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families today PENINSULA

April 2017

volume 7, issue 2

A special supplement produced by the Peninsula Daily News and Sequim Gazette

GETTING READY FOR SUMMER Camp registration is underway. Don’t miss enrollment deadlines for camps across the Olympic Peninsula — Page 8

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO PENINSULA DAILY NEWS AND SEQUIM GAZETTE

PENINSULA FAMILIES TODAY APRIL 2017 1


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WOMEN’S HEALTH

Women’s healthcare for all of life’s stages. From your first annual exam, to life after menopause – and everything in between.

families today PENINSULA

Published by the Peninsula Daily News and Sequim Gazette advertising department Peninsula Daily News 305 W. First St. Port Angeles, WA 98362 360-452-2345

Sequim Gazette 147 W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-3311

Terry R. Ward, regional publisher Steve Perry, general manager Patricia Morrison Coate, Brenda Hanrahan and Laura Lofgren, special sections editors 741839603

Peninsula Families Today is looking for story ideas, news tips and more Peninsula Families Today is a family-focused publication and is inserted into both the Peninsula Daily News and Sequim Gazette. Please let us know what you’d like to see in the next issue of Peninsula Families Today. This publication welcomes input and new contributors. Educators, parents and professionals in their fields are invited to contribute informative and educational articles or columns for consideration. We cannot guarantee publication due to space and content considerations. If your submission is accepted, we reserve the right to edit it. Send articles, columns and photos (JPEGs at 200 dpi minimum) to section editor Brenda Hanrahan at bhanrahan@peninsuladailynews.com. For details, phone 360-452-2345.

The new Jefferson Healthcare Women’s Clinic is now open and accepting patients. We are proud to introduce Dr. Ann Hoffman, board-certified in Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Jane Albee, ARNP. They bring decades of experience specializing in women’s health, wellness and preventative care.

WOMEN’S CLINIC OPEN HOUSE | MAY 1ST, 4:00 PM Enjoy food and beverages. Meet the Women’s Clinic care team. Learn more about the many services we offer.

Call 360.344.0403 | Visit JeffersonWomensClinic.com

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PENINSULA FAMILIES TODAY APRIL 2017 3


North Olympic Library System has an abundance of programs this spring by PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

HIT THE TRAILS WITH POETRY IN NATURE

The North Olympic Library System (NOLS) is offering multiple programs in April in celebration of National Poetry Month. For the fourth season, NOLS has partnered with Olympic National Park to provide Poetry Walks. Throughout April and May, signs featuring poetry will be placed on four trails in Olympic National Park. Additionally, state Poet Laureate Tod Marshall will join NOLS for a Poetry Reading and Q & A session at 6 p.m. at the Forks Library, 171 S. Forks Ave., on Friday, April 21. Marshall will also lead a short hike and guided writing workshop on Saturday, April 22, along the Marymere Falls trail at Lake Crescent. Preregistration is required for the hike and workshop; to register, visit your local library or visit www.nols.org and select “Events.”

BRING THE FAMILY TOGETHER AT YOUR LIBRARY On Saturday, April 29, NOLS will join hundreds of libraries across the nation in celebration of El día de los

niños/El día de los libros (Children’s Day/Book Day). Bilingual library programs will feature books, songs, crafts and games in both Spanish and English. These programs will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave.; 1 p.m. at the Forks

PreSchool PreSchool PreSchool

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Queen Queen ofQueen Angels of Angels of Angels

photo courtesy of NORTH OLYMPIC LIBRARY SYSTEM

The entire family, including the family dog, can participate in Poetry Walks this spring. Free events celebrate April as National Poetry Month and include nature walks, a poetry reading and a guided writing workshop.

LOVE LOVE LEARN LOVE LEARN LEARN GROW GROW GROW

Library; and 2 p.m. at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St. All children in attendance will receive a free book. >> LIBRARY SPRING PROGRAMS continued on Page 5

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1007 South Oak St. 360-457-6903 South St. Port1007 Angeles, WAOak 98362 www.qofaschool.org Port360-457-6903 Angeles, WA 98362 Spots are also available in our 360-457-6903 www.qofaschool.org K-8 classes. Please contact www.qofaschool.org the school for more details.

