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NORTH KITSAP Special Supplement to the North Kitsap Herald


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WELCOME

Welcome to North Kitsap ... welcome home

N

orth Kitsap is an exciting, thriving place where diversity reigns: Beaches, farmland, forests, seaside towns, wildlife. Entertainment, recreation, retail, services, tourism. New neighborhoods and communities established in the mid- and late-1800s. Our population is equally diverse: The Suquamish and S’Klallam peoples who have always called this place home. The descendants of Scandivanians who arrived here beginning in the mid-1880s, drawn by abundant natural resources and an environment that reminded them of their places of origin. Residents of Mexican and Asian ancestry who are Cyclists in the 2016 Criterium race through downtown Poulsbo. Sophie Bonomi

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Grandparents Grandma and Grandpa always supported us...

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LIKE US ON

WELCOME now two of the largest demographics in Poulsbo. All are drawn here by economic opportunity, good schools, safe neighborhoods, and natural spaces. No wonder North Kitsap is home to more than 20 of the county’s largest private-sector employers, and eight of the largest public-sector employers. The magazine you are holding tells North Kitsap’s story. Within these pages, you’ll find profiles of our communities: Hansville/Eglon, Indianola, Keyport, Kingston, Little Boston, Port Gamble, Poulsbo, Suquamish. You’ll find information you need to know: arts and entertainment venues, civic organizations, events and festivals, farmers markets, government offices, museums and heritage sites, parks and recreation, schools, and a handy keepsake map. You’ll also find charts and graphics that tell you a little bit about who we are: Demographics and population, economic data, employment data, housing costs, and weather. As much as North Kitsap expands, there’s still a sense of continuity here. Whether you were born, are a long-time resident, or a newcomer here, we all have something important in common: We respect this place we share. It’s evident in the efforts to balance development with the needs of our environment. It’s evident in workplace innovations that are generating new products and creating new jobs. It’s evident in the fundraising and volunteerism that ensures neighbors can meet their basic needs when faced with financial crisis. No matter where we are from, once we move here we become part of that culture. The Almanac is published by the North Kitsap Herald, the Voice of North Kitsap since 1901. Call 360-779-4464 or email circulation@north kitsapherald.com for convenient home delivery. You can also stay up-to-date on North Kitsap news and events by visiting KitsapDailyNews.com. Enjoy the North Kitsap Almanac. And welcome home. Terry Ward, publisher Richard Walker, editor

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INSIDE

What you’ll find, and where, in the Almanac Welcome to North Kitsap Inside Quick reference Culture Poulsbo Hansville Indianola Keyport Kingston Port Gamble Map Port Gamble S’Klallam Suquamish Art Entertainment Faith Taste Get involved Be active Parks and trails Fitness and fun Schools Weather Advertiser index

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A stand-up paddleboarder enjoys a paddle on Liberty Bay in Poulsbo.

Peter O’Cain / 2015

North Kitsap Almanac

is an annual publication of the North Kitsap Herald and Sound Publishing 19351 8th Ave. NE, Suite 106, P.O. Box 278, Poulsbo WA. 98370 360-779-4464 | 360-779-8276 (fax)

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ADMINISTRATION Terry Ward, Regional publisher Donna Etchey, Kitsap general manager Nicole Clapp, office administrator EDITORIAL Richard Walker, editor; Sophie Bonomi; Terryl Asla, Leslie Kelly

NORTH KITSAP

ADVERTISING Donna Etchey, director; Bill McDonald, Sharon Allen CREATIVE TEAM Bryon Kempf, manager; Vanessa Calverley, Mark Gillespie, John Rodriguez, Kelsey Thomas

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Special Supplement to the North Kitsap Herald

Copyright 2017 Sound Publishing Inc.

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ESSENTIALS

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EXCEPTIONALS

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Quick reference guide to public services

NUMBERS Animal/Wildlife

Kitsap Animal Control 800-827-7387 Kitsap Humane Society 360-692-6977 | www.kitsaphumane.org Department of Fish and Wildlife 360-902-2200 | http://wdfw.wa.gov West Sound Wildlife Shelter 206-855-9057 | www.westsoundwildlife.org

Chambers

Commerce

of

Kingston Food Bank (Kingston) 360-297-4861 ShareNet (Kingston) 360-297-2266 | www.sharenetfoodbank.org

Courts

Poulsbo Chamber of Commerce 19735 10th Ave. NE, Suite S100, Poulsbo 98370 360-779-4848 | www.poulsbochamber.com Greater Kingston Chamber of Commerce 11201 Highway 104 Kingston 98346 360-297-3813 | www.kingstonchamber.org

Poulsbo Municipal Court 200 NE Moe St. Poulsbo 98370 360-779-9846

G ov e r n m e n t

Crisis Services Domestic Violence Hotline 800-799-7233 Sexual Assault 24-hour Hot Line 360-479-8500 Suicide Prevention Helpline 800-273-8255 Washington Poison Center 800-222-1222

Food Banks North Kitsap Fishline (Poulsbo) 360-779-5190 | www.nkfishline.org

CITY Poulsbo City Hall 200 NE Moe St. Poulsbo 98370 360-779-3901 | www.cityofpoulsbo.com Mayor and City Council Becky Erickson, mayor. Jim Henry, Connie Lord, Jeff Mayor Becky McGinty, David Musgrove, Erickson Gary Nystul, Ed Stern, Kenneth Thomas COUNTY Kitsap County 614 Division St. Port Orchard 98366 360-337-5777 | www.kitsapgov.com Board of County Commissioners 614 Division St., Port Orchard 98366 360-337-7146 n District 1 (North Kitsap): Rob Gelder rgelder@co.kitsap.wa.us n District 2 (South Kitsap): Charlotte Garrido cgarrido@co.kitsap.wa.us n District 3 (Central Commissioner Kitsap): Edward E.Wolfe Rob Gelder ewolfe@co.kitsap.wa.us STATE Gov. Jay Inslee (D) P.O. Box 40002 Olympia 98504-0002 360-902-4111 | www.governor.wa.gov

Kindergarten through Fifth Grade • Rich, Engaging Curriculum • Small Class Sizes 8553 NE Day Road • Bainbridge Island • 206-842-0400

TheIslandSchool.org WHERE EVERY CHILD MATTERS

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Sen. Christine Rolfes (D) 230A John A. Cherberg Building P.O. Box 40423 Olympia 98504-0423 360-786-7644 | rolfes.chris- Sen. Christine tine@leg.wa.gov Rolfes

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North Kitsap School District A Great Place to Live & Learn

• Award-Winning Schools • Dedicated, High-Quality TEACHERS and SUPPORT STAFF • COMPETITIVE Advanced Placement (AP) Programs • ROBUST Career and Technology Education (CTE) offerings • Variety of LEARNING OPTIONS including a Highly Capable Program, K-5 Spanish Dual Language Program, Parent Assisted Learning Program, and a K-8 Options Program

FREE FULL-DAY KINDERGARTEN AT ALL ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Enrollment is always open for grades K-12

To enroll your child or to learn more about our schools visit our website at www.nkschools.org or call (360) 396-3000 N o r t h

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Quick reference guide to public services

NUMBERS

man; Bardow Lewis, vice chairman; Nigel Lawrence, Sammy Mabe, Luther “Jay” Mills, Rich Purser, Robin Sigo.

Libraries Rep. Sherry Appleton

Rep. Drew Hansen

Rep. Sherry Appleton(D) 132F Legislative Building P.O. Box 40600 Olympia 98504-0600 360-786-7934 | appleton.sherry@leg.wa.gov Rep. Drew Hansen (D) 369 John L. O’Brien Building P.O. Box 40600 Olympia 98504-0600 360-786-7842 | hansen.drew@leg.wa.gov FEDERAL Sen. Maria Cantwell (D) 206-220-6400 (Seattle) www.cantwell.senate.gov Sen. Patty Murray (D) 206-553-5545 (Seattle) www.murray.senate.gov Rep. Derek Kilmer (D) 360-373-9725 (Bremerton) www.kilmer.house.gov TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe 31912 Little Boston Road Kingston 98346 360-297-2646 | www.pgst. nsn.us Council members: Jeromy Sullivan, chairman; Chris Tom, vice chairman; Kyle Carpenter, Jeromy Sullivan Talia DeCoteau, Lena Tunkara, Renee Veregge. Suquamish Tribe 18490 Suquamish Way P.O. Box 498 Suquamish 98392 360-598-3311 | www. suquamish.nsn.us Council members: Leonard Forsman, chair-

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Kitsap Regional Library www.krl.org Kingston branch 26159 Dulay Road NE 360-297-3330 Little Boston branch 31912 Little Boston Road NE 360-297-2670 Poulsbo branch 700 NE Lincoln Road 360-779-2915

M e d i ca l C a r e ALL EMERGENCIES: 911 North Kitsap Family Practice (urgent care) 20730 Bond Road, Poulsbo 360-779-7011 | www.immediateclinic.com/ poulsbo-urgent-care The Doctors Clinic (urgent care) 19245 7th Ave. NE, Poulsbo 360-782-3500 | www.thedoctorsclinic.com Harrison Medical Center 866-844-9355 (WELL) www.harrisonmedical.org Peninsula Community Health Services 360-779-1963 (Poulsbo) www.pchsweb.org HIV-AIDS Information 800-874-AIDS Hospice of Kitsap County 360-698-4611 | www.hospiceofkitsapcounty. org Kitsap Public Health District 360-377-5235 | www.kitsappublichealth.com Shellfish Water Quality Hotline 800-223-9355

Parks

and

R e c r e at i o n

Kitsap County Parks and Recreation 360-337-5350 | www.kitsapgov.com/parks City of Poulsbo Parks and Recreation 360-779-9898 | www.cityofpoulsbo.com/

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parks/parks.htm Village Green Metropolitan Park District 360-930-9242 | www.myvillagegreen.org

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Port of Eglon P.O. Box 451, Hansville 98340 360-297-4542 | nklaw1@gmail.com Port of Indianola P.O. Box 496, Indianola 98342-0496 www.portofIndianola.com Port of Keyport P.O. Box 195, Keyport 98345 360-627-0594 | www.portofkeyport.com Port of Kingston 25864 Washington Blvd. P.O. Box 559, Kingston 98346 360-297-3545 | www.portofkingston.org Port of Poulsbo P.O. Box 732, Poulsbo 98370 360-779-9905 | www.portofpoulsbo.com

P o l i c e , F i r e P rot e c t i o n ALL EMERGENCIES: 911 Kitsap County Sheriff’s Department 360-337-7101 (non-emergency) Poulsbo Police Department 200 NE Moe St. Poulsbo 98370 360-779-3113 (non-emergency) Port Gamble S’Klallam Police 31912 Little Boston Road NE Kingston 98346 360-930-9061 (non-emergency) Suquamish Police Department 18490 Suquamish Way NE Suquamish 98392 360-598-4334 (non-emergency) Washington State Patrol 360-779-9111 North Kitsap Fire & Rescue 360-297-3619 (non-emergency) Poulsbo Fire Department 360-779-3997 (non-emergency)

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Quick reference guide to public services

NUMBERS Burn Ban Information 360-297-4888

Serving as a police officer means more than law enforcement. A Poulsbo police officer helps a young girl shop during the annual Shop with a Cop Christmas event.

Schools See Almanac pages 54-56

T r a n s p o r tat i o n Hood Canal Bridge 800-419-9085 (status) 800-695-ROAD (conditions) Kitsap Transit Bus service, carpool, RideShare 800-422-2877, 800-501-7433 | www.kitsaptransit.org Washington State Ferries 206-464-6400 | www.wsdot.wa.gov/ferries

Utilities POWER OUTAGES: CALL 211 Bainbridge Disposal (solid waste) 206-842-4882 www.bainbridgedisposal.com Brem-Air Disposal (solid waste) 800-592-9995 Peter O’Cain / 2015 www.wm.com City of Poulsbo (sewer, water, trash) Puget Sound Energy Poulsbo 98370 200 NE Moe St., Poulsbo 98370 360-394-9881 888-225-5773 360-779-5547 www.pse.com www.cityofpoulsbo.com Vehicle and Vessel Licensing JRO, Inc. (for the State of Washington) Kitsap Public Utilities District 227 NW Lindvig Way, Poulsbo 98370 Vehicle/Vessel Licensing 1431 Finn Hill Road, Poulsbo 98370 360-779-7656, 800-739-6766 Driver’s License Examiner www.kpud.org 19045 Highway 305, No. 140,

Swift

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CULTURE

The cultural diversity of North Kitsap

Left, Poulsbo’s waterfront Julefest celebrates the heritage of the area’s early Scandinavian immigrants. Right, Suquamish children welcome canoes to their shores during the annual Canoe Journey. Left: Angie Donovan Right: Sophie Bonomi

T

he cultures of the First Peoples of this land are a prominent part of our landscape. A mill town established in the 1850s by New Englanders is a reminder that North Kitsap timber helped build communities all along the west coast. The Scandinavians who settled here beginning in the 1880s are remembered in the names of local streets and in public art. The U.S. Navy, which has been a presence in North Kitsap for more than a century, is an important part of our nation’s defense as well as our local economy. Take a day trip and get to know the cultures of North Kitsap. They’re all located within a 20- by 10-mile area reachable by ferries from downtown Seattle and Edmonds. At Point No Point, a monument marks the place where representatives of the United States and the Chemakum, S’Klallam and Skokomish peoples signed the Treaty of Point No Point on Jan. 26, 1855, opening the region to newcomers.

