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MARCH 2017 | VOL. 19, NO. 12

Apartment squeeze Are 2,000 new apartments too many? • 8-9 Luxury home: County’s most expensive home • 4

Treehouse: Bed & breakfast in the sky • 6

Trucking in style: Terminal offers all the extras • 12

Supplement to The Daily Herald

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March 2017

CALENDAR M A R C H 7/14: Port Commission Meetings

M A R C H 11: Free Vessel Safety Checks M A R C H 16: Port 2 Business Contractor Outreach: Job Order Contracting with City of Everett & Snohomish County; RSVP @ www.portofeverett.com/p2b2017 M A R C H 18: Everett Blackmouth Derby

Port of EVERETT

EXECUTIVE

The Waterfront Place Central Integrated Cleanup and Infrastructure Project earned Best in State: Engineering Excellence Award. On Feb. 7, the Port Commission awarded the $3.43 million Marine Terminal Rail Upgrades Phase II contract to Granite Construction Co.

MARINA

Bellingham Yacht Sales, the first-ever boat dealer to offer new yacht sales at the Port of Everett Marina, is now open for business.

REPORT RE Port of EVERETT

Creating Economic Opportunities

Port of Everett Joins Green Marine Program The Port of Everett recently joined Green Marine, the largest voluntary environmental certification program for the maritime industry in North America. “We’re absolutely delighted to welcome the Port of Everett within the Green Marine program,” said David Bolduc, Green Marine’s Executive director. “With its newly adopted environmental policy, its desire to enhance environmental awareness, and its participation in our certification program, the Port of Everett continues to show its true commitment to sustainability.” The Port of Everett has a strong track record of environmental management and is an environmental leader in Washington’s maritime industry. “Green Marine certification aligns well with our strategic initiatives with regards to the environment and sustaining the clean air, water and soil that we have in our Port,” said Port of Everett CEO Les Reardanz. “This program is a great example of how good environmental planning and economic growth can go hand in hand.” Green Marine’s program offers a roadmap for port authorities, terminal operators and shipping lines to voluntarily reduce their

environmental footprint. The comprehensive program addresses key environmental issues using 12 performance indicators that include reducing air emissions, minimizing community impacts, and demonstrating environmental leadership. Some of the benefits the Port of Everett hopes to realize by participating in Green Marine are: • Improved management framework for marine terminal environmental stewardship • Pursue state-of-the-art best environmental practices • Improved employee morale and support by having clear environmental goals • Improved public communication tools for reporting our environmental performance • Improved relationships with regulatory agencies, granting agencies, and public The Port of Everett is proud to join other Washington ports, including Port of Olympia, Northwest Seaport Alliance, and Port of Longview, in participating and incorporating Green Marine into its daily operations.

First Large Ship Docks at the Port's Pacific Terminal

REAL ESTATE

Save the date! The Port of Everett is planning its annual Waterfront Place Central Development Open House on April 20.

1810296

At the end of January 2017, the 682-foot Westwood Bardu tied up at the Port of Everett’s Pacific Terminal for the first time. Prior to the Port’s Mill A Interim Action Cleanup, the terminal could only accommodate ships up to 640-feet in length. Commissioners Troy McClelland/District 1 Tom Stiger/District 2 Glen Bachman/District 3

CEO/Executive Director Les Reardanz

Information you would like to see in next month’s update? Please e-mail lisam@portofeverett.com Stay Connected!

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MARCH 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 3

TABLE OF CONTENTS

KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

The Gateway Apartments are going up between Everett and Mill Creek. The 177-unit project will open in the fall. More than 2,000 apartments are under construction in Snohomish County.

COVER STORY

BUSINESS BUILDERS

What so many apartments opening means for Snohomish County, 8-9

Monika Kristofferson: Is it time to ditch the paper planner?. . . . . . . . . 14

BUSINESS NEWS Woodway home sells for $8 million in 2016, top sale for county . . . . . . . . . 4 Woodinville couple turn novelty treehouse into bed and breakfast. . . 6 Camano’s Dusky Cellars part of North Sound Wine Trail. . . . . . . . . . 10 Massage chair and more at Smokey Point Distributing headquarters. . . 12 Bothell entrepreneur markets his dad’s barbecue sauce . . . . . . . . . . 13

Mike Spencer • Evergreen Way

Andrew Ballard: Selling process needs to match buying process . . . 15 Tom Hoban: Litigation makes condos too costly to build. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Bankers who get it.

PEOPLE WATCHING . . . . . . . . . . 18 BUSINESS BRIEFS . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 BUSINESS LICENSES . . . . . . . . . . 20 PUBLIC RECORDS . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 BANKRUPTCIES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Loans that will get you there.

ECONOMIC DATA . . . . . . . . . 22-23

Snohomish business sells Amish quality furniture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

NEWSROOM

ADVERTISING SALES

Editor: Jim Davis 425-339-3097; jdavis@heraldnet.com; businessnews@heraldnet.com

Tara Raimey 425-339-3445 — Fax 425-339-3049 traimey@soundpublishing.com

Contributing Writers: Jennifer Sasseen, Andrea Brown, Victoria Buritsch-Tompkins Contributing Columnists: Monika Kristofferson, Tom Hoban. Andrew Ballard Publisher Josh O’Connor 425-339-3007 joconnor@soundpublishing.com

COVER PHOTO Crews work on the roof of the Gateway Apartments, one of several new projects that are adding 2,000 more units to Snohomish County. Kevin Clark / The Herald

Helping small business fight to win.

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The take-your-breath-away home Home sold for $8 million, most expensive sale last year in county By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

I

t looks like something plucked out of a European countryside and dropped along the shore of Puget Sound. The French chateau-like estate on Woodway Park Road in Woodway sold for $8 million last year, making it the most expensive home sold in Snohomish County in 2016, according to the Northwest Multiple Listing Service. The sale also tied for the top 5 biggest sales in the region. “From the minute you pull up to the gate, literally, and the gate swings open to the circular drive and the sprawling landscape and the fountain, it really just takes your breath away,” said Taji DeGross, the listing real estate agent for the property. The 11,663-squarefoot home sits on 10 acres along high-bank waterfront with views of the Sound and Olympic Mountains. Built in 1992 and extensively renovated in 2003 and 2006, the home has stucco walls, gable shake roofs and Venetian plaster walls. It features four bedrooms, 5.25 baths and five fireplaces. “A house that has seven dishwashers, you know is a large house,” DeGross said. The property has all the amenities that would come with an estate of this type: the swimming pool, the tennis court, the Englishstyle garden, the greenhouse, the guest house, the pond and the orchard. It also includes a music studio, exercise room and THX-certified home theater. “There’s nothing it doesn’t have, to tell you the truth,” DeGross said. DeGross described the bright, open foyer with a

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

The fabulousness of the most expensive home sold in Snohomish County in 2016 can be seen as you drive around the circular driveway.

The 11,663-square-foot home was built in 1992 and extensively renovated in 2003 and 2006 and features four bedrooms, 5.25 baths and five fireplaces.

The home sits along Puget Sound in Woodway with spectacular views of the water and Olympic Mountains.

grand piano bearing pictures of celebrites and icons of business in the Puget Sound area. Another selling point: the helicopter landing pad. “There’s very, very few places you can land a helicopter,” DeGross said. “You can’t do that in Mercer Island, you can’t do that in Medina.” The property sale last June was more than double the selling price for the most expensive home sold in the county in 2015 —

an Edmonds house — and the most expensive home sold in 2014 — a home in Woodway. The website Seattle Curbed named the seller as American Seafoods CEO Bernt Bodal. Property records show the buyer was Clay Siegall, president and CEO of Seattle Genetics, the Bothell biotech firm. DeGross grew up in Edmonds and went to Woodway High School: “I’m old-school Edmonds,

my family has lived there forever.” She worked out of a real estate office in Edmonds until 2015 and now works for Winderemere Real Estate in Kirkland. She knew Siegall and knew that he wanted to stay in the Woodway area, where he already had a home. She reached out to the homeowner in 2015 and asked if he would ever be willing to sell the property. She didn’t immediately get a response.

“A year later, I get a phone call, ‘I got your message and I’m considering buying a house. Do you still have a buyer?’” DeGross said. She reached out to Siegall, but it turned out that he had already bought another home in Woodway. She still became the listing agent for the house. She put it on the market for $8.5 million. The number of prospective buyers for a property of that value is limited, but the home is well known in the Woodway area and she received several inquiries. In the end, Siegall called her back and told her that

he had a change of heart and wanted to buy the home. The property was only on the market for a little more than a month. DeGross is still relatively new to the business; she’s only in her third year as a real estate agent. She owned a personal assistant company and has worked with foreign buyers who have purchased expensive properties. She maintains her county roots and notes that she’s selling a Lake Stevens property. “I go out and make people’s dreams come true,” DeGross said. “That’s what I tell myself that I do.”


MARCH 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 5

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MARCH 2017

This is no tree house of horror By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

WOODINVILLE — Tree houses are growing up. Take the one in the back yard of John and Beth Shephard’s home. It was built by Pete Nelson, the Fall City contractor who doubles as the star of the reality television show “Treehouse Masters” on Animal Planet. The Shephards had stayed at Nelson’s Treehouse Point in Fall City; it was a birthday present for John Shephard about 10 years ago. “We went there and really liked it and it was charming and one thing led to another,” John Shephard said. “We’ve always been fanciful — we’re both musicians — and somehow we decided we were going to have a tree house.” So they invited Nelson to come to their home at 17324 185th Ave. NE, outside of Woodinville, along the shores of Cottage Lake. The couple had dinner with Nelson, who sketched a design for the tree house. They employed him to build the project around a thick Douglas fir next to the roof of their home. It was a luxury item built during the recession that cost $40,000. Nelson did the project in a little over a month in 2010. The Shephards used the space to entertain, to meditate and do art. Mostly it was a novelty for John Shephard, a retired counselor, and Beth Shephard, a retired teacher and educator. So last year, they decided to open it up as a bed and breakfast. “We had always toyed with the idea of doing a B&B somewhere, and then John retired and needed a project,” Beth Shephard said. It’s called the Cottage Lake Treehouse Bed & Breakfast, but Beth Shephard gave it the informal name The Nest. “After all of these years of dealing with minds and hearts, now I’m dealing with towels and bedsheets and carpets and breakfasts,” John Shephard said. The Treehouse Bed & Breakfast is a single room

