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Refresh: Why Moss Adams put on new look • 4

Keeping Secrets Mukilteo firm’s extra-secure phones used by NSA, FBI and even Oval Office • 6-7 JULY 2017 | VOL. 20, NO. 4

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Endodontic system units line racks at Aseptico’s factory in Woodinville. Aseptico, which makes portable dental equipment, won a major export award. Page 9.

COVER STORY

to 150 workers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Mukilteo’s Teo Technologies makes secure phones for federal government, unified communications, 6-7

Everett’s FastSigns to relocate after acquisition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

BUSINESS NEWS

James McCusker: What retail can do in this environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Moss Adams overhauls look and brand. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Young Everett entrepreneur opens second skin-care clinic. . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Monroe woman finds second career in voice-over business. . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Woodinville’s Aseptico wins major export award. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Seattle Genetics gets mixed results on clinical tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Andrew Ballard: Manufacturing process translates to marketing . . . 14 Tom Hoban: Everett wins big with commercial air travel. . . . . . . . . . . . 16 BUSINESS BRIEFS . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 BANKRUPTCIES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

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COVER PHOTO Teo Technologies president Steve Hill at his phone-covered desk in his company’s Mukilteo offices. Dan Bates / The Herald

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BUSINESS LICENSES . . . . . . . 20-21 ECONOMIC DATA . . . . . . . . . 22-23

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Moss Adams refreshes look, brand Accounting firm remodels Everett office, embraces Western heritage in rebranding By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

EVERETT — It’s a fresh look and a chance to re-tell its story. Accounting firm Moss Adams just remodeled its sizable office in downtown Everett and last month launched a companywide rebranding. The moves are aimed at driving efficiency and collaboration while showing clients and potential employees what sets Moss Adams apart. This coincides with a change in leadership at some of Moss Adams’ biggest offices in Washington, including Everett, where Rob Grannum was named partner in charge two years ago. The firm rebuilt the eighth floor of the Everett Mutual Tower at 2707 Colby Ave. last year and reopened in January. Out went individual offices and in came collaborative work spaces. “A couple of years ago, we started thinking about our space use, how we face our clients, how we face the market, how we face the workforce we’re trying to attract and retain,” Grannum said. The last part is an important piece. Millennials are used to a different office setting than what has been offered in the past, Grannum said. “They work at tables, not desks and cubicles,” Grannum said. Most of Moss Adams’ 29 offices are undergoing remodels. The Everett location is one of Moss Adams’ biggest offices, with 110 employees and 16 partners. After the remodel in Everett, employees don’t have permanent desks but instead check out areas and rooms as needed in what is called a “hoteling concept.” White noise is piped in to dampen conversations. Before, each of the partners in Everett had an office that lined up against the windows. Now, the window areas have been opened to free views of Port Gardner Bay and Mount Baker, especially in a kitchen and dining area that has become an office hub. One wall is the “Wall of Gratitude,” where people can write messages of thanks to coworkers. Another wall is set aside for upcoming events and social committee ideas. “We did it at the beginning of the year and we just went through our busiest time of the year,” said Kurt Lippmann, a partner in Everett who is the firm’s national aerospace leader. “From my perspective, I thought it went really, really well. To me, the collaboration and communication was vibrant.” Partner Noni LaLone has been impressed with the added technology, including video conferencing and new monitors and laptops. “It’s really fun to be able to meet with a

PHOTOS BY IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Moss Adams partner in charge Rob Grannum stands in a space known as ‘The Heart’ at the company’s remodeled Everett office.

“It’s really important that our community knows we’re here to stay. We want to help serve you, we want to help your companies grow and prosper.” — Noni LaLone, Moss Adams partner

Open areas with ample options for work spaces were included in Everett’s Moss Adams office remodel.

client and pull their tax return up on the screen and walk them through it so they can see exactly what you’re talking about and not flip through the paper pages and get lost,” LaLone said. “It just makes for a smooth and efficient meeting.” As for the rebranding, Moss Adams compared its website and informational materials with those of other accounting firms. “It became obvious to us that our peer firms are trying to tell the same story,” Grannum said. “So we knew that we wanted to tell our story a little bit differently. That’s what this brand launch is all about.” So what makes Moss Adams different?

History and roots in the Northwest, and the fact it is the only accounting firm of its size headquartered on the West Coast. There are thousands of smaller momand-shop accounting firms across the U.S. Then there are the four largest accounting firms across the country. Moss Adams fits into a middle category of larger regional firms. Moss Adams started in 1913 in Seattle, where its headquarters remain. The firm grew up with the timber industry but has embraced the industries that have thrived on the West Coast, such as aerospace and tech. With the rebranding, Moss Adams brought in a new logo. The ‘M’ looks like Western mountains. The website features

photos of woodsy settings, rolling coastal waves and mesas in desert areas. Beyond the imagery, Grannum notes the deep roots of many of their accountants in Snohomish County. He started with the firm in Everett in 1998 and lives in Snohomish County. His commute is a reliable 10 minutes each way. “It’s not necessarily because there’s that much business in Snohomish County,” Grannum said. “It’s a way of life. Our partners have chosen to build our business here, because they live in Snohomish County.” Many of the partners in Everett have deep ties to the county, including Lippmann, who built his home in Lake Stevens, and LaLone, who grew up in Lake Stevens and lives in Stanwood. “It’s really important that our community knows we’re here to stay,” LaLone said. “We want to help serve you, we want to help your companies grow and prosper. “And we want to help build up Snohomish County and Everett in the way we can. By doing this remodel it’s proof we’re here to stay, we’re really invested in this community.”


JULY 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 5

Inspiration grows Grove and Kane By Victoria Buritsch-Tompkins For The Herald Business Journal

Grove and Kane’s Karen Olsoy isn’t quite sure where she found her entrepreneurial spirit, but she knows where she found her inspiration. Puberty. The Everett woman suffered from a severe case of acne as teen, that carried into young adulthood. “Nothing worked,” Olsoy said. When she learned that she had a clinical condition, Olsoy eventually was able to find peace — and a mission to help others who had been through similarly difficult situations. Three years ago, at the age of just 23, Olsoy opened Grove and Kane skin care clinic at 520 128th St. SW, Suite A6, in south Everett. Now, she’s expanded, adding a second office in Seattle’s Ballard neighborhood. Olsoy is the daughter of a pair of doctors. For college, Olsoy moved to Manhattan to attend New York University. While everyone else dreamed about jobs on Wall Street, Olsoy told everyone that she was going to beauty school. Nobody understood: Why go to a trade school after college? “I was the only person with a vision, and it was lonely for a while,” Olsoy said. It was in New York that Olsoy dreamed up the name of her business. She lived on tree-lined Grove Street and liked the name of nearby Kane Street (Like Citizen Kane, Olsoy says, and a reminder to always put people before money.) For beauty school, Olsoy came back to Everett and attended Evergreen Beauty College. There’s artistry, but also the need for manual dexterity. There’s customer service that you have to learn while also training in physical work such as pouring hot wax and using chemical products and metal tools around clients’ eyes. The client needs to feel comfortable in your hands, Olsoy said. “And now I love it,”

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Grove and Kane founder Karen Olsoy gives client Brieann Kadiric, of Everett, a facial at the skin clinic’s Everett location. Olsoy has added a Ballard location.

Olsoy said. “Like anything, it takes practice. It was very humbling. It was so good for me.” After beauty school, Olsoy did additional hands-on work with Ulta Beauty in Everett as an asthetician before launching her own clinic. “You have to be part crazy to start a business. My friend spotted the location first, and it was perfect. Every two seconds, I was like, ‘This is perfect,’ and then two seconds later, ‘You’re going to fail.’ Once I signed the papers, though, there was a calm.” What was once an Edward Jones office with huge glass windows was blocked off; low lighting created a softer glow. Her family put in the sweat equity on the electrical work, painting, and drywalling. The chic interior of both locations share similarities. They’re very earthy, with a lot of darker hues with two chairs to each room — not including the treatment table. A large pitcher of water sits near the back of each store, tinted with peppermint oil

as a minty refreshment for guests. (Olsoy and her employees are proponents of hydration.) Opening the Ballard store at 5325 Ballard Ave. NW, Suite 212, Seattle was a completely different experience from the first launch. “It went together pretty quickly.” She hired contractors this time to do the work. “It was such a luxury.” Her family had special connections to Ballard growing up. “My grandparents immigrated here, and came to Ballard,” she said. “It was the place for Norwegians to go — my grandpa didn’t learn English until he was 5.” (He now lives in a house that he built himself.) She still loves the original Everett location, too — she lives in Everett. “In Everett, we’re a bit of a diamond in the rough.” Olsoy says she loves helping people. “When someone calls to tell me that they need help, my heart just leaps,” Olsoy says. “It’s not that they don’t wash their face. It’s a chronic skin condi-

tion that needs specific treatment. It took me more than 10 years to figure it out.” Even so, there are facial peels and other treatments that are good for “a day at the spa,” and she also has the Youngblood cosmetic line for customers looking for that “finishing touch.” Grove and Kane’s longest-tenured employee is make-up artist Jill DeVito, 47. The clinic uses the Youngblood cosmetic line on DeVito’s advice. “Sometimes foundation can make you look older, but this is nice, and mineral and hydrating.” She paused. “And they have good colors.” One of the other consultants, Rachel Greene, 30, recommends the darker lipsticks like rosewood. “And the blush — the dusty rose, suitable for all skin types, gives a bit of a dusty glow. You can even use a little bit on your eyes.” Both shops carry a small section of candles dedicated to nonprofit R.E.S.T., a charity focused on providing aid and raising awareness about women recovering from

domestic abuse and the sex trade. Founding members were the ones who signed up within the first nine months of business, and the group of members that kept Olsoy’s business going during the first year. There are also “Grove” members who have a monthly “flat fee” that they pay in advance and redeem for services over the course of the month. DeVito has been impressed with the success of the business. “It’s amazing how much it has grown,” DeVito said. “The clientele, our

Yelp, we have fantastic Yelp reviews. Just opening a new location, and our members — our members are just fantastic. And they’re always referring people, it’s nice. It’s kind of like a family.” In the end, it’s all about pouncing once you have experience in the field, and getting it done. “Everyone always asks me how to start a business. There is no guide,” Olsoy said. “You just have to jump in feet-first and do it. Hire people that you trust to do the things that you’re not as good at.”

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JULY 2017

COVER STORY

How to build a spy-proof phone Mukilteo firm manufactures secure phones, unified communications for businesses, government By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

S

teve Hill discovered his company’s phones were used in the White House after President George W. Bush left office. The owner of Teo Technologies in Mukilteo was contacted by the George W. Bush Library and Museum. The Dallas, Texas, library was building a replica Oval Office and wanted to know if Teo Technologies would donate phones that matched what had been there during the Bush years. Teo Technologies has sold tens of thousands of phones to the federal government, including to the National Security Agency. That doesn’t mean the Mukilteo company knows where all the phones land. “The NSA doesn’t reveal anything about anything they buy,” Hill said. “You just know some government agency purchased some phones and they end up somewhere at some point.” Hill donated the phones in exchange for photos. He believes his company’s phones were used in the Oval Office at least through the first years of the Obama administration. Building phones for the NSA, CIA, FBI and the U.S. Department of Defense comes with challenges. Any phone that’s used in a facility that handles classified documents needs to be secure and tested to ensure there can be no wiretapping. “A typical phone … even when it’s on hook, when the phone is in the cradle and it’s not (used) in a phone conversation, someone who can get access to the wiring somewhere in the building can actually pick up audio signals from the room,” Hill said. “Not from any means you can even imagine.” The most secure phones are encrypted, but those are also the most costly. Teo Technologies provides secure phones one step below at a cost of $600 per phone. “If you have a phone in a room and you only use it to make non-secure phone calls out for pizza or whatever, the phone in the room has to be certified to meet these standards,” Hill said. “NSA does the testing and it’s pretty intensive and they’re very specifically designed equipment so there’s no possibility to pick up a signal.” It took Teo Technologies two to three years to build phones to meet those standards. So how did the company build spyproof phones? “Well, that’s kind of the secret sauce,” Hill said. “There’s a lot of design precautions you have to put in there — specific disconnect circuitry — so that when the

DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Teo Technologies software engineers come together to solve problems through mob programming, which is a software development method involving the whole team on the same problem on the same computer with just one-person on the keyboard. Here, Teo engineers are, from left, Chuck Van der Linden, Robert Hadley, Jerry Richards and Cody Worden.