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>> LIBRARY SPRING PROGRAMS continued from Page 4

Put on your dancing shoes and grab your neighbors, your friends and your friends’ neighbors. Don’t miss these fun-filled performances on May 2 at 6:30 p.m. at the Port Angeles Library; May 3 at 10:30 a.m. at the Sequim Boys & Girls Club, 400 W. Fir St. in Sequim; and May 4 at 7 p.m. at Neah Bay Elementary School, 3560 Deer St. in Neah Bay. Olympic National Park and NOLS are also teaming up for Endangered Species Day Storytime at 10:30 a.m. on Friday, May 19, at Olympic National Park’s Visitor Center, 3002 Mount Angeles Road in Port Angeles. This special storytime for ages 3 to 5 will feature a puppet show, stories, songs and crafts with a focus on biodiversity.

BORROW AND EXPLORE

NOLS offers a multitude of non-traditional items available for borrowing and exploring the outdoors with your family. Plan, borrow, learn and grow with the new NOLS Grows Seed Library. The seed library can help you plan your garden, learn how to grow your own food and save quality fertile seeds for next year. This seed exchange kiosk is stocked with small, pre-packaged quantities of free vegetable seeds and other educational materials related to gardening, growing and seed-saving. The NOLS Grows Seed Library is located in the Port Angeles Library near the Reference Collection. You can also find a plethora of other fun items to borrow at the library, that will inspire you to get outside this spring.

photo courtesy of NORTH OLYMPIC LIBRARY SYSTEM

The new North Olympic Library System Grows Seed Library encourages people to plan, borrow, learn and grow healthy food and beautiful flowers by exchanging seeds.

Track your steps with pedometers, search for treasure with geocaching kits or discover local birds with birding kits. Explore your surroundings with telescopes, Olympic daypacks (including day passes to Olympic National Park), walkie talkies and pool passes to local swim centers. NOLS has something to inspire everyone to explore

the community this spring. Keep an eye out for programs for adults in May, including a visit by author Jayne Ann Krentz, a NASA presentation, computer privacy education, a media literacy talk and much more. For more information about programs at North Olympic Library System libraries, visit www.nols.org and select “Events.”

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR 2017/2018

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photo courtesy of NORTH OLYMPIC LIBRARY SYSTEM

State Poet Laureate Tod Marshall will give a poetry reading and answer attendees’ questions during a free event April 21 at the Forks Library in honor of National Poetry Month.

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Helping children process the death of a family pet by MOLLY DICKSON, office manager at Blue Mountain Animal Clinic

The loss of a pet can be a traumatic and difficult time for adults; the same is true of children, with the added confusion of a lack of life experience to cope with the event. The loss of a pet may be the first time a child comes face to face with death. This is not a dress rehearsal; it is the real thing and needs a sensitive response to offer your child the tools to cope with the loss. When speaking to a child about death, be honest. Your pet is not “going to live on a farm” and hasn’t “run away.” Children are perceptive and are aware of when they are being told a fib, even if it’s a “white lie.” A true explanation may be in order, so be prepared. Involve the child with the preparations leading up to the event such as picking out a burial spot, clipping some fur, making a paw print, feeding a special meal or taking photographs. >> FAMILY PET continued on Page 7

CONFLICT IS NATURAL PDRC is your community resource for conflict resolution.

Equine Connection Workshop: 6 wk program starting mid-may on wk/ends. ■ Program includes a fusion of natural horsemanship,the ABC’s of dressage & rider body awareness thru Pilates. All 6 sessions $250 or $50/session. Sessions are 2 hours long, minimum of 3 participants. We have horses available if you do not have your own. Email ch_equestrian@yahoo.com ■

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• Strengthen your relationships through mediation. • Enroll in We’re In This Together (WITT) an interactive youth and parent weekend seminar. • Enroll in our 40 hour Basic Mediation and Conflict Resolution Training, July 2017.

Contact Karen at karen@pdrc.org Mediations: Family, Parenting Plans, Neighborhood, Workplace, Business, Small Claims, Landlord/Tenant and Foreclosure

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>> FAMILY PET continued from Page 6

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This article was written by Molly Dickson, office manager at Blue Mountain Animal Clinic, 2972 Old Olympic Highway, located between Port Angeles and Sequim. For details, visit www. bluemountainvet.com or phone 360-457-3842.