PHOTOS BY IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

John Shephard enlisted the help of Pete Nelson, a treehouse builder featured on Animal Planet’s “Treehouse Masters” television show, to construct the tree house near Woodinville he now leases as the Cottage Lake Treehouse Bed and Breakfast near Woodinville. Below left, the tree house has earned the nickname, ‘The Nest.’ Below right, the tree house features a single room with a small balcony.

with a queen-sized bed and a couple of wicker chairs and wide windows overlooking Cottage Lake. A small balcony sits off one side for people who want to get fresh air in the treetop. A stairway built alongside the Shephards’ house leads to a walkway on the roof with motion sensors that lead to the treehouse. The tree house lacks a full bathroom — there’s a small toilet and a bin just out the front door. Guests need to go into a spare apartment in the Shephards’ home for showers and most bathroom activities. Still, John Shephard said that hasn’t deterred people from signing up for a night’s stay at the Treehouse Bed & Breakfast. They listed the tree house

on most of the internet travel sites last year. A night’s stay depends on the season and the night of the week but was usually around $200 last year. “We were virtually slammed roughly from April through September last year,” John Shephard said. Some of the people came looking for a lakeside getaway with a dock, kayaks and a hot tub within easy reach. Others came looking for a novel place to stay while taking in the Woodinville wineries or a concert at the nearby Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery. The Shephards socialized with some of the guests but offered as much privacy as the guests wanted. When guests stayed,

“After all of these years of dealing with minds and hearts, now I’m dealing with towels and bedsheets and carpets and breakfasts.” — John Shephard John Shephard would bring up a breakfast platter in the morning with croissants, a couple of types of yogurt, a couple of types of fruit, some granola and hard-boiled eggs. A Keurig coffee maker is in the treehouse. About 90 percent of their business came from people finding the bed and breakfast at the Shephards’ website or from Booking. com or Bedandbreakfast.

com. They’ve had less success with sites like AirBnB. com or TripAdvisor. “The people who have stayed here are from everywhere — Europe, China, from around this area and across America,” Beth Shephard said. “We’ve really enjoyed meeting the people.” The Shephards say they’ve been pleased with the reception they’ve received in online reviews,

including people who talk about their friendly black Lab, Harley. “In counseling, people walk in and they’re unhappy and I have an hour to give them a perspective that makes them feel better,” John Shephard said. “That was always my task and I didn’t realize how heavy it was until after I retired. Here, they come happy and they get happier.”


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COVER STORY

KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

A construction worker uses a staple hammer on the side of the Gateway Apartments, a set of apartment buildings with 177 units between Everett and Mill Creek. Heartland Construction, an affiliate of Bellevue’s DevCo, is building more than 450 apartments in Snohomish County.

Will there be a glut of apartments? More than 2,000 apartment units are under construction across Snohomish County By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

M

ore than 2,000 apartments are being built across Snohomish County — with more on the

way. That leads to the question: How many are too many? “It depends on who you’re rooting for — whether you’re rooting for the owners, the developers and the office managers or the tenants,” said Tom Cain of Apartment Insights Washington, a Seattle real estate market research firm. His firm does a quarterly analysis of the apartment market. His December report found that 2,078 apartment units were under construction in the county. The firm keeps track of apartment buildings with 50 or more units. With so many apartments being built,

that could push down rents, increase the vacancy rate and force apartment owners to offer more incentives for renters to move in, Cain said. The county has a relatively healthy vacancy rate of 4.4 percent. The apartment market is considered in equilibrium with a 5 percent vacancy rate, or about one out of every 20 units are empty, Cain said. The average rental rates for Snohomish County went up in the last quarter of 2016 compared with the year before, said Cain, whose firm does a survey in the middle of each quarter. The average rental price was $1,366 for all apartments from studios to three-bedroom apartments. That was $1,272 for the last quarter in 2015. That’s a 7 percent year-over-year increase. One of the big players right now is

Bellevue’s Heartland Construction, an affiliate of DevCo, which is building 453 apartments between two projects in Snohomish County. “It’s largely because that’s where the land is available,” said Jack Hunden, president of DevCo. “We have projects in King County as well, but there’s more land of the scale we’re interested in in Snohomish County than King County.” His company is building the Gateway Apartments with 177 units at 13105 21st Drive SE between Everett and Mill Creek. DevCo’s also building the 276unit Scriber Creek apartments at 20917 44th Ave. W near Lynnwood. Both are “affordable” projects, which means that DevCo can only rent the apartments to people who earn no more than 60 percent of the median income in the county and must keep the rents lowered. In return, the builder receives tax credits, which pay for a quarter of the project. That’s key for the Snohomish County projects, because it offers some cushion if

there’s a downturn in the economy. “I wouldn’t build a market-rate property in Snohomish County ourselves,” said Hunden, who said that his company does about 80 percent affordable projects and 20 percent market rate. “The affordable opportunity is maybe less a chance of a home run but there’s more stability.” Another way to look at the number of apartments under construction is to compare it to the number of existing units. The U.S. Census Bureau keeps track of multi-family units countywide, although the agency combines apartments and condominiums. The county had 12,636 units of both types in buildings with 50 or more units in 2015, according to the Census. So 2,078 units on the way in the county is a big number. The Census shows that the county had 10,260 units for larger complexes in 2010 and 10,252 in 2000. (The information gathered is from individual respondents that are asked how many total housing units there are within


COVER STORY

MARCH 2017

“It’s hard to imagine any new housing units coming on the market — even if they’re apartments — to be a bad thing..” — Mike Pattison the structure in which they live — so it is ‘self-reported’ information, said Stephen Toy, the county demographer, in an email.) One of the larger apartment projects under construction — The Reserve in Lynnwood, a 296-unit building at Scriber Lake Road and 198th Street SW — burned down in Jan. 25. City officials say they expect the developer to rebuild. A wave of new apartments can only be a good thing, said Mike Pattison, government affairs manager at the Master Builders of King and Snohomish Counties. “We’re experiencing a housing shortage of crisis portions,” Pattison said. “It’s hard to imagine any new housing units coming on the market — even if they’re apartments — to be a bad thing.” Snohomish County has less than a onemonth supply of housing in the real estate market. The supply of homes is measured by the time it would take for the current

KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

The under-construction Gateway Apartments buzzes with activities as crews work to open the project by this fall.

inventory of homes to be sold if no new homes were listed. He said a one-month supply of housing is unheard of in the real estate market. “There are families who prefer to rent, and, because of our affordability crisis, there are those who are forced to rent,” Pattison said. “The rental market is

important to keeping the housing market balanced. It can alleviate the buyer-side pressure. As long as we’re getting people into housing, that’s what’s important.” If more apartments come online and force down rents, so much the better, Pattison said. Snohomish County is seeing a small

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fraction of the overall development activity in the Puget Sound region, said Tom Hoban, CEO of the Coast Group in Everett. His company owns three apartment buildings in the county with nearly 500 units and also manages dozens of other apartments for other owners. Most of the development occurring in the county is happening near the Snohomish-King county line, Hoban said. “All of it leased up quickly, as we might expect,” said Hoban, who writes a column on real estate for The Herald Business Journal. “We could see a minor oversupply in the short term, causing vacancy rates to tick up to 6 percent, but longterm fundamentals are strong.” He’s watching what happens with Boeing, the commute times for new projects and how Snohomish County rents compare with King County rents. Apartment owners should keep an eye on the interest rate for mortgages and how that could affect home ownership rates, he said. And he also points to a social question: When millennials marry and have children, will they stay in the urban core of Seattle or move to the suburbs in Snohomish County? “I think there are opportunities for both market-rate and affordable projects in Snohomish County,” Hoban said. “Developers just have to be mindful of the sub-market in which they choose to build.”


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Finding their passion

By Jennifer Sasseen For The Herald Business Journal

C

amano Island winemakers Ryan and Dusty Kramer found their passion on a road trip to Northern California some 16 years ago. They’d been to Santa Rosa for a friend’s wedding and decided to do some wine tasting on the way back, first in Napa Valley and then in Portland, Oregon. “It was a good time,” Ryan said. “It was really nice,” said Dusty, smiling at the memory. It was their first real getaway since their marriage and their first time wine-tasting. “Granted, that’s the glamorous part of the wine business you see,” Ryan said. “You don’t see 12:30 at night with your pump broken and it’s 34 degrees out, you’re trying to salvage thousands of dollars.” Stanwood High School sweethearts who were married and having babies by the age of 20, Ryan and Dusty, now 44 and 43, moved to Camano Island 15 years ago. Since high school, Ryan’s worked in “the dirt business,” as he calls it, designing and installing septic tanks on the island, which has no sewer system. Today, he and Dusty have their own septic-system business, RW Kramer Enterprises, as well as three grown children and a burgeoning winery business. Dusty Cellars Winery, operating out of their former garage at 529 Michael Way, Camano Island, grew out of a wine kit Ryan Kramer brought home sometime after that road trip. What began as a hobby, he said, “just kind of got out of control.” “You just get the bug,” Dusty said. “And then before you know it, you’ve got 12 barrels.” The couple launched Dusty Cellars Winery in 2006, trucking grapes from Eastern Washington and bottling about 200 cases of wine that first year. It was Ryan’s idea to name the winery after his wife. “It just sounded good,” he said, but it took some arguing to convince her. And she had the last word. “I said, ‘You’d better make good wine,’” Dusty said, “‘because I’ve got my name on that.’” Apparently, he did — and does. Two Dusty Cellars wines from that first year, a Merlot and a Syrah, won a silver and a bronze medal in the Finger Lakes International Wine Competition in New York, which Ryan said he entered on a whim after getting some literature in the mail. Benefiting children with cancer, it’s one of the largest wine competitions in the world and last year included 3,824 wines from 916 wineries representing every state and 24 countries, according to the competition’s website. Five years ago, a 2008 The Queen Cabernet Franc from Dusty Cellars Winery won a Double Platinum award — reserved for “the best of the best”— in the Seattle Wine Awards competition, according to winepressnw.com. That competition drew 550 entries from more than 200 Northwest wineries.

PHOTOS BY KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

Dusty Kramer (right) talks with a wine taster at Dusty Cellars Winery on Camano Island. Below, Ryan Kramer uses a tool called a wine thief for a sample. Dusty Cellars Wine is part of the growing North Sound Wine Trail.

