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CLALLAM COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION 2016 ANNUAL REPORT

Profiles In Excellence:

GREAT COMPANIES OF CLALLAM COUNTY

An advertising supplement produced by the Peninsula Daily News and Sequim Gazette


PROFILES IN EXCELLENCE — AN INTRODUCTION by JENNIFER LINDE, AMY MCDONALD and BILL GREENWOOD, Clallam County Economic Development Corporation

“I know how to lift some men up, calm down others, until they are one heartbeat, together, a team.” — Legendary football coach Paul “Bear” Bryant, who during his 25-year tenure as the University of Alabama’s head football coach amassed six national championships and 13 conference championships. The Economic Development Corporation (EDC) has been chartered to be the “economic engine” of Clallam County. Through its members — many of whom are celebrated in this special report — the EDC aims to pull together all the businesses that grow, harvest, manufacture, create, sell and provide services to customers on the North Olympic Peninsula and throughout the world. In doing so, EDC members are increasing jobs, hiring local people, building the wage base and delivering taxes that allow area cities and the county to provide our infrastructure. The members of the EDC aim to work in concert with public officials and with the Port of Port Angeles to

make Clallam County the most vibrant and exhilarating place to live and work in the Pacific Northwest. Members strive every day to help move area citizens toward that “one heartbeat,” which is the essence of any winning organization. The EDC was given birth as a nonprofit corporation in 1985 by the state Department of Commerce to perform the assignment cited above. Using many tools available through the state departments of commerce and revenue, the EDC is able to provide a host of valuable tax incentives, alternative lending sources, and a wide array of business services and advice. It also serves as a catalyst in bringing together customers with providers of goods and services. Importantly, with its members, the EDC is also the primary recruiter of new businesses to Clallam County. What follows in this special report is a series of business stories titled “Profiles in Excellence.” The companies and institutions described represent only a fraction of the great companies that make up our community. More such stories will follow in future supplements in the local newspapers of Sound Publishing. The companies you will learn about have a passion for excellence and demonstrate a common theme:

“There are only two ways to create and sustain superior performance over the long haul. First, take exceptional care of your customers via superior service and superior quality. Second, constantly innovate. That’s it. There are no alternatives in achieving long-term superior performance, or sustaining strategic competitive advantage.” — Tom Peters and Nancy Austin, authors of “A Passion For Excellence: The Leadership Difference.”

TABLE OF CONTENTS

EDC staff and board of directors — Page 4 A bit more about the EDC — Page 5 1st Security Bank profile — Page 6 American Fiber & Finishing — Page 7 Angeles Furniture — 10 H2O Waterfront Bistro — Page 10 Lincoln Industrial Corporation — Page 11 Sequim Health & Rehabilitation and Crestwood Health & Rehabilitation — Page 12 Two amazing SCORE counselors — Page 13 Port Angeles is ready to realize its potential — Page 14

The Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe A sovereign Indian Nation and Clallam County employer. Proud to collaborate with the Clallam County Economic Development Corporation.

Proud partners of Clallam County Sheriff ’s Office, Clallam County Fire District #3, Olympic Medical Center and Economic Development Corporation

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Clallam County Economic Development Corporation Profiles in Excellence — February 2017

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Clallam County Economic Development Corporation Profiles in Excellence — February 2017

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We’ve got to try. Because if we don’t try we don’t do. And if we don’t do, what on earth are we here for?

2016 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

— JAMES “JIMMY” STEWART was an American actor, known for his distinctive drawl and down-toearth persona. He starred in many films that are considered classics and is known for portraying an American middle-class man struggling with a crisis.

CLALLAM COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

Chairman — Randy Johnson, president of Green Crow Vice chairman — Douglas Sellon, executive director of Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe Economic Development Authority, retired

905 W. Ninth St., Suites 222 and 223, P.O. Box 1085 Port Angeles, WA 98362 | 360-457-7793 | www.clallam.org

Secretary/treasurer — Ryan Malane, vice president of marketing for Black Ball Ferry Line Steven D. Burke — Port of Port Angeles commissioner Kelly Fox — chief executive officer of Lumber Traders Bill Greenwood — outgoing executive director of Clallam County EDC Hugh Haffner — vice president-director of Clallam County Public Utility District Larry Hueth — president and chief executive officer of First Federal Eric Lewis — chief executive officer of Olympic Medical Center Bill Littlejohn — president and chief executive officer of Sherwood Assisted Living Jim McEntire — former Clallam County commissioner Michael McQuay — owner of Kokopelli Grill Luke Robins — president of Peninsula College Terry Ward — regional publisher of Olympic Peninsula Newspaper Group

Bill Greenwood outgoing executive director

Jennifer Linde

director of operations and finance

Amy McDonald

NOTE: 2017 EDC Board of Directors was installed Jan. 27, which was after this publication went to press.