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Children grieve but with shorter attention spans, so they may grieve in shorter spurts. Younger children have active imaginations and may believe that they can cause events to happen. This has the potential to lead them to believe that the loss is somehow their fault, so they may need reassurance that the loss was not in their control and not their fault. Teenagers are often self-conscious about grieving openly. This grief needs to be expressed or it could result in depression. Grieving varies with a child’s age. The following is an age-appropriate guide for dealing with the loss of the family pet: l Infants feel the stress and tension surrounding the family during the event. Help them with normal routines and lots of cuddles. l Toddlers and preschoolers are often confused by grief and the finality of death. They may believe that their pet will “come alive again” as characters in video games and movies. These children benefit from exploring their emotions through play and crafts. Be patient with their endless questions. l School-age kids are usually able to understand that death is permanent. Including these children in decisions such as where the pet will be laid to rest and answering all questions openly and honestly will help them learn to cope. They will be watching you for acceptable grieving behavior, so awareness of the stages of grief is important. l Teenagers often have a difficult time with the

passing of a pet as they feel they are on the cusp of adulthood and may not wish to express their emotions openly. Encourage them to tell their close friends; a peer support group is often the best way for them to express themselves. l Young adults often experience the end of an era when a childhood pet dies. Giving them the opportunity to say goodbye goes a long way toward aiding the grieving process. Calling to check on them and reassuring them that their grief is normal and touching on the stages of grief will help them with the process. Children can add a depth of grief to your own that may feel burdensome at the time, but their adaptability and recovery can vastly affect your own grief. Professional intervention is sometimes required if you or a family member gets “stuck” during the grieving process.

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Getting ready for SUMMER FUN

Wednesdays and Fridays June 26-30 and Aug. 7-11. Cost is $90 per session. Campers will spend time outdoors and at the center’s touch tanks with trained and attentive counselors. l Junior Explorers Day Camp is for youngsters ages 5 to 7. A morning session from 9 a.m. to noon will be offered Aug. 14-18. Afternoon sessions, held between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m., will be held June 26-30, Aug. 7-11 and Aug. 14-18. Cost is $150 per session. Campers will explore and discover marine and coastal life, animals, plants and secret spots around the center. l Coastal Explorers Day Camp, for children ages 8 to 10, will occur from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. from July 10-14. Cost by PENINSULA DAILY NEWS is $275 per camper. Spring is finally here. Its arrival brings warmer and Camp participants will examine the varied coastal longer daylight hours and the beginning of summer camp environments of beach, glacial bluff, forest, pond and registrations. Many of the Olympic Peninsula’s most pop- meadow. Using observation skills, campers discover how ular camps are filling up fast, so don’t wait until the last these places support life in the coastal ecosystem. school bell rings to find a summer camp that children l Marine Biology Afoot & Afloat, for kids ages 10 to 13, will look forward to attending. will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 17-21. Cost is $400. Camps across the Peninsula offer area youth a chance Students will sail aboard Northwest Maritime Center to stretch their imaginations and legs with an array of vessels while doing scientific investigations. Ashore, stuactive learning activities. dents participate in intertidal surveys and labs in the Here’s a sampling of some of the camps offered in our touch tanks and exhibits. region this summer: l Marine Biology Day Camp will be offered from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 24-28 for kids ages 9 to 13. Cost is $275. JEFFERSON COUNTY Activities will include sieving through gooey sediments HERON POND FARM SUMMER HORSE CAMPS to look for brittle stars, finding out where young fish hide Camps tailored for children 7 and older who love and using microscopes to observe the plankton that suphorses will be offered May 21, June 22-23, July 20-21 and ports all life in the sea. Aug. 17-18 at Heron Pond Farm,152 Douglas Way, in Port Port Townsend Marine Science Center members Townsend. receive $10 off each registration. Heron Pond Farm Summer Horse Camps will feature Scholarships are available to those who qualify. horseback riding, horsemanship skills, crafts and friendFor more information about summer camps at Port ship building in a safe and fun learning environment. Townsend Marine Science Center, email camps@ptmsc. The camp will be presented by qualified and reputable org or phone 360-385-5582, ext. 104. staff using experienced horses. For more information, email Christine Headley at CLALLAM COUNTY ch_equestrian@yahoo.com or phone 360-286-9256. MUSICAL THEATRE INTENSIVE FOR TEENS Olympic Theatre Arts in Sequim is accepting registraYMCA OF JEFFERSON COUNTY tions for its summer workshop program called “Musical Summer day camps will be offered at the YMCA of Jef- Theatre Intensive for Teens.” ferson County, 1925 Blaine St., from June 19-Sept. 1. The workshop is open to teens between the ages of 12 Camps are offered in week-long sessions. and 19. Space is on a first-come, first-served basis. Camps offerings include: Artist Workshop, Basketball, The workshop will run daily from July 24-Aug. 4 from Comic Creations, Dance, Drama O’rama, Flag Football, 9:45 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Olympic Theatre Arts Center, 414 Frisbee Golf, Junior Architects, Mad Scientist, Ninja N. Sequim Ave., where Sequim’s Pacific Pantry will proWarrior, Outdoor Explorers, Picture Perfect, Secret vide lunch. Agents, Soccer, Sports Sampler, Top Chefs, Tennis, Y BakEnrollment is limited to 20 students. ers and Y Directors. Cost is $475. Limited tuition assistance is available. Half-day camps sessions are offered in the morning or Linda Dowdell, a local award-winning musical comafternoon. All-day camps also are available. poser and arranger, will lead the group with Elinore YMCA members pay $85 per half-day camp and $170 O’Connell, a Broadway singer and actor coming to per full-day camp. Sequim from New York City, and Annuel Preston, a Non YMCA members pay $95 per half-day camp and Seattle-based dance and yoga instructor. $190 for a full-day camp. The workshop will focus on “Finding Your Voice,” Financial assistance is available for those who qualify. “Acting a Song,” “Dance Basics,” “Improvisation” and For more information about summer camps, visit www. “Audition Coaching.” olympicpeninsulaymca.org or phone 360-385-5811. Rehearsals will integrate singing, acting, staging and choreography to produce musical numbers. PORT TOWNSEND MARINE SCIENCE CENTER In addition, students will receive individual coaching. The Port Townsend Marine Science Center, 532 BatAfter training as a company, students and staff will tery Way, will offer summer science camps filled with present an informal performance to invited audiences. exploring area beaches, uncovering treasures in its exhibVisit www.olympictheatrearts.org for a registration form its, making crafts, playing games and taking nature or phone the theatre business office at 360-683-7326. walks through Fort Worden State Park. Camps include: DUNGENESS RIVER AUDUBON CENTER The Dungeness River Audubon Center, 2151 W. Henl Seal Pups Day Camp, for preschoolers ages 3 to 4, drickson Road in Sequim, will offer its popular summer will take place from 9:30 a.m. to noon Mondays,