One of the “boutique” wineries of the North Sound Wine Trail — mostly family-owned wineries that bottle 1,000 or fewer cases a year — Dusty Cellars is open for wine-tasting on the first weekend of each month. Formed in 2013, the North Sound Wine Trail this year includes five local wineries — Dusty Cellars; Edward Lynne Cellars, also on Camano Island; Skagit Cellars, in La Conner; Glacier Peak Winery, in Rockport; and Carpenter Creek Winery, in Mount Vernon — and customers are encouraged to visit all wineries on the trail. The proliferation of such wineries in recent years — a 400-percent increase in the past decade, according to www. winesnw.com — helped the wine industry become the fastest-growing agricultural sector in Washington, with an economic

impact in the billions of dollars. Though wine grapes were first planted by settlers in Washington in 1825 and were growing in most areas of the state by 1910, according to the website, they weren’t planted commercially until the 1960s. Washington State Wine represents and promotes the state’s more than 900 wineries and 350 grape growers, estimates annual wine production at 16 million cases, roughly half red and half white wines. Total economic impact to the state was $4.8 billion in 2013. The 800 cases Dusty Cellars expects to produce this year is a drop in the bucket by comparison, but the winery makes money every year and has allowed the Kramers to slowly build the business. “Almost all the money we get out of it, we put back into it,” Ryan Kramer said. “I mean, we bought a pump one year and a

press and a bin and a corker. So it’s just kind of a progressive thing.” In a few years, when he’s 50, Ryan said he hopes to limit himself to septic-system design and back off from the heavy labor of installation, redirecting his energy into the wine business. He and Dusty would like to erect another building on their 3-acre property that could be used solely for winemaking, with the current garage-turned-winery/ tasting room dedicated to wine-tasting. “This is our retirement,” he said. The goal is to produce the 2,000-case minimum needed for distribution. “It’s just almost impossible for us to get a distributor right now,” Dusty said, “because we make such limited quantities that they’re just thinking it’s not enough.” Dusty Cellars wines are generally only available at Camano Island grocery stores, as well as at the winery and through Dusty Cellars’ 80-member wine club. Ranging from $12 to $30 a bottle, proof of the label’s popularity is that three of its eight wines are currently sold out, though Ryan credited the “buy local” movement with having some influence. Come summer, Dusty Cellars wine-tasting weekends are enlivened by local blues and classic-rock musicians, from June through Labor Day weekend, 3 to 6 or 7 p.m., in addition to the third Saturday of the month. It’s not uncommon for people to bring picnics, the Kramers said. “You give people something to do, like come in and listen to music, and make it a destination,” Ryan said, “and people really like that.” “They’ve got the view,” Dusty said, “they can sit outside, hang out for three hours. That’s fun.”


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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 11

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12 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MARCH 2017

Trucking with all the bells, whistles By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

ARLINGTON — Hauling freight from Point A to Point B now includes a zero-gravity relaxation chair. That’s just one of the fringe benefits of the new terminal built by Smokey Point Distributing, a national trucking firm in Arlington. The building comes with the goals of attracting and keeping employees and also using technology to make the outfit as efficient as possible. “It’s very, very difficult to retain long-haul drivers,” said Dan Wirkkala, Smokey Point Distributing’s president and CEO. “It was important for us to make the move not only to give our people a new home and somewhere they love to come to work but it was also for the retention of our drivers to make sure they have a nice facility here.” Truckers and other employees can book massages through their Outlook calendar in the relaxation chair, which features Infinity speakers that stream Pandora music and 3-D imaging for each individual’s back. Smokey Point Distributing employs about 400 workers, including about 285 drivers and 115 administration and support staff. The majority of those workers are based at Arlington, but Smokey Point Distributing has smaller terminals around the U.S. Smokey Point Distributing is owned by Daseke, a trucking company headquartered in Addison, Texas. Smokey Point Distributing specializes in opendeck hauling — often flatbed trailers — and hauls general commodity loads, including for aerospace businesses such as Boeing, Triumph Structures and Spirit Aerospace. The company has been based in Arlington since it was started in 1979. The new terminal at 19201 63rd Ave. NE is 60,000 square feet shared between administration offices and the shop and sits on 16 acres.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

A lounge for drivers at Smokey Point Distributing in Arlington offers a reclining sectional and a large-screen television. Below, the shop now allows trucks and trailers to be parked indoors, an improvement over the last terminal.

It’s about three times as large as the old terminal, which is less than a mile away, across from Crown Distributing. “We had been in our previous location for about 20 years and when we first moved into that location, we thought we’d never outgrow it,” Wirkkala said. Wirkkala and his management team designed the layout for the new building. Barbara Daseke, the wife of Don Daseke, the chairman of the parent company’s board, owns an interior decorating company and did the terminal’s design. Coast Construction in Arlington built the terminal. The firm finished moving into the terminal last fall. Wirkkala declined to say how much the building cost. Smokey Point Distributing still plans

to build a 10,000- to 15,000-square-foot addition to offer warehousing space for clients once the former terminal is sold. The terminal looks like any industrial building from the outside. The inside looks entirely different, painted in deep earth tones and decorated with paintings, plants and other accents. A driver’s lounge includes a black leather recycling sectional and a large-screen television. A gym includes two treadmills and a bike machine. Large showers with slate tile offer a place for drivers to clean up after trips. Washing and drying machines are also available. There are several conference rooms and a couple of kitchens, including one large enough to hold employees for compa-

As far as being more efficient, the terminal offers a training room with the computer equipment that drivers will have out on the road. One large open space features pods focused on several geographic areas of the U.S., and one pod to focus on permits. The offices are outfitted with 26 televisions that give up-to-the-minute analytics on such things as loads and available trucks. “It gives us quick visuals on where we need assistance and where we need more loads in the system to facilitate the trucks we have available,” Wirkkala said. The shop features seven bays with wireless connectivity to the Internet at each site so mechanics can quickly look up infor-

nywide announcements. That dining area includes a roll-up door to the outside for barbecues or just to let the breeze inside. A fenced-in dog run outside offers a place for employees to bring their pets.

mation on parts or parts availability. One of the biggest fringe benefits is just being able to close the doors, said Dawn Craig, the shop manager. The old terminal featured bays where the truck and trailer couldn’t fit all the way into the building. That meant that the bay doors often needed to remain open on cold and rainy days. Now the bays are big enough to house all of the equipment, she said. “It’s night and day compared to where we were,” Craig said. “We were functionable definitely over there, but for our guys and the pride they take in the equipment that they work it makes a big difference that the environment is that much more pleasant.”

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MARCH 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 13

Dad’s recipe spurs barbecue company By Victoria Buritsch-Tompkins For The Herald Business Journal

BOTHELL — Andrew Holes of J. Wilbur foods has a lot of enthusiasm for his brand, but it wasn’t an easy start. As a part-time entrepreneur and full-time stay-at-home father, he spent the first five years of the company’s launch in self-taught research and development mixed with building the brand. “I was in the mortgage business, a loan originator. I lost my job in late 2008, just like everybody else,” Holes said. His wife managed to find a job, but since he didn’t have any immediate prospects, he began to pursue bringing his father’s barbecue sauce to market as a part-time launch. Building the barbecue sauce was a challenge, because the bigbox brands had low-price

markets cornered — so to build a place for his own sauce, he decided to push quality to the forefront. J. Wilbur’s sauces are gluten free, Holes took additional steps to make sure that the barbecue sauce no longer has high fructose corn syrup. He has the barbecue sauce and Bloody Mary mix made at outside food services providers and keeps a warehouse for the product. That allows him to focus on marketing from his home in Bothell. The barbecue sauce itself has a story, spelled out on J. Wilbur Foods’ website. Andrew’s father, James Wilbur Holes, had cultivated a homemade barbecue with bite after a career as a travelling salesman through Memphis, and shared it with friends and family. The namesake of the barbecue died in 2002, before his son had really considered bringing the zingy sauce to market.

There are now three flavors in the J. Wilbur brand — the original, an Applewood Smoked flavor that is sweeter and little less intense, a spice rub in keepsake tins and a Bloody Mary mix that Andrew and his father never saw coming. Holes and his wife had some friends and family on a retreat in Walla Walla back in 2008. Andrew, of course, made baby back ribs with his father’s recipe, which went over quite famously with his friends. “I was sitting on the deck, having a beer, when one of my friends came out of the kitchen with a hand behind his back.” His friend presented a Bloody Mary made with the barbecue sauce garnished with a pork rib, of course, and the rest is history. “I’ve built my business around the idea that if I could get it in people’s mouths, they would buy it again.”

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Andrew Holes is the founder of J. Wilbur Foods, which makes three types of barbecue sauce as well as a Bloody Mary drink flavoring.

Holes visited trade shows, county fairs, and other venues to make it happen. Without direct retail marketing experience, he found that there was a lot to challenge him in learning a new trade.

“But once you’re in there,” he continues, “you gotta grease the wheels. You have to pay for shelf space where you are, because most of the prime spots are already paid for.” But he’s certainly found

his way into shelf space now — slotting fees and free fills, free product to test at new markets — are now things that he budgets. According to Holes, there are more than 600 locations carrying his barbecue sauce or other products, including some locations in California, Oregon, and Alaska. Wilbur continues to believe that his father’s legacy will spread, working on early concepts for a twist on the current spice rub, and exploring new markets in northern California. His advice to share with other would-be entrepreneurs entering a busy market: “There’s always someone there to tell you there’s no place for you, you’ll never make it. If you have a quality enough product and you do a good enough job — you have that ‘it’ factor — you can do it.”

Amish furniture in the outdoors By Andrea Brown

If you go

Herald Writer

SNOHOMISH — This is an outdoor furniture store that is outdoors. The roadside sprawl has about 100 gliders, swings, benches and tables, punctuated by gazebos, yard barns, man caves and sheshacks. A pirate ship playhouse with a long plank stands near the entrance. It looks like a giant yard party waiting to happen. Or that maybe already happened. Amish Country Originals has been turning heads since 1999 along the stretch of Highway 9 near Clearview, across the street from that antique red pickup on a high platform at Whiteside Towing and Truck Parts. It’s a long way from Amish country. Owner Tom Pentecost isn’t Amish, but he knows firsthand the quality of the workmanship from his many years of living in Ohio and working with the strict Mennonite sect that shuns modern technology and conveniences. The furniture comes directly from several Amish suppliers in Ohio.

Amish Country Furniture: 17805 Highway 9, Snohomish; 360-668-9226; www.amishoriginals.us

KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

Tom Pentecost owns and operates Amish Country Originals in Snohomish offering furniture and structures available for do-it-yourself or assembled.