director of business development

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS/SEQUIM GAZETTE


A BIT MORE ABOUT CLALLAM COUNTY EDC OUR TOOL KIT

International Airport. When Mack Baseball announced in August 2016 its Thanks to the EDC’s relationship with the Department intention to locate a team in Port Angeles, the EDC of Commerce and the state Department of Revenue, helped to host the welcoming party and sent out approxiThe Economic Development Corporation is responsible there are a strong set of incentives available to mately 500 invitations to individuals and groups associbusinesses in Clallam County. for setting the table for business activity in Clallam ated with the city of Port Angeles, Port Angeles Business Many are unique to our area because the incentives County. Association, Port Angeles Downtown Association and the The most obvious need is to create family-wage jobs in are provided to counties that have unemployment that Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce. is higher by a certain percentage than the average of an area whose unemployment rate is about twice that of The EDC advises businesses large and small on busiothers in the state. King County. ness planning, financing alternatives, acquisition or sale We blend these incentives with our own local offerings The team at the EDC is getting to know every busiopportunities, planning and zoning issues, and the like. to help any business in the county in any way we can. ness in the area in an effort to advise and help them For example, we recently assisted an experienced Certain tax incentives offer a compelling argument to grow. And the team has been aggressively recruiting new businesswoman to negotiate with and acquire a retailer. businesses to the county who will not only employ locally many recruited companies that consider locating here. The EDC introduced her to a strong accountant and A few examples: but also stimulate our economy by bringing some or all of brought her help with the purchase from a low-cost • An 8-year sales tax abatement (8.4 percent) for their employees here. lender. manufacturers and construct buildings and purchase New job growth will better balance our business base When an outside company wishes to consider a move equipment in order to conduct their business. and spread out our tax burden in a meaningful way to our county it is normal for the EDC to field their • $2,000 to $4,000 in tax credits against the salary of while creating ever more amenities for each citizen. initial inquiry. any new hire for a manufacturer whose employee base is Executing the above is a major challenge, but we are Our job is to quickly calculate what individuals and growing at 15 percent. getting a lot of help. institutions should be brought forward to play a major • $1,500 in tax credits for any company hiring an Last summer, EDC board leaders requested an assessrole in welcoming that prospective employer. unemployed veteran. ment on our performance from the state Department of As a large landowner with multiple tenants, the Port • Low cost financing available from Mercy Corps and Commerce to whom we report quarterly against an of Port Angeles is almost always at the top of our list. the National Development Fund for companies unable to annual plan. Our marks were exceptional. But there are many private landowners — who have let secure loans or reasonably low rates from local banks. Maury Foreman, a senior manager of the Department us know of their properties — and they are contacted, • The advantages of workforce training at Peninsula of Commerce, reported that the Clallam EDC had as well. exceeded its targets by 350 percent and that its reporting College; training that can often be secured by grants. The appropriate cities and the county all play a role. Beyond the above, the stood as a model for all other EDCs in the state. EDC membership, which is He also pointed out that “there are only 150 to 200 businesses that make the decision to relocate in the U.S. now about 150 strong, can be marshalled for important each year and most decide to remain in the state that community projects which they are in.” are necessary to show true He went on to emphasize that working with county desire to attract a project companies was our most productive use of time, as here. opposed to going to trade shows or spending heavily on Recent examples would long-distance recruitment. be the creation of a long “We’re very pleased that the EDC has received such list of letters of interest to high praise from the state. Bill Greenwood [outgoing the Port of Port Angeles EDC executive director] and his staff worked very hard demonstrating the county’s to grow our economy by working closely with area busiinterest and need for air nesses,” said 2016 EDC Board of Directors Chairman service to Seattle-Tacoma Randy Johnson. The Clallam County Economic Development Corporation Profiles by BILL GREENWOOD, outgoing Clallam County Economic Development Corporation executive director

in Excellence is a special supplement published by the Peninsula Daily News and Sequim Gazette advertising department. This supplement has been fully paid for by the private sector membership of the EDC.

Proudly supporting economic development in Clallam County.

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Port Angeles 360.452.4624 Sequim 360.683.2818 soundcb.com

Sequim Gazette 147 W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-3311 www.sequimgazette.com

Patricia Morrison Coate, Brenda Hanrahan and Laura Lofgren, special sections editors

Clallam County Economic Development Corporation Profiles in Excellence — February 2017

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A NICE NEW KID IN TOWN — 1ST SECURITY BANK by BILL GREENWOOD, outgoing Clallam County Economic Development Corporation executive director

Bank of America has grown so large (having about 10 percent of all U.S. deposits) that it has been under governmental pressure to divest a number of its branches throughout the country. From its Charlotte, N.C., headquarters came the decision to sell its branches of long standing in Sequim and Port Angeles. Many residents will recall that these branches were once part of SeaFirst, Washington’s largest bank. Late at night on Friday, Jan. 22, 2016, the keys were turned over to Joe Adams, chief executive officer of Washington-based 1st Security Bank, which is headquartered in Mountlake Terrace. Adams and his team went into a mad scramble to change all systems, meet with all employees and be ready to open for business by Monday morning. Founded in 1936, 1st Security has long had a reputation as being one of the “Best Places to Work” (by the Puget Sound Business Journal) and for its intense focus on being a community bank where close relationships, in the old sense, makes its customer experience special. “We’re nice people. We take good care of our employees and they take good care of our customers,” Adams said. For many years, in order to change the thermostat at the Bank of America Port Angeles branch, a phone call was required to be made to Charlotte.

That requirement, and many others, had ceased by Jan. 25. As one 1st Security manager, elated by the acquisition said: “I’m no longer Employee 456123897. I’m me again. I have a name!” It appears that 1st Security Bank has had no trouble retaining its new employees or increasing them. Jeff Allen, a well-known and respected figure in Port Angeles, continues to hold his managerial position and is more active than ever in supporting the sports teams at Peninsula College and expects to be a major supporter of the new Port Angeles Lefties baseball team. In Sequim, Manager Darcie Senf is a lifetime Peninsula resident with 29 years of banking experience. She is a board member of the Sequim-Dungeness Chamber of Commerce and has involved her bank in the Sequim Farmers Market, the Sequim Irrigation Festival and the Lavender Festival, and is a proud sponsor of the Boys & Girls Club. There is nothing quite so special for a borrower than to be able to personally get to know the team and the CEO of his own bank. That is something that Allen, Senf and Adams work on every day. It is no accident that 1st Security Bank has been named in the Top 200 Healthiest Banks in the U.S. by www.DepositAccounts.com or that it was named the No. 1 Washington-based bank in 2015 by Bankers Caddy — Drew Ness, left, 1st Security Bank’s executive vice president, and a private bank rating firm. chief operating officer, and Joe Adams, the bank’s chief executive officer, pose for a photo during an event. 1st Security bankers — they are nice people.