“We’ve made the transition from what you would call a widget supplier, from where we’re selling phones and parts of the phone, to more of a service business.” — Lisa Nowak, Teo Technologies

DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Steve Hill is president of Teo Technologies in Mukilteo. Hill started working at the company during college and purchased it in 1992.

phone is idle there’s no chance that there’s any audio signal that can be picked up.” Teo Technologies, at 11609 49th Place W, employs 40 to 50 people. It has a long history in the tech sector in the Puget Sound region. While cellphones have changed the landscape of how most people make calls, businesses and government agencies still

rely on desktop phones. (Many businesses and agencies are moving to “soft phones,” or software that allows people to make calls over the internet.) Many telephone companies import phones built in Asia, and Teo Technologies does as well. But the high-end phones, including the secure ones, are made at the Mukilteo plant, said Gene

Dodson, the company’s director of finance and administration. “We’re one of the last made-in-theUSA telephone manufacturers here that I’m aware of,” Dodson said. Secure phones for the government and for other businesses remain an important part of the business, but Teo Technologies focuses more nowadays on unified communications. That’s putting together phones, instant messaging, voice mail, presence information and video into a single platform for businesses and governments, such as cities and school districts. Unified communications make up about half of Teo Technologies’ business. “We’ve made the transition from a what you could call a widget supplier, from where we’re selling the phones and parts of the phones, to more of a service


JULY 2017

COVER STORY “We reinvent ourselves continuously. That’s the name of technology really. ... If you don’t reinvent and adjust to new markets, you’re going to die off.” — Steve Hill, owner of Teo Technologies business,” said Lisa Nowak, the company’s partner success manager. “That’s where unified communications comes in.” Teo Technologies is owned solely by Hill. He doesn’t release revenue figures. He said he likes to keep a smaller company so he knows everybody’s name. The company can do the work of a larger corporation with strategic relationships with outside contractors, vendors and suppliers. That’s one of the reasons the average tenure of the company is 16 to 17 years, Dodson said. It used to be a quarter of a century. Teo Technologies was originally named Tone Commander when it opened in 1972. The company built components for Western Electric, which was a supplier for Bell Telephone Co. Hill joined the company in 1976, getting summer work while he was still going to college. “That was right after one of Boeing’s ups and downs, and it was really difficult to find jobs in the tech sector at all,” Hill said. “I was literally going through the phone book — the Yellow Pages, back in the day — and looking for anybody who I thought might be in the electronics business.” One business recommended Tone Commander. Hill called the company looking for work and said he didn’t care what he was paid: “The guy said, ‘You don’t care what we pay you?’ I said, ‘I don’t care, I need the experience.’ He said, ‘You really don’t care what they pay you? I think they’ll like that.’” The breakup of Bell Telephone Co. in the 1980s had a major impact on Tone Commander. The Baby Bells — the

DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Above, electronics assembler, Lynne Long uses a microscope and hot tweezers to install tiny parts on a circuit board at Teo Technologies. To the right is a Teo Technologies phone in a replica Oval Office at the George W. Bush Library and Museum in Dallas, Texas.

smaller, regional companies formed from Bell — could only sell services, not products. Tone Commander shifted to selling attendant consoles for the front desks at businesses. It was a small piece of a big market. A couple of years after the breakup of Bell, Hill left for another tech company in the Puget Sound region. In the early 1990s, he heard from former co-workers that Tone Commander was for sale. He inquired about buying the company but was told Tone Commander already had a letter of intent for a sale. When that fell through, Hill made the bid in 1992. “I borrowed money, I mortgaged my house, I did a little bit of everything,” Hill said. “I arranged a buyout over time. It wasn’t a complete cashout.” After he bought the company, Hill moved the business from Redmond to Mukilteo. The company had been just a couple of blocks from Microsoft, and traffic was becoming impossible. By moving to Mukilteo, the company was able build its own 32,000-square-foot facility. Another change was in the works at

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the same time: the internet. All of a sudden, businesses and government agencies needed to use their phone lines to connect with the internet. Tone Commander — as it was still known at the time — evolved into helping companies connect. “We reinvent ourselves continuously,” Hill said. “That’s the name of technology, really. The technology demands you keep adjusting. If you don’t reinvent and adjust

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 7

to new markets, you’re going to die off. We’ve done that continuously.” In 2009, Hill renamed the company Teo Technologies. Tone Commander was too tied to touch-tone technology from the 1980s. “It seemed a little anachronistic to us,” Hill said. “It seemed like maybe both change from the older name, but also get to a name that didn’t imply a particular technology or a particular business model or segment we were in.” Through its contacts with the Baby Bell companies — and the companies that eventually emerged from them, including AT&T, Verizon and CenturyLink — the company would get referrals for work. That’s what led to the company picking up orders from the federal government. At one point in time, Teo Technologies had 16,000 telephones in the Pentagon, Hill said. The Department of Defense doesn’t require all of their phones to be secure phones, but phones need to meet their stringent network and interoperability requirements. “They have their own closed network, but they’re super-concerned about the security of that network and interoperability and you can imagine there are millions of endpoints on their network, all over the world at their military bases, and there are tons of people hooked onto their network,” Hill said. Teo Technologies started selling secure phones in 2000. The company remains certified through the National Telephone Security Working Group to provide secure phones to the federal government. The company sells some phones directly to the federal government and some through resellers. Teo Technologies also makes commercial secure phones for companies worried about corporate espionage. While technology continues to change, Teo Technologies has proved to have staying power for a very non-technical reason. “You can think about all the bleeding-edge technologies, but all of the bread-and-butter companies that are out there that we do business with want a solid reliable business from a provider that is there from them,” Hill said. “That’s what we focus on is the relationships both with our partners and customers, that’s the key for our company.”

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JULY 2017

Voice for positive energy, blessings Vibrant Vibes does voice-over work for businesses in Snohomish County By Jennifer Sasseen

For The Herald Business Journal

SNOHOMISH — Not long after her 25-year marriage ended in divorce seven years ago, Saacha K. Belgar picked up an Everett Community College class schedule and found her voice. “I was thinking, I have to take a class,” she said. “I have to take a class, I have to figure out what it is that I’m really passionate about, that I really want to do.” She found it near the back of the pamphlet: an introductory class on voice acting taught by former longtime radio disc jockey Mike Elmore. “And my heart just leaped for joy,” Belgar said. “I could feel it.” Belgar, 56, had a job in customer service for Snohomish County PUD, she said, but was looking for more meaning in her life. She attended the first voice class unsure of why it excited her. She left with a new career. Something clicked, she said, when Elmore told her, “You have a motherly, nurturing voice and I think you will do very well in audiobooks for children.” It was then Belgar remembered reading in a variety of voices to her two daughters when they were young and how much they’d loved it. She dreamed back then of someday writing children’s books herself. After that first voice-actor class, Belgar continued to research and learn, studying with the likes of The Great Voice Company’s Susan Berkley, known as the voice of AT&T and Citibank. Belgar, who lives in Snohomish, got involved with her local Toastmasters Club — a nonprofit that helps members gain confidence through public speaking — serving as president this past year. She started writing children’s books and opened her own voice business, Vibrant Vibes. Demos of Belgar’s work can be heard on her website at www.saachakbelgar. com, where the tagline is “Storytelling with Care and Concern.” Belgar said she’s made a niche for herself working “with companies that are trying to make a difference, that are very earth-oriented, that are either spiritual or they’re on some path where they’re really trying to make a difference.” Her projects include a voiceover in a commercial for the Natural Clothing Company in Snohomish, which features eco-friendly products “made of natural fibers hemp, organic cotton, bamboo and are good for the consumer as well as the planet.” Belgar said she tries to infuse her voice with “positive energy and blessings,” which came to fruition in a message she recorded for the business answering machine of Body and Brain Everett Yoga Studio. “The phone message is usually

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

A computer records Saacha K. Belgar’s voice. The Snohomish woman uses her closet as a recording studio when she needs to dampen sound more than usual.

“I was thinking, I have to take a class,” she said. “I have to take a class, I have to figure out what it is that I’m really passionate about, that I really want to do.” — Saacha K. Belgar, owner Vibrant Vibes something you tolerate so you can leave a message, but I have callers thanking me for such a pleasant message,” owner Maki Perry said on Belgar’s website. When Belgar was searching for a business name, she consulted with Kabalarian Philosophy, based in Vancouver, Canada, a society that does name analyses drawn upon mathematics and Eastern and Western philosophies. According to the society’s website, the Kabalarians believe there is an intimate link between mind, language and math, and that a name creates qualities of mind from which all thoughts and experiences flow. With the help of the Kabalarians, Belgar chose Vibrant Vibes as the name of her business, but the Kabalarians advised her to go further and change her own name as well. At first she resisted. Then, she said, “I thought, well, how is this going to work on the computer when somebody’s trying to find me?” So she typed in her birth name — Susan Smith — and up popped information on the South Carolina woman convicted in 1995 of killing her two young sons by strapping them into their carseats and letting her car roll into a lake, afterward stirring racial tension by claiming a black man had kidnapped them. Appalled, Belgar had a change of heart. “Writing children’s books, I’m like, I

don’t really want people to type my name in and then they get that,” she said. It’s been five years since she legally changed her name to Saacha Kesa Belgar and the Kabalarian promise of greater balance, harmony and happiness in her life is coming true, she said. Though she also believes in the importance of confidence, persistence and diligence. The children’s book that she said contains “my life lessons in a nutshell” came to her during a daydreaming state of mind while she was cleaning house. Ideas that had been bubbling in her brain for years suddenly connected, she said. “I was cleaning for a few hours and by the time I was done cleaning, I had the whole storybook,” she said. “And I said to myself, ‘Hurry, write this down before I forget.’ “ Starring Hilda the Duck sharing her secrets of the universe and her thoughts on living a balanced life, “The Five P’s” emerged first as an audiobook in 2014 and a year later, as a book and CD. The “P’s” of the title are privacy, play, pals, possibilities and positivity. Illustrated by artist friend Susan Broughton, of Sultan, “The Five P’s” is available at the Artisans Mercantile and at Grow Washington, both in Snohomish, as well as on Amazon and at Belgar’s website, www.saachakbelgar.com.

She attended college for only a year after high school in her hometown of Billings, Montana, but she’s taken classes throughout her life whenever the yen for knowledge strikes her, such as accounting classes in her former husband’s stomping grounds in Anchorage, Alaska. That helped her get a job as an accounting clerk with the state of Alaska, after several years working as a waitress and bookkeeper for a popular restaurant, Clinkerdagger, Bickerstaff and Petts. When she and her husband moved to Monroe, Belgar started her own bookkeeping business, later using her skills to help her husband with a courier business they owned for a few years. The growth of the internet has created endless opportunities in the voiceover business, she said. In particular, she is interested in the work people are doing on Vimeo, creating videos that resemble mini-movies. While she hasn’t quit her day job at the PUD, she is brimming with ideas on how to use her voice and her skills to help others. “I can teach them bookkeeping, I can teach them about the money aspect, how to be careful,” she said. “I can teach them about evolving and growing and all kinds of things.” Helping others is important to her, Belgar said, because she believes she has a deeper mission in life. “I am someone who just wants to learn how to live with my community, my neighbors, the animals, the plants,” she said, “so that we can all survive and be content and happy and peaceful. “And we all can live in abundance. I really believe that is possible. And it has to start with one person at a time and it has to start with ourselves.”


JULY 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 9

Dental equipment maker honored By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

WOODINVILLE — Most dentistry is performed in an office, but sometimes patients can only be reached by elephant. That’s where Aseptico comes in. The south Snohomish County company makes portable dental equipment — drills, lights and even dental chairs — that can be transported into jungles, deserts or the wilds of Alaska. Customers include humanitarian organizations such as Dentists Without Borders and Missions of Mercy. Another major customer is the U.S. military, which can account for 20 percent to 25 percent of annual sales. “We started making portable dental equipment for friends of my dad, primarily through his church, and before long we realized the military needed equipment, too,” said Glenn Kazen, Aseptico’s president. “It’s kind of funny way how it happened — my dad was just trying to do something nice and it turned into a commercial success.” Aseptico also manufactures electric motors for dental surgery. While most dentists — at least in the U.S. — still use drills powered by air compressors, electric motors are becoming more popular. “The industry is trending toward electric motors, and that’s an area where we are the U.S. specialist in doing this,” Kazen said. The company is growing its international sales, regularly shipping to 70 countries. Aseptico received a President’s “E” Award for Exports in May for making a significant contribution to the expansion of U.S. exports. It was the only company in the state this year to win one of these awards. U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross praised the company in a letter for its flexible international sales model tailored to individual markets, including its legally compliant sales to Iran. Aseptico employs 120 people at the plant at 8333 216th St SE in Woodinville. The company is privately held and does not release sales data. Chief Financial Officer Paul Jackson said the company had sales less than $100 million last year. Glenn Kazen’s father, Douglas Kazen, started the company in 1975 to produce dental consumables such as fluoride and epinephrine, which is used to shrink gums away from teeth. Douglas Kazen died in 2012, but his wife, Edyie Kazen, 81, still works on the factory floor in packaging. “I’m here at 5:30 every morning,” Edyie Kazen said. “I like it. It’s home.” Her family sat around the kitchen table planning the company. Their children, Glenn Kazen and Linda Murdoch, were teenagers at the time. They each put $1,000 in the venture, money they had made cleaning Edyie Kazen’s beauty salons. Edyie Kazen said she’s amazed at how much Aseptico has grown. “Every time I walk in here I think, ‘Oh my goodness, if you saw the little place where we started,’” Edyie Kazen said. Aseptico took off in the 1980s after making the first portable dental equip-

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Nathan Rivera assembles an AMC-20 portable dental unit at Aseptico’s factory in Woodinville. The dental equipment manufacturer won a President’s “E” Award for exports this year, the only one given to a Washington state company.