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The lighthouse dates to 1879 and is open for tours. The U.S. Lighthouse Society is headquartered in the lighthouse keeper’s duplex, one side of which it rents out as a vacation rental. Next to the light station is a salt marsh that attracts one of the largest bird lists in Washington state. The forested trails of Hansville Greenway and Wildlife Preserve provide a fairly level hike from Puget Sound to Hood Canal. In Little Boston, the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe’s Point Casino & Hotel is a showcase of Northwest Coast Native art; the hotel grounds features a courtyard with a spindle whorl pattern and several story poles and totem poles created by noted Northwest Coast Native artists. A visit to the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe’s House of Knowledge, next to the government center, is a must. The longhouse, veterans memorial, welcome poles and an honor pole help tell the story of the S’Klallam people’s culture of welcoming, teaching and serving. Nearby is Heronswood Gardens, founded by noted horticulturalist Dan Hinkley

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and now owned by the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe (Hinkley is on staff and frequently gives presentations). Tour 15 acres of botanical gardens featuring plants Hinkley collected from all over the world, as well as plants native to the region. Across Port Gamble Bay, the town of Port Gamble resembles the founders’ hometown of East Machias, Maine. A mill operated here from 1853 until 1995. Today, the community is a National Historic Landmark District and a popular events venue. Restored mid-1800s buildings now house a variety of stores and shops. The Port Gamble Historical Museum is located on the lower floor of the general store. The center of Suquamish Village is a cultural district, with sites within walking distance. Visit the Suquamish Museum and view the exhibit, “Ancient Shores, Changing Tides,” presenting Suquamish history from the beginning of time to present day. Nearby are Chief Seattle’s gravesite at the Suquamish Cemetery; Old Man House Park, once the site of the largest winter longhouse in the Salish Sea; the Suquamish Veterans Memorial, with two house posts depicting 19th century leaders Kitsap and Seattle; and the stunning House of Awakened Culture overlooking Port Madison. The Suquamish Clearwater Casino Hotel Resort overlooking Agate Pass is also appointed with Coast Salish art. Downtown Poulsbo’s building fronts and street names reflect the heritage of the Norwegians who settled here beginning in the 1880s. Downtown is cultural district of sorts, with art galleries, bookstores, a live theater, a marine science center, a historical museum, a maritime museum, and restaurants that reflect the diversity of the city -- American, English, Italian, Mexican, and Spanish. In Keyport, the Naval Undersea Museum is one of 14 official U.S. Navy museums and has the largest collection of artifacts in the United States related to naval undersea history and science. Study sea life with a microscope, peer into a torpedo tube, operate a control panel in a recreated submarine control room and check out the deep-sea diving equipment. Admission is free. There are regular events and activities for children.

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COMMUNITIES

Poulsbo pays tribute to its early Scandinavian settlers

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ith salmon-bearing streams, easy access to open water, and more, the area known today as Poulsbo has always been prized for its resources. Here’s a glimpse at Poulsbo’s evolution — and who we are today.

Pre-contact to the 1880s The Suquamish people were present on the shores of what is now Liberty Bay for thousands of years before lumber and fishing companies began using the area as a safe harbor for their operations. The Suquamish had communities throughout the Kitsap Peninsula and on Bainbridge Island. A Suquamish community at the head of Liberty Bay, ho-cheeb, was described in a report of the Indian Claims Commission as having “one or two large [55-foot by 150-foot] buildings and about four smaller [25-foot by 50-foot] ones.” The Suquamish signed the Treaty of Point Elliott in 1855, making land available for newcomers. The Suquamish reserved land for themselves and their descendants — the Port Madison Indian Reservation — and reserved the right to harvest resources, including fish and shellfish, in their usual and accustomed grounds, including Liberty Bay.

1880s to 1940s

Lisa Stirrett’s ‘Guardian Stone’ installation in Muriel Iverson Williams Waterfront Park is based on a similar, much larger sculpture in Hafrsfjord, Stavanger, Norway. The Stavanger sculpture commemorates when Harald Fairhair united Norway into one kingdom, in 872. Sophie Bonomi

Jorgen Eliason (1847-1937) rowed into Dog Fish Bay — now Liberty Bay — in September 1883 and became Poulsbo’s first permanent non-Native settler. He settled here after visiting Ole Stubb (1821-1916) who, like Eliason, was from Nautsdal, Norway and had settled on the other side of the bay at what is now Keyport in 1876. Waves of Norwegian settlers followed, drawn here from Norway or the Midwest by similarities to their home countries. They farmed, fished and logged. In 1886, I.B. Moe spearheaded an effort

to establish a post office here. He named the town “Paulsbo,” after his home village in Norway. Paulsbo roughly translates to “Paul’s place.” But when postal officials in Washington, D.C. formalized the town’s post office, it exchanged the “a” for an “o,” resulting in “Poulsbo.” Poor handwriting is suspected to be the cause of the change. The spelling stuck. The population of Poulsbo was about 300 when the town incorporated in 1907. The Norwegian language was widely spoken here until the 1940s, when World

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War II resulted in more jobs and attracted new residents.

Post-war to the 21st century Poulsbo’s population grew in the ensuing years: from 639 in 1940 to 1,014 in 1950, 1,505 in 1960, 1,856 in 1970, 3,453 in 1980, 4,848 in 1990, 6,813 in 2000, and 9,200 in 2010.

21st century

FUN FACTS Two Norwegian kings and one queen have visited Poulsbo: Olav V in 1975, and Harald V and Sonja in 1995. Above, King Harald reviews the day’s headlines with Poulsbo Mayor Mitch Mitchussen. n The east fork of Dogfish Creek originates at what is now Wilderness Park, on Caldart Avenue near North Kitsap High School. The spring there supplied Poulsbo’s first water system. n There are five breweries in Poulsbo: Rainy Daze Brewing, Slippery Pig Brewery, Sound Brewery, Valhöll Brewing, and Western Red Brewing — enough to warrant, in some eyes, designation of Poulsbo as a Brew City USA. n Prominent public art in Poulsbo: Mark Gale’s octopus sculpture in front of the SEA Discovery Center, downtown; James Mayo’s Viking mural on the exterior wall of Boehm’s Chocolates, downtown; the sculptures “Viking” and “Guardian Stone” in Muriel Iverson Williams Waterfront Park; Gale’s concrete and steel sculpture, “Norseman,” on Viking Avenue and Lindvig Way; a driftwood sculpture of a salmon, at Fish Park; Mayo’s Nordic- and marine-themed mural under the Lindvig Way bridge. n The city’s shortest trail is so short it’s not on the city’s list of parks and trails. But if you scale Moe Street Trail, across the street from City Hall, you’ll see a remarkable view of the Olympics. n

In 2016, Poulsbo’s population was estimated at 10,100. The city is an ethnically diverse community, with people of Mexican and Asian ancestry comprising the second- and third-largest demographics in the city. Poulsbo is economically diverse as well, with five retail zones: Historic Downtown Poulsbo, the Viking Avenue Corridor, Highway 305 Corridor, the Downtown Area (outside of historic downtown), and College Marketplace, the home of big box retailers. Store fronts, street names and public art in Historic Downtown Poulsbo reflect the Norwegian heritage of the city, but restaurants and stores reflect the city’s 21st century diversity. The Port of Poulsbo, a separate entity from the City of Poulsbo, operates Poulsbo Marina on the waterfront, making the town an easy destination for boaters. The nearby marine science center is operated by Western Washington University, which also offers four-yeardegree programs at Olympic College’s campus at College Marketplace.

AT A GLANCE Source: 2011-15 American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau

Population and demographics n Poulsbo’s

n 89 percent of Poulsbo residents were born in the U.S.; 38 percent were born in Washington. n 11 percent of residents were foreign born. Of the foreign-born population, 49 percent are naturalized citizens and 87 percent entered the country before 2010. n Foreign-born residents come from different parts of the world, the greatest numbers being Mexico, Central and South America, 48 percent; Asia, 26.3 percent; Europe, 16.1 percent; and Africa, 4.9 percent. n 16 percent of residents speak a language other than English at home. Of that number, 63.6 percent speak Spanish; 17.8 percent speak another European language; 16.7 percent speak an Asian or Pacific Island language.

Education

n 93 percent of residents 25 years and older graduated from high school and 35 percent have at least a bachelor’s degree. An estimated 7 percent did not complete high school.  n The total school enrollment is 2,400. Nursery school and kindergarten enrollment is 245, and elementary or high school enrollment is 1,700. College or graduate school enrollment is 463.

Employment and income n 51 percent of the population 16 and older is employed; 43 percent is not in the labor force.  n 74 percent of the people employed are private wage and salary workers; 18 percent are federal, state, or local government workers; 7 percent are self-employed.  n The median income is $56,226. An estimated 11 percent of households had income below $15,000 a year and 7 percent had income of $150,000 or more.  n The median income for males is $61,454, for females $46,604. n An estimated 36 percent of households

Building Relationships Building Relationships Building Relationships Building Relationships That Strengthen Building Relationships That Strengthen Strengthen Building Relationships That Strengthen That Strengthen OurOur Community Community Community OurStrengthen Community That Our Community Our Community

population is 10,100.

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receive Social Security; the average income from Social Security was $17,248. An estimated 24 percent received retirement income other than Social Security.

COMMUNITIES

Hansville: Time slows here

Health insurance n 91 percent of residents have health insurance coverage, 9 percent do not. Of those younger than 18, 5 percent had no health insurance coverage.

Households and families n There

are 3,700 households in Poulsbo. The average household had 2.6 residents. n Families make up 63 percent of the households; 7 percent of that number are single-parent families. n 35 percent of households have one or more members younger than 18; 33 percent have one or more members 65 and older. n 151 grandparents live with grandchildren younger than 18. Of those grandparents, 36 percent of them have financial responsibility for their grandchildren.  n 56 percent of the population is female; 44 percent is male. n The median age is 38.1 years; 25 percent of the population is younger than 18 and 20 percent is 65 and older.  n 62 percent of males and 47 percent of females are married. 

Housing n Poulsbo has 3,900 housing units, 7 percent of which are vacant. n 68 percent are single-unit structures, 27 percent are multi-unit structures, 6 percent are mobile homes. n 52 percent of the housing units were built since 1990. n The median number of rooms in all housing units is 6. Of these housing units, 63 percent have three or more bedrooms. n 2,400 housing units are owner- occupied, 1,300 are renter-occupied. n 77 percent of the owner-occupied units has a mortgage. n The median monthly housing costs for mortgaged owners is $1,672, nonmortgaged owners $610, and renters $908. n 43 percent of owners with mortgages, 24 percent of owners without mortgages, and 45 percent of renters spend 30 percent or more of household income on housing.

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In Hansville, you’ll find quiet, rural and rustic.

S

weeping views of Admiralty Inlet, Whidbey Island and Puget Sound. The sounds of children playing on the beach. The mewing of a gull. The whoosh of an eagle’s wings. The splash of a seal. Time seems to slow in Hansville. That, and its unchanging beauty, is part of the allure of this seaside community. But first, the story of how Hansville got its name (one may be apocryphal). Story No. 1: The earliest non-Native settlers were Anton Husby, a teetotaller, and Hans Zachariasen, who reportedly enjoyed a snort now and then. When some loggers, their workday done, were looking to unwind, they were told by a local, “Husby von’t drink with you, but Hans vill.” Story No. 2: Local columnist Donna Lee Anderson wrote, “The story goes that because ships couldn’t get in close to shore at Point No Point, every day someone from this community had to row out to the ship that carried mail, gather the

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Annie LaValle

communications and bring them back to the post office. ”One day, the seas were particularly rough and they were looking for someone to do this rowing-out deed. They chatted about it for a while then someone said in their best Scandinavian accent, “Don’t worry, Hans vill do it.” And sure enough he did, and was very reliable thereafter. And so the town was named Hansville in appreciation for his services.” The Treaty of Point No Point was signed here in 1855. Construction began on the lighthouse in 1879. A road was established from Point No Point to Port Gamble to provide access to trade and other services. In the 1930s, four fishing resorts were developed in Hansville, prompted in part by a 1925 article by Frank L. Crosby Jr., who wrote in “Taft’s Sportsman’s Guide” that Hansville was the place for “surething fishing.” Three fishing cabins at Norwegian Point Park are from that era and are

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COMMUNITIES under the care of Friends of Norwegian Point Park. Volunteers hope one cabin can be restored and used as a museum. The park features a gazebo built by Friends of Norwegian Point Park. The state Department of Fish and Wildlife bought the former Point No Point fishing resort nearby and redeveloped it into a park; a boat launch is proposed there. If installed, it would be one of six public boat launches in North Kitsap; the others are at Salsbury Point County Park and the ports of Eglon, Kingston, Keyport, and Poulsbo.

Hansville’s boundaries The Greater Hansville area is defined as the very northern tip of Kitsap County south to Little Boston Road and east to Eglon. Neighborhoods include Cliffside, Driftwood Key, Point No Point, Shore Woods, and Sterling Highlands. The Greater Hansville Community Center (www.hansville.org) is a center of community life. Located at Buck Lake Park, the center hosts regular events,

including bingo nights, holiday gatherings, an annual rummage sale, and socials. The Hansville Grocery is a gathering place too; you’ll have to drive 7.5 miles to get to the nearest store. The Hansville Grocery is a general store where you can get groceries, goodies, fishing gear and souvenirs. Located in the store is the HansGrill restaurant. Local organizations include: Boot Scootin’ Grannies, Eglon Improvement Club, Flotsam and Jetsam Garden Club, Friends of Point No Point Lighthouse, Hansville Art Guild, Hansville Greenway, Hansville Historical Society, Hansville Ladies Aid, Men’s Koffee Klatch, and North Kitsap Puget Sound Anglers. Nature Conservancy volunteers help care for Foulweather Bluff Preserve. Hansville has hundreds of acres of greenways and open space for biking, hiking, and wildlife watching. Hansville Greenway Wildlife Corridor and Community Trails wind from Norwegian

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COMMUNITIES Point Park to Hood Canal in the west and Point No Point Park in the east. If you want to put living in Hansville to the test, you can stay at the Milky Way Farm Guest House (www.milkywayfarmguesthouse.com), or the Point No Point Light keeper’s quarters (http:// uslhs.org/about/point-no-point-vacationrental).

BTW, Eglon is not Hansville “We don’t want to be Hansville; we’re Eglon,” Jacque Thornton once said in response to a county plan that lumped Eglon in with neighboring Hansville for the purposes of community planning. Indeed, Eglon is an independent community with its own history. A dock was built here in 1912, when the Mosquito Fleet, trails and wagon roads were the only means in and out of the community. The dock is gone, but the Eglon Port District owns a boat launch, parking lot, picnic area, and beach. Wendy Tweten wrote in the Kingston Community News in 2008: “It remains a small town with roots that go back more than 100 years. Community amenities include a church, meeting hall, cemetery, a fire truck (kept in one family’s garage), and the beach, where residents of Eglon still gather for bonfires and summer picnics just as they have for the last century.” Eglon voters elect port district commissioners to six-year terms. Current commissioners are Timothy Holbrook, C. Joyce McClain and David A. Roberts.

AT A GLANCE Source: 2011-15 American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau

Population and demographics n Hansville’s n 56

population is 3,600. percent are females, 44 percent are

males. n The median age is 53; 22 percent of the population is younger than 18 and 26 percent is 65 years and older.  n There are 1,500 households in Hansville. The average household size is 2.3 residents.  n Families make up 70 percent of households; 62 percent are married-couple families, 1 percent are single-parent households with children younger than 18. n 26 percent of all households have one

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Hansville’s shores provide views of Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound and Whidbey Island. The area is rich in avian and marine wildlife. Annie LaValle or more members younger than 18; 44 percent have one or more members 65 and older. n 27 grandparents live with grandchildren younger than 18. Of those grandparents, fewer than 0.5 percent of them have financial responsibility for their grandchildren.  n 98 percent of residents were born in the United States, and 57 were born in Washington. n 2 percent of residents were foreign born. Of foreign-born residents, 83 percent were naturalized U.S. citizens. They were born in North America or in Asia. n 3 percent of residents speak a language other than English at home. Of those speaking another language, 38 percent speak Spanish, 29.1 percent speak another European language, and 32.7 percent speak an Asian or Pacific Island language.

