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Shipping out: Maritime industry grapples with aging crisis • 4-6 AUGUST 2017 | VOL. 20, NO. 5

Wow Factor A sneak peek at WSU’s new home in Everett • 16-17 Plus: Our look at news on area campuses • 13-22 Supplement to The Daily Herald

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Helping small businesses go BIG.

ANDREW BRONSON / THE HERALD

From a dream to reality, WSU opens its $64.6 million Everett campus this month to the first classes. Page 16-17

COVER STORY WSU to celebrate the opening of its new home in Everett this month, 16-17

BUSINESS NEWS Maritime industry attempts to replace aging workforce. . . . . . . . 4-6 Everett Comics adjusts to living in Funko’s shadow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 How a Lake Stevens farm carves its annual corn maze . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Design-your-own-pizza Blazing Paddles comes to Tulalip resort . . . . 9 Natural gas danger that could be lurking under your home. . . . . . . . . 10

WSU plans to open institute to research senior living issues . . . . . . 16 EdCC helps small business owner gain entrepreneurial skills. . . . . . . . 22

BUSINESS BUILDERS James McCusker: Leadership lessons learned aboard ship. . . . . . 23 Tom Hoban: Tech that can enhance, upend apartment industry . . . . . . . 23 Monika Kristofferson: How to resist constant distractions. . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Andrew Ballard: Audit assumptions of your marketing plan. . . . . . . . . . 24 BUSINESS BRIEFS . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 PEOPLE WATCHING . . . . . . . . . . 26

CAMPUS OUTLOOK

PUBLIC RECORDS . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

EvCC launches first avionics program in state. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

BANKRUPTCIES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Forensic accounting class at UW Bothell helps prosecutors. . . . . . . . 13

ECONOMIC DATA . . . . . . . . . 30-31

BUSINESS LICENSES . . . . . . . 28-29

NEWSROOM

ADVERTISING SALES

Editor: Jim Davis 425-339-3097; jdavis@heraldnet.com; businessnews@heraldnet.com

Jody Knoblich 425-374-0758 — Fax 425-339-3049 jknoblich@soundpublishing.com

Contributing Writers: Jennifer Sasseen, Jocelyn Robinson, Deanna Duff Contributing Columnists: James McCusker, Andrew Ballard, Monika Kristofferson, Tom Hoban Publisher Josh O’Connor 425-339-3007 joconnor@soundpublishing.com

COVER PHOTO Washington State University in Everett opens its doors to its inaugural classes this month. Andy Bronson / The Herald

SUBSCRIPTIONS 425-339-3200 www.theheraldbusinessjournal.com

Commercial Loans & Lines of Credit Treasury Management | Merchant Services Local Bankers

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AUGUST 2017

Maritime industry faces aging crisis By Jennifer Sasseen

For The Herald Business Journal

The owner of a private maritime-training school in Edmonds sees a lot of opportunity opening up in the industry for young people. “What we’re finding in our industry is that we have too many people retiring and not enough young people getting involved,” said Julie Keim, owner of Compass Courses, located in Harbor Square on Dayton Street. Partly it’s a matter of changing attitudes, she said, of today’s generation wanting instant gratification and not liking to be away for long — the opposite of older generations. “I think, you know, years ago, guys would get on ships to get away from things,” she said. It’s also a matter of educating school counselors and students who may be unaware that it’s possible to make a career of a life at sea. Gov. Jay Inslee has made it a priority to research the state’s maritime sector and “start some programs to get young people involved in maritime,” Keim said. The average age of Washington’s maritime workforce in 2013 was “upwards of 54 years old,” according to a task-force report on the state’s maritime industry. The state’s maritime industry is robust and growing an average of 6.4 percent a year and is responsible for 146,000 jobs, including 57,700 directly, with an economic impact of $30 billion, according to the report. At an average union salary of $70,800 a year, compared to an average statewide paycheck of $52,000 across other sectors, maritime workers can earn a middle-class, living wage without a college degree. “As our state grapples with widening income disparity,” the report says, “the sector offers above average salaries without the necessity for advanced degrees and ongoing education debt.” A steady stream of licensing requirements for seafarers ensures there will always be a need for schools like Keim’s Compass Courses as well. “When we started the business it was the wave of something called STCW,” Keim said. “And that stands for Standards Training, Certification and Watchkeeping. That is an umbrella term for a lot of classes. But it was a treaty that the United States signed that said we are going to offer these classes and any mariner all over the world will have those classes.” Unlike drivers’ licenses, Keim said some maritime licenses can expire in as little as one year and seafarers must take classes to update them. That’s Compass Courses’ specialty — continuing education for commercial workers in the maritime industry. Its students work on everything from cruise ships to fishing boats, to research vessels, tugboats and more. The school is GI-approved and sometimes attracts people looking to change careers. “So through the years,” Keim said, “we’ve gotten guys that were laid off at Boeing, that may have had past military experience or fishing experience in their

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Compass Courses in Edmonds offers continuing education for commercial workers in the maritime industry for everything from cruise ships to fishing boats, to research vessels, tugboats and more.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

The average age for maritime workers is 54 in Washington state meaning there’s a need to attract younger workers, said Julie Keim, owner of Compass Courses.

20s and now they’re in their 50s, to the guy that goes, ‘Yeah, you know, I’m bored being a contractor or a construction worker, I want to go work on a tugboat.’” Women also work in the maritime industry, though not in high numbers. Only about 10 percent of her students are women, Keim said, but she’s hoping that will change. Historically the industry has had an image of “the old salty dog,” but attitudes are shifting, she said. “I think it’s changing because that older generation is leaving or they’re knowing they have to shift their paradigm to allow women on board, and that they’re capable,” she said.

Keim herself, now 53, grew up in the landlocked state of Idaho before migrating to Alaska and later working on small cruise ships for five years. She earned her license to pilot a ship before quitting the business and teaching for two years at the Seattle Maritime Academy in Ballard, part of Seattle Central College. While teaching, Keim recognized the need for another school in the region and, with two partners, started Compass Courses in Edmonds. (One partner quit after two years and Keim bought the other one out in 2006.) Keim pushes her students to acquire a thorough knowledge of equipment, reg-

ulations and survival techniques. Some training takes place offsite at the Port of Edmonds, the Shoreline Pool and in the case of firefighting, at Fremont Maritime Services in Ballard or the Washington State Fire Training Academy in North Bend. One of the biggest issues in her business is finding qualified instructors, Keim said. She is always accepting applications, but is choosy about who she hires, she said. Instructors include fulltime firefighters and retired merchant mariners and Coast Guard captains. No one works as hard as Keim at getting students to understand course materials, said Katie Knifong, vessel safety manager for Trident Seafoods, based in Seattle. Knifong worked on Trident Seafoods fishing boats for 25 years before working in safety, she said, and has both taken classes at Compass Courses and sent others there. “Probably what sets them apart is, they stay up with technology, first of all, and with regulatory changes in the industry,” Knifong said. Regarding women working in the maritime industry, Knifong said she sees nothing to stop them. Still, those considering a life at sea need to thrive in close quarters, Keim said. “Let’s say a fishing vessel’s a hundred feet long,” she said. “In a couple weeks it’s 50 feet and then in another week, it’s 20 feet, you know?” Those who do choose the sea will likely need to take classes at some point at Compass Courses, or a similar school. Compass Courses is one of about 300 private maritime-training schools in the country, Keim said. Continued on Page 6


AUGUST 2017

Upcoming Events The Speaker Series An EASC Breakfast

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 5

www.economicalliancesc.org

August 2017

What we learned at the Paris Air Show By: Patrick Pierce

Tuesday, August 8 8:00 - 9:30 a.m., Marysville Annual Summer Networking Thursday, August 17 4:00 - 7:00 p.m., Mukilteo At The Edge of Amazing Snohomish County Health Summit September 19, Lynnwood D.C. Fly-In September 25-27 Washington D.C. Blues, Brats & Brews September 28, Everett

Snohomish County: The global home of aerospace innovation for 50 years

OUR MISSION Economic Alliance Snohomish County exists to be a catalyst for economic vitality resulting in stronger communities, increased job creation, expanded educational opportunities, and improved infrastructure. (P) 425.743.4567 • info@economicalliancesc.org 808 134th St SW, Suite 101 • Everett, WA 98204 1919853

economicalliancesc.org

Pictured (left to right): Patrick Pierce, Kendee Yamaguchi, US Congressman Rick Larsen, Councilmember Sam Low, Mary Kaye Bredeson, Larry Cluphf, Terry Cox, and Arif Ghouse.

Every two years, aerospace suppliers, manufacturers, and economic developers descend on the northern Paris suburb of Le Bourget for the Paris Air Show. 139,000 tradeshow attendees and exhibitors from 48 countries braved the unseasonably hot weather to display their latest technologies, connect with existing and potential customers, and discuss future business plans with economic developers, such as Economic Alliance Snohomish County (EASC). US Congressman Rick Larsen led the State of Washington delegation comprised of companies, state/local government and academic institutions. EASC served as the lead for the Snohomish County delegation which included Councilmember Sam Low, Kendee Yamaguchi from the County Executive’s Office, and Paine Field Airport Director Arif Ghouse. In addition, Terry Cox and Larry Cluphf (Edmonds Community College) and Mary Kaye Bredeson (Center of Excellence for Aerospace and Advanced Manufacturing) attended to participate in a global panel on workforce development. Snohomish County companies Crane Aerospace, Esterline, Senior, MTorres, SeaCast, Orion Industries, AIT/NovaTech and Panasonic Avionics all had a presence at the show. The end-of-show tally for Boeing was 571 net orders valued at $40+ billion, compared to 326 for Airbus. It was no surprise that most of these were 737, but 59 were twinaisle aircrafts built in Everett (767, 777, 787), a big win for Snohomish County. Boeing quickly stole the show when they hinted at the new 797 aircraft (previously the NMA or MoM) that would fill the gap between current single and twin aisle offerings from Boeing and Airbus. The proposed 797 would be a twin-aisle design with composite fuselage and wings, implementing the technological advancements from the 787 and 777X. While Boeing has not committed to the program and no site decision has been made, this presents a significant opportunity for Snohomish County

and Washington State and emphasizes the importance of protecting existing aerospace incentives. Our County delegation met with 32 companies over four days resulting in six new recruitment projects, four new expansion projects, and several referrals to our education and workforce development partners. One of these meetings was with MTorres, a Spanish company that successfully won the bid for the 777X composite wing tooling. EASC has supported MTorres with their expansion project for their new North American headquarters and Innovation Center which will open in Everett this September. A key takeaway from our meetings was that companies want to be in Snohomish County and the Puget Sound region. They want to know about our incentives, workforce, industrial space, access to potential customers, and the business operating environment. They recognize and appreciate our community’s strong partnerships between EASC, local governments and our educational partners. Our existing aerospace incentives are competitive and supplemented by our lack of personal or corporate income taxes. Even though the elimination of the Governor’s Strategic Reserve Fund is a disadvantage for our region, EASC will remain laser-focused on all of these issues in the coming months and years to keep Snohomish County as the North American Aerospace Capital. As the economic development leader in Snohomish County, it is EASC’s responsibility to clearly articulate our county’s business case and unique attributes. It is in all of our longterm economic interest to think beyond political boundaries and associate ourselves with the larger ecosystem that exists in the region. Strong local knowledge paired with regional collaboration will continue to make Snohomish County a destination for aerospace and other business investments.


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AUGUST 2017

Everett Comics eyes Funko’s big move Longtime shop hopes to see spike in sales as Funko opens store across street By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

EVERETT — Everett Comics owner Charlie Knoedler sees Funko’s big move as being a positive even though it might mean some direct competition. He and his wife Tracy own the shop at 2831 Wetmore Ave. across the street from the new headquarters of Funko, the toy and collectible manufacturer. Funko has already moved dozens of office workers to its new location in the old Bon Marche building, and the company plans to open a 6,000-square-foot flagship store and interactive museum this month. Everett Comics has come to rely more and more on selling Funko’s Pop! figures and other products. “We’ve already tapered off what we would order long-term with them until we know how it’s going to affect us,” Charlie Knoedler said. “It could have the opposite effect. It could spike sales.” About 15 to 20 percent of store sales come from Funko products, Tracy Knoedler said. “For a small business, it’s a big deal,” Tracy Knoedler said. Funko CEO Brian Mariotti met with the Knoedlers last year to tell them about the move before he announced it publicly. He also told them that he wanted to work with them. The company is being tight-lipped on the new store and museum. Funko is planning a grand unveiling with food trucks, giveaways and photo opportunities later this month. “We certainly do hope that our store, which opens August 19th, will be a draw for downtown Everett and increase the foot traffic to the surrounding businesses,” said Mark Robben, Funko’s director of marketing, in an email. “We ultimately believe the Funko HQ will be a great addition to the local business community.” Charlie Knoedler started Everett Comics in dowtown Everett 34 years ago. He was a comic fan before he went into the Air Force and had a family. “One day, while buying diapers at the Continued from Page 4

Private schools are different from the government-run, four-year academies some aspiring mariners attend, the nearest being the California Maritime Academy in Vallejo, whose students graduate fully licensed, Keim said. For one thing, academies are able to acquire training tools from the government that for-profit schools must buy themselves. An example is the lifeboat gravity davit Keim acquired eight years ago, a cranelike device used onboard ships to sup-

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Behind rows of Funko Pop! figures, owner Charlie Kneeler looks up comic book information for Christian Holst at Everett Comics on Wetmore Avenue. Funko is moving its headquarters and a store across the street from the long-time comic shop.

grocery store, I walked past a spinner rack and there were comics there,” he said. “I picked out a few and I took them home and read them and it got me re-hooked. About a year later, I looked into the business end of things, because I discovered there were these things called comic book stores.” He opened a store in the Strand Building across the Historic Everett Theater in 1983. He said it was the only comic book store north of Woodinville at the time. The Knoedlers moved the store to Wetmore in 2010 after a fire damaged the original location. About 10 years ago, Everett Comics stocked Funko collectibles when Mariotti was first starting to grow his business. Funko was selling a product line called Wacky Wobblers and few stores were carrying the company’s lines. Funko started making it big in 2010 when they started producing the Pop! line of figurines, anime-inspired, big-headed, big-eyed figures of the most popular pop culture characters out there, including characters such as Batman, Spider-Man

and Superman. “It hit the scene and the orders just kept on increasing,” Charlie Knoedler said. “Word of mouth got around that we were one of the stores that carried them and all of a sudden you have people coming from out of the city, from Tacoma and Seattle, to our store looking for them.” Funko has now grown into a giant with its products being carried at all of the major retailers. The company produces vinyl figurines, but also has branched into apparel, home decor and stuffed animals. The company said last year it expected to generate more than $400 million in revenue. Funko has been headquartered at 1202 Shuksan Way in south Everett for more than three years. In December, the company announced that it was moving its corporate offices to downtown Everett into a building at 2802 Wetmore Ave., which most recently housed the now-defunct Trinity Lutheran College. Funko employees are already some of Everett Comics’ best customers, said the Knoedlers and their long-time manager Brandon Ottenerg.

“You always know when their lunch breaks are, there’s an influx of people and they always seem to be in a hurry,” Charlie Knoedler said. The Knoedlers are excited about the festivites when Funko opens its store in downtown, saying “it’s going to be wonderful for Everett.” “It’s going to be huge,” Tracy Knoedler said. “We’re going to be here bright and early. We’re going to be set up and ready for those people to come visit us and get them into things other than Funko. We will complement each other.” Funko produces so many items that it would be impossible for them to be all displayed, the Knoedlers said. “We’re not sure how much they’re carrying, if there’s differences in what they’re carrying compared to what we have,” Charlie Knoedler said. “We won’t know until they open their doors.” And they figure that lots of Funko fans — called Funatics — will be visiting the new headquarters to take in the sights. “Stop by and say hi to us, too,” Tracy Knoedler said.

port, raise and lower lifeboats. Compass Courses is one of only two private schools in the country to own the tool, Keim said, which is needed to teach the Able Seaman course — her most popular class. It cost her $70,000 and a trip to Brownsville, Texas, she said. There the device was cut off a ship and delivered to her in pieces for $7,000. Shipping cost another $3,000. Then, with the help of Everett Engineering and a naval architect, she put it back together in a barn in Snohomish at a cost of $60,000. Keim said she initially meant to anchor it in the ground, but when the permit-

ting process grew too daunting, opted for mounting it on a flatbed truck instead. The truck is now parked in a fenced back lot near the railroad tracks in Edmonds, not far from Compass Courses in Harbor Square. Compass Courses serves 2,000 to 2,700 students annually and is open Mondays through Fridays, with most classes starting at 8 a.m., Keim said. Basic Safety Training, which is the first class offered when Compass Courses opened in April 2001, is the only class where you can find beginners hoping to land a maritime job, she said.

