced-in areas for dogs to play off leash based on size. For more information, visit www. padogpark.org.

Port Townsend has one official off-leash dog park, a small area next to Chetzemoka Park. The Port Townsend Dogs group is looking to strategize ways to develop an official park for dog recreation in the near future. Other good places to bring your dog in Port Townsend are the Larry Scott Trail and

North Beach County Park (low tide is the best time). Pets in a state park, such as Fort Worden, for example, must always be on leash. For other city park rules for doggies, check in with an area chamber of commerce office.

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PORT ANGELES With more than 19,000 residents, Port Angeles is the largest city on the North Olympic Peninsula. Visitors use the city as a base to explore Olympic National Park and Victoria. Pretty as a picture

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laid-back Northwest town. A variety of events, a quaint downtown and an active harbor make Port Angeles a joy to visit throughout the

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Mountains, low-traffic roads to cycle along, cobble-strewn beaches to stroll on and a variety of shops and eateries to explore.

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Establishing Port Angeles

Port Angeles sits between the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Olympic Mountains on a natural deepwater harbor, originally named “Puerto de Nuestra Señora de los Angeles” (or “Port of Our Lady of the Angels”) in 1791 by Spanish explorer Don Francisco de Eliza. This was eventually shortened into its current name, Port Angeles Harbor. However, long before Don Francisco came across the region, the area was home to Klallam tribes and two major Klallam villages, I’e’nis and Tse-whit-zen. Port Angeles was established as a townsite by President Abraham Lincoln in 1862 by executive order. The Board of Trade in 1890 called Port Angeles the “Second National City,” with Washington, D.C., being the first. In 1887, the Puget Sound Co-Operative Colony settled in Port Angeles and the population steadily grew. While the colony did not last long, it played a major role in the development of Port Angeles.

A chance to explore history

Built in 1914, the impressive Clallam County Courthouse at Fourth and Lincoln streets is a Georgian-style brick structure with distinctive features such as

Clallam County Courthouse a stained-glass skylight, marble steps and a clock tower. Nearby, the Museum at the Carnegie, 207 S. Lincoln St., offers a glimpse into Clallam County’s past. The Museum at the Carnegie in the cityowned historical 97-year-old Carnegie Library, is operated by the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe. Seven permanent exhibits — one describing the North Olympic Peninsula’s Native American heritage — located on the museum’s second floor. Heritage Tours offers you a guided

walking tour through Port Angeles’ past. The tour takes you through historical downtown buildings, past murals that tell stories and down into the Port Angeles underground, created when downtown street levels were raised above the tidal flats in 1914. The tours start from the Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center, 121 E. Railroad Ave., on the waterfront. For additional information and Port Angeles Heritage Tour availability, phone 360-452-2363, ext. 0, or visit www.portangelesheritagetours.com.

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Downtown art

Art on the Town is an ever-changing outdoor art project that graces downtown Port Angeles sidewalks. The art ranges from the realist to the abstract, conveyed in various media. Eleven steel sculptures along Laurel Street called “Avenue of the People” have become a popular photography opportunity for visitors. Conrad Dyar Memorial Fountain at First and Laurel streets features cascading water and benches for resting. The three-level Laurel Street stairs begin behind the fountain area and connect First and Second streets, and offer great views of Port Angeles Harbor.

Feiro Marine Life Center

The marine life within the tanks at the Feiro Marine Life Center seems static until a volunteer points out a scallop filtering plankton, and several starry flounders and great sculpins blanketed in sand. These and other lessons are what the late Arthur Feiro, a Port Angeles biology teacher with a passion for marine life, wanted his legacy to be in establishing the center on Port Angeles City Pier next to Hollywood Beach. The center is an educational and scientific organization promoting marine education and conservation.

Community educational programs are scheduled regularly. Visitors can get close to local marine life in the center’s touch and view tanks and bank of aquariums. Exhibits are representative of marine life inhabiting the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Close to 20,000 visitors walk through the nonprofit center’s doors annually. Feiro is open seven days a week yearround, from noon to 5 p.m. during the winter months. For additional information about the center, visit www.feiromarinelifecenter.org or phone 360-417-6254 for details.

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Port Angeles Fine Arts Center

The 1,300-square-foot visual arts exhibition at the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center, 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., is a wonderful place to visit. The center’s gallery, originally the private residence of Esther and Charles Webster, was designed in 1951 by Paul Hayden Kirk as both a residence and artist’s studio. Kirk’s use of voids and indigenous materials offers a low-impact structure that ushers indoors the abundance of the natural world. With sweeping vistas of the city, Port Angeles Harbor, the Strait of Juan de Fuca

Be sure to stop by the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce, 121 E. Railroad Ave., to talk to friendly and knowledgeable volunteers about what there is to see and do in Port Angeles. Located on the scenic waterfront, the chamber carries an array of maps, brochures and tourist-related guides to help visitors enjoy their time on the North Olympic Peninsula. For additional information about the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce, phone 360-452-2363 or visit www.portangeles.org.

and British Columbia’s Vancouver Island, the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center presents an atmosphere conducive to observation and reflection. Visitors can explore Webster’s Woods Art Park independently by using the park trails to discover artworks hanging in trees, burrowing in the ground or camouflaged by the natural beauty of the foliage. The center is open Thursdays through Sundays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Webster’s Woods is open daily from dawn to dusk year-round. Admission is free, with donations accepted. For details., phone 360-457-3532 or visit www.pafac.org.

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Ediz Hook

Only a few minutes from downtown Port Angeles, you will find Ediz Hook, a 3-mile-long sand spit enhanced by rock that juts into the Strait of Juan de Fuca to form Port Angeles’ deepwater harbor. This is an ideal spot to view the city and the Olympic Mountains. The hook offers public beaches access for beachcombing opportunities and places to view ships traveling through the Strait. Harbor seals, orcas and seabirds can be spotted from the hook. Access is via Marine Drive, which passes through the McKinley Paper Co. mill.

Elwha Klallam Heritage Center

Olympic Discovery Trail

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The Olympic Adventure Route is a 25-mile alternative to the paved, rail grade ODT route between the Elwha River and Lake Crescent. It is designed for active mountain bikers, hikers and equestrians. It has double and single track riding over scenic, hilly, forested terrain. The trail is entirely off road except the last 4 miles on the west end, which is on old railroad grade along the Lyre River and shared with logging access. For more information about the Olympic Discovery Trail or the Olympic Adventure Route, including trail status updates, maps and more planning tips, visit www.olympic discoverytrail.com or www.peninsulatrails coalition.org.

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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The route of the Olympic Discovery Trail will traverse almost 130 miles of lowlands, bordered on the south by the Olympic Mountain Range and on the north by the Strait of Juan de Fuca. It starts in Port Townsend and will end on the shores of the Pacific Ocean in La Push. The trail is a wide, paved pathway designed to multi-user standards for bicyclists, hikers and disabled users, with a 4-foot shoulder for equestrians where appropriate. Construction started in the 1990s, and work continues to complete the route. The Peninsula Trails Coalition — the

Olympic Adventure Route

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To learn more about the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe and its history on the North Olympic Peninsula, stop by the Elwha Klallam Heritage Center, 401 E. First St. in Port Angeles. Port Angeles was once home to a huge village called Tse-whit-zen, which was unearthed in 2003 at the west end of Port Angeles Harbor. Many of the artifacts found are being stored at the Burke Museum in Seattle. Others can be viewed at the Elwha Klallam Heritage Center. The center integrates life and vocational skills, cultural values and history, as well as providing entrepreneurial avenues and initiating opportunities to learn traditional Klallam arts. For center details, visit www.elwha.org.

all-volunteer nonprofit behind the Olympic Discovery Trail — was founded in 1988. The group works with local jurisdictions to complete and maintain the ODT as an amazing place to spend your day (and a regional catalyst for recreation, tourism, public health and economic development). A nearly 2-mile portion of the Olympic Discovery Trail that links central Port Angeles with the heavily residential west side is being designed so that pedestrians, bicyclists and residents with disabilities can more easily wend their way along the route. It will include installing 12-foot shared bicycler-pedestrian paths from Valley Creek past the old KPly site and Platypus Marine to the existing 12-foot-wide shared path along the Port of Port Angeles’ East Boat Haven and 4,200 feet of shared trail from Crown Park to 10th and Milwaukee streets. The design is expected to be completed by spring 2018. The ODT includes views of snow-capped peaks, ocean vistas, fast-flowing rivers, pristine lakes and majestic forests. Travelers can enjoy the ODT in small bites. In the Sequim-to-Port Angeles segment, distances between trail nodes — places where the ODT crosses public roads — often are short and easy to access. The Spruce Railroad segment of the ODT reopened in summer 2017 and provides a scenic stretch of trail along the lake and includes tunnel access.


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Port Angeles City Pier

Located at the foot of Lincoln Street, Port Angeles City Pier features an observation tower, promenade, deck and picnic area. The pier is a wonderful place to view a sunrise or sunset over the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Take a stroll along adjacent Hollywood Beach or Waterfront Trail after you visit the pier.

Peabody Creek Trail

If you’re looking for a dog-friendly trail that’s not too long and all-season friendly, check out the Peabody Creek Loop Trail near the Olympic National Park Visitors Center, 3002 Mount Angeles Road. From the west end of the parking lot, hikers will immediately descend through green trees. After about ¼ mile, you will spot the creek. The trail crosses a bridge and goes under a large tree. To the left is a spur trail that will continue up the creek, but you’ll want to veer right to continue on the loop. Follow along the trail some more and go right again. Another bridge comes up, giving you another chance to peer into the creek. From there, head back up the stairs to the parking lot. In total, this hike is a half-mile long.

Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary

Counterclockwise from top: A group of kayakers paddle in Port Angeles Harbor near City Pier. The Peabody Creek Trail is an allseason friendly hike. Check out West End Park for great views of Port Angeles Harbor and to enjoy public art sculptures.

Comprising of 2,408 square nautical miles of marine waters off the rugged Olympic Peninsula coastline. It is difficult to miss Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary. Stop by the Olympic Coast Discovery Center on the Port Angeles waterfront at The Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad Ave., to learn more about the sanctuary and the animals and plants that call the area home. The free visitor center helps inform local and international guests about Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary natural and cultural resources, research and educational programs. For details, visit www.olympiccoast.noaa.gov.

West End Park

The 1.5-acre waterfront West End Park is along Front Street and features two beaches — one 80 feet by 200 feet, the other 80 feet by 130 feet — that fringe the shoreline. Take a moment to investigate the park’s public art sculptures. Have a picnic on the green grass, do a little bird watching or snap photos of boats moving about in the harbor.

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Sol Duc Falls

Easy-to-reach waterfalls

Sol Duc Falls can be enjoyed year round, but the route might require snowshoes in the winter. During the early spring, the runoff from the falls is pretty spectacular. Take U.S. Highway 101 west from Port Angeles for 30 miles, or 26 miles east from Forks. Turn southeast on the Sol Duc Hot Springs Road and follow it 14 miles to the trailhead parking lot. There is a wide gravel trail and a railed viewing area at this falls. Be careful when crossing the bridge over the falls. The wooden planks are slippery from the constant spray from the falls.