Economic Development Begins at Home.

All our employee owners thank you for choosing local when purchasing your building materials. Angeles MIllwork & Lumber Co. 1601 South “C” St Port Angeles, WA 98363 360.457.8581

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Since 1906 at Angeles Millwork & Lumber Co. and 1960 at Hartnagel Building Supply, we have served Port Angeles and the greater Olympic Peninsula with great pride. As employee owners we are proud to invest our time supplying building materials that will shape our surrounding community. We have committed ourselves to providing the homeowner and the contractor with the best quality materials coupled with unparalleled customer service. From the modest home to the local commercial project, and everything in between. Our ability to provide you with what is needed, supported by knowledgeable customer service professionals is what we are here for.

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Clallam County Economic Development Corporation Profiles in Excellence — February 2017

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LUMBER • ROOFING • SIDING • DECKING • FENCING • WINDOWS • DOORS • HARDWARE • PAINT • STAIN • TOOLS • RENTALS • METAL SHOP • REBAR • DELIVERY

Peninsula Daily News/Sequim Gazette


THAT OTHER AEROSPACE COMPANY — AMERICAN FIBER & FINISHING by BILL GREENWOOD, outgoing Clallam County Economic Development Corporation executive director

One of the fastest growing companies in Clallam County is Angeles Composite Technologies Inc. (ACTI), which is serving a far-flung customer base that is now world-wide. Already one of the county’s largest manufacturers, ACTI expects its employee base to at least double in the next five years. It is the county’s dominant provider of composite parts to the aerospace industry. In 2013, a small company in Sequim called Chemical Cloth was acquired by American Fiber & Finishing, a North Carolina company that is the leading U.S. manufacturer of light to medium weight woven industrial fabrics and fiber-based products. American Fiber & Finishing serves many markets and aerospace leads the list. Although the company has a wide and diverse product line, its primary products for aerospace are commonly called “tack cloths,” which are critical wiping cloths used during the painting process for aircraft. The cloths are chemically treated to achieve an especially clean surface and are used throughout the process. The treated cloths are also used to clean critical component parts that go into an aircraft. In addition, very large cloths produced by the company are used to wipe clean existing aircraft that have picked up grit and dirt during the course of flight. Since coming to Sequim, American Fiber’s business with Boeing has increased substantially and its specialty cloths are now being used by airlines in Turkey, Korea, Germany and Japan. About a year ago, American Fiber & Finishing acquired another chemical cloth manufacturer, Greider of El Segundo, and integrated it into the Sequim facility.

The employee base of five is small, but growing. What’s special? American Fiber & Finishing serves a very unusual niche market. Its product lines, especially as they pertain to aerospace, must be disposed of after every use. Thus, its business resembles that of the Gillette Company, whose razor blades are disposed of after use and replaced with newly purchased blades. The ability to manufacture and sell such a product is widely sought and rarely found. American Fiber is quietly riding a strategy that Paul Robichaud, its North Carolina-based president, feels will lead to substantial growth for the Sequim operation in the years ahead.

Winning is not a sometime thing; it’s an all time thing. You don’t win once in a while, you don’t do things right once in a while, you do things right all the time. Winning is a habit. Unfortunately, so is losing.

— VINCE LOMBARDI was a football player, coach and executive. He is best known as the head coach of the Green Bay Packers during the 1960s, where he led the team to three straight and five total National Football League championships in seven years, in addition to winning the first two Super Bowls following the 1966 and 1967 NFL seasons.

Estate Planning Probate Personal Injury Thank you to the EDC for its support of

Business & Real Estate

Thank you to the EDC for its support of education Thank you in toour thecommunity! EDC for its support of education in our community!

Timber Industry

education in our community!

Municipalities & Utilities

Christopher J. Riffle

Patrick M. Irwin

Allison R. Mahaney

Simon Barnhart

David J. Berger

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“Reputation is a Product of Performance.” The Board of Directors of the Clallam County Economic Development Corporation salutes the following companies, institutions, and individuals who consistently serve our community. All are members of the EDC and every day they create new jobs and make their best effort to develop our economy and improve the quality of our lives. They are the “economic engine” of our county.

ANGELES CONCRETE

LIFETIME CARE FOR YOUR PETS

BLUE MOUNTAIN ANIMAL CLINIC

bom

Baker, Overby & Moore, Inc., P.S.

Castell Insurance

AUTO, HOME, HEALTH & INVESTMENTS

Forks Community Hospital

AVENUE

J J and

CONSTRUCTION OF PORT ANGELES INC.

Your Peninsula. Your Newspaper.

PORT ANG OF

S ELE

CITY

OLYMPIC NATURAL RESOURCES CENTER

The “Original” Since 1957

SEQUIM-EAST

PORT ANGELES, WA U.S.A.

“SWAIN’S HAS EVERYTHING!” © 2015 Swain’s General Store Inc.

STEVE BEARMAN PAUL LAMOUREUX

JOHN BEITZEL JIM MCENTIRE

BRANDO BLORE JOHN BREWER ORVILLE CAMPBELL JIM MORAN JOHN M. RALSTON CONSULTING JIM REYNOLDS

GEORGE EASTMAN MEL RUDIN

ROD FLECK SEQUIM ADVISORS

Clallam County Economic Development Corporation

905 West 9th, Suite 222-223 * P.O. Box 1085 * Port Angeles, WA 98362 * PH: 360.457.7793 WEB: www.clallam.org 8

Clallam County Economic Development Corporation Profiles in Excellence — February 2017

Peninsula Daily News/Sequim Gazette

Peninsula Daily News/Sequim Gazette

Clallam County Economic Development Corporation Profiles in Excellence — February 2017

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“Reputation is a Product of Performance.” The Board of Directors of the Clallam County Economic Development Corporation salutes the following companies, institutions, and individuals who consistently serve our community. All are members of the EDC and every day they create new jobs and make their best effort to develop our economy and improve the quality of our lives. They are the “economic engine” of our county.