Each of the remaining 25 courses require previous sea time, she said. Certificates are turned over to the U.S. Coast Guard to get them added to a merchant-mariner credential. Cost of the classes varies, but the weeklong Basic Safety Training class is $1,100, which Keim said is comparable to similar schools. Sometimes companies pay for employees to take classes at Compass Courses, especially if it’s a required class, but if it’s simply to upgrade a license, the student may be on his own. Compass Courses offers some scholarships.


AUGUST 2017

CALENDAR E V E R Y F R I DAY: Food Trucks @ South Marina E V E R Y S U N DAY: Farmer's Market @ Boxcar Park E V E R Y T H U R S DAY & S AT U R DAY: Marina Music @ Port Gardner Landing

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 7

August 2017

REPORT REPORT Port of EVERETT

Creating Economic Opportunities

Port of Everett Reclaiming Marina Village

E V E R Y DAY Jetty Island Days E V E R Y F R I DAY I N A U G U S T : Sail In Cinema @ Boxcar Park A U G U S T 1/8: Port Commission Meeting Complete events list at www.portofeverett.com/calendar

EXECUTIVE

The Summer Port Side Newsletter is now available at www.portofeverett.com.

SEAPORT

The Port's new double rail spur is nearing completion.

MARINA

The Port of Everett sustained a major fire in the South Marina on July 8. There were no major injuries and investigation and recovery is underway.

REAL ESTATE

The City of Everett awarded the Grand Avenue Bridge Project in July, and expects to begin construction this fall. The pedestrian bridge will land just north of Lombardi's on the Port's property. Latitude Development and KW Projects are well underway with construction on the Riverside Business Park. Commissioners Troy McClelland/District 1 Tom Stiger/District 2 Glen Bachman/District 3 1922718

On June 6, 2017, the Port Commission authorized CEO Les Reardanz to execute a ground lease termination and acquisition agreement with Everett Marina Partners, LLC at Marina Village. The property has been under a long-term ground lease since opening in 1982. The Port will pay Everett Marina Partners the value based on the projected income for the fair market value on the remainder of the lease, and we will acquire five structures, and management of its nine leases and nearly 210 parking spaces. “This project is another good example of strategic investments being made throughout the Port on behalf of the District to strengthen the local economy, enhance the area’s regional identity, and preserve and create jobs while at the same time creating a highly desirable, destination waterfront community within the

Waterfront Place neighborhood,” Chief of Business Development Terrie Battuello said. “The high-quality tenants at Marina Village will benefit moving forward from being closely integrated into the Port’s overall vision for this destination facility.” Marina Village is located at the western edge within the Port of Everett’s South Marina District of Waterfront Place. The site’s current service mix consists of restaurants, including Anthony’s Homeport, Anthony’s Woodfire Grill and Moon Tree Asian Tapas, as well as a hair salon, offices and medical uses. The site was originally developed in the early-1980s following Port authorization of a 50-year ground lease with Diversified Marina Enterprises. Everett Marina Partners took shape with the addition of new partners in 1984. The original lease was set to run through 2032.

PORT OF EVERETT EARNS 20TH CONSECUTIVE CLEAN AUDIT The Washington State Auditor’s Office has reported another clean audit report for the Port of Everett, marking two decades of consecutive clean audits with no findings. “I’m proud of our Port team,” Port of Everett CEO Les Reardanz said. “Clean audits 20 years in a row is a remarkable milestone that wouldn’t have been possible but for the strong leadership of our former CEO John Mohr, our financial team led by former Chief Financial Officer Karen Clements and current CFO John Carter, and the commitment to fiscal responsibility by all Port staff.” Representatives from the Washington State CEO/Executive Director Les Reardanz

Auditor’s Office visited the Port in April 2017 to review financial documents from the period of January 1, 2016 through December 31, 2016. The scope of the audit focused on review of financial statements and accountability in five primary areas: financial condition, self-insurance, Open Public Meetings Act compliance, payroll system review and accounts payable process. The Washington State Auditor’s Office audits the Port of Everett annually to ensure the Port is being fiscally accountable, transparent, and complying with laws and regulations.

L E A R N M O R E & S TAY U P TO DAT E @

W W W. P O R TO F E V E R E T T.C O M S TAY U P DAT E D DA I LY ! Follow the Port of Everett on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube & Instagram


8 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

AUGUST 2017

Plotting out an a-mazing adventure Heavy lifting of fall corn maze happens during heat of summer By Jocelyn Robinson For The Herald Business Journal

LAKE STEVENS — Pumpkin patches and apple cider are the furthest things from most people’s minds during the summer heat. At Carleton Farms, Darren Carleton has already started thinking about October — and what he calls the “30-day show” at his parents’ farm. Starting in late September, the farm at 630 Sunnyside Blvd. SE overlooking the Snohomish River will turn into a fall wonderland with a corn maze, hayrides, a pumpkin cannon, zombie paintball and more. The festivities first started 30 years ago, when Darren’s parents, Reid and Mary Carleton, opened a pumpkin patch on the front lawn of their house. “People stopped to buy pumpkins, I couldn’t believe it,” Reid Carleton said. “Then we had a drive-through pumpkin patch and people would get their cars stuck.” Hayrides followed the pumpkin patches, and the first corn maze was designed in the shape of a John Deere tractor in 1992, Darren Carleton said. Carleton’s older brother Shawn came up with that first design. In the years since, the mazes have been designed in the shape of everything from an ear of corn to a pig in a barn to a cow jumping over a pumpkin. “We don’t do a labyrinth-style maze. We have curves, ovals, circles and different kinds of shapes,” Carleton said. “Ours are more animated.” Around the first part of July, Carleton will plant 4 to 5 acres of corn in the field where the maze will be. The final maze design is superimposed on graph paper; each row on the grid represents a row of

PHOTOS BY KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

Darren Carleton uses lye to lay out the corn maze at Carleton Farms in Lake Stevens. Below to the left, Carleton and his wife Georgina carve the maze through the 8-inch tall corn stalks. Below right, flags mark the shape of the design for this year’s corn maze.

corn. Using that grid for reference, the design is outlined on the field in white paint or lime. Carleton places a marker every 50 rows of corn to use as a guide. Two to three weeks later, when the corn is about 8 inches tall, he takes a small tractor with a tiller and cuts the design out. The whole design takes about three days to cut out, although more complex designs can take longer. A recent maze that featured a Seahawks helmets with numbers was extremely difficult to cut

out, Carleton said. Carleton plants animal -feed corn so it won’t grow beyond 10 feet tall and won’t develop ears of corn that kids can turn into projectiles. A 5-acre maze takes a family about 45 minutes to go through, Carleton said. The farm hands out an aerial photo of the maze to use as a guide, although extra trails pop up toward the end of October as people make their own shortcuts through the corn. Three years ago, Carleton added a trivia component to the maze to

keep it interactive for families. Stations are posted throughout the maze with questions relating to that year’s theme; each correct answer spells out a phrase. Some bigger farms with larger mazes hire services to design and cut out their mazes, but Carleton believes in keeping it family oriented. Before he came back to the farm full time five years ago, he would help his parents cut out the corn maze each summer. This will be the first year Carleton’s brother didn’t design the maze.

Carleton Farm’s fall festivities have grown beyond their humble origins in the Carleton’s front yard. There are now food concessions with burgers, kettle corn and pumpkin spice donuts; a kids’ play area; firepits; a powerful pumpkin cannon that can shoot the orange squash a half-mile; and a 150-foot zipline. Of course, it wouldn’t be a festival without a horde of zombies to defeat. “We have a whole back story about the zombies,” Carleton said. “A boatload of zombies floating down Ebey Slough, landed at Carleton Farms and invaded all of our fields and killed all our workers.” Visitors can climb on a wagon ride and shoot paintball guns at the zom-

bies, who are typically teenagers in body armor. Visitors can also choose to be dropped off the wagon ride out in a dark corner of the farm and make their way back to the barn down a dark trail – all the while being chased through the field by relentless zombies. Carleton said his staff does a phenomenal job each year; many are teenagers working their first job. “It takes about four months to get ready for it, but once it starts it runs itself,” Carleton said. “We really love people coming here,” he added. “It’s a huge honor to have people come and visit our farm. It allows them to have a connection to farming still and see how important it really is.”


AUGUST 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 9

Design-your-own pizza arrives at Tulalip Mother’s homemade pizza inspires new dining option at Tulalip Resort Casino By Deanna Duff For The Herald Business Journal

Fridays were pizza night in the Mascitti home. Chef Perry Mascitti’s mother made the dough from scratch and her favorite pizza pans were worn and well-loved. Adults enjoyed her Margherita style version while kids dug into classic cheese and pepperoni. The table was happily crowded at 6 p.m. “I remember coming home from school and seeing the bowl of dough on the kitchen counter,” Mascitti says. “The wonderful smell of fresh dough and yeast — that’s what I want to bring to the restaurant.” Those childhood memories are a touchstone for Blazing Paddles Stone Fired Pizza and Spirits, Tulalip Resort Casino’s newest food destination. The 1,200 square-foot spot opened in mid-July. Blazing Paddles is the resort’s eighth dining spot and the first food opening in over three years. The venture was guided by guests who expressed the desire for a graband-go option. Located on the north side of the casino, it is on the edge of the gaming floor so people can seamlessly blend their dining and gaming experiences. “In terms of dining, quick-service restaurants are kind of the wave of the future,” says Sam Askew, hotel general manager. “Like any good business, we listen to our guests and what they want. That’s how the concept was born.” The planning process began two years ago. Hotel representatives visited Las Vegas, Chicago and New York to research other destinations and experience firsthand what they liked. “Our mindset and mandate is to create something you can’t find someplace else. Tulalip’s model is helping to redefine the

casino experience so that it’s elevated and refined at every level,” Askew says. From a culinary standpoint, Mascitti couldn’t agree more. “The hotel-casino environment allows chefs to be very creative. There is revenue, which allows us to explore. That’s what chefs love doing and we’ve created a great culinary program at Tulalip,” Mascitti says. Currently, Tulalip employs seven chefs in addition to Mascitti, plus 28 sous-chefs and 195 members of the culinary team not including waitstaff. For Blazing Paddles, Mascitti followed his vision of making it both quick and quality. Mascitti developed the dough in his mother’s tradition. The 24-hour dough is made with generous amounts of olive oil and is hand-balled daily at 11 a.m. for the next day’s service. As many ingredients as possible are sourced locally. A greenhouse in Arlington supplies fresh oregano with the kitchen team hand-plucking each leaf from the stem. In-season mushrooms arrive from a hothouse in Darrington. Italian sausage is supplied by Rainier Valley’s Mondo & Sons, a third-generation family business that’s been around more than 80 years. Walla Walla onions are sliced and shaped by hand. “We can’t source everything locally year-round, but we try for as much as possible,” Mascitti says. “Opening a fresh box of oregano? The aroma is amazing! We finish the pizzas with a touch of it. I think it’s those signature little touches that sets Blazing Paddles apart,” Mascitti says. Mascitti’s “Ten Commandments of Pizza” grace the order line. The first rule is, “Thou Shalt Be The Boss of Thine Own Pizza.” Diners can build their own from a

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Customers can build their own pizza from four sauces and more than 50 ingredients or choose a chef-designed pie at Blazing Saddles, the newest dining option at Tulalip Resort Casino.

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10 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

AUGUST 2017

‘We nearly blew up your house’ Although rare, gas lines piercing sewer lines can pose considerable danger By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

The plumber shocked me with what he said: “Oh s—-! We nearly blew up your house.” I was standing in the basement bathroom of my Shoreline home. I thought I had a plugged toilet. That was only a symptom of a much larger problem. And what I learned could affect any number of thousands of homeowners in Snohomish County and the rest of the Puget Sound area. I had tried using a plunger on my clogged toilet on that hot July day but didn’t get anywhere. Then I noticed sewage had backed into a rarely used shower. This was no ordinary clog. It was time to call a professional. I lit a candle on the bathroom counter to stave off the smell. The plumber and his supervisor informed me that it could possibly be a tree root or a broken pipe. They removed the toilet and used a motorized auger to clear the line. I sat in our living room with my 12-year-old son. Once the clog was cleared, the plumber asked me to watch while his supervisor used a pipe inspection camera to determine the problem. He snaked the camera about 40 feet down the line until they found that a yellow PVC pipe had penetrated my sewer line. It’s not easy seeing professionals panic. The yellow pipe was most likely a gas line. Had they nicked the line, there could have been a fire or an explosion like the one that destroyed several businesses in the Greenwood neighborhood of Seattle in March 2016. I went pale. I scrambled my son out of the house to a nearby neighbor’s home, outside of what I figured would be the blast radius. The two plumbers conferred. Usually a gas line has writing along the side. They couldn’t see any writing. Maybe it was a water line or a communications line. Was the line yellow or was it white? Was this a false alarm? They brought in a crew to dig several feet down to expose the lines. Yes, it was a yellow gas line. The plumbers called PSE and an emergency crew was on hand 30 minutes later. That afternoon was a blur of trucks with flashing lights, traffic cones and yellow caution tape. They tied off the gas line and fixed the sewer line. The plumbing problem was clearly caused by the gas line, a PSE supervisor said, and I’ve filed a claim to be repaid for the replaced sewer pipe. PSE replaced gas lines in the neighborhood in 2016. Contractor InfraSource did something that’s called directional boring,

MELISSA DAVIS / FOR HBJ

Explosions from gas lines being bored through sewer lines are rare, but it is enough of an issue that Puget Sound Energy is warning people about the danger.

COURTESY OF PSE

Puget Sound Energy is working to alert homeowners and plumbers about the dangers of what are called cross-bored pipes, or when a natural gas line has been drilled through a sewer line.

a way to install underground pipe without digging trenches. It aims to cause the least amount of damage to lawns, streets and sidewalks. Unfortunately, directional boring can sometimes go through sewer lines and cause other problems. That’s what happened to my home. Explosions from this are rare, said Charlie Gadzik, customer safety communications manager. In his research, there have only been about a dozen explosions since the 1970s in the U.S. when plumbers hit gas lines that had speared sewer lines, Gadzik said. “The incident of accident or injury is really rare,” Gadzik said. “There has never been an explosion in Washington state that we know of.” Still, there have been other natural gas

explosions where the exact cause wasn’t determined, he said. And two explosions in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 2010 focused attention on the risk. One of the explosions was a similar situation where a plumber using a motorized auger hit a cross-bored gas line. No one was killed, but the plumber suffered burns to his face, neck and hands and the house burned to the ground. “This is a high priority for us,” Gadzik said. “It’s something, when we became aware of the risk, we acted quickly to put together a program to mitigate the risk.” About twice a year, PSE gets called out to a home where a plumber has cut a gas line that’s speared a sewer line, but hasn’t caught fire. “And we have shut off the gas before

there was a calamity,” Gadzik said. PSE will come out to send a camera down a backed-up sewer line to make sure that a gas line isn’t causing the problem. I asked Gadzik why would a homeowner think about calling the gas company over a clogged toilet. “You wouldn’t,” Gadzik said. “It’s the most unlikely thing you might to expect, which is why we’re trying hard to get the word out.” PSE has been running advertisements to make customers aware that this could be an issue. They’ve had news organizations do stories on cross-bored pipes. They’ve worked with plumbers and plumbing businesses to make them aware. PSE has 800,000 customers in the Puget Sound area including 140,000 in Snohomish County. The utility company replaced or installed 17,000 gas lines in 2016, Gadzik said. The utility discovered 138 gas lines that were bored through sewer lines. Of those, 94 came from reports of blocked sewers. Contractor InfraSource is supposed to work with homeowners to locate sewer lines and avoid them. Depending on the job, the contractor could ask to go into a home and use a camera to determine the sewer’s pathway. Even if that doesn’t happen, a second company, Hydromax, is supposed to come around to the neighborhood shortly after to use a pipe inspection camera to make sure new lines hadn’t penetrated the sewer lines. That didn’t happen with my neighborhood. When I called Gadzik, he said they had been having meetings about my house. He said information about replaced gas lines wasn’t always being shared between the two companies. PSE is still doing an analysis on how many homes and neighborhoods may have been missed. “As a result of your incident, we have changed our process to add a cross-checking step to make sure this doesn’t happen again,” he said.


