Page 1

Inspiring: Women who shaped Boeing • 4

Doubling down Tulalip chairwoman talks details about $100 million new casino • 8-9

SEPTEMBER 2017 | VOL. 20, NO. 6

Supplement to The Daily Herald

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2 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2017

REPORT REPORT Port of EVERETT

CALENDAR E V E R Y F R I DAY: Food Trucks @ South Marina

Creating Economic Opportunities

E V E R Y S U N DAY: Farmer's Market @ Boxcar Park T H R U L A B O R DAY: Jetty Island Days S E P T. 8-10: Mukilteo Lighthouse Festival S E P T. 9: Wheels on the Waterfront Car Show S E P T. 12/19: Port Commission Mtgs S E P T. 30: Walk to End Alzheimer's View complete list of events at: www.portofeverett.com/events

EXECUTIVE

The Port's 2018 operating and capital budget planning is in full swing. View the budget schedule at www.portofeverett.com/budget.

SEAPORT

Design engineering for the South Terminal Upgrades is wrapping up. The Port expects to seek construction bids this Fall.

September 2017

New Guiding Principles Set Vision for the Marina of the Future In July 2017, the Port Commission adopted Guiding Principles to set the stage for the Marina of the Future. The Guiding Principles were developed by a citizen Ad Hoc Committee made up of a diverse group of boaters, business owners, engineers and developers. The group met over a six-month period to take a deep dive into the current status and future vision for the Marina. The following Guiding Principles are the result of this process, and will help form the Marina Business Plan in the coming years.

• •

Support year-round activity on the waterfront and fund an active promotional campaign Deploy innovative lease, management, finance, and construction options, including privatization, to achieve financial sustainability

• • • • • • •

Integrate upland vessel storage and inwater moorage Consider the application of tiered service levels reflected in fee structure for moorage Keep marina moorage rates competitive with other public and private marinas in the region Design and build new marina facilities to be flexible in response to market changes Provide moorage and services that support both commercial and recreational vessels Design marina facilities to work with, not in opposition to, the natural hydraulic and sediment conditions Develop user-friendly connectivity between marina basins and downtown Everett

WATERFRONT PLACE CONSTRUCTION UPDATE

MARINA

In July, the Marina had its busiest month at the guest docks ever with 1,703 nights of guest moorage. This brings the year to date total to more than 4,100. This time in 2014, the total annual guest moorage was 2,708.

REAL ESTATE

Port contractor, SRV Construction, will mobilize on site at Riverside Business Park mid-tolate September to begin construction of the new 8th Street access road and trail system. Commissioners Troy McClelland/District 1 Tom Stiger/District 2 Glen Bachman/District 3 1942156

Fisherman's Harbor Public Infrastructure

City's Grand Avenue Park Bridge Construction Begins

The Port of Everett's public infrastructure work at Fisherman’s Harbor is on-track for completion in early-2018. Currently crews are focused on forming and paving all site roadways, sidewalks and esplanade features, as well as installing landscape irrigation and placing mulch. They are also making headway on construction of Pacific Rim Plaza, including forming hardscapes for the plaza planter boxes, installing benches and configuring piping and utilities for the splash fountain feature.

City contractor, Interwest Construction, has started mobilizing equipment on-site to begin construction of the Grand Avenue Park Bridge. The first phase of the project will take place within a designated work area on Port property, which includes a portion of Port Gardner Landing and a small area of the parking lot adjacent to Lombardi's. Public access around the site has been re-routed to accommodate construction. The project is anticipated for completion in late-2018. More at www.everettwa.gov/gapb.

CEO/Executive Director Les Reardanz

L E A R N M O R E & S TAY U P TO DAT E @

W W W. P O R TO F E V E R E T T.C O M S TAY U P DAT E D DA I LY ! Follow the Port of Everett on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube & Instagram


SEPTEMBER 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 3

TABLE OF CONTENTS

When you think banking...

COURTESY OF BOEING

Look to women such as Ellen Church and others past and present at Boeing for inspiration or to serve as role models. Page 4.

COVER STORY

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Tulalip Tribes are planning to build a 110,000-square-foot replacement for Quil Ceda Creek Casino, 8-9

James McCusker: Productivity data have uses, limitations . . . . . . . . . . . 14

BUSINESS NEWS

Monika Kristofferson: What really matters in life. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Women at Boeing who should be remembered. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Snohomish’s SisAdmin founder helps untangle IT knots. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Bob’s Burgers new owner started as dishwasher. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Edmonds shop mixes honey with juice-infused water . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Snohomish inventor makes device to help hotel workers change beds. . . 11 Owner of Edmonds’ Chermak Construction sells business. . . . . . . 12

Tom Hoban: Why owning property is key to liberty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Andrew Ballard: Before starting ad campaign, do this exercise. . . . . . . 16

BUSINESS BRIEFS . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 PUBLIC RECORDS . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 BANKRUPTCIES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

ECONOMIC DATA . . . . . . . . . 22-23

Editor: Jim Davis 425-339-3097; jdavis@heraldnet.com; businessnews@heraldnet.com

Jody Knoblich 425-374-0758 — Fax 425-339-3049 jknoblich@soundpublishing.com

Publisher Josh O’Connor 425-339-3007 joconnor@soundpublishing.com

COVER PHOTO Tulalip Tribes Chairwoman Marie Zackuse stands in the boardroom for the tribes. Andy Bronson / The Herald

CAMANO ISLAND DARRINGTON DOWNTOWN - EVERETT EVERGREEN WAY - EVERETT FREELAND MARYSVILLE MONROE SILVER LAKE - EVERETT SMOKEY POINT SNOHOMISH STANWOOD SULTAN

BUSINESS LICENSES . . . . . . . 20-21

ADVERTISING SALES

Contributing Columnists: James McCusker Monika Kristofferson, Tom Hoban, Andrew Ballard

We’d like to be on your mind...

PEOPLE WATCHING . . . . . . . . . . 17

NEWSROOM

Contributing Writers: Jennifer Sasseen, Deanna Duff, Victoria Buritsch-Tompkins

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E IC V ER AL S LL SON SS U F ER NE NT P SI ME U B IRE T RE

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4 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2017

Women of Boeing who

Inspire

COURTESY OF MOHAI

By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

I

t’s such a good idea that it needs to be copied. Lego created the Women of NASA Lego set earlier this year to shed light on women who have played historical and critical roles in the space program. The set with five Lego figurines aims to promote women whose contributions are unknown or underappreciated. It also encourages a new generation of girls to explore the fields of science, technology, engineering or mathematics, commonly known as the STEM professions. Science writer Maia Weinstock came up with the concept in the Lego Ideas competition, which allows fans to submit ideas that potentially could be turned into Lego sets. But this is a Boeing town — and a Funko town. So which women historical and present day should be immortalized with Funko figures? The book “Trailblazers: The Women of the Boeing Company” offers an excellent summary of the women who pioneered aerospace for the company. Here are five nominees: Ellen Church: The preeminent woman of Boeing’s early days, Church was a pilot and a nurse who approached the company seeking to fly an airplane commercially. Boeing Air Transport, as it was called then, didn’t hire her, but was intrigued by another of her ideas. Church recommended putting nurses on airplanes to combat the fear of flying. She was hired as the company’s head stewardess and she recruited other women who eventually came to be called the sky girls. The concept of flight

COURTESY OF BOEING

COURTESY OF BOEING

COURTESY OF ANN JOYCE

Pictured clockwise from top are Bessie Marie Dempsey, Capt. Suzanna DarceyHennemann, Annabella Morgan, Elizabeth Lund and Ellen Church. FILE PHOTO

attendants has become a staple of the industry. Church eventually did get in the pilot’s seat — flying a Model 80A for 20 hours from Chicago to San Francisco. She then served as a captain in the Army Nurse Corps during World War II. Annabella Morgan: Rosie the Riveter is almost synonmous with Boeing’s efforts during World War II. Thousands of woman flocked to the Puget Sound area to build the planes that helped win the war. One of those women was Annabella Morgan, who rode the train from

New Orleans to Seattle shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941. She was hired at Boeing as a “rivet bucker” for B-17s, becoming part of a wave of African-American Rosies. Morgan was promoted to riveter with a pay increase from 99 cents to $1.29 an hour. She recalls in the “Trailblazers” book the clapping and cheering when President Harry Truman announced the war was over. Her job ended shortly after that. Bessie Marie Dempsey: In 1974, Boeing employed 330 women as engineers. That has grown to the thousands.

The first woman to work as an aeronautical engineer at Boeing was Bessie Marie Dempsey. She started her career as a ballerina, vaudeville dancer and Hollywood star. She was a dancer in “A Night at the Opera” with the Marx Brothers, according to “Trailblazers.” But she gave up the entertainment career to study mechanical engineering. She graduated in the top 10 percent of her class and joined Boeing in 1948. She worked for the company for 24 years. Suzanna Darcy-Hennemann: Capt. Darcy-Hennemann joined Boeing in 1974 as an engineer, but her career would

take her to the skies. In 1985, she became the first woman hired as a test pilot at Boeing. In 1989, she became the first woman rated as a captain on the 747-400. In 2005, she and her crew flew a 777-200LR from Hong Kong to London, breaking the distance record in the greater-than661,000-pound weight class. She was the first woman to join the elite Boeing Engineering Flight Test group. She would later serve as Boeing’s chief training pilot for more than 550 instructors worldwide. Elizabeth Lund: As one of the top Boeing

executives in Snohomish County, Lund stands out. She’s been the vice president and general manager of the 777 program in Everett since 2013. In the role, she leads the design, development, certification, production and delivery of all models of the Boeing 777 airplanes in production. Lund trained as a mechanical engineer and has held leadership positions in engineering, program management, manufacturing, and supplier management across Boeing Commercial Airplanes. She earlier headed the 747 program and worked on the Air Force KC-X tanker program.


SEPTEMBER 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 5

Snohomish IT founder aims to save day SisAdmin provides tech support for small- and medium-sized companies By Deanna Duff For The Herald Business Journal

SNOHOMISH — At 11 years old, Mary Burris had a clear vision for her future. She wanted to own her own business, and envisioned a tight-knit team of employees working to make a difference. Hopefully it would become part of a vibrant community with smalltown charm. Burris made dreams reality. She founded SisAdmin in 2000, which provides IT support to small- and medium-sized businesses ranging from accounting firms to construction companies. Cli-

1944950

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

SisAdmin owner Mary Burris stands in firm’s new location on Cedar Avenue in Snohomish. The company provides IT support to small- and medium-sized businesses ranging from accounting firms to construction companies.

ents average 20 to 100 computer networks with SisAdmin serving networks upwards of 200. SisAdmin’s staff of 12 includes family members, but everyone is made to

feel like family. “All of it is a dream come true,” Burris says. “This profession is my passion. I’m one of those lucky people who gets to do what they love.”

As a young woman, Burris was initially drawn to graphic and computer-aided design. It was the 1980s and Max Headroom, a computer-generated character,

was inspiring imaginations including Burris. However, a clear career path did not yet exist, so she redirected towards IT. “I think most people in the IT world, especially in

the service part, want to be the hero. We want to help save the day for people,” Burris says. “Solving puzzles is the other aspect. I like taking messy networks and making sense of it. It’s like a big knot that you untie and transform the chaos into order.” IT support is crucial to a company’s success. Seattle’s Johnson Barrow, Inc. specializes in HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) with offices in Washington, Oregon and British Columbia. As the company has grown, SisAdmin has provided support and helped connect Johnson Barrow’s regional offices. “If our tech goes down, it’s terribly bad,” says Tony Melchoir, controller at Johnson Barrow. “Pricing modules are on factory specific software, so we’re basically incapacitated if the network goes down. It’s vital that we’re up and running at all times.” Melchoir appreciates Continued on Page 6


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SEPTEMBER 2017

Edmonds shop to bee all it can bee By Victoria Buritsch-Tompkins

the great honey spill, Eric Butler created his first sample of honey, water, and a hint of fruit and had his wife try as the first sample. “I was sold,” she recalled. Pre-production was 2012 for Hunniwater, and some of their first products were launched in Cafe Ladro and PCC Markets in 2013, adding their Detox line in 2014. “We started working on the store in 2015,” said Karin of the soft launch of the storefront in Edmonds. The grand launch of Hunniwater

location followed in February 2016. Hunniwater Detox flavors include matcha (think green tea), ginger cayenne, lemon and cinnamon. “You have to give them all a good shake,” Karin Butler said, regarding the mixture’s tendency to settle at the bottom. The couple continue to try to market their drink lines. The drinks are sold only in Washington state stores, but they’re hoping to get the drinks sold in Oregon and California. They’re experimenting with more flavors. One of Karin Butler’s favorites is a charcoal cherry. As it hasn’t yet been launched in other locations, hardcore Hunniwater fans have to go straight to the Edmonds store to request it. It’s really a collaborative process for the couple. The role of the Tastemaker is owned by Eric, where Karin’s experience in science has helped formula current and past drinks to scale. She also runs the social media and storefront, where Eric manages some of the wholesale distribution aspects. “We kind of all work together until things go out,” Karin Butler described their tagteam process. “It’s not ready until it’s ready. But we love it. As hard as it is, it’s definitely like another baby for us, and it’s so lucky that we get to do this.”

back into the working world, she brought me on, retrained me as needed and I’ve grown in different areas of the company.” Clark’s daughter sometimes accompanies her to work and has marveled that, “Your boss is a girl?” The company’s next chapter could include expansion. The client base already extends from north in Bellingham to Portland, Oregon. Options haven’t been formally researched, but additional offices could eventually be on the horizon while remaining headquartered in Snohomish County. SisAdmin’s recently relocated from the Mill Creek/Bothell area to the heart of down-

town Snohomish. Their new home is a 1908 historic building. At just more than 8,000 square feet, Burris foresees SisAdmin sharing the space with other tenants. The move also signals the final realization of Burris’ childhood dreams. She now owns a business located on the corner of a bustling community. “I love Snohomish. It’s actually growing quite a bit. You can see a lot of renovation and revitalization in the old downtown area. “We’re within walking distance from the farmers market and in the midst of such a good community. It’s a great place to be,” Burris says.