Marymere Falls is a 1.8-mile roundtrip trail that leads day hikers through some of the Olympic National Park’s most pristine environment, weaving through old-growth forest. To reach the falls, take U.S. Highway 101 west from Port Angeles to the Storm King Ranger Station on Lake Crescent. The trailhead begins as a paved walkway that runs alongside the ranger station, a re-creation of the original station built in the early 1900s. You’ll see a nice view of the north side of the lake before wandering inland toward the falls. For about the first three-quarters of a mile of the trail, wheelchairs may be used with assistance. The final trek to the falls is a steep uphill climb, with the choice of two lookouts, one about 50 feet above the falls, the other at its base.

Marymere Falls

Madison Falls Madison Creek Falls is an easy hike just west of Port Angeles. Follow U.S. Highway 101 to Olympic Hot Springs Road. Turn south and follow the road to the parking area. The trailhead begins right at the parking lot. This is the Olympic National Park’s most accessible waterfall — only about 150 yards from the parking area over a fully paved, accessible trail. The falls is listed as a 60-foot-high cascade by the National Park Service. Several old-growth trees and stumps line the trail. A nearby picnic area provides an easy place for families to dine and enjoy the beauty of the Elwha Valley. Visit the Olympic Peninsula Waterfall Trail website at www. olympicpeninsulawaterfalltrail.com for directions, photos and details about more than 20 waterfalls.

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Scenic drives

Many of the Olympic Peninsula’s highways and roads curve around glacier-carved lakes, wind past sea stacks and lighthouses, and provide views of farms, old-growth trees and the majestic Olympic Mountains. All of these landscape features combined with the chance to see deer and elk in forested areas and harbor seals and whales just off quiet coastal roads combine to make the Peninsula a wonderful place to take a leisurely day trip. On any day, it is hard to beat a drive along these scenic and fun-to-drive roads: Neah Bay: Highway 112 to Cape Flattery For a long day trip, start early out on state Highway 112 and head toward Neah Bay and Cape Flattery. Once on 112, also known as the Strait of Juan de Fuca Scenic Byway, enjoy the rolling countryside that leads to scenic views of the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Motorcyclists take care when nearing the area near Pillar Point County Park. The road is bumpy and curvy. Pass through Clallam Bay and Sekiu, potentially pausing for a bite to eat and seeing some fishermen do what they do best. Continue on past Sekiu’s famous Rosie the fish statue after stopping for a photo, and take in views of the coastal sea stacks rising out of the blue water. After reaching Neah Bay, stop for a Makah Recreation Permit at the Makah Museum, located within the Makah Cultural

Cruise along state Highway 110 to La Push and Research Center, or Washburn’s General Store, before continuing to Cape Flattery. Take Cape Loop Road until you reach the parking area for Flattery. A short hike from the trailhead through Sitka spruces leads to an amazing view of the Strait, Cape Flattery Lighthouse on Tatoosh Island and opportunities for photos of murres and other coastal creatures. Forks: Coastal beaches A favorite spot, no matter the distance, is heading down U.S. Highway 101 past Forks toward the coastal beaches. Starting in Port Angeles, travelers can take in views of the Elwha River, Lake Sutherland and Lake Crescent before the long extension into Forks. Before Forks, turn right onto state Highway 110 and then right again onto Mora Road to spend a few moments at beautiful Rialto Beach, entering into the “treaty area” of the “Twilight” vampires and werewolves. Enjoy a picnic and take in sea stack views as fishermen surf-cast into the waves.

Depart Rialto and head back to Forks. Cast a line in fishing rivers such as the Bogachiel and Hoh, or blaze a trail in the Hoh Rain Forest before popping out on the coast. Stop at Ruby Beach for a walk filled with views of eagles, the Destruction Island Lighthouse and crashing waves, or continue to any other roadside beach stops. Hungry or looking for a place to rest overnight? Go the extra few miles and post up at Olympic National Park’s Kalaloch Campground to grab a bite at the Kalaloch Lodge. Port Townsend: Historic seaside town Traveling east on U.S. Highway 101 from Port Angeles, exit onto state Highway 20 and head northeast for 12 miles to historic Port Townsend. Founded in 1851, colorful Port Townsend has a rich maritime heritage. Enjoy the twists and turns the highway takes while you play peek-a-boo with the blue waters of Discovery Bay. >> SCENIC DRIVES continued on Page 78

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HEALTHY FAMILIES OF CLALLAM COUNTY Helping Children and Families Heal Since 1971

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<< SCENIC DRIVES continued from Page 76

tages and old houses to reach Fort Flagler State Park and Point Wilson Lighthouse. Point Wilson marks the west entrance The highway turns into Water Street once into Puget Sound. in town and runs next to Admiralty Inlet, Picnic tables in the park make the perfect ending at the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Driving into town, you will pass historic place to eat lunch or simply stop to take in Victorian buildings and storefronts, the scenic surroundings. marinas and working boat yards, restauExplore the fort’s old bunkers and stroll rants and hotels. along sandy beaches. After exploring the town on foot, grab A Discover Pass is required for vehicle a bite to eat in Port Townsend or snag a access. A day pass costs $10, and an annual picnic lunch and enjoy a ride by cute cotpass is $30.

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Lake Crescent

Spruce Railroad Trail is an 8-mile roundtrip hike that runs along the north shore of the lake. A section of the trail recently reopened following the completion of a project that rehabilitated a half-mile segment leading to and through the century-old McPhee Tunnel. The trail dates back to 1918, when the U.S. Army built a railroad track to make airplane frames for World War I. Though millions of dollars were spent, the railway wasn’t completed until 19 days after the war ended. The train rails were later removed, but the trail remains for hikers and mountain bikers to enjoy. Information about hiking along the trail is available at the Storm King Ranger Station. The turnoff from U.S. Highway 101 to Olympic National Park’s Storm King Ranger Station leads to several picnic tables nestled in the trees, and makeshift sites along the shoreline provide the perfect place to enjoy a picnic lunch or dinner. Last-minute lunch supplies can be purchased at Shadow Mountain General Store, along U.S. Highway 101 at Lake Sutherland, or at Fairholm General Store at the west end of the lake, which has seasonal hours.

Counterclockwise from top: A sunset at Lake Crescent illuminates calm waters on an autumn day. The recently renovated McPhee Tunnel on the Spruce Railroad Trail provides access to one of the lake’s favorite trails. A bridge spanning the Devil’s Punchbowl is a trail highlight.

>> LAKE CRESCENT continued on Page 81

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Bed & Breakfast Charming Rooms & Gourmet Breakfasts

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The Storm King Ranger Station area includes restrooms and access to potable water, a ranger station, a boat launch and trails. After a relaxing picnic, consider getting out on the water. Boat launches are at both east and west ends of the lake. Rowboats are available for rental from historical Lake Crescent Lodge. The popular trail to Marymere Falls also starts from the Storm King Ranger Station. Whether it is taking a row, kayaking, sailing or simply relaxing on the beaches and shores, Lake Crescent is a great place to visit, hike and stay for the night. There are several lodging options if you want to extend your Lake Crescent experience. On the west end of Lake Crescent, the Fairholme Campground has 87 campsites, one of which is wheelchairaccessible. The campground is open May through mid-fall. Sites are first-come, first-served. The Fairholme Campground Trail begins across Camp David Junior Road and wanders through dense stands of trees. For less primitive accommodations, try Lake Crescent Lodge or Log Cabin Resort. Historical Lake Crescent Lodge is at Barnes Point on Lake Crescent Road just off Highway 101. Log Cabin Resort is on the other side of the lake on East Beach Road, north of U.S. Highway 101. Visit www.olympicnationalparks.com/ stay/lodging/log-cabin-resort for details.

Five SeaSuns

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PENINSULA PET SERVICES ASK US ABOUT OUR FIRST FREE EXAM

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10159 Old Olympic Hwy, Sequim WA 98382

1433-D Sims Way, Pt. Townsend WA 98368

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Craig Dotson, Owner

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We welcome our newest veterinarians: Dr. Lauren Clarke and Dr. Dana Wisniewski

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Call Karen for your boarding & grooming needs.

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We love our Customers and our Community FALL/WINTER 2017-2018

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Freshwater Bay

West of Port Angeles, Freshwater Bay, where river water spills into the Strait of Juan de Fuca, is a great place for an outing. Freshwater Bay County Park features 21 acres and has 1,450 lineal feet of public tidelands. The protected bay provides a tranquil location to launch kayaks and small boats to explore beautiful coves while enjoying panoramic views of Vancouver Island and Mount Baker. Once on the secluded bay, it is very common to come face to face with any number of wildlife including harbor seals, orcas and river otters. Bald eagles often can be found soaring above the bay. Freshwater Bay also is great for stand-up paddle boarding, thanks to relatively shallow and calm waters. A picnic area is on the bluff above the bay. This area, the park’s restroom and covered picnic shelters are open May 15 through Sept. 15. The lower picnic site, concrete launch ramp and beach access areas are open throughout the year. The east entrance of the state Department of Natural Resources’ Striped Peak Recreation Area also can be accessed from the park. Freshwater Bay is 10 miles west of Port Angeles on state Highway 112, then travel 3 miles north on Freshwater Bay Road.

Counterclockwise from top: The quiet waters of Freshwater Bay invite kayakers to enjoy a paddle around the bay’s lone sea stack, appropriately named Bachelor Rock. Freshwater Bay is a stop on the Peninsula’s Whale Trail.

www.portangeleslandmark.com

(360)452-1326

RHAWA

330 E. 1st St, Suite 1, Port Angeles, WA

Rental Housing Association of WA

Elite leaders in residential, commercial, furnished rentals & storage since 1986 84

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Complete real estate management Eliteleaders leadersininresidential, residential, commercial, furnished rentals & Elite commercial, furnished rentals & storage storage since since1986 1986


Voted Best Retirement Community for 10 years

Our Cottages and Apartments are on 7 LUSH ACRES INCLUDING A POND with plenty of walking trails and benches to enjoy the outdoors.

Whether one is pursuing an active, independent lifestyle, or you require more personal living assistance PARK VIEW VILLAS OFFERS A SAFE, SECURE AND FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENT.

Rentals include meals, weekly housekeeping/linen service, utilities, cable, weekly scheduled transportation, Senior Center memberships, entertainment and social and recreational activities. Our Wellness Team ensures exceptional PERSONAL CARE 24 HOURS A DAY.