AUGUST 2017

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 11


12 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

AUGUST 2017

EvCC students learn to fly by wire Program focuses on emerging field of avionics or electronic systems of aircraft By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

EVERETT — Anaseini Naulivou yearns to one day design her own airplanes. Until then, she’ll settle for learning how to put together planes designed by others. Naulivou is one of the first 10 students at Everett Community College’s new avionics program, studying how to troubleshoot, repair and maintain the electonic systems of aircraft. “How I look at it is if I were to design something, I need to know what it’s going to do and how it will behave out in the field,” Naulivou said. “In that way, it will make me a better designer, because I’ll have hands-on experience.” The program covers two quarters and is offered at the Aviation Maintenance Technology school at Paine Field. EvCC is the first school in the state and believed to be the first in the Northwest to offer avionics. “Avionics is a wide field,” instructor Raylene Alexander said. “It’s everything from the reading light of the passenger who sits in an aircraft with a book to complicated glass cockpits and autopilot systems. It’s anything (on an aircraft) with a wire.” Avionics has been part of the aviation industry for decades, but it’s becoming a more and more important field because aircraft manufacturers such as Boeing and Airbus are building planes with wiring controlling flight rather than cables and hydraulics. “It’s really an emerging field in the last 10 years,” said Rob Prosch, EvCC’s associate dean of aviation. “The issue is because everything has gone so high tech with electronics, we have (aircraft mechanics) who have no idea how to troubleshoot and repair it.” Boeing approached EvCC three years ago about starting an avionics program, one that could be emulated at other colleges around the state that train aircraft mechanics. Boeing along with Woodinville’s Dynon Avionics and Delta Airlines have supported the program through donations and technical know-how. There is a pressing need to train more aircraft mechanics with large numbers of aviation industry workers set to retire and a projected growth in flights, aircraft and even airlines over the next 20 years, Prosch said. Students can get a two-year degree to become an aircraft mechanic without taking the avionics courses. But getting a certificate in the avionics program makes them much more in demand. Those workers are needed at airplane manufacturers such as Boeing and Airbus, their suppliers and the airlines them-

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Students of Everett Community College’s new avionics program (from left) Andrew Leffew, Anaseini Nauvilou, Ed Thompson and Maddie Kutzera work to dissassemble a cockpit at the school’s Paine Field facility.

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Tools are layed out as students work on a plane during a class at Everett Community College’s new avionics program.

selves, Prosch said. EvCC gave the green light for the program in January. It started offering courses two months later. Prosch had been working behind the scenes getting it ready to go. That included recruiting instructor Alexander from Kansas State University to teach it. Prosch met her while he was visiting the college looking at their program. He hired her on a contract basis to put together the avionics curriculum for EvCC. Alexander, who started as an avionics tech for the U.S. Marine Corps in 1980, had been thinking about retiring to pursue other interests. She’s originally from this area and her mother still lives in

Granite Falls. “Quite truthfully, he just wore me down,” Alexander said. She liked the challenge of putting together an avionics program from the ground up and one that could be used at other colleges in the state. To get the program together, EvCC started with just 10 students, but they’re expanding to 20 this fall and will offer it twice a year to train 40 students. The fall class is already full. At a class on a July afternoon, Alexander sent her students to a hangar working on a grounded Piper Apache. One of the students is John Poppke, a retired mailman who lives on the Tulalip Reservation.

“We’re going to dismantle the old instrument panel, because we’re getting a donated glass cockpit, which means we’ll replace all the steam gauges and put in a nice screen that you can touch and move things and go from one screen to another real easily,” Poppke said. He’s already completed the two-year aircraft mechanic degree and has returned for the avionics courses. “I’m thinking about building a kit plane and I want to know as much as I can before I go out and kill myself,” Poppke said. Naulivou, 34, is taking avionics courses for a second time. She had taken the courses in Fiji where she’s from and was hired at Fiji Airlines as an avionics trainee. The airline didn’t have a place for her once she finished as a trainee. Instead, she moved to job as a materials planning officer, getting parts and equipment to grounded Fiji Airlines jets around the world. She really wanted to design airplanes. So she decided to move to the Seattle area in 2015 to continue her education. She’s living in Federal Way, but attending classes at EvCC and South Seattle Community College. She wants to transfer into the aeronautics program at the University of Washington in 2019. The program is hyper-competitive so she’s hoping that her experience as well as her training in avionics will make the difference. “As you see, aircraft designing is moving into more digital instead of cables and hydraulics running through it,” Naulivou said. “I think that with avionics that I’ll have an advantage over other students.”


AUGUST 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 13

UW Bothell class follows the money Forensic accounting class digs into finances of cases for King County prosecutors For The Herald Business Journal

One of the first rules detectives, prosecutors and journalists learn is “follow the money.” Now students in the University of Washington Bothell’s forensic accounting class are learning that following that money trail can lead to interesting discoveries. The class, taught by professor Rajib Doogar, is part of UW Bothell’s master’s in accounting program. Doogar started offering the class two years ago and its popularity has grown tremendously in that time. The students don’t just sit in a classroom and learn how to crunch numbers — they get the opportunity to see how forensic accounting could have life-altering consequences. Doogar partners with the King County prosecutor’s office each quarter, giving students the chance to work on an actual case involving financial misconduct. Their efforts will impact more than their final grade; their work could potentially lead to someone doing time in jail. “It seemed like a very good way to drive home to students the enormous responsibility that rests on your shoulders when you’re a professional accountant,” Doogar said. “It certainly makes the students grow up in a hurry.” Doogar said he had heard of one or two programs where forensic accounting was offered, but it wasn’t done on a regular basis. “We stumbled on this idea of a project with local law enforcement and King County responded very positively,” Doogar said. The prosecutor’s office picks a case they think the students can handle in a 10-week course and uploads the data and evidence they have

collected onto a secure server. Students break into groups and look at different accounts, trying to reconstruct the flow of money from transactions. The students don’t handle complex corporate fraud case, but focus on cases involving individuals — someone scamming the elderly or embezzling money from a nonprofit organization. Doogar said these cases often have very compelling stories. “When the students are looking at it, they’re thinking of their parents, they’re thinking of their families, they’re thinking of themselves, saying ‘There but for the grace of God go I,’” Doogar said. He brings in professionals from the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners to mentor students and give them a taste of what it’s like to be on the job. Kenneth Hines, who focused on criminal enforcement of the tax code while working at the IRS, returned to school to get his master’s degree at UW Bothell and was in the first forensic accounting class Doogar taught. He enjoyed interacting with the students and watching their enthusiasm as they worked their way through a case where a treasurer was pilfering money from a local Little League. Students in that first class went through bank records and tracked the treasurer’s activities to reconstructed how funds from the Little League were issued. After completing the program, Doogar asked Hines if he wanted to be a mentor for the class. Hines returns once a week to talk to the class, borrowing from training materials he had from his 25 years with the IRS; he even used the Lindbergh kidnapping case from the 1930s as an example of how forensic accounting can help solve crimes.

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

University of Washington Bothell’s forensic accounting class students Yiya You (left) and Rochelle McElroy (right) talk with professor Rajib Doogar (center right) and class mentor Kenneth Hines, a former IRS investigator.

In that case, the IRS was able to track the ransom money and prove who had kidnapped Charles Lindbergh’s infant son. “You’re putting together a jigsaw puzzle without a picture,” Hines said. “It’s putting it together by the shapes and doing a lot of painstaking analysis.” This quarter, the class looked at a fraud case involving adult children who may have stolen money from their elderly mother. “You let the financial records and the activity tell the story,” Hines said. “We’ll show a pattern of activity that the money being spent was nowhere near for the benefit on mom, it was for the benefit of others.” Once the students figure out that story, they practice telling it — testifying at mock trials in class. Students will grill one another with questions, tearing apart the story and looking for possible legal explanations for why the money moved from one place to another. Doogar said it prepares students for defense attorneys looking to attack the story. “I don’t want to go into court and have my testimony torn apart,” he said. “If that happens to me once in my lifetime, every lawyer in the world is going to know that I got destroyed and then this would be the end of

my career as a forensic accountant.” Both Hines and Doogar signed off on weekly reports that students sent to the prosecutor’s office, updating the attorneys on their progress. Hines tried to prepare students for the emotional impacts that come with reconstructing money records. It’s one thing to help a big corporation track where money went, but it’s harder when they can put a face to the victim. “They saw the victim was an elderly woman in assisted living and she needed the people she trusted to take care of her,” Hines said. At the end of the quarter, students present their findings to a prosecutor from the prosecutor’s office. Hines said the attorney was impressed with the students’ work, even mentioning that he might use the students’ timeline of financial transactions in trial. Hines said hearing comments like that from professionals was a great benefit to the students and that he was proud of what they accomplished. “This woman was unable to speak for herself,” Hines said. “They spoke for the victim when no one else was.” Forensic accounting is a growing specialty in both criminal and civil law and

Hines said colleges are slowly starting to respond by offering specialized classes. “I think where we’re one of a kind in that we’re partnering with King County,” Hines said. “Stu-

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dents have a live case to look at and put together.” Doogar hopes to one day make the class available to students outside the master’s program and offer it to first year college students as well. Freshmen in the class will analyze bank statements and find out how where the money went to. “They’ll have to make up their mind whether the money was justly spent or unjustly spent,” Doogar said. “You don’t need to be an accountant to do that.” He wants to teach students the skills to hold themselves mentally accountable and avoid the temptation that can come when you’re given access to other people’s money, whether it’s an elderly relative or local organization. “How do you not fall into that trap? Fraud is a slippery slope,” Doogar said. “How do you set yourself up to avoid temptation?”

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14 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

AUGUST 2017

Why EvCC?

“FACULTY HAVE INDUSTRY EXPERIENCE IN THE FIELD.� Jeremy Allen chose to get an education close to home. He chose to learn about the manufacturing process from start to finish at EvCC's Advanced Manufacturing Training & Education Center (AMTEC), which serves more than 200 manufacturing industry employers in Snohomish County. AMTEC teaches students about the manufacturing process from start to finish as they complete interdisciplinary projects like creating unmanned aerial vehicles, rockets, robots and paddle boards.

Jeremy Allen and his son Jordan EvCC Class of 2017 Computer Aided Design (CAD)

EvCC offers six advanced manufacturing programs at AMTEC: mechatronics, precision machining, welding and fabrication, engineering technology, composites and manufacturing pre-employment.

FIND OUT MORE EverettCC.edu/AMTEC

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Everett Community College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religious belief, sex, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national or ethnic origin, disability, genetic information, veteran status or age.


AUGUST 2017

New programs. New buildings. New technology. I

n Everett Community College’s 76th year, the college is continuing to grow and innovate. Student Success EvCC, which has earned national recognition for its efforts to help students complete their education and transfer to four-year schools or go to work, is developing new student success strategies. A key step is encouraging students to choose a program early, develop an academic plan with a clear path to reaching their goals and get help following the plan. EvCC 2017 Honors program graduate Melanie Fischer credits her instructors with helping her map out a plan for her future. “Everett is a great place to grow on a personal level. You will meet inspiring teachers and fellow students. You will feel at home and well taken care of,” she said. Fischer, who earned an associate degree in business, is headed to Columbia University in the fall to study economics. “If I could, I would do it all over again,” Fischer said.

Everett Community College PROFILE INSTITUTION TYPE: TWO-YEAR, COMMUNITY COLLEGE

NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 19,673 IN 2016-17 LOCATIONS: NORTH EVERETT CAMPUS: 2000

TOWER ST. IN EVERETT; EAST COUNTY CAMPUS: 14090 FRYELANDS BLVD. SE, SUITE 283, IN MONROE; CORPORATE & CONTINUING EDUCATION CENTER: 2333 SEAWAY BLVD. IN EVERETT; AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY: 9711 32ND PLACE W., EVERETT; SCHOOL OF COSMETOLOGY, 9315 G STATE AVE., MARYSVILLE; OCEAN RESEARCH COLLEGE ACADEMY, 1205 CRAFTSMAN WAY, SUITE 203 IN EVERETT; EVERETT; ONLINE; AND EVCC CLASSES AT WESTON HIGH SCHOOL, 4407 172ND ST. NE IN ARLINGTON.

CONTACT: EVERETTCC.EDU, 425-388-9100

In Everett Community College’s 76th year, the college is continuing to grow and innovate.

The college created the program after hearing about the need for aircraft electronics technicians from industry. The Boeing Co., Delta AirLines, Alaska Arlines, Rolls Royce and regional avionics manufacturers helped develop the program.

“This is the program our industry partners wanted and need. It meets the skills gap they have identified,” said Rob Prosch, EvCC associate dean for aviation. “Graduates with an Airframe & Powerplant license and an avionics certificate have great career opportunities.” EvCC also recently added a cybersecurity analyst certificate, hospitality management degree and technical customer service program, which trains students to troubleshoot customer questions for companies like Comcast and the Snohomish County PUD. Student Housing One year after EvCC opened its first student housing building, the college is poised to open a second, Cedar Hall, in September.

North and East County EvCC offered its first advanced manufacturing class in Arlington at Weston High School in 2016, and there’s more to come. The goal is ultimately to offer classes in the Arlington area similar to those at EvCC’s Advanced Manufacturing Training & Education Center (AMTEC) at the college’s main campus, said John Bonner, EvCC vice president of Corporate and Workforce Training. EvCC also plans to expand offerings at its East County Campus in Monroe. EvCC’s East County Campus director Mostafa Ghous expects that 600 students will be educated there this fall. Employee Training and Professional Development EvCC also offers a wide variety of professional development and career training options. The college’s Corporate & Continuing Education Center provides training for more than 10,000 people each year. Courses can be customized and delivered on-site for employers throughout Snohomish County and the Northwest. Learn more at EverettCC.edu/CCEC About Everett Community College EvCC offers associate degrees in Arts and Sciences, Business, General Studies, Science, Fine Arts and Technical Arts; certificates in more than 30 technical and career fields. Students also come to the college to finish high school, learn basic reading, writing and math skills, learn English and earn a GED.

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New Programs EvCC is the first college in the state to offer an advanced avionics program, which trains students to maintain, troubleshoot and repair aircraft electronic systems.

The new building joins the 120-room Mountain View Hall, where students have private rooms and bathrooms. In the 132-bed Cedar Hall, students can share three and four-bedroom apartments with living rooms and kitchens. All units in both buildings are fully furnished. Rent includes all utilities and wireless internet. “Students enjoy living in housing because of the convenience it affords them to have immediate access to their classes and campus resources, along with the opportunity to feel connected to the college community,” said Lea Wasson, EvCC Assistant Director of Residence Life. The residence halls offer exclusive activities for students living on campus, live-in staff and onsite class tutoring. For more information visit EverettCC.edu/Housing or email housing@everettcc.edu.

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 15

Everett Community College students with the college’s mascot, the Trojan.


16 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

AUGUST 2017

COVER STORY

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

This active learning classroom with wheeled chairs and a four-panel video monitor at Washington State University in Everett is meant to break the traditional “sage on a stage” classroom dynamic. It’s one of 14 classrooms that’s opening this month at WSU’s new campus in Everett.

A dream achieved

By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

I

t’s a place to achieve dreams that have yet to be dreamed. Washington State University celebrates its newest campus in Everett this month, a transformational moment for the city and region and those who live here or will someday. The building is designed with vast expanses of glass that face Everett, not so people can look out but rather for people to look in. “It’s about the community, it’s about kids walking by and seeing there are students in there and understanding, ‘I can be that student someday,’” said Randy Bolerjack, communication’s director for WSU North Puget Sound at Everett. The building named simply Washington State University Everett stands four stories tall at 915 N. Broadway on property still owned by Everett Community College. The 95,000-square-foot structure can eventually accommodate 1,000 to 1,100 students a year. That’s more than double the 500 students that WSU and its partner universities taught last year across the street in EvCC classrooms and offices. The project cost roughly $64.6 million including $10 million for design. Construction took just less than two years. It’s visible success after decades of fruitless efforts by community leaders to establish a four-year university in Sno-

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

About 1,000 to 1,100 students will be able attend WSU in Everett with the opening this month of the $64.6 million campus.

homish County. After one of those failed efforts — when a plan to land a University of Washington branch campus collapsed — Everett Mayor Ray Stephanson gave a cold call to then WSU President Elson S. Floyd. That began a series of conversations between Everett’s long-time mayor and the WSU president, who died more than two years ago of cancer, about bringing a campus to Everett. Eight years later, those discussions have led to this day. “We’re so excited,” said Paul Pitre, the

chancellor for WSU at Everett. “This building represents an effort to bring a four-year university and higher education to the community that’s been years in the making. It’s been said to me, this is the realization of a dream.” WSU will open the building to the public on Aug. 15 — with lectures, wine, cheese and bread tasting, guided tours, speeches by university presidents and a sealing of a time capsule. Students will arrive for the first classes on Aug. 21. What those first visitors and the inaugural students will find is a building meant

to inspire with the opening of the door. From the ground floor rises the floating staircase, built of laminated beams glued several layers thick that run to the top of the building. Construction firm GR Plume of Ferndale crafted the 6-ton staircase — made of wood as a nod to Washington’s timber history — in Whatcom County. “In order to install it in the building, they had to do it before they put the roof on, because they had to lower it into place,” Bolerjack said. The staircase will pair with a 1,000pound geometric wooden sculpture by Machias artist Paul Vexler suspended from the ceiling. The sculpture is scheduled to be installed during WSU’s winter break in December. The artwork features long curves, cones and planes. “It’s designed to give you a little relief from all the right angles in the building and work with the curved wooden shapes of the staircase,” Vexler said. On one side of the ground floor is a tiered lecture hall that can seat 100, the largest classroom in the building. It has an adjacent kitchen area with a walk-in wine cooler. The idea is the room can be used by WSU’s School of Hospitality Business Management program yet double to host community events. Across the way on the ground floor is the capstone lab for the mechanical engineering program, a lab with garage doors that open to the outside. “A lot of our senior mechanical engi-


AUGUST 2017

neers will do their projects right here during the summers when we have the garage doors open,” Bolerjack said. “It won’t be a surprise to see the (engineering school club’s) Mars rover drive right out into the north courtyard.” Boeing became the first industry sponsor to fund one of the ground-floor labs naming it the Boeing Innovation Studio. The lab will feature a wind tunnel, invaluable for engineers attempting to copy the actions of an object in flight. The building is equipped with threephase power, important for the electrical engineering program. That will allow WSU Everett operate a power lab to teach student engineers who want to work on the power grid for public utility districts and government agencies. EvCC buildings have three-phase power in some labs, but those labs were being used by EvCC classes. “They were very gracious hosts,” said Jacob Murray, program coordinator for the electrical engineering program for WSU in Everett. “We were able to share a lab space with them, but we didn’t have a power lab at all. What this opened up with the new building was to offer the power tract. It’s a pretty high-interest field.” In all, the building features 14 classrooms, 10 labs and nine seminar rooms. It also includes office space for WSU professors and staff as well as other professors with the University Center. Other rooms include a lactation room for students and staff and a gender neutral restroom. One of the classrooms is an active learning classroom formatted to break from the traditional “sage on stage” learn-

To attend Washington State University at Everett plans to hold an open house for its new campus on Aug. 15. Anyone can attend, but the university is asking people to RSVP at everett.wsu.edu/ openhouse.