“Everything is actually made in America,” he said. “That’s not a line.” Amish Country Originals will be among the hundreds of vendors at the Everett Home & Garden Show, March 10, 11 and 12, at Xfinity Arena. Pentecost, 58, got into the business by taking a chance. “A guy was looking for local investors. He wanted to start opening Amish

outdoor furniture and gazebos businesses, so I invested with him,” Pentecost said. “He started on the East Coast, then his dealers started moving west.” Pentecost and his wife, LuAnne, an elementary teacher, opened the business in 1997 about two miles from where it is now. “It was a great business the first four or five years. I was basically just an order-

taker,” he said. “Then when 2001 came, it was a step back, but I survived. It was a good business until about 2008.” To survive, he took a total hands-on approach. “I started building and delivering all my barns instead of framers and contractors,” he said. “It gave a lot more personal touch. The guy they ordered it from, they saw him come out and build

it, too. I got a lot less callbacks to fix things.” Some of the products are made from wood. Others from recycled milk jugs. The poly-furniture made from recycled plastic withstands the Pacific North-wet climate better than wood, and comes in 26 colors and 20-year warranties. The assembled products sit out in the elements year-round as displays or until they find a home. Pick what you want and put it in your car or he’ll deliver. Buyers can also get many items unassembled for DIY. There’s a covered warehouse in back where these are stored. Items include yard art lighthouses with a bulb on top, starting at $159. “The lighthouses are made out of the scraps from siding,” Pentecost said. “The Amish don’t waste anything.” Paul Canniff bought a

14-by-14 foot playhouse last fall. Why did he choose Amish Country Originals? “That pirate ship play structure by the street,” Canniff said. “We were driving down 9 like we often do and spotted that several times, so when we were thinking about a playhouse that came to mind. That’s smart marketing to put something distinctive out there like that.” Canniff said it was a surprise for his kids, ages 5, 9 and 11. “They thought we were building a shed for the goats,” he said. The playhouse is their second home. “They have all sorts of bold statements that they are going to live out there,” he said. Not if their mom has anything to say about it. “My wife was thinking it could be a little art studio down the road when the nest gets empty,” he said.


14 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MARCH 2017

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Time to pull plug on paper planners? I

t’s the war of planners with digital planners on one side and hard copy planners on the other side. Often, people feel forced to choose a side without taking their own natural tendencies and work habits into consideration. Paper people often feel compelled to embrace electronic planners due to pressure to conform to using the electronic gadgets that are ubiquitous. Well, what are planners and calendars for anyway? ■ To schedule appointments. ■ To schedule meetings. ■ To keep track of personal and professional events and activities. ■ To remember birthdays and special occasions. ■ To schedule vacations. ■ To take notes. What else do you use your planner for? Planners can be a major tool in helping you get organized and use your time wisely. With the importance of using your planner daily, how do you choose which type to use? I like people to think about their natural tendencies and what feels comfortable to them. Do you naturally gravitate toward paper and pencil so you have something in your hands to touch and so you can

turn the pages? Or do you prefer to have the latest and greatest electronic gadgets and apps at your fingertips? I want you to be able to embrace what you use because it’s easy Monika you to use Kristofferson for and so you use it consistently. Office This means using it every day, Efficiency multiple times per day as well as checking it in the evening prior to the next day.

Paper Planner I actually prefer a paper planner and a pencil because I like seeing my days laid out in front of me all at once. I like to be able to turn the pages to look ahead at the days, weeks and months ahead. If you’re a tactile person you may gravitate toward a paper system for these reasons. Recently, I worked with a client and had her take notes during our consultation. As it turns out, she greatly benefits

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from physically writing things down as it helps her remember details better. This is a great testament for using a paper planner to help us remember the details of our schedules. I prefer large planners with ample room to write. I’ve found it frustrating in the past to use calendars with little squares to write in because it’s easy to run out of space or end up with appointment times that are out of order. When I was using a paper planner (yes “was”as I did go digital), I loved the At-aGlance Quick Notes Weekly/Monthly planners because each day is laid out from morning until night. There’s also a section on the side of the page to jot down notes which is handy. If you’re using a paper planner, be sure to look for one with a sturdy cover as you’ll be toting that thing around for 365 days and you want it to hold up. Even if you’re a die-hard paper person, at some point you may come to a crossroads when a paper planner isn’t serving you as well as it once did. That time came for me a few years ago. It took some time to get used to, but I’m really happy that I switched to digital.

Digital Planner As I said, I did make the switch to a

digital calendar system. As much as I liked my paper planner, eventually it just wasn’t working well for me anymore and it was no longer an efficient system. I was afraid I would leave my planner behind at a client’s home or office and, of course, I wasn’t able to make further appointments unless I had my planner with me. I think the biggest issue that pushed me toward digital was the fact that I had to hand write all recurring events and appointments. A great option with digital systems is being able to add a reminder to your tasks. A pop-up reminder on your screen, with or without a tone, can be a boost for time management. I always like to set a reminder 30 minutes prior to a meeting or an appointment so I know I’ll arrive at my destination on time. A digital system can go with you wherever you go when you sync your calendar on your computer, phone and other devices. Whether you have a paper planner in your hand or a cell phone to track your schedule, be sure to consistently use it every day as an important time management tool. Monika Kristofferson is a professional organizer and productivity consultant who owns Efficient Organization NW in LakeStevens. Reach her at 425-220-8905 or monika@efficientorganizationnw.com.

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Align selling process to buying process I

t doesn’t matter what business you are in, being effective at sales is important; even if most of your selling is internal…to your staff, your board or a supplier. The challenge is that rarely do people align their selling process to the buying process. What I’m suggesting is that your sales process should be aligned to the drivers of purchasing decisions in your industry. Like in the product development process, a buyer goes through various stages and gates in their buying process — stages being research and consideration; gates being a “go” or “no go” decision. World-class marketing won’t pay the light bill until you sell something. Marketers who align their selling process to the stages a buyer goes though in making a purchase are far more successful than those who just walk through the traditional sales steps. There are several different sales programs — four, five, even six-step systems. The basics, however, are: identify, qualify, demonstrate and convert (close). As John Kypriotakis, president of Lysis International, a sales consultancy group in Cleveland, puts it, “Buyers have no interest in your selling process. Their only interest is to meet a need or solve a problem.”

Kypriotakis goes on to say, “Don’t use your sales cycle to manage the purchase your customer is about to make. Instead, recognize the existence of and learn all about your customers’ buying cycle.” You can begin this alignment process by studying Andrew the stages your Ballard buyers go through during their buying process, which Growth usually involves: Strategies need recognition, research, evaluate/ compare and making a selection. Here are a few questions you should consider. ■ What information does the buyer need or seek before making a buying decision? You need to know how they absorb information…all at once or bit by bit? What are the frequently asked questions? This is typically based on the complexity of your product or service. ■ How does the buyer prefer to consume information? What channels do they typically explore: Websites, product

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World-class marketing won’t pay the light bill until you sell something. Marketers who align their selling process to the stages a buyer goes though in making a purchase are far more successful than those who just walk through the traditional sales steps.

sheets, videos, reviews, demonstrations? Would a third-party endorsement be meaningful to the buyer? Remember that all digital media must be mobile enabled. ■ What are the buyers’ potential risk sensitivities? Most “perceived” risks result from one of two categories: lack of product knowledge or they have been burned before. Both are barriers to making a purchase decision. Understanding the buyers’ fears are critically important to making a sale. ■ What alternatives (competitively speaking) does the buyer have? Are you in a highly competitive or saturated business category? Who are the key players, and how do their offerings and selling processes compare to yours? ■ Who or what may influence the decision maker? Are there people or

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external market forces that can impact your consumers’ buying process? What weight does the buyer place on those influence factors? Other dynamics play into the equation, such as the larger the purchase — or the longer the sales cycle — the more judicious buyers become in their decision-making process. In these product and service categories, it is even more imperative to align the selling and buying processes. Unless you are selling a highly consumable product such as food staples or impulse items, use the buying process to drive your selling process — then it will be easier to pay the light bill. Andrew Ballard is president of Marketing Solutions, an agency specializing in growth strategies. For more information, call 425337-1100 or go to www.mktg-solutions.com.

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16 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MARCH 2017

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Lawsuits make condos too costly B Tom Hoban Realty Markets

efore the current legislative session, Gov. Jay Inslee handed a task to several boards and commissions that report to him to bring recommendations to ease the current housing affordability crisis. Looming large in the dialogue is what to do about the lack of interest developers seem to have

As a local developer put it, there are two kinds of condo developments: Those under lawsuit and those about to be under a lawsuit. in developing condominiums. The main reason condos have fallen out of favor is the risk of litigation from the homeowner’s association for any variety of liabilities.

A Wall Street Journal feature last year pointed out the significant extra costs a developer must bear to build condominiums over apartments, citing several sources that

place the national average at more than $15,000 per unit for insurance coverage alone. As a local developer put it, there are two kinds of condo developments:

Those under lawsuit and those about to be under a lawsuit. Trial lawyers make convincing arguments to condominium association boards that virtually compel them to initiate a law suit before the statute of limitations expires, usually at about 48 months after occupancy. They’ve found a reliable client base and are serving it well. The result is that developers took their ball and went to play in another game. Over the past five years apartments have tripled in production while condominiums have barely recovered. Some might explain this as a millennial phenomenon. They grew up watching their parents’ homes take a beating in the housing crash during the recession and had no appetite for the same experience goes the theory. But millennial attitudes about ownership don’t explain the entire difference. It simply costs a lot more to build condominiums and unique legal exposures are the primary reason. Lawmakers in Texas and Nevada have approved legislation in recent years intended to limit litigation, while a 2015 study in Seattle suggested the city and state explore similar changes to its condo laws. Politically, such measures pit Inslee against the powerful trial lawyers lobby, a group that has supported his races. What he and the Legislature are willing to do this year is a big question. Curtailing condo litigation is likely to be high on the list of recommendations and they’ll be confronted with that reality. The core issues is how to convert land inventory that could be built into condos. Changes in the law that limit lawsuits would no doubt bring some of that land inventory into production and should be carefully considered. Tom Hoban is CEO of The Coast Group of Companies. Contact him at 425-339-3638 or tomhoban@coastmgt.com or visit www.coastmgt.com. Twitter: @Tom_P_Hoban.