ANGELES CONCRETE

LIFETIME CARE FOR YOUR PETS

BLUE MOUNTAIN ANIMAL CLINIC

bom

Baker, Overby & Moore, Inc., P.S.

Castell Insurance

AUTO, HOME, HEALTH & INVESTMENTS

Forks Community Hospital

AVENUE

J J and

CONSTRUCTION OF PORT ANGELES INC.

Your Peninsula. Your Newspaper.

PORT ANG OF

S ELE

CITY

OLYMPIC NATURAL RESOURCES CENTER

The “Original” Since 1957

SEQUIM-EAST

PORT ANGELES, WA U.S.A.

“SWAIN’S HAS EVERYTHING!” © 2015 Swain’s General Store Inc.

STEVE BEARMAN PAUL LAMOUREUX

JOHN BEITZEL JIM MCENTIRE

BRANDO BLORE JOHN BREWER ORVILLE CAMPBELL JIM MORAN JOHN M. RALSTON CONSULTING JIM REYNOLDS

GEORGE EASTMAN MEL RUDIN

ROD FLECK SEQUIM ADVISORS

Clallam County Economic Development Corporation

905 West 9th, Suite 222-223 * P.O. Box 1085 * Port Angeles, WA 98362 * PH: 360.457.7793 WEB: www.clallam.org 8

Clallam County Economic Development Corporation Profiles in Excellence — February 2017

Peninsula Daily News/Sequim Gazette

Peninsula Daily News/Sequim Gazette

Clallam County Economic Development Corporation Profiles in Excellence — February 2017

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97 YEARS YOUNG — ANGELES FURNITURE As the years turned, the Grays and their partners naturally expanded into most of the top brand names in furniture today. For the home or office they offer about 23 brands from It was 1919. World War I had concluded, ending all wars, and two experienced mill workers were determined Flexsteel, Howard Miller, La-Z-Boy and Lane to Sealy, Simmons and Tempur-Pedic. to start their own business in Port Angeles. Two lines in particular demand are the NorwegianHarvey Gray and Howard Breen saw an opportunity made Ekornes luxury line of reclining armchairs (tradeto sell furniture and possibly other household goods in marked “Stressless”) as well as choices of handcrafted Port Angeles. They located their first shop in downtown Amish furniture. Port Angeles. Management stays on top of consumer preferences Quite quickly their business expanded to ice boxes through its membership in a 70-member buying group. (some for rent) and many other goods for which there “High-tech has come to La-Z-Boy,” Jack said. was growing demand in their frontier community. “Now you alter the shape with the push of a button What Gray and Breen grasped early on were two and have a place to charge your laptop.” simple precepts that still guide the business 97 years The ever-expanding brands led the company to later: “Take excellent care of the customer and constantly purchase property well away from town at 1114 E. First innovate.” St. in 1962. Providing quality products and service have been the “Land out there was reasonable in those days,” says company’s consistent touchstones. Jack. Their newly constructed 15,000-square-foot build“The relationship begins with the sale” said third-gening was nearly four times the size of their downtown eration owner Jack Gray. “We want to take good care of the customer and make that person our customer for life.” location. Now, into its fourth generation, (Harvey, Don, Jack and In 1976, an additional 22,500 square feet were added Jon), the Gray family has been the consistent thread and the company built nearly 10,000 square feet of through the growth of Angeles Furniture. warehouse space. But each generation has included strong partners of Today, the Angeles Furniture complex continues to feel good will, from Breen to Pierre Lieurance in the late like new. 1950s to Vern Grall in the 1970s to Bill Clevenger in the Jack and Jon credit much of their success to their mid-80s. With their wives and children, each made an Olympic Peninsula roots and location. Most competitors are far away, but the company finds itself delivering to indelible mark on the growth of the company. customers not only all over the Peninsula, but to Seattle, Today, Jack’s son Jon is in the midst of making a full Olympia and Bellingham. purchase of Bill Clevenger’s interest in the company. by BILL GREENWOOD, outgoing Clallam County Economic Development Corporation executive director

JACK AND PATTY GRAY

JANET AND JON GRAY

“People stop by,” Jack said. “We try to take good care of them.” Such a far-flung customer base backs up his statement. Today, 97 years since inception, Jack is proud to say: “You don’t just get Angeles Furniture, you get us!”

A BRIGHT LIGHT IN DOWNTOWN PA — H2O WATERFRONT BISTRO by BILL GREENWOOD, outgoing Clallam County Economic Development Corporation executive director

Young Johnson took a very long road to Port Angeles. Born in Seoul, South Korea she immigrated to the United States in third grade. Early on Johnson was trilingual (Korean, Japanese and English) and was clearly a bright and vivacious young lady. Johnson and her former husband moved to Port Angeles in 1985 because they loved the area, particularly all the outdoor activities. “This community welcomed me and my family with open arms,” Johnson said. Throughout an eclectic business career, Johnson found herself — no matter what her job description — gravitating toward anything that could promote her businesses or her community in special ways. If there was a major meeting to be held, a convention, anything else — Johnson was on hand to plan, arrange, invite and make as perfect as possible. As one who makes things happen in our county, she is a natural. By late 2014, Johnson had taken a major leap. She was attracted to the waterfront corner at 222 N. Lincoln St. in the Harbor Towne Mall.