For The Herald Business Journal

EDMONDS — The latest line of energy drinks by Karin and Eric Butler came about by accident. Literally. The couple’s 4-year-old with his stuffed monkey, Nibble, knocked over a half-gallon honey container on the carpet in the living room of their Edmonds home. “That’s it, Hunniwater, write that down,” Eric Butler told his wife at the time. He used the accident as inspiration to create a drink that mixes raw honey and juice-infused water. From that, they launched Hunniwater line of beverages. Their current active line is the Hunniwater Detox drink. The Butlers tout the drinks as the perfect blend of sweetness and hydration. The drinks comes in several flavors that can be purchased at PCC Markets, Safeway and QFC. They’ve also started a honey-themed retail shop called Hunni Co. at 186 Sunset Ave. in Edmonds. At the shop, the couple sell art, apparel, honey bottles, candles and other products inspired by bees, honeycombs and honey. And of course, customers can pick up one of their signature drinks, and try new flavors as they come out. Continued from Page 5

the level of service that comes from supporting a fellow, Northwest business. “I can call and directly speak to someone right away. It’s nice knowing the actual people who are running it and supporting a local, small business rather than being outsourced by a giant conglomerate,” Melchoir says. Such customer loyalty speaks to the success of SisAdmin’s business approach. The path to a productive bottom line is a blend of competency and customer service. “Sales are through the roof this year and people have asked what we’re

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Karin and Eric Butler created a line of specialty drinks called Hunni Water Detox (picture below) and have opened a honey-themed retail shop, Hunni Co., near the Edmonds waterfront.

The Butlers have been experimenting with speciality drinks for a while. Eric Butler, 44, had previously launched the mint-flavored-water

Osmosis about a decade ago and Eric’s Famous Energy Drink between 2010 and 2012. The couple have been through it all together,

having met at a party on the UW campus in April 1999. They fell in love, and got married in May 2003. None of the other of the drinks had taken off quite like Hunniwater. As a matter of fact, the Butlers were struggling with his Eric’s Famous Energy Drink. “I felt like it was time to make a change,” says Eric. “It’s was kinda like it was always there, always the next big thing.” While Karin was prepping her resume for realworld jobs at the time of

doing differently,” Burris says. “I think we’re just concentrating even more on what we do well. I communicate with customers like they’re friends.I treat them with respect and kindness. I approach people how I want to be approached.” Due to booming success, SisAdmin is having to revise their five-year goals and business plan. From January to July 2017, the company had already overshot expectations and nearly doubled their monthly recurring revenue. “People are tired of just being a number. As the world and IT gets bigger, people are circling back to wanting a personal touch.

We’re both high quality and hands-on with our clients,” says Elisabeth Clark, SisAdmin’s virtual chief information officer. In 2017, SisAdmin internally restructured to address their growth. As CEO, Burris stepped away from a close focus on day-to-day operations and personally overseeing client projects, operations and workflow. She is now focused on sales development and steering the company’s overall course. Her leadership as a female role model is also important to the wider tech community. Early in her career, Burris built and repaired PCs. She experienced male customers demanding

that they “didn’t want a woman working on their computer.” “There are women in other positions, but not as much on the technical or ownership sides,” Burris says. SisAdmin’s staff includes female employees working all aspects of the business. Clark performed IT work in the military for 21 years and was a stay-at-home parent for seven years. She joined SisAdmin’s team four years ago. “I’ve experienced the negative aspects of being a female in the IT field,” Clark says. “Mary nurtures the growth of everyone’s career. She recognizes there are seasons of life. When I was coming


SEPTEMBER 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 7

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COVER STORY

Tulalips unveil $100M casino plan The 110,000-square-foot replacement for Quil Ceda Creek Casino could open as soon as 2018 or 2019 By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

T

he Tulalip Tribes plan to break ground later this year on a $100 million replacement for Quil Ceda Creek Casino. It’s the next big project for the tribes, which have grown into an economic powerhouse and one of the largest employers in Snohomish County. The 110,000-square-foot casino — which is being called informally QCC2 — will be built directly across the street from the existing casino at 6410 33rd Ave. NE, Tulalip. The casino will feature new entertainment and dining options, a spacious gaming floor and a 1,200-stall garage with a fast-ramp access. Tulalip Tribes chairwoman Marie Zackuse sees it complementing Tulalip Resort Casino, which sits about three miles north and draws visitors from all over the West. “It’s time for a new one,” Zackuse said. “We’re going to keep it as the locals’ casino and cater to what they like. It will be more entertainment and more food venues, but keeping that feel for the locals.” By comparison, QCC2 will be only a little less than two-thirds the size of the 192,000-square-foot Tulalip Resort Casino. The footprint for the new Quil Ceda Creek Casino covers 15 acres and will be built on land now occupied by the old Arby’s at 6328 33rd Ave. NE as well as the Tulalip Court and police department at 6103 31st Ave. The tribal courts and police department are going to move into the former Hewlitt-Packard building on 31st Street,

which is undergoing an extensive remodel. “The courthouse and police department, their area has doubled and it’s beautiful,” said Teri Gobin, vice chairwoman for the tribes. “It’s going to be really nice when we get done with it.” If all goes as planned, the tribes will start work on the new Quil Ceda Creek Casino later this year. It will be finished in late 2018 or early 2019. After it opens, the tribes will tear down the casino across the street. What will open there? “To be announced,” Gobin said. “We have dreams in our head, we all have dreams, we all have these visions, we have to be together to make sure we’re together in our vision.” Marysville Mayor John Nehring said the city has known for years the tribes have been planning to replace Quil Ceda Creek Casino. In the past year, the city has become aware that the project was imminent. It’s important to note that the city of Marysville receives no revenue from these projects, Nehring said. “That being said I full recognize that there are benefits with jobs and services and economic opportunity for both people in Marysville and Tulalip,” Nehring said. “We view ourselves as a close knit community and a lot of our partnerships with the Tulalips are built around trying to find ways to benefit both sides of the freeway.” The city does benefit — and tries to capitalize — on secondary visits from people headed to the casinos or the outlet mall. He notes that there is one five-story hotel under construction; two more multiple-story hotels are

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Tulalip Tribes Chairwoman Marie Zackuse announces plans for the tribes to build a 110,000-square-foot, $100 million casino to replace Quil Ceda Creek Casino. She said the aging casino serves locals and they want to offer those people a top venue.

in the permitting phase in Marysville. All the hotels are in close proximity to the casinos. The new casino shows the tribes’ continued growth as one of the economic engines in the county, said Patrick Pierce, CEO and president of Economic Alliance Snohomish County. He said the tribes have become a draw not just with the two casinos, but also Seattle Premium Outlets mall and other surrounding businesses. “I’m a fan of the quote, ‘When it comes to economic development, they’ve been doing this for hundreds, if not thousands

JIM DAVIS / HBJ

The $100 million casino to replace Quil Ceda Creek Casino is planned for across the street from the existing one.

of years,” Pierce said. “I have a lot of respect for what they do.”

The tribes opened the Quil Ceda Creek Casino — it was initially called

Tulalip Casino — 25 years ago. The casino featured roulette, blackjack and poker and cost $2.5 million. Over time, the tribes have grown their offerings, building the Tulalip Resort Casino in 2004 and adding a 12-story hotel in 2008 at Quil Ceda Village. Still the tribes kept Quil Ceda Creek open, saying it serves an entirely different clientele. Tulalip Resort Casino attracts people regionally with many customers coming from Seattle and Vancouver, B.C. Quil Ceda Creek attracts Snohomish County patrons. “My mom goes there all of the time,” Zackuse said. “She’s 89. She loves being able to be dropped off right there. She only has to go a little way and she’s in her seat.” Quil Ceda Creek Casino started small, but was added to over the years. “It’s an old building,” Zackuse said. “We’ve built on it and taken it apart and built on it. It’s time to have that locals’ good casino. They deserve that, the customers.” When designing the new casino, the tribes surveyed customers of Quil Ceda Creek to find out their preferences. While many details aren’t being released just yet, Zackuse and Gobin said QCC2 will include top-end food options with reasonable prices in a food court setting. It will also include a state-of-the-art smoke filtration system, an even better one than the Tulalip Resort Casino. And the tribes will be hiring more people to staff the new casino. ”It will be a significant amount of new employees that will be coming on,” Gobin said. The Tulalip Tribes with 3,700 employees are the third largest employer in the county, as well as the biggest public employer. Gobin, who once headed the Tribal Employment Rights Office, notes that most of those employees do not belong to the


SEPTEMBER 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 9

COVER STORY “What our businesses have done, what the casino has done, has not only benefited our community, it’s also benefited the surrounding communities.” — Teri Gobin, Tulalip Tribes vice chairwoman

tribe. “About 68 percent of our workforce is nontribal,” Gobin said. “What our businesses have done, what the casino has done, has not only benefited our community, it’s also benefited the surrounding communities and all of those businesses that have come up.” Revenues from the casinos and lease payments from businesses at Quil Ceda Village also pay for programs that benefit tribal members. By expanding Quil Ceda Creek Casino, the tribes are hoping to increase

revenues to continue and expand programs. “What we’re doing with this is we have to increase our business revenues to accommodate the services that we provide through our government,” Gobin said. “That’s why we’re driven — the business committee — to find future revenues so we can take care of our elders, our children, our education for our people and our health care.” Through money from the casinos and Quil Ceda Village, the tribes have opened the Hibulb Cultural Center, an Early

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Tulalip Tribes Vice Chairwoman Teri Gobin notes that 68 percent of the workforce is nontribal. She said projects such as the envisioned Quil Ceda Creek Casino replacement help generate revenues to ensure the future.

Learning Academy for their children and a clinic for their health care needs. They’re also talking about a new gathering hall for the tribes. The Tulalips also donate millions each year to charities both on and off the reservation. Gobin also has a special

place in her heart for the Tribal Employment Rights Office, which educates and trains tribal members. One program trains 25 students twice a year in a pre-apprenticeship program. It’s accredited through South Seattle College and Renton Technical College. The

program even has received a grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Gobin said. “By improving the lives of these clients, we’re improving the lives of their children,” she said. The program trains members of any tribe in

construction skills. Participants have built 14 tiny houses for the Low Income Housing Institute in Seattle. Gobin would like to see the program venture into solar panel manufacturing and repair and start retrofiting tribal buildings with solar power. This is what was envisioned by earlier tribal councils who set aside the land for Quil Ceda Village and planned the first casino and later the Tulalip Resort Casino, Zackuse said. Now the next big project is building a new Quil Ceda Creek Casino. In the future, the tribes need to look at what else can happen either in the old casino space, at Quil Ceda Village or north of the Seattle Premium Outlets mall. “We were able to see a dream come true that our ancestors had for the future,” Zackuse said. “Now our charge is to do the same for our future generation.”

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SEPTEMBER 2017

Bob’s Burgers owner rose up ranks Everett owner started as dishwasher-hostess 20 years ago By Jennifer Sasseen

For The Herald Business Journal

Everett restaurant owner Carrie deKubber’s life is proof that those willing to work hard can achieve the American dream. Starting 20 years ago as a hostess and dishwasher at a Washington burger restaurant, the 38-year-old deKubber today owns the Everett version of the same restaurant, Bob’s Burgers and Brew. How she got here is mainly a story of hard work, passion and determination, the latter being traits she said she needs to help her succeed in the business. “Because this is my life,” she said. “I mean, everything that I’ve ever worked for is wrapped up in this. And so I’m definitely passionate and it’s got to work… And I feel like I have the determination and perseverance to do what it takes to make it work.” Those who worked with deKubber on her purchase of the Everett Bob’s think so, too. “We just saw her as very capable and somebody that could take over the business and be successful at it,” said Jay Duffy, of JJMD, Inc., the partnership that sold the restaurant to deKubber. “She has extraordinary passion for the thing that she does and this was a longtime dream of hers,” said. C.J. Seitz, director of the Small Business Development Center in Bellingham. DeKubber turned to that center as a resident of Whatcom County. An extension of Western Washington University, the center is the largest in the state and serves some 500 clients a year, Seitz said. Seitz is so certain of deKubber’s competence that she scheduled the Everett Bob’s for a tour last month by Rep. Rick Larsen, D-Wash., as an example of the work the business center does to help grow the economy. She grew up among the berry fields of Whatcom County, deKubber said, where her father worked as a mechanic on a berry farm and later moved into selling berry harvesters. So it’s not surprising that her first job was picking berries. After high school she followed some of her friends to the original Bob’s Burgers and Brew in Lynden and restaurant founder Bob Kildall hired her as a hostess/dishwasher. That was in 1997. “And so I started working there and then I really enjoyed just customer service,” deKubber said. “And the restaurant atmosphere is, I don’t know, it’s kind of fun. It’s kind of chaotic sometimes and there’s just always something different happening, so it keeps it interesting.” While at the Lynden store she worked her way up to server and then bartender, later moving on to the Fairhaven Bob’s to bartend. Meanwhile, Bob’s was growing and in 2004, the chain’s first franchise store opened in Burlington.