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18 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

EDMONDS — Re/ Max Direct Realty in Edmonds announced that real-estate agent Lois Champion-Myers has joined its team as an accredited buyer representative and senior real estate specialist. The longtime Snohomish County resident brings more than 16 years of local real estate experience and five years of expertise working in the title and escrow industry. WOODINVILLE — Juli Bacon, owner of JB Consulting Systems and Bacon Maintenance Services in Woodinville, has been sworn in as the 2017 chair of the National Association of Home Builders Professional Women in Building Council. Bacon is also a partner in JJ BizWorks. She is a long-time member of the Master Builders Association of King and Snohomish Counties. BOTHELL — Mortgage professional Matt Allen of Caliber Home Loans in Bothell has been recognized in a list of the industry’s most

MARCH 2017

influential individuals. Mortgage Professional America released its fifth annual Hot 100 report that featured Allen as one of the major power players heating up the mortgage world. Allen closed more than $90 million in loans in 2016. EDMONDS — Landau Associates has promoted staff in its Edmonds office. Eric Zick was promoted to Graphics III. Darlene Ruth is an accounting and human resources specialist. Jeovani Huerta-Avila is a staff scientist. Stephanie Renando is now a senior staff scientist. Amy Maule and Rosemary Trimmer are project scientists. Brandon Duncan is a senior project engineer. Katherine Saltanovitz and Kathryn Hartley are now associates. LAKE STEVENS — Northwest Kidney Centers has named Lake Stevens resident Heather Johnson as clinical director to oversee multiple area dialysis clinics. Johnson, a registered nurse,

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is responsible for three dialysis clinics on First Hill in Seattle and one at SeaTac. She began with the company as a dialysis technician in 1997 and has been nurse manager at the Seattle and Kirkland clinics. BOTHELL — Kara Adams has been selected as the new director of community engagement at the University of Washington Bothell. She will still oversee the UW Bothell Office of Community-Based Learning and Research where she

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has been working as the interim director. In this new role, Adams will help the university apply for the prestigious Carnegie Community Engagement Classification. ARLINGTON — Country Financial Agency Manager Brian Castellanos in Arlington was presented on Jan. 30 with a Patriot Award by John Van Dalen, ombudsman for the Washington Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Committee. The honor was in recognition of his extraordinary support for one of his employees serving in the Guard. Country Financial Agency is located in Arlington. MUKILTEO — Benefit Solutions has welcomed Alex Munoz as its new director of sales. Munoz previously served as a senior training and quality

EVERETT — Local nonprofit HopeWorks has welcomed Kerri Lonergan-Dreke to its board of directors. She is the co-owner of Lombardi’s Italian Restaurants, and has made community involvement a staple of her career. In addition to HopeWorks, Lonergan-Dreke serves as a board member for the Northshore School District Foundation, the Snohomish County Tourism Bureau and Providence Hospice & Home Care of Snohomish County. ARLINGTON — IRG Arlington Physical and Hand Therapy in Arlington has welcomed Loren Johnson as its newest physical therapist. His special interest is treating patients who have had joint replacement and

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EVERETT — Leadership Snohomish County has added eight new members to its Board of Directors. They are Ryan Crowther, Rachel Wilkinson Downes, Jennifer Graves, Kurt Hintze, Seema Sharma, Roslyn Sterling, Barbara Tolbert, and Kendra Trachta. The organization believes these new board members will bring their diverse perspectives to its mission of cultivating sustainable, local community leadership. MOUNTLAKE TERRACE — 1st Security Bank has hired Dexter Wellington as a senior loan officer at its home lending office in Mountlake Terrace. A lifetime resident of Edmonds, Wellington serves on the board of directors for the Edmonds Chamber of Commerce. MONROE — Canyon Creek Cabinet Company has promoted Shad Cooper as the new director of supply chain management. He was previously the assistant purchasing manager for the company. Cooper has over 22 years of experience at Canyon Creek. EVERETT — Brad Tilden, the CEO of Alaska Airlines is the keynote speaker for the 2017 Snohomish County Good Scout Breakfast. This fundraising event to support local Scouting programs begins at 7:30 a.m. on April 12 at the Edward D. Hansen Conference Center, 2000 Hewitt Ave., Everett. To reserve a table or a seat, call 425-3380380 or email 606fos@ scouting.org. EVERETT — Leadership Snohomish County is now accepting nominations for the 2017-18 program year — its 20th season. Leadership Snohomish County teaches, engages, challenges, and mobilizes professionals from all sectors to address the larger questions of the community’s future. Visit www.leadershipsc.org/ apply through April 30 to make a nomination.


MARCH 2017

BUSINESS BRIEFS MALTBY — Taco Time NW Foundation has awarded $100,000 in grants to six Puget Sound area non-profits. These included Farmer Frog in Snohomish County and WSU Bread Lab in Skagit County. Farmer Frog’s grant funds will provide stipends to urban farmer educators who work at school gardens. EVERETT — Credit union BECU reached its 1 million member mark. The organization also announced that it had donated $2.3 million in support of non-profit and community-based organizations in 2016 and empowered its employees to invest more than 16,600 hours in community service EVERETT — Classic Remodeling NW in Everett has received a place on the 550 list from Remodelers magazine for 2016. The listing rates the top 550 construction and

its eighth Four Diamond Award for lodging and its fifth Four Diamond Award for dining at the Tulalip Bay Restaurant.

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EDMONDS — Chermak Construction has won Best Of Design on Houzz, a leading platform for home remodeling and design. The company was chosen by the more than 40 million monthly unique users that comprise the Houzz community.

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remodeling companies in the country. Classic Remodeling NW came in at 257 out of a list of 550 companies. A digital list plus analysis of the state of the industry can be found at www.remodeling. hw.net/. MONROE — EvergreenHealth Monroe’s Emergency Services department now offers Telestroke capability. This advanced technology dig-

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 19

itally connects emergency department providers with stroke care specialists even when a neurologist isn’t physically on site. TULALIP — A total of 31 lodgings and 12 restaurants are represented on AAA’s Four Diamond Award list in Washington and northern Idaho this year. Locally, the Tulalip Resort Casino once again appeared on that list. The resort’s hotel won

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BELLEVUE — The Master Builders Association is now accepting applications for its May Rampathon event. Applications for free ramps for families struggling with mobility within their home, or from nonprofit organizations whose clients or residents struggle with mobility, are due in no later than March 1. Details and a link to apply online can be found at www.mbaks.com/ givingback/rampathon.

REAL ESTATE You could be someplace like this… …instead of managing your OFFICE own commercial property RETAIL INDUSTRIAL Sales & Leasing

425-418-3183

shelia@windermere.com

1812711

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360.629.3888

CAMANO ISLAND

370 NE. Camano Drive, C-101 Camano Island, WA 98282

360.387.6888

MARYSVILLE

922 State Ave., Suite A Marysville, WA 98270

360.651.1160

QUESTIONS: CHRIS COLLEY, FORMA Construction P: (206) 626-0256 E: CHRISC@FORMACC.COM

President & Designated Broker

ANACORTES IS CLOSE!

A Different Approach

To advertise call 425.339.3445 or email TRaimey@soundpublishing.com • www.TheHeraldBusinessJournal.com 1812708

Password: lowbid

Bud H. Kopp

206.579.8812 • budkopp1@comcast.net

www.NorthWest4Sale.com

Username: forma

Call us for a FREE consultation t

For all your real estate needs

STANWOOD

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ASSOCIATE BROKERS

26910 92nd Ave. NW, C-4 Stanwood, WA 98292

BID DATES: FEBRUARY 23 & MARCH 22-23, 2017

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WWW.FORMACC.COM


20 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

PLEASE NOTE: Business license information is obtained monthly from the Washington Secretary of State’s Office through the paid commercial services of InfoUSA. For the complete list, please go to www.theheraldbusinessjournal.com.

MARCH 2017

BUSINESS LICENSES

C1, Bothell, WA 98012-7280; Information Technology Services U-Haul Neighborhood Dealer: 4012 148th St. SE, Bothell, WA 98012-4740; 425357-9650; Truck Renting and Leasing

Edmonds

Arlington 204 West Technologies: 19231 107th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-6662; Nonclassified Establishments D2 Aviation: 17916 59th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223; 360-386-8031; Airline Support Services RPI Inc.: 3710 168th St. NE, Arlington, WA 982238461; 425-257-3038; Nonclassified Establishments Seattle Galvanizing: 19603 60th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223; 360-363-4931; Galvanizing (Manufacturers) Wine Club: 18933 59th Ave. NE, No. 105, Arlington, WA 98223-6316; 425-2395376; Wines-Retail

Bothell Grace Baha Bothell: 17624 15th Ave. SE, Bothell, WA 98012-5106; 425949-7136; Nonclassified Establishments Stats-IT Solutions: 20520 Bothell Everett Highway, No.

Ametech: 6729 135th Place SW, Edmonds, WA 98026-3333; 425678-8185; Nonclassified Establishments Big River: 22927 Highway 99, Edmonds, WA 980268468; 425-835-0458; Nonclassified Establishments Brackett Maintenance Office: 9329 244th St. SW, Edmonds, WA 98020-6529; 206-801-7657; Maintenance Contractors Innate Health Clinic: 420 Fifth Ave. S, Edmonds, WA 98020-3464; 425-697-3900; Clinics Makota Co: 303 Fifth Ave. S, Edmonds, WA 98020-3626; 425-412-3793; Nonclassified Establishments Mel & Mia’s: 7530 Olympic View Drive, Edmonds, WA 98026-5522; 425361-7044; Nonclassified Establishments Raymond James: 533 Fifth Ave. S, Edmonds, WA 980203458; 562-628-5589; Financial Advisory Services

Everett Clean Slate House: 2901 Everett Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3810; 425-512-0114; Janitor Service Dream Bean: 4231 Rucker Ave., Everett, WA 982032244; 509-787-3523; Nonclassified Establishments Escape Scene: 1313 Hewitt Ave., Everett, WA 982013920; 425-512-8032; Nonclassified Establishments Everett Hotel Group: 1122 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201-1412; 425-405-3607; Hotel and Motel Management Glen At North Creek: 12115 Meridian Ave. S, Everett, WA 98208-5761; 425-265-0077; Nonclassified Establishments Ideal Balance: 3624 Colby Ave., Everett, WA 982014776; 425-366-8517; Nonclassified Establishments Live Sound & Stage: 12432 Highway 99, No. 69, Everett, WA 98204-5545; 425-440-3392; Nonclassified Establishments Quality Funding: 6930 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98203-5148; 425-265-1044; Financing Rocketbase Solutions: 2711 93rd Place SE, Everett, WA 98208-3712; 425948-6834; Nonclassified Establishments RVB Electric & Con-

struction: 2803 Grand Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3417; 425349-0971; Electric Contractors Silver Lake Shell Food Mart: 9501 19th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-3804; 253-235-5689; Service Stations-Gasoline and Oil Thales Avionics Inc.: 808 134th St. SW, Everett, WA 98204-2300; 425-582-2032; Aircraft Avionics-Sales and Service (Wholesale) TMPH Rental: 8600 18th Ave. W, No. A111, Everett, WA 98204-4993; Nonclassified Establishments