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What Johnson envisioned was what has become the widely and favorably reviewed H2O Waterfront Bistro. But giving birth to one of the fine dining establishments in Port Angeles was not easy. Johnson became her own contractor working with subcontractors such as Feeley Construction Inc., Paint & Carpet Barn and Shamp Electrical Contracting. She even painted a good portion of the building’s exterior on her own. Today, that corner is in the early stages of what appears to be a spectacular boom. H2O Waterfront Bistro has also proven to be the base for Johnson’s ability to organize. When Mack Athletics (the Port Angeles Lefties) first approached our community in August about establishing a baseball team in Port Angeles, Johnson’s first words were: “Let’s throw them a party!” Working with local agencies including the City of Port Angeles, EDC, Port Angeles Business Association, Port Angeles Downtown Association and Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce, Johnson then secured space, pulled together a team of local leaders — all of whom made serious donations to the event — and played a key role in “selling” Clallam County to the ball club. At H2O Johnson has a close and loyal staff. She treats people right. And it is no surprise that she is now president of the

Clallam County Economic Development Corporation Profiles in Excellence — February 2017

YOUNG JOHNSON

Port Angeles Downtown Association, an enterprise that is now running better than ever. As a promoter of her city and her county, she always goes the extra mile. A bright light? Indeed. Peninsula Daily News/Sequim Gazette


LINCOLN INDUSTRIAL CORPORATION by BILL GREENWOOD, outgoing Clallam County Economic Development Corporation executive director

In October 1946 Bill Possinger and Wilson Meyers set up shop as Lincoln Welding on what is now the parking lot of the Red Lion Hotel on the Port Angeles waterfront. Possinger and Meyers had just purchased Lasalle Welding & Forge and set out with ambition and long days to provide equipment repair services to all-comers. They intended to offer quality, reliability and excellence. It was a two-man, no employee operation. They liked to say that, “The only thing we can’t weld is a broken heart and the crack of dawn.” Today, the company sits high on a hill overlooking the harbor and is known as Lincoln Industrial Corporation with a business base that stretches throughout the western half of the United States and five countries. How did this happen? First, Lincoln Industrial Corporation was a welding repair company for the growing logging industry. And those in the industry had particular needs. By the 1960s, Possinger had a few sons — Will and Brian — running around who were willing to work. So they expanded the business from repair to making things. They designed and built a log trailer. Soon the company was building long and short logger trailers. Over the years, the company would manufacture a full line of long hauling equipment, roll-off truck and trailer equipment, dump bodies and trailers.

The company also began to provide custom trailer fabrication, structural steel construction and on-site industrial repair services and consulting. Lincoln Industrial Corporation has built several dump boxes for the growing construction business on the I-5 corridor and is expanding that market. Second, by the late 1970s, Will and Brian Possinger, who own and run the company today, began playing larger roles. The Possinger brothers expanded the business by doing industrial repair and structural steel construction, including on-site repair for major mills in and outside of Clallam County. Significant customers were Crown Zellerbach, ITT Rayonier and Port Townsend Paper. By 1982 Lincoln Industrial Corporation had 42 employees. But as the company’s reputation for exceptional products and customer service in the mill industry grew, so did its employee base. By 1990, the Possinger brothers employed 157. Then, disaster hit. For many manufacturing businesses in the U.S., 1990 through nearly all of 1991 is known as “the time commerce stopped.” Iraq invaded Kuwait on Aug. 2, 1990 in what is known as the first Persian Gulf War and the combined U.S./ Allied response did not fully occur until March 20, 1991. The period of uncertainty was so long that corporate mill expansion plans were put on the shelf and normal facility repairs were often skipped entirely.

Over the course of 1991 employment at the company was forced to drop from 157 to 13. When the war was over, the base business was slow in coming back. Many businesses could not survive such a shock, but the Possinger brothers held on. Their moves to diversify into other markets continued to pay off. The demand for an innovative supplier of custom fabrications continued to grow, which is why Lincoln Industrial Corporation operates and has customers in approximately 17 western states today. Recently, the company completed the structural rebuild of the Kolstrand Building in Ballard and a very large cage building project for Seattle’s Woodland Park Zoo. The company’s main focus is to build strong relationships. As Will Possinger said, “We want our customers to be our friends.” On July 29, 2016, Lincoln Industrial Corporation acquired Allform Welding in Sequim. Over the years Allform had focused on the custom needs of the home market and not the industrial side. Dan Donovan, Allform’s owner, was facing what could potentially be a serious health issue. The Possinger brothers, who had believed their companies to be semi-competitive for many years, sat down to discuss a possible acquisition. Finally, they really got to know each other for the first time. Will said, “I just met with a great guy. We were both sorry that we hadn’t combined forces years ago!” As Lincoln Industrial approaches its 70th anniversary, the company stands out as one of the most successful and innovative manufacturers in Clallam County.

Hard work, passion, and a deep appreciation for the sea. 721772627

Cooke Aquaculture Pacific is committed to our local communities; proud to be a part of a working waterfront making Clallam County stronger today and for generations to come.

Peninsula Daily News/Sequim Gazette

Clallam County Economic Development Corporation Profiles in Excellence — February 2017

11


SEQUIM HEALTH AND REHABILITATION AND CRESTWOOD HEALTH AND REHABILITATION by BILL GREENWOOD, outgoing Clallam County Economic Development Corporation executive director

“Most people who first come to a skilled nursing facility are scared. They are worried it could be their last stop in life,” said Ed Ebling, executive director of the 100-bed Sequim Health and Rehabilitation located in Sequim. “But quite quickly new patients are very surprised.” The goal of Ebling’s company is exactly what its name implies: ED EBLING rehabilitation. For instance, if you have had hip surgery or a knee replacement and have trouble getting around your own home, this is the place to come to. New patients find Sequim Health and Rehabilitation not to be gloomy but rather a good place to recover. What they encounter is a cohesive and hardworking staff determined to give what fine hotels often call “a good customer experience.” In the ideal, that customer will be up, out and back home in as little as 10 days, or whatever recovery period is appropriate.