Salt Creek Recreation Area

Salt Creek Recreation Area

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1st Place

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One of the county’s most popular parks, Salt Creek Recreation Area near Joyce offers visitors forests, rocky bluffs, tide pools, a sandy beach and campsites, and features wonderful panoramic views of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Crescent Bay and Vancouver Island. Highlighted as a premier birding site, Salt Creek is on the National Audubon’s Olympic Loop of the Greater Washington State Birding Trail. The area was once the location of Camp Hayden, a World War II harbor defense military base. Two concrete bunkers preserve its military history. The area was purchased after being decommissioned at the end of World War II. The adjacent Tongue Point Marine Life Sanctuary includes a rocky outcropping that, at low tide, reveals starfish, sea urchins, limpets, sea cucumbers and many other forms of marine life. When you visit tidal areas, practice tide pool etiquette. Remember the old saying: “Take nothing but pictures; leave nothing but footprints.” The waters surrounding Salt Creek are popular spots for kayaking, surfing and paddleboarding. Mountain bikers and hikers can access the state’s Striped Peak Recreation

Area from the Salt Creek area. Salt Creek is a popular camping site for families. Park amenities include one picnic shelter with a fireplace, play equipment, basketball, volleyball and horseshoe courts and a softball field, plus several trails. For details about camping reservations, visit www.clallam.net/Parks/SaltCreek.html or phone 360-928-3441. The scenic Whale Trail is a string of 20 locations around Washington where visitors are likely to see whales and other marine mammals from shore. A sign at Salt Creek Recreation Area — in the northwest corner of the park, near the stairs leading to Tongue Point — overlooks Crescent Bay, where gray whales often are seen. Along state Highway 112, also known as the Strait of Juan de Fuca National Scenic Byway, Whale Trail sites are found at Freshwater Bay County Park, the Sekiu Overlook and Shipwreck Point. For more information about the trail, visit www.thewhaletrail.org. To reach Salt Creek Recreation Area, take state Highway 112 west from Port Angeles toward Joyce. After nine miles, turn right (north) onto Camp Hayden Road (near Milepost 54). Travel about 3 miles. The park entrance will be on your right.

Clallam Co.

VOTED BEST ASSISTED LIVING TEN YEARS IN A ROW

“BRING RETIREMENT TO LIFE”

Assisted Living programs available. www.villageconcepts.com

A Village Concepts Retirement Community 1430 Park View Lane, Port Angeles

360-452-7222 1-888-548-6609

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BAPTIST

PENTECOSTAL

Bethany Pentecostal

First Baptist Church

506 S. Francis • 457-1030 Corner of 5th & Francis Omer Vigoren, Pastor Jeff Douglas, Music/Youth Leader

Leading people in an ever changing culture to the hope of Jesus. (American) 105 West 6th Street • (360) 457-3313 Tim Hughes, Pastor

PORT ANGELES CATHOLIC

www.firstbaptistpa.org

209 West 11th St. Port Angeles (360) 452.2351 www.clallamcatholic.com

FRIENDS/QUAKER

Queen of Angels Parish Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil: 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Tuesday evening 6:00 p.m. Wed. thru Sat. 8:30 a.m.

Confession: 30 minutes prior to daily Masses on Wednesday and Friday Weekend Confessions: Saturday 3:30-4:30 p.m.

St. Joseph Parish

101 E. Maple St., Sequim (360) 683.6076 www.clallamcatholic.com Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil: 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Monday & Tuesday: 8:30 a.m. Thursday-Saturday: 8:30 a.m. Spanish Mass every 2nd Sunday 2 p.m.

Peninsula Evangelical Friends Church

Between Sequim & Port Angeles on Old Olympic Hwy. 1291 N. Barr Road, Pt. Angeles 360-452-9105 Pastor Jonathan D. Fodge Ministers: The Entire Congregation SUNDAY 9:00 a.m. Meeting for Worship 10:45 a.m. Sunday School jfodge@olypen.com Families worshiping and learning together www.sermonaudio.com/pefc www.pefcpa.com

Confession: 30 minutes prior to daily Masses on Wednesday and Friday Weekend Confessions: Saturday 3:30-4:30 p.m.

EPISCOPAL

St. Andrew’s Episcopal 510 East Park Ave. • 457-4862 (1 block east of PA High School) sapa@olypen.com The Rev. Gail Wheatley

SUNDAY 9 a.m. Adult Forum & Sunday School 8 & 10 a.m. Holy Eucharist Nursery available on Sundays MONDAY 8:15 p.m. Compline WEDNESDAY 11 a.m. Holy Eucharist www.standrewpa.org

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SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Worship Service 6:30 p.m. Evening Service

SUNDAY 9:30 & 11 a.m. Worship Service (nursery available)

WEDNESDAY 7 p.m. Evening Service SATURDAY 7:00 p.m. Prayer Service www.bethanypa.com

NAZARENE Port Angeles Church of the Nazarene Corner of 2nd & Race P.O. Box 2086 • (360) 457-4839 Pastor Neil Castle

EVERY SUNDAY 9 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Worship Service Nursery available during AM services EVERY WEDNESDAY 6 p.m. Christian Maturity Studies Invite your friends & neighbors for clear, biblical preaching, wonderful fellowship, & the invitation to a lasting, personal relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ.

NONDENOMINATIONAL JEWISH Congregation Olympic B’nai Shalom

Monthly Shabbat Services & Onegs High Holy Days & Other Jewish Holiday Services Social and Cultural Events... Bi-Monthly Newsletter

Connections to Seattle & Tacoma Congregations For Information: www.obsh.org, (360) 452-2471 or write P.O. Box 553, Port Angeles, WA 98362

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Calvary Chapel Port Angeles

213 E. 8th St. • 360-504-2106 (at the corner of Lincoln & 8th) Andrew McLarty, Pastor SUNDAY 8:30 & 10:30 a.m. Worship Service Children’s classes during teaching time taught at their level and nursery. WEDNESDAY 6 p.m. Dinner 6:30 p.m. Refuel (worship & bible study), Youth and Kid’s Ministry www.calvarypa.org

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UNITY

Unity in the Olympics

2917 E. Myrtle • (360) 457-3981 Reverend Donna Little, Minister SUNDAY 10:00 a.m. Silent Meditation 10:30 a.m. Worship Service 11:30 a.m. Fellowship Time Childcare services available www.unityintheolympics.org uito@olypen.com


CHRISTIAN First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) Park & Race • (360) 457-7062 Dave Moffitt, Pastor

SUNDAY 9:00 a.m. Sunday School-All Ages 10:00 a.m. Worship Service

PORT ANGELES BAPTIST

Hillcrest Baptist Church (SBC) 205 Black Diamond Road 457-7409 Dr. William Gullick, Pastor

SUNDAY 9:45 a.m. Bible Study, all ages 11 a.m. Worship Nursery provided WEDNESDAY 6 p.m. Bible Study & Prayer Call for more info regarding other church activities.

TUESDAY 10:00 a.m. Bible Study Coffee Fellowship Hour to greet new friends and visitors immediately following worship hour.

Church of Christ

1233 E. Front St., Port Angeles (360) 457-3839 lovetrth1233pa@gmail.com pacofc.org Edward Burrows, Minister A Christ–Centered message for a world weary people SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Worship Service TUESDAY 6:30 p.m. Port Angeles small group meeting WEDNESDAY 2:00 p.m. Sequim small group meeting Call or email for meeting location of small groups THURSDAY 10:00 a.m. Bible classes at the church building

North Olympic Church of Christ

LUTHERAN St. Matthew Lutheran

(Missouri Synod) Lincoln at 13th St. • (360) 457-4122 Patrick Lovejoy, Pastor SUNDAY 8:45 a.m. Adult Bible Class 8:45 a.m. Children’s Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship Service 7:00 p.m. Worship Service WEDNESDAY 5:30 p.m. Free Dinner Call for more information regarding other church activities.

Independent Bible Church 452-3351

SATURDAY 6:00 p.m. Upper Room Service 112 North Lincoln St. PA SUNDAY 8:15 a.m. & 11 a.m. Worship Services 9:50 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 116 E. Ahlvers Road, PA www.indbible.org

Preaching the Gospel of Christ

Meeting at Port Angeles Senior Center 328 E. 7th Street (Corner of S. Peabody St.)

SUNDAY 10:30 a.m. Worship Service For information: (360) 504-1950 www.rgopc.org

Holy Trinity Lutheran Church & Preschool (ELCA) 301 East Lopez • (360) 452-2323 www.go2trinity.org htlc@olypen.com Pastors Olaf & Kristin Luana Baumann

SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Education (Sept.-May) Nursery available during morning services Broadcast on KONP 1450 at 11 a.m. We have many ongoing Bible studies, youth and social activities. Call us for more info.

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST

Looking for a different kind of “church” community?

Olympic Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Explore Spirituality. Engage Community. Transform the World.

10:30 a.m. Sunday Service and Children’s Program-Enrichment & Play Fellowship Hour following the service

116 N. Albert, Port Angeles LORD’S DAY WORSHIP 10:00 AM Weekdays - Home Bible Study

Redeeming Grace Orthodox Presbyterian Church

www.stmatthewportangeles.org

R.E. Swan - Preacher 360-797-1536 360-417-6980

BIBLE CHURCH

PRESBYTERIAN REFORMED

PRESBYTERIAN First Presbyterian

139 West 8th Street, Port Angeles 360-452-4781 Wendy Taylor, Interim Pastor Paul Smithson, Pastoral Assistant

SUNDAY

ACTIVITIES Choir, Women’s Groups & Men’s Groups, Ted Talk tUUesday, Tuesday Brunch Between Sequim & Port Angeles 1033 N. Barr Rd., Port Angeles Agnew Area Between Hwy 101 & Old Olympic

WelcomingCongregation Email: admin@olympicuuf.org Facebook: OlympicUUFellowship www.olympicuuf.org (360) 417-2665 751855117

Worship Hours: 8:30 &11:00 a.m. Childcare Provided Sunday School For All Ages 9:45 a.m. For more information: Call church office or visit our website: www.fpcpa.org

FIRST TUESDAY 6:00 p.m. Contemplative Service (excluding Dec., Jan. & Feb)

First Prest FALL/WINTER 2017-2018 F NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE 87 Jeannette, The only thing I see is... can the line about sunday school have the time only under it? Can “for all ages” fit on the previo


Joyce

For a small town, Joyce has a really big personality. What the town just west of Port Angeles lacks in size it makes up for with fun festivals, historical sites and a general store that offers an eclectic array of goods you need to see to believe. Joyce General Store is what you think of when you think of a small-town momand-pop shop in the Northwest. This quaint little store is just 16 miles west of Port Angeles. The store, built in 1911 by Joe Joyce, from whom the town gets its name, remains very much the same — false front, beaded ceilings and wooden floor. Much of the store’s interior is made of remnants from the opera house and Markhum House, which stood in the township of Port Crescent in the 1800s. Port Crescent was a few miles north of Joyce on what is now Crescent Beach. Joyce Museum, housed in a former railroad station, is next door to Joyce General Store. Built in 1915, it is considered to be the last remaining log depot from the Milwaukee Line. Museum displays include railroad memorabilia with photos and artifacts of Port Crescent, Gettysburg, Disque, Twin, Piedmont, Camp Hayden at Tongue Point, Lake Crescent, Sol Duc and, of course, Joyce.

It is built of Alaska yellow cedar and was restored by the Joyce Museum Society in 2002. Phone 360-928-3568 for hours of operation and other information. A popular local event is the Joyce Daze Wild Blackberry Festival, a one-day event that takes place the first weekend of August and features blackberry pies, pie-making contests, a community pancake breakfast,

a lively parade, arts and crafts vendors and much more. Blackberry brambles can be seen growing along highways and most side roads across the Peninsula and have been known to take over open fields and backyards if not cut back substantially. The reward from letting these prickly vines grow is delicious blackberries. For information, visit www.joycedaze.org.