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Solar panels on Washington State University Everett make the four-story building 50 percent more energy efficient than similar sized buildings.

ing environment. In fact, the college was able to draw on experiences from students and staff at other branch campuses to learn what is used and what is not. “One of the advantages of being part of the WSU system is we were able to look at modern facilities at the various campuses and see what the students want and what they actually use,” Bolerjack said. The building is built to be 50 percent more energy efficient that similar sized buildings. LED lighting is in all the fixtures, 80 kilowatt photovoltaic solar panels line the roof and the data center at the core of the building is designed so that heat can disperse. The school uses rainwater to flush the toilets. What the school is missing is a library. That’s due in part to future planning and

YOUR FUTURE IS CALLING edcc.edu

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 17

a nod to how students do research for their classes. “We’re taking about the potential of having a shared resource facility that’s a partnership between Everett Community College and WSU,” Bolerjack said. “While that would look like a traditional library, it’s not so much we would need books anymore, it’s access to technology, it’s access to research assistance, it’s access to pizza and coffee so when you’re studying all day long you can keep yourself fueled up.” WSU offers six programs in Everett — mechanical, electrical and software engineering, data analytics, hospitality business management and integrated strategic communication. The university is planning to also offer organic agriculture sys-

tems in the future. The programs offered are aimed to complement businesses and industry in the north Puget Sound area, said Pitre, WSU Everett’s chancellor. “We will continue to do that,” Pitre said. “This is why we’re here to integrate our academic program with economic development to benefit Everett, Snohomish County and the entire region.” The Everett site could also offer more summer courses for students who attend to the main campus in Pullman, but will return home to Snohomish County or work here on internships or jobs during the summer. “Everybody has been saying we’re the front porch over here for WSU,” Murray said. “When everyone leaves Pullman for the summer, it would make a lot of sense to offer courses here between Pullman students and our own students, I think this would be a pretty popular location for students in the summer.” That’s the future. WSU is celebrating the now. “We’re so proud of this building and we’re proud to be a major part of Everett,” Pitre said.


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AUGUST 2017

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New WSU institute to research senior living By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

EVERETT — Where will the baby boomer generation live as they grow older? Who will care for them? What technology can be used to aid them? These are questions that need to be answered — and fast as more than 10,000 people a day reach the age of 60. Now Washington State University is proposing a new research institute as part of its Senior Living Management program to explore these issues. “We talk about the silver tsunami,” said Scott Eckstein, who heads the program at Washington State University North Puget Sound at Everett. “The numbers are astronomical on what’s coming and what the need is.” A research focus will allow the WSU program to consider best practices for residents, staff, management and families, Eckstein said. “We don’t know how the boomers are going to want to or need to — I don’t want to say retire, because baby boomers don’t retire — re-purpose or transition,” Eckstein said. The institute will formally bring together groups on the WSU campuses who have been meeting informally to shape the Senior Living Management program, said Nancy Swanger, asso-

“We talk about the silver tsunami. The numbers are astronomical on what’s coming and what the need is.” — Scott Eckstein, senior living executive resident at WSU ciate dean and director for school of hospitality business management. The program only includes a single course right now. Eventually WSU would like to offer a professional certification and later a major in the program, Swanger said. “It has been in slow growth mode, but there’s a ton of interest there since the day we started,” she said. If the institute is approved, there is a separate effort to name it after Granger Cobb, the former CEO of Emeritus Corp. in Seattle who died of cancer in 2015. Cobb along with other senior living industry executives in the Puget Sound area helped convince WSU — and raised $500,000 — to launch the Senior Living Management program in 2010. Industry veterans felt WSU’s School of Hospitality Management was a natural fit to train a next generation of senior living managers, Swanger said. There are similar skills needs to run senior living communities as there are to run hotels and resorts. “It was pointed out to us by the industry folks, the Seattle folks who came

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out to us and said this is a no-brainer,” she said. Argentum, the nation’s largest senior living association, predicts that 1.2 million more people will be needed to work in the senior living industry in the next decade, Eckstein said. “I think that’s a conservative number considering the growth and the demographics,” Eckstein said. “With 10,000 people a day are turning 60, the numbers are phenomenally large.” Eckstein joined WSU’s Senior Living Management program in March 2016, taking over for Merrill Gardens president Bill Pettit who had been the senior-living-executive-in-residence. Eckstein has offices in Everett and Pullman, but teaches the senior living course at all of WSU’s branch campuses online. He started his career in New York as a developer, but changed his focus to senior living for professional and personal reasons. In the early 1990s, his grandfather who suffered from Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease and needed to be cared for in a nursing home. His grandmother was living by herself at her home in Bronx, New York. “She was alone,” Eckstein said. “She had an aneurysm and passed away alone. The story was she was there for eight or nine hours. I said that should not be.” He started in marketing and research and moved into development — building and constructing senior housing — before eventually moving into operations. He also worked in consulting for the industry. Before WSU, Eckstein worked at Brook-

dale Senior Living, which acquired Seattle-based Emeritus Corp. in 2014. “I was sort of a fix-it guy, an operations specialist is the best way to put it,” Eckstein said. “I would go around to fix some properties and help some properties that were leaderless.” Senior living has evolved over the past quarter century from institutional care to a model where older people live together in a social setting. The senior care industry needs to figure out the best way to care for 65 year olds to 85 year olds and 86 years old to 120 year olds, Eckstein said. “I say 120 year olds on purpose, because we’re going to have gains in longevity over time,” Eckstein said. Technology is also changing the way that seniors live. Can monitors help detect falls or people wandering away from their homes? Could monitors be used to detect urinary infections, which can cause life-threatenting problems? Can Fitbit-type devices alert to changes in sleeping patterns or blood pressure that can to medical emergencies? One of the biggest questions that needs to be answered is how to attract a future workforce. Eckstein had his largest class yet this spring with 45 students. He always takes his classes on field trips to see senior living communities in Seattle and Vancouver, Washington. “I take them to show them what modern senior living can be and 10 times out 10 they’re blown away by it,” Eckstein said. “When I show them what senior living is and can be, they are completely blown away.”


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Neverending push to aid entrepreneurs EdCC, nonprofit partner to help people become financially independent business owners By Deanna Duff

izing and organizing her library. When she was 14 years old, Mr. B’s Bookery opened in Kingston. She visited on the second day asking for a job and persisted for a year before landing six hours a week

For The Herald Business Journal

A love for small businesses and books are in Annie Carl’s blood. As a girl, she played bookshop with her Barbies, alphabet-

shelving and tidying. “I was so incredibly happy. I was too young to be officially paid, so they paid me in books. I took home a stack every week,” Carl recalls. The 33-year-old Puget Sound area native opened her Bothell store, The Neverending Bookshop, in October 2015. The passion and dream were all hers. She learned nuts and bolts knowledge at Edmonds Community

College and through one of its partner programs, Center for Inclusive Entrepreneurship. Both EdCC and the center are currently expanding their curriculums to reach even more students in terms of teaching successful small business strategies and thinking. In early August, 27 EdCC instructors and staff plan to participate in a two-day training workshop by Ice House Entre-

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preneurship Program Ice House is overseen by The Entrepreneurial Learning Initiative. The concept focuses on “soft skills” such as mindset, creative and critical thinking, problem solving and teamwork. The intent is to integrate the approach across a variety of disciplines in addition to business classes. At EdCC, this includes fields such as English, math, health, communications and more. “When we talk about entrepreneurship instruction, it’s often thought of in terms of business management practices,” says Pam Foust, project manager, EdCC Workforce Development and Training. “This is about changing the mindset around entrepreneurship. Maybe you don’t have a business plan or investors yet. You don’t know budgeting or accounting. However, you do have drive, resourcefulness and persistence. How do you recognize and capitalize on those soft skills?” Foust says. EdCC’s goal for their newly trained staff and faculty is to reach an additional 500 students this year. Additionally, they are striving for diversity. “A lot of students don’t see themselves as entrepreneurs. Something I love about this particular curriculum is that it highlights that entrepreneurs come from all walks of life,” says Terry Cox, vice-president, EdCC Workforce Development and Training. “Our students are pretty brilliant and have ideas of how to contribute to the world. We want to help them move those ideas from their heads and classroom into businesses.” Ice House builds on an already productive partnership between EdCC and the Center for Inclusive Entrepreneurship. Mike Skinner founded the Northwest-based center in 2013, which became a standalone nonprofit in 2016. The Center for Inclusive Entrepreneurship offers an initial, four-week course to students and community about shaping and turning an idea into a business. They provide a

followup course including financial overviews, market information and more. Assistance takes many forms from mentoring to legal advice and navigating small-loan applications. “We want to reach people in underserved communities with fewer resources and lots of challenges,” Skinner says. “The goal is to help those individuals become financially independent and self-sufficient through small business. It’s about building healthy communities through entrepreneurship.” The center serves the greater Puget Sound but focuses much of its efforts in Snohomish and King counties. EdCC was an early partner and provides classroom space. Approximately 600 people have participated in the center. “There are around 500,000 small, family-owned businesses in Washington. The big corporations get a lot of headlines, but it’s ordinary people with everyday ideas — bakeries, childcare, handymen — that collectively strengthen local economies,” Skinner says. Carl is the perfect example. She graduated from Western Washington University and, in anticipation of launching the bookstore, earned a certificate in small business accounting from EdCC. She furthered her knowledge through the Center for Inclusive Entrepreneurship. “It was a good way to learn the ins-and-outs of owning my own business. It was so helpful talking to people who’d helped other businesses get off the ground,” Carl says. It’s a success story EdCC and CIE hopes to replicate. For as much as her business contributes to the Bothell community, Carl feels equally rewarded. Customers drop by to chat and ask about her baby and share about their lives. “Something really opened up in me since I started the store. I’ve made so many friends and it allows me to be independent in a new way. I think everyone should have the ability and information to explore opportunities,” Carl says.


BUSINESS BUILDERS

AUGUST 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 23

How the power of belief can motivate J

ames O. Hornfischer’s bestseller, “The Last Stand of The Tin Can Sailors,” describes the ships and the men who sailed them into battle… and almost certain death. The setting is World War II. The U.S. is attempting to retake the Philippines with an amphibious landing at Leyte Gulf. Amphibious landings are especially vulnerable when troops and supplies are being landed, and Japanese Navy saw this as an opportunity to stop the American advance across the Pacific and give the Imperial forces time to rebuild their strength. A destroyer can feel awfully small in a fight involving huge battleships, cruisers, and aircraft carriers – like a squirrel finding itself on the 40-yard line of an NFL playoff game. One hit from the main battery of a battleship or a cruiser could easily send a destroyer to the bottom. Destroyers in that time earned their nickname, “tin cans” both from their unarmored vulnerability to enemy fire and the decidedly uncomfortable way they made their way in stormy seas. The term also applied to the destroyer escorts, which were designed as smaller, less expensive, anti-submarine escort ships for convoys, and were even more uncomfortable for their crews. We can imagine what it must have felt like to be on one of those “tin cans,” finding yourselves the only thing standing between the beachhead and a powerful enemy force bent on annihilating the defenseless transports off-loading the troops and cargo of the amphibious landing.

Hornfischer provides readers with a moving account of the resulting naval engagement as the destroyer-Davids attack a fleet of Goliaths. What James he also provides, though, is a look at McCusker the leadership and management charBusiness acteristics that held 101 the small ships’ crews together as they faced almost certain doom. Translating wartime shipboard experiences into workplace lessons is an uncertain process at best. There is nothing in a business environment that is truly comparable to confronting people who are trying to kill you. Still, workplaces have their pressures and times of stress, and preparing for these can be surprisingly similar to preparing a ship’s crew for combat – and we can learn some useful lessons from the leadership in the heroic actions of the Navy’s “tin cans” at Leyte Gulf so many years ago. It was the commanding officers (COs) that gave each ship its character – in very much the same way that the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) imprints a business organization. The COs of the Navy ships were a diverse group of personalities, no two alike, proving once again that there is no single “type” of successful leader. There is

“The power of those two intangibles, faith and disappointment, is easily forgotten in today’s world of worker metrics, surveillance, and loud, often harsh, criticism.” room for all kinds. Most of the leadership characteristics revealed by Mr. Hornfischer’s account are familiar to anyone who has ever looked at a management textbook. There is one in particular, though, that is rarely, if ever, mentioned in texts or articles about how to lead, manage, and motivate people and mold them into a team. The reason for its lack of popularity with textbook writers and motivational speakers may be that it is the one leadership quality that has to be totally genuine. It cannot be faked. It can be learned, but not easily, and is generally out of reach for the self-absorbed. The leadership characteristic he reveals is faith-based, although not in the religious sense, and it also uses disappointment, and its avoidance, as a strong motivator. The USS Johnston, was one of the “tin cans” which displayed such dedication to its responsibility to protect the troops and such audacity (let alone sheer bravery) in attacking the enemy’s superior force that it stunned and unbalanced the Japanese command. It was a major factor in the Japanese decision to turn back and return to home waters. What prepared the crew for this action? At the heart of their heroic per-

formance was the commanding officer’s faith in them. The training and preparation that allowed the crew to function effectively despite their justifiable fear was the direct result of the relationship between them and their skipper — a relationship based on mutual trust and faith. Commander Ernest E. Evans was the CO of the Johnston, and Mr. Hornfischer writes that “Evans trusted people to do their work. If they failed, he let them — he knew instinctively, as they did, that they wouldn’t fail him twice. He never had to spell out the consequences; the very thought that the skipper might become disappointed was enough.” The power of those two intangibles, faith and disappointment, is easily forgotten in today’s world of worker metrics, surveillance, and loud, often harsh, criticism. From CEOs to football coaches, classroom teachers to shift managers, leaders would do well to remember the quiet, unseen power of believing in people, in having faith in them. It isn’t easy, but it works. James McCusker is a Bothell economist, educator and consultant. He also writes a column for the monthly Herald Business Journal.

Tech can upend, enhance apartment industry

I

learn best by talking to people and I seem to be deeply curious about everything. So when I hop in a cab, I usually open a conversation with my cabbie, learn a little about his life, and maybe get a quick read on the place I’m visiting. It’s also a chance dig into whatever interesting life they have led that put the two of us in a moving vehicle with his two hands controlling my destiny. Uber and other ride-sharing applications have been a gift for curious oral learner types like me because most drivers are just locals trying to earn a few bucks on the side and many, like me, enjoy the social aspect of the experience. On a recent trip to San Francisco, I rode with a nice fellow who was a contract software developer working out of his apartment. He drove for Uber to get away from the computer screen and talk to people. “Beats sitting at a bar,” he quipped as he dropped me off. Five-star rating for that

guy. On another trip to L.A., my driver was the youth basketball coach of one of this years’ top NBA draft picks. I wish that ride had lasted an hour. I pushed the wrong button one time and found myself in a pooled ride arrangement from Kennedy Airport in New York to Lower Manhattan. Along the way we picked up and dropped off three people, two of whom I am pretty sure were drug dealers. It doesn’t work every time. Ride sharing with Uber, room sharing with Airbnb, vacation rentals with VRBO and many other technology-driven efficiencies are penetrating our lives and making things more efficient and cost-effective. Viewed one way, they de-personalize our lives. To many, though, they do the opposite and connect us. There’s enormous untapped potential in apartment properties for technology that connects us that will lead to cost savings, but also enhance the experience.