Education percent of residents graduated from high school and 38 percent has at least a bachelor’s degree. An estimated 2 percent did not complete high school. n School enrollment is 663. Nursery school and kindergarten enrollment is 59, elementary or high school enrollment is 96.

older is employed; 48 percent is not in the labor force. n 56 percent of the people employed are private wage and salary workers; 34 percent are federal, state, or local government workers; and 9 percent are self-employed.  n The median income was $61,442. An estimated 8 percent of households has income of less than $15,000 a year and 9 percent has income of more than $150,000.  n 66 percent of households receive earnings, and 29 percent receive retirement income other than Social Security. An estimated 44 percent of the households receive Social Security. The average income from Social Security is $17,555.

Health insurance n 97 percent has health insurance coverage and 3 percent do not. Of those younger than 18, less than 0.5 percent has no health insurance coverage.

n 98

Employment and Income n 50

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percent of the population 16 and

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Housing n Hansville

has 1,900 housing units, 19 percent of which are vacant. n 94 percent are single-unit structures, less than 0.5 percent are multi-unit structures, and 6 percent are mobile homes. An estimated 58 percent of the housing units were built since 1990. n The median number of rooms in all

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COMMUNITIES

Participants carve elaborate sand sculptures in an Indianola Days contest.

In Indianola, dock, sea and local life are intertwined

I

ndianola’s century-old dock, restored by the community in 2015, is a centerpiece of community life. It’s history is also intertwined with that of the community. Indianola is located on the Port Madison Indian Reservation, but a court decision in the early 1900s, after the death of a Suquamish woman who was married to a non-Indian, led to much of the land

falling under non-Indian ownership. The Indianola Beach Land Company formed in 1916 and established Indianola as a summer community. The dock was built in 1916 and passenger boats transported people to and from Seattle every day by 1929. Voters created the Port of Indianola in 1933 to maintain the dock, and Mosquito Fleet ferries visited here until 1951, when the Agate Pass bridge

Hansville | from page 20

n 1,400 housing units are owner occupied and 153 are renter occupied. 65 percent of owner-occupied units had a mortgage.

housing units is 6. Of these housing units, 61 percent have three or more bedrooms.

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was completed and Washington State Ferries took over ferry service on Puget Sound. Today, the dock is used for recreation — fishing, swimming, and enjoying the sea view. Although technically a pier, the dock has a float where small boats can tie up temporarily. The Indianola Clubhouse, built in 1930, is a venue for local events. Indianola’s forests and beaches still draw visitors. Each summer, the community celebrates Indianola Days. There is no set date; it’s held on whichever weekend coincides with the lowest minus tide. Indianola Days features a car show, dance, pet parade, salmon bake, tennis tournament, and talent night. Beach activities include a sand castle contest, kids’ dash and tug-of-war competition. The 80.91-acre Indianola Waterfront and Woodland Preserve is open to the public and features forested walking trails, a seasonal stream, and beach access. Camp Indianola (www.campindianola.org) is a year-round camp and retreat; it also offers summer camps in July and August.

Community leadership The Port of Indianola (www.portof indianola.com) owns the property and tidelands 50 feet to the left and right of the dock. Port assets include the dock, the mooring float and the access stairs to the beach. The beach is open only to members of the Indianola Beach Improvement Club. The port boundary is a grid that stretches about two miles east to west. The west boundary is a line stretching north to south, from Sunridge Way NE in Miller Bay to Gerald Cliff Drive. The port’s property tax rate is 15.4 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value, or $30.80 annually on a house assessed at $200,000. Port commissioners, elected by port district residents to six-year terms, meet once a month and are unpaid. Current commissioners are Eric Cookson, Jeff Henderson and John Lane. The Indianola Beach Improvement Club (www.indianola.club) was incorporated in 1928 to raise money for local capital projects, among them the Indianola Clubhouse. The club owns and manages the clubhouse; Gill Park, a grassy and forested park with an outdoor stage and benches; and the Bud Merrill Pavilion. Clubhouse and pavilion rentals help provide funding for community projects and maintenance

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and elementary or high school enrollment is 503. College or graduate school enrollment is 222.

Employment and income n 61 percent of the population 16 and older is employed; 35 percent are not in the labor force.  n 67 percent of people employed are private wage and salary workers; 22 percent are federal, state, or local government workers; and 11 percent are self-employed.  n The median income in Indianola is $65,893. n 9 percent of households have income of less than $15,000 a year and 10 percent have income of $150,000 or more.  n 80 percent of households receive earnings, 23 percent receive retirement income other than Social Security. An estimated 27 percent of households receive Social Security. The average income from Social Security is $18,400.

Indianola is known for its charming homes. File photo of community amenities.

AT A GLANCE Source: 2011-15 American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau

Population and demographics n Indianola’s

population is 3,500 — 1,800 (52 percent) females and 1,700 (48 percent) males. n The median age is 44.1 years. An estimated 21 percent of the population is younger than 18 and 14 percent is 65 years and older.  n 95 percent of residents were born in the U.S., and 51 percent were born in Washington. n 5 percent of residents were foreign born. Of the foreign-born population, 51 percent are naturalized U.S. citizens, and 97 percent entered the country before 2010. n 4 percent of residents speak a language other than English at home. n Of those speaking a language other than English at home, 40 percent speak Spanish and 60 percent speak some other language.

Education n 97 percent of residents graduated from high school, and 34 percent have at least a bachelor’s degree. n School enrollment is 819. Nursery school and kindergarten enrollment is 94

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Health insurance n 91

percent of Indianola residents have health insurance coverage, 9 percent do not. n Of those younger than 18, 7 percent have no health insurance coverage.

Households and families n There are 1,400 households in Indianola. The average household size is 2.5 residents.  n Families make up 67 percent of households. This includes married-couple families (50 percent) and other families (17 percent). Of other families, 7 percent are singleparent households with children younger than 18. n 30 percent of all households have one or more member younger than 18. n 25 percent of all households have one or more member 65 years and older. n 51 grandparents live with grandchildren younger than 18. Of those grandparents, 55 percent of them have financial responsibility for their grandchildren. 

Housing n Indianola

has 1,600 housing units, 14 percent of which are vacant. n 87 percent are single-unit structures, 1 percent are multi-unit structures, and 11 percent are mobile homes. n The median number of rooms in all housing units is 6. Of these housing units, 62 percent have three or more bedrooms. n Indianola has 1,400 occupied hous-

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COMMUNITIES

Keyport: Torpedo Town USA, and more

F

ranklin Delano Roosevelt visited here. It was 1921 and the future president of the United States was serving as assistant secretary of the Navy. Keyport then, as now, was a pretty dynamic place. Established as a community in 1896, the Pacific Coast Torpedo Station was established here 18 years later, cementing Keyport’s role as Torpedo Town USA and a bulwark in the nation’s defense. The first non-Native settler, Norwegianborn Ole Stubb (1821-1916), settled here in 1875 after sojourns in Stony Lake, Michigan; Union County, South Dakota;

and Camano Island. A wharf was built for the Mosquito Fleet in the mid-1890s. Keyport Bible Church was established in the early 1900s. Keyport caught the attention of the United States Navy in 1910. The Navy had been searching for a site to build a Pacific Coast torpedo station; Keyport had the advantage of being close to Puget Sound Navy Yard in Bremerton, and so the Pacific Coast Torpedo Station was established in 1914. Navy divers trained here as well. The base was renamed the United States Naval Torpedo Station in 1930, and during World War II Keyport was home to 2,000 civilians and 800 military person-

Indianola | from page 22

ers spent 30 percent or more of household income on housing.

ing units — 1,100 (76 percent) are owner occupied and 334 (24 percent) are renter occupied. n 75 percent of the owner-occupied units has a mortgage. n The median monthly housing costs for mortgaged owners was $1,597, non-mortgaged owners $506, and renters $1,206. n An estimated 36 percent of owners with mortgages, 15 percent of owners without mortgages, and 53 percent of rent-

N o r t h

Keyport is a stop on the Kitsap Water Trail, a federally designated part of the National Water Trails System. Terryl Asla

FUN FACT n Access to the beach is limited to members of the Indianola Beach Improvement Club. Good news: You don’t have to live in Indianola to be a club member. Go to www. indianola.club.

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COMMUNITIES

A veteran salutes as the Keyport Singers sing the National Anthem, Dec. 7, 2016, at the 23rd annual Pearl Harbor Remembrance Ceremony at the U.S. Naval Undersea Museum in Keyport. The museum is one of 14 official U.S. Navy museums. Terryl Asla nel. In the 1990s, the base was renamed the Naval Undersea Warfare Engineering Station. It is now Naval Base Kitsap – Keyport, one of the Navy’s two undersea warfare engineering stations. While the base is off-limits to unauthorized personnel, the Navy is very much a part of community life. Residents can set their clocks by the National Anthem, played over the base’s loudspeakers every morning at 8. The Naval Undersea Museum in Keyport is one of 14 official U.S. Navy museums and is open to the public. Among the museum’s annual observances: an honoring of Pearl Harbor veterans every Dec. 7. The town’s annual Fourth of July parade is one of the more significant local events. Among the reminders of the base’s development: The Keyport Mercantile, which was built in 1903 and moved to its current location to make way for development of the Navy base.

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Local leadership Voters created the Port of Keyport in 1923, and the first order of business was constructing a public dock. Today, the Port of Keyport manages a marina with 14 private slips, 250 feet of guest moorage in five 50-foot slips, and a boat launch ramp. There is water and power at all slips. The port commission meets at 6 p.m. the first Monday of each month in the marina office. Commissioners are elected for six-year terms. Current port commissioners are John Thompson, Gene Warden and Brian Watne. Online: www.portofkeyport.com.

AT A GLANCE Source: 2011-15 American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau

Population and demographics n Keyport’s

N o r t h

population is 488 — 279

K i t s a p

females and 209 males. n The median age is 35.5 years. An estimated 18 percent of the population is younger than 18, and 9 percent is 65 years and older. 

Education

n All residents 25 and older graduated from high school; 33 percent have at least a bachelor’s degree. n School enrollment is 62. Nursery school and kindergarten enrollment is 0, elementary or high school enrollment is 52, college or graduate school enrollment is 10.

Employment and income n 71

percent of the population 16 and older is employed; 24 percent are not in the labor force. n 78 percent of the residents employed are private wage and salary workers; 22 percent are federal, state, or local government workers; and fewer than 0.5 percent are self-employed.  n The median income is $83,214. Fewer

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COMMUNITIES than 0.5 percent of households have income of less than $15,000 a year, 4 percent have income of more than $150,000. n The median income for males was $60,203, for females $27,644. n 83 percent of households receive earnings and 36 percent receive retirement income other than Social Security. An estimated 22 percent of the households receive Social Security. The average income from Social Security is $9,844.

Health insurance n All residents have health insurance coverage. 

Households and families n There

are 200 households in Keyport. The average household size is 2.4 people. n Married couples with families make up 94 percent of the households; 0.5 percent are single-parent households with children younger than 18. n 30 percent of all households have one or more members younger than 18; 22 percent of all households have one or more members 65 years and older. n 97 percent of males and 92 percent of females are married. 

Housing n Keyport

has 220 housing units, 9 percent of which are vacant. n 87 percent are single-unit structures, 13 percent are mobile homes. n The median number of rooms in all housing units is 6. Of these housing units, 62 percent have three or more bedrooms. n 149 housing units are owner occupied and 51 are renter occupied. n 66 percent of the owner-occupied units have a mortgage. n The median monthly housing costs for mortgaged owners is $2,170, nonmortgaged owners $804, and renters $1,190. n An estimated 58 percent of owners with mortgages, less than 0.5 percent of owners without mortgages, and 55 percent of renters spend 30 percent or more of household income on housing.

N o r t h

The community, led by the Village Green Foundation, raised more than $8 million to build the Village Green Community Center. Village Green Foundation photo

Kingston: Residents make things happen here

V

illage Green Community Center, which opened in April 2016, is a symbol of how residents can come together and build something that connects and strengthens the community. The Village Green was the site of dilapidated military housing when residents formed the Village Green Foundation in 1999 to redevelop the site. The Village Green was a grand vision with many parts requiring many partners. First, voters created the Village Green Metropolitan Park District to develop and manage a park on the site. Next, Martha & Mary, a Poulsbo-based organization providing services for children and older residents, purchased a portion of the property for senior apartments. Money from that sale was used for site preparation for the new community center, for which the foundation raised more than $8 million. The community center has a branch library and a Boys & Girls Club. Kitsap County has pledged the proceeds from the future sale of its current community

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center building on Highway 104. “The community center stands as a testament to the ‘Kingston grit’ that is fueling the charge to build it,” foundation director Daniel Johnson wrote in the Kingston Community News. “Twelve dedicated board members and an army of volunteers are delivering on the promise. The thousands of volunteer hours, endless meetings and millions raised represent the community’s skin in the game that will ensure its completion.”

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COMMUNITIES

North Kitsap Fire & Rescue’s new fire boat was welcomed with a big community celebration in May 2016. Kingston is a well-rounded community. Appletree Cove is a popular destination for boaters, fishers, kayakers and paddle boarders. Take in the views of the Puget Sound and beauty of the peninsula with a local hike. Walk along North Beach or Arness Park for spectacular views of Puget Sound, or along the marsh at Carpenter Lake. Hikers can find six miles of trails beginning at the North Kitsap Heritage Park. The Billy Johnson Skate Park is a popular venue for skateboarders. Along Highway 104, there’s a wide variety of galleries, restaurants, services, shops and stores. Nearby is award-winning White Horse Golf Club. The course has a 22,000-square-foot clubhouse with fullservice pro shop, restaurant and bar. It is owned and operated by Port Madison Enterprises, the economic development arm of the Suquamish Tribe. A farmers market and live music at Mike Wallace Park, the community Fourth of July celebration, and various waterfront events all contribute to the unique flavor of community life.