Serving The Community Since 1911

“We are the oldest continuous operating General Store in the State of Washington”

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Warmth, friendliness, local color and a touch of history come with every purchase. The Joyce General Store, located on Hwy. 112 between beautiful Lake Crescent and Crescent Beach, has been in the same family for 49-plus years. We are more than happy to take time to chat and tell you about visiting the mythical University of Joyce. We will also give any directions to anywhere you might be interested in. “The finest people from all over the country pass through our doors. We welcome them as friends as well as customers.”

7A1843671

Drop in at the Joyce General Store and step into a building that has had few changes since the early 1900’s. The false front, beaded ceiling, oiled wood floors and many of the fixtures remain the same. Much of the interior of the store is from the Markham House Hotel which stood in the now vanished town of Port Crescent in the 1800’s. The store carries gas, groceries, tackle, bait, and other items. There JOYCE GENERAL STORE also are unique gifts, souvenirs, and in beautiful downtown Joyce • 360-928-3568 Indian arts and crafts.


First Beach

DISCOVER COASTAL HIKES, TEMPERATE RAIN FORESTS, FISHING AND MORE IN

FORKS/WEST END

Those looking for a taste of the rugged Pacific Northwest will find it on the West End of the Olympic Peninsula. Surreal and fantastically green rain forests and wild coastal beaches are plentiful. Ready for adventure?

Gigantic trees draped in moss surrounded by enormous ferns, beaches dotted with sea stacks and rolling rivers tinted by

glacier powder dominate the wild and wonderful West End. The Hoh Rain Forest receives 100-plus inches of rain each year and is one of the best

examples of a temperate rain forest in the world. Located along the Pacific Ocean, La Push is home to the Quileute tribe. Viewing coastal storms

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from a cozy cabin is a popular winter activity. In spring, visitors can look for migrating gray whales while surfing and kayaking off First Beach.

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The coast with the most

Another natural glory of the West End is the accessibility of its beautiful beaches. Close to La Push are scenic and rugged Second Beach and Third Beach. Both involve short hikes through forest but are worth the effort as you are rewarded with long stretches of sandy beach. Sea stacks decorate the landscape and provide inspiration to snap a photograph or two. When the tide is out be sure to carefully peek around the edges of rocks and sea stacks for a glimpse at what lives in the Pacific. Ruby Beach, about 35 miles south of Forks, is one of the most scenic beaches in the state. It offers rugged sea stacks, flat stretches of sand and a small stream that flows through it at the base of the short trail from the parking lot. Beaches in the Kalaloch strip of coastline are easy walks from car to shore. The beaches are numbered 6, 4, 3, 2 and 1.

Quileute tribe welcomes visitors

La Push is a wonderful place to stretch your legs after making the journey to the coast. The seafront town is the home of the Quileute tribe and offers beautiful views of the Pacific Ocean. You can stroll to First Beach to watch surfers catch a wave or simply to watch seabirds soar above James Island (the island is called a-ka-lat in the Quileute language, which translates to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;top of the rockâ&#x20AC;?). The island, at the mouth of the Quillayute River, is sacred to tribal members. Throughout the years, the island has been used to spot whales and was a burial spot for Quileute chiefs. Public access to the island is not permitted. First Beach is one of the main spots to watch for gray whales as they migrate along the coast. The beach also is an ideal location to watch tribal fishermen return after a long day on the water. A short stroll to the Quileute Harbor Marina will allow you to see them unload their catches and to view colorful stacks of crab pots, nets and coolers. Keep your eyes open for brown pelicans, which often fish in the river. As you wander through town, stop by the general store for a snack and head back out to the beach to watch the sun set over the Pacific.

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Counterclockwise from top: A short stroll to Ruby Beach provides quick access to the wild Pacific Ocean. Massive trees decorate the landscape of the rugged West End. Boats in Quileute Harbor Marina return after a long day of fishing. Easy-to-reach Rialto Beach is a great place to watch waves race to shore.

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Hoh River

Forests, rivers, beaches

Abundant rain forests, wild rivers and coastal beaches are just part of the allure of the wild and wonderful West End. Forests in the Quinault, Queets, Hoh and Bogachiel valleys are dazzling examples of primeval temperate rain forest. The drive to get there is beautiful in its own right, but the going can be slower than most North Olympic Peninsula trips. The main route, U.S. Highway 101, twists and turns around beautiful Lake Crescent, and you might compete with recreational vehicles and log trucks, but gaining an appreciation for natural beauty — pristine even outside Olympic National Park boundaries — makes it worthwhile. Have your camera ready to take photos at a moment’s notice. There will be a lot of photo opportunities. There are several marked scenic overlooks to stop at along the way. The beauty of Lake Crescent is difficult to resist and the allure of the Sol Duc Valley might inspire you to stop and explore on your journey to the West End.

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It is common to see a bald eagle soaring above Lake Crescent or elk drinking in the Hoh River. Stop in Forks to stretch your legs, buy lunch and learn about the town. A self-guided tour allows those wanting a look back in history to stop at

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signposts in downtown Forks that feature pictures and stories about historical buildings or happenings. For more information about the tours, stop at the Forks Chamber of Commerce, 1411 S. Forks Ave., phone 360-374-2531 or visit www.forkswa.com.

Hoh Rain Forest

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Forks Timber Museum and Loggers Memorial

To understand the history and importance of logging on the West End, stop by the Forks Timber Museum and Loggers Memorial. Look for the log cabin at the south end of Forks with the loggers out front — next door to the Forks Chamber of Commerce Visitors Center, 1411 S. Forks Ave. Built in 1989 by the Forks High School carpentry class and local volunteers, this cozy museum offers a self-guided interactive look into the local history of homesteading, farming, logging and Native American cultures. Children 12 and younger receive free entry with a paid adult admission and will be entertained with the Museum Hunt — finding things as they go through the museum. At the end of the “hunt,” children will be given a prize. Displays include a pioneer “home” with a wind-up phonograph, ringer washer, cast-iron stove and other items. A loggers bunkhouse, chain saw display and hand saws of all kinds are displayed. Models of old-time steam donkeys and tractors plus historical photographs are featured. A small gift shop offers locally made items to help fund the museum. Outside the museum, you will find the Forks Loggers Memorial, old equipment and a garden along with picnic tables. L e t

u s

t a k e

c a r e

o f

t h e

Open daily. Museum entry costs $3. Visit www.forkstimbermuseum.org for more details or phone 360-374-9663.

A small town with heart

Historically Forks is known as a timber town and the gateway to wild Pacific Ocean beaches. Forks also is known for its annual

r o a d

f o r

rainfall, and celebrates the moisture that falls from the sky each April during RainFest. The phrase “long may it rain” has been an unofficial town slogan throughout the years. Visitors to Forks will find a selection of locally owned hotels, bed-and-breakfasts, cafes and retail stores.

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Historical lodges

Lake Crescent Lodge

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For Information on lodging and the area

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VISITOR INFORMATION CENTER 94

11 S. Forks Ave, Forks, WA Mon – Sat. 9 am – 6 pm. Variety 360-374-5030 Prescriptions 360-374-5030

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Staying in a historical lodge is a wonderful way to enjoy the beauty of the area. Four lodges on the Olympic Peninsula provide comfortable accommodations directly inside Olympic National Park. Check each resort for availability and seasonal schedules. Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort (open late spring to early fall) offers rustic cabins free of modern distractions such as telephones, televisions and radios. Cabins offer access to mineral hot spring soaking pools. Kalaloch Lodge (open year-round) is perched on a bluff steps from a pristine stretch of a sandy Pacific Ocean beach. The main lodge offers two suites with stunning ocean views and three rooms. There are also several cabins and additional rooms in the Seacrest Building. Lake Crescent Lodge (open late spring to Jan. 1) was built in 1915 and is an ideal base camp for enjoying the park. A variety of guest room options are available, including the lakeside Roosevelt cottages. Log Cabin Resort (open May to September) offers lakeside chalets, lodge rooms, cabins, full hook-up RV sites and tent sites. Although it is not within Olympic National Park, nearby Lake Quinault Lodge (open year-round) was built in 1926 and has several room choices, many with lakeside views, as well as boathouse rooms that are pet-friendly.


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Shellfishing options

On the North Olympic Peninsula you can find bucket-loads of oysters and clams. Going after crab and shrimp also are popular pursuits. Seasons fluctuate, and anyone wanting to go after razor or other clams, oysters and crab should first check the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations. The best way to figure out what’s open and what’s not is to visit www.wdfw. wa.gov/fishing/shellfish. Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge sets its own seasons and rules. Contact the refuge at 360-457-8451. Licenses are required for shellfish harvesting and may be purchased at most tackle shops and other stores. Razor clams are available on many coastal beaches, but domoic acid, a naturally occurring marine toxin that can cause amnesic shellfish poisoning in humans, sometimes causes digging closures. But in recent years, beaches have routinely opened to harvesting. Other species of shellfish are currently considered unsafe and should not be harvested from any beach on the state coastline. Look for informational signs at beach trailheads about closures. For details about which shellfish are and are not safe, and dates and locations on seasons, phone the state Department of Health’s beach closures/shellfish toxin hotline at 800-562-5632 or visit www. wdfw.wa.gov.

Fishing, hunting rules

Everything from heavy, world-class salmon to small, fun-to-fight alpine brook trout can be caught with a rod and reel in waters across the North Olympic Peninsula. Be sure to pick up a copy of the Washington State Sportfishing Rules pamphlet while you’re here, as well as the Olympic National Park official sportfishing guide. The pamphlets detail boundaries and regulations, as well as licensing. Current regulations usually are available at most tackle shops, sporting goods stores or wherever fishing licenses are sold. Washington Department of Fish and

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Wildlife fishing regulations are at 360-9022500, www.wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations.

Need to Know

Licensing: Anglers can renew their license by visiting www.fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov or by calling 866-246-9453. A list of license vendors is available online at www.wdfw. wa.gov/licensing/vendors. Regulations: All anglers should refer to Fish and Wildlife fishing regulations before departing on any trip. Refer to the state’s sportfishing rules pamphlet, available where licenses are sold or online. Check regulations before fishing. Boater alert: A warning to private boaters with state fishing licenses only. Make sure you stay on the U.S. side of the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Those wanting to try the Canadian half must obtain a license from British Columbia. Peninsula Daily News publishes local outdoors columns in its sports section Thursdays and Fridays. Columns also are available online at www.peninsuladailynews.com.

Hunting

Peninsula visitors can hunt everything from elk and deer to bear and cougar — even rabbit and grouse. Areas around Forks, Clallam Bay, Neah Bay and Sequim provide chances at large Roosevelt elk, while blacktail deer can be found all around the Peninsula. Detailed information about hunting seasons and regulations can be found in the Washington Big Game Hunting Seasons and Regulations pamphlet. The Migratory Waterfowl and Upland Game Season rules pamphlet contains detailed information about hunting seasons. Both of the pamphlets outline specific information about boundaries, restrictions and licensing information. Free pamphlets usually are available wherever licenses are sold and can also be downloaded at www.wdfw.wa.gov. Note that hunting is prohibited inside Olympic National Park. Washington law requires first-time hunters born after Jan. 1, 1972, to successfully complete a hunter education class before they can purchase a hunting license.