The work involved in finding an apartment, touring it, going through screening, completing the paperwork, securing the keys and then actually moving in is fraught with friction and technology is coming quickly into the industry to Tom streamline those Hoban steps. New technology Realty is being birthed to enhance the Markets experience once an apartment renter moves in, though. The thinking is that neighborhoods can be viewed as a bundle of amenities which can be brought to bear to improve the lives of people. Using technology to aggregate neighborhood restaurants, shopping and entertainment while alerting us to crime

or traffic issues around us in real time and at the tap of a finger on our smart phones is where this seems to be headed. Bike sharing, dog walking, and other shared services are already showing up. Like an Uber ride, the primary goal with emerging technology in apartment living is to make things more efficient and cost-effective. In the process, though, these applications can serve to broaden the rental experience and enrich lives. As for ride-sharing, I’m learning how to use it more and more and loving it. I found out about a local farmer’s market on one ride in Snohomish County recently. I have removed the pooled ride option permanently, though. No more hopping around big cities with drug dealers in the seat next to me. Tom Hoban is CEO of The Coast Group of Companies. Contact him at 425-339-3638, or tomhoban@coastmgt.com or visit www.coastmgt.com. Twitter: @Tom_P_Hoban.


24 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

AUGUST 2017

BUSINESS BUILDERS

7 strategies to help you regain focus “People often complain about lack of time when the lack of direction is the real problem.” — Zig Ziglar, American motivational speaker

I

love this acronym I found online for the word focus — Follow One Course Until Success. It doesn’t say, work in a scattered manner and don’t fully complete anything. Oh no, it’s about staying on one path, working without distraction and seeing projects through to the end. Now, that’s what gets things done. We’ve all heard about time management for years and years. There’s a new kid in town called focus management and you’ll probably be hearing that term much more. To examine the difference, let’s start with the definitions of each term from Dictionary.com. Time management is the analysis of how working hours are spent and the prioritization of tasks in order to maximize personal efficiency in the workplace. Focus is a central point, as of attraction, attention, or activity. Time management relates to clocks, calendars, to do lists and reminders. Focus management is about being able to focus on the task at hand and keep distractions at bay. We all know that distractions abound in today’s fast-paced work environment, enveloped in technology. Let’s take a look at just a few of those distractions as a reminder of what we’re up against each day.

The two P’s of social media: Posting and Perusing. Chasing squirrels and shiny objects that sound interesting or more fun than what we’re currently Monika working on. Phone and com- Kristofferson puter notifications, Office research, email and socializing. Efficiency Researchers say the stimulation that we get from constantly checking our devices creates an addiction with a squirt of dopamine. There may be something to see with every click. So, we check our email and texts and they are stimulating. We check our social media likes, hearts and comments and they are stimulating. Without all this stimuli, we can actually start to feel bored. There was a study by Silverpop that said we have eight seconds to capture someone’s attention online before they move onto the next thing. Just think how quickly we scroll through photos and videos on Instagram and Facebook and we get just a quick peek of photos and videos on Snapchat. Dr. John Ratey is a clinical associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard who started using the term “acquired atten-

tion deficit disorder” to describe the condition of people who are used to a constant stream of digital stimulation and feel bored in the absence of it. (From Personal Productivity Secrets by Maura Nevel Thomas). In her book “Personal Productivity Secrets,” Maura Nevel Thomas wrote, “The secret to defending against the constant demands on your attention is learning control — and the most important place for you to exert your control is over your own attention.” Yes, Maura, I agree with you. Let’s examine some solutions with the following seven strategies to help you gain control of your focus. When you’re in control, you will then manage your time better, too. Time management and focus management go hand-in-hand. ■ Acknowledge that there will always be more information available to you then you have time for. The information on the internet is endless and sometimes we just have to put a cap on how much time we invest in research. For example, if you’re going on vacation, you don’t have to research 50 vacation options, perhaps five choices are sufficient. ■ Be very clear with yourself on your goals. Know exactly what you want and how you’re going to get what you want before you do the work that it takes to reach your goals. Once you are clear, it will help you put your focus in the correct places. ■ Evaluate each activity or request on your time and energy to decide whether

or not it helps your goals or hurts your goals and your focus. ■ Say no to activities and requests that take you away from your goals. No more guilt over this one, we all need to get past the guilt. ■ Retrain yourself to be OK with downtime and less stimulation instead of being “on” all the time. Find relaxing activities you enjoy such as listening to music, dancing, soaking in a bubble bath, meditation, coloring or practicing yoga. You can even just sit quietly. ■ Eliminate distractions while you’re working on critical tasks. Critical tasks are activities that help you reach your goals, increase your income, have a deadline or have a financial consequence associated with it. ■ Decrease content in your life by evaluating what you can let go. It may be a group on social media, newsletters, junk mail, magazine subscriptions, newspaper subscriptions or activities. Just simplify. I believe we need a combination of time management tools like calendars, timers and clocks along with the skills and control that comes with focus management. You have the power to make changes in your life, so I encourage you to combine these strategies to improve your productivity and your well-being. Monika Kristofferson is a professional organizer and productivity consultant who owns Efficient Organization NW in Lake Stevens. Reach her at 425-220-8905 or monika@efficientorganizationnw.com.

Exercise No. 1: You’ll begin by conducting a SWOT Analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats). Catalog your internal (conAndrew trollable) strengths Ballard and weaknesses from a marketing Growth perspective. Be brutally honest as Strategies you evaluate all of your marketing elements, including: product, price, place (distribution), promotion, people, processes and technology. After completing both your strengths and weaknesses lists, go through the same process on your external (uncontrollable) opportunities and threats, e.g. consumers, competitors, economy, technology and government. Prioritize your lists on which can have the greatest impact on your marketing activities. I recommend including team members from both your marketing and sales departments in this exercise. Exercise No. 2: Next, you’ll segment the market. Look at your total market

“pie” and divide it up into segment “pieces” (or customer groups) that are held together by having common circumstances, situations, values and motives. The purpose of this exercise is to better understand the composition and characteristics of your core segment or niche. Demographic and geographic characteristics are the easiest to profile. Psychographics are more difficult to evaluate but far more informative when segmenting a market to expose the most responsive and profitable niche. Typical psychographic categories include activities, opinions and interests. Interviewing your best customers is a great way to learn about their psychographics. Exercise No. 3: After you’ve divided your market pie into segment pieces, align the most responsive and profitable market segments to your best product and service lines in a product/market matrix. Use a spreadsheet and enter your products/services in the first column and market segments in the second. Each row will document a product line adjoined to the appropriate market(s). This exercise will help you focus on the best market segments as opposed to the entire market. The core purpose of this exercise is to be clear about your most

profitable products (or services), and the markets they attract. Your top performers are where you want to allocate marketing resources. Exercise No. 4: Finally, you’ll review key competitors to see how their strengths and weakness line up with yours. By this time, you’ve already chronicled your core competencies (exercise No. 1, in terms of your top priority strengths), most responsive market segments (exercise No. 2 exposing the best niche segment), and aligned your best-selling products to your most profitable markets (exercise No. 3 by developing your product/market matrix). In this final exercise, you’ll be looking for an opening in the competitive landscape you can fill that distinguishes your brand. Go through these four exercises and you’ll be better prepared to develop a winning marketing plan; one that takes you from where you are, to where you want to be. Armed with this real-time fact-base, the best strategic path to accomplish your marketing objectives will be clear. Andrew Ballard is president of Marketing Solutions, an agency specializing in growth strategies. For more information, call 425337-1100 or go to www.mktg-solutions.com.

Audit marketing plan for best results M

ark Twain said, “Plan for the future, because that is where you are going to spend the rest of your life.” Conducting an upfront marketing audit improves both the process and outcomes of your marketing plan. A marketing plan, like a strategic plan, should clearly define three areas: 1) where the company is today; 2) where management wants the company to be tomorrow; and 3) the strategic path between those two points. If you don’t have an accurate assessment of where you are (present-day situation), your plan may miss the mark. I’ve done postmortems on many marketing plans that were adequately resourced and well executed; yet, they still failed to produce desired results. Problems in marketing planning often stem from an inaccurate view of the company’s current situation…in terms of core competencies, target markets and competitive landscape. A marketing audit that evaluates these factors can increase the efficacy of your marketing plan. By conducting four exercises (in sequence) — SWOT analysis, market segmentation, product/market matrix and competitive comparison — you will assess the factors having the greatest potential impact on your business.


BUSINESS BRIEFS

AUGUST 2017

EVERETT — Providence Regional Medical Center Everett’s bariatric surgical center has been accredited as a Comprehensive Bariatric Surgery Center by the American College of Surgeons and the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Bariatric surgery is a treatment for severe obesity and its related conditions.

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clean audit report for the Port of Everett, marking two decades of consecutive clean audits with no findings.

Ship port calls 2017 YTD: 39

MARYSVILLE — Apprenticeship Education — How to Fill Your Employment Gap is the topic for the next installment of the Economic Alliance Snohomish County Speaker Series presented by Sno-Isle Libraries. The event is from 8 to 9:30 a.m. on Aug. 8 at the Marysville School District Board Room. Register for this event at www.economicalliancesc. org/events/ssb-august/.

Aug. 2: Westwood, Westwood Columbia

MARYSVILLE — The City of Marysville’s new One-Stop Permit Center gives residents and small businesses easier access to a building inspector who can answer questions about the building code and review simple plans. Located at the Community Development office at 80 Columbia Ave., One-Stop Permit Center is open from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 360363-8100 to schedule an appointment.

SNOHOMISH COUNTY — Williams Partners has announced that Northwest Pipeline filed an application with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission seeking authorization for its North Seattle Lateral Upgrade project in south Snohomish County. This is a capacity upgrade of the existing gas pipeline that runs through the county. LYNNWOOD — All Things HR will present a Recruiting Roundtable from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Aug. 8 at 4210 198th St. SW, Suite 105, Lynnwood. There is no fee to attend this brown bag meeting but registration is required. Register at http://tinyurl.com/y7hlnkqd.

Barge port calls 2017 YTD: 23 Ship port calls 2016: 85 Barge port calls 2016: 57

Aug. 8: Westwood, Balsa Aug. 9: Swire, Siangtan Aug. 15: Westwood, Westwood Olympia Aug. 17: ECL, Asian Naga Aug. 22: Westwood, Bardu Aug. 29: Westwood, Westwood Rainier Source: Port of Everett EDMONDS — Edmonds Center for the Arts will host their annual New Volunteer Open House at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 15, at the Edmonds Center for the Arts, located at 410 Fourth Ave. N., Edmonds. Support Edmonds Center for the Arts through ushering, concessions, box office, administration and special events. EVERETT — The Washington State Auditor’s Office has reported another

EVERETT — Local nonprofit organization HopeWorks has received a $350,000 grant award from The M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust. The grant supports the development of HopeWorks Station II, a five-story building next door to HopeWorks Station I on Broadway in Everett. The building will break ground in early 2018 and will be home to a workforce development facility with 65 affordable housing units. EVERETT — Evergreen Beauty College, with a campus in Everett, is one of the first beauty colleges in Washington state to obtain approval to offer the new Hair Design License. This new licensing option, focused solely on hair, takes less time and money to obtain than a traditional cosmetology license. LYNNWOOD — The Cogworks, a makerspace in the Lynnwood/Edmonds

ECA SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 25

area, is looking for new members to join its creative community. The Cogworks is a co-op where members share tools, workspace and knowledge. If you are interested in participating or just learning more, contact Making@theCogworks. org. EVERETT — Nurse.org has recognized Providence Regional Medical Center Everett as the one of the best hospitals for nurses to work for in Washington. Over the past two years, Nurse.org has collected more than 39,000 reviews from nurses about their workplace satisfaction. ARLINGTON — The City of Arlington and partners, including NW Innovation Research Center, Everett Community College, Sno-Isle Libraries, and Washington State Department of Commerce, are developing a plan for establishing the Arlington Innovation Center, also known as a makerspace. The organizations are asking for public feedback. To take the survey, go to https://arlingtonwa. seamlessdocs.com/f/InnovationCenter. OLYMPIA — Washington’s average annual wage grew by 4.8 percent in 2016 to $58,957, representing the largest percentage increase year over year since 2007, according to the state Employment Security Department. The average weekly wage rose from $1,082 in 2014 to $1,133 in 2016. These figures include only those wages covered by unemployment insurance.

We Know Feet Inside and Out!

THE FOUR TOPS

Saturday, September 30, 2017 | $54–$89 This American vocal quartet from Detroit, MI, helped define the city's Motown sound of the 1960s. The group's repertoire has included soul music, R&B, disco, adult contemporary, doo­wop, jazz, and show tunes. The group continues to be a hit in concert, a testament to the enduring legacy of the Motown Sound.

From simple sprains to major pains, the doctors at Ankle & Foot Clinic of Everett are trained exclusively to diagnose and treat ankle and foot problems.

ECA SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT

AN EVENING WITH RANDY NEWMAN Thursday, October 12, 2017 | $49–$84

With songs that run the gamut from heart­ breaking to satirical and a host of unforgettable film scores, Randy Newman has used his many talents to create musical masterpieces widely recognized by generations of audiences.

When experience, knowledge, and personal attention are important to you – give us a call and meet these special doctors. Let us help you put your best foot forward!

ECA SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT

WILLIE K

Wednesday, December 6, 2017 | $29–$64 When the Honolulu Pulse said, “Willie K can play or sing almost anything an American audience might ask for,” that wasn’t hype, it was the literal truth. No less than Prince was a huge fan, calling Willie K a “funky mother#%@&er,” while another avowed fan is a fellow Hawaiian who goes by the name Barack Obama.

SECOND LOCATION! Alpine Foot & Ankle Clinic 17432 Smokey Point Boulevard, Arlington WA • 360-653-2326 www.alpinefootandankle.com

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Practicing at both locations:

Dr Jarrod Smith & Dr Robert Stanton

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425-339-8888

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26 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

AUGUST 2017

BOTHELL — Shari L. Dworkin has been named dean of the School of Nursing & Health Studies at the University of Washington Bothell. Dworkin comes from the University of California San Francisco where she was a professor and associate dean for academic affairs. She replaces David Allen who retired in June. MONROE — Katy Woods was inducted last month as president of the Rotary Club of Monroe. Woods is the Monroe branch manager for Coastal Community Bank and has been a club member since 2005. Other board members include Kelly Backstrom, Lisa Caldwell, Staci Cogar, Mostafa Ghous, Brenda Hunt, Jeff Rasmussen, Marlene Rouleau, Delma Silva, Phil Spirito and Sam Wirsching. EVERETT — James Schwartz and Don Sheppard have joined Everett construction firm Kirtley-Cole Associates. Schwartz joins the team as senior project manager. Sheppard joins the team as superintendent. EDMONDS — Sarah Mixson has been appointed to serve on the City of Edmonds Diversity Commission. Mixson is the rental and stage manager for Edmonds Center for the Arts/Edmonds Public Facilities District. EVERETT — Michelle Schroeder has been appointed branch manager of the Peoples Bank Everett Financial Cen-

PEOPLE WATCHING

Shari Dworkin Fritz King

Katie Healy

Jason Sanders

Will McMahan

Lynne Varner

Kelli Thode

Michelle Schroeder

ter located at 2702 Colby Ave., Everett. Schroeder brings 15 years of branch management experience over the course of her 37-year career in banking. LYNNWOOD — Yvonne Terrell-Powell, vice president of Equity and Inclusion at Edmonds Community College, is encouraging everyone to actively engage and connect. Since taking on her new role March 16, Terrell-Powell has set out to cultivate relationships within the campus and broader community. EVERETT — Will McMahan was sworn last month in as the new president of the Rotary Club of Everett during Changing of the Guard ceremonies at Everett’s Legion Golf Club. A retired real estate broker, McMahan will serve

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Daren Kloes

Don Sheppard

Emily Weaver

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James Schwartz

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through June 2018. McMahan takes over the Rotary presidency from Ed Petersen of Everett. BOTHELL — Azure Blue Vacations owner Suzy Schreiner was selected to attend the fifth-annual Global Travel Marketplace that took place July 9 through 11 at the Diplomat Beach Resort in Hollywood/Fort Lauderdale, Florida. EVERETT — Red Cross Snohomish County Chapter last month elected new board members. They are: Jennifer Howard, Everett Community College; Keely Reinhard, RhinoVentures; Daren Kloes, Coastal Community Bank, Kelli Thode, Paul Davis Restoration; Lynne Varner, Washington State University, in Everett; Emily Weaver, Fortive Corp.; Crystal Donner, Perteet Inc.; Jason Sanders, Puget Sound Energy; and Fritz King, Premera Blue Cross. EVERETT — Doug McCormick was named Snohomish County’s new Public Works deputy director and county engineer effective July 1. He will oversee day-to-day operations and long-range planning for the construction and maintenance of county roads. EVERETT — The American Institute of Chiropractors has recognized Everett chiropractor Dr. Ronnie Sikka with a Two Years — 10 Best Chiropractors for Client Satisfaction award. Sikka practices at Progressive Chiropractic & Massage in Everett.