Registration is now underway for a variety of popular summer camps

8  PENINSULA FAMILIES TODAY  April 2017

camp programs to encourage children to learn and have fun while exploring the beauty of the region. Camps include: l Builders Camp, for children ages 8 to 12, will be offered from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 6-7. Camp participants will build bridges, towers, airplanes, boats and more. Cost is $90. l Nature Ninjas! is geared to children ages 8 to 12 and will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 13-14. Campers will learn to become a “nature ninja” by practicing techniques of blending into the woods by mastering camouflage and sneaking skills. Cost is $90. l Girls in Science will be offered for girls ages 7 to 12 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 17-19. Fun and interactive experiments and activities will encourage participants to explore grade-level appropriate topics in biology, chemistry and physics while being introduced to local women in scientific careers. Cost is $120. l Creatures of the Olympic Peninsula, for children ages 8 to 12, will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Aug. 3-4. Campers will learn about different animals that live in our area and explore different animal habitats, discover amazing adaptations, see what it takes to survive and even pretend to be them for a little bit. Cost is $90. l Treasure Hunters is for children ages 8 to 12 and will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 31-Aug. 1. Campers will learn how to read and follow maps as they work to solve riddles and unearth clues to find hidden treasure. Cost is $90. l Summer Nature Camp will be offered for children ages 8 to 12 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Aug. 21-24. The camp aims to help participants understand and enjoy nature through hands-on activities, including games, science investigations, arts, crafts, hikes and a bicycle adventure. Enrollment is limited to 20 campers to guarantee a personal learning experience. Cost is $150. l Bike Camp will be offered for children ages 8 to 14 from 9 a.m. to noon Aug. 7-10. Children must be able to ride 10 miles per day. Participants will learn the basics of bicycle maintenance and ride on trails around Sequim. Bicycle routes will include various locations along the Olympic Discovery Trail and beyond. A bicycle and helmet are required. Cost is $90. All camps are led by environmental educators and naturalists who have backgrounds working with elementary- and middle school-aged youth. For more information about any of the camps, visit www.dungenessrivercenter.org/summer-camps or phone 360-681-4076. BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS The Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula will offer summer programming for area youth throughout the summer. Weekly day camp sessions will begin June 19 at the Carroll C. Kendall Unit, 400 W. Fir St. in Sequim, and Port Angeles Unit, 2620 S. Francis St. Camps run from 7:45 a.m. to noon each weekday. Cost per child is $65 for the week or $15 a day. Participants must be Boys & Girls Club members, and membership dues are $30 per child through December. Each week, the camp’s crafts and activities are centered around a different theme and most are paired with field trips. Parents can sign up children for as many camp weeks as they want — one day, one week or the entire summer. >> SUMMER CAMPS continued on Page 9