They share the same issues and speak nearly every day, providing resources each to the other with frequency — a feature that seems to set them apart and to give them a powerful edge on any competitor. Ebling, an Ohio native with multiple degrees Segar is highly talented in his own (including a juris doctor and a master’s degree in health right. He has two degrees in healthadministration), fell for the health care industry while care administration from the relatively young and circled back to what he loved after University of Phoenix and was a nearly 10 years of professional education. pharmacy technician for 10 years JASON SEGAR Ebling and his 160 employees believe in and practice before taking over Crestwood Health the “power of the relationship with their patients, their and Rehabilitation in 2015. doctors and with one another.” Segar completed the Extendicare Administrator in Finally, he understands the importance of being Training Program shortly before Fortis Management accountable, particularly in a small community like made its acquisition. Sequim, and he is an active and energetic contributor. Crestwood, family-formed in 1968, is an older facility Ebling has other arrows in his quiver, as well. that has received extensive upgrades over time and Perhaps the most valuable is his relationship with newer ones under Segar’s leadership. Jason Segar, who is executive director of Crestwood Like Ebling, Segar is a man of the community in Port Health and Rehabilitation, a 101-bed facility located in Angeles. Port Angeles. Both facilities have been named “Facility of the Year” Both facilities are owned by the Fortis Management by their own corporation. Group of Milwaukee, which purchased them in 2015 Both have won the American Healthcare Association from Extendicare. Quality Award. And Sequim Health and Rehabilitation Fortis Management is a strong mid-level corporation in was recently named “Best Rehabilitation Center in the U.S. with 66 operations like the above. Clallam County” in the “2016 Best of the Peninsula” Both Segar and Ebling consider Fortis Management to special section published by the Peninsula Daily News be an enlightened operator that encourages them to be and Sequim Gazette. entrepreneurial and to invest in their facilities, employThe frequent newspaper ads of each facility often ees and the community, and to work with each other. proudly provide warm testimonials from patients and This last they do in spades. pleased family members.

Baker, Overby & Moore, Inc., P.S. CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS PORT ANGELES OFFICE: 505 E. 8th St., Suite A Port Angeles, WA 98362 Office (360)457-4481

FORKS OFFICE: PO Box 269, 1071 S. Forks Ave. Forks, WA 98331 Office (360)374-2275 611496036

BRUCE BEDINGER • JENNIFER ZACCARDO • WENDY LESKINOVITCH 12

Clallam County Economic Development Corporation Profiles in Excellence — February 2017

727 East 8th St. • (360) 452-3325 Port Angeles, WA 98362 www.greencrow.com

711496033

www.bomcpa.com

Green Crow is a privately-owned company focusing on the timberland and wood products industries. We provide timberland investment management services to both institutional and individual investors. Our operations are in the Pacific Northwest and the Northeast. Our headquarters are in Port Angeles, Washington.

Peninsula Daily News/Sequim Gazette


TWO AMAZING MEN — SCORE COUNSELORS MARK HANNAH AND MIKE MCCARTY

Mike McCarty, left, and Mark Hannah are SCORE counselors who help small businesses get off the ground, grow and achieve their goals through education and mentorship. SCORE, a nonprofit association, is supported by the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), and thanks to a network of volunteers, is able to deliver services at no charge or at very low cost.

by BILL GREENWOOD, outgoing Clallam County Economic Development Corporation executive director

Part of the service to people in Clallam County is the provision of SCORE counseling, a free nonprofit corporation dedicated to providing small business counseling to all who request it. SCORE is an adjunct of the Clallam County Economic Development Corporation and for many years now has been led by two dedicated and exceptional individuals Mark Hannah and Mike McCarty. Appointments are set by the EDC team and then one of these gentlemen has a confidential meeting with anyone, most of whom are individuals seeking to start or fund a new business. While both Hannah and McCarty have held hundreds of such meetings over the years, follow-through by those counseled has only been about 10 percent. This rate has not slowed either man down. They know they can help and they do so with reliability and excellence. Hannah is a Montana boy who earned a Ph.D in

chemical engineering at Montana State University. He went to work in the paper industry in R&D where he provided technical help to numerous mills. Ultimately, Hannah became general manager for about three years of the local Daishowa Paper Mill in Port Angeles. Soon after retirement Hannah began assisting the EDC and became a SCORE counselor in 2008. He lives in Port Angeles. McCarty is something of a renaissance man whose credentials cross wide boundaries. Following graduation from Lewis & Clark College in Oregon, he became an officer in the U.S. Air Force and then a highly-decorated lieutenant colonel.

Upon retirement, McCarty held several highly technical posts at IBM, British Telecom, MCI and others. McCarty also earned a master’s degree in systems management from the Florida Institute of Technology. McCarty has been heavily involved in all manner of local projects and has received multiple awards from organizations in Clallam County. Port Angeles While he has lived in Port Angeles since 2005, Division McCarty and his wife, Patty, will be moving to Spokane in the spring. It will be a tough loss for us all. Both Hannah and McCarty received the Olympic Leader Award as SCORE counselors from the EDC in 2012. It is an award they deserve every year.

Serving Clallam County for over 50 years!

Port Angeles Division

We offer programs to benefit all members of the community.