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Three generations work at Aseptico including company president Glenn Kazen (left), his mother Edyie Kazen and son Stuart Kazen. Edyie Kazen, who works in packaging, arrives at 5:30 every morning.

ment. Shane Hohnstein, who was a neigbhorhood friend of Glenn’s, helped design the equipment. Hohnstein continues to work at Aseptico. Photos show Aseptico’s dental equipment being carried on the backs of elephants in Thailand and used in makeshift clinics in Haiti and Nicaragua. Schools, prisons and nursing homes also are institutions that use portable dental equipment. “As the community around us is aging and it’s more difficult to transport nursing home patients or hospital-bound patients to the dentist, our mobile and portable equipment allow that level of care to be brought into the facility,” said Stefan

Gefter, the company’s director of international sales. There will likely be more need for portable dental equipment the future. “You have the refugee crisis in Europe and the Middle East, where people are in tent cities,” Gefter said. “Where are you going to set up a dental clinic in a tent city? Well the clinic can come to you.” All branches of the military have become reliable customers for Aseptico, which makes equipment that can be transported to some of the most rugged areas of the world. Aseptico started buying electric motors 30 years ago and started making its own about 25 years ago. Early dentists used

electrical motors, but the equipment went out of favor because water used during dental surgeries would short out the equipment, or, worse, shock dentists and the patients. In more recent years, electrical equipment has been used for drills and other dental equipment with casings that prevent shorts. Electrical dental drills give dentists more control over speed and torque. All of Aseptico’s motors are made at its plant, about a quarter mile south of the Maltby Cafe. “There’s nobody else that I know of in our industry who makes their motors in the U.S. — winding them, putting the magnet inside — that’s all done here,” said Jackson, Aseptico’s chief financial officer. Aseptico also is an original equipment manufacturer, meaning that it produces dental equipment that is sold to other organizations that resell the equipment under other brand names. “We have two different motor systems that do a very similar job for two totally different companies who hate each other, yet we can be comfortably in the middle, producing quality equipment for both, with features that are confidential between the two companies, without rocking the boat,” Gefter said. When the military is buying, the company produces about half portable dental equipment and about half electric motors for dental equipment. In other years, portable equipment equals about 35 percent to 40 percent of the product. Aseptico would like to see sales divided equally between what is sold to the military, sold under other companies’ brand names and sold under its own brand name nationally and internationally. “It never seems to work out that way,” Glenn Kazen said.


10 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

JULY 2017

Mixed trials results for Seattle Genetics The Herald Business Jounral

BOTHELL — Seattle Genetics announced in June that one of its clinical trials on a drug was successful, but said it was discontinuing the trial on a second drug. The news on both announcements caused the company’s stock price to fall. The Bothell biotech company announced in late June that its drug

Adcetris, with a combination of chemotherapy drugs, outperformed the traditional chemotherapy mix for treating Hodgkin lymphoma. “The outcome of the (clinical trial) represents a significant milestone for the Hodgkin lymphoma community,” said Clay Siegall, president and CEO of Seattle Genetics, in a statement. Seattle Genetics and its partner, Takeda Phar-

maceutical, plan take the findings to regulatory authorities to argue that Adcetris should be part of the frontline treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma patients. Now, Adcetris is used only after other treatments have failed. The study, called Echelon-1, involved 1,334 patients who were randomly given a combination Adcetris with drug chemotherapy or a traditional chemotherapy drug

treatment. After two years, 82.1 percent of patients treated with Adcetris did not see their cancer progress, compared with 77.2 percent treated with the traditional mix of chemotherapy drugs. Earlier in the month, the company decided to abandon the trial for a drug to treat acute myeloid leukemia after consulting with the Independent Data Monitoring Committee and after reviewing

unblinded data. That data found a higher rate of deaths among patients using the drug, vadastuximab talirine, or SGN-CD33A, than in the control group. Siegall thanked the patients, caregivers and investigators involved in the trial. Seattle Genetics will work with the Food & Drug Administration on the next step. Abandoning the trial for vadastuximab talirine

led to a drop in the stock price. The company’s stock dropped a second time after the news that Adcetris proved successful in treatments. Investment website Motley Fool explained why Seattle Genetics stock got “whacked” by writing that “sometimes good news isn’t enough.” “Unfortunately, in biotech, sometimes it’s the magnitude of the win that counts,” the site wrote.

Bothell’s CMC Biologics to add 100-150 By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

BOTHELL — CMC Biologics plans to add 100 to 150 employees over the next two to three years as it becomes the hub for bioscience for its new parent company. CMC Biologics is expected to employ as many as 450 people in Bothell after the expansion. The company manufactures drugs for other biotech firms and helps those firms navigate regulatory approval. The company was purchased by Tokyo-based Asahi Glass Company in February for $511 million. That includes CMC Biologics’ Bothell site as well as locations in Berkeley, California, and Copenhagen, Denmark, where it was founded in 2001 as a startup company. Asahi also last year purchased drug manufacturer Biomeva in Heidelberg,

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

CMC Biologics plans to add 100 to 150 workers at its plant in Bothell. The firm helps other companies manufacture drugs and navigate through regulatory approvals.

Germany. With the purchases, Asahi Glass wants to make Bothell the companywide headquarters for the bioscience division. “The U.S. market is the

largest biotech market in the world,” said Gustavo Mahler, CMC Biologics’ CEO. “We wanted to have our headquarters in a place where we serve most of

our customers.” He added that Bothell is large in terms of a footprint and revenue. Asahi Glass, or AGC, is known for producing glass, chem-

icals and high-tech materials. Asahi Glass also has a life sciences unit in Japan, with a small division devoted to manufacturing medicine. CMC Biologics

and Biomeva are keeping their company names but will operate as units within the company. The companies take drugs developed by biotech firms or pharmaceutical companies and scale production up to get the drugs to market. Along the way, the companies work with regulatory agencies. With the purchase of CMC Biologics and Biomeva, Asahi Glass now owns companies that have worked with regulatory agencies in the U.S., Europe and Asia. The company works with customers from around the world and have seen a strong business. He expects the expansion will serve both existing and future customers. CMC Biologics has four buildings in the Canyon Park Business Park. Only three of those buildings are occupied; the fourth is planned for expansion. The company looking to hire workers in manufacturing.

Clear Image owner purchases Everett’s FastSigns The Herald Business Journal

EVERETT — FastSigns of Everett has been purchased by a local business owner who will relocate the shop this summer to downtown Everett. Daniel and Christi Jolly and Daniel’s father, David Jolly, purchased the Everett franchise of the sign and visual graphics company earlier this year. The Jollys already own Clear Image Frame and

Photo. “I think the biggest thing I’m finding is already having a connection in the community is important,” Daniel Jolly said. “Having design skills is useful and translates well. “The other thing that sets us apart is we have a motto, rabid dedication to near instant communication. That’s what sets us apart, is being a shop that responds to emails and phone calls quickly especially in the busi-

More info Fastsigns’ hours are 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 425438-9350 or email 471@fastsigns.com. ness-to-business world. It’s nice not being a newbie.” Jolly plans to move Fastsigns from 7404 Evergreen Way, Suite

A, to co-locate with his Clear Image store at 2802 Colby Ave. in downtown Everett by August. His FastSigns store has five employees. While studying photography during college, Daniel Jolly worked at Clear Image One-Hour Photography in Lynnwood. He left the business, but then bought it in 2009. By then, it had become Clear Image Studio in Marsyville. He’s expanded the busi-

ness to three locations in Everett, Marysville and Sequim. Clear Image specializes in digital photography, photo restorations and framing services and includes a photo studio and event photography. FastSigns as a corporation has been in business since 2005. The company makes custom signs, graphics and visual marketing solutions including wall, window and floor graphics, dimen-

sional letters, trade show displays, ADA-compliant signs, vehicle decals and more. He was considering getting a FastSigns franchise in Sequim, but then the Everett store came open when the former owner had to sell for health reasons. “The last minute before we were going to pull the trigger, the Everett location opened and we went that route instead,” Jolly said.


JULY 2017

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 11

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12 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

JULY 2017

MILL CREEK — High-end natural grocery store Sprouts Farmers Market has submitted plans for a store in Mill Creek. The grocer plans to redevelop 29,942 square feet of space in the Gateway Shopping Center, 13314 Bothell-Everett Highway. The Chandler, Ariz.,based grocery chain has more than 250 stores nationwide. This is its first store in Washington. EVERETT — The Port of Everett has reached a deal with Seattle’s Columbia Hospitality to bring a 142-room hotel to the Everett waterfront. Construction is expected to begin on the upscale boutique Hotel Indigo by January and be completed no later than October 2019. The hotel is planned to be 86,163 square feet and include conference spaces, banquet and meeting rooms. SNOHOMISH — Kari Zimmerman and Ronn Rutan have joined Re/Max Elite at its Snohomish location on Bickford Avenue. Zimmerman started her career in real estate more than 12 years ago. Rutan has more than 20 years of service in the industry. EVERETT — An Everett company that won fanfare for its deluxe, high-end furniture designed for playing tabletop games has shut down. Geek Chic announced on its website and social media pages in June that it had ceased operations. The messages do not give any information for people who have

BUSINESS BRIEFS

PORT OF EVERETT SHIPPING SCHEDULE Ship port calls 2017 YTD: 39 Barge port calls 2017 YTD: 23 Ship port calls 2016: 85 Barge port calls 2016: 57 July 4: Westwood, Westwood Rainier July 11: Westwood, Bardu July 18: Westwood, Westwood Victoria July 23: ECL, Millennium Leader July 25: Westwood, Westerland Aug. 2: Westwood, Westwood Columbia Source: Port of Everett

paid for tables and other furnishings and have not received their purchase. EVERETT — Workforce Snohomish is getting $2 million from federal and state tax dollars to help Boeing and other aerospace workers who were laid off or took buyouts in recent months. The aerospace giant has slashed its workforce around the world and in Washington. In the first five months of the year, Boeing’s workforce in the state dropped by 3,196 — from 71,881 to 68,685.

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EVERETT — Barton Bunnell, general sales manager of Dwayne Lane’s Auto Family, participated in an intensive, four-day seminar for dealers in Dearborn, Michigan, sponsored by Ford Motor Company. The seminar discussed ways to meet or exceed customer expectations and to help those customers be more completely satisfied every time they visit the dealership. EVERETT — Re/Max Elite has added Nyla Nguyen to its team of real estate professionals. Nguyen is the daughter of an agent and grew up planning for a career in real estate. She is a graduate of Marysville Pilchuck High School and Everett Community College. Nguyen will work in the company’s Everett office alongside her mother Anna Nguyen. MILL CREEK — Erica Erdozain has been appointed as a commercial loan officer at Peoples Bank and will serve customers at the Everett Financial Center and at the Mill Creek office. She has 26 years of experience in banking, and has served as past president of the Rotary Club of Redmond and Highlands East Homeowners Association. She plans to join the Rotary Club of Mill Creek. LYNNWOOD — Snohomish County Tourism Bureau has recognized its Volunteers of the Year for 2016. Those members are: Bob Temple, who volunteers at the Visitor Information Center at the Future of Flight; Clark Fowler, who vol-

unteers at the East County/Snohomish Visitor Information Center; Marilyn Carlson, who volunteers at the South County/Heritage Park Visitor Information Center; and Ginger Dollarhide, Volunteer of the Year for Special Projects. EVERETT — Snohomish native Eric Pedack is opening The Cleaning Authority at 909 SE Everett Mall Way, Suite B-220, Everett. The franchise, that has more than 200 locations across the U.S., provides environmentally responsible residential cleaning services. Pedack, 27, traded in his financial career at JP Morgan Asset Management in order to become a small business owner. LYNNWOOD — Re/Max Elite has added newly licensed agent Dustin Comey to its Lynnwood office located at 3400 188th St. SW, Suite 190, Lynnwood. Dustin Comey is the brother to brokerage owner Scott Comey. Dustin Comey, his wife, and two daughters moved to Everett from Los Angeles last September. EVERETT — An Everett Banner Bank employee has been selected to receive the Banner’s Best award – the company’s the highest level of recognition. Tonya Sprague, an Everett Colby branch teller, received the award for surpassing her individual professional goals in 2016, as well as providing exceptional customer service to the bank’s clients and her fellow colleagues.

ECA SUMMER ENGAGEMENT

LA SANTA CECILIA Wednesday, July 26 | 7:30 pm | $19–44 Exemplifying the modern-day creative hybrid of Latin culture, rock, and world music, this group draws inspiration from all over the world, utilizing Pan-American rhythms including cumbia, bossa nova, rumba, bolero, tango, jazz, and klezmer. 6:00–6:40 pm Artist Pre-Show Talk with Q&A: Bridging the U.S.-Mexico Gap through Music

ECA SUMMER ENGAGEMENT

THE WEEPIES Wednesday, August 9 | 7:30 pm | $19–49 Singer-songwriters Deb Talan & Steve Tannen began writing together the night they met, and soon formed indie band The Weepies. On the strength of their simple yet insightful songwriting and distinctive harmonies, they quietly sold more than a million records, with over 17 million streams on Spotify, and 20 million views on YouTube.