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Forks Chamber of Commerce

Forever Twilight in Forks Die-hard “Twilight” fans, eager to see the location of author Stephenie Meyer’s bestselling books, travel to the North Olympic Peninsula to retrace the footprints of their favorite characters. Although none of the movies was filmed in the small town of Forks, people from all over the world have come to the West End, making stops everywhere from Forks High School, where Bella and Edward met, out to La Push, where Bella visits her werewolf friend, Jacob. The majority of the four books of the Twilight series — and five motion pictures — are set in Forks. Fans will celebrate “Forever Twilight in Forks” during the weekend closest to Bella’s birthday (Sept. 13). For more information about the event, visit www.forevertwilightinforks.com. Although Meyer didn’t have specific Forks homes in mind when she wrote the books — she didn’t visit Forks until after the first book was completed — the Forks Chamber of Commerce has dubbed a couple of homes as those of Bella and Edward. >> Twilight continued on Page 97


<< Twilight continued from Page 96

The McIrvin residence at 775 K St. is considered the home of Bella and her police chief father. Fans are welcome to drive by the house, but since it is a private residence, they are asked to respect the family’s privacy and not go on the property. The Miller Tree Inn, 654 E. Division St., with its large windows and open and airy layout, fits the bill for the Cullen house, residence of Edward and his vampire family. Feel free to take pictures, but do not go inside unless you are a guest. 

reservation where Bella’s friend Jacob lives. Visitors can enjoy the beauty of the Quileute reservation while checking out First Beach, where Bella first learned of “the cold ones” from Jacob, who later is revealed to be a werewolf. The cliffs where the werewolves and Bella are said to have gone cliff diving are visible from La Push — but visitors should know that cliff diving is illegal and dangerous. The Quileute have a connection to wolves in legends, but no werewolves and vampires actually exist in the stories.

Other Forks locations to visit

More to see in Port Angeles

Forks Visitor Center, 1411 S. Forks Ave., to take photos next to a replica of Bella’s truck from the books and the movies. The Forks Chamber of Commerce’s Forever Twilight in Forks Collection is the world’s largest collection of screen-worn costumes and props from the “Twilight” saga. More than 30 costumes that appeared in the movies are displayed, along with Jacob’s motorcycle, Bella’s crashed motorcycle and Edward’s meadow costume. Viewing the gallery is free, though the chamber gladly accepts donations. Since the release of the first book, more than 428,000 people have signed in at the Forks Visitor Information Center. Forks High School, 261 S. Spartan Ave., is where the characters attend school and where Bella met Edward. Forks Police Department, 500 E. Division St., is where Police Chief Charlie Swan, Bella’s father, works. Forks Community Hospital, 530 Bogachiel Way, is where Bella — a selfproclaimed klutz — is a frequent visitor, and where Dr. Carlisle Cullen — Edward’s “father” — is employed. Forks Outfitters, 950 S. Forks Ave., is considered the “Newton’s Olympic Outfitters” store owned by the Newton family and where Bella works. Stop at the welcome to Forks sign, at the north entrance to Forks, to take a photo.

Don’t forget about La Push

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About 15 miles west of Forks on state Highway 110 is La Push, another town with Twilight fame. La Push may be off-limits to vampires, but werewolf fans — and yes, vampire fans, too — can visit the Quileute

The former Lincoln Theater, 132 E. First St., is considered the same cinema where some of the characters see films.

The theater closed in 2014 and is in the process of undergoing renovations to become a performance venue. The first three film adaptations were shown there. Just down the street from the theater is Bella Italia, 118 E. First St., where Edward and Bella have their first date (called La Bella Italia in the novel). The bookstore where Bella goes to shop after her friends look for dresses has two possibilities. It could either be Odyssey Bookshop, 114 W. Front St., or Port Book and News, 104 E. First St., which are within walking distance of Bella Italia. Bella would have flown into quaint William R. Fairchild International Airport, off Airport Road on the outskirts of Port Angeles.

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Native American Tribes

Jamestown S’Klallam tribe Members of Klallam communities formed the Jamestown S’Klallam tribe. The tribe’s complex is east of Sequim in Blyn, right off U.S. Highway 101. The tribe operates several businesses along the highway in Blyn, including 7 Cedars Casino, the largest casino on the Peninsula. The tribe also operates The Cedars at Dungeness golf course, on Woodcock Road, known for its crab-shaped sand trap. For details, visit www.jamestowntribe.org.

Lower Elwha Klallam tribe Today, the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe resides in the Lower Elwha River Valley and adjacent bluffs, but has lived on the river for thousands of years. The tribe’s home once made up a majority of the Peninsula. In fact, Port Angeles was once home to a huge village called Tse-whit-zen, which was unearthed in 2003 at the west end of Port Angeles Harbor. Many of the artifacts found are being stored at the Burke Museum in Seattle. Others can be viewed at the Elwha Klallam Heritage Center, 401 E. First St. The tribe operates various enterprises in the Port Angeles area including the Elwha River Casino, at 631 Stratton Road. Visit www.elwha.org for more tribal details.

Counterclockwise from top: Quileute tribal members lead the Welcoming of the Whales ceremony in La Push. A totem pole watches over A-KaLat Center in La Push, home of the Quileute tribe. The Jamestown S’Klallam tribe owns and operates 7 Cedars Casino in Blyn.

Quileute tribe The Quileute gained recent fame due to the success of the “Twilight” books and movies. While the fictional Quileute have legends of vampires and werewolves, no such stories exist in reality. But the tribe and many of the places mentioned in the books, including La Push and First Beach, are quite real and have been occupied by the tribe for hundreds of years. La Push is about one square mile, but the tribe’s territory once stretched along the shores of the Pacific. Visitors can stay at Quileute Oceanside Resort and enjoy the beauty of coastal beaches and surf, or watch for whales and other wildlife. Each year, the tribe holds Quileute Days, a celebration rich in tradition. For information, visit www.quileutenation.org.

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Makah tribe The Makah Nation is on the northwestern tip of the Peninsula. It is the home of the celebrated Makah Cultural and Research Center (p. 102), which houses, among other things, the extensive Ozette collection. From the reservation you also can reach Cape Flattery, the northwestern-most point of the lower 48 states. While Neah Bay is a small community, people wanting to extend their stay will find a variety of lodging choices, restaurants and stores for groceries and supplies. During the summer months, the Makah Marina is a busy place with fishing charter boats and tribal fishermen returning with the catch of the day. Each August, Makah Days, an annual celebration featuring traditional dancing, singing, canoe races and more is held. For more information about the tribe, visit www.makah.com. Hoh tribe The Hoh tribe is a small community in West Jefferson County, along the mouth of the Hoh River that runs untouched by dikes or diversion into the Pacific Ocean. The Hoh River — famous for its king salmon run — is jammed at its mouth with a maze of massive spruce, hemlock and cedar old-growth driftwood. The river is the focal point of the tribe’s identity and stories. For more information about the tribe, visit www.hohtribe-nsn.org.

EPISCOPAL St. Swithin’s Episcopal

FORKS

LUTHERAN (ELCA) Prince of Peace Lutheran Church

Meeting at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church 250 N. Blackberry Avenue, Forks (360) 374-7486 SUNDAY MEETING AT LONG TERM CARE CENTER 10:30 a.m. Worship

SEKIU

NON DENOMINATIONAL

Church of Christ Snob Hill Sekiu WA, 98381 (360) 963-2380

SUNDAY 10:00 a.m. Adult Bible Study 11:00 a.m. Worship Service

MEETING AT PRINCE OF PEACE 5:00 p.m. Worship followed by Supper For more info call (360) 374-9770 or email at dillionmama@gmail.com

250 N. Blackberry Avenue PO Box 660, Forks, WA 98331 (360) 374-6343 Pastor Pamela Hunter SUNDAY 9:00 a.m. Adult Bible Study 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:15 a.m. Sunday School Call for schedule changes, additional activities or other information.

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Quinault Nation The Quinault Nation consists of the Quinault and Queets tribes and descendants of five other coastal tribes ­— Quileute, Hoh, Chehalis, Chinook and Cowlitz. The tribe is located in the southwestern portion of the Olympic Peninsula. The reservation is a land of forests, swiftflowing rivers, gleaming lakes and 23 miles of unspoiled Pacific coastline. The reservation is primarily in Grays Harbor County, with some parts in Jefferson County. For additional information, visit www.quinaultindiannation.com.

Lower Elwha Klallam tribe welcomes Canoe Journey participants

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West End refuges

From Grays Harbor to Neah Bay, more than 600 rocks, reefs and islands dot the rugged coastline. Three wildlife refuges totaling 430 acres are within the boundaries of Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary and Olympic National Park. Hundreds of seabirds and other marine animals can be observed from vantage points along the way, particularly near Kalaloch and La Push. During migration seasons, more than 1 million birds gather in the area. The Flattery Rocks National Wildlife Refuge runs from Cape Flattery to the Ozette area. Quillayute Needles National Wildlife Refuge extends from that southern boundary to about Kalaloch. The last of the three refuges is Copalis National Wildlife Refuge, from south of Queets to just north of Grays Harbor. All refuges are closed to the public to protect the habitat. But visitors can observe crowds of seabirds, either from land or sea. A good pair of lightweight binoculars and a camera are good accessories to have on hand. Protective rain gear, or at least a sturdy plastic bag, is recommended to protect cameras from rain showers. When walking along coastal beaches be aware of tides, weather, beach logs and other dangers. Most of the islands are small enough that they never earned names on a map. Destruction Island and Point Grenville are among some of the better-known locations. Refuge staff warn that boaters should stay at least 200 yards off the islands, both for their own safety and to avoid disturbing birds. The refuge areas are the primary breeding grounds for the tufted puffin, with its striped head and peculiar beak, and the common murre, which resembles a little penguin. The region, where 80 percent of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seabird population nests, supports 12 types of marine birds. In addition, peregrine falcons and bald eagles reside with their cousins. Several types of seals, sea lions and otters also stop by the local kelp beds.

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Counterclockwise from top: Oystercatchers see what the tide has left for dinner on rocks off Beach 4. A gray jay waits for food in the Kalaloch area. Ducks dry off on a shoreline after searching for food. A variety of birds can easily be spotted off West End beaches.

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Cape Flattery Lighthouse on Tatoosh Island

ENJOY THE WILD COAST, STAND AT THE EDGE OF THE CONTINENT AND GO FISHING ON THE

NORTH/WEST COAST

The Olympic Peninsulaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spectacularly beautiful coastal area includes Clallam Bay and Sekiu, twin seafront towns about 50 miles west of Port Angeles, and Neah Bay, home of the Makah tribe. Go west for adventure The drive to the North/West Coast offers fabulous views of

the Strait of Juan de Fuca and plenty of places to stop for a picnic, to snap a photograph

or to search tide pools. A stop at the Makah Cultural and Research Center in Neah

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Bay is a must. The center features artifacts from Ozette, an ancient whaling village.