SNOHOMISH — Katie Healy, a 2008 Snohomish High School graduate, is the newest compounding pharmacist at Kusler’s Compounding Pharmacy in Snohomish. Healy began her pharmacy career as an assistant when she was still in high school and was an intern at Kusler’s while attending the University of Washington. SNOHOMISH — Kari Zimmerman and Ronn Rutan have joined Re/ Max Elite at its Snohomish location on Bickford Avenue. Zimmerman started her career in real estate more than 12 years ago. Rutan has more than 20 years of service in the industry. EVERETT — An Everett Banner Bank employee Tonya Sprague has been selected to receive the Banner’s Best award – the company’s the highest level of recognition for surpassing individual professional goals in 2016, as well as providing exceptional customer service to clients and colleagues. EVERETT — Procura Mortgage Company has hired Augie Bae to serve as its regional vice president for Washington state. The company has offices in Everett. LYNNWOOD — Re/Max Elite has added newly licensed agent Dustin Comey to its Lynnwood office located at 3400 188th St. SW, Suite 190, Lynnwood. Dustin Comey is the brother to brokerage owner Scott Comey and will be mentored by him personally.

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PUBLIC RECORDS Bankruptcy filings The following Snohomish County businesses or individuals filed business-related bankruptcies with U.S. Bankruptcy Court for Western District of Washington from June 1-30. 17-12690-MLB: Chapter 7, Jessica M. Lavake-Jaynes; attorney for debtor: Kenneth J. Schneider; filed: June 15; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual 17-12848-MLB: Chapter 7, Michael T. Novak and Rachael A. Novak; attorney for joint debtors: Kenneth J. Schneider; filed: June 26; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual

Snohomish County tax liens Tax liens are gathered from online public records filed with the Snohomish County Auditor’s Office. These federal and state liens were filed between June 1-30.

Federal tax liens 201706010160: June 1; Squires Machine Inc., 19510 21st Ave. W, Unit B, Lynnwood 201706010161: June 1; Bauer, Lynn Dee, 17611 83rd Drive NE, Arlington 201706010162: June 1; Village Bean, 132 Winesap Road, Apt. B, Bothell 201706010163: June 1; Grasseth, Heather J., 15012 23rd Ave NE, Arlington 201706010164: June 1; Carlson, Esther D., Estate Of, 20502 Marine Drive, Apt. A5, Stanwood 201706060430: June 6; Santana, Jose J., PO Box 1397, Lynnwood 201706060431: June 6; Avramovic, Emily R., 18400 52nd Ave. W, Lynnwood 201706060432: June 6; Villicana, Heather M., 17228 81st Drive NE, Arlington 201706060433: June 6; Sloniker, Gerry G., 30607 Seventh Ave. NE, Stanwood 201706060434: June 6; Wilbur, Loralynn, 14530 54th Ave. SE, Everett 201706060435: June 6; Janes, David F., 6413 Berkshire Drive, Everett 201706060436: June 6; Richards, Michael W., 12101 Huckleberry Lane, Arlington 201706060437: June 6; Hana Wellness Clinic, 17410 Highway 99, Suite 150, Lynnwood 201706060438: June 6; Guaymas Lynnwood Dox Inc., 3805 196th St. SW, Lynnwood 201706060439: June 6; Tom’s Auto Body Collision, 23125 Highway 99, Edmonds 201706060440: June 6; Sharpe, J. S., 4758 Park Drive, Apt. 108, Mukilteo 201706060441: June 6; Goehrs, Kenneth J., 5429 Lowell Larimer Road, Everett 201706060442: June 6; Purdom, Trudy D., 4525 164th St. SW, F201, Lynnwood 201706130392: June 13; Air Resources Inc., 17804 48th Drive NE, No. A, Arlington 201706130393: June 13; Hansen, Marilyn J., 12021 Roosevelt Road, Snohomish 201706130394: June 13; Gray, Renee M., 303 91st Ave. NE, A106, Everett 201706130395: June 13; Gray, Renee M., 303 91st Ave. NE, A106, Everett 201706130396: June 13; Argueta, Edwin Esteban, 2610 199th Place SW, Lynnwood 201706130397: June 13; Berg, Robert J., 14815 Chain Lake Road, Suite F, Monroe 201706130398: June 13; Makabi, Fumiko, PO Box 475, Mountlake Terrace 201706130399: June 13; Clark, John J.,

120 SE Everett Mall Way, Apt. 238, Everett 201706130400: June 13; Turner, Jason, 5227 149th St. SW, No. 3, Edmonds 201706130401: June 13; Bloch, Susan M., 2525 126th Place SW, Everett 201706130402: June 13; Sargent, Jayson B., 1326 S Lake Stickney Drive, Lynnwood 201706130422: June 13; Squire’s Machine Inc., 19510 21st Ave. W, Unit B, Lynnwood 201706130423: June 13; Gillis, Ruth, 3821 125th Place SE, Everett 201706130424: June 13; Liu, Shu-Chen, 2630 156th St. SW, Lynnwood 201706130425: June 13; Wise, Valerie, 4831 98th Place NE, Marysville 201706130426: June 13; Bringard, Cecilie W., 11030 Seventh Ave. SE, Apt. C210, Everett 201706130427: June 13; Alejandre, Jorge, 14313 Highway 530 NE, Apt. 16, Arlington 201706130428: June 13; Air Resources Inc., 17804 48th Drive NE, No. A, Arlington 201706130429: June 13; All County Evictions, 2302 Rucker Ave., Apt. 4, Everett 201706130430: June 13; Musch-Plumb, Julie, 2510 140th St. SW, Lynnwood 201706200397: June 20; Chin, Suana W., 4215 198th St. SW, Suite 106, Lynnwood 201706200398: June 20; Donovan, Charlotte M., 20622 78th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201706200399: June 20; Garka, Kelsey L., 5102 Weber Road, Snohomish 201706200400: June 20; Hilbert, Dave M, PO Box 3077, Everett 201706200401: June 20; Newman, Michele V., 20231 209th Ave. SE, Monroe 201706200402: June 20; Tilson, Joseph R., 25925 Ben Howard Road, Monroe 201706200403: June 20; Waltz, Garrett J., 1418 191st Drive SE, Snohomish 201706200404: June 20; Hatch, Jimmy G., 2018 181st St. SE, Bothell 201706200405: June 20; Appert, Scot A., 14751 N Kelsey St., Suite 105, Monroe 201706200406: June 20; Yeoman, Melody F., 5903 W Flowing Lake Road, Snohomish 201706200407: June 20; Ilano Blessing, Faye B., 706 89th St. SE, Everett 201706200408: June 20; Frontier Financial Corp., 1130 Colby Ave., Everett 201706200409: June 20; Kang, Stephanie, 19631 80th Place W, Edmonds 201706200410: June 20; Chin, Suana W., 4215 198th St. SW, Suite 106, Lynnwood 201706200411: June 20; Salo, Ray O., 28541 74th Drive NW, Stanwood 201706200412: June 20; Salo, Ray O., 28541 74th Drive NW, Stanwood 201706200413: June 20; Y Not Sports Bar & Grub, 2015 Hewitt Ave., Everett 201706200435: June 20; Millcreek Adult Family Homes Inc., 16000 75th Place W, Edmonds 201706200436: June 20; Caliber Cleaning Inc., PO Box 12162, Mill Creek 201706200437: June 20; Lyons, Bonnie J., 15321 Main St. NE, PMB 166, Duvall 201706270152: June 27; Davis, Tyrone, 1327 112th St. SE, Suite I, Everett 201706270153: June 27; DeFever, Robert B., 7820 100th St. NE, No. A, Marysville 201706270154: June 27; Naicker, Kirti A., 18115 15th Ave. W, Lynnwood 201706270176: June 27; Wellman, Julie A., 17117 69th Place W, Edmonds 201706270177: June 27; Seen On Screen Tv Inc., 4017 Colby Ave., Everett 201706270178: June 27; Mochinski, Jacob, 22805 55th Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace 201706270179: June 27; Lara, John, 842 Linden St., Everett 201706270180: June 27; Whitlock, Sharon M., 17714 Interurban Blvd., Snohomish

AUGUST 2017

201706270181: June 27; Wilson, Julianne E., 23406 99th Place W, Edmonds 201706270182: June 27; Hafner, Christopher P., 5732 60th St. SE, Snohomish 201706270183: June 27; Village Bean, 132 Winesap Road, Apt. B, Bothell 201706270184: June 27; Salo, Ray O., 28541 74th Drive NW, Stanwood

Employment security liens 201706190070: June 19; Blue Streak Finishers, State Of Washington (Dept Of)

Partial release of federal tax liens 201706140180: June 14; Coleman, Winfred, 1912 129th Ave. SE, Snohomish

Release of federal tax liens 201706010165: June 1; Luby, Robin L., 1121 Orchard Ave., Snohomish 201706060443: June 6; Gonzalezamey, L., 11420 33rd St. NE, Lake Stevens 201706060444: June 6; Jakusz, Noelle E., 24395 33rd Court W, Brier 201706060445: June 6; Haack, Aaron J., 14312 81st Place SE, Snohomish 201706060446: June 6; Hacke, Gaylynn M., 170 West Dayton St., Edmonds 201706060447: June 6; Myers, Mary L., 10404 Eighth Place SE, Lake Stevens 201706060448: June 6; Burns, Karla J, 11605 Sixth Ave. NE, Marysville 201706060449: June 6; Burns, Orion S., 11605 Sixth Ave. NE, Marysville 201706060450: June 6; Mack-Job, Jaime M., 9711 190th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201706060451: June 6; Mack-Job, Jaime M., 9711 190th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201706060452: June 6; Wilson, Cynthia K., 23920 Timber Lane, Woodway 201706060453: June 6; Mengistu, T., 23017 27th Drive SE, Bothell 201706060454: June 6; Teklemaimanot, Biniam L., 18666 Redmond Way, Apt. KK1087, Redmond 201706060455: June 6; Jimmy Jack’s Inc., 13428 Highway 99, Everett 201706060456: June 6; Fuller, George W. Jr, 18304 Snohomish Ave., Snohomish 201706060457: June 6; Weber, Andrew D., 10725 Holly Drive, Everett 201706060458: June 6; Love Plumbing & Remodel, 12108 NE, 163rd St., Bothell 201706060459: June 6; Closet Guy’s Inc., 4806 56th Place NE, Marysville 201706060460: June 6; Shangri-La Massage Thereapy, 7500 212th St. SW, Suite 101, Edmonds 201706130403: June 13; Skycorp Ltd., 526 N West Ave., Arlington 201706130404: June 13; Technical Security Integrations Inc,, 11633 18th St. SE, Lake Stevens 201706130405: June 13; Lenn, Ashley, 14221 NE, 181st Place SE, Woodinville 201706130406: June 13; Y Not Sports Bar & Grub, 2015 Hewitt Ave., Everett 201706130407: June 13; Y Not Sports Bar & Grub, 2015 Hewitt Ave., Everett 201706130408: June 13; Skycorp Ltd., 526 N West Ave. Arlington 201706130409: June 13; Saban, Theresa M., 3201 W Mukilteo Blvd., Everett 201706130410: June 13; Skycorp Ltd., 526 N West Ave., Arlington 201706130411: June 13; Y Not Sports Bar & Grub, 2015 Hewitt Ave., Everett 201706130412: June 13; Guerzon, Dash J.,

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 27

5131 115th St. SE, Everett 201706130413: June 13; Fear, Michael, 820 99th Ave. SE, Lake Stevens 201706200414: June 20; Gemmer, Jodi L., 9889 Central Valley Road NW, Bremerton 201706200415: June 20; Locking, Kelly M., 3727 Shore Ave., Everett 201706200416: June 20; Drexler, Terry J., 21010 120th Drive SE, Snohomish 201706200417: June 20; Generation Drywall Inc., 21114 22nd Ave. W, Lynnwood 201706200418: June 20; Lenon, Kevin, PO Box 909, Darrington 201706200419: June 20; Gorski, Tiffany D., 8607 Cascadia Ave., Everett 201706200420: June 20; Generation Drywall Inc., 21114 22nd Ave. W, Lynnwood 201706200421: June 20; Guzman, Jamie, 5805 Sixth Ave. NW, Tualip 201706200422: June 20; Reeves, Anthony M., 1507 Wall St., Everett 201706200423: June 20; Carey, William E., 9907 49th Drive NE, No. B, Marysville 201706200424: June 20; Ludington, Kari, 340 172nd St. NE, Arlington 201706200438: June 20; Meyers, Richard H, 23005 63rd Ave. W, Mountlake 201706200439: June 20; Oh, Chi Suk, 14310 Ash Way, Apt. A, Lynnwood 201706200440: June 20; Meyers, Richard H., 23005 63rd Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace 201706200441: June 20; Meyers, Richard H., 23005 63rd Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace 201706230373: June 23; Muller, Ann H., 1001 Oakes Ave., Everett 201706270185: June 27; Sound Garage Door Company Inc., PO Box 3127, Arlington 201706270186: June 27; Chang, Yun Fong, 19506 Richmond Beach Drive NW, Seattle 201706270187: June 27; Jang, Myung D., 19031 33rd Ave. W, Suite 211, Lynnwood 201706270188: June 27; Hammer Construction, 6925 216th St. SW, Suite N, Lynnwood 201706270189: June 27; Grandstaff Construction, PO Box 4215, Everett 201706270190: June 27; Diversified Northwest Inc., 13619 Mukilteo Speedway, Suite D5, Lynnwood 201706280523: June 28; Manchester, Mark B., 13102 42nd Place W, Mukilteo 201706200377: June 20; Hyatt, Lauren, 6711 126th St. SE, Snohomish 201706200378: June 20; Tracy Hyatt LLC, 6711 126th St. SE, Snohomish

Satisfaction of employment security lien 201706190066: June 19; Six Nines It, State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201706190067: June 19; Dynamo Construction Inc., State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201706190068: June 19; Omnivore Technologies Inc., State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201706190069: June 19; Entertainment Partners Services, State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201706290251: June 29; Smith, Ben C., State Of Washington (Dept Of)

Withdrawal of federal tax liens 201706270155: June 27; Gelinas, Erica, 2320 Bayview Place, Everett 201706130431: June 13; Pascual, Fernando B., 21706 80th Ave. W, Edmonds 201706200442: June 20; Jorgensen, John G., 13518 Beverly Park Road, Mukilteo


28 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

AUGUST 2017

PLEASE NOTE: Business license information is obtained monthly from the Washington Secretary of State’s Office through the paid commercial services of InfoUSA. For the complete list, please go online to www.theherald businessjournal.com.