Community leadership

The Port of Kingston owns Kingston Marina, which has 262 slips, a fuel dock, and a kayak and small-boat facility; Mike Wallace Park, the venue for the summer

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Concerts on the Cove concert series; and a park above the ferry landing. Commissioners are elected to sixyear terms; current commissioners are Walt Elliott, Bruce MacIntyre and Mary McClure. Online: www.portofkingston. org. The Kingston Citizens Advisory Council is appointed by the Kitsap County Board of Commissioners to provide a forum for discussion of community interests and issues, and to provide input to county government on issues of local importance. The advisory council meets 7-9 p.m. on the first Wednesday of February, April, June, August, October and December at North Kitsap Fire & Rescue, 26642 Miller Bay Road NE. Online: www.kitsapgov. com/boards/CAC/kingston/kcac.htm Voters created the Village Green Metropolitan Park District to develop and manage Village Green Park; property owners with the park district pay a property tax levy to support the park district. Commissioners are publicly elected to six-year terms; current commissioners are Tracy Darlene Harris, Jason Manges, Bobbie Moore, Jim Moore, and Patrick Pearson. Online: www.myvillagegreen. org. The Greater Kingston Chamber of Commerce advocates on behalf of the

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business community. The executive director is Colleen Carey; the president of the 13-member board of directors is Shelby Nelson. Online: www.kingstonchamber. com.

AT A GLANCE Source: 2011-15 American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau

Population and demographics n Kingston’s population is 2,000 — 1,000 (52 percent) females and 937 (48 percent) males. n The median age is 44.7; 21 percent of the population is younger than 18 and 21 percent is 65 and older.  n 95 percent of residents were born in the United States and 52 percent were born in Washington. n 5 percent of residents were foreign born. Of foreign-born residents, 54 percent were naturalized U.S. citizens, and 100 percent entered the country before 2010. n 2 percent of residents speak a language other than English at home. Of those speaking a language other than English at home, fewer than 0.5 percent speak Spanish and 100 percent speak some other language.

Education 98 percent of residents graduated from high school and 36 percent have at least a n

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Port Gamble is evolving into a year-round community

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s you read this, Port Gamble is in the midst of a new phase in its history. The old mill site and the nearshore have been restored. Owner Pope Resources is assisting public efforts to acquire its lands for open space preservation and bay access. The company has filed a plan with Kitsap County to build homes, commercial buildings, a hotel and a dock, to transform the visitor destination into a year-round community.

Kingston | from page 28 bachelor’s degree. n School enrollment is 471. Nursery school and kindergarten enrollment is 106 and elementary or high school enrollment is 292. College or graduate school enrollment is 73.

Today, visitors enjoy many of the amenities that the early mill-town families enjoyed: a New England-style town with

tree-lined streets, a community theater, a general store, a variety of shops and stores, and scenery ideal for a wedding

ings and 24 percent receive retirement income other than Social Security. An estimated 40 percent of the households receive Social Security. The average income from Social Security is $19,847.

member 65 years and older. n 49 percent of males and 46 percent of females are married.

Health insurance n 91 percent of residents have health insurance coverage and 9 percent do not.

Households and families

Employment and income n 58 percent of the population 16 and older is employed; 35 percent are not in the labor force. n 77 percent of the people employed are private wage and salary workers; 15 percent are federal, state, or local government workers; and 8 percent are self-employed.  n The median income is $47,153. An estimated 8 percent of households has income of less than $15,000 a year and 7 percent has income of $150,000 or more.  n 74 percent of households receive earn-

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Port Gamble was established in 1853 and resembles the New England hometown of its founders. Annie LaValle

n There are 896 households in Kingston. The average household size is 2.2 people. n Families make up 54 percent of households in Kingston. This figure includes married-couple families (41 percent) and other families (14 percent). n Of other families, 2 percent are singleparent households with children younger than 18. n 18 percent of all households have at least one member younger than 18; 36 percent of all households have at least one

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Housing n Kingston has 1,000 housing units, 15 percent of which are vacant. n 81 percent are single-unit structures, 15 percent are multi-unit structures, and fewer than 0.5 percent are mobile homes. An estimated 57 percent of the housing units were built since 1990. n The median number of rooms in all housing units is 6. Of these housing units, 63 percent have three or more bedrooms. n 74 percent of owner-occupied units has a mortgage. n The median monthly housing costs for mortgaged owners is $1,524, non-mortgaged owners $508, and renters $1,042. An estimated 34 percent of owners with mortgages, 0.5 percent of owners without mortgages, and 61 percent of renters spend 30 percent or more of income on housing.

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Water Trails Map

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NORTH KITSAP PENINSULA REGION NE Buck Lake Rd

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COMMUNITIES or an evening out. Pope hopes to expand on that. It’s a town with a rich history. The S’Klallam people knew the site as Teekalet, but today the town bears the name of a naval officer named Gamble, given when the Wilkes Expedition mapped the region in 1841. William Talbot and Andrew Pope established a sawmill on the sand spit at the mouth of the bay in 1853. Talbot’s business partner, Josiah Keller, struck a deal with the S’Klallam people living there — if they moved to the other side of the bay, to Point Julia, the mill would give them jobs, lumber for homes and firewood. Those families lived at Point Julia until the 1930s, when the U.S. government destroyed the village, moved the families inland, and established the Port Gamble S’Klallam Reservation. The Puget Mill Company’s workforce included S’Klallam people and transplants from East Machias, Maine, Pope and Talbot’s hometown. The town of Port Gamble grew around the sawmill to house its workers, and the homes and other buildings have architectural features similar to those in Maine. Buried at Port Gamble’s cemetery is Gustave Englebrecht, a Navy sailor killed in 1856 in a battle between crewmembers of the USS Massachusetts and indigenous raiding parties from British and Russian territories. Englebrecht was the first U.S. Navy sailor to die in action in the Pacific. The first school in the county was built in Port Gamble in 1859. The first Masonic Lodge in the state was established in Port Gamble the same year. When the mill closed in 1995, it was the oldest continuously operating sawmill in the United States. But the company town dynamic is partially still in place. Port Gamble is owned by Pope Resources, a corporate descendent of Pope & Talbot’s Puget Mill Company. Port Gamble has a full-time population of 45 but its own zip code. Despite its small population, Port Gamble has the daytime hustle and bustle of a tourist destination. Downtown shops include the general store, restaurants, and outdoor recreation providers. Port Gamble is a stop on the Kitsap Water Trail, a part of the federally designated system of national water trails.

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The Walker-Ames House is one of the more prominent homes in Port Gamble, and is the venue for a number of local events — including ghost tours. Public domain St. Paul’s Church, built in 1879, and Hood Canal Vista Pavilion, built on the site of the old Hotel Puget, are popular wedding venues. The Quilted Strait sells quilting materials, offers classes, and hosts the annual Port Gamble Fiber & Fabric Show. Port Gamble is also popular with those interested in paranormal phenomena. Ghost tours are offered annually, taking

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visitors through old homes associated with reported paranormal activity. (Port Gamble was the setting of and filming location for the 2010 film “ZMD: Zombies of Mass Destruction.” It’s also the setting for author Gregg Olsen’s “Empty Coffin” series of novels. Online: www.portgamble.com.

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COMMUNITIES

The Point Hotel is the second-largest hotel in North Kitsap. The exterior features this four-story sculpture, “Paddles Up,” by S’Klallam artist Brian Perry. The sculpture represents a form of welcome. Martin Bydalek

Port Gamble S’Klallam’s economic evolution

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016 was a historic year for the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe. The Point Hotel opened — four stories, 94 rooms, featuring impressive displays of Coast Salish art that help tell the story of the S’Klallam people. It’s the second-largest hotel in the area. It’s also, former Port Gamble S’Klallam chairman Jake Jones said in an earlier interview, “been a long time coming.” Jones remembers when the Tribe had $2,000 in the bank, when the Tribe’s housing authority couldn’t get bank loans to fund new-home construction, when the roads on the reservation were dirt.

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“Our enterprises were shellfish and salmon,” Jones said. “All of us worked out at the mill. Then the mill shut down.” Now, “we’re doing much better financially. We don’t have to depend on the outside anymore.” Port Gamble S’Klallam’s business portfolio, overseen by the Port Gamble Development Authority, now includes The Point Hotel & Casino; Heronswood, a 15-acre botanical garden founded by noted horticulturalist Dan Hinkley; Gliding Eagle Marketplace; Cedar Specialties, which supplies cedar to other Tribes for cultural purposes; and PGDAccess, which provides broadband

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access to S’Klallam families and all Tribal entities. Today, the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe is one of the 15 top jobs providers in Kitsap County, according to the Kitsap Economic Development Alliance. The Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe is a signatory to the Treaty of Point No Point in 1855. In the treaty, the United States obtained land in exchange for certain payments and obligations. The indigenous signatories reserved land over which they have jurisdiction, and retained certain cultural and natural resource rights within their historical territories. As an indigenous nation and a treaty

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COMMUNITIES signatory, the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe has a government-to-government relationship with the United States. The Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe is governed by an elected six-member council. The chairman is Jeromy Sullivan. Vice-chairman is Chris Tom. Council members are Kyle Carpenter, Talia DeCoteau, Lena Tunkara, and Renee Veregge. The Tribal Council exercises full governmental authority over the Tribe’s land and resources. Governmental departments and entities include administration, child and family services, courts, cultural resources, economic development, education, health services, housing, natural resources, public safety, and utilities and public works. As a member of the Point No Point Treaty Council and the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, Port Gamble S’Klallam works to protect the environment that has sustained its people for millennia and protect rights contained in the treaty, among them the right to fish, hunt and gather in traditional areas. In Little Boston, the House of Knowledge houses a career and education center, elders’ center, the S’Klallam Longhouse, a Northwest Indian College satellite classroom, and the Little Boston branch of the Kitsap Regional Library. Port Gamble S’Klallam participates annually in the Canoe Journey, a gathering of Northwest Native canoe cultures. The Journey brings hundreds of visitors to the area to celebrate the traditional form of travel on the ancestral marine highways. The canoes, many of them hand-carved and decorated, are works of art. Traditional foods, dances, songs and stories are shared. A pole being carved by S’Klallam artist Jimmy Price will be installed at Point Julia, a historic village site. Visitors to Heronswood, now open year-round, see a welcome pole carved by S’Klallam artist Brian Perry. The Tribe opened another recreational outlet in 2014: A skatepark, open to S’Klallam members and guests, the first project undertaken by a foundation started by pro skateboarder Ryan Sheckler. The Tribe partnered with the Kitsap Forest & Bay Coalition, which raised money to buy from Pope Resources as

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much as 7,000 acres and two miles of bay shoreline for public open space. The Tribe received up to $3.5 million to help acquire shoreline; the money is part of a settlement from the Navy for salmon habitat impacts from the second explosive weapons-handling wharf under construction at Kitsap Naval Base — Bangor. “(The) bay has been our source of economic growth, and sustained us as a culture and as a people,” Chairman Jeromy Sullivan said in an earlier interview. “We need to keep it going for future generations.”

AT A GLANCE

Source: 2011-15American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau

Population and demographics n The Port Gamble S’Klallam Reservation has a population of 898 — 471 (52 percent) females and 427 (48 percent) males. n The median age is 40.7; 25 percent of the population is younger than 18, and 8 percent is 65 and older.  n 99 percent of the people living on the S’Klallam Reservation were born in the U.S., 64 percent were born in Washington,  and 1 percent were foreign born. n Of foreign-born residents, 57 percent are naturalized U.S. citizens. n 2 percent of residents speak a language other than English at home. Of those speaking a language other than English at home, 5 percent speak Spanish and 95 percent spoke some other language.

Education n 90 percent of residents graduated from high school and 19 percent have at least a bachelor’s degree. n School enrollment is 262. Nursery school and kindergarten enrollment is 35 and elementary or high school enrollment is 173. College or graduate school enrollment is 54.

Employment and income n 37 percent of residents are employed; 50 percent are not in the labor force. n 50 percent of the people employed are private wage and salary workers; 44 percent are federal, state, or local government workers; and 5 percent are self-employed. n The median income is $43,125. An

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estimated 15 percent of households have income of less than $15,000 a year and 8 percent have income of $150,000 or more. n An estimated 71 percent of the households receive earnings and 18 percent receive retirement income other than Social Security. An estimated 46 percent of households receive Social Security. The average income from Social Security is $17,619.

Health insurance n 81 percent have health insurance coverage, 19 percent do not.

Households and families n There

are 279 households on the Port Gamble S’Klallam Reservation. The average household size is 3.2 people. n Families make up 91 percent of the households. This includes married-couple families (49 percent) and other families (41 percent). n 10 percent are single-parent households with children younger than 18. n 35 percent of all households have one or more members younger than 18; 23 percent of households have one or more member 65 years and older. n 32 grandparents live with grandchildren younger than 18. Of those grandparents, 53 percent of them have financial responsibility for their grandchildren. 

Housing n The Port Gamble S’Klallam Reservation has 331 housing units, 16 percent of which are vacant. n 73 percent are single-unit structures, 5 percent are multi-unit structures, and 23 percent are mobile homes. An estimated 40 percent of the housing units were built since 1990. n The median number of rooms in all housing units is 6. Of these housing units, 50 percent have three or more bedrooms. n The Port Gamble S’Klallam Reservation has 279 occupied housing units — 226 (81 percent) owner-occupied and 53 (19 percent) renter-occupied. An estimated 100 percent of householders of these units moved in since 2000. An estimated 49 percent of the owner-occupied units has a mortgage. n Residents spend 30 percent or more of household income on housing.

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Suquamish Tribe: Culture is a daily influence

Chief Kitsap Academy has a 100 percent graduation rate and some of the highest academic achievement in North Kitsap.