Lynnwood Chef Dane Catering: 19515 44th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5619; Caterers Excel Properties: 19620 68th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5961; 425-582-0932; Real Estate Puget Sound Smoke & Vape: 14608 Highway 99, No. 303, Lynnwood, WA 98087-5500; 206-755-3751; Electronic Cigarettes Service Joy Corp: 4100 194th St. SW, No. 390, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4613; Services Not Elsewhere Classified Spirits Of Romania: 16429 20th Ave. W, No. 2052, Lynnwood, WA 98037-5301; 772-559-9645; Distillers (Manufacturers)

MARKETPLACE

AUTO GLASS • GLASS REPLACEMENT • TINTING • VINYL WINDOWS

Rock Chip Repair…

Serving Snohomish County Since 1980

$

TRANSMISSION SERVICE

3495

CLEAR-VIEW GLASS COMPANY 1810525

Region One ELCA: 4306 132nd St. SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-8940; 425-225-6377; Churches Washington State Auditors: 15129 Main St., Mill Creek, WA 98012-9036; 425225-6673; Auditors

Monroe AT&T Store: 19191 U.S. 2, No. 105, Monroe, WA 982721553; 360-794-6280; Cellular

Mukilteo E Life North America: 9800 Harbour Place, Mukilteo, WA 98275-4747; 425-290-1001; Nonclassified Establishments Stephanie’s Doggie Doos-Shampoos: 4704 Pointes Drive, Mukilteo, WA 98275-6074; 425-374-7188; Pet Washing and Grooming

Quil Ceda Village Luxury Beauty Stores: 10600 Quil Ceda Blvd., Quil Ceda Village, WA 982718081; 360-653-1820; Cosmetics and Perfumes-Retail Pink Blossom Events: 602 Maple Ave., No. 151, Snohomish, WA 98290-2589; Events-Special Automobile Inc.: 27116 90th Ave. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292; 360-629-6200; Nonclassified Establishments One A-Chord Academy: 26930 94th Drive NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-8051; 360-572-3146; Nonclassified Establishments Zions EF: 313 Priest Point Drive NW, Tulalip, WA 982716830; 360-658-9466; Nonclassified Establishments Zions Equipment Finance: 313 Priest Point Drive NW, Tulalip, WA 98271-6830; 360658-9466; Financing

Serving the NW Since 1952

www.edstransmission.com 1810532

1811 Everett Ave. Everett (425) 252-2161

We are here for your projects, HOMEOWNERS and CONTRACTORS Eastvalleysandandgravel.com Same Day Deliveries – QUICK QUOTE

ROADSIDE SERVICES: Flat Tires • Car Lockouts Car Jump Start Service • Fuel Delivery (Mention this ad and receive a 10% Off Discount)

1810529

Mill Creek

Holiday Hair Salon: 21919 66th Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-2189; 425-582-7808; Beauty Salons

• Remanufactured • Automatic • Standards • Differentials • CV Axles Drivelines • Repairs and/or Replace

Spring is coming!

Serving ish 2406 39th St. • Everett, WA 98201 Snohom Cou nt y! (425) 259-9264 • RonMayTowing.com

Another Castle Video Games: 8628 36th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 982707245; 360-322-7571; Video Games ATI Physical Therapy: 1242 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-3672; 360-572-5800; Physical Therapists Can AM Coatings: 1110 Fifth St., Marysville, WA 98270-4500; 360-386-9692; Coatings-Protective-Manufacturers Deja Brew Espresso: 1309 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-3604; 360-386-8907; Coffee Shops Outback Steakhouse: 2537 172nd St. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-4824; 425557-7711; Restaurants Worlds Beyond: 306 State Ave., Marysville, WA 982705028; 360-322-7428; Nonclassified Establishments

Mountlake Terrace

Quality Transmission Service & Repair

We can TOW or MOVE just about ANYTHING!

Heavy Machines • “Auto Offload” • Antique Autos Motorcycles with Condor • Lathes • Small Forklifts • Toolboxes Latte Stands • Golf Course Mowers • Small Tractors • Safes

Marysville

Telephones (Services) Jackson’s: 13885 Fryelands Blvd. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-2663; 208-888-6061; Nonclassified Establishments

TRANSMISSIONS Our Speciality, Not a Sideline

www.clearviewglass.com 4317 Rucker • Everett 425-258-9399

Terracon: 20225 Cedar Valley Road, Lynnwood, WA 98036-6365; 425-640-2145; Nonclassified Establishments T-Mobile: 17425 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 980373101; 425-412-2960; Cellular Telephones (Services)

Pricing available on our website or call 360-403-7520 Road repairs, grading, site work and road construction. Over 35 products available 1810528

Visit us at 5802 Cemetery Road Arlington WA 98223 7:30 – 5:00

How to Advertise in the Herald Business Journal Call 425.339.3445 Email TRaimey@soundpublishing.com www.TheHeraldBusinessJournal.com 1810519

ADVERTISE ! e m o c ll i w y e h t an d Shoppers are ready to see what you have in store for them!

www.heraldnet.com

Call your Multimedia Consultant or 425.339.3030


PUBLIC RECORDS Bankruptcy filings The following Snohomish County businesses or individuals filed business-related bankruptcies with U.S.Bankruptcy Court for Western District of Washington from Jan. 1-31. 17-10063-MLB: Chapter 7, Brian Lettman; attorney for debtor: Samuel R. Leonard; filed: Jan. 8; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual 17-10300-MLB: Chapter 7, Paradise Drywall; attorney for debtor: John A. Sterbick; filed: Jan. 25; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation 17-10356-MLB: Chapter 13, Isabella Cano; attorney for debtor: Matthew W. Anderson; attorney for special request: Elizabeth H. Shea; attorney for interested party: Lesley Lueke Barreca; filed: Jan. 27; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual

Snohomish County tax liens Tax liens are gathered from online public records filed with the Snohomish County Auditor’s Office. These federal and state liens werefiled between Jan. 1-31.

Federal tax liens 201701040228: Jan. 4; Ewart, Nanci (+), 6319 55th Place NE, Marysville 201701040229: Jan. 4; McCreary Aaron, 3503 133rd St. SW, Lynnwood 201701040230: Jan. 4; Zapara, Traci K. (+), 19505 43rd Ave. SE, Bothell 201701040231: Jan. 4; Kershaw, Georgianna, 432 W Maple St., Monroe 201701040232: Jan. 4; Horgan, John S., 3628 Upland Ave., Everett 201701040233: Jan. 4; Sterba, Joseph V., 60th St. SE, Everett 201701040234: Jan. 4; Anderson, Jerald A., 6428 64th Place NE, Marysville 201701040235: Jan. 4; Pulu, Jacinta (+), 10121 62nd Drive NE, Marysville 201701040236: Jan. 4; Advanced Mobility Of Arlington (+), 5406 232nd St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201701040237: Jan. 4; M&D Quality Painting (+), 18501 66th Ave. W, Lynnwood 201701040238: Jan. 4; Grasseth, Heather J. (+), 15012 23rd Ave. NE, Arlington 201701040239: Jan. 4; Ruiz, Sonya (+), 13321 209th Ave. SE, Monroe 201701040240: Jan. 4; Robison, Karen L. (+), 211 W Hill St., Monroe 201701040241: Jan. 4; Martinez Stanley Estate Of, PO Box 14578, Mill Creek 201701040242: Jan. 4; Hutchinson, Ana, 4891 76th St. SW, Unit C302, Mukilteo 201701100357: Jan. 10; Baba, Joseph Steven (+), 6921 191st St. SE, Snohomish 201701100358: Jan. 10; AJS Full Service Automotive Repair, 2110 25th St., Everett 201701100359: Jan. 10; Ray, Julie Ann (+), 10412 40th Ave. SE, Everett 201701100360: Jan. 10; Peyanuvatchai, Kimberly S., PO Box 13414, Mill Creek 201701100361: Jan. 10; Herrington, David L., 21100 Hillcrest Place, Edmonds 201701100362: Jan. 10; Generation Drywall Inc., 21114 22nd Ave. W, Lynnwood 201701100363: Jan. 10; Stewart, Elizabeth A., 9910 Marine View Drive, Mukilteo 201701100364: Jan. 10; Roten, Shawn, 9910 Marine View Drive, Mukilteo 201701100365: Jan. 10; Reeves, Anthony M., 2900 Grand Ave., Apt 340, Everett 201701100366: Jan. 10; Andersen-Ross, Amy, 16119 73rd Place W, Edmonds 201701100367: Jan. 10; Shoreline Sign &