Description: Description:

Production: Production: Production:

Interfor’s Port Angeles Division produces Hemlock Division produces Hemlock Hemlock Interfor’s Port Angeles and Douglas-Fir studs, Division with the produces majority of volume with the the majority majority of of volume volume and Douglas-Fir studs, with consumed in the United States. United States. States. consumed in the United

The mill has annual production capacity of The mill mill has has annual annualproduction productioncapacity capacityof of The 165 million board feet based on a two-shift structure. 165 million million board boardfeet feetbased basedon onaatwo-shift two-shiftstructure. structure. 165

Buying Local:

Buying Buying Local: Local: Interfor acquired the mill in 2004. The mill has been Interfor acquired the mill mill in in 2004. 2004. The The mill mill has has been been at this location since 1998. Logs are sourced from the surrounding public and is a growth-oriented lumber company with operations in Canada and the United States. atInterfor this location since 1998. 1998. Logs from surrounding public and Logs are are sourced sourced fromthe the surrounding public and private timberlands. timberlands. private private timberlands. The Company has annual production capacity of 3.2 billion board feet and offers one of the most

Investment and and Taxes: Taxes: Investment

diverse lines of lumber products to customers in over 30 markets around the world. Interfor In 2014, the mill purchased $3.8 million in localhas Building Value in the Community:

$1.4 million million has has been invested invested in in the the mill mill over over the the $1.4 $1.4 million has been been invested in the millWA, overOR, the GA, 19 mills North America (BC, last three across years, mainly mainly for maintenance capital. last last three three years, years, mainly for for maintenance maintenance capital. capital.

Financial Generators: Financial Generators: diverse lines of lumber products to customers in over 30 markets around the world. Interfor has Chips are sold to pulp do Chips sold to area area pulp mills. mills. Logs Logs that thatWA, do not not 19are mills across North OR, Chips are sold to area pulp America mills. Logs(BC, that do not fit fit the the mill mill are are sold sold to to area area processors. processors. fit the mill are sold to area processors.

621496044

Peninsula Daily News/Sequim Gazette

721788544

225 E. FIFTH ST. PORT ANGELES WILLIAMSHOREPOOL.ORG

Interfor contributes to a healthy economy

and environment by supporting a number of Building Value the Community: and environment byin supporting a number of

local initiatives: local initiatives: • Sponsor The Festival Trees with proceeds going Interfor contributes to aof healthy economy • Sponsor The Festival of Trees with proceeds going towards the Olympic Medical Center. and environment by supporting a number of towards the Olympic Medical Center. Employment: Employment: • Supporting local fairs. local initiatives: • Supporting local fairs. DonatingThe Lumber forof Captain Joseph Housegoing —a •• Sponsor Festival Trees with proceeds employs 147 120 workers workers (staff (staff and and Currently the mill employs • Donating Lumber for Captain Joseph House — a Currently the mill employs 120 workers (staff and retreat for families who have lost a loved towards themilitary Olympic Medical Center. structure (80 (80 hours/week). hours/week). crew), on a two shift structure retreat for military families who have lost a loved crew), on a two shift structure (80 hours/week). • Supporting local fairs. one in action. The payroll is $9.1 $9.6million million(including (includingbenefits). benefits). one in action. The payroll is $9.6 million (including benefits). •• Donating Lumber for Captain Joseph House — a Supporting local sports teams. • retreat Supporting local teams. Interfor is a growth-oriented lumber company with operations in sports Canada States. for military families and who the haveUnited lost a loved Revenue and Other one in action. The Company has annual production capacity of 3.2 billion board feet and offers one of the most Revenue and Other The mill mill paid $257,300 $383,970 in property property taxes in in 2015. The The mill paid paid $383,970 in in property taxes taxes in 2014. 2015.

360-417-9767

Building Value in the Community:

supplies and services. SC, AR) and employsto over 3,100 economy people. Interfor contributes a healthy

GA, SC, AR) and employs over 3,100 people.

PORT ANGELES DIVISION | 243701 HIGHWAY 101 WEST, PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 | GENERAL MANAGER: STEVE KROLL | TEL: (360) 457-6266 PORT ANGELES DIVISION | 243701 HIGHWAY 101 WEST, PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 | GENERAL MANAGER: STEVE KROLL | TEL: (360) 457-6266 PORT ANGELES DIVISION | 243701 HIGHWAY 101 WEST, PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 | GENERAL MANAGER: STEVE KROLL | TEL: (360) 457-6266

Clallam County Economic Development Corporation Profiles in Excellence — February 2017

13


PORT ANGELES IS READY TO REALIZE ITS POTENTIAL by JOHN BREWER, 2016 Port Angeles Business Association president

Raymond Carver — short-story master, poet and essayist, a towering figure of contemporary American literature — lived his last years in Port Angeles before dying of lung cancer in 1988. One of his favorite stops downtown was the Cornerhouse Restaurant at Front and Laurel streets. The Cornerhouse is much like the diner in “Fat,” one of his most poignant short stories. Narrated by a nameless waitress, the story is about transformation, and about things you can’t control and other things you can. “My life is going to change,” the waitress says at the end of the story. “I feel it.” In many ways, Carver’s story is a metaphor for Port Angeles as it moves into 2017. In different ways, three changes are already being felt and have the potential to improve our city: • Composites, composites, composites. One of Port Angeles’ accomplishments is its successful positioning as a composites manufacturing hub. The new Port Angeles Composite Recycling Technology Center just announced its first product — the world’s first pickleball paddle made from recycled carbon fiber. More products are promised. Supporters say the facility will grow from its startup crew of eight to 200 new jobs in Port Angeles over the next six years.

“CRTC is trying to demonstrate that a market exists for products made from carbon fiber scrap; it is the first company in the world to take on this significant challenge,” said Anson Fatland, chairman of the center’s board of directors. The center is coupled to Peninsula College’s advanced manufacturing and composites technology program. Peninsula College recently held an open house there for the public and to sign up new students. Across the parking lot from the center is Angeles Composite Technologies Inc. (ACTI). Its products are made from aerospace-quality composites, and ACTI describes itself as “a world-class supplier of advanced structural composite assemblies and components serving the global commercial and military aerospace markets.” ACTI now has about 105 employees, with plans to more than double its workforce. • Baseball and more. The newest baseball team in the West Coast League will take the field next summer as the Port Angeles Lefties. Civic Field will get upgrades that will provide cushioned seats, corporate boxes and a party deck with beer and wine available. The first game will be June 1 against the Victoria HarbourCats. The HarbourCats and other WCL clubs like the Walla Walla Sweets and Yakima Valley Pippins draw more than 1,000 people to each game — and this will hopefully be duplicated in Port Angeles. • A community game-changer. Plans for the Port

Angeles Waterfront Center — a $15-to-$20 million, 600to-800 seat performing arts venue — are moving forward, with decisions made on an interim executive director and an architectural design firm. The facility was jump-started by a pair of donations — $9 million in a will, followed by a $1.43 million donation for the purchase of a 1.6-acre parcel at the northwest corner of Front and Oak streets where it will be built once more money is collected. Studies are in progress about having it double as a conference and convention center. That, said Deputy Mayor Cherie Kidd, would be “an answer to prayer for the whole community.” “In Port Angeles, we have a real void for a conference center,” she said. “We’ve done the best with what we had.”

