Page 1

WASHINGTON NORTH

COAST magazine

Fly the coop Your feathered friends await

WINTER ISSUE $3.99 Supplement to The Daily Herald ©2017

RELAX Cats and Snacks

PORT SUSAN Play In The Bay

STEVENS PASS Fun That Never Melts


Turning waste to warmth...

One ямБreplace at a time.

1680651

2 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE


WINTER 2017

contents

48

FEATURES

12

FRISKY KITTY CAFE

28

FOR THE BIRDS

Winter is cause for celebration at this mountain resort. It’s time to go play in the snow.

Sip a drink, have a snack and curl up with adoptable cats at this cafe in Edmonds.

TOP: With the Olympics rising in the distance, a yacht glides through Saratoga Passage between Camano and Whidbey islands. Daniella Beccaria / Washington North Coast Magazine

ABOVE: Flower art made from recycled glassware for the garden.

24

STEVENS PASS

COVER

You don’t have to fly south this winter to see resident or migratory birds. Some are even in your own back yard.

Lynn Jefferson / Washington North Coast Magazine

COVER: Find spotted towhee and other birds when out birding in Snohomish County.

Mike Benbow / Washington North Coast Magazine

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 3


Cat Cafe PG. 12

WINTER 2017

contents IN THIS ISSUE 10 HISTORICAL FICTION

A busy Everett lawyer finds time to write novels. His latest is set in Snohomish County during World War II.

16 BASKETS BEARING GIFTS No matter what the occasion, this business makes a work of art out of gift-giving.

20 PORT SUSAN, SKAGIT BAY February is a beautiful time to explore Camano Island, Stanwood, Conway and La Conner.

51 TOP: A cat climbs into a visitor’s hands at The Kitty Catfe in Edmonds. Ian Terry / Washington North Coast Magazine

ABOVE: Bottles of the 2013 Quilceda Creek “Columbia Valley” Cabernet and the 2013 Quilceda Creek “Golitzin Vineyard” Cabernet at Quilceda Creek winery.

32 UPSCALE DATE NIGHT

Dinner, drinks and a movie are all rolled into one comfy, entertaining evening.

36 CASCADIA ART MUSEUM Northwest art from the 1930s through the 1940s. And some of it is pretty gritty.

Andy Bronson / Washington North Coast Magazine

4 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

40 SURFING WORKOUT

Surf’s up at Mukilteo Fitness Bar — the next best thing to Maui.

42 BOEING FURNITURE

If you must have a jet-engine wine bar or airplane-wing conference table, you’ll find these and other unique pieces at the Boeing Store.

46 CRAFTY DISTILLERS

Local liqueur creators share their favorite drink recipes.

48 HOW-TO GARDEN ART Warning: This craft may lead to a glassware addiction, but the end result is worth it.

IN EVERY ISSUE 8 From the Publisher 52 Why I Love It Here — Dianne White


FINAL DAYS TO SAVE! Why paint, when you can insulate!

PREMIUM

VINYL

Siding ! INSTANT REBATE

$

Maintenance Free • Energy Efficient OVERSTOCKED IN SOME STYLES & COLORS

ft.

Don’t Move, Improve!

• MAKE YOUR HOME NEW AGAIN • REDUCE THOSE HIGH HEATING BILLS • THROW AWAY THE PAINT BRUSH • INCREASE YOUR HOME VALUE • MAKE YOUR HOUSE WARMER IN THE WINTER! *Some restrictions apply. Please call for complete details.

0 DOWN

NO paymenCt Until Feb. 2018

OA

900 %

With purchase of 1,000 sq. of siding or 7 windows

5

OFF

When our design specialist inspects your home and explains our offers and products in detail. This coupon must be presented. You will receive an additional 5% OFF your purchase!

This offer good during initial visit only. Prior sales valid. This offer may be withdrawn at any time!

100% Financing • 10% Discount for Seniors, Military, Police & Fire

LAST CHANCE AT LAST YEAR’S PRICES! * Serving the Northwest for 40 years!

Call Today!

www.buildersservicecompany.com 100% Financing O.A.C. Provided by

Twice Dealer of Distinction by Associated Materials

425.353.9663 1.800.499.4959 *Limited to Stock On Hand.

1774172

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 5


WASHINGTON NORTH

COAST

WHEN THIS IS YOUR OFFICE, THIS IS YOUR LUGGAGE.

magazine

PUBLISHER

Josh O’Connor

EDITOR

Sara Bruestle

WRITERS

Mike Benbow Andrea Brown Megan Brown Gale Fiege Lynn Jefferson Aaron Swaney

Integrated USB Port lets you power up on the go. (Power Bank not included. Select models only.)

MAGAZINE GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Travelpro’s Crew™ 11 is packed with innovations – MagnaTrac™ self-aligning wheels, PowerScope Extension Handle, Contour Grip and integrated USB Port on select Carry-ons. This stylish collection is designed for today’s frequent travelers who put a premium on design excellence, quality and durability.

PHOTOGRAPHERS

112 5th AVE S. Edmonds, WA (425) 744-6076 • Toll Free 1(877)225-1994 www.SavvyTravelerStore.com ©Travelpro Products,, Inc. 2016. All rights reserved.