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Carrie deKubber, owner of Bob’s Burgers and Brew in Everett, stands outside the restaurant. She began her career with the restaurant starting as a hostess/dishwasher 20 years ago.

If you go Bob’s Burgers and Brew is located at 1611 SE Everett Way, Everett. For hours and menu, go to www.bobsburgersandbreweverett.com. More information, call , more information, call 425-290-8308. It was Duffy’s partnership — JJMD, Inc., which he said stands for Jay, Jon (Rickert, a family friend), Mike (Jay’s brother) and Dad (Jay’s and Mike’s father) — that bought the franchise store, Duffy said. DeKubber, who knew a fair amount about Bob’s Burgers and Brew by then, was hired to help open the Burlington Bob’s. “She knew a lot more about the restaurant than we did at that time,” Duffy said, and she became one of their “star performers.” She started out as a server, deKubber said, and later also worked part-time as a manager before eventually learning to do office work. At the time she was a breakfast server, finishing her shift at 1 or 2 p.m. and asking if there was anything else she could do to help. “And that was initially where I was like, I want to own one of these some day,” deKubber said. “Well it was in that model, it was bigger, I don’t know what it was—it was the flow, or the atmosphere was different. I loved it. “And so that kind of is where the spark happened.” After Burlington, JJMD, Inc. went on to purchase the Tulalip franchise and then opened the Everett store in 2010, Duffy said. When they decided recently to scale

back on their investments, the Everett Bob’s was the logical choice because it was the furthest south, he said. And knowing that deKubber was interested in someday owning a Bob’s, she was a logical choice as well. “You have to wear a lot of hats,” he said, of the restaurant business. “So it’s helpful that she’s been around the restaurant for a long time.” Everett is the seventh Bob’s Burgers and Brew at which deKubber’s worked, including a stint as general manager of the Birch Bay restaurant, she said. She also worked as a corporate trainer for Bob’s for a time and that varied experience really helped when she went to talk to the bank. “So it was really cool that all that hard work actually paid off,” she said. “And it mattered. I mean, yeah, you have to have some money, but that resume — man, it made a difference.” The deal was finalized last December and today deKubber owns Bob’s Burgers and Brew, 1611 SE Everett Mall Way, one of several franchise restaurants that grew from the Lynden burger joint Kildall founded in 1982 with the motto “Only the Best.” The Everett Bob’s is the first franchise store to be sold while already in operation, deKubber said. The sale had to be approved by Kildall, but that wasn’t difficult. “He knew me,” she said. Between the corporate-owned — run by Kildall and family — and franchise models, there are now 13 Bob’s in Washington and deKubber is thrilled to call one her own. “I mean, I never went to college,” she said. “So this is amazing.” Ownership is not without hurdles, however, one being name recognition.

While Bob’s Burgers and Brew restaurants are well-known in Whatcom and Skagit counties, deKubber said, they are less well-known in Everett and vicinity. So she is working on ways to bring customers in and keep them coming back for more. Hamburgers, chicken burgers and various sandwiches, as well as beef, chicken and seafood plates and salads dominate the menu, but starting this month, deKubber is adding vegan/vegetarian options exclusive to the Everett Bob’s. “They say in a group of five, if one’s a vegetarian, they go where that person can eat,” she said. “And I don’t want to be excluded from that.” She’s also done some staff retraining, including on kitchen prep and on more efficient ways of serving a table, aimed at improving the total customer experience. A busy Friday night that went more smoothly than staff had expected, as well as customer comments on improved food quality and staff morale, showed the retraining is paying off, DeKubber said. And she also listens to her employees, encouraging their suggestions with an open-door policy. “You know, because they’re in there every day doing the job,” she said. “So now that I’m in that owner position, I really try to get their feedback on how we can make things more efficient.” She’s been married for 10 years but her children are her 42 employees, she said. She has high standards for them because, as children represent their parents “out in the world,” her employees represent her to their customers. “And we want them to keep coming back,” deKubber said. “I mean, I want this to be a place that people tell their friends and they want to keep coming back.”


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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 11

Inventor makes changing beds magical By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

SNOHOMISH — Making your bed and lying in it just got a lot easier. Snohomish inventor Jeff Shea has dreamed up a handy tool to end the back breaking chore. Magic Mattress Lift fits underneath each corner of a mattress and pops up the edge with a simple tug to allow sheets to be changed easily. He’s already sold 8,000 units, with more than half being sold online through his website and through Amazon and the other half sold to hotels. The hotel industry is where he’s hoping Jeff Shea to make his big push. That’s where injuries have been on the increase for housekeepers as mattress and linens at hotels have become thicker and heavier. “We’ll be able to sell it to every hotel chain,” Shea said. “You can’t tell me they don’t want to take a ton of weight off the back of their workers.” Shea is the president of Three60, a company that’s calling card at the moment is the Magic Mattress Lifts. Kristi Dailey of Mill Creek is the executive vice president. “We are constantly getting emails and feedback, saying, ‘Thank you so much, this is such an ingenious idea, My mom

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Magic Mattress Lift aims to make it easier to lift corners of mattresses to change sheets. The company hopes this can help hospitality workers as well as older people.

can now change the bed on her own. This makes her feel so independent,’” Dailey said. The lifts are made of black plastic with metal pins and springs. One goes under each of the corners of a mattress. The weight of the mattress keeps the lifts flat, but a tug on the edge pops the mattress up. Shea originally came up with the idea to help an older family friend who complained about back pain after changing her sheets. His first couple of prototypes went nowhere. He eventually found inspiration —

and spare parts — from the folding steps on his camper. That led him to create a design and work with an engineer to create the current version of Magic Mattress Lifts. At first, he saw potential of selling this to an aging U.S. population. And he and Dailey still see a market in that. But a year ago, a hotel company tested out the product and started giving them feedback. Shea realized how beneficial this could be for the hospitality industry. Housekeepers suffer from an inor-

dinate number of injuries. In 2015, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 5.1 out of 100 hotel workers suffer a work-related injury that forces time away from work or work restrictions. That’s compared with 3.3 incidences for all other industries. The numbers go up when looking at just housekeepers. One study in California found that hotel housekeepers rank in the top 10 of 800 professions for injuries that involve days away from work. Industry experts blame a grueling workload under tight deadlines with repetitive motions. And hotel mattresses, pillows and linens are getting puffier and heavier. Shea and Dailey believe their product will help hotels cut down on repetitive stress injuries. “Our motto is to load it, leave it and love it,” Dailey said. “The hotel industry is going to love it, because it’s going to save them money.” Shea said he’s sold one large order to AKA hotels in New York and has spent the summer traveling to hotel chains demonstrating the product. Many hotels have purchased a small number of units to test the product. “As far as the hotel side of things, yeah, we’re on the verge of exploding,” Shea said. The product sells for about $20 a unit or $80 for a full bed. The company offers discounts for bulk orders. More information can be found at the company’s websites at www.magicmattresslift.com.

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12 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2017

Chermak Construction changes hands Award-winning firm grew, won acclaim by going against grain By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

EDMONDS — For 37 years, Howard Chermak has run a construction business a little bit different than other construction companies. For instance, he and his wife Judy would meet with a counselor every other week to talk about their thoughts and feelings about the business and personnel. “I don’t think you and I could sell any of my construction friends on it now,” Chermak said. “That’s not a path very many people would take. Yet, for me, it was excellent.” He credits it with helping Chermak Construction grow and get through tough times. The Edmonds firm, which specializes in home remodeling, also has won praise from clients and acclaim through a host of industry honors, including several national and regional awards. Now, the Chermaks have sold the business at 655 Edmonds Way to Noah France, who owns France Construction, a wood finishing business in Woodinville. France is moving his operations to Edmonds and will continue Chermak Construction under its original name. The Chermaks said they have had a few other serious offers over the years, but they felt France would be best to carry on the company. “We have a wonderful new owner,” Judy Chermak said. “We’re very pleased and excited about him. He’ll be a wonderful asset to the business and the community.” Howard Chermak didn’t set out to enter the construction business. He trained as a teacher and speech therapist. After graduating from Western Washington University in 1969, he served a couple of years in Vietnam in an artillery unit. When he got back to the states, Chermak was hired to teach in northern Minnesota where he was originally from. He didn’t see a future for himself teaching. “I couldn’t see a clear path for where a speech therapist would go,” Chermak said. “You might be the regional person, but there’s one of those for 50 therapists.” In the summer months, he’d head to Minneapolis for construction. After a couple of years, he moved back to Edmonds and went to work full time in construction doing a series of jobs painting, wallpapering, framing and tiling. For six years, he worked for an architect who doubled as a builder. Chermak became the superintendent working on custom homes with often hard excavations, difficult foundations and sophisticated designs. When interest rates for mortgages shot up in the late 1970s, the architect couldn’t continue the business. “He gave me the truck and tools I had been using for his business,” Chermak said. “He gave them to me and he shook my hands and said, ‘I’m sorry I can’t

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Howard and Judy Chermak are selling Chermak Construction after nearly 40 years of doing business. The firm, which specializes in home remodeling, racked up a long list of industry honors.

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Chermak Construction located prominently along Edmonds Way in Edmonds will continue under the same name with new owner Noah France.

employ you anymore.’ That was completely understandable, however. I just went out and started working for people by word of mouth.” And that’s how Chermak started his own business. Things started slowly at first. During a divorce, Chermak started seeing a family counselor, Frank Miller. Although most counselors maintain a professional distance from clients, Miller and Chermak became friends and he met Judy Rice, Miller’s significant other, who took a job with Chermak Construction. Chermak brought Miller and Rice onto the board of the company. Chermak brought the construction skills, but Miller and Rice added business acumen and knowledge of people. It turned out to be an inspired match. Chermak Construction found its footing and began to grow. Then, Miller died in 1995. Judy Rice remained working for Chermak Construction and became close friends with Howard Chermak. In 1996, they took the

company out to lunch to announce their intentions to start dating. “All the women in the unit said, ‘We knew it ... ,’” Howard Chermak said. “All the men went, ‘Huh? You and Judy?’” The couple were married a year later. One of the ways the company went against the grain was on staffing. Traditionally, most construction firms have separate sales and production staffs, figuring each side needs its own expertise. Chermak Construction has its project developers oversee contracts from the sale to the completion, with the idea that continuity would make the best project and best experience for the client. Another key to the business has been its location on Edmonds Way just before going down into downtown. It was a 1,400-square-foot doctor’s office. He and his team expanded it to 4,000 square feet. “It’s a nice connection to the town,” Chermak said. “It’s very visible with a lot of traffic because the road here goes to the ferry dock and downtown Edmonds.”

Howard Chermak points to the human side of the business that Judy Chermak has helped nurture and grow. She was the one who made sure birthdays sre observed, birth of children are acknowledged and Christmas parties are celebrated at the Edmonds Yacht Club with bonuses. Tension will always be present in a construction company, but it’s dealt with in the open and people move on at Chermak, they said. “Everybody is there to lift one another up,” Judy Chermak said. “No one is there to compete with one another, I think that’s the harmony that makes Chermak what it is.” That’s helped the company navigate through difficult times. In 2007, the company did $9 million in business, but that fell in half in just a few years after. They cut subcontractors, but the company didn’t lay off anyone. “We went to people and said we either need each of you to take a 10-percent cut in pay or we’re going to have to let somebody go,” Howard Chermak said. “They chose to a person to take a 10-percent cut in pay. That’s the thing that Judy brings.” In their meetings with a counselor, they have been talking about transitioning out of the company. Howard Chermak’s daughter, Dana, works for the business and will remain. He said she saw how hard it was to meet payroll and didn’t want to become an owner. While they’re leaving, they hope they’ve left a path forward for the company. “I brought the construction knowledge and (Judy) brought the heart and caring and collaboration into a rough-and-tumble construction company,” Howard Chemak said. “She taught me it’s OK to care. It’s OK to help someone do something that may cost you a little bit, but in giving you’ll receive more.”


SEPTEMBER 2017

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 13


14 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2017

BUSINESS BUILDERS

What productivity data can measure T

he controversies swirling around the productivity data at the national level are not really a concern for individual businesses. Owners and managers can still make good use of productivity data to keep an eye on the things that determine the bottom line — now and in the future. And it can give your business a competitive edge just when you need it. Some of the basic productivity measures are very useful and do not require advanced math degrees or expensive software. And they are an excellent way to get started. The most basic productivity index is found in a ratio showing the revenue taken in per employee. Just take the total revenue at year end shown in your income statement and divide it by the number of employees in your business. You might be able to compare your revenue per employee to that of some public companies in your industry; it isn’t unusual for a company’s annual report to include the total number of employees. That comparison can be useful, but the real value of “revenue per worker” is in its trend up or down in your own business. The business model should always be kept in mind because it will help you to avoid over-interpreting changes in the unrefined employees per dollar ratio.

The next productivity measure to look at is “net income per worker.” This is calculated by dividing net income by the number of workers. Whether your business manufactures a product, resells a product produced by someone else, or provides a service, each James dollar of revenue McCusker can be matched up with a set of costs. Business The basic cost categories are things 101 like: direct labor; indirect labor; shipping and/or delivery; accounting; and overhead. You are free to assign costs to any categories that fit your business, but those who produce their own product, or distribute products to others, should be aware that the Internal Revenue Service for its part has very definite ideas about cost categories. By converting the number of workers to their cost, you can look at how many dollars in compensation it takes to bring in, say $100 in revenue or $100 of net income.