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he Suquamish Tribe is a sovereign, or self-governing, indigenous nation and a signatory to the Treaty of Point Elliott of 1855. In the treaty, the United States obtained land for non-Native settlement, in exchange for certain payments and obligations. The indigenous signatories reserved land over which they have jurisdiction, and retained certain cultural and natural resource rights within their historical territories. The Suquamish Tribe is a significant economic force in the region. Port Madison Enterprises, the Tribe’s economic development arm, is the second-largest private-sector employer in Kitsap County, with 752 employees, surpassed only by Harrison Medical Center. That’s according to data from the Kitsap Economic Development Alliance. The Tribe’s economic success has enabled it to reacquire land lost during the allotment era, and “the Tribe and Tribal members now own more than half of the land on the reservation for the first time in recent history,” Suquamish Tribe communications director April Leigh said. Major acquisitions include White Horse

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Golf Club in 2010, placed into trust in March 2014; and 200 acres known as the Place of the Bear, in the Cowling Creek watershed, in November 2015. Suquamish Clearwater Casino Resort, which opened more than 20 years ago, has evolved into an events and entertainment destination, with 15,000 square feet of meeting space, 183 hotel rooms, a showcase of Coast Salish art by such prominent artists as Ed Carriere and Andrea Wilbur-Sigo, fine dining, a spa, golf at White Horse, and a summer concerts-on-the-lawn series. Completion of the Suquamish Museum in 2012 helped solidify Suquamish Village as a walkable cultural district which includes Chief Seattle’s grave, the Old Man House site, the Suquamish Veterans Memorial, and the House of Awakened Culture. The Tribe owns and operates an accredited school for grades 6-12, Chief Kitsap Academy, which offers regular public school curriculum as well as culturally-oriented classes. According to the state Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, only four of 10 of North Kitsap School District schools and

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programs met Adequate Yearly Progress goals in reading and math proficiency in 2014 — one of those was Chief Kitsap Academy. Suquamish Seafoods built a new 16,000-square-foot seafood processing plant, eight times larger than its previous plant. It has chilled processing rooms, live-product holding areas, larger cold storage and air-blast freezers. Suquamish Seafoods formerly concentrated on geoduck. “With the new plant, we have the ability to deliver fresh clams, crab and salmon to our commercial customers,” Suquamish Seafoods general manager Tony Forsman said when construction began. “We also plan to develop our product lines further, making them available directly to the consumer.” The Tribe also built a 34,000-squarefoot fitness and youth center, on Totten Road near the Tribe’s early learning center and a sports field. The Suquamish Tribe government has a preliminary master plan for Suquamish Shores, a neighborhood of 80 lots on 36 acres, midway between the government center and the House of Awakened Culture. Leases there expire in 2018, and

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INTEGRITY I EMPATHY I EXCELLENCE Photo by Johnny Walker/Almost Candid Photography

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The inaugural run of the KingstonEdmonds ferry in 1923 was cause for celebration. It still is — you’ll enjoy a half-hour on the water; wildlife you’ll see includes eagles, otters and an occasional orca.

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COMMUNITIES Chairman Leonard Forsman said the Tribe is looking at restoring the area to accommodate cultural activities, recreation, and, possibly, housing for elders. The Suquamish Tribe has grown in political influence as well. Forsman, an anthropologist and archeologist who has served as the Suquamish Tribe’s chairman since 2005, is vice chairman of the U.S. Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. Cindy Webster-Martinson is vice president of the North Kitsap School Board and is believed to be the first Native American elected to public office in Kitsap County.

Diverse portfolio Port Madison Enterprises is the economic development arm of the Suquamish Tribe. Among its ventures and subsidiaries: Suquamish Clearwater Casino Resort, White Horse Golf Club, Kiana Lodge, Port Madison Enterprises Construction Corporation, PME Retail, Property Management, and Agate Dreams. Port Madison Enterprises annually awards grants to organizations that “[improve] the lives of community members” and “support worthy programs in the region.” More than $600,000 is awarded annually. Culture has a role in all that Suquamish’s enterprises do. For example, Suquamish Clearwater Casino Resort is not just about gaming. It’s about connecting visitors to cultural, entertainment and recreational experiences. Guests often visit the Suquamish Village cultural district, and the resort features Coast Salish art throughout as well as traditional foods on restaurant menus. Suquamish is a regular stop on the Canoe Journey, an annual reunion of Northwest First Nations and other canoe cultures, in July. Chief Seattle Days takes place the first weekend in August. The celebration includes canoe races, a commemoration at Chief Seattle’s grave, a powwow, and sports competitions.

Leadership The Suquamish Tribe is governed by an elected seven-member council. Current members are Leonard Forsman, chairman; Bardow Lewis, vice chairman;

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Nigel Lawrence, secretary; Robin Sigo, treasurer; and council members Sammy Mabe, Luther “Jay” Mills, and Rich Purser. Government departments: Administration, child support enforcement, community development, court, early learning center, education, fisheries, human services, legal, natural resources, police. (The Tribe contracts with local fire districts for fire protection service.)

AT A GLANCE Source: 2011-15 American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau

Population and demographics n Suquamish has a population of 4,200 — 2,200 (51 percent) females and 2,100 (49 percent) males. n The median age is 45.2. An estimated 20 percent of the population is younger than 18 and 18 percent is 65 and older.  n 95 percent of residents were born in the U.S., and 50 percent were born in Washington. n 5 percent were foreign born. Of foreignborn residents, 69 percent are naturalized citizens, and 94 percent entered the country before 2010. n 7 percent speak a language other than English at home. n Of those speaking a language other than English at home, 33 percent speak Spanish and 67 percent speak some other language.

Education

n 93 percent of residents graduated from high school and 31 percent have at least a bachelor’s degree. n School enrollment is 947. Nursery school and kindergarten enrollment is 148 and elementary or high school enrollment is 610. College or graduate school enrollment is 189.

Employment and income n 58

percent of the population 16 and older are employed; 37 percent are not in the labor force. n 69 percent of the people employed are private wage and salary workers; 20 percent are federal, state, or local government workers; and 11 percent are self-employed.  n The median income is $55,643. An estimated 13 percent of households have

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income of less than $15,000 a year and 7 percent have income of $150,000 or more. n 76 percent of households receive earnings and 22 percent receive retirement income other than Social Security. An estimated 34 percent of households receive Social Security. The average income from Social Security is $17,928.

Health insurance n 86 percent of residents have health insurance coverage and 14 percent do not.

Households and families n There are 1,800 households in Suquamish. The average household size is 2.4 people. n Families make up 59 percent of the households. This figure includes marriedcouple families (43 percent) and other families (17 percent). n 7 percent are single-parent households with children younger than 18. n 25 percent of all households have one or more members younger than 18; 32 percent of all households have one or more member 65 and older. n 94 grandparents live with grandchildren younger than 18. Of those grandparents, 31 percent of them have financial responsibility for their grandchildren. 

Housing n Suquamish has 2,000 housing units, 12 percent of which are vacant. n 77 percent are single-unit structures, 3 percent are multi-unit structures, and 17 percent are mobile homes. An estimated 38 percent of housing units were built since 1990. n The median number of rooms is 6; 58 percent of homes have three or more bedrooms. n Suquamish has 1,800 occupied housing units — 1,300 (73 percent) owner occupied and 472 (27 percent) renter occupied. An estimated 73 percent of householders of these units moved in since 2000. n The median monthly housing costs for mortgaged owners is $1,552, non-mortgaged owners $423, and renters $981. n 40 percent of owners with mortgages, 20 percent of owners without mortgages, and 46 percent of renters spend 30 percent or more of household income on housing.

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Experience life through a local artist’s lens

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he North Kitsap community prides itself on its diverse arts culture. From Native American art to a contemporary art in local galleries, there’s an eclectic mix that’s visually pleasing to everyone. EVENTS POULSBO SECOND SATURDAY ART WALK: Second Saturday of each month on Front Street in downtown Poulsbo. www.historicdowntownpoulsbo.com. KITSAP ARTS & CRAFTS FESTIVAL: July 28, 29, 30, in Kingston. www.kitsapartsandcrafts.com. POULSBO ARTS FESTIVAL: third weekend in August, at Muriel Iverson Williams Waterfront Park in Poulsbo. www.cafnw.org. ART IN THE WOODS TOUR: Nov. 10, 11, 12, a self-guided tour of 23 North Kitsap artists’ studios featuring more than 70 local artists.

Local galleries host a variety of talented artists working in various mediums, like this acrylic abstract by Evan Kennedy at Liberty Bay Gallery. Lisa Stirrett’s public installations can be found at Muriel Iverson Williams Waterfront Park and at Village Green Community Center. Sophie Bonomi MAGAL & LOUIS GALLERY 18961 Front St., Poulsbo 818-645-7345 | www.magal-louis. gallery

GALLERIES 2 BIRDS GALLERY 11250 NE Highway 104, Kingston 360-297-0885

ALMOST CANDID PHOTO, FRAME & FINE ARTS 10978 NE Highway 104, Kingston 360-297-1347 | www.almostcandid.net CARRIE GOLLER GALLERY 18801 Front St., Poulsbo 360-779-2388 | www.carriegollergallery.com

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FRONT STREET GALLERY 1881 Front St., Poulsbo 360-598-6133 | www.frontstreetgallerypoulsbo.com LIBERTY BAY GALLERY 18830 Front St., Poulsbo 360-930-0756 | www.libertybaygallery.com

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THE ART FARM 9321 Highway 104, Kingston 360-297-4223 | www.theartfarm.org VERKSTED GALLERY 18937 Front St., Poulsbo 360-697-4470 | www.verkstedgallery.com

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A world of entertainment close to home

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ilms, gaming, literary events, live music and theater — all are a short distance from your front door, but will take you worlds away. This list is not all-inclusive. Check the calendar on KitsapDailyNews.com.

CASINO RESORTS SUQUAMISH CLEARWATER CASINO RESORT 15347 Suquamish Way, Suquamish. 360598-8700. Games, dining, live entertainment. www.clearwatercasino.com. THE POINT CASINO & HOTEL 7989 NE Salish Lane, Kingston. 360-2970070. Games, dining, live entertainment. www.the-point-casino.com.

CINEMA

FIREHOUSE THEATER 11171 NE Highway 104, Kingston. 360-2974849. An independent theater featuring new films on two screens. www.firehousetheater.com REGAL CINEMAS 750 NW Edvard St., Poulsbo. 360-697-5642. The latest-releases on 10 screens. www. removies.com.

LITERARY

BOOK REPLAY 20373 Viking Ave., Poulsbo. 360-779-7334. An independent used book store. BOOK STOP 18954 Front St., Poulsbo. 360-779-9773. Used books spanning an impressive range of genres from classics to manga. www. poulsbobookstop.com. LIBERTY BAY BOOKS 18881 Front St., Poulsbo. 360-779-5909. An independent bookstore with new

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The Jewel Box Theatre in Poulsbo is a popular venue for comedies and dramas — and sometimes a mix of both. books; frequently hosts author events. www.libertybaybooks.com. THE KINGSTON BOOKERY 10978 Highway 104, Kingston, 360-2977380. A range of used books from all genres.

SPOKEN WORD POULSBOHEMIAN COFFEEHOUSE 19003 Front St., Poulsbo. 360-779-9199. Monthly poetry readings and open mic. www.poulsbohemian.com.

STAGE

KITSAP CHILDREN’S MUSICAL THEATRE 1881 NE Hostmark St., Poulsbo. A children’s theater producing a variety of musicals each year. www.kcmt.org. JEWEL BOX THEATRE 225 NE Iverson St., Poulsbo, 360-697-3183. Community theater productions featuring local talent. www.jewelbox poulsbo.org. PORT GAMBLE THEATER Northeast View Drive, Port Gamble. 360977-7135. Community theater productions

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featuring local talent. www.portgambletheater.com.

VENUES

CASA MEXICO 1918 NE Poulsbo Ave., Keyport. 360-5982727. Restaurant with live jazz. THE FILLING STATION 11200 Highway 104, Kingston. 360-2977732. A bar with food and 20 beers on tap. Frequent live music, pool, darts, fire pit. MAIN STREET ALE HOUSE 11225 Highway 104, Kingston. 360-8810412. Frequent open mics, jams and trivia. SLIPPERY PIG BREWERY 18801 Front St. NE, Poulsbo, 360-94-1686. A brewery with a stage featuring trivia, local bands and karaoke. www.slippery pigbrewery.com. TIZLEY’S EUROPUB 18928 Front St., Poulsbo, 360-394-0080. A wide beer selection and food with frequent trivia, Celtic music and jams. www.tizleys.com.

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FAITH

Every denomination calls North Kitsap home NORTH POINT CHURCH 1779 NE Hostmark, Poulsbo 360-779-0800 | www.northpointpoulsbo. org

ALIVE COVENANT CHURCH 18563 11th Ave. NE, Poulsbo 360-697-4321 |www.kitsapalive.com

THE GATHERING CHURCH 28096 Hansville Road NE, Kingston 360-297-4702

BAYSIDE COMMUNITY CHURCH 25992 Barber Cut Off Road NE, Kingston 360-297-2000 | www.baysidecommunity church.org

HANSVILLE COMMUNITY CHURCH 7543 NE Twin Spits Road, Hansville 360-638-2335 | www.hansvillechurch. com

BIBLE BAPTIST CHURCH 2490 NE Jacobson Road, Poulsbo 360-779-5665 | www.bbcpoulsbo.com

INDIANOLA LIVING HOPE CHURCH 20789 NE Division, Indianola 360-297-2340 | www.indianolachurch. net

POULSBO COMMUNITY CHURCH 651 Finn Hill Road, Poulsbo 360-598-5377 | www.poulsbocc.com

JEHOVAH’S WITNESSES 4861 NE Lincoln Road, Poulsbo 360-779-9410 | www.jw.org

REDEEMER UNITED METHODIST 9900 NE Shorty Campbell Road, Kingston 360-297-4847 | www.redeemer-umc.org

KEYPORT BIBLE CHURCH 15270 Washington Ave. NE, Keyport 360-779-4235 | www.keyportbible.org

ST. CHARLES ANGLICAN CHURCH 19351 8th Ave. NE, Suite 205, Poulsbo 360-779-3524 | www.stcharlesanglican. org

BREIDABLIK BAPTIST CHURCH 239 NW Lofall Road, Poulsbo 360-779-6844 CALVARY CHAPEL OF POULSBO 23300 Stottlemeyer Road NE, Poulsbo 360-697-3795 | www.calvarypoulsbo.org GATEWAY FELLOWSHIP 18901 8th Ave., Poulsbo 360-779-5515 | www.gatewayfellowship. com

KINGSTON CHRISTIAN CHURCH 11255 NE 2nd St., Kingston 360-297-2551 | www.kingstonchristian. org

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 2138 NE Mesford St., Poulsbo 360-779-9197 | www.lds.org

LIBERTY BAY PRESBYTERIAN 18561 9th Ave. NE, Poulsbo 360-779-7545 | www.libertybaypca.com

EGLON COMMUNITY CHURCH 33690 Eglon Road NE, Kingston 360-638-2020

NEW COVENANT FELLOWSHIP 705 NE Lincoln Road, Poulsbo (Gateway School Gym) 360-598-2555 | www.ncfpoulsbo.com

FAITH EPISCOPAL CHURCH 20295 Little Valley Road NE, Poulsbo 360-471-7522 | http://faith-episcopal.org FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH 26736 Miller Bay Road NE, Kingston 360-297-2736 | www.faithkingston.org FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH AND CHRISTIAN CENTER 18920 4th Ave. NE, Poulsbo 360-779-2622 | www.poulsbofirst lutheran.org

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NEWLIFE CHURCH Meets at North Kitsap High School 1780 NE Hostmark St., Poulsbo 360-337-1300 | www.newlife.tv NORTH KITSAP BAPTIST CHURCH 20516 Little Valley Road NE, Poulsbo 360-779-4689 | www.nk-bc.org NORTH KITSAP FAMILY CHURCH 20965 Cindy Court NE, Poulsbo 360-779-1060

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POULSBO CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 22097 Viking Way NW, Poulsbo 360-626-1053 | www.poulsbonaz.org

ST. ELIZABETH ORTHODOX CHURCH 26580 Breidablik Place NW, Poulsbo 360-598-9700 | www.saintelizabeth poulsbo.org ST. OLAF’S CATHOLIC CHURCH 18943 Caldart Ave. NE, Poulsbo 360-779-4291 | www.stolafschurch.org ST. PETER CATHOLIC MISSION 7076 NE South St., Suquamish 360-779-4291 | www.seattlearchdiocese. org SCANDIA BIBLE CHURCH 16748 Scandia Road NW, Poulsbo 360-697-1113 | www.scandiabible church.org SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH 1700 NE Lincoln Road, Poulsbo 360-779-4746 | www.poulsbo22. adventistchurchconnect.org S’KLALLAM WORSHIP CENTER 32274 Little Boston Road NE, Kingston 360-297-5505

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Port Gamble

Shopping • Dining • Romance Culture • Entertainment • Recreation

Rhea Schneider

Gifts, Cards, Jewelry, Vintage & Home Decor 32220 Rainier Ave. NE Port Gamble

“For Something Different”

360.297.4114

www.portgambleweddings.com

EAT.