Arlington Artemis Accounting and Bookkeeping: 5515 257th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-7600; Accounting and Bookkeeping General Services Aurora Kay Photography: 303 E Burke Ave., Arlington, WA 98223-1008; Photography Baileys RV Repair: 19130 113th Place NE, Arlington, WA 98223-6727; Recreational Vehicles-Repairing and Services Dietrich’s Espresso: 26804 Highway 9 NE, Arlington, WA 98223-9102; 360-474-1818; Coffee Shops Fresh Pick Home Design: 3405 172nd St. NE, No. 5-331, Arlington, WA 98223-7717; Home Design and Planning Service Hell-Back Firearms Restoration: PO Box 3632, Arlington, WA 98223-3632; Guns and Gunsmiths John Kelley Golf: 15927 19th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-9679; Golf Courses Killer Joe Coffee Co: 4031 188th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-7775; Coffee Shops Kim Trautman Photography: 28721 Fifth Ave. NW, Arlington, WA 98223-5544; Photography Melissa Jeane Trucking: 22002 59th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8250; Trucking Michael Blankenship Doulas: 24732 N Brooks Creek Road, Arlington, WA 982235319; Midwives Michele Hudon Bookkeeping: 28530 59th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8652; Accounting and Bookkeeping General Services Next Project General Contractor: 17325 116th Place NE, Arlington, WA 98223-7985; General Contractors Ronin Construction: 19200 Vista Drive, Arlington, WA 98223-4007; Construction Saltwater Bungalow: 18424 Woodlands Way, Arlington, WA 98223-7419 Seattle Permits and Planning: 21004 44th Drive NE, Arlington, WA 98223-4856; Business Services Not Elsewhere Classified Stone Crow Stables: 219 156th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8013; Stables Thrivent Financial: 16404 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington, WA 98223-8417; 360-5720882; Financial Advisory Services Wish Makers Party Pros: 7313 176th Place NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8190; Party Planning

Brier Aleksey Moody Independent: 2801 225th Place SW, Brier, WA 98036-8169; Contractors Moveology: 21700 37th Place W, Brier, WA 98036-8085; Movers

Darrington Banks Cottage: 5358 Chief Brown Lane, Darrington, WA 98241-9420; Cabin Rentals Photos By Michele: PO Box 669, Darrington, WA 98241-0669; Photography

Edmonds A Brewed Awakening: 8314 225th Place SW, Edmonds, WA 98026-8284; Coffee Shops Adoption Services-Western WA: 10016 Edmonds Way, No. C102, Edmonds, WA 98020-5107; Adoption Agencies Atelier Portraiture: 18508 79th Place W, Edmonds, WA 98026-5850; Photographers-Portrait Becker Painting and Landscaping: 14204 48th Place W, Edmonds, WA 98026-3910; Painters Car-Mel Courier Services: 7603 218th St. SW, No. B, Edmonds, WA 98026-7948; Courier Services Doyle Family Farm: 1035 Spruce St., Edmonds, WA 98020-3334; Farms Econo Lodge: 23607 Highway 99, No. 2a, Edmonds, WA 98026-9272; Hotels and Motels Eleet Properties NW: 19421 81st Place W, Edmonds, WA 98026-6223; Real Estate

BUSINESS LICENSES

Gardner Investments: 8521b 238th St. SW, Edmonds, WA 98026-8939; Investments Intuit Educational Services: 15322 50th Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98026-4411; Educational Service-Business Katsu Burger Lynnwood: 23319 94th Place W, Edmonds, WA 98020-5006; Restaurants Kayla’s Embroidery: 4904 154th St. SW, Edmonds, WA 98026-4415; Embroidery Liana Thompson Photography: 6117 154th St. SW, Edmonds, WA 98026-4447; Photography Northwest Antiques: 21002 80th Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98026-7002; Antiques-Dealers Olympic Cascade Drive Ins: 120 W Dayton St., Edmonds, WA 98020-7217; 425-582-9645; Insurance One Off Fabrication: 8104 219th St. SW, Edmonds, WA 98026-7867; Assembly and Fabricating Service (Manufacturers) Steve’s Tile and Stone: 19014 Dellwood Drive, Edmonds, WA 98026-6040; Tile-Ceramic-Contractors Dealers

Everett 360 Yacht Detailing: 2331 Howard Ave., Everett, WA 98203-4821; Boat Painting and Lettering A1 Home Care Builders: 3615 Shore Ave., Everett, WA 98203-1209; Building Contractors AA Dispatch: 701 100th St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-3727; 425-259-2000; Dispatch Service-Trucking ACT Auto and RV: 10431 19th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-4261; 425-948-6839; Recreational Vehicles A New Hope Counseling: 2722 Colby Ave., No. 420, Everett, WA 98201-3532; Counseling ASR Tile: 2813 York Road, Everett, WA 98204-5409; Tile-Ceramic-Contractors Dealers B&Y Retails: 10218 Holly Drive, Everett, WA 98204-3728; Retail Shops Burnout Wheels and Tires: 6923 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98203-5174; 425-610-4787; Wheels and Wheel Covers Creamer Aquatics: 11000 16th Ave. SE, No. 1403, Everett, WA 98208-4834; Swimming Pools-Public Daily Pressure Coffee Roasters: 520 128th St. SW, No. A3-5, Everett, WA 98204-9362; Coffee Shops Danny’s Hardscape: 7701 Hardeson Road, No. 47, Everett, WA 98203-6251; Concrete Hardscaping DJ Rissa: 11516 28th Drive SE, Everett, WA 98208-5210; Music and Live Entertainment Farentinos Classic Cuts: 11419 19th Ave. SE, No. C105, Everett, WA 98208-5120; Beauty Salons Fix All Construction: 8521 10th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-2034; Construction Flower Of Life Services: 5120 Beaumont Drive, No. A, Everett, WA 98203-2450; Florists-Retail Funko Valley Techs: 2802 Wetmore Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3569; 425-349-2517 Group 66 Real Estate: 3419 Snohomish Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4149; Real Estate Guitar Circle: 1118 Grand Ave., Everett, WA 98201-1509; Musical Instruments-Dealers High Performance Auto Detailing: 5111 110th St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-9179; Automobile Detail and Clean-Up Service Hotrod Ink: 12720 Fourth Ave. W, No. C, Everett, WA 98204-5707 J3 Machine: 715 105th Place SE, Everett, WA 98208-4731; Machine Shops (Manufacturers) JK Chris Delivery Services: 605 Center Road, No. A203, Everett, WA 98204-5914; Delivery Service James Electric: 2818 Grand Ave., No. 412, Everett, WA 98201-3470; Electric Contractors Jay General Contractor: 5814 136th St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-9477; General Contractors Jubie’s Bbq-Caribbean Delight: 2831 W Marine View Drive, Everett, WA 98201-3423; 425-263-9223; Restaurants Leonard Kippi Interior Design: 723 Grand Ave., Everett, WA 98201-1301; Interior Decorators Design and Consultants Lina Yu Interpreting Services: 11812 E Gibson Road, No. C319, Everett, WA 98204-8644; Translators and Interpreters

Mega Smoke and Vape: 13112 39th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-5602; 425-225-5351; Electronic Cigarettes Metier Building: 7733 Timber Hill Drive, No. C, Everett, WA 98203-6952; Building Contractors Mint Emporium: 12626 12th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-6551; General Merchandise-Retail Mo Yoga Wellness and Fitness: 10806 41st Drive SE, Everett, WA 98208-5434; Yoga Instruction NW Appliance Repair: 605 Center Road, No. H101, Everett, WA 98204-5928; Appliances-Household-Major-Repairing Nick’s Wood Work: 2324 119th St. SW, No. B1, Everett, WA 98204-4740; Woodworkers On The Mark Construction: 3802 Colby Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4940; 425-953-9930; Construction Companies PSP Mechanical: 2420 116th St. SE, No. B, Everett, WA 98208-6042; Mechanical Contractors Plain Co Clothing: 10220 Meridian Ave., Everett, WA 98208-3945; Clothing-Retail S Group Consulting and Construction: 514 107th Place SW, Everett, WA 98204-3808; Consultants-Business Not Elsewhere Classified Schultz Electric: 11725 29th Ave. SE, No. A, Everett, WA 98208-6025; Electric Contractors Sound Woodworking: 3525 95th Place SE, Everett, WA 98208-3021; Woodworkers Stan’s Wood Shop: 2115 Columbia Ave., Everett, WA 98203-5337; Wood Products Surface and Millwork: 6427 Cypress St., Everett, WA 98203-4433; Millwork (Manufacturers) Thai Lime Leaf: 10430 19th Ave. SE, No. 1, Everett, WA 98208-4200; 425-224-4755; Restaurants Thai Mana: 2116 19th St., Everett, WA 98201-2467; 425-374-2897; Restaurants Tiny Salon: 1721 Madison St., No. B, Everett, WA 98203-5270; Beauty Salons Two Hearts Ultrasound Clinic: 3202 Hoyt Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4311; 425-252-6444; Diagnostic Imaging Centers Unlimited Handyman: 2120 Broadway, No. B, Everett, WA 98201-2320; Handyman Services USA Affordable Insurance Group: 3616 Colby Ave., No. 250, Everett, WA 98201-4773; Insurance Washington Notary Services Plus: 12712 Admiralty Way, No. B301, Everett, WA 982048014; Notaries-Public West Coast Beard Supply: 312 Crown Drive, Everett, WA 98203-1808; General Merchandise-Retail Yi Nuo Construction: 29 112th St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-5002; Construction Companies

4G Distributing: 422 82nd Ave. SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-3326; Distribution Services Blue Ribbon Builders: PO Box 333, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-0333; Building Contractors Blueline Photography: 12008 28th Place NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9163; Photography Carol Sue’s Catering: 1714 81st Ave. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-6450; Caterers Door Doctor Services: PO Box 85, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-0085; Doors-Repairing Falkauge Photography: 10628 60th St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8722; Photography Green Pursuits Bookkeeping: PO Box 1135, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-1135; Accounting and Bookkeeping General Services LK Restaurant Enterprises: 1512 72nd Drive SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-7357; Restaurants Lake Stevens Hot Dogs: 712 123rd Ave. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8024; Restaurants Lochsloy Kilnworks: 14319 71st Place NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9690; Kilns-Wholesale MRJ Painting: 9527 Chapel Hill Road, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-3966; Painters Malicious Women Candle Co: 2206 87th Drive NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-6474; Candles Mattress Warehouse: 11818 14th Place SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8188; Mattresses Mobile Mechanic: 5626 99th Ave. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-4107; Automobile Repairing and Service Newell Electrical: 1020 123rd Ave. SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9794; Electric Contractors North Sound Welding: 11509 128th Drive NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8354; Welding Om Yoga Northwest: 9623 32nd St. SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-5779; 425-397-3900; Yoga Instruction Pathways To Wellness: 1709 124th Ave. NE, No. 652, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-1825; Wellness Programs Radford Photography: 8924 First St. SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-3346; Photography Reilly Built: 502 125th Ave. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8179; Building Contractors Silva Construction: 7830 11th St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-3449; Construction Companies Urban Complex General Contractor: 621 Highway 9 NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8525; General Contractors

Gold Bar

Lynnwood

Alpine Countertops: 44212 Fir Road, Gold Bar, WA 98251-9352; Counter Tops Blazing Sisters: 428 Croft Ave. W, Gold Bar, WA 98251 Bouncing Broomstick: 14821 Moonlight Drive, Gold Bar, WA 98251-9582

AAM Flooring: 6510 208th St. SW, No. E1, Lynnwood, WA 98036-8537; Floor Laying Refinishing and Resurfacing Art For Sore Eyes: 15128 22nd Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6340; Optical Goods-Retail Aziz Import and Export: 12909 Mukilteo Speedway, No. N, Lynnwood, WA 98087-5266; Importers (Wholesale) Beaver Valley Electrical: PO Box 2161, Lynnwood, WA 98036-2161; Electric Contractors Blowing Leaf Landscapingg: 18910 20th Place W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4862; Landscape Contractors Briggs Game Shop: 3624 164th St. SW, No. 108, Lynnwood, WA 98087-7082; Games and Game Supplies Cascadia Sailing Services: 19031 33rd Ave. W, No. 207, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4731; Boat Clubs Circle Of Healing Aromatherapy: 14223 Meridian Place W, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6721; Holistic Practitioners Emerald Investment: 16409 54th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-3529; Investments Euro-Al Remodeling: 6502 208th St. SW, No. A8, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7431; Remodeling and Repairing Building Contractors Gotch’Ya Photography: 1530 173rd St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4036; Photography

Granite Falls CDL Construction: 17313 Engebretsen Road, Granite Falls, WA 98252-8608; Construction Companies FS Financial Strategies: 204 S Bogart Ave., Granite Falls, WA 98252-8788; 360-691-9030; Financial Advisory Services JB Cleaning: 20313 Menzel Lake Road, Granite Falls, WA 98252-9771; Janitor Service Live Love Dance: 5928 226th Drive NE, Granite Falls, WA 98252-9391; Dancing Instruction Luminescence Skin and Body: 224 Paradise Parkway, Granite Falls, WA 98252-8798; Skin Treatments MA Books: PO Box 407, Granite Falls, WA 98252-0407; Book Dealers-Retail Monte’s Wood Craft: 19908 Canyon Drive, Granite Falls, WA 98252-9537; Wood Products Northwest Demolition and Hauling: 18110 100th St. NE, Granite Falls, WA 98252-9616; Demolition Contractors

Z’s County Construction: 11416 181st Drive NE, Granite Falls, WA 98252-9681; Construction Companies

Lake Stevens


BUSINESS LICENSES Grill King Korean Bbq: 4210 198th St. SW, No. 201, Lynnwood, WA 98036-6737; Restaurants Herman Law Firm: 19020 33rd Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4746; 425-361-1273; Attorneys In House Accounting and Tax: 5116 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-6148; 425-6973674; Accounting Ipainting: 15631 Ash Way, No. C205, Lynnwood, WA 98087-5311; Painters Irma’s Salon: 15332 Highway 99, No. 7, Lynnwood, WA 98087-2390; 425-361-1459; Beauty Salons J Contracting: 16626 6th Ave. W, No. B203, Lynnwood, WA 98037-8801; Contractors Lash Artistry and Co: 1019 167th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-9316; Artists-Commercial M&C Diaz Construction: 17722 Spruce Way, Lynnwood, WA 98037-7431; Construction Mandarin Wonderland: 3116 164th St. SW, No. 904, Lynnwood, WA 98087-3249; Restaurants Mt Olive Development: 19505 44th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5658; 425-967-5191 NW Accountants Inc.: 19009 33rd Ave. W, No. 203, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4710; Accounting Neato! Organizers: 614 Logan Road, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7242; Business Services Not Elsewhere Classified Oscar’s Landscaping: 12221 Beverly Park Road, No. 16b, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1519; Landscape Contractors Punjab Transit: 14908 23rd Place W, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6331; Transit Lines Ramos Siding: 1730 147th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6040; Siding Contractors Selena’s Hair Salon: 3317 169th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-3254; Beauty Salons Starka Consulting: 6817 208th St. SW, No. 5388, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5800; Consultants Steel Blanket: 1110 213th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-8610; Welding and Steel Fabrication Top Gunner Academy Dog Training: 18109 36th Ave. W, No. F104, Lynnwood, WA 980373826; Dog Training Tortas Locas NW: 20801 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98036; Restaurants Ultimate Knits: 15907 Ash Way, No. C413, Lynnwood, WA 98087-5192; Knit Goods-Retail United Charter Buses: 3331 171st St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-9146; Buses-Charter and Rental Witch’s Brew Coffee: 13223 Beverly Park Road, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1615; Coffee Shops Yellow Cab: 4811 180th St. SW, No. D107, Lynnwood, WA 98037-3662; Taxicabs and Transportation Service

Marysville Barksy Bakery: 6332 95th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-2855; Pet Supplies and Foods-Retail Be Positive Life Coaching: 5957 Grove St., No. B, Marysville, WA 98270-3944; Counseling-Transformation Services Ferguson Property Inspection: 1010 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-9802; Real Estate Inspection Herban Mushroom: 14008 Fifth Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-8228; Mushrooms Independent Contractor: 14511 20th Drive NW, Marysville, WA 98271-8175; Contractors Indigo Mobile Massage For Women: 7913 86th Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-7417; Massage Therapists Let It Bee Natural: 1010 State Ave., No. 497, Marysville, WA 98270-6021; Holistic Practitioners Linda Conti Photography: 7516 83rd Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-7940; Photography Marysville Kids Dentistry: 505 Cedar Ave., No. C3, Marysville, WA 98270-4561; Dentists Marysville Window Wash: 12102 51st Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-8504; Window Cleaning McKenna Store: 18111 25th Ave. NE, No. NN102, Marysville, WA 98271-2906; General Merchandise-Retail Northwest Element Construction: 1117

47th Ave. NE, No. 208, Marysville, WA 98270; Construction Companies Pet Fence Battery Store: PO Box 956, Marysville, WA 98270-0956; Batteries-Storage-Retail Polk Mechanical: 5016 83rd Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-7064; Contractors Precision Repair Automotive: 10504 39th Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98271-7221; 360548-3028; Automobile Repairing and Service QT Rolls Crepes and Boba: 8344 74th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-4080; Restaurants Real Dill Produce: 1831 147th St. NW, Marysville, WA 98271-8150; Produce-Retail Red Zed Auto Parts: 3812 93rd Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-7231; Automobile Parts Right Choice Home Construction: 3627 Sunnyside Blvd., Marysville, WA 98270-9555; Construction Companies Solid Gold Tattoo: 11603 State Ave., No. A, Marysville, WA 98271-8465; 360-386-8995; Tattooing Tut Interpreting and Services: 8433 74th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-4081; Translators and Interpreters Wooden Metal Creations: 5018 73rd Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-8813; Metal Goods-Manufacturers ZNW Piercings: 12021 81st Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-7637; Ear Piercing Service

Mill Creek Compliance Integrity Solutions: 13400 Dumas Road, No. M2, Mill Creek, WA 980125586; Iso Certification Donnavin’s Music Studios: PO Box 13934, Mill Creek, WA 98082-1934; Recording Studios Dream Real Estate Group: PO Box 13433, Mill Creek, WA 98082-1433; Real Estate Management Elva Cosgrave Massage: 1212 144th Place SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-1384; Massage Therapists Frontier Project Management: 2111 140th Place SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-1306; Management Services Kiss and Stitch: 914 164th St. SE, No. 395, Mill Creek, WA 98012-6385; Embroidery Mill Creek News Room: 800 164th St. SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-6301; 425-361-1949; News Dealers Pine Brook Landscaping and Services: 2630 161st Place SE, Mill Creek, WA 980128034; Landscape Contractors Town and Country Markets Inc: 15605 Main St., Mill Creek, WA 98012-7373; 425357-3240; Food Markets