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SKERRYVORE Wednesday, August 23 | 7:30 pm | $19–44 Hailed as “the most promising young band in Scotland today,” Skerryvore is a 7-piece band from Scotland that blends traditional music with the urban sounds of rock, pop and funk. The award-winning artists have been featured as ambassadors for their country in an international advertising campaign for “Visit Scotland.”

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CALENDAR E V E RY F R I DAY: Food Trucks @ South Marina E V E RY S U N DAY: Everett Farmer's Market @ Boxcar Park

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REPORT JULY 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 13

July 2017 2017 July 2017July

REPORT REPORT RE Creating Economic Opportunities

Port ofof EVERETT Port of EVERETT Port EVERETT Columbia Hospitality Selected as Anchor Tenant for Port's Fisherman’s Harbor Creating Economic Opportunities

Columbia Hospitality Selected as Anchor Creating EconomicOpportunities Opportunities Creating Economic Tenant for Port's Fisherman’s Harbor as Columbia Hospitality Selected Columbia Hospitality Selected asAnchor Anchor

Columbia Hospitality Selected as Anchor Tenant for for Port's Fisherman’s Harbor Tenant Port'sFisherman’s Fisherman’sHarbor Harbor

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most accurately represents the global nature of On June 13, the Port Commission authorized the Port of Everett’s international seaport and the CEO to sign a long-term lease with compliments the adjacent Pacific Rim Plaza that Waterplace LLC, a partner with Columbia is designed to honor the international trading Hospitality, to construct the 142-room Port CommissionThe Meeting Port of Everett EVERETT th J U LY 21: flagship Hotel Indigo in Fisherman’s Harbor at relationships in Everett. received its 20 straight J UJ U LYLY5:5: Opening Night ofyear Sail InofCinema Waterfront Place. Construction will begin in “We are thrilled to be selected as the clean financial JettyIsland IslandDays Days Begins Jetty most accurately represents the global nature On June 13, the Port Commission authorized @ Boxcar Begins Park 2018, with an opening scheduled for mid-2019. management partner forofa new waterfront hotel audits. 11: the CEO toHotel sign a Indigo long-term lease with the Port of Everett’s international seaport and J UJ U LYLY11: and restaurant,” said Yogi Hutsen, executive vice is a flag under Intercontinental compliments the adjacent Pacific Rim Plaza that Waterplace LLC, a partner with Columbia PortCommission CommissionMeeting Meeting EXECUTIVE Port president of Columbia Hospitality. “The hotel Hotel that is branded as a lifestyle boutique Port of is designed to honor the international trading Hospitality, to construct the 142-room TheSEAPORT Port of Everett 21:EVERETT will offer an incredible guest experience and hotel with luxury accommodations. The hotel, J UJ U LYLY21: relationships in Everett. received its 20thSouth straight The Port's Ter- flagship Hotel Indigo in Fisherman’s Harbor at Opening Night of Sail In Cinema one of selected the largest event spaces in the Everett, which willConstruction be the firstwill ofbegin itsauthorized kind in in Washington “We are thrilled be asmost the Opening Night of Sailyear Inminal Cinema of clean financial Hotelto Indigo concept accurately represents the On JunePlace. 13, the Port Commission project is at 75%Waterfront management partner for a new waterfront hotel 2018, with an opening scheduled for mid-2019. allowing the city to attract larger meetings, State, will feature a restaurant, lounge, indoor most accurately represents the global nature of On June 13, the Port Commission authorized @ Boxcar Park audits. globalaccurately nature of therepresents Port of Everett’s international seaport the CEO to13, signthe a long-term lease with Waterplace LLC, most the global nature of On June Port Commission authorized @ Boxcar Park design, and the Port and restaurant,” said Yogi Hutsen, executive vice Hotel Indigo is a flag under Intercontinental conferences and special events.” swimming pool, conference center, retail shops and compliments the adjacent Pacific Rim Plaza that is a partner with Columbia Hospitality, to construct the the Portof ofEverett’s Everett’s international seaport and the CEOtoto sign long-term lease with expects to bid the dock Port international seaport and the CEO sign aalong-term lease with president ofthe Columbia Hospitality. “The hotel Hotel that is flbranded as a lifestyle boutique designed to honor the international trading relationships 142-room agship Hotel Indigo in Fisherman’s Harbor at SEAPORT The deal includes Columbia Hospitality and business center. 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Waterfront Place. will begin in 2018, with anancompliments The Port's South Terconstructing and operating an 86,163 square operated by Intercontinental include the popular Port of is designed to honor the international trading Hospitality, to construct the 142-room one of the largest event spaces in Everett, which will be the first of kind Washington ThePort Port Everett Port of “We are thrilled tothe be selected as the management opening scheduled foritsmid-2019. is designed to honor the international trading Hospitality, to construct thein 142-room minal project is at 75% The ofof Everett EVERETT feet hotel under a 50-year land lease, with three Kimpton, Even Hotels, Crowne Plaza, Staybridge th MARINA allowing the city to attract larger meetings, State, will feature a restaurant, lounge, indoor relationships in Everett. flagship Hotel Indigo in Fisherman’s Harbor at EVERETT partner for a new waterfront hotel and restaurant, ” said Hotel Indigo is a fl ag under Intercontinental straight received 20 th the design, and Port flagshipSuites, HotelCandlewood Indigo in Fisherman’s Harbor at relationships in Everett. received itsits20 straight Suites, and Holiday Inns. 10-year options. swimming pool, conference shops and special Yogi Hutsen, executiveto vice Columbia Hotel that is branded as acenter, lifestyleretail boutique hotelconferences with Thank to every“We areevents.” thrilled bepresident selectedofas as the HospiWaterfront Place. 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1900801

character and of the communities that they operSnohomish ” Suites, 10-year Suites, Candlewood andand Holiday Inns. Waterfront Place story options. is thehistory heart and soul of submittals, butCounty. after extensive review 10-year options. Suites, Candlewood Suites, and Holiday Inns. ate in, and the Waterfront Place story is the heart and soul The Port received three well-known hotel submittals, Thank you to everyCOMMISSION thisPort new waterfront community.” decided the to Hotel Indigo REACTION concept “The Port team received proposals from “We are honored collaborate withdecided the REAL ESTATE Port Commission autho-deliberation, one that came out of“The this new waterfront community. ” but after extensive review and deliberation, the Port team received proposals from “We are honored to collaborate with the Port one that out Oncame June 6, 2017, the " The very feeling of a hotel room three well-known and qualified hotel operators of Everett on what will be a transformational “The quality of this new “Columbia has a rized annual CEO Les ReardanzofCOMMISSION for the 23rd Everett on whatHospitality willREACTION be a transformational three well-known and qualified hotel operators Port Commission authoCOMMISSION REACTION is important to When that for the 23rd annual a ground projectgreat waterfront hotel create to"will serve as the anchor tenant forme. Fisherman’s for the downtown Everett waterfront,” track record ofEverett revitalto execute The very of a hotel room for Fisherman’s “The quality of this new to serve as feeling the anchor tenant project forHospitality the downtown waterfront,” “Columbia has a Marina and Island rized CEOJetty Les Reardanz feeling is right, I know I'mis a year-round destination for “Columbia Hospitality has a “The quality of this new waterfront “ The very feeling of a hotel room said track Columbia Hospitality founder and CEO, John Harbor,” saidtoTerrie Battuello, the Port’sthat Chief Marinatoand Jetty Island and great izing waterfront lease termination is important me. When that the waterfront hotel willJohn create record of revital-communities a ground said Columbia Hospitality founder and CEO, Harbor,” said Terrie Battuello, Port’s Chief cleanupexecute day. Volunteers great track record of revitalizing hotel will create a year-round important to me. When that feeling welcomed. I'm sure that residents toisenjoy. right, I know that I'm “Ultimately, throughcommunities tourism. We are acquisition agreement Oppenheimer. “Our collective goal is to create and offeeling Business Development. weguests is a year-round destination for visitors cleanuplease day. Volunteers izing waterfront termination and of Business Development. “Ultimately, we Oppenheimer. “Our collective goal is to create waterfront communities through destination for residents and right, I know that I’m welcomed. sure removed nearly 1,600 have same feeling atI’m the welcomed. I'm surewill that gueststhat because Ivisitors look forward their grand residents to enjoy.to excited about with through tourism.destination We areworking with Everett acquisition agreement selected Columbia Hospitality of their an incredible for locals,and tourists and removed nearly 1,600Marina an tourism. Weworking are excited about that guests willbecause have that of same feeling visitors toand enjoy. look forward to samePort incredible destination forI look locals, tourists selected Columbia Hospitality their will have that feeling the forward to their grand of at Everett’s Hotel Indigo. about with with opening, andI the new business pounds ofEverett trashMarina from Columbia asstimulating theyas bring their LLC at Marina excited Hotel Indigo flagHotel that prides their facilities on This businesses alike, economic growth working with Columbia they their grand opening, and the new at the Port of Everett’s Hotel Indigo. poundsPartners, ofPartners, trashLLCfrom Port of Everett’s Indigo. This opening, and the new business Hotel Indigothey flag that theirgem facilities on This stimulating economicand growth Columbia as alike, they bring their of success at Marina will prides be another for Everett. tourism opportunities talent and record The property businesses the PortVillage. of Everett Maembracing the character and history of the for Snohomish County.” bring their talent and record of business and tourism opportunities will be another gem for Everett. will be another gem for Everett. and tourism opportunities they talent and record County.” of success the PortVillage. of Everett MaThe property Snohomish embracing the character and history of Who wouldn’t wouldn't want to the stay bring to our waterfront.” has been under a long-forsuccess to our waterfront. ” well-known they bringtotoour ourwaterfront.” waterfront. ” stay here?here? rina and Jetty Island. communities that they in, to and the Thewaterfront.” Port received three hotel Who wouldn't want Who to stayoperate here? want bring to our waterfront.” to our has been under a longrina and Jetty Island. Port Commissioner communities that they operate in, and the The Port three well-known hotel Port Commissioner Portreceived Commissioner term ground PortCommissioner Commissioner Port Commissioner Port Commissioner Port Commissioner Port Commissioner Port term ground leaselease the the submittals, Waterfront Place story is the heart and soul of but after extensive review and Glen Bachman Tom Stiger Waterfront submittals, after extensive and Place story the heart and soul of Glen is Bachman TroyMcClelland McClelland Tom Stiger Glen Bachman Troybut McClelland early 1980s. Tomreview Stiger Troy early 1980s. this new waterfront community.” deliberation, decided the Hotel Indigo concept REAL ESTATE this new waterfront community.” deliberation, decided the Hotel Indigo concept REAL ESTATE On June 6, 2017, the On June 6, 2017, the COMMISSION REACTION Commissioners Director Director Information you would like you to would Visit www.portofeverett.com Commissioners CEO/Executive Information like to Visit www.portofeverett.com Port Commission autho- CEO/Executive COMMISSION REACTION Troy McClelland/District 1 Les Reardanz see in next month’s update? ‘Like’ us on Facebook; ‘Follow’ Port Commission autho" The very feeling of a hotel room “The this new Troy McClelland/District 1 Les Reardanz see quality in next of month’s update? ‘Like’ us on Facebook; ‘Follow’ “Columbia Hospitality has a rized CEO Les Reardanz Tom Stiger/District 2 Please e-mail "isThe very feeling of a hotel room us on Twitter and Instagram “The quality of this new “Columbia Hospitality has a rized CEO Les Reardanz important to and me.Instagram When that Tom Stiger/District Please e-mail waterfront hotel will create us on Twitter great track record of revitaltoBachman/District execute a ground Glen 32 lisam@portofeverett.com is important to me. When waterfront hotel will create great track record of revitalto execute a ground Glen Bachman/District 3 lisam@portofeverett.com feeling is right, I know thatthat I'm a year-round destination for Stay Connected! izing waterfront communities lease termination and feeling is right, Isure know that I'm aresidents year-round destination for izing waterfront communities lease termination and Stay Connected! welcomed. I'm that guests and visitors to enjoy. through tourism. We are acquisition agreement I'msame sure that guests residents and visitors enjoy. welcomed. through tourism. We are acquisition agreement will have that feeling at the I look forward to theirtogrand excited about working with with Everett Marina will have that same feeling at the I opening, look forward to their grand excited about working with with Everett Marina and the new business Port of Everett’s Hotel Indigo. This Columbia as they bring their Partners, LLC at Marina opening, and the new business Port of Everett’s Hotel Indigo. This


14 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

JULY 2017

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Surviving, thriving in retail world Editor’s note: James McCusker has recovered from an extended illness that kept him from writing his regular column. He wants you to know that he is glad to be back, and that he missed his readers very much.