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Edge-of-the-Earth views

The Cape Flattery Trail, a short trail featuring boardwalk, stone and gravel steps, and four observation decks, offers breathtaking views of the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, Tatoosh Island and the Cape Flattery Lighthouse. The lighthouse, built in 1858, is now automated. The trail is a Makah Wilderness Area, so stay on the trail and supervise children closely. You will need a $10 per car Makah Recreation Permit to hike the Cape Flattery Trail. Permits can be purchased at the Makah Marina, Washburnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s General Store, Makah Tribal Center, Makah Mini Mart and the Makah Museum.

Neah Bay â&#x20AC;&#x201D; home of the Makah

The Makah Nation is in Neah Bay on the northwestern tip of the Peninsula. It is the home of the Makah Cultural and Research Center, which houses, among other things, the extensive Ozette collection. In 1970, tidal erosion uncovered an ancient whaling village at Ozette, parts of which had been covered by a mudslide hundreds of years ago. The artifacts now make up part of the exhibits at the museum. Its Ozette collection is the largest archaeological collection of any U.S. tribe. On display is about 1 percent of the 55,000 artifacts recovered from Ozette, all 300-500 years old. For more details about the museum, phone 360-645-2711 or visit www.makahmuseum.com. Visit www.makah.com for more information about the tribe.

Counterclockwise from top: An overlook on the Cape Flattery Trail provides wonderful views of sea stacks, the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Pacific Ocean. You can learn about centuries-old Makah tribal petroglyphs at the Makah Cultural and Research Center. Gulls wait for the tide to wash ashore breakfast at Point of the Arches in Olympic National Park.

View wildlife at every turn

Clallam Bay, Sekiu and Neah Bay are great places to view wildlife ranging from bald eagles and an array of sea birds to harbor seals, sea lions, sea otters and gray and humpback whales. As you travel along state Highway 112, also known as the Strait of Juan de Fuca National Scenic Byway, you will find easy access to a number of beaches. The winding drive offers several just-offthe-road overlooks perfect for trying to spot whales as they move along the coast in search of food.

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viewpoint to enjoy watching birds search for food in tide pools and in offshore waters. This also is the location of an Audubondesignated IBA (Important Bird Area) due to the unique estuary bay shoreline habitat and wide variety of shorebirds.

Clallam Bay Spit

Stop by this 33-acre day-use county park in the center of the Clallam Bay community, where the water of the Clallam River empties into the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Clallam Bay Spit Community Beach County Park is jointly managed with Washington State Parks. The park includes public access to Clallam Spit, a mile of a sand and gravel saltwater beach and access to the Clallam River. Watch for bald eagles and osprey feeding on the beach. Watch for oystercatchers, cormorants and other birds on offshore rocks. It is common to see a variety of marine life just offshore, including harbor seals, sea lions and sometimes even whales. The interaction between the river and the Strait of Juan de Fuca’s tides often results in drastic changes in the landscape. A picnic area and full-service restroom are available.

Cleaning fish in Sekiu

Fishing opportunities

Pillar Point County Park

Located 10 miles east of Clallam Bay along scenic Highway 112, you will find Pillar Point County Park. The 4.3-acre park offers saltwaterbeach access and a concrete launch ramp for small boats, and is a good place to start a kayak trip. When the tide is out, it feels as though you could walk for days on the mudflats before reaching water. The mudflats are a hunting spot for crabs when the season opens. Picnic tables are nestled under shade trees and provide a panoramic

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CLALLAM BAY BED & BREAKFAST

Winter Summer Inn B&B 7A1963538

Clallam Bay and Sekiu (pronounced SEEK-you) are the Strait of Juan de Fuca’s fishing headquarters. Here you can find charters for fishing — halibut, salmon, lingcod and rockfish are good catches — plus diving, kayaking, whale watching, birdwatching and general sightseeing. Vacation homes, beach cabins, bed-and breakfasts and resorts offer guests comfortable places to stay, while local restaurants serve up fresh-off-the-boat fish and other seafood. The beach area between the two towns is a good place to beachcomb, hunt for agates and explore tide pools. For more details about Clallam Bay and Sekiu, contact the Clallam Bay/Sekiu Chamber of Commerce (360-963-2339, www.clallambay.com or www.sekiu.com). A little farther down the highway, the Makah Marina is a popular place to start a fishing trip.

A number of guides operate charters out of Neah Bay and offer an array of opportunities to catch your limit. Marine tours of Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary are available through some sport fishing companies. Neah Bay Chamber of Commerce (www.neahbaywa.com) features more information about fishing in Neah Bay.

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Tide pool treasures

Counterclockwise from top: Low tide reveals a sea star at Second Beach in Olympic National Park. Anemones peek through sea grass at Shi Shi Beach. Urchins are common tide pool finds at Freshwater Bay.

As coastal waters retreat, pools of seawater — tide pools — expose a variety of marine life. Purple, red or yellow sea stars, crabs, sea snails, sea urchins, brittle stars, hard-shelled limpets, wolf eels and anemones are just some of the treasures that can be found in area tide pools. Here are a few rules to follow when visiting tide pools: l While exploring, remember to watch your step. To avoid killing or harming organisms in tide pools, try to walk on sand or bare rocks and do not attempt to jump from rock to rock. l Never try to pull or pry something out of a tide pool or off a rock. While some plants and wildlife in a tide pool can be gently touched, keep in mind that these are living organisms. l Never remove anything from a beach or tide pool. Everything within these pools exist as part of a very delicate ecosystem. Instead, only take photographs. l Don’t leave behind anything that doesn’t belong on the beach including food, garbage and clothing. l Check the tide schedule before heading out to explore, and keep an eye on water levels. Many rocks near pools can become submerged as the tide comes in. Recommendations for great tide pooling experiences include Ruby Beach and Beach 4 in the Kalaloch area; Second Beach, Third Beach and Hole-in-the-Wall in the La Push/Mora area; Shi Shi Beach near Neah Bay; and Freshwater Bay and Salt Creek Recreation Area off Highway 112.

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Ozette Loop

Caution should be used when walking down the steep 150-foot bluff that leads to the beach. Take advantage of safety ropes Numerous publications have listed Olympic National Park’s Shi Shi Beach as a and pay close attention to tree roots as you descend to the beach. top beach experience for good reason. A $10 Makah Recreation Permit (see This wilderness beach offers breathtaking views of the Pacific and nearby Point of the p. 102) is required to use the trail. A long stretch of sandy beach leads to Arches, tide pools, spires, arches and more. Point of the Arches in about 2.3 miles. Shi Shi Beach Trail, a 3.3-mile trek from Photographers flock to Point of the the Makah Reservation in Neah Bay to the beach, is the easiest way to reach the beach. Arches and often camp for several days to try to capture the beauty of the craggy sea Much of the trail is a boardwalk that stacks at sunset and sunrise. meanders through lush forests, but other Camping reservations are required from sections of the trail can be very muddy, May 1 through Sept. 30. For details, phone especially after a heavy rain. the park’s Wilderness Information Center at As the trail winds closer to the ocean, 360-565-3100. take note of sheer and unmarked cliffs. Located one block from the bay in the heart of Neah Bay, WA

Butler’s Motel

One Block from the bay and Mini Mart Satellite TV, Microwave, Refrig., Coffee Pot Birdwatching from your room

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NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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The 3.3-mile hike to the campground at Cape Alava sounds easy: a short jaunt on a boardwalk to the Pacific Ocean. The stroll along the beach to the petroglyphs at Wedding Rocks to the south sounds equally inviting. Don’t be fooled. The boardwalk can be treacherous in spots. It is quite slick when wet and at times the beach is an ankle-bending jumble of rock and gravel. The trail starts at the Ozette Ranger Station with a bridge crossing the tranquil, tannin-stained water of the Ozette River. The path soon splits in the woods, one branch heading west toward Cape Alava, the other southwest to Sand Point. Each trail forms a leg of a triangle loop hike, with a 2.9mile stretch of beach forming the third leg. The path traverses an up-and-down path through young spruce and hemlock packed tight with ferns and other greenery. Part way through the hike, the trail enters a clearing, once the site for homesteader Lars Ahlstrom, and then returns to forested areas. The sound of ocean surf and the fresh whiff of ocean air soon spur weary legs to a scenic overview of the rocky coast. Rather than carry heavy backpacks, hikers can pick a campsite among the twisted spruce and shoulder-tall grass north of the trail. Then unburdened, they can head off with light daypacks for the one-mile trek of hopping tide pools and avoiding shifting rocks south to Wedding Rocks — named after a pictogram depicting a man and a woman with a sexual symbol of a bisected circle. The carvings are estimated to be 300 to 500 years old. If the tide is low, continue along the surf. If the tide is high, use the steep but short signed trails that bound over rough headlands. Continue on a wide beach and approach another spot that may require a headland detour if the surf is high. Continuing south, the trek makes its way past a headland to Sand Point, where stately spires jut out of the sea. A circular sign just past the point marks the trailhead back to the ranger station. Reservations are required for overnight camping between May 1 and Sept. 30. Phone Olympic National Park’s Wilderness Information Center at 360-565-3100 for details.

Shi Shi Beach and Point of the Arches

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Beyond the Peninsula

State Highway 110 to La Push

BRITISH COLUMBIA BED & BREAKFAST

ton of British charm.

After enjoying your visit to the North Olympic Peninsula, it is easy to extend your travels to southern Washington and Oregon or even to travel to Vancouver Island, British Columbia. What may not be so easy is actually leaving behind the rugged Olympic Mountains, pristine Pacific Ocean beaches, quaint little seaside towns and the giant stands of oldgrowth trees that decorate the forest. Enjoy one last look at the beauty of the Peninsula as you make your way down Washington’s scenic coastline into Oregon. Or gaze at Port Angeles while aboard the ferry to Victoria, B.C. — a big city with a

Ferry to Victoria

The privately owned Black Ball Ferry Line operates the MV Coho, which takes passengers and vehicles between Port Angeles and Victoria daily. The crossing takes about 90 minutes. Departures leave from the Port Angeles ferry landing, 101 E. Railroad Ave., and return from the Victoria ferry landing, 430 Belleville St. For schedule and fare details, contact Black Ball Ferry Line (360-457-4491, www.cohoferry.com). Turn to p. 107 for information about required crossing documents.

Close to the City with a Country Charm!

Misty Meadows Bed & Breakfast Victoria, B.C.

2627 Bukin Drive East, Victoria, B.C. V9E IH4

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Your Hosts: Erroll & Cathy Koshman

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7A1963545

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Required crossing documents

All U.S. citizens and permanent residents who cross the international border must carry a valid passport or an accepted traveler program card to return to the United States via sea, including passengers aboard the ferry to the Port Angeles port of entry. Citizens of the United States and Canada will need to present one of the following if taking the ferry between the two countries: l Passport, passport cards or trusted travel program cards (NEXUS, SENTRI and FAST). l An enhanced driver’s license/ID card. l U.S. military identification with military travel orders, U.S. Coast Guard Merchant Marine ID document when traveling on

official maritime business, or enhanced tribal cards. Peninsula visitors who are not U.S. or Canadian citizens will be required to have a passport and possibly a visa to enter the U.S. A permanent resident of the U.S. will be required to show his or her immigration “green card” at the ports of entry. All U.S. and Canadian citizens 15 and younger only need proof of their citizenship with an original or photocopy of a birth certificate or citizenship card. Groups of U.S. and Canadian citizen children 18 and younger, when traveling with a school or religious group, social organization or team, will be able to enter under

MV Coho adult supervision with originals or copies of their birth certificates or other proof of citizenship. Those with a criminal record — including a DUI — can be denied entry into Canada. There is a process for applying for a waiver. For details, visit U.S. Customs and Border Protection at www.cbp.gov and Canadian Border Services at www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca.