SHOP.

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A crow perches on a street sign in Port Gamble. The town, established in 1853, resembles the founders’ hometown of East Machias, Maine. The town is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Annie LaValle

Port Gamble

Shopping • Dining • Romance Culture • Entertainment • Recreation

www.PortGambleGuestHouse.com

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From farm to table to you

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rom beer and coffee to food and wine, North Kitsap is home to a variety of unique flavors. Here’s where you can get a taste of the peninsula.

FARMERS MARKETS KINGSTON FARMERS MARKET At Mike Wallace Park on the Kingston waterfront. Saturdays, May through October. | www.kingstonfarmersmarket.com

1686 | www.slipperypigbrewery.com. SOUND BREWERY 19815 Viking Ave NW, Poulsbo. 360-9308696 | www.soundbrewery.com. VALHÖLL BREWING 18970 3rd Ave. NE, Poulsbo. 360-9300172 | www.valhollbrewing.com.

COFFEE

POULSBO FARMERS MARKET On Iverson Street and 7th Avenue, Poulsbo. Saturdays, April through December. | www.poulsbofarmersmarket.org.

AVIATOR COFFEES & TEAS 25876 Washington Blvd. NE, Kingston (adjacent to the ferry landing). 206-6177765.

SUQUAMISH FARMERS MARKET At the Masi Shop on Highway 305. 3-7 p.m. Wednesdays, May through October. | www.suquamishfarmersmarket.org.

GROUNDS FOR CHANGE INC. 15773 George Lane NE, No. 204, Poulsbo. 360-779-040 | www.groundsfor change.com.

BREWS

HOT SHOTS JAVA 18881 Front St. NE, Poulsbo. 360-7792171 | www.hotshotsjava.com.

DOWNPOUR 10991 NE Highway 104, Kingston. 360881-0452 | www.downpourbrewing.com. HOOD CANAL BREWERY 26499 Bond Road NE, Kingston. 360297-8316 | www.hoodcanalbrewery.com. RAINY DAZE 650 NW Bovela Lane, Suite 3, Poulsbo. 360-692-1858. | www.rainydazebrewing. com.

PUGET SOUND COFFEE ROASTERS 655 NE Owl Hill Way, Poulsbo. 360-2654144 | www.pugetcoffee.com.

EATS

CB’S NUTS 6013 NE Highway 104, Kingston. 360297-1213 | www.cbsnuts.com/wp/.

SLIPPERY PIG 18801 Front St. NE, Poulsbo. 360-394-

MOLLY WARD GARDENS 27462 Big Valley Road NE, Poulsbo. 360779-4471 | www.mollywardgardens.com.

Faith | from page 41

18732 Division Ave. NE, Suquamish 360-598-4434 | www.suquamishucc.org

STOREHOUSE CHURCH 20714 Highway 305, Suite 2C, Poulsbo 360-698-5987 | email storehousepoulsbo 13@hotmail.com SUQUAMISH CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST

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UNITY OF NORTH KITSAP 18732 Division Ave NE, Suquamish 360-626-1084 | www.unitynorthkitsap. com VINLAND LUTHERAN CHURCH 2750 Finn Hill Road, Poulsbo 360-779-3428 | www.vinlandlc.org

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TASTE

Taste | from page 44

A Rainy Daze Brewery employee checks the tank in preparation for final hopping.

MOSSBACK 26185 Ohio Ave NE, Kingston. 360-3281254 | www.mossbackcafe.com. PORT GAMBLE GENERAL STORE AND CAFE 32400 N Rainier Ave, Port Gamble. 360297-7636 | www.portgamblegeneralstore. com.

WINE

LIBERTY BAY CELLAR 4250 Emerald Lane NE, Poulsbo. 206910-2588. By appointment only. The winery produces more than 1,000 cases each year.

Terryl Asla

GET INVOLVED

Make a difference in your hometown POULSBO AMERICAN LEGION POST NO. 245 Meets at 7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month at 19068 Jensen Way, Suite 3A. Open to veterans and active-duty members of U.S. Armed Forces. Also: Sons of Veterans and the Ladies Auxiliary. 360-7795456 | email alpost245vso@gmail.com CULTURAL ARTS FOUNDATION NORTHWEST Volunteer group dedicated to furthering the arts in Kitsap County. Presents Art in the Woods and the Poulsbo Arts Festival. 360-697-6342 | www.cafnw.org. DAUGHTERS OF NORWAY The Nina Grieg Lodge No. 40 meets at 10 a.m. the second Saturday of each month in

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the Sons of Norway Lodge, 18891 Front St. 360-779-5209. EAGLES AERIE NO. 3586 The North Kitsap Fraternal Order of Eagles No. 3586 meets in the group hall, 4230 NE Lincoln Road. Bingo 12:30 p.m. every Sunday. 360-779-7272 | www.foe3586.com.

LITTLE NORWAY TOASTMASTERS Public speaking and leadership skills. Meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month at Martha & Mary, 19160 Front St. NE, Poulsbo. 360-297-2845 | www.littlenorway-tm.com.

HISTORIC DOWNTOWN POULSBO ASSOCIATION Works to preserve and promote downtown, | www.historicdowntown poulsbo. com.

WARREN G. HARDING MASONIC LODGE NO. 260 The Warren G. Harding Lodge meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of the month at 18815 3rd Ave. NE, Poulsbo. 360-633-5936 | www.nkmasons.net.

KIWANIS CLUB OF GREATER POULSBO Meets at 7 a.m. Fridays at Coffee Oasis, 780 NE Iverson St. Poulsbo | 360-535-4110, email Tombro@msn.com

POULSBO NOON LIONS The Poulsbo Noon Lions Club meets at 12:15 p.m. every Thursday in the First Lutheran Church social hall. 360-471-1573 | www.poulsbolions.blogspot.com.

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GET INVOLVED NORTH KITSAP FISHLINE Provides food and other assistance in cooperation with other agencies. Food bank, 787 NW Liberty Lane, Poulsbo; Second Season, 18825 Anderson Parkway; Second Season Home, 18916 3rd Ave. NE, Poulsbo. 360-779-5190 | www.nkfishline.org. OPTIMIST CLUB Meets at 6 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesday of the month in the Poulsbo Inn breakfast room. A volunteer service group dedicated to creating an optimistic future for children and older residents. Contact: Bob or Adele Heinrich, 360-7791931 | www.optimist.org. POULSBO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Serves as an advocate for businesses and provides leadership in the community to ensure a healthy business climate. Located at 19735 10th Ave. NE, Suite S100, Poulsbo. 360-779-4848 | www.poulsbo chamber. com.

POULSBO EVENING LIONS Poulsbo Evening Lions Club meets at 6:30 p.m. the first and third Thursday in St. Olaf’s Church, 18943 Caldart Ave. NE. | www.poulsbolions.blogspot.com. POULSBO GARDEN CLUB To create a wider knowledge of plants and flowers, general interest in gardening, civic beauty, and organize exhibitions. Meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Saturday of the month, Poulsbo Library, 700 Lincoln Road 360-779-6234 | email poulsbogarden club@gmail.com. POULSBO HISTORICAL SOCIETY Meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Tuesday of each month in the City Council chambers, 200 Moe St. 360-440-7354 | www.poulsbohistory.org. POULSBO-NORTH KITSAP ROTARY Meets for breakfast, fellowship and informative presentation at 7 a.m. Fridays, Sons of Norway Hall, 18891 Front St. | www. poulsborotary.org. POULSBO YACHT CLUB The club hosts activities — from dinners to card games, dances to cruises — and promotes boating in the Northwest. 18129 Fjord Drive NE, Poulsbo. 360-779-3116 | www.membermanager.net/poulsboyc. SONS OF NORWAY LODGE NO. 44 Located at 18891 Front St., the group offers activities and classes related to Scandinavian culture. 360-779-5209 | www. poulsbosonsofnorway.com. SOROPTIMISTS Soroptimist International of Greater North Kitsap is a group of professional women in the area, dedicated to improving the lives of children and women in the community | www.signk.org.

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TROUT UNLIMITED North Kitsap chapter meets at 7 p.m. the third Tuesday of the month in the Poulsbo Library community room. Chapter works to conserve, protect and restore cold-water fisheries, watersheds, and ecosystems | www.kop.tu.org.

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HANSVILLE FLOTSAM AND JETSAM GARDEN CLUB Meets at 9 a.m. the second Wednesday of the month, September through June, in the Greater Hansville Community Center on Buck Lake Road. The club hosts expert speakers, field trips and workshops, and supports conservation and scholarships. 360-638-1061 | www.flotsamandjetsam gardenclub.com. FRIENDS OF NORWEGIAN POINT PARK Norwegian Point Park is located next to the Hansville Store in downtown Hansville, at the site of an old fishing resort. Jo Nelson, 360-638-0000. FRIENDS OF POINT NO POINT LIGHT Friends of Point No Point Lighthouse is a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation of the lighthouse, and educating the public on the history of this landmark | www.pnplighthouse.com. GREATER HANSVILLE COMMUNITY CENTER The center’s Board of Trustees meets at 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of the month in the community center, at Buck Lake Park on Buck Lake Road. 360-638-1143 | www. hansville.org. HANSVILLE GREENWAY ASSOCIATION Provides stewardship services for the Greenway, in cooperation with Kitsap County Parks and Recreation Department | www. hansvillegreenway.org. HANSVILLE HISTORICAL SOCIETY Hansville Historical Society brings together people interested in documenting and interpreting the history of the community. Tom Lee, 360-638-1973 | www.hansville. org.

INDIANOLA

INDIANOLA BEACH IMPROVEMENT CLUB 20466 Indianola Road NE. 360-297-4242 | www.indianola.club. INDIANOLA GARDEN CLUB Meets at 12:30 p.m. on the third Wednesday of the month at the Indianola Clubhouse. 360-297-1245.

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GET INVOLVED KINGSTON

DOWNTOWN KINGSTON ASSOCIATION Meets at 4 p.m. the first Tuesday of the month in American Marine Bank on Lindvog Road. The group works to revitalize downtown. KINGSTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Provides support and networking for area businesses with monthly business lunches, after-hours networking and promotes Kingston by hosting seasonal community events. 360-297-3813 | www.kingston chamber.com. KINGSTON KIWANIS CLUB Provides support of local projects and its foundation sponsors scholarships. Meets at 7 a.m. every Thursday at the Village Green Community Center. 360-297-2661, ext. 34 | www.greaterkingstonkiwanis. weebly.com. KINGSTON CITIZENS ADVISORY COUNCIL This council, appointed by the Kitsap County Board of Commissioners, meets at 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of every month at the Village Green Community Center. 360-337-4650 | ww.kitsapgov.com/boards/ CAC/kingston/kcac.htm. KINGSTON COVE YACHT CLUB Hosts events, including barbecues, boat parades, cruises, and a fall salmon derby. Monthly meetings at 8 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, with a potluck dinner at 7 p.m. 360-297-3371 | www.kcyc. org.

KINGSTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY Meets at 11:15 a.m. the third Monday of every month at the Village Green Community Center to help preserve and promote the heritage of Kingston. | www.kingston history.org. KINGSTON-NORTH KITSAP ROTARY Meets at noon on Wednesdays at Village Green Community Center in Kingston for business and a featured presentation. Supports parks and schools in the area. Online: www.kingston-nkrotary.org. SHARENET A food bank, thrift store and social services agency located at 26021 United Road, off Bond Road, in the Cutting Edge Business Park. 360-297-2266 | www.sharenetfood bank.org.

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SUQUAMISH SUQUAMISH CITIZENS’ ADVISORY COUNCIL This council, appointed by the Kitsap County Board of Commissioners, meets at 6 p.m. the first Thursday of the month at Suquamish Elementary School Library, 18950 Park Ave. NE. Works to improve the Suquamish community. | www.kitsapgov. com/boards/CAC/suquamish/scac.htm YWCA ALIVE A women’s support group focusing on healing from the effects of physical and/ or emotional abuse in relationships meets from 6-7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of the month in Suquamish. 360-551-3140. Crisis hotline: 1-800-5005513.

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KINGSTON FOOD BANK Illinois Avenue and Highway 107, next to the Sheriff’s Office, Kingston. Serving downtown Kingston for more than 40 years. Provides food and necessities for those in need. 360-297-7100.

KINGSTON GARDEN CLUB Meets monthly for business and special presentations by guest gardeners and horticulturists. Provides grants and scholarships | www.kingstongardenclub.com.

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BE ACTIVE

Become a caretaker of our natural spaces ...

T

The south fork of Dogfish Creek originates in Wilderness Park in Poulsbo.

he natural beauty and resources of North Kitsap have sustained the needs of people here for millennia. Modern residents are still nurtured by the beauty and bounty of land and sea. You can learn more about our natural environment and your role as a caretaker at the following venues.

Sophie Bonomi

poulsbo. The Marine Science Center offers an up-close introduction to the local marine ecosystem, with a touch tank, exhibits of more than 100 species of marine animals and plants, and an aquarium (the resident octopus is a popular attraction). Admission is free.