T

here is an old saying that goes, “those who are not worried are seriously under-informed about the situation.” It could easily apply to today’s retailers. It takes some effort these days to be under-informed about the problems of retail businesses. Newspaper headlines and TV news stories about nationally known retail chains stumbling or failing have been appearing with worrisome regularity. It isn’t just large, national names that are being affected, either. Many small businesses, some of them fixtures in their own communities, are swept up in the same market forces — just without the headlines. A sporting-goods store in Redmond, for example, recently closed after the business was sold to a large distributor. Many Seattle area residents were saddened by the store’s passing for it had become, over the years, a fixture in the community. It was the store where fathers took their sons to get fitted for their first baseball glove, just as their own fathers had taken them. And it was a place where new traditions were born as fathers took their daughters for their first bats and catcher’s mitts.

Retailers today worry that they will become casualties — left behind as their customers change their habits and preferences and move to markets where today’s businesses cannot compete. Sears, for example, was once the largest retailer in the United States and it got that way James by seeing an underserved market in McCusker the millions living in rural America Business who did not have 101 easy access to the department stores in cities. Sears essentially created the mail-order market — the granddaddy of today’s Internet sales — with its key to success: home delivery. The firm continued to innovate in response to market and consumer shifts. In pursuit of a “one-stop shopping” concept it diversified into sales of securities, real estate, credit cards, and even computers and Internet access. In the process, though, Sears seemed to lose its identity and, worse, lost its grip on fundamentals. Those factors, along with the bad timing of reshaping itself as a department store when consumers were moving away from the concept. That created a cashflow problem and the retailer responded

by closing stores and selling assets. The sale of the Craftsman business to Stanley Tools seemed to put a seal of finality on Sears, and its future is much in doubt. Another icon of American retail is Macy’s. Macy’s annual Thanksgiving Day Parade was, and still is, for many, the semi-official start of the Christmas shopping season. Unfortunately, icon status does not include a cash award and Macy’s is now in a fight for survival. If these big names like Sears and Macy’s, with all their resources, can’t make it in this retail environment, what chance does the smaller retailer have? A good one. Start by not giving up. That will help more than you might think. The retail survivors of these changes will not include those who waited passively for stuff to happen. Your old business plan can help. Blow the dust off it and its basic structure will serve as the framework for your new competitive plan. Business plans generally have four main sections: marketing; production; finance; and management. And no matter what strategy you adopt, understanding the changes that each section will go through is crucial to your success. All retailers, from giants like Amazon and Walmart to the smallest sandwich shops and pajama websites are coping with rapid changes in their customer preferences and market pricing. Because of their lower purchasing

power, smaller businesses are likely to find themselves with their operating margin caught in a squeeze between more price-conscious consumers and increasing cost of goods sold. Lower margins will mean lower profits and retained earnings and will make it harder and harder to afford capital improvements or even routine maintenance. It is a slow, dispiriting death for those who put so much energy and heart into their businesses. Make sure that your new strategy includes close monitoring of your operating margin and emphasizes the “buy side” of your business as much as the “sell side.” The sell side, of course, includes taking care of your customers. They are more price-conscious than they used to be, and they will use the Internet to compare prices even if they plan to shop at a store. But the fundamentals still apply. Do whatever it takes to get them to buy from you, to visit your store or website and return because you share your product expertise with them, have competitive, if not always lowest, prices — and they were treated so well. One thing about retailing won’t change: take care of the fundamentals and the fundamentals will take care of you. James McCusker is a Bothell economist, educator and consultant. He also writes a column for the monthly Herald Business Journal.

Marketers, take lesson from manufacturers

M

ost of us associate Six Sigma with improving the manufacturing process. Originally developed by Motorola, Six Sigma is a data-driven approach toward improving process, quality and productivity. And the same practice, used by manufactures, can improve your marketing results. The term Six Sigma comes from its intention to achieve quality (absence of defects or errors) within six standard deviations from the mean (average); which translates to a maximum of 3.4 defects or errors per million. Impressive standard; however, I’m suggesting more of a mindset than a metric. Michael J. Webb, president of Sales Performance Consulting, put it well in an iSix Sigma Magazine article, “As in any process improvement effort, the key question to pose in marketing is: ‘What value does your activity create for the customer?’ ” A typical Six Sigma project involves five sequential steps — define, measure, analyze, improve and control otherwise known as DMAIC. You don’t need to be a “Black Belt” to incorporate Six Sigma as an approach to improve the results of your marketing activity. Following are DMAIC descriptions and examples of how they can

apply to your organization’s marketing activities. Define the problem area you want to improve by developing a “problem statement.” Then determine the team, objectives, resources and timeline. Incorporating the “voice of the customer” is a critical Six Sigma success factor. Here is a problem statement example: The sales conversation ratio is too low to continue supporting the current marketing budget. The project team’s objective is to improve the sales conversion ratio by 300 percent within 12 months. Measure the process to determine the current performance level. Decide what data is required to establish a baseline; then collect the data. In the case above, the key metric would be sales conversion ratio. In other words, how many prospective customers who inquire about your service are converted into a customer. Example: The current “inquiry to sales” conversation ratio is 1:20. Based on the problem statement, the objective would be to increase the conversion ratio from 5 to 15 percent. Analyze and determine the root cause(s) of the problem. The objective is to understand the current process well enough to formulate viable options for improvement. By conducting a root cause

analysis, your team may find that the primary breakdown in conversion is that the current marketing activity generates low quality leads. The two most common tools used in conducting a root cause analysis are the “Five Whys” and “Fishbone Diagram.” Google those two terms and you will Andrew discover simple ways to conduct Ballard your analysis. Improve the Growth process by dealStrategies ing with the root cause(s) of the problem. Identify, test and implement solutions to resolve breakdowns and improve your process. In staying with the same case, here is an example: Based on a customer survey, reposition the selling proposition and media to target a higher quality market. In this fourth step, be sure to test your assumption, as to the solution to the root cause problem, before fully implementing the fix. Control future processes and perfor-

mance. Institute a tracking system to maintain process enhancements over time. Develop standard operating procedures and constantly monitor activity and results. Example: Conversion ratios will be reviewed at weekly management meetings. This last step will keep your team from slipping back to old habits and activities. Following the linear DMAIC progression will serve as an effective project management method and help you uncover opportunities that will likely lead to greater return on marketing and sales investments. Another important Six Sigma success factor involves appointing a champion to oversee the project and conduct “toll gate reviews” (process checks) at each DMAIC milestone to assure the project stays on track. This will facilitate better reporting and real-time tweaks as necessary. Use Six Sigma as a philosophical and data-driven approach toward improving your marketing process. A Six Sigma mindset will generate greater customer value … and that usually translates to better results. Andrew Ballard is president of Marketing Solutions, an agency specializing in growth strategies. For more information, call 425337-1100 or go to www.mktg-solutions.com.


JULY 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 15

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16 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

JULY 2017

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Everett wins air travel jackpot Realty Markets

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flights between Seattle and San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose and there’s demand for more. The connections between the two regions link to tech, of course. With Seattle possessing two of the big winners in the cloud race in Amazon and Microsoft, creating a business or moving a second stage company to the Puget Sound area makes even more sense today than it did 10 years ago. New businesses will be spawned in the Puget Sound more so now as well and many will need access to an airport, particularly with links to their partners, venture capital sources, customers and talent in the Bay Area. Another airport that links the Puget Sound region and Bay Area could not be better timed. Tom Hoban is CEO of The Coast Group of Companies. Contact him at 425-339-3638 or tomhoban@coastmgt.com or visit www.coastmgt.com. Twitter: @Tom_P_Hoban.

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sneezes, goes the theory, Everett catches a cold. Meanwhile, adjacent communities such as Bothell that offer more diverse employment either by virtue of a strategy or location have seen stronger gains. Even Arlington offers a more diverse jobs story than Everett. That all can change with the announcement that Everett will be the second airport serving the Puget Sound region. Proximity to airports is often a high priority for businesses looking for new locations. Everett will soon have that advantage. Facilitating commerce and attracting companies that simply need to be near air travel is obvious and has been for some time. What might not be so obvious is the power of having a local link to the Bay Area, assuming Alaska Airlines provides one as part of its promised services. Today, there are 48

1

Tom Hoban

health of our region. Other areas of the Puget Sound have seen great gains in this strong current economy. But in the view of too many members of the business community, Everett still remains overly dependent on Boeing employment, has offered no plan to change that and that has

144809

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hether or not you use the airport, if you are a resident or business owner in the Everett area, commercial passenger service at Snohomish County’s Paine Field will benefit your life almost assuredly if you prioritize jobs, opportunity, the environment and the long-term

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JULY 2017

1900970

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 17


18 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

Bankruptcy filings

JULY 2017

Robinson, Royette M., 7634 70th Place NE, Marysville 201705020327: May 2; Godinez, Sofia E., 4716 153rd Place SE, Everett 201705020328: May 2; Fletcher Jefferson, 22206 32nd Ave SE, Bothell 201705020329: May 2; Associated Metal Kraft, 119 E Rivmont Drive, Monroe 201705020330: May 2; Martin, Douglas D., PO Box 926, Bothell 201705020331: May 2; Verheul, Jeffrey R., 12918 311th Ave. SE, Sultan 201705020332: May 2; Verbass Concrete, 12918 311th Ave. SE, Sultan 201705020333: May 2; Sand, Thea M., 20912 82nd Ave. W, Edmonds 201705020334: May 2; Rudick, Shadd M., PO Box 492, Mountlake Terrace 201705020335: May 2; Heaton, Kimberly, 20616 13th Drive SE, Bothell 201705020336: May 2; Q Spa & Nails, 3414 132nd St. SE, Suite 306, Mill Creek 201705020337: May 2; La, Tuonglinh T., 16520 Larch Way, Unit Z-111, Lynnwood 201705020338: May 2; Alexander, Andrea L., 7104 230th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201705020339: May 2; Lowe, Doug A., 19503 Fales Road, Snohomish 201705020340: May 2; Lowe, Elina Jakubisin, 12712 Admiralty Way, Apt. H302, Everett 201705090052: May 9; Claflin, Michele M., 20431 77th Ave. W, Edmonds 201705090053: May 9; Camp, Matthew F., PO Box 943 Edmonds 201705090054: May 9; Camp, Matthew F., Estate Of, PO Box 943, Edmonds 201705090055: May 9; Phelps, Nanette A., 417 97th Drive NE, Unit B, Lake Stevens 201705090056: May 9; Chun, John H., 1225 183rd St. SE, Apt. B204, Bothell 201705090057: May 9; Myers, Mary L., 10404 Eighth Place SE, Lake Stevens 201705090058: May 9; Jung, Hui, 1225 183rd St. SE, Apt. B204, Bothell 201705090059: May 9; Camp, Kelley, PO Box 943, Edmonds

The following Snohomish County businesses or individuals filed business-related bankruptcies with U.S. Bankruptcy Court for Western District of Washington from May 1-31. 17-12328-MLB: Chapter 7, Aqua-Clean Inc.; attorney for debtor: Lawrence M. Blue; filed: May 19; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation 17-12364-MLB: Chapter 7, On Fire Construction Inc.; attorney for debtor: Kenneth J. Schneider; filed: May 23; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation 17-12365-MLB: Chapter 7, Lindsy Lee Hubby and Patricia Lynn Hubby; debtor: Pro se; joint debtor: Pro se; filed: May 23; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual

Snohomish County tax liens Tax liens are gathered from online public records filed with the Snohomish County Auditor’s Office. These federal and state liens were filed between May 1-31.