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>> SUMMER CAMPS continued from Page 8

All participants receive a free lunch and morning and afternoon snacks as part of the program. After the morning camp wraps up at noon, the clubs are open for general membership from noon to 6 p.m. at no additional charge. The afternoon is packed with programs to keep youth busy and their minds sharp over the summer. For more information on summer programming and camps or to register, stop by either club, phone 360-6838095 in Sequim or 360-417-2831 in Port Angeles, or visit www.bgc-op.org. OLYMPIC NATURE EXPERIENCE A variety of nature-based summer camps will encourage children to create a relationship with a specific place during Olympic Nature Experience summer camps. Camps maximize nature connection time with exploratory wanders, new skills and unifying games. Children will have the opportunity to climb, crawl, sneak, run and get dirty outside while their smiles and confidence grow. Single-day, multiple-day, week-long and month-long camps will be offered from June to August for children ranging in age from 3 to 12. Prices vary depending on the camp selected. Camps offered include: Adventure Club Camp, Wild Coyotes, Way of the Woods, Tribe Camp, Owl’s Hollow Early Learning, Owl’s Hollow Skills, Fairy Camp, Family Story Telling Camp and Young Warriors Camp. For information including camp descriptions, or to register online, visit www.olympicnatureexperience.org.

and Young Chefs. YMCA members pay $75 per week for one class per week or $150 for two classes per week. Non-YMCA members pay $95 per week for one class or $190 for two classes per week. Financial assistance is available for those who qualify. For information about summer camp programs, visit www.olympicpeninsulaymca.org or phone 360-452-9244. In addition to day camps, the YMCA will offer overnight camps. During Family Overnight Camp, held July 1-5, families will have the chance to enjoy an array of activities at Camp David Jr. at Lake Crescent. Cost is $125 per adult community member. Adult YMCA members pay $100. Youth fees are $105 for community members and $80 for YMCA members. The YMCA youth overnight camp — YMCA Camp at Camp Ramblewood in Sequim Bay State Park — for children ages 6 to 12 will be held Aug. 21-25. Camp fees are $275 per child for community members and $225 per child for YMCA members. Overnight camp registration continues through May 24 or until all spaces are filled. For additional overnight camp information, visit www. olympicpeninsulaymca.org or contact Olympic Peninsula YMCA Branch Manager Sarah Grai by email at sgrai@ olympicpeninsulaymca.org, or phone her at 360-385-5811, ext. 290.

FEIRO MARINE LIFE CENTER Port Angeles’ Feiro Marine Life Center and Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary are teaming up to encourage youths to investigate, explore and get inspired by what can be found in the ocean during Junior Oceanographer and TechLab: Teen Workshop summer camps. YMCA OF CLALLAM COUNTY l Junior Oceanographer Camp sessions, for children Summer day camps at the Clallam County YMCA, 302 ages 5 to 6, is scheduled for June 26-29; for ages 7 to 9, Francis St. in Port Angeles, are offered each week from July 10-13; for ages 10 to 12, July 17-20 (marine biology June 19-Aug. 25. theme); for ages 10 to 12, Aug. 7-10 (underwater robotics Campers can register for one or more weeks and have theme); and for ages 5 to 6, Aug. 14-17. options of morning or afternoon classes or both. Unless specified, camps are for children ages 5 to 12. l Older youth, ages 13 to 15, can sign up for TechLab: A wide variety of camps are available, including: Teen Workshop from July 24-27. Amazing Race, Archery, Art Explorers, Basketball, Beach This summer camp will focus on hands-on engineering, Explorers, Cheerleading, Crazy Art Camp, Creative technology and ocean science. Participants will complete Movement-Dance, Extreme Adventures Parks Tour, Flag advanced activities, such as building programming and Football, Flight Explorers, Fresh Water Explorers, Gear deploying ocean sensors, using digital microscopes to Heads, Lego Madness, Master Art Explorers, Ninja make images and videos of marine life and more. Warrior, Pay It Forward, Polynesian Dancing, Secrets and The camp is taught in partnership with center staff Spies, Sewing, Soccer, Stack Attack, Street Art, Swim and sanctuary scientists. Lessons, Trail Blazers Hiking Club, Volleyball, H2O Go! Early-bird rates are available for those who sign up