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Victoria, B.C.

29th

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A city full of classic British charm is just a ferry ride away from Port Angeles. While the 20-mile trip from Port Angeles may not exactly rank as an overseas journey, travelers definitely are in another country when they set foot in Victoria, B.C. Travel to Victoria for a one-day trek, a weekend getaway or long vacation, using the city with the British atmosphere as the starting point for an extended tour of Vancouver Island. The MV Coho ferry from Port Angeles lands in downtown Victoria — a city with a metropolitan population of more than 300,000 — after a cruise across the Strait of Juan de Fuca and through Victoria Harbour. The magnificent Fairmont Empress Hotel dominates the waterfront as ferry passengers arrive at Victoria’s Inner Harbour from Port Angeles. Harbor tours, available from a number of operators, give a different perspective of the city. Impressive Parliament Buildings, the Royal British Columbia Museum, downtown shops, restaurants and Chinatown are all within walking distance of the ferry landing. Public transportation easily can be found to reach other popular sites. First-time visitors might want to start at the Greater Victoria Visitor Information Center, on the waterfront across from the imposing Empress Hotel, just a short

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walk from the ferry terminal. The center provides visitor maps, a Fashions variety of brochures, lodging information Artisan and expert advice on what there is to see Designer and do in the area. Craft Fashions Distilleries The Royal British Columbia Museum Designer Craft & Wines Distilleries near the Parliament Buildings has special Fashions & Wines exhibits and an unparalleled First Nations area to explore. | The National Geographic Theater at Distilleries the museum presents an IMAX experience & Wines Nov 24-26 with a six-story-tall screen showing several Nov 24-26 movies that provide worldwide adventures. Distilleries Crafts Plenty of shops and eateries can be found & Wines | www.outofhand.ca along Government Street. www.outofhand.ca However, the real ‘‘main street” is Nov 24-26 Fine Douglas Street, and everything from major Crafts department stores to out-of-the-way speDesigner cialty shops can be found on side streets off Fashions Open year round with daily ferries Douglas between Courtney and Pembroke. from Swartz Bay and Tsawwassen www.outofhand.ca Nov 24-26 Food-fanciers should note that some of Designer Entertainment the finest bakeries in the world are found on Fashions Fort Street between Douglas and Blanshard. Authentic British and Irish pubs are a www.outofhand.ca Distilleries great way to take a break from shopping Craft and walking. & Wines Distilleries Old-fashioned London double-decker & Wines buses leave on tours from in front of the Empress Hotel for such attractions as the world-famous Butchart Gardens. PERFECT The group of floral display gardens near Victoria receive close to 1 million visitors FOR FAMILY NovNov 24-26 24-26 each year. See p. 109 for details. GETAWAYS! Victoria Conference Centre 9 fully equipped cottages 720 Douglas Street Or, if you’re looking for a more romantic admission with Fri 10-9 Sat 10-6 Sun 10-4:30 www.bluevistaresort.com bluevista@bluevistaresort.com kind of transport, there are horse-drawn this coupon www.outofhand.ca 1-877-535-2424 250-539-2463 carriages available. www.outofhand.ca 108 NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE F FALL/WINTER 2017-2018

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Things to see in Victoria

Victoria’s Chinatown, founded in 1858, is the oldest and most intact such district in Canada. If you begin exploring Chinatown from Government Street, you’ll pass under the Gate of Harmonious Interest. The gate is made of Taiwanese ceramic tiles and elaborate, decorative panels. While exploring the shops and stands you will wander through narrow alleys like the historical Fan Tan Alley, which is only five feet wide and three stories tall.

Market Square

One of Victoria’s oldest landmarks, Market Square, is a block south of Chinatown; a 5- to 10-minute walk from the Inner Harbour. Meticulously preserved to maintain its unique character, Market Square is the heart of Victoria’s Old Town. Independently owned and operated shops, eateries and more can be found here. Heritage brick buildings surround an open-air courtyard that is a great place to relax and eat a takeaway lunch from a nearby restaurant on a nice day.

Counterclockwise from top: The walkway around Victoria’s Inner Harbour is a popular place to view street performers and find local artists selling wares. Market Square is in the heart of Victoria’s Old Town. The Gate of Harmonious Interest welcomes visitors to Victoria’s Chinatown.

Art Gallery of Greater Victoria

A bit farther from downtown, the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, 1040 Moss St., is a public art museum with almost 17,000 works of art. When it opened in 1951, the gallery exhibited art in the historical Spencer Mansion.

The Butchart Gardens

What started as a sweet pea and a single rose in 1904 has blossomed into The Butchart Gardens, a 55-acre cascade of color that overwhelms the senses. Butchart is really a series of gardens, each with a distinct flair and seasonal displays. More than 1,000 varieties of flowers can be enjoyed during a stroll through the gardens, but allow plenty of time — one visit can take several hours to properly enjoy the gardens. The former cement factory and quarry site at Tod Inlet can be reached by taking the ferry from Port Angeles to Victoria, then traveling 12 miles north by bus or car. Transit and tour buses are found near the Victoria ferry landing. For more information, phone 866-6524422 or visit www.butchartgardens.com. FALL/WINTER 2017-2018

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Olympic Birdfest

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING TO DO? CHECK OUT THE

CALENDAR OF EVENTS There’s something happening on the North Olympic Peninsula throughout the year. During the fall and winter the region plays host to a variety of festivals and events. CALENDAR HIGHLIGHTS Nov. 24-26 — FESTIVAL OF TREES, Vern Burton Center in Port Angeles — This fundraising event for the Olympic Medical Center Foundation and other local charities kicks off the holiday season with events including a Teddy Bear Tea, gala and tree auction, live tree auction and a

110

silent auction for trees, wreaths and other donated items. www. omhf.org April 13-15 — OLYMPIC BIRDFEST — The weekend attracts birders nationwide with guided birding trips, photography workshops, birding cruises, owl prowls, a banquet, a silent auction and a featured birding expert. www.olympicbirdfest.org

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May 4-13 — SEQUIM IRRIGATION FESTIVAL — 123rd annual festival commemorating irrigation in the Sequim-Dungeness Valley. Festivities include two street fairs, kids day and family picnic, a carnival, a juried art show, logging show and truck and tractor pulls, a car cruise and show and the grand parade. www.irrigationfestival.com

FALL/WINTER 2017-2018

May 25-28 — JUAN DE FUCA FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS — A Memorial Day weekend festival in Port Angeles that features more than 100 international music and dance performances. The festival includes a street fair with arts and crafts and food vendors, art workshops, children’s activities and more. www.jffa.org


OCTOBER

PORT TOWNSEND & JEFFERSON COUNTY

Port Townsend Farmers Markets, Lawrence and Tyler streets every Saturday through Dec. 16. Chimacum Farmers Market, every Sunday through October. Port Townsend Gallery Walk, first Saturday of each month. Downtown Trick or Treat and Halloween Parade, Port Townsend, Oct. 31. Kiwanis Haunt Town, Oct. 27-28.

SEQUIM & DUNGENESS VALLEY

Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park. “Explorers Club,” Olympic Theatre Arts, 414 N. Sequim Ave., Oct. 20-Nov. 5. Trick or Treating Downtown Merchants, Oct. 31.

PORT ANGELES

Farmers Market, The Gateway, 125 E. Front St., Saturday mornings. Studium Generale, Thursday 12:35 p.m. programs, in the Peninsula College Little Theater. Magic of Cinema Series, Friday nights in the Maier Performance Hall. Downtown Trick or Treat, Oct. 31.

FORKS/WEST END

“Rain of Terror” Haunted House, Quillayute Airport, Oct. 27-28, Oct. 31.

NOVEMBER

PORT TOWNSEND & JEFFERSON COUNTY

Port Townsend Farmers Markets, Lawrence and Tyler streets every Saturday, through Dec. 16. Gallery Walk, Port Townsend, First Saturday. JeffCo Holiday Fair, Jefferson County Fairgrounds, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Nov. 4-5. Port Townsend Woodworkers’ Show, American Legion Hall in Port Townsend, Nov. 4-5. Harvest Wine Tour, Olympic Peninsula Wineries, throughout area, Nov. 11-12. www. olympicpeninsulawineries.org Veterans Day Concert, Port Townsend American Legion Hall, Nov. 11. Thanksgiving Weekend Cruise to Protection Island, Port Townsend Marine Science Center, Nov. 25. Port Townsend Holiday Craft Sale, 620 Tyler St., Nov. 4-5.

Quilcene Holiday Bazaar, Quilcene Community Center, 294952 Highway 101, Nov. 25. Key City Playhouse, “A Christmas Story,” Nov. 24-Dec. 23.

SEQUIM & DUNGENESS VALLEY

First Friday Reception and First Friday Art Walk, Nov. 3. Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park. “Explorers Club,” Olympic Theatre Arts, 414 N. Sequim Ave., Oct. 20-Nov. 5. Olympic Orchard Society Fruit Display & Tasting, Trinity United Methodist Church, Nov. 4, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Native and Non-Native Holiday Fair, Red Cedar Hall, Jamestown S’Klallam campus, Blyn, Nov. 4. Harvest Wine Tour, Olympic Peninsula Wineries, throughout area, Nov. 11-12. www. olympicpeninsulawineries.org Free admission day, Olympic National Park, Nov. 11. Holiday Nature Mart, Dungeness River Audubon Center, Nov. 17-18. Sequim Guild Holiday Bazaar, Sequim Prairie Grange, Nov. 19. Greywolf Holiday Bazaar, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Nov. 18-19. Yuletide Bazaar, Dungeness Valley Lutheran Church, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 18. Down Home Holidays, Sequim High School, Nov. 25. Santa’s Coming to Town, 1st Security Bank Park, Nov. 25. Sequim City Band, Sequim City Center, Nov. 25. Annual Lavender Holiday Bazaar, Sequim Lavender Growers Association at Sunland ballroom, 109 Hilltop Drive, Sequim, Friday, Nov. 24, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 25, from 9 p.m. to 4 p.m.

PORT ANGELES

Farmers Market, The Gateway, 125 E. Front St., Saturday mornings. Studium Generale, Thursday 12:35 p.m. programs, Peninsula College Little Theater. Sequim City Band, Port Angeles High School auditorium, Nov. 6. Christmas Cottage, Vern Burton Center, Nov. 10-12. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. Port Angeles Eagles Auxiliary Bazaar, Nov. 11. First Baptist Holiday Bazaar, Nov. 3-4. Queen of Angeles Holiday Bazaar, Nov. 10-12.