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The fundamental productivity data is a useful way to examine how your company is doing. It is so easy in a growing company to let your productivity slip as you hire additional people — and these simple ratios can provide an early warning of a problem while it is still easy to fix. The next fundamental productivity measurement is to look at the number of new and returning customers that your business served. It is often useful, too, to look at your average amount of a sale. These basic measurements will open a treasure trove of information about your business and how well it is doing in keeping customers satisfied. Don’t be in a hurry to use productivity data as a compensation determinant. Many newly launched incentive systems based on productivity have disappointing results — often because of “gaming the system.” We humans want to win, especially when our paychecks depend on it, so we focus our efforts on whatever maximizes our pay, not what is best for the customer or the business. Even robots, apparently, quickly learn how to game the system. A recent experiment in Artificial Intelligence had to be terminated when the robot players in a boat race game focused on accumulating points and ended up

crashing their boats instead of finishing the race. In general, the most frequent problem that business managers encounter when using productivity data is focusing on individual performance we often fail to recognize contributions to teamwork. NBA great Shane Battier, for example, had individual performance statistics that for an NBA player were, at best, modest. Yet he made his team play better, and they won more games. Houston Rockets’ general manager Daryl Morey said of him, “I call him Lego. When he’s on the court, all the pieces start to fit together.” Workers who improve team performance in business are often undervalued in productivity measurement systems, even though we all know that the success of any business depends on teamwork. Workers who make teams more effective may not be star performers themselves but they are what make a business a winner. Productivity measurements, when combined with your knowledge of how your business works, make a powerful tool for keeping your company more competitive. And that’s a good thing. James McCusker is a Bothell economist, educator and consultant. He writes a column for the monthly Herald Business Journal.

Why owning property is key to liberty in U.S.

T

o own a slice of the earth from its center to the heavens is precisely how private property rights work in the United States. The concept that ordinary people can do that is as foreign to other traditions as elements of Sharia Law are to Westerners. In some Eastern languages, there aren’t even words to describe a deed or the idea of being a property owner. Private property Tom ownership is at Hoban the center of the constitutionally Realty protected and God-given inalienMarkets able rights that we all enjoy as Americans. Without private property ownership, the few rule the land. Fortunately, America is unique in many ways and an important one is the opportunity to buy a slice of the earth and make it yours. As Puget Sound-area real estate prices escalate, the ability to exercise private property rights becomes more and more out of reach. The effects on the middle

class of rising prices and the lost link between ownership of a home or condo and liberty is a problem. Liberty can be a fickle feeling. But ownership of real estate is a very tangible place for people to feel it and once they do, they tend to want to protect it and defend it. Concerns are growing that a split culture, especially among younger Americans, is emerging where rural and semi-suburban residents who can afford a home will feel the experience of liberty through property ownership that their urbanite counterparts may never quite feel or understand. At its core, though, is the idea that ownership of real estate is a form of security and a means to pursue happiness at the gut level. It’s deep in Western culture and one of the main features of America that draws immigrants to us and defines for many their love of country. What our society looks like as young adults, who today present the lowest homeownership levels in generations, come of age and how they will understand and feel liberty in their lives is the question. Tom Hoban is CEO of The Coast Group of Companies. Contact him at 425-339-3638, or tomhoban@coastmgt.com or visit www. coastmgt.com. Twitter: @Tom_P_Hoban.


BUSINESS BUILDERS

SEPTEMBER 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 15

What needs to be balanced in life H

ave you noticed that when people talk about life balance they mention the two words work

and life? I know when I hear the term work-life balance, I picture work (running my business) and then kind of a blur of family and personal care. According to author James Patterson in his novel “Suzanne’s Diary for Nicholas,” there are five components to life balance. I find this very interesting and I find it makes it clear about where to focus my energy to strike a balance in life. First, work-life balance doesn’t necessarily mean 50 percent of your time is spent at work and 50 percent of your time is spent at home. That’s probably not very likely or practical. For many people, the majority of their day is spent at work and driving to and from work to make a living. It really boils down to having a balance that is comfortable for you and comfortable for your family as well. If you’re working 12 hour days because you love what you do, you’re on the road commuting and it’s causing you to miss out on family dinners and kids’ events, that’s probably not a comfortable balance for your whole family. A better solution may be to work eight

hours, commute, spend time with your family and then work from home in the evening for a couple of hours. A work-life balance may require some compromise. Let’s take a look at the five components to life balance: work, family, Monika health, friends and integrity. I just love Kristofferson this list. Work: As Office important as work Efficiency is for our livelihoods and professional satisfaction if we’re doing what we love, it may actually be the one component that can bounce back and recover from setbacks the easiest. Of course there are exceptions when someone’s job may really be on the line, but most of the time, we can recover from mistakes or errors. Family: If there’s not a good balance of time with your family and family members feel neglected, there can be serious consequences here. You may grow apart, argue, build up resentments and relationships can part ways.

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Health: In my opinion, this can easily be the most important component of life balance and the easiest one to not attend to. If you don’t have your health, then it affects everything else in your life. Ironically, eating healthy, exercising, stretching, deep breathing and proper sleep is commonly what people put off so they can get more stuff done each day. The list is long when it comes to possible health ailments, but the worst case scenario is an unexpected, early death. Friends: I hadn’t really thought about friendships as part of a work-life balance, but it makes sense. If you’re so focused on work that you don’t send out birthday cards on time, you don’t make a point to get together with people or you miss friends’ special occasions and milestones, one day you may look around and find you’re standing alone. Friendships worth having are worth nurturing. And, the good news is, it’s usually pretty easy and doesn’t take too much time and effort to stay in touch and stay connected to friends. Integrity: Honestly, I had never thought about integrity as a component of life balance. I’ve always strived to live my life and run my business with integrity. I think I took it for granted and

really didn’t think of this as a pillar for balance. But this one also makes sense. If you’re so busy that you take shortcuts, cut corners, lie or act in a dishonest manner, you can quickly lose people’s faith and trust in you, whether that’s from family, friends, co-workers or clients. You may find the number of people in your corner starts to dwindle. If your clients or customers lose faith in you, your bank account may also start to dwindle. I know it can be a struggle to keep all of the balls up in the air to achieve life balance. If the balls are dropping, I think that’s when we need to look at what we have on our calendars that we can remove and areas where we may be wasting time each day. We may have to make adjustment to give ourselves back some time in the day to devote to the five components of life balance. I believe life balance is a like a living document, we’re always adjusting and making tweaks, but it’s worth it to live a life that is healthy, wealthy and wise. Monika Kristofferson is a professional organizer and productivity consultant who owns Efficient Organization NW in Lake Stevens. Reach her at 425-220-8905 or monika@efficientorganizationnw.com.

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16 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2017

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Test before you invest in ad campaign D

irect marketing is used by many marketers to generate sales, in both business-to-business and business-to-consumer enterprise. The same technique also can be used to test and optimize your selling proposition, and various elements of an advertising campaign. My mantra is “test before you invest.” The definition of “direct marketing” is the delivery of promotional messages directly to prospective customers — on an individual basis as opposed to through a mass medium. This “direct marketing” definition holds true for traditional, digital and social delivery methods. The most common delivery methods are direct mail, telemarketing, e-mail, the use of landing pages and social media networks. Using direct marketing for testing is a popular marketing tactic because it can generate quick results and is very easy to measure. Its measurability is why direct marketing is a great testing tool. Before committing long-term to a promotion strategy or extensive advertising campaign, test various elements to hone in on the most effective messaging and imaging combination.

Although you can use any form of direct marketing to test your proposition, I’ll use direct mail to illustrate our four-step process. This course of action — also referred to as A/B testing — assumes you are already clear on your promotion objecAndrew tives and target Ballard audience. Begin by creating Growth a control message. Use a postcard to Strategies communicate the offer you think will work best to attract your target market and motivate recipients to respond. It should include a headline, a graphic or photo, a few key copy points and a call-to-action with contact information. Next, you’ll create a variation as a test against the control message. Determine which element of the control message you want to test, such as the headline, photo or call-to-action, e.g. discount or incentive. Important: you can only test one

element at a time; in other words, don’t test a different headline and photo in the same test version, because you would not know which element generated the difference in response rate. Contact a few mail service companies to buy a list of well-targeted prospects within your core market radius. By getting pricing and guidance from three companies, you’ll learn about direct marketing and make an informed decision. The process will be easier if you work with a company that can provide the list, printing and mailing services. You should target at least 1,000 addresses for each variation, e.g. one control and one test would require a list of 2,000. Another important success factor is to distribute your two variations (control A and test B) evenly over the entire list, as opposed to by ZIP code. Each carrier route should have an equal number of each variation. Mail your control and test pieces and measure the results. Document the number of responses to each variation to determine which version generated the best results. After you’ve tested one element, e.g. the headline, you can choose the best variation (the winner of you’re A/B test),

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create a new control message and conduct another test on a different element, such as the call-to-action. You can conduct an A/B test digitally and socially as well. On your website, you can split your traffic to two different landing pages, each with one element changed. Instead of using direct mail, you can do a small pay-per-click ad test through Google, which will automatically split the traffic. Socially, you can test two different Posts (or social ads) and count “Likes” and click-throughs. Using direct marketing as a testing mechanism can be less expensive and quicker than doing focus group or consumer panel research, and you’ll likely acquire new customers during the test — which can offset the cost of your test. This approach requires a short-term, up-front investment, but is well worth it when you consider the long-term impact of improving your selling proposition and sales results. Before embarking on a long-term campaign or promotion strategy, be sure to “test before you invest.” Andrew Ballard is president of Marketing Solutions, an agency specializing in growth strategies. For more information, call 425337-1100 or go to www.mktg-solutions.com.

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PEOPLE WATCHING EVERETT — Everett Community College English instructor Josh Searle is a recipient of the 2017 Anna Sue McNeill Assessment, Teaching and Learning Award. Searle is a founding faculty member of EvCC’s Ocean College Research Academy program and has taught at EvCC since 2002. BOTHELL — Woodinville resident Lisa Youngblood Hall has been hired as the director of communications for the Northshore School District. Her children attended Northshore District schools and she has been a past volunteer with the district. Previously, Youngblood Hall was the director of media relations and communications for the University of Washington Bothell and a producer at KING-TV. WOODINVILLE — Lauren Williams, founder of Casual Uncluttering in Woodinville, has earned the designation of certified professional organizer from the Board of the National Association of Productivity and Organizing Professionals. She is one of only nine designated CPOs in the state and 318 in the U.S. EVERETT — Everett Community College has hired Tammy Frankland as the college’s new executive vice president of Instruction and Student Services. Frankland, formerly dean of Casper College’s School of Health Science in Casper, Wyoming, started at EvCC on July 31.

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SEPTEMBER 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 17

company as a dealer training manager. Rhidian Grant is the new environmental health and safety manager. Jeff Norman is Canyon Creek’s new dealer sales manager.

Evelyn Ives

Alex Dieffenbach

Allison Bergseng

Jeff Norman

Sean Gertz

Scott Nordby

Gary Dewhirst

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Enrico Di Salvo

Josh Searle

BOTHELL — EagleView Technologies has promoted Kenneth Cook to the position of senior vice president of its EagleView OnSite Solutions. He will lead field Lisa services, while collaboYoungblood rating with engineering Hall and product teams to strategically develop advanced solutions for claims and underwriting professionals in the property insurance space.

provides geotechnical and construction monitoring services. Evelyn Ives was promoted to senior project engineer. Ives has five years of experience in environmental consulting with Tammy a focus on regulatory Frankland compliance for toxic cleanup sites. Allison Bergseng was promoted to senior engineer, providing support for environmental and civil engineering projects.

EDMONDS — Landau Associates has announced promotions. Sean Gertz was promoted to senior staff EIT. Gertz

MONROE — Award-winning Canyon Creek Cabinet Company has announced new hires. Scott Nordby has joined the

WARM BEACH — Warm Beach Senior Community has welcomed Gary Dewhirst as its new executive director. Dewhirst has more than 25 years of experience in the long term care arena which includes operations, marketing, and dementia expertise. MOUNTLAKE TERRACE — Enrico Di Salvo has been hired by 1st Security Bank as a mortgage planning specialist at its Mountlake Terrace Home Lending office. Di Salvo began his mortgage career in 2005. LYNNWOOD — Jerry Melchisedeck has been named director of operations by Re/Max Elite. This newly created position allows owner Scott Comey to lead the company as a director of vision and growth while Melchisedeck handles logistics and assists with recruiting and training at their five offices. EDMONDS — The American Red Cross Northwest Region has welcomed Alex Dieffenbach as its new chief executive officer. Dieffenbach will oversee Red Cross operations in seven chapters that span the state of Washington and the five northern counties of Idaho. Dieffenbach was born and raised in Edmonds


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SEPTEMBER 2017

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BUSINESS BRIEFS EVERETT — Mountain Pacific Bank has been designated as an SBA Preferred Lender by the U.S. Small Business Administration. Under the program, the Everett-based bank is delegated loan approval and most servicing and liquidation authority, enabling them to make loan decisions more rapidly

PORT OF EVERETT SHIPPING SCHEDULE

MONROE —IRG Physical & Hand Therapy sponsored the Evergreen State Fair’s First Annual Morning of Dreams, a two-hour morning event on Aug. 30, for children and adults with disabilities or special needs. It features added volunteers but fewer visitors, sound and lights so the children may experience the fair in a calmer setting.