FISH PARK 228 NW Lindvig Way (between Viking Avenue and Bond Road), Poulsbo. 360394-9772 | www.cityofpoulsbo.com/ parks. Features: 40 acres on Dogfish Creek and the Liberty Bay estuary, with entrances on Bond Road and on Viking Avenue. Features: Arboretum, bird and wildlife viewing, boardwalk, nature hiking trails, interpretive signage, pedestrian bridges, sitting areas, winding paths. GROVERS CREEK SALMON HATCHERY 23175 Indianola Road NE, Poulsbo. 360-598-3142. Call for hours. The hatchery is owned and operated by the Suquamish Tribe. Watch salmon make their way up the creek and the fish ladder into the holding ponds. Biologist Paul Dorn manages the Grover Creek Fish Hatchery and conducts salmon tours.

SEA DISCOVERY CENTER 18743 Front St. NE, Poulsbo, 360-5984460 | Hours: wp.wwu.edu/seacenter-

STILLWATERS ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER 26059 Barber Cut Off Road, Kingston, 360-297-1226 | Hours: www.stillwaters environmentalcenter.org. Stillwaters’ wetlands are part of a larger system that includes forest, freshwater and emergent salt marsh communities. The center has trails that lead to a viewing platform on the salt marsh and estuary off Puget Sound, and ponds full of sealife. Stillwaters presents numerous classes and events all year.

... and get out and explore our parks, trails

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ith approximately 90 parks and preserves, North Kitsap is conducive to an active lifestyle. It’s also a nature lover’s paradise. Enjoy second-growth forests and beautiful beaches; wildlife you’ll see include coyotes, raptors, river otters, seals and whales.

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These are the largest parks in North Kitsap. For a list of all parks, go to www. cityofpoulsbo.com and www.kitsapgov. com/parks

HANSVILLE FOULWEATHER BLUFF A 101-acre preserve off Twin Spits

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Road, two miles northwest of Hansville. Features: A trail that meanders through a forest to a sandy beach on Hood Canal; more than 300 species of plants; stands of red alder, western hemlock, secondgrowth western red cedar; a coastal lagoon that is habitat for many bird species, including red-breasted nut hatches and winter wrens. Dogs and other pets

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BE ACTIVE are not allowed. Watch your step; the nearshore has several colonies of sand dollars.

Online: www.greatpeninsula.org/ where/indianola.html.

HANSVILLE GREENWAY Hike from Puget Sound to Hood Canal on the Hansville Greenway trails. The greenway is 245 acres. Features: west shore of Buck Lake, two beaver ponds, other wetlands, and a portion of Hawk’s Hole Creek, which flows from Lower Hawk’s Pond to Hood Canal. Most of the land is second- and third-growth forest. The main entrance to the trail system is at Buck Lake County Park. Norwegian Point Park is the Puget Sound terminus of the Hansville Greenway trail system, but is not part of the Greenway. Buck Lake Park features a boat ramp for nonmotorized watercraft, lake swimming, trout fishing, and trailheads to the Hansville Greenway Wildlife Corridor. Online: www.hansvillegreenway.org. POINT NO POINT COUNTY PARK A 60.8-acre park, located at the end of Point No Point Road off Hansville Road. The Treaty of Point No Point was negotiated and signed here in 1855; Point No Point Lighthouse was built in 1879. The lighthouse is open noon to 4 p.m. weekends April to September. Point No Point is on Admiralty Inlet and is popular for salmon fishing, sand-castle building, kite flying, bird watching and other beach activities. Online: www.kitsapgov.com/parks/ Parks/Pages/regionalparks/point_no_ point.htm.

INDIANOLA INDIANOLA WATERFRONT AND WOODLAND PRESERVE An 80.91-acre preserve. Features: Undeveloped walking trails, mature mixed conifer forests, broadleaf forests, a seasonal stream that meanders down to Miller Bay, public access to a lowbank beach on Puget Sound through a serene forested trail crossing over a tidal estuary. Wildlife includes bald eagles, Cooper’s hawks, ospreys, violet-green swallows, and pileated woodpeckers.

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KINGSTON CARPENTER LAKE RESERVE AND WILDLIFE SANCTUARY Carpenter Lake is the center of this 67-acre nature preserve. Features: Boardwalk with viewing platforms leading across a bog and a salt marsh to the lake. The trailhead is located behind Richard Gordon Elementary School on Barber Cut Off Road. NORTH KITSAP HERITAGE PARK More than 800 acres of second-growth forest, with several miles of biking and walking trails. This park has no restrooms, and is pack-it-in/pack-it-out with no trash collection. Online: www.kitsapgov.com/parks/

playground, community center and restrooms. KITSAP MEMORIAL STATE PARK Located on Highway 3 north of Hood Canal Bridge. Features: A 58-acre park with tent camping, cabins, 1,797 feet of shoreline, and facilities for group events and weddings. Sweeping views of Hood Canal. Grassy playfields and children’s play equipment, a saltwater beach with tide pools, and shellfish harvesting opportunities. Online: www.parks.state.wa.us/529/ Kitsap-Memorial.

PORT GAMBLE PORT GAMBLE FOREST HERITAGE PARK A 535-acre park. Features: Biking, equestrian and walking trails; access to the bay for water trails and kayaking; parking lot. This park is pack-it-in/packit-out.

ONE CALL FOR ALL!

POULSBO FISH PARK 228 NW Lindvig Way (between Viking Avenue and Bond Road), Poulsbo. 360394-9772 | www.cityofpoulsbo.com/ parks/parks_parks_trails.htm. Features: 40 acres on Dogfish Creek and the Liberty Bay estuary, with entrances on Bond Road and on Viking Avenue. Features: Arboretum, bird and wildlife viewing, boardwalk, nature hiking trails, interpretive signage, pedestrian bridges, sitting areas, winding paths. ISLAND LAKE COUNTY PARK 1087 NW Island Lake Road, Poulsbo | www.kitsapgov.com/parks This 23-acre park offers swimming areas, a fishing pier, trails, picnic area,

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Serving Kitsap County Since 1988 • Complete Site • Land Clearing Preparation and • Demolition & Removal Development • Drainage Control • Septic Design • Ditching & Utillties & Installation • Bulldozing & Excavating • Driveway Construction • Rock, Gravel & Top & Maintenance Soil Deliver • Quality retaining walls

360-638-2300

Cell 360-271-4800 www.whitworthexcavating.com •

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POULSBO VILLAGE NORTH KITSAP’S SHOPPING CENTER SPECIALTY SHOPS | RESTAURANTS | GROCERY | SERVICES | LOTS OF PARKING!

POULSBO VILLAGE NORTH KITSAP’S SHOPPING CENTER

SPECIALTY SHOPS | RESTAURANTS | GROCERY | SERVICES | LOTS OF PARKING! Allen’s Cleaners

Domino’s Pizza

Olympic Wine Shop

Sound Publishing

A New Beginning

Edward Jones Investments

Papa Murphy’s Pizza

Sound Classifieds

Peninsula Outfitters

Sunrise Dental

Pho’ T&N Vietnamese Cuisine

Sway Salon

Poulsbo Animal Clinic

The New You

Poulsbo Village Chiropractic

The UPS Store

Richie’s Burger Urge

The Wild Bird

Rite Aid

Taco Bell

Sport Haus

Taqueria El Huarache

Sprint Store

Toys Etc.

Starbucks Coffee

Village Laundromat

St Charles Anglican Church

West Sound Treatment Center

Superior Pet Food

Woodwork Tattoo & Gallery

Bebe Nails

Elmer’s Restaurant

Brewton & Associates Insurance

5 De Mayo Meat Market

Burger King

Gallery of Hair Design

Chung’s Teriyaki

Galletta School of Dance

Coast Do It Best Hardware

Golden Lion Restaurant

Cobbler Shoppe

Harrison’s Comfort Footwear

Cut it Again Sam

Island Hammer LLC

Dahlquist’s Fine Jewelry

Liberty Tax Service

Defensive Driving School

Meat Market 5 De Mayo

Dollar Tree

North Kitsap Herald

Off Hwy 305 • Poulsbo • www.poulsbovillage.com

Toys Hobbies Kites Art Supplies Windsocks

Puppets Games Books Puzzles and more...

19425 7th Ave. NE #101 • Poulsbo, WA 98370 • (360) 779-8797

Open 7 days a week • Located in Poulsbo Village

Off Hwy 305 • Poulsbo • www.poulsbovillage.com 5 0

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POULSBO VILLAGE NORTH KITSAP’S SHOPPING CENTER • SHOPPING/SERVICES • DINING CHOICES • SPECIALTY SHOPS

Ballet • Pointe Jazz • Modern • Tap • Hip-Hop

Dance & Performing Arts

360-779-1122 www.gallettadance.com

Lyrical • Acting • Voice Wedding Choreography Sr. Company Member Becky Darrow

19351 8th Ave NE Suite 100 Poulsbo WA, 98370

THE SPORT HAUS Specialists in running shoes... we make happy feet!

Running Walking Baseball

Soccer Tennis Football

Basketball Volleyball Lacrosse

An Authentic Taste of Vietnam

PHO (Vietnamese Noodle Soup)

Spring & EggRolls • Stir Fried Egg or Rice Noodles • Vermicelli Noodle Bowl Rice Platters • Fried Rice • Bubble Tea Stop in today for a great experience! Visit www.photnpoulsbo.com to view our variety of dishes!

Poulsbo Village Shopping Center

(360) 697-2311 Mon-Fri 9:30am-7:00pm • Sat 9:30-6:00pm

(Please call ahead for groups of 8 or more)

360-394-1601 Mon-Sat 10:30am-9pm • Sun Closed

In the Poulsbo Village

Visit Your Locally, Family Owned Store For all your Shopping Needs

VOTED #1 Hardware & Paint Store in 2016! VOTED #1 Hardware store for 7 years from 2010- 2016!

SHOP LOCAL!

COAST

HARDWARE 360.779.2000

Customer Service is our Specialty

Visit us on

Can’t find it? We’ll have it or we can get it!

Poulsbo Village - 19494 7th Ave NE Poulsbo, WA 98370

We post all of our great in-store specials all month long

Off Hwy 305 • Poulsbo • www.poulsbovillage.com N o r t h

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Local News.

Wherever you are.

Welcome to KitsapDailyNews.com K

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Daily News

BAINBRIDGE ISLAND REVIEW | 98110 | NORTH KITSAP HERALD | CENTRAL KITSAP REPORTER PORT ORCHARD INDEPENDENT | KINGSTON COMMUNITY NEWS | REACH US AT 360-779-4464

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BE ACTIVE

North Kitsap: Fitness and fun

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Frisbee.

ild winters and warm, beautiful summers are conducive to indoor and outdoor activities — from golf to ultimate

GOLF WHITE HORSE GOLF COURSE 22795 Three Lions Place NE (off South Kingston Road), Kingston. 360-297-4468 | www.whitehorsegolf.com. Features: 11acre practice facility, Cedar Ridge Grill and Clubhouse.

ROWING KITSAP ROWING ASSOCIATION P.O. Box 232, Indianola 98342 | www. kitsaprowing.org, email kra.membership@ gmail.com. A competitive and recreational club for rowers 21 and older. Women’s and men’s crews. Practices weekday mornings,

early evenings and weekends. Members range from experienced rowers to novices.

SAILING POULSBO PARKS AND RECREATION Beginning sailing courses during the summer at the Port of Poulsbo Marina. For all ages. 360-779-9898 | www.cityofpoulsbo. com/parks/parks.htm.

SKATEPARKS BILLY JOHNSON SKATE PARK 24700 Lindvog Road NE, Kingston. LITTLE BOSTON SKATEPARK Little Boston Road, near the S’Klallam Tribal Center, in Little Boston. For Tribal members and guests. RAAB PARK SKATE PARK 18349 Caldart Ave NE, Poulsbo.

SWIMMING NORTH KITSAP COMMUNITY POOL 1881 NE Hostmark St., Poulsbo, 360-598 1070. Lap swims, lessons, water aerobics. Competitive swim programs | www. poulsbopiranhas.com).

YOUTH SPORTS LEAGUES LITTLE LEAGUE, BABE RUTH, GIRLS SOFTBALL Snider Park, 22898 Viking Way NW, Poulsbo. Little League: 360-697-5449 | www.nkll.org. NORTH KITSAP LACROSSE Competitive lacrosse league for middle school- and high school-age players, | www.nklax.org. NORTH KITSAP SOCCER CLUB North Kitsap Soccer Club is part of a network that includes more than 1,300 soccer players throughout the state. For ages 5-18, | www.northkitsapsoccer.org.

Community, Delivered Reach over 150,000 readers in print and online.

A DIVISION OF

360-779-4464 | KitsapDailyNews.com | BainbridgeReview.com BAINBRIDGE ISLAND REVIEW | 98110 | NORTH KITSAP HERALD | CENTRAL KITSAP REPORTER PORT ORCHARD INDEPENDENT | KINGSTON COMMUNITY NEWS

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EDUCATION

Education in North Kitsap: From K to college

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orth Kitsap’s educational opportunities are diverse. Private and public schools embrace creativity in the classroom, allowing students to thrive. North Kitsap’s educational offerings serve students from childhood to adulthood, granting every young person the skills they need to succeed in a technology-driven world.