JUAN DE FUCA DISCOVERY ARTS CAMP Art and The Human Machine 2.0 will be offered by the Juan de Fuca Foundation of the Arts for children ages 7 to 12 from July 17-21. The summer camp, held at Jefferson Elementary School, 218 E. 12th St. in Port Angeles, will focus on drama, creative movement, visual arts and music. Cost is $100 for Juan de Fuca Foundation of the Arts members and $120 for others. Optional camp T-shirts are available for $7. For more information about the camp, visit www.jffa. org/juan-de-fuca-discovery-arts-camp, or contact Carol Pope at 360-457-5411 or carolpope@jffa.org. Financial assistance is available for those in need. A “Financial Assistance Form” is located online under the “Participate” tab: http://jffa.org/participate-2/doyou-need-financial-assistance/. 4-H CTA SEWING DAY CAMP Clallam County 4-H and WSU clothing textile advisors will offer 4-H CTA Sewing Day Camp for youth ages 8-18. The camp will be held the mornings of July 25-28 at Viking Sew and Vac, 707 E. First St. in Port Angeles. At the camp, youth will learn to navigate their sewing machine and use basic sewing tools. The camp will provide opportunities for youth at various skill levels from beginning to independent. Please have your child bring a sewing machine. A limited number of machines are available for use and can be reserved at registration. Clallam County 4-H youth development programs teach life skills through hands-on project experiences. Cost is $45 per youth. Scholarships are available. Space is limited. The registration deadline is June 1. To register, contact Jenny Schmidt, 4-H program coordinator, at 360-417-2398 or email jenny.schmidt@wsu.edu.

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before May 1. The cost for full-day camps — 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. — is $130 for Feiro members or $150 full price. Half-day camp — 9 a.m. to noon — is $85 for Feiro members or $100 full price. Beginning May 1, prices for full-day camps rise to $150 for Feiro members or $175 full price. Half-day camp prices will rise to $125 full price. A limited number of scholarships are available on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information, phone Feiro Marine Life Center at 360-417-6254 or visit www.feiromarinelifecenter.org/ youth-programs.

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Community Supported Agriculture programs offer eating adventures by KIA ARMSTRONG AND PATTY MCMANUS-HUBER, of Nash’s Organic Produce

Spring has finally sprung and farmers all over the Olympic Peninsula are shaking off winter’s chill and eagerly prepping fields for row crops and grains and filling greenhouses with veggie transplants. It’s an exciting time of year as seeds for future harvests are sown and local growers put everything they’ve got into the new growing season. Local farmers are committed to growing healthy food for their community, and spring is a perfect opportunity for local families to partner with growers to make it all happen. Farmers face many challenges, especially early in spring when their product range is smaller. Winter produce is gone and fields are being planted for the upcoming season. But it’s also an expensive time of year when farmers need to purchase seed, diesel and equipment, plus hiring seasonal workers. In a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program, families pay up front for the boxes of fresh food

they will receive all summer and fall. By investing in their local growers, families not only literally help plant the farm but forge a meaningful relationship with the people and land producing their food. CSAs offer an opportunity for families to not only eat seasonally but to understand the ups and downs of farming. Every time Mom and Dad pick up the weekly box, children gain insight into what’s in season at that moment, and they also have the chance to learn why this region doesn’t grow certain crops (like mangoes or melons) but has a bounty of other produce (like carrots, beets, berries and brassicas). Tips and recipes for preparing lesser-known veggies, like kohlrabi or fava beans, are usually shared in weekly newsletters, and the CSA box becomes a treasure trove

of information and culinary inspiration. Kids love picking up the family’s weekly box directly from the farm or at a farmers market. It’s fun to open the box and be surprised by the fresh colors and flavors. Children are often more game to try new vegetables if they have a connection to where they have been grown. Once you have signed up for a CSA, contact your farm and see if there are any opportunities to visit so your family can actually see the place where your food was produced. Several Peninsula farmers offer CSA programs. To find participating farms in Clallam or Jefferson counties, visit www.LocalHarvest.org. Check one out with your family today and get in on the seasonal eating adventure.