Sept. 19: Westwood, Balsa

BOTHELL — The 10th Annual Washington State Medical Device Summit is from 1 to 7 p.m. Sept. 12 in Mobius Hall at Cascadia Community College. The summit will bring together leading executives, entrepreneurs, researchers, government officials, thought leaders, and stakeholders to explore the state of the industry, trends and innovations. Register at http:// tinyurl.com/ybpcpplo. MARYSVILLE — The Greater Marysville Tulalip Chamber is presenting a free Small Business Summit from 4 to 7 p.m. Sept. 14, at the Marysville

and 202nd in the nation in Qualified Remodeler magazine’s list of the Top 500 Full Service Remodelers. The honor recognizes commitment to quality work, integrity and excellent customer service.

Ship port calls 2017 YTD: 58 Barge port calls 2017 YTD: 29 Ship port calls 2016: 85 Barge port calls 2016: 57 Sept. 5: Westwood, Westerland Sept. 12: Westwood, Westwood Victoria Sept. 15: Formark, Daiwan Dolphin Sept 25: ECL, Genius Star X Sept. 26: Westwood, Westwood Columbia Sept. 28: Swire, Shengking Source: Port of Everett Opera House. Hear from experts and visit more than 20 vendor booths. Participants who register in advance will be eligible for a door prize drawing. More information can be found at http://tinyurl. com/yb2j3sa6. LYNNWOOD — Enjoy an evening of networking in a fun and relaxed atmosphere at the Lynnwood Golf Course with Chef Dane Catering. This Lynnwood Chamber After Hours event is from 5 to 7 p.m. Sept. 20 at 20200 68th Ave. W., Lynnwood. Register at http:// tinyurl.com/y7da9epy. DARRINGTON — Adventure Cascades, a Darrington-based family owned business specializing in white-water rafting and scenic float trips, has a new offering. The

company now has kayak trips and rentals available out of Haller Bridge Park on the Stillaguamish River in Arlington. The cost is $35 per person. For more information, go online at www.adventurecascades. com/ or find them on Facebook. EVERETT — Everett-headquartered Northwest Vox has been acquired by Virginia-based nexVortex. Northwest Vox offers cloud communication and IP voice services. Northwest Vox founder and CEO Casey Strom said that the increased resources and experience of the nexVortex team made this a tremendous opportunity. EDMONDS — Chermak Construction in Edmonds has been ranked first in Washington state

MARYSVILLE — The Building Industry Association of Washington has announced its 2017 Excellence in Remodeling Award winners. Winners included Belmark Homes in Marysville and Irons Brothers Construction in Shoreline from the Master Builders Association of King & Snohomish Counties. TULALIP — Last month, lululemon athletica opened at the Seattle Premium Outlets. The popular retailer for yoga-inspired athletic apparel and leisure wear, carries designs for men and women, including performance shirts, shorts and pants, lifestyle apparel and yoga accessories. EVERETT — Western Washington Medical Group is trying to combat the rise in type 2 diabetes with a Diabetes and Nutrition Education Program. People are urged to take a short online test at www.doihaveprediabetes. org to learn their risk. The group also offers pre-diabetes classes every month. Go to www.wwmedgroup. com/specialties/diabetes-nutrition/ for more details.

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PUBLIC RECORDS Bankruptcy filings The following Snohomish County businesses or individuals filed business-related bankruptcies with U.S. Bankruptcy Court for Western District of Washington from July 1-31. 17-13072-MLB: Chapter 7, Geek Chic Design; attorney for debtor: James W. Shafer; filed: July 10; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation 17-13134-MLB: Chapter 7, Mike Chung Woo and Kyong Sook Woo; attorney for joint debtors: Young Oh; filed: July 14; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual 17-13396-MLB: Chapter 7, Stray Partners; attorney for debtor: Thomas D. Neeleman; filed: July 31; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation 17-13397-MLB: Chapter 7, Liquid Partners Inc.; attorney for debtor: Thomas D. Neeleman; filed: July 31; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation 17-13404-MLB: Chapter 7, Brian S. Clement and Della W. Clement; attorney for joint debtors: Kenneth J. Schneider; filed: July 31; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual

Snohomish County tax liens Tax liens are gathered from online public records filed with the Snohomish County Auditor’s Office. These federal and state liens were filed between July 1-31.

Federal tax liens 201707050399: July 5; Healing Leaf Garden Collective, 9626 32nd St. SE, Lake Stevens 201707050400: July 5; Shirley, Walter W., 13005 E Gibson Road, Apt. T-236, Everett 201707050401: July 5; Storjohann, Scott, 1001 Lombard Ave. Everett 201707050402: July 5; Stephens, Dorothy, 929 154th St. NW, Marysville 201707050403: July 5; MCCI, 8126 66th Drive NE, Marysville 201707050404: July 5; Lopez Bros Construction, 33307 138th St. SE, Sultan 201707050405: July 5; Hammer, Aaron B., 6904 Cedarbough Loop. Arlington 201707050632: July 5; Jones, Tirzah E., 11121 17th Court W, Everett 201707110044: July 11; Hoepcke, Rebecca A., 11117 47th Ave. SE, Everett 201707110045: July 11; Hamlin, Sherri M., 3327 268th St. NW, Stanwood 201707110046: July 11; Burt, Darren, 4502 148th St. NE, Marysville 201707110047: July 11; Crain, Corey M., 7620 197th St. SE, Snohomish 201707110048: July 11; Nbargo Hospitality, 9100 Olympic View Drive, Edmonds 201707110049: July 11; Criscuolo, Christina, 3007 Kromer Ave., Everett 201707110050: July 11; Daniels, Beth A., 16829 62nd Ave. W, Lynnwood 201707110051: July 11; Rhino Linings, 2221 71st Ave. SE, Lake Stevens 201707110052: July 11; Townsend, Olivia E., 15204 12th Drive SE, Mill Creek 201707110053: July 11; Anderson, Charles G., 5311 E Wishon Road, Snohomish 201707110054: July 11; Gleason, James, PO Box 1505, Marysville 201707110055: July 11; Tate, Lonia, 3825 164th St. SW, Lynnwood 201707110056: July 11; Krofchek, Shannon M., 22310 45th Place W, Mountlake Terrace 201707110057: July 11; Le Minh, V., 14616 36th Ave. SE, Mill Creek 201707110058: July 11; Orr, Sarah, 8102 76th Place NE, Marysville 201707110059: July 11; Nelson, Aaron B., 18416 40th Ave. NW, Stanwood 201707110060: July 11; Nelson, Aaron B.,

18416 40th Ave. NW, Stanwood 201707110061: July 11; GCC 420 Wa Inc., 2340 130th Ave. NE, Suite 202, Bellevue 201707110062: July 11; Suh, Susanna, 15720 Manor Way, Apt. G8, Lynnwood 201707110063: July 11; Folk, Richard B. Jr., PO Box 1464, Edmonds 201707110064: July 11; Foster, Michael W. Jr., 15619 26th Ave. W, Lynnwood 201707110065: July 11; McMillan, Michael, 6231 St. Andrews Drive, Mukilteo 201707110066: July 11; Chipper Gardens, 8618 99th Ave. NE, Arlington 201707110067: July 11; Spearman Corp., 4700 56th Place NE, Marysville 201707110068: July 11; Hatch, Steven, 21781 Oak Way, Brier 201707110069: July 11; Grasseth, Heather J., 15012 23rd Ave. NE, Arlington 201707110070: July 11; Missih, Androws, 8204 80th Drive NE, Marysville 201707180396: July 18; Fenton-Young, Julie A., 23708 Locust Way, Unit 31, Bothell 201707180397: July 18; Nguyen, Nghi, 5417 67th St. NE, Marysville 201707180398: July 18; Kyzar, Kevin J., 5417 67th St. NE, Marysville 201707180399: July 18; McClain, Arlene J, 18012 31st Ave. NE, Unit A, Arlington 201707180400: July 18; Dyno-Mite Diesel Performance, 17631 117th St. SE, Suite 10 Monroe 201707180401: July 18; Dyno-Mite Diesel Performance, 13675 Roosevelt Road SE, Monroe 201707180404: July 18; Bradley, Kelly J., 20902-67th Ave. NE, Apt. 370, Arlington 201707180405: July 18; Miller-Hall, Christopher L., 20232 13th Drive SE, Bothell 201707180406: July 18; Pham, Lien T., 17322 15th Drive SE, Bothell 201707180407: July 18; Ha, Tien, 13410 Highway 99, Everett 201707180408: July 18; Heckman, Jeffrey, PO Box 103, Stanwood 201707180409: July 18; Turk, Charlotte, 2902 139th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201707180410: July 18; Yi, Choongha, 3521 156th Place SE, Bothell 201707180557: July 18; DTF Delivery Services Inc., 11014 19th Ave. SE, Suite 8, Everett 201707180558: July 18; Reed, Karen, 2205 119th Ave. SE, Lake Stevens 201707180559: July 18; Reeves, Anthony M., 1507 Wall St., Everett 201707180560: July 18; Ruiz, Sonya, 13321 209th Ave. SE, Monroe 201707180561: July 18; Ruiz, Sonya R., 13321 209th Ave. SE, Monroe 201707180562: July 18; Ruiz, Antonio, 13321 209th Ave. SE, Monroe 201707180563: July 18; Bailey, Chris, 17606 Valley Circle Drive, Bothell 201707180564: July 18; Hollinger, Gretchen W., 3015 185th Place NE, Arlington 201707180565: July 18; Masterwork Roofing Inc., 2415 40th St., Everett 201707180566: July 18; Everett Floral and Gift, 4522 Evergreen Way, Everett 201707250316: July 25; Langhans, Donald M., 916 Elm St., Sultan 201707250317: July 25; Erickson, Deborah J., 3711 164th St. SW, Apt. N352, Lynnwood 201707250318: July 25; Carrasco Miriam, 633 Smith St., Monroe 201707250319: July 25; Northstar Marble and Granite Inc., 3337 Paine St., Everett 201707250320: July 25; Counsellor, Charles L., 4902 Dogwood Drive, Everett 201707250321: July 25; Story, Rodney A., 16611 48th Ave. W, Apt. D2, Edmonds

Employment security liens 201707140667: July 14; G&S Greenery, State Of Washington (Dept Of)

Partial release of federal tax liens 201707110071: July 11; Alejandre, Jorge, 14313 Highway 530 NE, No. 16, Arlington 201707180567: July 18; Stockman, Corey

B. West, 16017 65th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201707190493: July 19; Elke, Michael E Estate Of, 5039 Ocean Ave., Everett 201707050406: July 5; Generation Drywall Inc., 21114 22nd Ave. W, Lynnwood 201707050407: July 5; Ohlsen, Jennifer, PO Box 1064, Gold Bar

Release of federal tax liens 201707050408: July 5; Generation Drywall Inc., 21114 22nd Ave. W, Lynnwood 201707050409: July 5; Bauer, Greg, 17611 83rd Drive NE, Arlington 201707050410: July 5; Widing, Clair, 21605 Chinook Road, Woodway 201707050411: July 5; Walker, Brian D., 20622 54th Ave. W, Lynnwood 201707050412: July 5; Yetter, Donald, 1417 128th Drive NE, Lake Stevens 201707050413: July 5; Moir, David B., 11501 34th Drive SE, Everett 201707050633: July 5; Lake Stevens Animal Hospital, 303 91st Ave. NE, A106, Everett 201707050634: July 5; Gray, Renee M., 303 91st Ave. NE, A106, Everett 201707100329: July 10; Kraft, James E., 119 Rivmont Drive E, Monroe 201707110072: July 11; Diversified Northwest Inc., PO Box 4433, Everett 201707110073: July 11; Guaymas Lynnnwood Dox Inc., 3805 196th St. SW, Lynnwood 201707110074: July 11; Martin, Laura D., 9427 36th Ave. SE, Everett 201707110075: July 11; Wallis, Jennifer R., 16221 41st Drive SE, Bothell 201707110076: July 11; Walton, Amy A., 19005 Third Drive SE, Bothell 201707110077: July 11; Romano, Richard M., 2005 185th Place SE, Apt. T101, Bothell 201707110078: July 11; Shirey, Merrily R., 17818 60th Ave. W, Lynnwood 201707180411: July 18; Crosby Coffee Group Inc., 7825 188th St. SE, Snohomish 201707180412: July 18; Killer Paint, 1033 Ave. D, Suite F, Snohomish 201707180413: July 18; Seekins Painting Inc., 6227 147th Place SE, Everett 201707180414: July 18; Guzman Trucking Inc., 5805 Sixth Ave. NW, Tulalip 201707180415: July 18; Brashear, Sheila R., PO Box 880, Everett 201707180416: July 18; Brashear Sheila R, PO Box 880, Everett 201707180417: July 18; Brashear Sheila R, PO Box 880, Everett 201707180418: July 18; Drexler, Terry J., 21010 120th Drive SE, Snohomish 201707180419: July 18; Brashear, Sheila R., PO Box 880, Everett 201707180420: July 18; Drexler, Terry J., 21010 120th Drive SE, Snohomish 201707180421: July 18; A Kind Heart Inc., 18506 64th Ave. W, Lynnwood 201707180422: July 18; Drexler, Terry J., 21010 120th Drive SE, Snohomish 201707180423: July 18; Erickson, Leah J., 2302 11th St., Snohomish 201707180424: July 18; Drexler, Linda K.,