Federal tax liens 201705020226: May 2; Nickel Creek Construction Inc., 526 N West Ave., Pmb 14, Arlington 201705020227: May 2; City Builders Inc., PO Box 5128, Lynnwood 201705020228: May 2; AR Solutions Inc., PO Box 3, Mukilteo 201705020229: May 2; TM Commercial Delivery, PO Box 1091, Lynnwood 201705020230: May 2; Gray, Elizabeth R., 10303 40th Ave. SE, Everett 201705020231: May 2; Pascual, Fernando B., 21706 80th Ave. W, Edmonds 201705020326: May 2;

PUBLIC RECORDS 201705090060: May 9; Aurora Maintenance Inc., 18123 56th Ave. W, Lynnwood 201705090061: May 9; Leajak Concrete Construction Inc., PO Box 250, Mountlake Terrace 201705090062: May 9; Cave, Brian T., 555 Dayton St., Edmonds 201705090063: May 9; Macias, R, 3109 175th St. SW, Lynnwood 201705090064: May 9; Carrillo, Jose A., 3105 123rd St. SE, Everett 201705090065: May 9; Millcreek Adult Family Homes Inc., 16000 75th Place W, Edmonds 201705090066: May 9; Crosson, Shellie J., 4405 S Machias Road, Snohomish 201705090067: May 9; Yu, Frank, 6704 63rd Drive NE, Marysville 201705090068: May 9; G&S Greenery, 19321 63rd Ave. NE, Arlington 201705090069: May 9; Board, Scot S., 4722 169th Ave. NE, Snohomish 201705090070: May 9; Wallis, Jennifer R., 16221 41st Drive SE, Bothell 201705090071: May 9; Shumate, Jerri L., 6823 Totem Beach Loop Road, Tulalip 201705090072: May 9; Meuret, Andrea L., 3604 Norton Ave., Everett 201705090103: May 9; All Seasons Waterproofing & Drainage Inc., 17616 15th Ave. SE, Suite 1068, Bothell 201705090104: May 9; JPE-IND Inc., 1509 Sixth Street, No. 172, Marysville 201705090105: May 9; Unirom Express, 5510 S Second Ave., Everett 201705090106: May 9; Benedetto, Judy M., PO Box 14983, Mill Creek 201705090107: May 9; Williams, Michael B., 22702 30th Court SE, Bothell 201705090108: May 9; Reams, Robert W., 14915 21st Drive SE, Mill Creek 201705090580: May 9; Dishneau, Gerald T., 6215 180th St. SE, Snohomish 201705160169: May 16; Shipbaugh, Chiloe D., 7311 281st Place NW, Stanwood 201705160170: May 16; Stewart, Elizabeth A., 9910 Marine View Drive, Mukilteo 201705160171: May 16;

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Heckman, Jenifer, PO Box 103, Stanwood 201705160172: May 16; Roten, Shawn, 9910 Marine View Drive, Mukilteo 201705160173: May 16; Turck-Zbytek, Lori M., 16503 Sixth Ave. W, Apt. H2, Lynnwood 201705160174: May 16; Ruiz, Sonya, 13321 209th Ave. SE, Monroe 201705160175: May 16; McGinnis, Stephen J., 401 Pine St., Apt. 208, Edmonds 201705160176: May 16; Reed, Damion, 9927 50th Ave. W, Mukilteo 201705160177: May 16; Klumb, Charles E., 16124 Motor Place, Lynnwood 201705160178: May 16; Spurrier, William, 20611 E Bothell-Everett Highway, Apt. 348, Bothell 201705160179: May 16; Shumate, Jerri L., 6823 Totem Beach Loop Road, Tulalip 201705160180: May 16; Kontas-Brush, Lori, 6909 160th St. SW, Edmonds 201705160181: May 16; Overbeck, Melissa, 15428 Eighth Ave. W, Lynnwood 201705160182: May 16; Matyuk, Stanislav, 1270 Goat Trail Road, Mukilteo 201705160183: May 16; Cory, Jean M., 4707 75th Place NE, Unit A, Marysville 201705160184: May 16; Flores, Catherine A., 11532 192nd Drive NE, Arlington 201705160185: May 16; Trike Stop, 22309 76th Ave. W, Edmonds 201705160186: May 16; Bear Creek Motors Inc., 15713 Old Snohomish Monroe Road, Snohomish 201705160187: May 16; Grounds Professionals Inc., 4804 84th St. SW, Mukilteo 201705160188: May 16; McGlon, Keith, 614 195th St. SE, Bothell 201705160189: May 16; Taylor, Patricia L., PO Box 1180 Stanwood 201705160190: May 16; Parenteau, Mark E., PO Box 24, Gold Bar 201705160191: May 16; Calpo, Queennie, 16212 Bothell Everett Highway, Suite F277, Mill Creek 201705160192: May 16; Grutchfield-Whitaker, T., 727 181st Ave. NE, Snohomish 201705160193: May 16; Diaz, Scott, 11325 22nd St. SE, Apt. B, Lake Stevens 201705160194: May 16; Kennedy, Amy, 1303 58th St. SW, Apt. B, Everett 201705160257: May 16; Saw Construction Inc., 22309 76th Ave. W, Edmonds 201705160258: May 16; Elliot Bay Electric, 6604 224th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201705160259: May 16; Garcia, Domingo, 4305 236th St. SW, Apt. C-304, Mountlake Terrace 201705160260: May 16; Laurens Adult Family Home, 2728 144th St. SW, Lynnwood 201705160261: May 16; Zab Thai Restaurant, 11108 Evergreen Way, Suite A, Everett 201705160262: May 16; DCI Metal Finishing, 6700 Hardeson Road, Suite 101,

Everett 201705160263: May 16; Cement Distributors Inc., 17501 59th Ave. NE, Arlington 201705240020: May 24; Knapp, Mark J., 4405 188th St. NE, Arlington 201705240021: May 24; Bond, Rita, 1800 Mill Creek Road, Unit 2a, Mill Creek 201705240022: May 24; Taroiff, Paula R., 13912 67th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201705240023: May 24; Young, Daniel, 704 First Ave. W, Goldbar 201705240024: May 24; Bryan, Julia L., PO Box 965, Darrington 201705240025: May 24; Copas, Gregory S., 928 Merea Lane, Sultan 201705240026: May 24; Alba-Lopez, Jose, 6224 107th Place NE, Marysville 201705240027: May 24; Latraille, Joseph P., 5020 Cemetery Road, No. B, Arlington 201705240028: May 24; Olson, Thomas S. Sr., 8528 220th St. SW, Edmonds 201705240029: May 24; Newbury, Elizabeth A., 202 E Spruce St., Mount Vernon 201705240030: May 24; Woolley, Kevin, 11914 47th Drive SE, Everett 201705240031: May 24; Jury, Tagen D., 6223 118th St. SE, Snohomish 201705240044: May 24; Fitzsimmons, Kimberly J., PO Box 265, Silvana 201705240045: May 24; Jones, Cornelius L., 102 87th Ave. SE, Lake Stevens 201705240046: May 24; Landgrebe, Lois A., 12012 20th St. NE, Lake Stevens 201705240048: May 24; Curnutt, Steven C. Estate Of, PO Box 711, Gold Bar 201705240049: May 24; Vershave, Rick, 1805 186th Place SE, Apt. G204, Bothell 201705240050: May 24; Byrd, Kari, 1805 186th Place SE, Apt. G204, Bothell 201705240051: May 24; DeFever, Robert B., 7820 100th St. NE, No. A, Marysville 201705240052: May 24; Enrapture Inc., 10530 19th Ave. SE, Everett 201705310362: May 31; Didok, Tatiana I., 7039 Morgan Road, Everett 201705310363: May 31; Novak, Michael T., 14719 Main St., F-102, Mill Creek 201705310364: May 31; Reeves, Anthony Mark, 1507 Wall St., Everett 201705310365: May 31; Crown Fire Protection Inc., PO Box 12113, Mill Creek 201705310366: May 31; Lowery, Michael E, 6714 164th St. SE, Snohomish

Employment security liens 201705030644: May 3; Granlund Paint & Design Inc., State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201705030645: May 3; Keppel Brothers, State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201705030646: May 3; Charlie Nathan Builders, State

Of Washington (Dept Of) 201705030647: May 3; Netversant Solutions, State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201705030648: May 3; Campbell’s Plumbing Inc., State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201705030649: May 3; Patty’s Eggnest Restaurant, State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201705030650: May 3; AGR Contracting Inc., State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201705030651: May 3; Patty’s Eggnest & Turkey House, State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201705030652: May 3; Miller & Sons Inc., State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201705030653: May 3; Pfaff Company, State Of Washington (Dept Of)

Partial release of federal tax liens 201705090073: May 9; Berry, Douglas A., 3427 Norton Ave., Everett 201705090109: May 9; Cavazos, Rangel, 21810 Vine Road, Brier

Release of federal tax liens 201705010131: May 1; Brown, Steven P., PO-Box-357, Snohomish 201705020232: May 2; Bennett, Irina M., 3506 154th Place SE, Bothell 201705020341: May 2; Yim, Myung, 18218 Turnberry Place, Arlington 201705020342: May 2; Rogers, Eddie, 5725 200th St. SW, Apt. 7, Lynnwood 201705020343: May 2; Schreier, T., 19410 Highway 99, Apt. A-340, Lynnwood 201705020344: May 2; LeMay, Carol B., PO Box 2554, Stanwood 201705020345: May 2; Coolbaugh, Janice G., 14225 61st Place W, Edmonds 201705020346: May 2; Yim, Seong Eun, 18218 Turnberry Place, Arlington 201705020347: May 2; Lussier, James, 624 79th Drive NE, Everett 201705020348: May 2; Duncan, Daniel S., 31729 Brandstrom Road, Stanwood 201705020349: May 2; Preece, Michael C., 1327 154th St. NW, Marysville 201705020350: May 2; Rorke, Douglas G., 23430 97th Place W, Edmonds 201705090074: May 9; Kim, Eugene, 4130 214th St. SW, Apt. B, Mountlake Terrace 201705090075: May 9; Jal Holdings Inc., 14512 167th Ave. SE, Monroe 201705090076: May 9; Maldonado, Ramon, 9021 49th Drive NE, Marysville 201705090077: May 9; Kyle, Cheryl L., 15214 116th St. NE, Arlington 201705090078: May 9; Bercot, Earl H., 331 140th St. SW, Everett 201705090079: May 9; Nicolas, Dolores L., 6106 51st St. NE, Marysville


PUBLIC RECORDS 201705090080: May 9; Albee, John D., 5710 198th St. SW, Lynnwood 201705090081: May 9; Hollingsworth, Sherilyn K., 7008 19th Ave. NE, Marysville 201705090083: May 9; Wilson, Kenneth E., 304 81st Drive SE, Lake Stevens 201705090084: May 9; Potong Floor Covering Inc., 23414 127th Ave. NE, Arlington 201705090085: May 9; Prince, Gregory D., 16520 North Road, Apt. 1105, Bothell 201705090086: May 9; Wilson, Kenneth E., 6808 277th St. NW, Stanwood 201705090110: May 9; Benson Drywall Inc., PO Box 13138, Mill Creek 201705160195: May 16; Guzman Trucking Inc., 5805 Sixth Ave. NW, Tulalip 201705160196: May 16; Meyers, Edward A., 6810 Armar Road, Apt. 20, Marysville 201705160197: May 16; Marks, James S., 2615 201st Place SE, Bothell 201705160198: May 16; Amundson & Co Inc., 2825 Colby Ave., Suite 206, Everett 201705160199: May 16; Schuhow, Michael T., 12404 E Gibson Road, Apt. J248, Everett 201705160200: May 16; Maissen, Jim, 20304 87th Ave. W, Edmonds 201705160202: May 16; Gallegos, Alfreda L., 6716A 60th Place NE, Marysville

201705160203: May 16; Wattam, Eric A., 2124 127th Place SE, Everett 201705160204: May 16; Absolute Graphix Inc., PO Box 6124, Lynnwood 201705160205: May 16; Larson, Judith A., 16220 Larch Way, Lynnwood 201705160206: May 16; Riehemann, Bill J., 405 Fir Lane, Arlington 201705160207: May 16; Terracotta Red, 2820 Hewitt Ave., Everett 201705160208: May 16; Johnson, Belrae, 616 Sunset Ave. N, Edmonds 201705160209: May 16; Easter, Charles W, 616 Sunset Ave. N, Edmonds 201705160264: May 16; Howe, Michelle L., 15729 Larch Way, Lynnwood 201705180061: May 18; Skycorp Limited, 526 N West Ave., Arlington 201705240032: May 24; Sweeney, Sarah L., 2814 206th Place SW, Lynnwood 201705240033: May 24; Rutter, John E III, 3409 Shore Ave., Everett 201705240034: May 24; Cavazos, Anne, 21810 Vine Road, Brier 201705240035: May 24; Stupey, Jamie R., 530 E Highland Drive, Arlington 201705240036: May 24; Shipman, George L., 5810 Fleming St., Space 73, Everett 201705300622: May 30; Smith, Dolly B., 10121 Evergreen Way, Suite 260, Everett 201705310367: May 31;

Let Your Career

Elliott, Eric, PO Box 2131, Lynnwood 201705310368: May 31; Hinchliffe, Martha J., 9204 Merchant Way, Everett 201705310369: May 31; Vep East Inc., 2373 Mukilteo Speedway, Mukilteo 201705310370: May 31; Moors, Joseph, 1005 Kentish Road, Lynnwood 201705310371: May 31; Bauer, Lynn Ee, 17611 83rd Drive NE, Arlington 201705310372: May 31; Heaton, Kimberly, 20616 13th Drive SE, Bothell 201705310373: May 31; Windsor, Gail L., 3520 156th St. SW, Apt. A4, Lynnwood 201705310374: May 31; Elliott, Eric M., 12122 Rainbow Drive, Arlington 201705310375: May 31; Laugen, Arvid B., 19816 50th Ave. W, Apt. 823, Lynnwood 201705310376: May

31; Evanger, Jennifer L., 1403 252nd St. NW, No. A, Stanwood 201705310378: May 31; Morgan, Stan, 3132 165th Ave. SE, Stanwood 201705310379: May 31; Morgan, Stan, PO Box 12396 Everett 201705310380: May 31; Duncan, Kelly J., 1919 Kirkland Place NE, Renton 201705310381: May 31; Elliott, Eric M., 12122 Rainbow Drive, Arlington 201705310382: May 31; Gold Bar Restaurant & Lounge, PO Box 12277, Everett 201705310384: May 31; Evanger, Jennifer, 1403a 252nd St. NW, Stanwood 201705310385: May 31; Kim, Kil Su, 16516 41st Place W, Lynnwood 201705310386: May 31; Roberts, Cheryl, 16725 405th

Drive SE, Gold Bar 201705310387: May 31; Elliott, Eric M., 12122 Rainbow Drive, Arlington 201705310388: May 31; Morgan, Stan, PO Box 12396, Everett 201705310389: May 31; Kim, Hyun S., 16516 41st Place W, Lynnwood 201705150471: May 15; Barnett, Toby L., 1704 Grove St., Unit B, Marysville

Satisfaction of employment security lien 201705030640: May 3; Smokey Point Auto Care, State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201705030642: May 3; JA Seekins Painting Inc., State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201705030643: May 3;

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20 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

JULY 2017

BUSINESS LICENSES PLEASE NOTE: Business license information is obtained monthly from the Washington Secretary of State’s Office through the paid commercial services of InfoUSA. For the complete list, please go online to www.theherald businessjournal.com.