DOING THE BEST WE CAN...

“ROOM TO GROW: Will Port Angeles ever take advantage of its geographic good luck?” was the headline on a cover article in The Seattle Times’ Sunday magazine last September. Written by Times reporter Ron Judd, it detailed “postmill town” Port Angeles’ efforts to attract new businesses and residents and have a more balanced, viable economy, “something with family-wage-jobs staying power,” bringing in new tax dollars for civic services while hopefully not changing the town’s character or pricing out locals. >> continued on Page 15

Quality Health Care – Locally Owned and Operated Established in 1951, Olympic Medical Center (Clallam County Public Hospital District No. 2) has always been a beacon of hope and economic vitality for the Clallam County community. OMC is operated locally with the oversight of a seven-member, publicly-elected board of commissioners. As such, we remain committed to the vision of delivering world-class care right here at home. We take pride in the investments we’ve made to allow us to offer our community the health care services it needs and deserves. We’ve grown so much and we’ve come so far, but health care is rapidly changing and we can never stop thinking about our future.

14

Clallam County Economic Development Corporation Profiles in Excellence — February 2017

721777182

Olympic Medical Center (360) 417-7000 www.OlympicMedical.org

Peninsula Daily News/Sequim Gazette


<< continued from Page 14

The article tossed bouquets about Port Angeles’ “diverse natural splendors” and being the gateway to Olympic National Park and Victoria; its growth in marine trades and the expansion of Olympic Medical Center and Peninsula College; the new and “pleasant waterfront promenade, which connects to the 68-milelong (and growing) Olympic Discovery Trail”; the Next Door Gastropub and other hip, tourist-attracting downtown stores and restaurants powered by a new generation of business owners. Judd saluted one of our big community victories, when “PA residents mounted a furious get-out-the-vote campaign, and wound up finishing second to Chattanooga, Tenn., a town 10 times the size,” in Outside magazine’s 2015 “Best Town Ever” contest. The Times article also talked about ongoing attempts by city leaders to lure business owners and residents “to PA’s idyllic location and increasingly idyllic low cost of living, compared with the increasingly unaffordable central Puget Sound region. “. . . The median house price in Seattle is about $585,000, or $500,00 in King County. Eighty miles west in PA? A little more than $200,000.” But there’s lots of competition from other ambitious, beautifully situated towns. And getting an I-5 employer to break out of its economic bubble and relocate here is difficult. “To date: numerous nibblers, few big biters,” the article noted. “But (outgoing EDC executive director Bill) Greenwood is optimistic that the city will grow with a boost in tourist-catching hot spots, an influx of telecommuting

CARVER’S EPITAPH

Maybe another metaphor for what Port Angeles

Chamber Member since 1977

John Brewer was elected as the 2016 president of the Port Angeles Business Association. Read the full Seattle Times article on Port Angeles at http://tinyurl.com/tms-pa.

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Petting Farm Photo: Erwin & Peggy Bauer

wants to be is “Late Fragment,” one of two poems carved into the black stone at Carver’s grave in Ocean View Cemetery. It was last poem he wrote before losing his battle to cancer at the age of 50. And did you get what you wanted from this life, even so? I did. And what did you want? To call myself beloved, to feel myself beloved on the earth.

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“ROOM TO GROW: Will Port Angeles ever take advantage of its geographic good luck?” was the headline on a cover article in The Seattle Times’ Sunday magazine last September. Written by Times reporter Ron Judd, it detailed “post-mill town” Port Angeles’ efforts to attract new businesses and residents and have a more balanced, viable economy, “something with family-wage-jobs staying power,” bringing in new tax dollars for civic services while hopefully not changing the town’s character or pricing out locals.

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refugees and new light manufacturing.” Like any city, Port Angeles has its negatives. The article didn’t ignore them. In addition to “no daily air service to or from perfectly capable Fairchild International Airport,” Judd noted: “The town suffers from common symptoms of struggling economies: low wages (PA median household income in 2013 was $40,000, compared with $58,000 in the state and about $73,000 in King County.). “Worrisome levels of drug abuse. Difficulty passing school tax measures, particularly construction bonds. A lack of skilled workers. And vituperative local politics that have turned the focus more on what the town should not be doing than what it might. “The most-recent political flashpoint: a protracted, stultifying battle over public-water fluoridation.” Will recycled-composite pickle ball paddles, the Lefties and watching plans move forward for the new arts venue/conference center help Port Angeles pick up the pace in 2017? While it doesn’t add up to the impact one or two new substantial employers would have, city leaders certainly hope so. To become “a truly great small town,” in the words of Mayor Pat Downie, Port Angeles can’t stand idle without the risk of slipping backward. But like the waitress discovered in Raymond Carver’s “Fat,” there are things you can and can’t control in that effort.

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Peninsula Daily News/Sequim Gazette

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1423 Ward Rd. Sequim, WA 98382 (360) 683-4295

For more information, visit our website at www.pencol.edu/proftech

Clallam County Economic Development Corporation Profiles in Excellence — February 2017

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Special Sections - EDC Annual Report 2017  

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