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 19

21010 120th Drive SE, Snohomish 201707180425: July 18; Clemens-Mitchell, L. K., 6604 224th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201707180426: July 18; Ludington, Mark S., PO Box 212, Arlington 201707180427: July 18; Messinger, Robert G., 14623 Main St., Apt. B103, Mill Creek 201707180428: July 18; Apex Speciality Coatings Inc., 31020 129th Ave. SE, Auburn 201707180429: July 18; Cox, Pamela S., 22015 78th Place W, Edmonds 201707180568: July 18; Paul, Michelle, PO Box 118, Snohomish 201707180569: July 18; Fraley, Michelle, 9906 32nd St. SE, Everett 201707180570: July 18; Knoblaugh, Amelia M., 15520 30th Ave. SE, Mill Creek 201707180571: July 18; Knoblaugh, Amelia M., 15520 30th Ave. SE, Mill Creek 201707250322: July 25; Sarsten, Robert G. Jr., 2801 S Machias Road, Snohomish 201707250323: July 25; Ness, Jennifer M., 12428 67th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201707250324: July 25; Swenson, Susan, 1920 150th Place SE, Mill Creek 201707250325: July 25; Banning, Gloria A., 3122 174th Place SE, Bothell 201707250326: July 25; Banning, Bruce L., 3122 174th Place SE, Bothell 201707250327: July 25; Randall, Jennifer M., 12428 67th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201707250328: July 25; Jung, Hui, 1225 183rd St. SE, Apt. B204, Bothell 201707250329: July 25; Julynard, Roger A., 4719 119th Place SE, Everett 201707250330: July 25; Klassen, Brenda, 12189 Greenhaven, Apt. 110, Mukilteo 201707250331: July 25; Neto, Rosa M., 16028 35th Drive SE, Bothell 201707250332: July 25; Sarsten, Robert G. Jr., 419 McRae Road NW, Arlington 201707250333: July 25; Larsen, Rebeca M., 4817 103rd Place SW, Mukilteo 201707270519: July 27; Helle, Arlana J., 13521 Dubuque Road, Snohomish 201707060437: July 6; Hatcher, Lisbeth, 15401 29th Ave. SE, Mill Creek

Satisfaction of employment security lien 201707110520: July 11; Cote, Malinda M, 4513 Sunnyside Blvd., Marysville 201707140672: July 14; Blue Streak Finishers, State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201707210664: July 21; Henning Concrete & Construction, State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201707210667: July 21; Premier Plumbing & Heating, State Of Washington (Dept Of)

Withdrawal of federal tax liens 201707050414: July 5; Cyr, Toby W., 4319 180th St. SE, Bothell 201707180430: July 18; Mathey, John L., PO Box 14008 Mill Creek

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20 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2017

PLEASE NOTE: Business license information is obtained monthly from the Washington Secretary of State’s Office through the paid commercial services of InfoUSA. For the complete list, please go online to www. theherald businessjournal. com.

Reflections A Window-Gutter: 26310 Tronson Road, Arlington, WA 982239069; Windows Reflective Image Cleaning: 25929 27th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-7667; Janitor Service

Arlington

YJ Squared: 2701 242nd Place SW, Brier, WA 98036-8571

All Service Enterprises: 14313 Highway 530 NE, No. 6, Arlington, WA 98223-5356 Andersen Quality Homes: 3810 166th Place NE, No. 123, Arlington, WA 98223-8403 Arlington Calvary: 225 E Third St., Arlington WA 98223-1327; 360-363-4198; Churches Arlington Farmers Market: 526 N West Ave., No. 36, Arlington, WA 98223-1251; Farm Markets B&H Fire and Security: PO Box 3711, Arlington WA 98223-1700; 425-244-1445; Fire Protection Service Barberry Brook Labradoodles: 26618 Second Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-2610; Dog Breeders Bauer: 19203 59th Ave. NE, Arlington WA 98223; 360-454-0161; Nonclassified Brovo: 6906 Upland Drive, Arlington WA 98223-7872; 360-691-9349; Nonclassified Clint’s Mowing and More: 20520 251st St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-6886; Lawn and Grounds Maintenance DT Staffing Solutions: 3204 Smokey Point Drive, Arlington WA 98223-8476; 360-386-9654; Personnel Consultants Forever Spring Spa: 3405 172nd St. NE, Arlington WA 98223-7717; 360-454-0667; Hot Tubs and Spas JBC Handyman Services and Repair: 28521 Rose Road, Arlington, WA 982237301; Handyman Services Jill’s Clothing Boutique: 16911 119th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-5840; Clothing-Retail L&S Cleaning Services: 16402 42nd Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8437; Janitor Service Moving Unlimited: 3710 168th St. NE, No. B103, Arlington, WA 98223-8463; Movers Mt. Baker Pain Clinic: 16410 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington WA 98223-8415; 360-658-4009; Clinics Northsound Basketball Academy: 13810 95th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 982236267; Amusement and Recreation Not Elsewhere Classified Operation Honey Badger: 440 S Macleod Ave., Arlington, WA 98223-1529 Patriot Meds: 17727 59th Ave. NE, Arlington WA 98223-6446; 360-386-8267; Clinics Premier Risk Solutions: 9717 200th St. NE, Arlington WA 98223-8910; 206-7354956; Nonclassified Psychiatric Nurse Consulting: 19907 Highway 530 NE, Arlington, WA 98223-4530; Nurses and Nurses’ Registries

Brier

Edmonds Aggie’s BBQ: 7533 Olympic View Drive, Edmonds WA 98026-5524; 425-678-1931; Barbecue Restaurant Apex Promotional Products: 500 Elm Way No. 11, Edmonds, WA 980204630; Advertising-Specialties (Wholesale) Arcadia Recovery Bureau: 512 Bell St., Edmonds, WA 98020-3147 Bermudez Landscape: 22810 Edmonds Way, Edmonds, WA 98020-5042; Landscape Contractors Brain Injury Law-Seattle Inc.: 437 5th Ave. S, No. 103, Edmonds WA 98020-3460; 425-307-6001; Physicians and Surgeons Buzzed Sheep: 8017 234th St. SW, No. 327, Edmonds, WA 98026-9308 Cabinetpak Kitchens: 18601 76th Ave. W, Edmonds WA 98026-5559; 425-6781981; Kitchen Remodeling and Planning Services Cinch Packaging Inc.: 320 Dayton St., Edmonds WA 98020-3567; 425-582-0038; Packaging Service Click Hood Cleaning Services: 23416 Highway 99, No. B, Edmonds, WA 98026-9328; Ventilating Systems-Cleaning Creations By Neesey: 11925 Maplewood Ave., Edmonds, WA 98026-3113 Diverse Design Build: 10302 242nd Place SW, Edmonds, WA 98020-5779; Building Designers Driftwood Modern: 403 Main St., Edmonds, WA 98020-3137; 425-582-2162 Ganache: 407 Main St., Edmonds, WA 98020-3137; Bakery Green Dynasty: 5204 162nd Place SW, Edmonds, WA 98026-4716 Green Olive: 8100 242nd St. SW, No. B, Edmonds, WA 98026-9126 Manchester Asset Management: 144 Railroad Ave., Edmonds WA 98020-7207; 425-361-7453; Financial Planning Consultants Mikeduffy.Org: 8423 198th St. SW, Edmonds, WA 980266334; Advertising-Computer Original Craftsman: PO Box 1062, Edmonds, WA 98020-1062 Rainbow Root: 21327 76th Ave. W, No. B7, Edmonds, WA 98026-7532 RB Gould Law Office: 9510 190th Place SW, Edmonds WA 98020-2332; 425-967-3973; Attorneys Roller Derby Skate Shop: 23830 Highway 99, Edmonds WA 98026-9209; 425-6976979; Skating Equipment and Supplies

BUSINESS LICENSES Tara Nash Co: 22714 98th Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98020-5910 Tiemstra Car H: 217 Alder St., No. 303, Edmonds WA 98020-3532; 425-582-7959; Nonclassified

Everett 190 Limited: 11813 Silver Lake Drive, Everett, WA 98208-2526 1st Aid Handyman Repair: 11317 First Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-4919; Handyman Services 520 Landscape and Gardening: PO Box 3075, Everett, WA 98213-1075; Landscape Contractors A Life Of Color: 2909 21st St., Everett, WA 98201-2522 A Magic Cleaning: 12102 Fourth Ave. W, No. 20-305, Everett, WA 98204-6402; Janitor Service A Pleasant Valley Senior Care: 2421 121st St. SW, No. 2421, Everett, WA 982046118; Senior Citizens Service A&D Tire Shop: 910 93rd St. SE, Everett, WA 982083718; Tire-Dealers-Retail A&M Cleaning Services: 912 94th St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-3724; Janitor Service Abbott Construction: 4201 Rucker Ave., Everett WA 98203-2237; 425-263-9210; Construction Companies Alpha Subdivision: 5205 S Second Ave., Everett, WA 98203-4114; 425-374-8154 America’s Quality Cleaning: 9512 First Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-2719; Janitor Service Bara International Solution: 6320 Evergreen Way, Everett WA 98203-4500; 425374-2984; Nonclassified Becoming A Better You: 6623 Morgan Road, Everett, WA 98203-4445 Breath Of Water: 3111 132nd St. SE, No. A103, Everett, WA 98208-6178 Clean Sweeps: 3930 Friday Ave., Everett, WA 982014817; Janitor Service Cleaning Authority: 801 Laurel Drive, Everett, WA 98201-4133; House Cleaning Color Solstice: 12221 Airport Road, No. C207, Everett, WA 98204-8528 Community Health Care Center: 4201 Rucker Ave., Everett WA 98203-2237; 425259-3086; Health Services CPR Cell Phone Repair Everett: 1205 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 982082815; 425-610-4494; Cellular Telephones Crosswoods Circle: 2614 Colby Ave., No. 111, Everett, WA 98201-2922 Crystal Clear Cleaning Services: 204 124th St. SW, No. 3, Everett, WA 982045762; Janitor Service Curries Indian Cuisine: 7318 Evergreen Way, Everett WA 98203-5684; 425-2129020; Restaurants DGK Inc: 1902 120th Place SE, Everett, WA 98208-8400; 425-332-3961 Dunlap Supplement: 7835 Upper Ridge Road, Everett WA 98203-6306; 425-3223143; Nonclassified Dust and Shine: 513 95th Court SE, Everett, WA 98208-

2733; Janitor Service Estafeta USA Inc.: 205 E Casino Road, Everett WA 98208-2603; 425-212-9883; Nonclassified Evanescent Tension: 3508 101st St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-4360 Fleet and Auto: 3824 Smith Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4548; 425-789-1928 Geissler and Ryan: 12403 4th Ave. W, No. 1303, Everett, WA 98204-5714 Glacier Properties: PO Box 5183, Everett, WA 982065183; Real Estate Grand Avenue Consulting: 1601 Grand Ave., Everett, WA 98201-2007; Consultants Hope and Butterflies Inc.: 10121 Evergreen Way, No. 25-455, Everett, WA 98204-3885 Huong Tailor: 901 135th St. SW, Everett, WA 982047346; Tailors Jaguar Landscaping: 12522 8th Ave. W, No. C203, Everett, WA 98204-1853; Landscape Contractors JWJ Designs: 2224 Hoyt Ave., Everett, WA 98201-2815 Kaopole Cleaning: 1010 100th St. SE, No. 828, Everett, WA 98208-2825; Janitor Service King Of Kings Recovery: 2504 Wetmore Ave., Everett WA 98201-2920; 425-3748283; Churches King Of Kings Recovery: 2624 Oakes Ave., Everett WA 98201-3043; 425-249-2094; Churches King Of Kings Towing Services: 12723 15th Ave. W, Everett, WA 98204-5520; Wrecker Service Krispe Grocery: 3510 Broadway, Everett WA 98201-5026; 510-556-6142; Grocers-Retail Lean Bean: 1402 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett WA 98208-2857; 425-789-1458; Nonclassified Lobach Cleaning Services: 3211 132nd St. SE, No. 407, Everett, WA 98208-6163; Janitor Service Maintenance: 525 132nd St. SW, Everett WA 982046383; 425-322-5624; Maintenance Contractors Merciful Care: 2020 129th Place SE, Everett, WA 98208-7123 Minted Tulip: 320 142nd St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-7326 Motoswag: 624 90th St. SW, Everett, WA 98204-1621 NVI Masterpiece: 133 124th St. SE, No. D105, Everett, WA 98208-5795 Pacdmo: 12507 25th Drive SE, Everett, WA 98208-7400 Pacific Cleaning: 2 W Casino Road, No. F129, Everett, WA 98204-7641; Janitor Service Papa Murphy’s Take ‘N’ Bake: 10117 Evergreen Way, Everett WA 98204-3860; 425267-5661; Pizza Pettit Family Ventures: 4530 Fifth Drive SE, Everett, WA 98203-2149 Power Kisses: 14830 48th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-8819 Prime Fades: 1607 California St., Everett WA 98201-3509; 425-374-7822;