Arlington Latham Realty Unlimited: 3710 168th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8461; 360-3227323; Real Estate Martinez Rios Foods NW: 318 N Olympic Ave., Arlington, WA 982231339; 360-435-4488; Food Products-Retail Morel Industries Inc.: 17735 59th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-6446; 360-572-0357; Nonclassified Establishments NW Restaurants-W Washington: 3433 169th Place NE, Arlington, WA 982238419; 360-658-6445; Restaurants OAB Engineering: 18660 58th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-7722; 360-548-3011; Engineers South Fork Cake Co.: 11313 192nd Drive NE, Arlington, WA 98223-5876; Bakers-Retail Sugar Pine Salon: 3525 168th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8456; 360-658-1734; Beauty Salons

Bothell ADI International: 2020 Maltby Road, Bothell, WA 98021-8669; 425-481-8729; Nonclassified Establishments American Evolution: 3306 175th St. SE, Bothell, WA 98012-6668; Nonclassified Establishments Bright and Right Electric Services: 826 226th St. SE, Bothell, WA 98021-8280; Electric Contractors C Bolum Family: 17624 15th Ave. SE, Bothell, WA 98012-5106; 425-483-1756; Nonclassified Establishments Cricket Wireless: 22833 Bothell Everett Highway, Bothell, WA 98021-9385; 425-419-4847; Cellular Telephones (Services) HEK Inc.: 3624 212th St. SE, Bothell, WA 98021-7817; 425-486-3784; Nonclassified Establishments Hoylu: 22722 29th Drive SE, No. 100, Bothell, WA 98021-4420; Nonclassified Establishments K&B Roofing and Construction: 24224 Sixth Place W, Bothell, WA 98021-8537; Roofing Contractors Landscapes Northwest: 1909 169th Place SE, Bothell, WA 98012-6471; 425-2866375; Landscape Contractors Marizen Gapud: 15 164th St. SW, Bothell, WA 980124936; 425-582-9329; Nonclassified Establishments Paradise Food Point: 17928 Bothell Everett

Highway, Bothell, WA 980126386; 425-877-1856; Food Products-Retail Quadrant Homes Grove At Cyn: 22324 44 Drive, Bothell, WA 98021; 425-4194750; Home Builders Salted Grape Cafe: 22121 17th Ave. SE, No. 106, Bothell, WA 98021-7404; 360-2963468; Restaurants Tech Force: 4132 Jewell Road, Bothell, WA 980127333; Biotechnology Products and Services Edmonds Arashi Ramen: 22511 Highway 99, Edmonds, WA 98026-8379; 425-835-0068; Restaurants Casa Oaxaca: 8402 Bowdoin Way, Edmonds, WA 98026-7322; 425-678-8307; Nonclassified Establishments Edmonds Hero Hardware: 550 Fifth Ave. S, Edmonds, WA 98020-3403; 360-3215776; Hardware-Retail Knowles Group: 120 W Dayton St., Edmonds, WA 98020-7217; 425-361-7327; Nonclassified Establishments M and M Rafizadeh Family: 23607 Highway 99, Edmonds, WA 98026-9272; 425-697-3607; Nonclassified Establishments MacCarthy Financial Services: 7125 176th St. SW, Edmonds, WA 98026-5619; Financial Advisory Services Vanity Lash Lounge: 315 Fifth Ave. S, Edmonds, WA 98020-3600; 425-582-8898; Miscellaneous Personal Ser-

vices Not Elsewhere Classified

Everett Abigail L. Sayler Services: 1901 Merrill Creek Parkway, No. R206, Everett, WA 982035878; Services Not Elsewhere Classified ACA Computer Integrators: 3216 Wetmore Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4368; 425-374-7018; Computer and Equipment Dealers Anna Yalanzhy Services: 10710 Evergreen Way, No. E209, Everett, WA 982044322; Services Not Elsewhere Classified Beacon Roofing Supply: 12807 Highway 99, Everett, WA 98204-6226; 360-3362300; Roofing Contractors Canna Brand Solutions: 720 132nd St. SW, Everett, WA 98204-9359; 425582-9274; Nonclassified Establishments Cosmos Siding: 12102 Fourth Ave. W, Everett, WA 98204-5713; 425-322-4337; Siding Contractors Estella’s Cleaning: 824 W Casino Road, Everett, WA 98204-1689; 425-903-4986; Janitor Service Everett Wetmore: 3208 Wetmore Ave., Everett, WA 98201-6406; 425-339-9866; Nonclassified Establishments Geeky Villain: 607 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-3248; 425-322-5826; Nonclassified Establishments Gianna Lemocavallo Coun-

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Granite Falls Head To Toe Massage and Energy: 105 Paradise Parkway, Granite Falls, WA 98252; 360-363-4952; Massage Therapists Mountain Loop Auto Wash: 502 E Stanley St., Granite Falls, WA 98252; 360386-8073; Car Washing and Polishing NW Diesel: 4411 226th Drive NE, Granite Falls, WA 98252-8339; Diesel Fuel

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Wetmore Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4016; 425-367-9955; Coffee Shops Puro Clean: 909 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 982083746; 425-512-9456; Janitor Service Repuvision: 3213 Wetmore Ave., No. 6, Everett, WA 98201-4337; Nonclassified Establishments Road Construction Northwest: 8620 Holly Drive, Everett, WA 98208-1825; 425-212-9261; Construction Companies SMJ Wireless: 20 SW Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98204-2700; 425-405-3142; Cellular Telephones (Services) Soleil By Design: 3525 Colby Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4782; 425-322-3078; Nonclassified Establishments Sportsman Warehouse: 505 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-3252; 425265-9722; Warehouses-Merchandise and Self Storage

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seling: 2722 Colby Ave., No. 425, Everett, WA 98201-3532; 425-322-4538; Counseling Services Igor Ialanji Services: 10710 Evergreen Way, No. E209, Everett, WA 98204-4322; Services Not Elsewhere Classified Imago Dei Care: 1528 Maple St., Everett, WA 98201-2130; Nonclassified Establishments JBI Paranormal Investigation: 1532 Walnut St., Everett, WA 98201-1955; 425-3748243; Investigators JDS Inc.: 6201 Associated Blvd., Everett, WA 98203; Nonclassified Establishments Jesse’s Flop Shop: 12102 Fourth Ave. W, Everett, WA 98204-5713; 425-374-7210; Nonclassified Establishments JMZ Contractors: 5205 S Second Ave., Everett, WA 98203-4114; 425-263-9213; General Contractors King Of Kings Recovery: 560 E Marine View Drive, Everett, WA 98201-1235; 425259-1607; Churches Lombardi’s Corporate Office: 2911 Bond St., Everett, WA 98201-3943; 425-740-3161; Nonclassified Establishments MFI: 530 SW Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 982043882; 425-355-6293; Nonclassified Establishments Mobileone: 4809 132nd St. SE, Everett, WA 982086241; 425-316-9960; Cellular Telephones (Services) Narrative Coffee: 2927

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JULY 2017

BUSINESS LICENSES (Wholesale) Studio Bodywise: 204 W Stanley St., Granite Falls, WA 98252-8489; 360-691-6000; Nonclassified Establishments

Lake Stevens All Ways Covered Contracting: 8828 139th Ave. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 982588823; Contractors Altman Air Heating and Cooling: 519 93rd Drive SE, Lake Stevens, WA 982583729; Air Conditioning Contractors and Systems Cobalt Enterprises: 3316 Old Hartford Road, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8184; 425-334-1020; Nonclassified Establishments ERI Network: 8805 24th Place NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-6431; Nonclassified Establishments Grandma’s Treasure Chest: 14029 44th St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8613; General Merchandise-Retail Nacho Family Mexican Restaurant: 526 91st Ave. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-2535; 425-512-8895; Restaurants Rental Properties NW: 9623 32nd St. SE, No. A115, Lake Stevens, WA 982585779; 425-334-3400; Real Estate Rice Up Thai Cuisine: 303 91st Ave. NE, No. C302, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-2500; 206-240-5750; Restaurants

Lynnwood Ace Metal Co.: 15030 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98087-2318; 425-361-2081; Metal Goods-Manufacturers ATI Physical Therapy: 3105 Alderwood Mall Blvd., Lynnwood, WA 98036-4703; 425-582-5902; Physical Therapists Bark Time Landscape Supply: 20600 Crawford Road, Lynnwood, WA 98036-8643; Landscape Contractors Bora and Co. Construction: 2125 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7029; 425-582-7246; Construction Companies Coleman Public Relations: 3333 164th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-3150; 425361-2259; Public Relations Counselors Desired Care Adult Family Home: 3304 151st St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-2403; Home Health Service Emma Skin Care: 17424 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98037-9241; 425-678-0194; Skin Treatments Evergreen Manor: 20508 56th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7650; Nonclassified Establishments First Intercontinental Bank: 17414 Highway 99, No. 204, Lynnwood, WA 980373112; 425-361-1207; Banks Fred Meyer: 4615 196th St. SW, No. 175, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5596; 425-6700200; Department Stores Innovatech: 5522 208th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 980367633; 425-967-3510; Nonclassified Establishments

Midici: 3000 184th St. SW, No. 145, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4723; 425-252-0412; Nonclassified Establishments Optimax Management: 20630 56th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7640; 425-245-8054; Management Services Premium Automotive: 14920 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98087-2300; 425-678-8725; Automobile Repairing and Service River-Life Christian Center International: 20830 52nd Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7613; 425-361-2930; Churches Silver Star Auto: 16825 48th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-6401; 425-582-7287; Nonclassified Establishments Sunridge Manor: 16521 13th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-8528; 425-745-8599; Nonclassified Establishments Tri State Roofing: 16513 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98037-3161; 425-835-0532; Roofing Contractors Vicidiem Inc.: 3720 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5753; 425-697-3629; Nonclassified Establishments Whenever: 15723 40th Ave. W, No. F202, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1467; 206-792-5951; Nonclassified Establishments

Marysville Bailey Doesn’t Bark Designs: 8924 46th Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-2517; Nonclassified Establishments Call First Of Washington: 4806 56th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-5716; 360-386-9617; Nonclassified Establishments Century 21-Atwood: 1326 Fifth St., Marysville, WA 98270-4517; 360-454-0285; Real Estate Define Gorgeous LLC: 1326 Fifth St., Marysville, WA 98270-4517; 360-658-5979; Nonclassified Establishments DK Precision Machine: 3707 124th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-8770; 360658-2650; Machine Shops (Manufacturers) Group Health Co-Op: 8528 72nd Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-6647; 360454-0275; Cooperatives Grove Adult Family Home: 8822 47th Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-2547; Home Health Service Marysville Jewelry & Pawn: 1050 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-4241; 360-386-8785; Jewelers-Retail Nickel Brothers House Moving: 15510 Smokey Point Blvd., Marysville, WA 982715911; 360-386-9082; House and Building Movers Nickel Brothers: 3304 156th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-5901; 425-257-2067; Nonclassified Establishments Northwest Wireless: 4711 64th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-4495; 360-548-3307; Cellular Telephones (Services) Northwind Homes: 17533 27th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-4758; Nonclassified Establishments State Ave Chevron: 70

State Ave., No. B, Marysville, WA 98270-5164; Service Stations-Gasoline and Oil

Mill Creek Dream Real Estate Group: 16300 Mill Creek Blvd., Mill Creek, WA 98012-1737; 425225-6093; Real Estate Zieglers Bratwurst Haus: PO Box 12073, Mill Creek, WA 98082-0073; Restaurants Monroe Amarillo: 116 E Main St. Frnt, Monroe, WA 982721506; 206-567-2100; Nonclassified Establishments Joanna Monger Photography: 126 S Ferry Ave., Monroe, WA 98272-2334; Photographers-Commercial O Joy Beads: 15419 179th Ave. SE, Monroe, WA 982721724; Beads-Retail Pacific Mini Mart: 20317 Corbridge Road SE, Monroe, WA 98272-8668; Convenience Stores

Mountlake Terrace Eyes 4 Wellness: 6405 218th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-2180; 425-678-0634; Wellness Programs Olympic Spine and Sports Therapy: 6603 220th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-2186; 425-672-7065; Physical Therapists Olympic Sports: 6603 220th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-2186; 425-776-8994; Nonclassified Establishments Soul’s Path Counseling: 6912 220th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-2169; Counseling Services