Awning (+), 12101 Huckleberry Lane, Arlington 201701100368: Jan. 10; Koch, Christopher A., 2229 120th Place SE, Everett 201701180467: Jan. 18; Allwater Inc., 5820 188th St. SW, Suite A, Lynnwood 201701180468: Jan. 18; Snohomish Bicycles, 1210 First St., Snohomish 201701180469: Jan. 18; Crees Underground Construction (+), 10910 100th St. NE, Suite D 202, Lake Stevens 201701180470: Jan. 18; Kolash, Paul, 9216 Woods Creek Road, Monroe 201701180471: Jan. 18; Potong Floor Covering Inc., 23414 127th Ave. NE, Arlington 201701180472: Jan. 18; Dahlgren, Venea L (+), 17433 79th Drive NE, Arlington 201701180473: Jan. 18; Health Research Associates Inc., 6505 216th St. SW, Suite 105, Mountlake Terrace 201701180474: Jan. 18; Hudy Plumbing & Heating Inc., PO Box 760 Monroe 201701180550: Jan. 18; O’Finnigans Pub (+), 13601 Highway 99, Everett 201701180551: Jan. 18; Sound Storage Management Inc., PO Box 43, Everett 201701180552: Jan. 18; Fairmont Manor Care Center Inc., PO Box 1808, Woodinville 201701180553: Jan. 18; Lopez, Leon Juan (+), PO Box 241, Startup 201701180554: Jan. 18; Northstar Marble & Granite Inc., 3337 Paine St., Everett 201701180555: Jan. 18; Sabotage Sports Training & Management Company, 3616 South Road, A-3, Mukilteo 201701180556: Jan. 18; Downing, David R. (+), 4229-76th St. NE, Marysville 201701180557: Jan. 18; Alder Architects Corp., 2813 Rockefeller Ave., Everett 201701180558: Jan. 18; Lathrop, Brett, 19916 Old Owen Road, Apt. 345, Monroe 201701180559: Jan. 18; Martin, Tracie L. (+), 12633 75th St. SE, Snohomish 201701180560: Jan. 18; Allwater Inc, 5820 188th St. SW, Suite A, Lynnwood 201701240554: Jan. 24; Ressler, Lynn M., 23826 115th Place W, Edmonds 201701240555: Jan. 24; Ressler, Lynn M., 23826 115th Place W, Edmonds 201701240556: Jan. 24; Lemay, Carol Ballard (+), PO Box 2554, Stanwood 201701240557: Jan. 24; Stewart, Elizabeth A., 9910 Marine View Drive, Mukilteo 201701240558: Jan. 24; Advanced Mobility Of Arlington (+), 5406 232nd St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201701240559: Jan. 24; Miller, Kirk A., 12918 11th Ave. NE, Marysville 201701240560: Jan. 24; Rathert, Kimberly P. (+), 25326 133rd Ave. NE, Arlington 201701240561: Jan. 24; Hacks, Gaylynn M. (+), 170 W. Dayton St., Edmonds 201701240562: Jan. 24; Roten, Shawn, 9910 Marine View Drive, Mukilteo 201701240563: Jan. 24; Eugene, Dwianshell, 2003 32nd St., Unit D, Everett 201701240564: Jan. 24; Hammer Construction (+), 6925 216th St. SW, Suite N, Lynnwood 201701240565: Jan. 24; Enrapture Inc., 10530 19th Ave. SE, Suite 203, Everett 201701240566: Jan. 24; MCCI (+), 8126 66th Drive NE, Marysville 201701240567: Jan. 24; Angie Bueing Insurance Agency Inc., 8301 212th St. SW, Edmonds 201701240568: Jan. 24; Bauer, Greg, 17611 83rd Drive NE, Arlington 201701240569: Jan. 24; Bauer, Lynn Dee, 17611 83rd Drive NE, Arlington 201701240570: Jan. 24; All Seasons Waterproofing & Drainage Inc., 17616 15th Ave. SE, Suite 1068, Bothell 201701310318: Jan. 31; Anderson, Warren (+), 8722 147th Ave. NE, Granite Falls 201701310319: Jan. 31; Moore, Russell W. (+), 23929 22nd Drive SE, Bothell 201701310320: Jan. 31; DeFever, Robert B., 4850 Sterling Way, Apt. 110, Mukilteo

SERVICES

MARCH 2017

201701310321: Jan. 31; Providence Construction & Design Inc., 4208 227th Place SW, Mountlake Terrace 201701310322: Jan. 31; O’Finnigans Pub (+), 13601 Highway 99, Everett 201701310323: Jan. 31; Chin, Michael S., 16527 33rd Ave. W, Lynnwood 201701310324: Jan. 31; Carrillo, Jose A., 3105 123rd St. SE, Everett 201701310325: Jan. 31; Berg, Robert M., 717 Lawrence St., Monroe 201701310326: Jan. 31; House, Daniel E. (+), 9015 Vernon Road, Suite 8, Lake Stevens 201701310327: Jan. 31; House, Daniel E. (+), 9015 Vernon Road, Suite 8, Lake Stevens 201701310328: Jan. 31; Amundson & Co Inc., 2825 Colby Ave., Suite 206, Everett 201701310329: Jan. 31; Smith, Joan A. (+), PO Box 674, Arlington

Employment security liens 201701050548: Jan. 5; Maistrali Inc. (+), State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201701050549: Jan. 5; Dynamo Construction Inc., State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201701050550: Jan. 5; Home Entertainment (+), State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201701050551: Jan. 5; Idexcel Inc., State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201701050552: Jan. 5; Kogaty Construction Group (+), State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201701050562: Jan. 5; Sanh, D. Duong (+), State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201701050564: Jan. 5; Six Nines It, State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201701050565: Jan. 5; Snohomish Sports Institute, State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201701130556: Jan. 13; AIS-International Ltd., State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201701130557: Jan. 13; Bruno’s Pizzeria (+), State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201701130558: Jan. 13; Bumstead, Shannon S. (+), State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201701130559: Jan. 13; Robert, Gene Sarsten Jr (+), State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201701130564: Jan. 13; Country Care (+), State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201701130566: Jan. 13; Smith, Laurie (+), State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201701130567: Jan. 13; Discount Water Heater & Plumbing Inc., State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201701130568: Jan. 13; Drywall Pros Inc., State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201701130571: Jan. 13; Jacobson Mechanical Inc., State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201701130573: Jan. 13; Northcreek Custom Painting, State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201701130574: Jan. 13; Orca Electrical Contract, State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201701130575: Jan. 13; Wired Electric Inc., State Of Washington (Dept Of)

Partial release of federal tax liens 201701040243: Jan. 4; Cavazos, Rangel, 21810 Vine Road, Brier

Release of federal tax liens 201701040244: Jan. 4; Farrimond, April, 9215 163rd Ave. SE, Snohomish 201701040245: Jan. 4; Pattys Eggnest Mukilteo (+), 20016 Cedar Valley Road, Suite 204, Lynnwood 201701040246: Jan. 4; Osborn, Denis K., 1430 W Casino Road, Apt 201, Everett 201701040247: Jan. 4; Marshall, Gregory, 1604 Hewitt Ave., Suite 507, Everett 201701040248: Jan. 4; Spearman Corp., 4700 56th Place NE, Marysville 201701040249: Jan. 4; O’Bear, Joann (+), 602 Morgan Court, Everett 201701040250: Jan. 4; Ver-Heul, Tina L.

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 21

(+), 12918 311th Ave. SE, Sultan 201701040251: Jan. 4; McCoy-Hernandez, Y. (+), 21723 19th Ave. W, Lynnwood 201701040252: Jan. 4; Rammage, Caty, 8828 206th St. SE, Unit E, Snohomish 201701040253: Jan. 4; Park, Song B., PO Box 15109, Mill Creek 201701100369: Jan. 10; Cox, Cynthia S. (+), 9432 Turk Drive, Marysville 201701100370: Jan. 10; Turner, Joseph S., 12311 Maplewood Ave., Edmonds 201701100371: Jan. 10; Shaffer, Sherry L., 19818 13th Drive SE, Bothell 201701100372: Jan. 10; Hayes, Michael L., PO Box 3633, Everett 201701100373: Jan. 10; Ohlsen, Jennifer (+), PO Box 1064, Gold Bar 201701100374: Jan. 10; Spencer, Kirk D. (+), 19818 13th Drive SE, Bothell 201701100375: Jan. 10; Spencer, Kirk D., 19818 13th Drive SE, Bothell 201701100376: Jan. 10; Shafer, Sherry L. (+), 19818 13th Drive SE, Bothell 201701100377: Jan. 10; Bradley, Jeffrey R., 1242 State Ave., Suite I, Marysville 201701100378: Jan. 10; Extremis Audio Partnership, PO Box 5074, Lynnwood 201701100379: Jan. 10; Monteiro, Paula C. (+), 4312 151st St NE, Marysville 201701100380: Jan. 10; McNair Charles, Estate Of (+), 8724 44th Drive NE, Marysville 201701100381: Jan. 10; Home Realty Canyon Park Inc., 12811 Eighth Ave. W, C-202, Everett 201701100382: Jan. 10; Duran, Y. Torralba (+), 2411 122nd St SW, Apt. B, Everett 201701100383: Jan. 10; Grafing, Judith M. (+), 30901 247th Ave. NE, Arlington 201701100384: Jan. 10; Cookson, William R. Jr., 3516 132nd St. SW, Unit A, Lynnwood 201701180561: Jan. 18; Archer, Karla A. (+), 22526 44th Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace 201701180562: Jan. 18; Green, Robert R., 9701 9th St. NE, Lake Stevens 201701180563: Jan. 18; Thomas-Ta, Cindy K. (+), 1304 114th Ave. SE, Lake Stevens 201701180564: Jan. 18; Talkington, Shante A., 1009 181st Ave. NE, Snohomish 201701180565: Jan. 18; Oh, Young S., 16824 44th Ave. W, Suite 200, Lynnwood 201701180566: Jan. 18; Green, Robert R., 9701 Ninth St. NE, Lake Stevens 201701240571: Jan. 24; Millcreek AFH Inc., 16000 75th Place W, Edmonds 201701240572: Jan. 24; Dolan, Lawrence P., 6230 189th Place SW, Lynnwood 201701240573: Jan. 24; Je, Choon Og (+), 7527 172nd St. SW, Edmonds 201701240574: Jan. 24; Squires Machine Inc., 19510 21st Ave. W, Suite B, Lynnwood 201701240575: Jan. 24; Edmark, Julie J. (+), 16222 29th Place NE, Snohomish 201701240576: Jan. 24; Sea Com Corporation, PO Box 434, Mountlake Terrace 201701240577: Jan. 24; Kohlwes, Debra L., 13209 42nd Ave. W, Mukilteo 201701310184: Jan. 31; Bransford, Sheryl (+), PO Box 2649, Lynnwood 201701310330: Jan. 31; Hollingsworth, Sherilyn K (+), 7008 19th Ave. NE, Marysville 201701310331: Jan. 31; Coale, Robert D.G. Jr., 4365 Walden Loop, Greenbank 201701240537: Jan. 24; Shriver, Stephen A, 5732 Sunset Lane, Mukilteo

Satisfaction of employment security lien 201701050546: Jan. 5; Asphalt Services, State Of Washington (Dept Of)

Withdrawal of federal tax liens 201701240578: Jan. 24; Sherman, Jason R., 613 106th SW, Everett