Nonclassified Establishment. Providence Seattle Childrens: 900 Pacific Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4168; 425-259-2984 Quick Time Espresso: 1515 112th St. SE, Everett WA 98208-4823; 425-3797078; Coffee Shops Raliberto’s Striping: 730 112th St. SW, No. I3, Everett, WA 98204-7892 RDDII Photography: 5327 Glenwood Ave., No. B, Everett, WA 98203-3084; Photography Regency Cleaners: 10730 19th Ave. SE, Everett WA 98208-5190; 425-585-0639; Cleaners Reyna’s House Cleaning: 4118 Crescent Ave., Everett, WA 98203-2120; House Cleaning Rosa’s Janitorial Services: 11615 Highway 99, No. A201, Everett, WA 98204-7819; Janitor Service RR Flooring Install Services: 2120 Broadway, No. B, Everett, WA 982012320; Floors-Contractors and Builders Samereye: 4620 151st Place SE, Everett, WA 98208-8837 Schlipf Strategic Trading: 5002 115th Place SE, Everett, WA 98208-9108 Shine Star: 1020 112th St. SW, No. B201, Everett, WA 98204-7895 Shu Sheng: 221 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett WA 98208-3239; 425-374-2765; Nonclassified Snoco Lawn Care: 3616 Colby Ave., No. 121, Everett, WA 98201-4773; Lawn and Grounds Maintenance Sound Cleaning Services: 909 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett WA 98208-3746; 425322-4354; Janitor Service Stokes Family: 2315 Fifth St., Everett, WA 98201-1104 Strak and Wayne: 330 126th St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-6419 Tasty Indian Bistro: 510 W Casino Road, Everett WA 98204-1626; 425-267-2444; Restaurants Unique Home: 6923 Evergreen Way, Everett WA 98203-5174; 425-438-4122; Nonclassified Vextron Industries: 2431 Cedar St., Everett, WA 98201-3146 VG Carpenter: 6229 Berkshire Drive, No. B, Everett, WA 98203-3854; Carpenters Westwood Precision: 2615 W Casino Road, Everett, WA 98204-2124; 425-263-3053 WT Consulting: 5431 141st Place SE, Everett, WA 982089457; Consultants Young and Sons Towing: 515 112th St. SE, No. D5, Everett, WA 98208-5017; Wrecker Service Ypark Food: 8530 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98208-2614; Food Products-Retail

Gold Bar A Towne Design: 44311 Fir Road, Gold Bar, WA 98251-9366 C&J West: 509 Stickney Mountain Place, Gold Bar, WA 98251-9463

Granite Falls Angel Movers: 3531 Alyson Drive, Granite Falls, WA 98252-9301; Movers Bour Consulting: 9523 149th Ave. NE, Granite Falls, WA 98252-9211; Consultants Equal Performance Services: 17827 Engebretsen Road, Granite Falls, WA 98252-9628 Guardian FX: 715 E Stanley St., Granite Falls WA 98252-8777; Nonclassified Hiwire Design: PO Box 1799, Granite Falls, WA 98252-1799 Lake Martha Development: PO Box 870, Granite Falls, WA 98252-0870 Maccurdys Hidden Treasure: 101 E Stanley St., Granite Falls WA 98252; 360322-7039; Nonclassified Perfection Services: 23517 Hidden Valley Road, Granite Falls, WA 98252-9305 Ye Gods Services: 21222 133rd St. NE, Granite Falls, WA 98252-8531

Lake Stevens Anchored In Paradise: 8331 22nd St. NE, Lake Stevens WA 98258-6483; Nonclassified Blue Ridge Northwest: 529 119th Ave. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8019 Conley Homes and Design: 3015 112th Ave. SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-5644 Detailed Designs: 7927 8th St. SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-3601 Dragon Mountain Studio: 11028 Callow Road, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8479 Klocker Norms: 9532 24th Place NE, Lake Stevens WA 98258-8794; 425-397-0955; Nonclassified Spitfire and Spunk: 12428 Second St. SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8652 Spring Meadows Cleaning: 2305 117th Ave. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 982588447; Janitor Service Technological Beauties: 806 77th Drive SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-7393 Tiger Inc.: 13219 68th St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9361 Torset Team: 8329 20th St. SE, Lake Stevens WA 98258-4710; 425-263-9332; Nonclassified Valanc3 Consulting: 1421 72nd Ave. SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-7354; Consultants Wendy’s: 819 91st Ave. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258; 425-322-4598; Restaurants

Lynnwood Alternatives Service: 19009 33rd Ave. W, Lynnwood WA 98036-4717; 425-697-3839; Services Not Elsewhere Classified Arc Watch Works and Engraving: 3000 184th St. SW, Lynnwood WA 980374718; 425-697-3799; Engravers-Metal (Manufacturers) CA Senior Lynnwood WA Property: 4015 164th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6902; Real Estate


BUSINESS LICENSES Cathy’s Closet: 4220 148th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1822 Corndoggery: 15631 Ash Way, No. D403, Lynnwood, WA 98087-5356 Denali: 17704 14th Place W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4056 Dreke Designs: 20716 54th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7622 Executive Towing: 1503 N Lake Stickney Drive, Lynnwood, WA 98087-2025; Wrecker Service Full Armor: PO Box 5268, Lynnwood, WA 98046-5268 Giron Insurance: 1120 164th St. SW, Lynnwood WA 98087-8190; 425-582-0916; Insurance Halo Branded Solutions: 19730 64th Ave. W, Lynnwood WA 98036-5957; 425482-2000; Nonclassified Insignia D&M: 4100 194th St. SW, No. 390, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4613 Little Sugar Kisses: 16206 Second Place W, No. 1, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6620 Lynnwood City Senior Center: 19501 40th Ave. W, Lynnwood WA 98036-5723; 425-697-3608; Senior Citizens Service M Burns Consulting: 1308 215th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-8683; Consultants Made By Jazzy: 17308 59th Place W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-2830 Makaymax Inc: 3400 188th St. SW SE, Lynnwood, WA 98037 Metsker Maps: 3000 184th St. SW, Lynnwood WA 98037-4718; 425-673-8165; Maps-Dealers Miigoi Inc: 4123 Lincoln Way, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1630 Mixed: 3220 147th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-3401 Mukilteo School District: 1625 Madison Way, Lynnwood WA 98087-6024; 425741-2286; School Districts Paradise Spot: 19031 33rd Ave. W, No. 207, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4731 Priyavi Redmond Ridge: 19031 33rd Ave. W, No. 207, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4731 Queen Bee Cleaning Services: 3702 203rd Place SW, Lynnwood WA 98036-9129; 425-321-0348; Janitor Service Renton Landing Holding: 5827 204th St. SW, Lynnwood WA 98036-7564; 425-6722035; Holding Companies Revelationist: 17610 14th Place W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4031 RSF Enterprises: PO Box 195, Lynnwood, WA 98046-0195 Sabillon: 19717 27th Place W, No. A, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7885 Sea Line Cleaning Services: 2820 Lincoln Way, No. A, Lynnwood, WA 980875620; Janitor Service Seattle Junk Haul: 6619 210th St. SW, No. B206, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7316; Trucking-Heavy Hauling Seattle Theological Seminary: 14509 11th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98087-8501; Religious Organizations

Sentry Northwest: 19730 64th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5957; 425-412-3071 Sesek String Studio: 15503 18th Ave. W, No. 6h, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6083 Showfer Media: 19730 64th Ave. W, Lynnwood WA 98036-5957; 425-967-3526 Silver Spurs: 1033 188th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4910 Superior Services: PO Box 164, Lynnwood, WA 98046-0164 Tony: 2620 197th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4952 U Lin Bistro: 1120 164th St. SW, Lynnwood WA 98087-8190; 425-678-0121; Restaurants Upshift Consulting: 601 152nd Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-2124; Consultants Valintina: 15305 Highway 99, No. 10, Lynnwood, WA 98087-5006 Viarv: 13718 Mukilteo Speedway, Lynnwood WA 98087-1661; 425-361-7583; Nonclassified Walker Ballew and Associates: 3333 164th St. SW, No. 1723, Lynnwood, WA 98087-3183 Wayne Lodge: PO Box 1955, Lynnwood, WA 98046-1955 Zeleke Mulu-Work: 14501 47th Place W, Lynnwood WA 98087-1857; 425-361-1713; Nonclassified

Marysville Chloe’s Complete Cleaning Services: 5731 140th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98271-6623; Janitor Service Christina Maria The Stylist: 1505 Third St., Marysville, WA 98270-5001 Crotus No Selection: 4711 64th St. NE, Marysville WA 98270-4495; 360-548-3907; Nonclassified Differentiated Selves: 1106 Columbia Ave., No. 100, Marysville, WA 98270-4311 Dos Gallitos: 202 State Ave., Marysville WA 982705108; 360-386-8847; Nonclassified Early Bloomers: 7318 44th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-3716; 360-658-3336 Evergreen Cleaning Services: 12713 48th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-8667; Janitor Service Gardner Enterprises: 7310 46th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-8966 Great Northern Flooring: 9920 State Ave., Marysville WA 98270-2255; 360-3869401; Floor Laying Refinishing and Resurfacing HN Spa and Nails: 1246 State Ave., No. B, Marysville, WA 98270-3694; Health Spas Image By Kelz: 5622 104th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-6618 Judah: 8245 42nd Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-6860 Luckybug Creatives: 12921 58th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-8733 Rolland Thomas: 7707 61st St. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-8955 Royal Designs By Josh:

PO Box 205, Marysville, WA 98270-0205 Shatae Okay Studio: 9510 62nd Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-2466 SL Brooks Consulting: 8354 75th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-7783; Consultants Sunshine Massage: 1620 Third St., Marysville WA 98270-5004; 360-691-9289; Massage Therapists Total Innovation: 6532 94th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-2883 Touchof: 1010 State Ave., No. 265, Marysville, WA 98270-6009 Tri-Star Express: 3818 80th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-3614 Villins Kustoms: 7701 75th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-6542

Mill Creek Aihpa: 3630 148th St. SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-4268 Delizioso Gelato: 15111 Main St., Mill Creek WA 98012-9034; 425-225-5733; Ice Cream Parlors JWP Construction: 16300 Mill Creek Blvd., Mill Creek WA 98012-1737; 425-224-4523; Construction Companies L&M Capital Group: 3108 149th Place SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-4810 Mister Mo’s Window Cleaning: 15325 33rd Drive SE, Mill Creek, WA 980127833; Window Cleaning Near Me Towing: 914 164th St. SE, No. 483-B12, Mill Creek, WA 98012-6385; Wrecker Service Nord Escapes: 16012 29th Drive SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-7821 Northwest Systems: 13425 31st Ave. SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-5625; 425-225-5616 Onhaus Technology: 14529 N Creek Drive, No. B209, Mill Creek, WA 98012-5471 Sparkling Mama: 15212 14th Court SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-8474 Vacations Tailored: 13400 Dumas Road, No. E1, Mill Creek WA 98012-5569; Amusement and Recreation WA Business Services: 16300 Mill Creek Blvd., No. 201, Mill Creek WA 980121286; 425-357-8783; Business Services Not Elsewhere Classified Woodinville Pediatrics: 4220 132nd St. SE, Mill Creek WA 98012-8999; 425948-7076; Physicians and Surgeons

Monroe AFCO Performance Group: 101 E Main St., No. 206, Monroe, WA 982721519; 360-863-6180 Bargain Stumble: 22328 151st Place SE, Monroe, WA 98272-8414 Busy Creative: 15698 168th Ave. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-2695 Elliott Con: 19163 Rainier View Road SE, Monroe, WA 98272-8339 Humanista Projects: 14919

239th Drive SE, Monroe, WA 98272-7622 MCD and More: 15225 179th Ave. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-1115 Madison Hill Chapel: 307 N Madison St., Monroe, WA 98272-1410 Rich Brothers Constructors Inc.: 204 W Main St., Monroe WA 98272-1829; 360-794-6050; General Contractors Rustin’ Relics: 14919 211th Ave. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-9740 Ualani: 13105 200th Ave. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-8797 Urrutia’s Landscaping: 18679 Rainier View Road SE, Monroe, WA 98272-8301; Landscape Contractors Voltage House: 15115 174th Ave. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-1045 Wharry Enterprises: 17514 158th Place SE, Monroe, WA 98272-1609 Zinntopia: 20302 N High Rock Road, Monroe, WA 98272-8859

Mountlake Terrace Grytte Shop: 4106 225th Place SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-4551 Waipaheaina: 6608 216th St. SW, No. 106a, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-2038

Mukilteo B Wilde Designs: 13430 42nd Ave. W, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5904 Champion Spa: 8410 Mukilteo Speedway, Mukilteo WA 98275-3233; 425-2129438; Health Spas Coin Development: 9421 53rd Ave. W, No. M, Mukilteo, WA 98275-3344 Helping Hands: 415 Fifth St., Mukilteo, WA 98275-1537 Heritage Symphony: 12508 55th Place W, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5520 Mapal Inc.: 12003 Mukilteo Speedway, Mukilteo WA 98275-5733; 425-322-5304; Nonclassified Murnan Enterprises: 9321 61st Ave. W, Mukilteo, WA 98275-3545 Nature Together: 9111 46th Place W, Mukilteo, WA 98275-3473 Nelia’s Cleaning: 5025 84th St. SW, No. B, Mukilteo, WA 98275-2945; Janitor Service Puttist USA: 6715 Waterton Circle, Mukilteo, WA 98275-4860 Studio Lux Pilates: 12199 Village Center Place, Mukilteo WA 98275-5313; 425-2909303; Pilates Summer Boyd Marketng and Consultng: 4516 131st Place SW, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5826; Marketing