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Understanding traumatic stress, dispelling stigma around PTSD by MICHELLE WATERS, a therapist with the Behavioral Health Team in the Child & Family Services Department at Peninsula Behavioral Health

Trauma is not exactly a delightful topic, making it difficult to talk or write about in a non-depressing manner. However, this topic stretches its reach to millions all over the world and demands attention. An estimated 70 percent of adults in the U.S. will have experienced a traumatic event in their life, and about 8 percent of Americans have the diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Hopefully this information will help you understand a little more about the effects of traumatic stress and dispel some of the mystery and stigma around PTSD. To understand trauma, it is helpful to have an understanding of stress and its impact on a person. Your mind and body want to keep you as stable as possible, so when something happens that is stressful or overwhelming, certain processes kick in to respond. You may have heard of this as the “fight or flight” response. This can look different for different people, but how humans have been able to survive is by responding to threatening situations by either fighting the obstacle or running away (flight). Another response that is sometimes forgotten is the “freeze” reaction. Sometimes a stressor is too much for either fight or flight, so the body freezes, protecting you from fully experiencing the emotional or physical stress. This can also be called “dissociating” or a “numbing out,” where someone is mentally removed from their

body. Our stress response system developed to help protect us and keep us safe. Though commonly experienced, trauma is difficult to define. What separates a “traumatic” event from a “stressful” event is how your body and mind respond during and after it’s over. Trauma is often characterized as an overwhelmingly stressful event or series of events that alters the mind and body, making it difficult to bounce back. Prolonged exposure to traumatic experiences can cause complex reworking in the brain. If exposed to months or years of repeated trauma, the brain begins to normalize this experience, making it more difficult to cope in the long run. To help define it, trauma is often separated into two categories: chronic and acute. Chronic (sometimes referred to as “complex”) trauma means ongoing or repeated events, like repeated violence in the home or combat in war. Acute trauma is typically a singular event like a car accident or losing a loved one. Many factors influence the way an individual may respond to traumatic experiences. A singular traumatic event may have a different impact than a series of traumatic events. Some individuals who have sustained traumatic events develop PTSD. PTSD has three main symptoms including hyperarousal, re-experiencing and avoidance. Hyperarousal looks like constantly being alert and vigilant, looking out for stressors.

graphic by MICHELLE WATERS/PENINSULA BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

Re-experiencing is often referred to as flashbacks (a sudden replay of the traumatic memory) or nightmares. Avoidance means that the individual will actively make choices in their lives to not be around reminders or triggers of the experience (like avoiding a certain building or person who reminds them of what happened). >> UNDERSTANDING TRAUMATIC STRESS continued on Page 13

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>> UNDERSTANDING TRAUMATIC STRESS continued from Page 12

These symptoms have often been confused with other diagnoses. For instance, within children, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common diagnosis confused with PTSD, since the symptoms can look very similar. Trauma can also cause children to become stuck at the developmental level they experienced the trauma. These traumatic experiences can remain locked in the body, altering instincts and behavioral patterns. This can often look like an older child behaving much younger, particularly when it comes to emotion expression and regulation. Recent neurological research suggests that traumatic memory is largely stored as a nonverbal, emotional and physiological (bodily) experience, making it difficult for a trauma survivor to verbalize their trauma history. Because of the lack of language around the trauma, it may be difficult for survivors to verbalize their narrative in a conventional verbal therapy session; therefore, an expressive therapy may be more beneficial. Some therapies that have demonstrated effectiveness in helping alleviate trauma related symptoms include expressive therapies (like art or music therapy), cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), trauma-informed CBT and exposure therapy.   Compassion and connection to others are essential to resolve damage to the brain resulting from stress. Those who have experienced trauma will likely require some level of support in reducing their symptoms and reconnecting with their environment and community. It is important to be aware that triggers for

re-experiencing the trauma can be literally anything. When triggered, the mind will re-engage in the survival response and other areas of the brain will shut off (the parts that help us calm down). If you or your loved one has experienced trauma, it is helpful to discuss what some of these triggers may be and how to support them in times of distress. With the right kind of support, people can process their trauma and manage their symptoms. While trauma’s effects appear to be wide and deep, the potential for resilience and healing exists within every person. Michelle Waters is a therapist with the Behavioral Health Team in the Child & Family Services Department at Peninsula Behavioral Health. Waters currently works with youth involved in the court system. She has experience working with children and teens living in residential care and older adults in nursing facilities. Waters earned a master’s degree in art therapy at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

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A child passenger safety clinic will be held at First Step Family Support Center, 325 E. Sixth St. in Port Angeles, between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Saturday, May 20. Technicians will be located in First Step’s parking lot to instruct parents and guardians on how to safely install and check already in-place children’s car seats. The clinic is free and open to the public. The Child Passenger Safety Program is funded by the Washington Traffic Safety Commission and is operated almost entirely by volunteers. Studies have shown that children who are seated in age- and size-appropriate vehicle restraint systems may be at a significantly lower risk of sustaining serious or fatal injuries during motor vehicle crashes, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Traffic crashes account for the leading cause of death among children in the United States. Because of their diminutive statures, kids who suffer injuries in motor vehicle accidents may fare far worse than adults who suffer similar injuries. While many parents understand the need for proper child safety seats, keeping up-to-date on regulations can be challenging; however, infant seats, convertible seats and booster seats can mean the difference between minor injuries and fatality in the event of accidents. For details, phone Neilu at First Step at 360-457-8355.