Public Schools NORTH KITSAP SCHOOL DISTRICT 18360 Caldart Ave., Poulsbo 360-396-3001 | www.nkschools.org The North Kitsap School District is comprised of six elementary schools, two middle schools, two high schools and a Parent Assisted Learning Program. The North Kitsap School Board is composed of five members who are elected in districtwide elections and represent all constituents within the boundaries of the North Kitsap School District. The board meets at 6 p.m. on the second and fourth Thursday of each month, in the district offices. DISTRICT 1 CINDY WEBSTER-MARTINSON, vice president and legislative representative. 360-979-8489, cwebster@nkschools.org DISTRICT 2 JIM ALMOND, liaison to the City of Poulsbo and WIAA. 360-979-8488, jalmond@nkschools.org DISTRICT 3 BETH WORTHINGTON, president and liaison to the Kingston community. 360979-8491, bworthington@nkschools.org DISTRICT 4 GLEN ROBBINS, liaison to the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe and the Suquamish Tribe. 360-979-8481, gdrobbins@nkschools. org DISTRICT 5 BILL WEBB. 360-265-2371, bwebb@ nkschools.com

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ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS RICHARD GORDON ELEMENTARY 26331 Barber Cut Off Road NE, Kingston Karen Tollefson, principal | 360-396-3800 HILDER PEARSON ELEMENTARY 15650 Central Valley Road NW, Poulsbo Deb Foreman, principal | 360-697-6266 POULSBO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 18531 Noll Road NE, Poulsbo Claudia Alves, principal (retiring, will be succeeded by Drew Crandall) 360-779-2911 SUQUAMISH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 18950 Park Blvd. NE, Suquamish Gwen Lyon, principal | 360-598-4219 VINLAND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 22104 Rhododendron Lane NW, Poulsbo Charley McCabe, principal | 360-779-8990 DAVID WOLFLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 27089 Highland Road NE, Kingston Benjamin Degnin, principal | 360-394-6800 MIDDLE SCHOOLS KINGSTON MIDDLE SCHOOL 9000 NE West Kingston Road, Kingston Craig Barry, principal | 360-396-3400 POULSBO MIDDLE SCHOOL 2003 Hostmark St., Poulsbo Josh Emmons, principal | 360-779-4453 HIGH SCHOOLS NORTH KITSAP HIGH SCHOOL 1780 NE Hostmark St., Poulsbo Megan Sawicki, principal | 360-779-4408 KINGSTON HIGH SCHOOL 26201 Siyaya Ave. NE, Kingston Christy Cole, principal | 360-394-1200 SUQUAMISH TRIBE CHIEF KITSAP ACADEMY 15838 Sandy Hook Road NE, Suquamish Fabian Castilleja, principal 360-394-8566 (For grades 6-12. One of the first Tribal Compact Schools in Washington. Operated

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and funded by the Suquamish Tribe)

Independent Schools CHILDREN’S GARDEN MONTESSORI 3805 NE Sawdust Hill Road NE, Poulsbo Kristen Sundquist, director 360-779-1225 | www.cgmspoulsbo.com Preschool and kindergarten classes for children ages 21/2 to 6, set in a one-room schoolhouse surrounded by 10 acres of pasture and woodlands. THE FARM MONTESSORI SCHOOL 17197 Clear Creek Road NW, Poulsbo 360-779-2620 Classes for 68 students ages 3-6. GATEWAY CHRISTIAN SCHOOLS 705 Lincoln Road NE, Poulsbo 360-779-9189 | www.gateway christianschools.org A Christ-centered education for grades K-9. Affiliated with Gateway Fellowship Church. GOOD SHEPHERD MONTESSORI PRESCHOOL 15439 Sandy Hook Road NE, Poulsbo 360-779-2345 | http://gspreschool.com A Christ-centered Montessori education for children ages 3 to kindergarten. The teaching style blends practical life exercises with sensorial activities, language skills, math, geography and Bible stories. POULSBO ADVENTIST SCHOOL 1700 Lincoln Road NE, Poulsbo 360-779-6290 | http://anim69. adventistschoolconnect.org/ A Christian education for grades 1-8. A ministry of Poulsbo Seventh-day Adventist Church. SILVERWOOD SCHOOL 14000 Central Valley Road NW, Poulsbo

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EDUCATION Jon Torgerson, head of school 360-697-7526 | www.silverwoodschool.org Offers an interactive, interdisciplinary approach to learning for grades 1-6. WEST SOUND ACADEMY 16571 Creative Drive NE, Poulsbo Barrie Hillman, head of school | 360-5985954, www.westsoundacademy.org A college preparatory school with a high level of scholarship and artistic expression for grades 6-12.

Colleges NORTHWEST COLLEGE OF ART & DESIGN 16301 Creative Drive NE, Poulsbo 360-779-9993 | www.ncad.edu Offers a well-rounded experience in the arts. Degree offered: bachelor of fine arts

in visual communications.

cal management.

NORTHWEST INDIAN COLLEGE, LITTLE BOSTON SATELLITE SITE 31912 Little Boston Road NE, Kingston 360-297-6216. NWIC offers courses leading to certificates; six associate degrees; and bachelor’s degrees in Native studies leadership, Native environmental science, human services, and Tribal governannce and business management.

WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY AT OLYMPIC COLLEGE POULSBO 1000 Olympic College Way NW, Poulsbo. 360-394-2700 | email poulsbocampus@ olympic.edu Washington State University offers fouryear degree studies at Olympic College Poulsbo.

OLYMPIC COLLEGE, POULSBO 1000 Olympic College Way NW, Poulsbo. 360-394-2725 | email poulsbocampus@ olympic.edu The Poulsbo campus is a branch of the main campus in Bremerton. It offers courses leading to associate degrees in arts and sciences, as well as bachelor’s degrees in information systems, nursing, and organizational leadership and techni-

NEW HOTEL Now Open

WESTERN ON THE PENINSULAS 1000 Olympic College Way NW, Poulsbo. Kathy Johnson | 360-394-2733, email western.peninsulas@wwu.edu Western on the Peninsulas, a satellite campus of Western Washington University, offers bachelor degrees in business administration, Computer and Information Systems Security, environmental science, environmental policy, elementary education, and human services at Olympic College Poulsbo.

PLAY WITH PASSION. RELAX IN STYLE. THAT’S THE POINT! Our brand new hotel is where comfort meets luxury. The Hotel offers 94 guest rooms and suites and is the perfect destination to stay and play on the Kitsap Peninsula. • Each room has in-room coffee and a refrigerator • A 100-person conference/reception room is available with breakout doors to courtyard area with fire-pit • Fitness Center • The Point Julia Cafe • Outdoor courtyard for receptions • Adjacent to 24-Hour Casino with enclosed access

Kingston, Washington www.the-point-casino.com 1.866.547.6468

The Point Casino & Hotel is proudly owned and operated by The Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe. You must be at least 21 years old to participate in gaming activities, attend entertainment events and to enter lounge/bar areas. Knowing your limit is your best bet—get help at (800) 547-6133.

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EDUCATION The former Poulsbo Marine Science Center is now owned and operated by Western Washington University, which is expanding its exhibits and public events, and developing educational programs for all ages. The center now bears the name Sea Discovery Center and is located on the Poulsbo waterfront. Submitted

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earn about local history — pre-contact, the logging era, the maritime era, and our Navy connection — at these local museums and cultural centers.

LATE 1800s/EARLY 1900s

PORT GAMBLE HISTORIC MUSEUM 1 Northeast View Drive, Port Gamble, 360297-8078. Hours: www.portgamble.com/ museum. Located on the lower floor of the Port Gamble General Store. Exhibits include rooms with period furnishings and items depicting life and work in this former New England-style mill town, which was established in 1853 and is now a National Historic Landmark. POULSBO HISTORICAL MUSEUM Poulsbo City Hall, 200 NE Moe St., Poulsbo, 360-440-7354. Hours: www.poulsbohistory. org. Learn about late 1800s/early 1900s life in this former fishing village.

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The museum’s Martinson Cabin at Viking Avenue and Lindvig Way is restored and furnished in period items, depicting life in a settlement cabin of the 1800s. Admission free at both museums. INDIGENOUS HISTORY SUQUAMISH MUSEUM & CULTURAL CENTER 6861 NE South St., Suquamish. 360-3948499. Hours: www.suquamishmuseum.org. This museum is Washington’s secondoldest Native American museum. The museum’s architecture is reminiscent of a Coast Salish longhouse. The museum’s collection of artifacts, oral histories, photographs and contemporary items tell the story of the Suquamish, the people of the dxwseqweb, “the place of clear salt water.” The museum gift store features traditional items made by noted Coast Salish artists.

MARITIME HISTORY POULSBO MARITIME MUSEUM 19010 Front St. NE, Poulsbo. Hours: www.

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poulsbohistory.com/poulsbo-maritimemuseum Through imaginative exhibits and interactive displays, explore Poulsbo’s diverse maritime history — from families traveling dock to dock to get to their farm products to market, to the homeporting of codfish fleets, to the tour ships and paddle boards of today. See historic boats that have been restored or are undergoing restoration. Admission: Free. MILITARY HISTORY U.S. NAVAL UNDERSEA MUSEUM 1 Garnett Way, Keyport, 360-396-4148 | Hours: www.navalunderseamuseum.org. This museum is one of 14 Naval History & Heritage Command museums in the United States. Artifacts, exhibits and hands-on displays related to the U.S. Navy’s undersea history, exploration, and technical development. Features: diving gear, mines (including one dating to the Civil War), models, ROVs, submarine equipment, submersibles, and torpedoes. Admission: Free.

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WEATHER

Even on a foggy day, the Olympic Mountains are a stunning sight from North Kitsap.

Sophie Bonomi

Rainfall varies from Hansville to Poulsbo 2015: 2014: 2013: 2012: 2011: 2010:

POULSBO

2016 AVERAGE TEMPERATURES January: high 60.1 low 21.8 February: high 63 low 30.3 March: high 75.3 low 31 April: high 89.7 low 37.6 May: high 88.4 low 40.4 June: high 92.2 low 42.7 July: high 87.7 low 49 August: high 92.8 low 47.6 September: high 79.5 low 40.9 October: high 67.2 low 34.7 November: high 70.2 low 33.2 December: high 51.7 low 0 ANNUAL RAINFALL 2016:

42.93 inches

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35.4 inches 37.36 inches 22.09 inches 42.65 inches 31.54 inches 42.63 inches

— Source: CentralMarketWeather.com

HANSVILLE

2016 AVERAGE TEMPERATURES January: high 58.2 low 30.1 February: high 59.5 low 35.8 March: high 63.6 low 37.1 April: high 69.4 low 42.8 May: high 81.3 low 46.1 June: high 74.1 low 45.2

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July: high 75.0 low 52.1 August: high 77.0 low 52.1 September: high 68.5 low 46.5 October: high 64.5 low 41.6 November: high 70.4 low 39.9 December: high 50.6 low 27.1 ANNUAL RAINFALL 2016: 38.02 inches 2015: 26.55 inches 2014: 31.60 inches 2013: 19.71 inches 2012: 35.98 inches 2011: 25.40 inches 2010: 20.49 inches 2009: 23.68 inches — Source: SkunkBayWeather.com

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ADVERTISERS INDEX ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT The Point Casino..................... 2 & 55 The Barn...........................................17 Port of Kingston..............................37 Almost Candid Photo, Frame & Fine Arts..........................37 Port Gamble Weddings...................42 Galleta Dance Studio......................51 BANKING/FINANCIAL Liberty Bay Bank............................15 Columbia Bank................................36 First Federal.....................................47 Poulsbo Village................................50 DANCE & MUSIC STUDIO Kitsap Hot Yoga...............................25 Galleta Dance Studio......................51 RESTAURANTS & EATERIES The Point Casino..................... 2 & 55 Central Market..................................3 Hot Shots Java....................................6 Tizley’s Europub................................6 Boehm’s Chocolates..........................7 Taqueria Los Cazadores.................19 Dairy Queen.....................................24 The Grub Hut...................................36 Westside Pizza.................................36 The Kingston Ale House................36 d’Vine Wines Wine Bar..................36 Port Gamble General Store............42 Poulsbo Village................................50 Pho T&N...........................................51 HEALTHCARE Liberty Shores...................................4 Acupuncture & Wellness Center...11 Eric Thanem PT..............................25 Wunderful Health............................25 Kitsap Hot Yoga...............................25 Apple Tree Cove Dental..................36 Kingston Dental..............................36 Anderson Dental & Denture Center................................59 The Doctor’s Clinic.........................60 Mrs. Muir’s House..........................43 RETIREMENT Liberty Shores...................................4

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EDUCATION/CHILDCARE The Island School..............................8 North Kitsap School District...........9 Madrona School...............................21 Carden Country School..................46 FITNESS/SPORTS Eric Thanem PT..............................25 Wunderful Health............................25 Kitsap Hot Yoga...............................25 Galleta Dance Studio......................51 The Sport Haus................................51 LODGING The Point Casino..................... 2 & 55 Port Gamble Guest Houses............43 RETAIL Central Market..................................3 Blue Heron Jewelry...........................6 Boomer’s Pet Boutique.....................6 Closet Transfer..................................6 Crimson Cove.....................................6 Nordic Maid.......................................6 Cat’s Meow.........................................6 Boehm’s Chocolates..........................7 Salt Kettle...........................................7 Poulsbo Mercantile.........................18 CHS Northwest/Cenex...................19 Red Apple Grocery..........................19 Almost Candid Photo, Frame & Fine Arts..........................37 Red Apple Grocery..........................19 Wish Gifts.........................................42 Port Gamble General Store............42 Tango Zulu........................................42 Poulsbo Village................................50 Toys Etc............................................50 The Sport Haus................................51 Coast Do It Best Hardware............51 Mrs. Muir’s House..........................43 SERVICES Liberty Shores...................................4 The Island School..............................8 North Kitsap School District...........9 Acupuncture & Wellness Center...11 Swift Plumbing................................12 Scott’s Home & Roof.......................13 Keyport Auto Repair.......................14 Liberty Bay Bank............................15

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The Barn...........................................17 Ken’s Northwest Automotive.........18 CHS Northwest/Cenex...................19 Kitsap Tire Center...........................19 Shoomadoggie.................................19 Northern Asphalt.............................23 Northern Rentals.............................24 Director’s Mortgage.......................24 Kimco Plumbing..............................24 Eric Thanem PT..............................25 Wunderful Health............................25 Kitsap Hot Yoga...............................25 Apple Tree Cove Dental..................36 Catherine Arlen with Windermere Real Estate........36 Kingston Dental..............................36 Port of Kingston..............................37 Almost Candid Photo, Frame & Fine Arts..........................37 Port Gamble Weddings...................42 Hill Moving Company.....................44 Whitworth Excavating....................49 Poulsbo Village................................50 Mike’s Car Wash .............................50 Coast Do It Best Hardware............51 Anderson Dental & Denture Center................................59 The Doctor’s Clinic.........................60 PET SERVICES Boomer’s Pet Boutique.....................6 SALON & SPAS Upsy Daisy Salon & Spa.................14 REAL ESTATE & CONSTRUCTION Scott’s Home & Roof.......................13 Swift Plumbing................................12 Patty Shannon with Windermere Real Estate........17 Shoomadoggie.................................19 Northern Asphalt.............................23 Northern Rentals.............................24 Director’s Mortgage.......................24 Kimco Plumbing..............................24 Action Now Property......................27 Catherine Arlen with Windermere Real Estate........36 Whitworth Excavating....................49

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You’ll love what we can do for your smile!

• Denturist & Dentist on Staff • Crowns & Bridges • Cosmetic & General Dentistry • Denture Repair • Relines (Same Day)

• Extractions • Emergency Care • Dentures / Partials • Crown & Denture Implants

Most Insurances Accepted

19410 8th Ave. N.E., Suite 102, Poulsbo 360-779-1566 • 800-990-9116

email: AndersonDenture@hotmail.com • www.andersondenturedental.com


A part of Franciscan Medical Group

We’re with you every step of the way. Por t Orchard |

Poulsbo | Silverdale

TheDoctorsClinic.com | (360) 782-3660

Profile for Sound Publishing

Almanacs - 2017 North Kitsap Almanac  

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Almanacs - 2017 North Kitsap Almanac  

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