SEPTEMBER 2017

98290-9045 Built To Last: 21609 Echo Lake Road, Snohomish, WA 98296-7857 Debash: 821 Cottage Ave., Snohomish, WA 98290-2491 Earthen Studios: 20721 Highway 9 SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-8316 Equitus Mortgage: 4808 134th Place SE, Snohomish WA 98296-8915; 425-2244720; Real Estate Loans Genesis Healthcare: 800 10th St., Snohomish WA 98290-2131; 425-659-3811; Health Services Honeycomb and Soul: 17707 W Interurban Blvd., Snohomish, WA 98296-5352 Jack and Jill Enterprise: 19309 78th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-7979 Las Mujeres Tango Marathon: 15206 67th Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-8980; Non-Profit Organizations Mam Nurse Consulting: 9319 W Meadow Lake Drive, Snohomish, WA 98290-7200; Nurses and Nurses’ Registries Mobileone: 1001 Ave. D, Snohomish, WA 98290-2018; 360-563-2420 Nelson Accounting-Bus Consultng: 20603 127th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 982963937; Accounting and Bookkeeping General Services Our Table Inc.: PO Box 889, Snohomish WA 982910889; Nonclassified Pilchuck Technology Solutions: 17717 56th St. NE, Snohomish, WA 98290-7756 Planet Preview: 22121 138th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-5430 Shisler Tech: 11108 Chennault Beach Road, No. 101, Mukilteo, WA 98275-4903 Shodun: 1526 Lake View Ave., Snohomish, WA 98290-1856 Shoetini: 10216 219th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-7114 South Snohomish Valley: 8626 E Lowell Larimer Road, Snohomish, WA 98296-5903; 360-668-7918 Tactical Topcoats: 12900 Robinhood Lane, Snohomish, WA 98290-8688 Team Tracy: 17607 OK Mill Road, Snohomish, WA 98290-9633 Vannoy Millennium: 12914 72nd St. SE, Snohomish WA

98290-9084; 360-568-8356; Nonclassified Wells Integrity Services: 4527 144th Place SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-6915 Whole Land Services: 6413 123rd Ave. SE, No. 46, Snohomish, WA 98290-5536 Woobot Inc.: 20118 107th Place SE, Snohomish WA 98290-3257; Nonclassified

Stanwood Bellevue Commercial Cleaning: 2506 255th St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-9251; Janitor Service Chantelle Frosig Agency: 7202 267th St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-6270; 360-629-6000 Crow Island Farms: 27014 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood WA 98292-8019; 360-5723249; Farms Debron Ventures: 22011 Marine Drive, Stanwood WA 98292-6118; Nonclassified Earth and Stone Landscaping: 27228 103rd Drive NW, Stanwood, WA 982927420; Landscape Contractors Messages From Beyond: 7004 288th St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-8401 My Sisters Attic: 14011 70th Ave. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-6959 Radius Church: 9612 270th St. NW, Stanwood WA 98292-1906; 360-939-0637; Churches South Sno Valley: 2305 Norman Road, Stanwood, WA 98292-9225 Striv Coffee House: 7208 267th St. NW, No. 103a, Stanwood WA 98292-6289; 360-631-5833; Coffee Shops

Sultan R Kossian Designs: 14006 339th Ave. SE, Sultan, WA 98294-9600

Tulalip A Client 4 You: 1620 Delia Jimicum Place NW, Tulalip, WA 98271-7091 Cole’s Sports: 25 Cedar Loop Road, Tulalip, WA 98271-7082 Dragon Way: 115 92nd St. NW, Tulalip, WA 98271-6416 Triple B Transport: 6021 Marine Drive, Tulalip WA 98271-6862; Trucking

Transmissions of Marysville European • Japanese • Domestic One Day Service/Rebuilds in Stock 36 mo. Unlimited Mileage. Warranty Available

Snohomish 1 New Mechanical: 11906 206th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-7623; Mechanical Contractors A Cut Above: 7220 69th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-6032 Bella Design: 7826 147th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 21

Free Local Towing w/Major Repair www.edstransmissions.com

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(360) 653-1835 10226 State Ave. Marysville


22 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2017

SNOHOMISH COUNTY ECONOMIC DATA Pending sales, residential real estate

Closed sales, residential real estate

Unemployment rate, percent

Continued unemployment claims

Aerospace employment

Construction employment

Professional services employment

Local sales tax distributions, Snohomish County and incorporated cities

01/13

1,154

713

7.1

9,962

46,800

15,600

22,600

$4,466,777

02/13

1,236

673

6.3

9,182

46,600

15,300

22,500

$5,680,845

03/13

1,576

932

5.7

9,060

46,400

15,400

22,500

$4,093,977

04/13

1,500

1,020

4.9

8,891

46,100

15,500

22,900

$3,970,313

05/13

1,487

1,131

4.7

8,093

45,500

15,800

22,700

$4,725,432

06/13

1,488

1,159

5.7

7,888

45,700

16,200

22,900

$4,316,634

07/13

1,470

1,141

5.6

7,787

45,900

18,000

24,000

$4,584,288

08/13

1,402

1,143

6.2

7,062

44,900

18,400

24,000

$4,921,104

09/13

1,150

1,032

N/A

7,180

45,100

18,300

24,000

$3,573,194

10/13

1,219

1,041

6.0

7,149

44,500

18,200

23,900

$4,998,366

11/13

1,010

833

5.7

7,499

44,300

17,900

24,200

$5,132,975

12/13

835

871

5.3

8,829

44,700

17,800

24,000

$3,348,852

01/14

1,195

615

6.0

9,651

44,000

14,500

23,300

$3,382,321

02/14

1,180

688

6.4

8,850

43,700

14,800

23,100

$4,087,089

03/14

1,481

949

6.0

8,897

43,700

14,800

23,400

$3,013,059

04/14

1,454

943

4.9

8,069

43,400

14,800

23,100

$2,923,521

05/14

1,718

1,074

5.0

7,502

43,600

15,100

23,100

$3,370,904

06/14

1,545

1,220

5.1

7,177

44,400

15,400

23,300

$3,290,880

07/14

1,457

1,172

5.3

6,587

44,000

18,400

23,500

$3,474,651

08/14

1,393

1,163

5.4

6,244

43,000

18,800

23,800

$3,695,926

09/14

1,328

1,057

5.1

N/A

42,900

18,800

23,800

$3,838,762

10/14

1,327

1,113

4.8

N/A

41,400

18,300

24,200

$3,663,750

11/14

1,027

885

4.8

6,093

41,800

18,000

24,100

$3,852,205

12/14

956

920

4.5

N/A

42,000

17,700

24,100

$3,582,032

1/15

1,237

686

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$3,280,200

2/15

1,406

740

5.3

6,663

43,000

17,200

23,700

$4,146,999

3/15

1,938

1,075

4.5

6,762

42,800

17,500

24,000

$2,981,599

4/15

1,747

1,272

3.6

6,273

42,800

18,100

24,100

$3,041,795

5/15

1,777

1,315

4.0

5,923

42,800

18,600

24,000

$3,654,693

6/15

1,799

1,374

4.3

5,607

42,700

19,200

24,400

$3,445,201

7/15

1,764

1,411

4.3

5,323

44,100

20,700

25,000

$3,590,957

8/15

1,634

1,442

3.9

5,367

43,600

21,200

25,300

$11,743,713

9/15

1,501

1,290

4.1

5,089

43,600

21,200

25,200

$11,603,019

10/15

1,503

1,178

4.5

5,109

43,400

20,400

25,100

$10,854,566

11/15

1,307

973

5.0

5,748

43,500

20,100

24,900

$11,503,562

12/15

1,067

1,189

5.0

6,193

43,600

19,800

25,300

$10,765,437

1/16

1,249

811

5.7

7,085

43,600

19,300

24,500

$10,477,405

2/16

1,475

848

5.3

6,388

43,500

19,600

24,500

$13,559,687

3/16

1,825

1,156

5.2

6,084

43,100

20,000

24,800

$9,496,443

4/16

1,836

1,213

4.4

5,957

43,300

19,800

25,600

$9,617,406

5/16

1,979

1,386

4.8

5,770

43,300

20,300

25,800

$11,697,044

6/16

1,862

1,493

4.7

5,396

43,800

21,000

26,400

$10,816,389

7/16

1,795

1,515

4.8

5,489

44,000

21,700

26,400

$11,102,633

8/16

1.873

1,538

4.4

5,502

43,900

22,100

26,500

$12,493,656

9/16

1,601

1,431

4.3

5,377

43,500

22,200

26,500

$12,193,233

10/16

1,561

1,364

4.0

5,502

42,100

22,800

26,700

$12,195,581

11/16

1,314

1,270

4.2

5,774

42,100

22,500

26,600

$12,515,314

12/16

1,104

1,145

3.9

6,187

42,100

22,300

26,600

$11,120,365

1/17

1,238

938

4.2

8,226

41,800

21,200

26,500

$11,114,968

2/17

1,296

904

3.7

6,551

41,200

21,500

26,200

$14,139,163

3/17

1,614

1,167

3.5

6,245

41,300

21,700

27,600

$10,378,749

4/17

1,527

1,116

3.1

6,247

40,400

22,000

28,000

$10,024,215

5/17

1,948

1,394

3.5

5,661

39,900

22,300

28,000

$12,095,386

6/17

1,957

1,558

4.1

5,445

39,200

22,900

28,400

$10,987,362

7/17

1,856

1,556

4.0

5,569

38,500

23,600

27,600

$11,646,311

Consumer price index, King and Snohomish counties 239.90

240.82

242.82

242.77

242.78

241.05

242.77

246.61

247.64

247.18

247.854

245.05

245.496

247.611

251.622

251.617

250.831

250.385

250.942

253.815

256.098

256.907

256.941

256.821

259.503

261.560 263.756


SEPTEMBER 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 23

ECONOMIC DATA Boeing stock price

PUD retail electricity use, kilowatt hours

Snohomish County PUD connections

New vehicle registrations

Average gas price (regular, unleaded

01/13

$73.87

700,861,857

223

4,656

$3.37

02/13

$76.90

674,618,017

316

3,753

$3.62

03/13

$85.85

608,606,315

330

4,713

$3.80

04/13

$91.41

617,541,384

321

4,943

$3.64

05/13

$99.05

492,112,324

276

5,256

$3.83

06/13

$102.32

465,163,451

213

5,275

$3.79

07/13

$105.10

453,404,099

322

5,622

$3.82

08/13

$103.92

470,067,543

232

5,742

$3.78

09/13

$117.50

410,719,601

338

5,141

$3.65

10/13

$138.36

518,766,206

461

5,179

$3.44

11/13

$133.83

461,012,493

447

4,083

$3.24

12/13

$136.92

671,835,200

244

4,752

$3.29

01/14

$125.26

696,306,571

421

5,726

$3.36

02/14

$128.92

682,348,469

386

4,467

$3.31

03/14

$125.49

610,841,349

352

5,428

$3.75

04/14

$129.02

605,381,115

368

6,389

$3.74

05/14

$135.25

468,754,469

466

6,542

$3.87

06/14

$127.23

492,917,254

412

6,626

$3.93

07/14

$120.48

432,682,894

444

6,611

$3.95

08/14

$126.80

463,314,006

363

5,614

$3.83

09/14

$127.38

451,089,566

264

5,987

$3.74

10/14

$124.91

496,335,315

403

5,929

$3.40

11/14

$134.36

422,769,229

426

4,867

$3.04

12/14

$132.25

663,368,433

426

6,072

$2.88

1/15

$145.37

634,592,067

209

6,364

$2.30

2/15

$150.85

611,633,434

287

5,889

$2.30

3/15

$150.08

567,831,393

284

7,707

$2.85

4/15

$143.34

578,264,358

427

8,057

$2.70

5/15

$140.52

449,046,426

326

8,649

$3.05

6/15

$138.72

494,611,488

384

9,852

$3.10

7/15

$144.17

451,503,602

334

7,641

$3.20

8/15

$130.68

474,207,621

242

7,021

$3.09

9/15

$130.95

557,429,310

442

7,018

$2.79

10/15

$148.07

477,438,877

217

6,828

$2.49

11/15

$145.45

491,536,717

221

5,631

$2.41

12/15

$144.59

686,858,030

282

6,995

$2.35

1/16

$120.13

634,697,183

333

6,910

$2.33

2/16

$118.18

655,390,592

333

7,298

$2.02

3/16

$126.94

612,151,814

288

9,209

$2.12

4/16

$134.80

514,320,049

428

8,364

$2.25

5/16

$126.15

457,566,044

342

8,906

$2.44

6/16

$129.87

463,105,233

277

10,754

$2.57

7/16

$133.66

430,295,041

435

8,268

$2.56

8/16

$129.45

467,001,501

325

8,315

$2.49

9/16

$131.74

454,085,665

394

7,628

$2.60

10/16

$142.43

452,214,305

401

6,861

$2.64

11/16

$150.56

495,372,342

331

6,360

$2.59

12/16

$155.68

658,223,433

620

6,663

$2.47

1/17

$163.42

783,258,995

512

7,048

$2.69

2/17

$180.23

653,923,271

537

6,279

$2.67

3/17

$176.86

692,459,353

533

9,462

$2.73

4/17

$184.83

530,371,921

324

8,364

$2.79

5/17

$187.63

497,975,765

579

8,869

$2.44

6/17

$197.75

463,060,012

399

10,754

$2.72

7/17

$242.46

444,943,513

330

7,303

$2.70

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24 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2017

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Herald Business Journal - 09.01.2017  

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Herald Business Journal - 09.01.2017  

i20170905064731822.pdf