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Eight common myths about raising chickens Eight common myths about raising poultry in your backyard by BRANDPOINT

From fresh egg production to natural garden fertilizer, there is no shortage of benefits in raising backyard poultry. But even as families become more familiar with sustainable living and keeping chickens, several poultry myths still exist. Here to set the record straight for our feathered friends is poultry expert Lisa Steele, creator of the Fresh Eggs Daily brand and author of three top-selling books on the subject. Here are Steele’s eight most common myths surrounding backyard flocks:

MYTH 1: CHICKENS ARE DIFFICULT TO CARE FOR

“There is, of course, a certain level of responsibility required to properly care for any living animal,” Steele said. “However, when it comes to backyard poultry, the time commitment is fairly minimal — maybe 30 minutes daily.” Here’s what you can expect: In the morning, chickens will need to be let out and fed. Waterers will need to be filled. At some point, eggs will need to be collected. Then, around dusk, after the chickens have wandered back to the coop, the door needs to be locked to protect from predators.

MYTH 2: CHICKENS (AND COOPS) SMELL

MYTH 3: CHICKENS ARE NOISY

“Despite what you may have heard, chickens are pretty quiet. In fact, a clucking chicken tends to be on par with normal human conversation (60-65 decibels),” Steele said. “In other words, it’s a lot quieter than your neighbor’s barking dog, lawn mower or car alarm.”

“Chickens themselves don’t smell, nor does a wellmaintained coop,” Steele said. “On average, a chicken produces about 1.5 ounces of manure a day, which is far less than the average dog — not to mention, when composted, it makes wonderful nitrogen-rich fertilizer for a garden.”

>> RAISING BACKYARD POULTRY continued on Page 15

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>> RAISING BACKYARD POULTRY continued from Page 14

Roosters are a different story, and some areas prohibit them for that very reason. Be sure to check your local city and county ordinances about keeping backyard poultry.

MYTH 4: YOU NEED A ROOSTER TO GET EGGS

Chickens will lay eggs regardless of whether there is a rooster in the flock. A male chicken is only needed to fertilize an egg, meaning eggs laid by hens in a rooster-less flock can never hatch into baby chicks. And while there are some benefits to having roosters, they aren’t necessary for your hen to produce a basket of delicious, fresh eggs.

MYTH 5: A CHICKEN LAYS AN EGG EVERY DAY

MYTH 6: BROWN EGGS ARE MORE NUTRITIOUS THAN WHITE EGGS

“The nutrient content of an egg is based largely on a hen’s diet, not the color of its egg, which is determined

possibility of flies and mice.” For additional information about what is required to raise chickens, talk to experts at feed and supply stores across the North Olympic Peninsula.

MYTH 7: CHICKENS CARRY DISEASE

“Chickens don’t carry any more risk of disease than a dog or cat. In fact, they love to eat ticks and other pesky critters known to transmit diseases like Lyme disease, tapeworm and heartworm,” Steele explained. “While salmonella can be transmitted to humans through poultry dander and feces, simply washing hands after handling the chickens keeps the risk of infection minimal.” The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) also cautions against live poultry inside the home and against letting children younger than 5 years old handle poultry.

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MYTH 8: CHICKENS ATTRACT RODENTS AND PREDATORS

“Wild predators are not any more attracted to chickens than they are to wild birds, rabbits, squirrels and other small animals,” Steele said. “The truth is, predators are likely already living in your midst. The key to keeping them at bay is to keep your chickens safe in an enclosed pen or run area. “Chicken feed should also be taken up at night and stored in predator-proof containers to reduce the

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Fresh eggs to eat and share with friends are one of the best benefits of raising poultry, but Steele said not to expect your hen to lay an egg every day. “The average chicken will produce four to five eggs a week, but that will vary depending on the chicken’s age, breed, health and environment,” Steele said. “Shorter days, extreme temperatures, molting (growing in new feathers) and other stressors, such as the presence of predators, can all affect egg production.”

solely by the chicken’s breed,” Steele said. According to a study conducted by Mother Earth News magazine, a free-roaming chicken that consumes grass and bugs will lay eggs with less cholesterol and saturated fat and more vitamin A and E, beta-carotene and omega-3s than a chicken fed purely commercial corn/ grain-based foods.

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