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Port Angeles Senior Center Bazaar, Nov. 5. Ski Swap, Vern Burton Center, Nov. 4. Holy Trinity Lutheran Church Bazaar, Nov. 11. Harvest Fall Wine Tour, Nov. 11-12. Second Weekend Art Event, downtown. “Making God Laugh,” Port Angeles Community Players, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd. Nov. 24-Dec. 10. Winterfest, Vern Burton Community Center, Nov. 17-18. Community Christmas Tree Lighting, Conrad Dyar Memorial Fountain, Nov. 25. Festival of Trees, Vern Burton Center, Nov. 24-26.

FORKS/WEST END

Forks Wine and Cheese, Roundhouse, Nov. 4. Free entrance day, Olympic National Park, Nov. 11.

DECEMBER

PORT TOWNSEND & JEFFERSON COUNTY

Port Townsend Farmers Markets, Lawrence and Tyler streets every Saturday through Dec. 16. Chimacum Arts and Crafts Fair, Chimacum High School, 91 West Valley Road, Dec. 9-10. Gallery Walk/Artists Receptions, Port Townsend, first Saturday. Community Tree lighting, Santa Arrival and Parade, Haller Fountain, Port Townsend, Dec. 2. Admiralty Audubon’s Christmas Bird Count, contact Dan Waggoner at 360-3011788. “Spirit of Yule,” Key City Playhouse, Port Townsend, Dec. 1-23. Port Townsend Community Orchestra Holiday Concert, Chimacum High School auditorium, Dec. 2. First Night, non-alcoholic family New Year’s Eve celebration, in and around Port Townsend City Hall, Dec. 31. New Year’s Eve Cruise to Protection Island, Port Townsend Marine Science Center, Dec. 31.

SEQUIM & DUNGENESS VALLEY

Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park. First Friday Art Walk, Dec. 1. Sequim-Dungeness Christmas Bird Count, contact Dungeness Audubon River Center, 360-681-4076.

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Sequim City Band, Sequim High School, Dec. 17. Breakfast with Santa, Sequim Middle School cafeteria, Dec. 2.

PORT ANGELES

Farmers Market, The Gateway, Saturday mornings. Annual Christmas Bazaar, Port Angeles Friends of the Library, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 1-2. North Pole Stroll, downtown Port Angeles, Dec. 2. Vern Burton Christmas Fair, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 2-3. Port Angeles Symphony Orchestra Holiday Concert, Port Angeles High School Auditorium, Dec. 12. Second Weekend Art Event, downtown. Port Angeles Symphony Orchestra, Port Angeles High School auditorium, Dec. 9. Raindeer Run and Walk, Port Angeles City Pier and Olympic Discovery Trail, Dec. 16. Shop ’til You Drop, downtown store event with music and treats, Dec. 21. “Making God Laugh,” Port Angeles Community Players, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., Dec. 1-10.

FORKS/WEST END

Cherish Our Children, A-Ka-Lat Center, LaPush, Dec 1. Breakfast with Santa, Congregational Church, Forks, Dec. 2. Moonlight Madness, Forks downtown merchants, Dec. 2. Twinkle Light Parade, Forks, Dec. 2. Forks Festival of Trees, Dec. 2-3.

JANUARY

PORT TOWNSEND & JEFFERSON COUNTY

Gallery Walk/Artists Receptions, Port Townsend, first Saturday. Strange Brew Festival, American Legion Hall, Port Townsend, Jan. 27-28.

SEQUIM & DUNGENESS VALLEY

First Friday Reception & First Friday Art Walk, Jan. 5. Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park. Port Angeles Symphony Chamber Orchestra, Sequim Worship Center, Jan. 20. “Tuesdays with Morrie,” Olympic Theatre Group, 414 N. Sequim Ave., Jan. 19-28.

PORT ANGELES

Farmers Market, The Gateway, Saturday mornings.

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Studium Generale, Thursday 12:35 p.m. programs, Peninsula College Little Theater. Second Weekend Art Event, various downtown locations. Port Angeles Christmas Bird Count, TBA. Port Angeles Symphony Chamber Orchestra, Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, Jan. 19. Young Artist Competition, Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, Port Angeles, Jan. 20. Snowgrass 2018, local bands, bluegrass, Port Angeles High School, TBA. “Love Letters,” Port Angeles Community Players, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., Jan. 12-14.

FEBRUARY

PORT TOWNSEND & JEFFERSON COUNTY

Gallery Walk/Artists Receptions, Port Townsend, first Saturday. Red Wine and Chocolate, wineries throughout area, Feb. 10-11 and Feb. 17-18. www.olympicpeninsulawineries.org. Olympic Peninsula Salmon Derby, Port Townsend Boat Haven, Gardiner Boat Ramp and other areas, TBA. Port Townsend Community Orchestra Winter Concert, Chimacum High School auditorium, Feb. 25. Annual Shipwrights’ Regatta, Port Townsend, Feb. 24.

SEQUIM & DUNGENESS VALLEY

First Friday Art Walk, Feb. 4. Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park. Red Wine and Chocolate, wineries throughout area, Feb. 10-11 and Feb. 17-18. www.olympicpeninsulawineries.org. NPBA Building, Remodeling & Energy Expo, Sequim High School, Feb. 17-18. “Time Stands Still,” Olympic Theatre Arts, Feb. 9-25. Olympic Peninsula Salmon Derby, John Wayne Marina and other areas, TBA. Sequim Irrigation Royalty Pageant, Sequim High School auditorium, Feb. 10.

throughout area, Feb. 10-11 and Feb. 17-18. www.olympicpeninsulawineries.org. Olympic Peninsula Salmon Derby, Ediz Hook, Freshwater Bay and other areas, TBA. “Heisenberg,” Port Angeles Community Players, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., Port Angeles, Feb. 23-March 11.

MARCH

PORT TOWNSEND & JEFFERSON COUNTY Port Townsend Chamber Music Festival, Showcase of Baroque artists, Joseph F. Wheeler Theater, Fort Worden State Park, March 4.

SEQUIM & DUNGENESS VALLEY

First Friday Reception and First Friday Art Walk, March 2. Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park. Soroptimist Gala Garden Show, Boys & Girls Club, March 17-18. “Starting Here, Starting Now,” Olympic Theatre Arts, March 16-25. Sequim City Band, Sequim High School auditorium, March 11.

PORT ANGELES

Farmers Market, The Gateway, 125 E. Front St., Saturday mornings. “Heisenberg,” Port Angeles Community Players, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., through March 11. Port Angeles Symphony Orchestra, Port Angeles High School auditorium, March 31. Clallam County Home and Lifestyle Show, Port Angeles High School, March 10-11. Second Weekend Art Event, various downtown locations.

FORKS/WEST END

Quillayute Scholarship Auction, Forks High School, March 17-18. Welcoming of the Whales Ceremony, First Beach in LaPush, TBA.

PORT ANGELES

Farmers Market, The Gateway, 125 E. Front St., Saturday mornings. Studium Generale, Thursday 12:35 p.m. programs, Peninsula College Little Theater. Port Angeles Symphony Chamber Orchestra, Port Angeles High School auditorium, Feb. 17. Second Weekend Art Event, various downtown locations. Doll Show, Vern Burton Center, Feb. 3. Red Wine and Chocolate, wineries

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APRIL

PORT TOWNSEND & JEFFERSON COUNTY

Gallery Walk, Port Townsend, first Saturday. Port Townsend Community Orchestra Spring Concert, Chimacum High School auditorium, April 29. Port Townsend Farmers Market reopens, Lawrence and Tyler streets, opens first Saturday in April.

FALL/WINTER 2017-2018


SEQUIM & DUNGENESS VALLEY

“The Tin Woman,” Olympic Theatre Arts, April 20-May 6. Olympic BirdFest, Dungeness River Audubon Center, 360-681-4076, April 13-15. First Friday Reception & First Friday Art Walk, April 6. Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park.

PORT ANGELES

Farmers Market, The Gateway, 125 E. Front St., Saturday mornings. Second Weekend Art Event, downtown. “Lend Me a Tenor,” Port Angeles Community Players, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., April 27-May 13.

FORKS/WEST END

Easter Egg hunts, various locations, March 31. Easter Breakfast, Elks Lodge, April 1. RainFest, multiple venues, April 26-28. Fabric of the Forest Quilt Show, April 20-24. Welcoming of the Whales Ceremony, LaPush, TBA.

MAY

PORT TOWNSEND & JEFFERSON COUNTY Port Townsend Farmers Market, Lawrence and Tyler streets. Gallery Walk/Artists Receptions, Port Townsend, first Saturday.

Rhody Festival, various Port Townsend locations, May 18-20. Brinnon Shrimpfest, field between Cole RV and the Yelvik Store, 303375 U.S. Highway 101, May 26-27.

SEQUIM & DUNGENESS VALLEY

First Friday Art Walk, May 4. Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park. Irrigation Festival, May 4-13. www. sequimirrigationfestival.com. Port Angeles Symphony Chamber Orchestra, Sequim Worship Center, May 26. Sequim Irrigation Festival Grand Parade, May 12.

PORT ANGELES

Port Angeles Farmers Market, The Gateway, 125 E. Front St., Saturday mornings. Second Weekend Art Event, downtown. Port Angeles Symphony Chamber Orchestra, Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, May 25. Juan de Fuca Festival of the Arts, multiple venues, May 25-28. www.jffa.org North Olympic Mustang Annual Show, May 5-6. Cruise at 11 a.m. Saturday from Price Ford; registration 9 a.m. Sunday at Gateway Center in downtown Port Angeles, www.northolympicmustangs.com. “Lend Me a Tenor,” Port Angeles Community Players, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., through May 13.

FORKS/WEST END

Forks Lions Club White Cane Days Live Auction, Blakelee’s Bar & Grill, May 5. Annual Kids Fishing Derby, Bogachiel Rearing Pond, May 6. Forks Logging and Mill Tour, Forks Chamber of Commerce, starts May 31, Wednesdays through Sept. 5.

AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE WEBSITES

Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce, Port Townsend/Chimacum: www.jeffcountychamber.org North Hood Canal Chamber of Commerce, Quilcene/Brinnon: www.emeraldtowns.com Sequim-Dungeness Valley Chamber of Commerce, Sequim/Dungeness Valley: www.sequimchamber.com Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce, www.portangeles.org Forks Chamber of Commerce, Forks/ LaPush: www.forkswa.com Clallam Bay/Sekiu Chamber of Commerce, Clallam Bay/Sekiu: www.clallambay.com Neah Bay Chamber of Commerce, Neah Bay: www.neahbaywa.com For more event information, visit Peninsula Daily News at www.peninsuladailynews.com, Sequim Gazette at www.sequimgazette.com and Forks Forum at www.forksforum.com.

Black bears in a valley below Hurricane Ridge FALL/WINTER 2017-2018

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CONGRATULATIONS Call us! We’re passionate about real estate, 1st Place

Eileen Schmitz President 360.565.2030

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T HA

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NK

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& N I A

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Special Sections - North Olympic Peninsula Guide Fall-Winter 2017  

i20171025185642567.pdf

Special Sections - North Olympic Peninsula Guide Fall-Winter 2017  

i20171025185642567.pdf