Mukilteo Body Spa: 8490 Mukilteo Speedway, Mukilteo, WA 98275-3208; 425-212-9701; Health Spas DK Precision Machine: 11700 Mukilteo Speedway, No. 201, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5436; Machine Shops (Manufacturers) K&B Golf World: 6715 Waterton Circle, Mukilteo, WA 98275-4860; Golf Courses Longwood Village COA: 4889 76th St. SW, Mukilteo, WA 98275-2773; 425512-0431; Nonclassified Establishments Rainey Real Estate: 11709 Cyrus Way, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5455; 425-290-9021; Real Estate Shalimar Catering: 728 Second St., Mukilteo, WA 98275-1554; 425-374-3632; Caterers Sheila Maher Pa-C Inc.: 8028 53rd Ave. W, No. D, Mukilteo, WA 98275-2639; Physicians Assistants Sojourn House: 9423 59th Ave. W, Mukilteo, WA 98275-3637; Nonclassified Establishments

Beacon Roofing Supply: 1428 Bonneville Ave., Snohomish, WA 98290-1745; 425-334-0043; Roofing Materials Eagle Tutoring: 22119 99th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-7113; Tutoring Fears Love Yoga: 9115 112th Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-8436; 360-5683385; Yoga Instruction House Fx: 5628 125th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-8903; Nonclassified Establishments Iridescence USA: 14330 46th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-7650; Nonclassified Establishments Jackson Brown Consulting: 3420 139th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-9746; Consultants-Business Not Elsewhere Classified Kellar Business Building: 4925 83rd Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-5167; Building Contractors KOZ 2211 Sw 4th Avenue: 1830 Bickford Ave., No. 201, Snohomish, WA 98290-1750; Real Estate Management Ness Insurance & Annuity: 21 Ave. A, Snohomish, WA 98290-2944; 360-568-3317; Insurance Rebel Mel’s Fitness: 6503 195th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-7369; Nonclassified Establishments Tha Hideaway: 723 Ave. D, Snohomish, WA 98290-2380; 360-568-6888; Nonclassified Establishments Top Line Plumbing System: 9509 204th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-7109; 360-668-8444; Plumbing Contractors Wobbly Ranch: 7022 153rd Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-6113; Ranches Wood Slabs & Table Inc.: 115 Glen Ave., Snohomish, WA 98290-2933; 360-5683907; Wood Products

Stanwood Early Bloomer Child Care: 9300 271st St. NW, No. A9, Stanwood, WA 98292-1910; 360-572-4838; Child Care Service J&B Tools: 8217 317th Place NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-9708; Tools-New and Used Kelsey Motto Hair: 6662 281st St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-4908; 360-588-4686; Beauty Salons Kosookun Dai Properties: 18419 40th Ave. NW, No. B, Stanwood, WA 98292-6000; Real Estate Management Stilly River Yarns: 9913 271st St. NW, No. 0, Stanwood, WA 98292-8069; 360631-5801; Yarn-Retail

Sultan Kiss The Sky Books: 401 Main St., Sultan, WA 982940070; 360-243-3608; Book Dealers-Retail

Snohomish

Tulalip

Ardun Construction: 9822 152nd St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-7073; 360-217-7352; Construction Companies

Dreamers Building: 420 90th St. NW, Tulalip, WA 98271-6910; Building Contractors

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 21

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22 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

JULY 2017

SNOHOMISH COUNTY ECONOMIC DATA Pending sales, residential real estate

Closed sales, residential real estate

Unemployment rate, percent

Continued unemployment claims

Aerospace employment

Construction employment

Professional services employment

Local sales tax distributions, Snohomish County and incorporated cities

Consumer price index, King and Snohomish counties

11/12

1,114

806

6.8

8,445

47,500

16,100

23,000

$4,768,450

241.36

12/12

872

892

6.6

9,351

47,100

15,900

23,100

$4,378,797

01/13

1,154

713

7.1

9,962

46,800

15,600

22,600

$4,466,777

02/13

1,236

673

6.3

9,182

46,600

15,300

22,500

$5,680,845

03/13

1,576

932

5.7

9,060

46,400

15,400

22,500

$4,093,977

04/13

1,500

1,020

4.9

8,891

46,100

15,500

22,900

$3,970,313

05/13

1,487

1,131

4.7

8,093

45,500

15,800

22,700

$4,725,432

06/13

1,488

1,159

5.7

7,888

45,700

16,200

22,900

$4,316,634

07/13

1,470

1,141

5.6

7,787

45,900

18,000

24,000

$4,584,288

08/13

1,402

1,143

6.2

7,062

44,900

18,400

24,000

$4,921,104

09/13

1,150

1,032

N/A

7,180

45,100

18,300

24,000

$3,573,194

10/13

1,219

1,041

6.0

7,149

44,500

18,200

23,900

$4,998,366

11/13

1,010

833

5.7

7,499

44,300

17,900

24,200

$5,132,975

12/13

835

871

5.3

8,829

44,700

17,800

24,000

$3,348,852

01/14

1,195

615

6.0

9,651

44,000

14,500

23,300

$3,382,321

02/14

1,180

688

6.4

8,850

43,700

14,800

23,100

$4,087,089

03/14

1,481

949

6.0

8,897

43,700

14,800

23,400

$3,013,059

04/14

1,454

943

4.9

8,069

43,400

14,800

23,100

$2,923,521

05/14

1,718

1,074

5.0

7,502

43,600

15,100

23,100

$3,370,904

06/14

1,545

1,220

5.1

7,177

44,400

15,400

23,300

$3,290,880

07/14

1,457

1,172

5.3

6,587

44,000

18,400

23,500

$3,474,651

08/14

1,393

1,163

5.4

6,244

43,000

18,800

23,800

$3,695,926

09/14

1,328

1,057

5.1

N/A

42,900

18,800

23,800

$3,838,762

10/14

1,327

1,113

4.8

N/A

41,400

18,300

24,200

$3,663,750

11/14

1,027

885

4.8

6,093

41,800

18,000

24,100

$3,852,205

12/14

956

920

4.5

N/A

42,000

17,700

24,100

$3,582,032

1/15

1,237

686

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$3,280,200

2/15

1,406

740

5.3

6,663

43,000

17,200

23,700

$4,146,999

3/15

1,938

1,075

4.5

6,762

42,800

17,500

24,000

$2,981,599

4/15

1,747

1,272

3.6

6,273

42,800

18,100

24,100

$3,041,795

5/15

1,777

1,315

4.0

5,923

42,800

18,600

24,000

$3,654,693

6/15

1,799

1,374

4.3

5,607

42,700

19,200

24,400

$3,445,201

7/15

1,764

1,411

4.3

5,323

44,100

20,700

25,000

$3,590,957

8/15

1,634

1,442

3.9

5,367

43,600

21,200

25,300

$11,743,713

9/15

1,501

1,290

4.1

5,089

43,600

21,200

25,200

$11,603,019

10/15

1,503

1,178

4.5

5,109

43,400

20,400

25,100

$10,854,566

11/15

1,307

973

5.0

5,748

43,500

20,100

24,900

$11,503,562

12/15

1,067

1,189

5.0

6,193

43,600

19,800

25,300

$10,765,437

1/16

1,249

811

5.7

7,085

43,600

19,300

24,500

$10,477,405

2/16

1,475

848

5.3

6,388

43,500

19,600

24,500

$13,559,687

3/16

1,825

1,156

5.2

6,084

43,100

20,000

24,800

$9,496,443

4/16

1,836

1,213

4.4

5,957

43,300

19,800

25,600

$9,617,406

5/16

1,979

1,386

4.8

5,770

43,300

20,300

25,800

$11,697,044

6/16

1,862

1,493

4.7

5,396

43,800

21,000

26,400

$10,816,389

7/16

1,795

1,515

4.8

5,489

44,000

21,700

26,400

$11,102,633

8/16

1.873

1,538

4.4

5,502

43,900

22,100

26,500

$12,493,656

9/16

1,601

1,431

4.3

5,377

43,500

22,200

26,500

$12,193,233

10/16

1,561

1,364

4.0

5,502

42,100

22,800

26,700

$12,195,581

11/16

1,314

1,270

4.2

5,774

42,100

22,500

26,600

$12,515,314

12/16

1,104

1,145

3.9

6,187

42,100

22,300

26,600

$11,120,365

1/17

1,238

938

4.2

8,226

41,800

21,200

26,500

$11,114,968

2/17

1,296

904

3.7

6,551

41,200

21,500

26,200

$14,139,163

3/17

1,614

1,167

3.5

6,245

41,300

21,700

27,600

$10,378,749

4/17

1,527

1,116

3.1

6,247

40,400

22,000

28,000

$10,024,215

5/17

1,948

1,394

3.5

5,661

39,900

22,300

28,000

$12,095,386

237.99

239.90

240.82

242.82

242.77

242.78

241.05

242.77

246.61

247.64

247.18

247.854

245.05

245.496

247.611

251.622

251.617

250.831

250.385

250.942

253.815

256.098

256.907

256.941

256.821 259.503

261.560


JULY 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 23

ECONOMIC DATA Boeing stock price

PUD retail electricity use, kilowatt hours

Snohomish County PUD connections

New vehicle registrations

Average gas price (regular, unleaded

11/12

$74.28

473,023,558

225

3,682

$3.47

12/12

$75.36

614,283,104

234

3,636

$3.34

01/13

$73.87

700,861,857

223

4,656

$3.37

02/13

$76.90

674,618,017

316

3,753

$3.62

03/13

$85.85

608,606,315

330

4,713

$3.80

04/13

$91.41

617,541,384

321

4,943

$3.64

05/13

$99.05

492,112,324

276

5,256

$3.83

06/13

$102.32

465,163,451

213

5,275

$3.79

07/13

$105.10

453,404,099

322

5,622

$3.82

08/13

$103.92

470,067,543

232

5,742

$3.78

09/13

$117.50

410,719,601

338

5,141

$3.65

10/13

$138.36

518,766,206

461

5,179

$3.44

11/13

$133.83

461,012,493

447

4,083

$3.24

12/13

$136.92

671,835,200

244

4,752

$3.29

01/14

$125.26

696,306,571

421

5,726

$3.36

02/14

$128.92

682,348,469

386

4,467

$3.31

03/14

$125.49

610,841,349

352

5,428

$3.75

04/14

$129.02

605,381,115

368

6,389

$3.74

05/14

$135.25

468,754,469

466

6,542

$3.87

06/14

$127.23

492,917,254

412

6,626

$3.93

07/14

$120.48

432,682,894

444

6,611

$3.95

08/14

$126.80

463,314,006

363

5,614

$3.83

09/14

$127.38

451,089,566

264

5,987

$3.74

10/14

$124.91

496,335,315

403

5,929

$3.40

11/14

$134.36

422,769,229

426

4,867

$3.04

12/14

$132.25

663,368,433

426

6,072

$2.88

1/15

$145.37

634,592,067

209

6,364

$2.30

2/15

$150.85

611,633,434

287

5,889

$2.30

3/15

$150.08

567,831,393

284

7,707

$2.85

4/15

$143.34

578,264,358

427

8,057

$2.70

5/15

$140.52

449,046,426

326

8,649

$3.05

6/15

$138.72

494,611,488

384

9,852

$3.10

7/15

$144.17

451,503,602

334

7,641

$3.20

8/15

$130.68

474,207,621

242

7,021

$3.09

9/15

$130.95

557,429,310

442

7,018

$2.79

10/15

$148.07

477,438,877

217

6,828

$2.49

11/15

$145.45

491,536,717

221

5,631

$2.41

12/15

$144.59

686,858,030

282

6,995

$2.35

1/16

$120.13

634,697,183

333

6,910

$2.33

2/16

$118.18

655,390,592

333

7,298

$2.02

3/16

$126.94

612,151,814

288

9,209

$2.12

4/16

$134.80

514,320,049

428

8,364

$2.25

5/16

$126.15

457,566,044

342

8,906

$2.44

6/16

$129.87

463,105,233

277

10,754

$2.57

7/16

$133.66

430,295,041

435

8,268

$2.56

8/16

$129.45

467,001,501

325

8,315

$2.49

9/16

$131.74

454,085,665

394

7,628

$2.60

10/16

$142.43

452,214,305

401

6,861

$2.64

11/16

$150.56

495,372,342

331

6,360

$2.59

12/16

$155.68

658,223,433

620

6,663

$2.47

1/17

$163.42

783,258,995

512

7,048

$2.69

2/17

$180.23

653,923,271

537

6,279

$2.67

3/17

$176.86

692,459,353

533

9,462

$2.73

4/17

$184.83

530,371,921

324

8,364

$2.79

5/17

$187.63

497,975,765

579

8,906

$2.44

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24 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

JULY 2017

Bernie Garcia, Moctezuma’s World traveler Photographer Fiery foodie

Each and every one of us is an original. Shaped by unique inuences that make us who we are today. Here at Heritage Bank, we think differences can build a better bank, too. That’s why we share the best ideas from across all of our branches and local communities with one goal in mind: to serve our customers better every day. By sharing our strengths, we’re able to offer customers like Bernie Garcia—and you—more than a community bank. But rather, a community oƒ banks.

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Herald Business Journal - 07.01.2017  

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