List it or find it in The Daily Herald. 425-339-3100

www.heraldnet.com

classified@heraldnet.com • heraldnet.com/classified


22 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MARCH 2017

SNOHOMISH COUNTY ECONOMIC DATA Pending sales, residential real estate

Closed sales, residential real estate

Unemployment rate, percent

Continued unemployment claims

Aerospace employment

Construction employment

Professional services employment

Local sales tax distributions, Snohomish County and incorporated cities

Consumer price index, King and Snohomish counties

07/12

1,400

1,029

8.4

9,114

45,800

16,100

23,300

$4,264,446

239.54

08/12

1,324

1,027

7.5

7,834

46,300

16,500

23,400

$4,485,421

09/12

1,206

880

7.1

7,865

46,900

16,300

23,600

$4,522,340

10/12

1,325

937

7

7,870

46,800

16,300

23,300

$4,577,850

11/12

1,114

806

6.8

8,445

47,500

16,100

23,000

$4,768,450

12/12

872

892

6.6

9,351

47,100

15,900

23,100

$4,378,797

01/13

1,154

713

7.1

9,962

46,800

15,600

22,600

$4,466,777

02/13

1,236

673

6.3

9,182

46,600

15,300

22,500

$5,680,845

03/13

1,576

932

5.7

9,060

46,400

15,400

22,500

$4,093,977

04/13

1,500

1,020

4.9

8,891

46,100

15,500

22,900

$3,970,313

05/13

1,487

1,131

4.7

8,093

45,500

15,800

22,700

$4,725,432

06/13

1,488

1,159

5.7

7,888

45,700

16,200

22,900

$4,316,634

07/13

1,470

1,141

5.6

7,787

45,900

18,000

24,000

$4,584,288

08/13

1,402

1,143

6.2

7,062

44,900

18,400

24,000

$4,921,104

09/13

1,150

1,032

N/A

7,180

45,100

18,300

24,000

$3,573,194

10/13

1,219

1,041

6.0

7,149

44,500

18,200

23,900

$4,998,366

11/13

1,010

833

5.7

7,499

44,300

17,900

24,200

$5,132,975

12/13

835

871

5.3

8,829

44,700

17,800

24,000

$3,348,852

01/14

1,195

615

6.0

9,651

44,000

14,500

23,300

$3,382,321

02/14

1,180

688

6.4

8,850

43,700

14,800

23,100

$4,087,089

03/14

1,481

949

6.0

8,897

43,700

14,800

23,400

$3,013,059

04/14

1,454

943

4.9

8,069

43,400

14,800

23,100

$2,923,521

05/14

1,718

1,074

5.0

7,502

43,600

15,100

23,100

$3,370,904

06/14

1,545

1,220

5.1

7,177

44,400

15,400

23,300

$3,290,880

07/14

1,457

1,172

5.3

6,587

44,000

18,400

23,500

$3,474,651

08/14

1,393

1,163

5.4

6,244

43,000

18,800

23,800

$3,695,926

09/14

1,328

1,057

5.1

N/A

42,900

18,800

23,800

$3,838,762

10/14

1,327

1,113

4.8

N/A

41,400

18,300

24,200

$3,663,750

11/14

1,027

885

4.8

6,093

41,800

18,000

24,100

$3,852,205

12/14

956

920

4.5

N/A

42,000

17,700

24,100

$3,582,032

1/15

1,237

686

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$3,280,200

2/15

1,406

740

5.3

6,663

43,000

17,200

23,700

$4,146,999

3/15

1,938

1,075

4.5

6,762

42,800

17,500

24,000

$2,981,599

4/15

1,747

1,272

3.6

6,273

42,800

18,100

24,100

$3,041,795

5/15

1,777

1,315

4.0

5,923

42,800

18,600

24,000

$3,654,693

6/15

1,799

1,374

4.3

5,607

42,700

19,200

24,400

$3,445,201

7/15

1,764

1,411

4.3

5,323

44,100

20,700

25,000

$3,590,957

8/15

1,634

1,442

3.9

5,367

43,600

21,200

25,300

$11,743,713

9/15

1,501

1,290

4.1

5,089

43,600

21,200

25,200

$11,603,019

10/15

1,503

1,178

4.5

5,109

43,400

20,400

25,100

$10,854,566

11/15

1,307

973

5.0

5,748

43,500

20,100

24,900

$11,503,562

12/15

1,067

1,189

5.0

6,193

43,600

19,800

25,300

$10,765,437

1/16

1,249

811

5.7

7,085

43,600

19,300

24,500

$10,477,405

2/16

1,475

848

5.3

6,388

43,500

19,600

24,500

$13,559,687

3/16

1,825

1,156

5.2

6,084

43,100

20,000

24,800

$9,496,443

4/16

1,836

1,213

4.4

5,957

43,300

19,800

25,600

$9,617,406

5/16

1,979

1,386

4.8

5,770

43,300

20,300

25,800

$11,697,044

6/16

1,862

1,493

4.7

5,396

43,800

21,000

26,400

$10,816,389

7/16

1,795

1,515

4.8

5,489

44,000

21,700

26,400

$11,102,633

8/16

1.873

1,538

4.4

5,502

43,900

22,100

26,500

$12,493,656

9/16

1,601

1,431

4.3

5,377

43,500

22,200

26,500

$12,193,233

10/16

1,561

1,364

4.0

5,502

42,100

22,800

26,700

$12,195,581

11/16

1,314

1,270

4.2

5,774

42,100

22,500

26,600

$12,515,314

12/16

1,104

1,145

3.9

6,187

42,100

22,300

26,600

$11,120,365

1/17

1,238

938

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$11,114,968

240.21

241.36

237.99

239.90

240.82

242.82

242.77

242.78

241.05

242.77

246.61

247.64

247.18

247.854

245.05

245.496

247.611

251.622

251.617

250.831

250.385

250.942

253.815

256.098

256.907 256.941

256.821


MARCH 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 23

ECONOMIC DATA Boeing stock price

PUD retail electricity use, kilowatt hours

Snohomish County PUD connections

New vehicle registrations

Average gas price (regular, unleaded

07/12

$73.91

446,516,298

207

4,402

$3.57

08/12

$71.40

468,361,106

282

4,664

$3.81

09/12

$69.60

408,581,275

255

4,155

$4.01

10/12

$70.44

503,030,443

442

4,303

$3.96

11/12

$74.28

473,023,558

225

3,682

$3.47

12/12

$75.36

614,283,104

234

3,636

$3.34

01/13

$73.87

700,861,857

223

4,656

$3.37

02/13

$76.90

674,618,017

316

3,753

$3.62

03/13

$85.85

608,606,315

330

4,713

$3.80

04/13

$91.41

617,541,384

321

4,943

$3.64

05/13

$99.05

492,112,324

276

5,256

$3.83

06/13

$102.32

465,163,451

213

5,275

$3.79

07/13

$105.10

453,404,099

322

5,622

$3.82

08/13

$103.92

470,067,543

232

5,742

$3.78

09/13

$117.50

410,719,601

338

5,141

$3.65

10/13

$138.36

518,766,206

461

5,179

$3.44

11/13

$133.83

461,012,493

447

4,083

$3.24

12/13

$136.92

671,835,200

244

4,752

$3.29

01/14

$125.26

696,306,571

421

5,726

$3.36

02/14

$128.92

682,348,469

386

4,467

$3.31

03/14

$125.49

610,841,349

352

5,428

$3.75

04/14

$129.02

605,381,115

368

6,389

$3.74

05/14

$135.25

468,754,469

466

6,542

$3.87

06/14

$127.23

492,917,254

412

6,626

$3.93

07/14

$120.48

432,682,894

444

6,611

$3.95

08/14

$126.80

463,314,006

363

5,614

$3.83

09/14

$127.38

451,089,566

264

5,987

$3.74

10/14

$124.91

496,335,315

403

5,929

$3.40

11/14

$134.36

422,769,229

426

4,867

$3.04

12/14

$132.25

663,368,433

426

6,072

$2.88

1/15

$145.37

634,592,067

209

6,364

$2.30

2/15

$150.85

611,633,434

287

5,889

$2.30

3/15

$150.08

567,831,393

284

7,707

$2.85

4/15

$143.34

578,264,358

427

8,057

$2.70

5/15

$140.52

449,046,426

326

8,649

$3.05

6/15

$138.72

494,611,488

384

9,852

$3.10

7/15

$144.17

451,503,602

334

7,641

$3.20

8/15

$130.68

474,207,621

242

7,021

$3.09

9/15

$130.95

557,429,310

442

7,018

$2.79

10/15

$148.07

477,438,877

217

6,828

$2.49

11/15

$145.45

491,536,717

221

5,631

$2.41

12/15

$144.59

686,858,030

282

6,995

$2.35

1/16

$120.13

634,697,183

333

6,910

$2.33

2/16

$118.18

655,390,592

333

7,298

$2.02

3/16

$126.94

612,151,814

288

9,209

$2.12

4/16

$134.80

514,320,049

428

8,364

$2.25

5/16

$126.15

457,566,044

342

8,906

$2.44

6/16

$129.87

463,105,233

277

10,754

$2.57

7/16

$133.66

430,295,041

435

8,268

$2.56

8/16

$129.45

467,001,501

325

8,315

$2.49

9/16

$131.74

454,085,665

394

7,628

$2.60

10/16

$142.43

452,214,305

401

6,861

$2.64

11/16

$150.56

495,372,342

331

6,360

$2.59

Serving Communities Throughout The Northwest

12/16

$155.68

658,223,433

620

6,663

$2.47

541.617.3500 | botc.com | Member FDIC

1/17

$163.42

648,223,433

512

7,048

$2.69

Here to Help Businesses Grow & Thrive Responding to your business opportunities with Local SBA Expertise, Quick Decisions & Streamlined Processing Bank of the Cascades, a leading Northwest SBA lender, is proud to provide Small Business Administration (SBA) loans to help local business succeed. We provide SBA loans for: • Business Expansion • Business Buyouts • Working Capital • Equipment

• Franchise Financing • Self Storage • Manufacturers • Wholesale

Please call or stop by to discuss how we might help your business today. Lynnwood Branch 2502 196th St SW Lynnwood, WA 98036 425.774.5643

1810291


24 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

MARCH 2017

Dan Ollis, Whidbey Coffee Family man Mud runner Coffee connoisseur

Each and every one of us is an original. Shaped by unique inuences that make us who we are today. Here at Heritage Bank, we think differences can build a better bank, too. That’s why we share the best ideas from across all of our branches and local communities with one goal in mind: to serve our customers better every day. By sharing our strengths, we’re able to offer customers like Dan Ollis—and you—more than a community bank. But rather, a community oƒ banks.

W H AT ’ S YO U R H E R I TAG E?

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Herald Business Journal - 03.01.2017  

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Herald Business Journal - 03.01.2017  

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