Monroe Amy Aldworth Photography: 13725 248th Ave. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-7274; Photography Bad Dog Espresso: 144 Woods St., Monroe, WA 98272-2328; Coffee Shops Bulldog Printing: 10528 Friar Creek Road, Monroe, WA 98272-7209; Printers Connor’s Fireworks: 1017 W Main St., No. D101, Monroe, WA 98272-2045; Fireworks (Wholesale) Fireplace Guy Hearth and Home: 26115 166th St. SE, No. B, Monroe, WA 98272-9319; Fireplaces First Step Flooring: 16570 155th St. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-2651; Floor Laying Hair By Amy Scofield: 23509 105th St. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-7750; Beauty Salons Harbor Freight Tools: 19139 U.S. 2, Monroe, WA 98272-1531; 360-794-1130; ToolsNew and Used Heston Door Services Inc.: 17461 147th St. SE, Monroe, WA 98272; 360-805-4970; Doors JLK Realty: 14911 Chain Lake Road, No. M330, Monroe, WA 98272-8766; Real Estate JR Car Wash and Detials: 18710 Blueberry Lane, No. D, Monroe, WA 98272-1300; Car Washing and Polishing Lisa Freimark Performance: 24027 Old Owen Road, Monroe, WA 98272-9604; Training Consultants Meadows Mobile Notary: 20377 Springbrook Road SE, Monroe, WA 98272-7233; Notaries-Public

AUGUST 2017

Powers Marine Co: 22917 105th St. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-7706; 360-805-4685; Marine Equipment and Supplies Rosemary Spa: 19999 U.S. 2, Monroe, WA 98272-2338; Health Spas Xando Cards: 28916 104th Place SE, Monroe, WA 98272-9597; Greeting Cards-Retail

Mountlake Terrace Centerline Homes: 22803 44th Ave. W, PMB 253, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-5032; Home Builders MPG Siding and More: 22813 Lakeview Drive, No. F215, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-2837; Siding Contractors Mesky Dental Care: 22406 40th Place W, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-4512; Dentists She Delivers: 4008 212th St. SW, No. A206, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-3576; Delivery Service Tribal Technology Training: 7104 230th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-2310; Training Consultants

Mukilteo AP Deals: 4758 Park Drive, No. 111, Mukilteo, WA 98275-6073; General Merchandise Bird Dog Ales: 6013 Championship Circle, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5031; Beer and Ale-Retail Braddington Soaps: 9509 49th Place W, No. 29a, Mukilteo, WA 98275-3746; Soaps and Detergents-Manufacturers Edgar Rock Publishing: 12716 61st Ave. W, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5552; Publishers MAS Transportation: 4840 Park Drive, No. 304, Mukilteo, WA 98275-6069; Transportation Maintain Loop Ranch: 10704 64th Place W, Mukilteo, WA 98275-4556; Ranches My Lashes and Brows: 7120 48th Ave. W, Mukilteo, WA 98275-2550; Eyelashes-Artificial Scott’s Painting and Exterior: 13032 42nd Ave. W, Mukilteo, WA 98275-8600; Painters Translator: 13412 47th Place W, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5855; Translators and Interpreters

Quil Ceda Village Fun Usual Suspects: 8825 34th Ave. NE, No. L343, Quil Ceda Village, WA 98271-8085 OSE Properties: 8825 34th Ave. NE, No. L383, Quil Ceda Village, WA 98271-8085; Real Estate Management

Silvana Council-Nurse Educators: PO Box 271, Silvana, WA 98287-0271; Educational Service-Business

Snohomish Ascension Painting-Restoration: 13007 Seattle Hill Road, Snohomish, WA 98296-5294; Painters BTL Construction: 14200 69th Drive SE, No. E3, Snohomish, WA 98296-6947; Construction Companies Binky Beads: 22509 N Carpenter Road, Snohomish, WA 98290-9514; Beads-Retail Blue Orchard Apothecary: 8025 144th Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-9018; Pharmacies CHE Investments: 13119 Seattle Hill Road, Snohomish, WA 98296-3400; 425-337-4950; Investments Child Psychological Services PLLC: 20113 53rd St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-7121; Psychologists Die Hard Custom Paint: 7526 89th Ave. SE, No. B, Snohomish, WA 98290-1610; Paint-Retail Dreamtime Earthworks: 8003 164th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-8719; Excavating Contractors ECS Automotive: 12718 238th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-3972; Automobile Repairing and Service Elle Kennedy Photography: 16525 50th St. NE, Snohomish, WA 98290-4675; Photography Full Metal Gun Shop: 18121 103rd St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-6392; Guns and Gunsmiths

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 29

Have Pencil Will Travel: 1012 Grant Place, Snohomish, WA 98290-2535; Travel Agencies and Bureaus Home Check Solutions: 2120 Bickford Ave., Snohomish, WA 98290-1705; Real Estate Inspection IWS Construction: 6828 81st Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-5824; Construction Companies Images By Kim Photography: 9425 56th St. SE, No. 10, Snohomish, WA 98290-9246; Photography Imperial Yoga: 5702 E Wishon Road, Snohomish, WA 98290-8597; Yoga Instruction Keplinger Drums: 7220 89th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-1604 Omega Flooring: 20230 87th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-5119; Floor Laying Refinishing and Resurfacing Rubi and Carmen Cleaning Co: 13118 Lost Lake Road, No. 5, Snohomish, WA 982965410; Janitor Service Seattle Mega Games: 14417 228th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-5452; Games and Game Supplies Wilde Beauty: 15026 Broadway Ave., Snohomish, WA 98296-7079; Beauty Salons Wyevern Mercantyle: 1429 Ave. D, No. 441, Snohomish, WA 98290-1742 Yesterdaze News Photography: 11811 59th Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-6965; Photography

Stanwood David Bell Photography: PO Box 446, Stanwood, WA 98292-0446; Photography Definitive Homes: 9722 272nd Place NW, No. 14, Stanwood, WA 98292-8063; Builders Dixie Yacht: PO Box 187, Stanwood, WA 98292-0187; Yachts Grandma Foxy’s Jewelry Designs: PO Box 54, Stanwood, WA 98292-0054; Jewelers-Retail Hooks Academy: 21301 81st Ave. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-7884 J&J Junktion: 6104 174th St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-6904; Junk-Dealers Lost Lake Supplements: 7016 Lakewood Road, Stanwood, WA 98292-8926; Vitamin and Food Supplements Mountain Wave Aviation: 24032 Seventh Ave. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-4709; Aviation Consultants NW New Construction Excavating: 9109 271st St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-5999; 360-572-4486; Excavating Contractors Parkside Association: 27821 36th Ave. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-9461; Associations Rain City Fitness: 27207 28th Ave. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-9411 Storybridge Publications: 8329 319th St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-5835; Publishers (Manufacturers) T Beck Construction: 2710 196th St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-6882; Construction Companies

Sultan Oasis Farms: 36023 160th St. SE, Sultan, WA 98294-7716; Farms PPG Landscaping: 601 Alder Ave., Sultan, WA 98294-7000; Landscape Contractors

Tulalip A&C Glass and Windows: 8205 Shoemaker Road, Tulalip, WA 98271-9623; Glass-Auto Plate and Window and Etc. AP General Contracting: 3201 Mission Beach Road, Tulalip, WA 98271-9736; Contractors Lighthouse Adult Family Homes: 13619 30th Ave. NW, Tulalip, WA 98271-7061; Residential Care Homes Samurai Teas: 12608 Marine Drive, Tulalip, WA 98271-6011; Coffee and Tea TnT Home Improvement: 7327 Hermosa Beach Road, Tulalip, WA 98271-6106; Home Improvements Volkovv Games: 1729 Delia Jimicum Place NW, Tulalip, WA 98271-7088; Games and Game Supplies


30 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

AUGUST 2017

SNOHOMISH COUNTY ECONOMIC DATA Pending sales, residential real estate

Closed sales, residential real estate

Unemployment rate, percent

Continued unemployment claims

Aerospace employment

Construction employment

Professional services employment

Local sales tax distributions, Snohomish County and incorporated cities

Consumer price index, King and Snohomish counties

12/12

872

892

6.6

9,351

47,100

15,900

23,100

$4,378,797

237.99

01/13

1,154

713

7.1

9,962

46,800

15,600

22,600

$4,466,777

02/13

1,236

673

6.3

9,182

46,600

15,300

22,500

$5,680,845

03/13

1,576

932

5.7

9,060

46,400

15,400

22,500

$4,093,977

04/13

1,500

1,020

4.9

8,891

46,100

15,500

22,900

$3,970,313

05/13

1,487

1,131

4.7

8,093

45,500

15,800

22,700

$4,725,432

06/13

1,488

1,159

5.7

7,888

45,700

16,200

22,900

$4,316,634

07/13

1,470

1,141

5.6

7,787

45,900

18,000

24,000

$4,584,288

08/13

1,402

1,143

6.2

7,062

44,900

18,400

24,000

$4,921,104

09/13

1,150

1,032

N/A

7,180

45,100

18,300

24,000

$3,573,194

10/13

1,219

1,041

6.0

7,149

44,500

18,200

23,900

$4,998,366

11/13

1,010

833

5.7

7,499

44,300

17,900

24,200

$5,132,975

12/13

835

871

5.3

8,829

44,700

17,800

24,000

$3,348,852

01/14

1,195

615

6.0

9,651

44,000

14,500

23,300

$3,382,321

02/14

1,180

688

6.4

8,850

43,700

14,800

23,100

$4,087,089

03/14

1,481

949

6.0

8,897

43,700

14,800

23,400

$3,013,059

04/14

1,454

943

4.9

8,069

43,400

14,800

23,100

$2,923,521

05/14

1,718

1,074

5.0

7,502

43,600

15,100

23,100

$3,370,904

06/14

1,545

1,220

5.1

7,177

44,400

15,400

23,300

$3,290,880

07/14

1,457

1,172

5.3

6,587

44,000

18,400

23,500

$3,474,651

08/14

1,393

1,163

5.4

6,244

43,000

18,800

23,800

$3,695,926

09/14

1,328

1,057

5.1

N/A

42,900

18,800

23,800

$3,838,762

10/14

1,327

1,113

4.8

N/A

41,400

18,300

24,200

$3,663,750

11/14

1,027

885

4.8

6,093

41,800

18,000

24,100

$3,852,205

12/14

956

920

4.5

N/A

42,000

17,700

24,100

$3,582,032

1/15

1,237

686

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$3,280,200

2/15

1,406

740

5.3

6,663

43,000

17,200

23,700

$4,146,999

3/15

1,938

1,075

4.5

6,762

42,800

17,500

24,000

$2,981,599

4/15

1,747

1,272

3.6

6,273

42,800

18,100

24,100

$3,041,795

5/15

1,777

1,315

4.0

5,923

42,800

18,600

24,000

$3,654,693

6/15

1,799

1,374

4.3

5,607

42,700

19,200

24,400

$3,445,201

7/15

1,764

1,411

4.3

5,323

44,100

20,700

25,000

$3,590,957

8/15

1,634

1,442

3.9

5,367

43,600

21,200

25,300

$11,743,713

9/15

1,501

1,290

4.1

5,089

43,600

21,200

25,200

$11,603,019

10/15

1,503

1,178

4.5

5,109

43,400

20,400

25,100

$10,854,566

11/15

1,307

973

5.0

5,748

43,500

20,100

24,900

$11,503,562

12/15

1,067

1,189

5.0

6,193

43,600

19,800

25,300

$10,765,437

1/16

1,249

811

5.7

7,085

43,600

19,300

24,500

$10,477,405

2/16

1,475

848

5.3

6,388

43,500

19,600

24,500

$13,559,687

3/16

1,825

1,156

5.2

6,084

43,100

20,000

24,800

$9,496,443

4/16

1,836

1,213

4.4

5,957

43,300

19,800

25,600

$9,617,406

5/16

1,979

1,386

4.8

5,770

43,300

20,300

25,800

$11,697,044

6/16

1,862

1,493

4.7

5,396

43,800

21,000

26,400

$10,816,389

7/16

1,795

1,515

4.8

5,489

44,000

21,700

26,400

$11,102,633

8/16

1.873

1,538

4.4

5,502

43,900

22,100

26,500

$12,493,656

9/16

1,601

1,431

4.3

5,377

43,500

22,200

26,500

$12,193,233

10/16

1,561

1,364

4.0

5,502

42,100

22,800

26,700

$12,195,581

11/16

1,314

1,270

4.2

5,774

42,100

22,500

26,600

$12,515,314

12/16

1,104

1,145

3.9

6,187

42,100

22,300

26,600

$11,120,365

1/17

1,238

938

4.2

8,226

41,800

21,200

26,500

$11,114,968

2/17

1,296

904

3.7

6,551

41,200

21,500

26,200

$14,139,163

3/17

1,614

1,167

3.5

6,245

41,300

21,700

27,600

$10,378,749

4/17

1,527

1,116

3.1

6,247

40,400

22,000

28,000

$10,024,215

5/17

1,948

1,394

3.5

5,661

39,900

22,300

28,000

$12,095,386

6/17

1,957

1,558

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$24,623,583*

*Now includes Regional Transit Authority Sales Tax

239.90

240.82

242.82

242.77

242.78

241.05

242.77

246.61

247.64

247.18

247.854

245.05

245.496

247.611

251.622

251.617

250.831

250.385

250.942

253.815

256.098

256.907

256.941

256.821

259.503 261.560

263.756


AUGUST 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 31

ECONOMIC DATA Boeing stock price

PUD retail electricity use, kilowatt hours

Snohomish County PUD connections

New vehicle registrations

Average gas price (regular, unleaded

12/12

$75.36

614,283,104

234

3,636

$3.34

01/13

$73.87

700,861,857

223

4,656

$3.37

02/13

$76.90

674,618,017

316

3,753

$3.62

03/13

$85.85

608,606,315

330

4,713

$3.80

04/13

$91.41

617,541,384

321

4,943

$3.64

05/13

$99.05

492,112,324

276

5,256

$3.83

06/13

$102.32

465,163,451

213

5,275

$3.79

07/13

$105.10

453,404,099

322

5,622

$3.82

08/13

$103.92

470,067,543

232

5,742

$3.78

09/13

$117.50

410,719,601

338

5,141

$3.65

10/13

$138.36

518,766,206

461

5,179

$3.44

11/13

$133.83

461,012,493

447

4,083

$3.24

12/13

$136.92

671,835,200

244

4,752

$3.29

01/14

$125.26

696,306,571

421

5,726

$3.36

02/14

$128.92

682,348,469

386

4,467

$3.31

03/14

$125.49

610,841,349

352

5,428

$3.75

04/14

$129.02

605,381,115

368

6,389

$3.74

05/14

$135.25

468,754,469

466

6,542

$3.87

06/14

$127.23

492,917,254

412

6,626

$3.93

07/14

$120.48

432,682,894

444

6,611

$3.95

08/14

$126.80

463,314,006

363

5,614

$3.83

09/14

$127.38

451,089,566

264

5,987

$3.74

10/14

$124.91

496,335,315

403

5,929

$3.40

11/14

$134.36

422,769,229

426

4,867

$3.04

12/14

$132.25

663,368,433

426

6,072

$2.88

1/15

$145.37

634,592,067

209

6,364

$2.30

2/15

$150.85

611,633,434

287

5,889

$2.30

3/15

$150.08

567,831,393

284

7,707

$2.85

4/15

$143.34

578,264,358

427

8,057

$2.70

5/15

$140.52

449,046,426

326

8,649

$3.05

6/15

$138.72

494,611,488

384

9,852

$3.10

7/15

$144.17

451,503,602

334

7,641

$3.20

8/15

$130.68

474,207,621

242

7,021

$3.09

9/15

$130.95

557,429,310

442

7,018

$2.79

10/15

$148.07

477,438,877

217

6,828

$2.49

11/15

$145.45

491,536,717

221

5,631

$2.41

12/15

$144.59

686,858,030

282

6,995

$2.35

1/16

$120.13

634,697,183

333

6,910

$2.33

2/16

$118.18

655,390,592

333

7,298

$2.02

3/16

$126.94

612,151,814

288

9,209

$2.12

4/16

$134.80

514,320,049

428

8,364

$2.25

5/16

$126.15

457,566,044

342

8,906

$2.44

6/16

$129.87

463,105,233

277

10,754

$2.57

7/16

$133.66

430,295,041

435

8,268

$2.56

8/16

$129.45

467,001,501

325

8,315

$2.49

9/16

$131.74

454,085,665

394

7,628

$2.60

10/16

$142.43

452,214,305

401

6,861

$2.64

11/16

$150.56

495,372,342

331

6,360

$2.59

12/16

$155.68

658,223,433

620

6,663

$2.47

1/17

$163.42

783,258,995

512

7,048

$2.69

2/17

$180.23

653,923,271

537

6,279

$2.67

3/17

$176.86

692,459,353

533

9,462

$2.73

4/17

$184.83

530,371,921

324

8,364

$2.79

5/17

$187.63

497,975,765

579

8,869

$2.44

6/17

$197.75

463,060,012

399

10,754

N/A

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32 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

AUGUST 2017

Mike Morse, Morse Steel 4th generation owner Runner Sports dad

Each and every one of us is an original. Shaped by unique inuences that make us who we are today. Here at Heritage Bank, we think differences can build a better bank, too. That’s why we share the best ideas from across all of our branches and local communities with one goal in mind: to serve our customers better every day. By sharing our strengths, we’re able to offer customers like Mike Morse—and you—more than a community bank. But rather, a community oƒ banks.

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Herald Business Journal - 08.01.2017  

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