Margi Hartnett Lynn Jefferson

Dan Bates Daniella Beccaria Andy Bronson Kevin Clark Ian Terry

1774258

PHOTO CONTRIBUTORS

Mike Benbow Jennifer Buchanan Cascadia Art Museum Glass Quest Fine Art Studio Sofia Jaramillo Genna Martin Stevens Pass Samuel Williams Matthew Williams The Boeing Store

ADVERTISING AD GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Carrie Radcliff Sound Publishing Creative

CIRCULATION

Tim Williams

SUBSCRIPTIONS

Brenda Hales

DISTRIBUTION

Jerri Grubb

CONTACT INFO Advertising inquiries, subscriptions and change of address 425.339.3200

1609872

Washington North Coast Magazine is published quarterly by The Daily Herald, a division of Sound Publishing and may not be reproduced without express written permission, all rights reserved. No liability is assumed by Washington North Coast Magazine, The Daily Herald or Sound Publishing regarding any content in this publication. A subscription to Washington North Coast Magazine is $14 annually. Single copies are available at selected locations throughout Snohomish County and Puget Sound.

6 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

www.WashingtonNorthCoast.com © 2017 by The Daily Herald

www.heraldnet.com


Quil Ceda Village FUN Where

is a Priority…

! e r e h t i e c n ie r e p x E

™ ts Seattle Prem iu m Outle Legendar y Brands, Re

al Savings

Cabela’s

tter World’s Foremost Outfi

A mph itheatre

and Tulalip Concer t Series

More

T u la lip Resort Casino citement 4 Diamond Luxury & Ex

One location, Quil Ceda Village www.quilcedavillage.com Quil Ceda Village is conveniently located on the I-5 corridor. Use exits 200 and 202 and turn west. For more information call 360-716-5010. 1766688

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 7


WINTER ISSUE: Skiing, surfing and fine arts

T

This place we call home? Visitors by the thousands call it something else: Vacation. Many of them travel long distances to sample the joys of the north Puget Sound region — things we drive past every week on our way to jobs, the grocery store or kids’ soccer games. Regional tourism officials will vouch that visitors are drawn to attractions big and small, industrial and natural. It may be airplanes (old and new) — or birds and whales and mountain trails. It may be lively casinos (and all their shopping and entertainment options) — or bakeries and boutiques and art galleries. Those of us who live here know the area is rich with natural and manmade pleasures and adventures. From time to time, however, we may need a reminder not to take it all for granted. It’s my hope that Washington North Coast magazine will inspire all of us to tap the brakes, put on the turn signal and head for a local destination we haven’t yet experienced. And when we get there, you know who we’ll find? Our neighbors. Just as the water and mountains imprint this region with natural beauty, there are folks who enrich our communities with their creativity and enterprise. This edition of Washington North Coast magazine gives us a chance to meet …. Kristina Robinson, who operates the Kitty Catfe, a place where people can get snacks while being entertained by a dozen cats, some

that are permanent residents and others that are up for adoption. The place is also open for kids’ birthday parties and field trips. Fellow skiers, hikers, bikers and outdoor enthusiasts who are discovering ways to enjoy Stevens Pass Mountain Resort during snow season — and on into the warmer months. Laurie George at Mukilteo Fitness Bar, the only place in the Puget Sound region to offer Surfset. What’s that? It’s an exercise regimen that lets you ride a bouncing surfboard on dry land (with lively music setting the pace, of course). David Martin at Cascadia Art Museum in Edmonds, who curated the current show, Northwest Social Realism and the American Scene, 1930-1950. It’s an exhibit, he says, that will impart industrial and social insights into the region before and after World War I. The important thing, of course, is for the rest of us to behave a little bit more like the many visitors who are drawn to this busy, beautiful place we call home. I hope you enjoy this issue of our magazine.

Josh O’Connor Publisher

8 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

Josh O’Connor with daughters Mailie and Lauren after an exciting zipline ride through the Cascades.

Read Us Online! Visit our Print Editions at www.WashingtonNorthCoast.com and view our current and past publications from the comfort of your desktop or mobile device.


PEOPLE › PLACES › TRAVEL › FOOD › ARTS › LIFE

WASHINGTON NORTH

COAST magazine

Publishes four times each year.

Our north coast communities boast a thriving economy, impressive natural beauty and tons of exciting entertainment choices.

A unique journey into everything Snohomish and Island County. It opens the door to an exhilarating tour through diverse community experiences celebrating people, places, events and cultural enrichment. There’s food, wine, anecdotes, events, homes, travel and proud history. Come explore with us and take a journey through Washington’s North Coast.

COAS COAST T Eb GTON

magaz

ine

PLAY

Skydive ov Snohom er ish

EAT

6 new fla of froze vors n custar d

RELAX

Indulge yo at Tulalip urself Resort Casino

TO ADVERTISE: 425.339.3030 sales@WashingtonNorthCoast.com

WASH IN

WASH IN

GTON

NORT

magaz

NORT

ine

H

H

ey’s Land ing How to YogaMosa ex Whidbey plore Island’s h Strength ,

xibility, idden g self-acceptfle ance (a focus, em

nd a cock tail)

Fashion: Tips ever yone can Luxury: Cr use aft your very own Travel: Be gin st of the

Mountain Loop

TO SUBSCRIBE: 425.339.3200 www.WashingtonNorthCoast.com FALL ISSUE

SUMMER

©2016 The

$3.99 Suppl The Daily ement to Herald ©201 6

ISSUE $3.9

Daily Hera

ld

9

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 9


HISTORICAL FICTION Set in Snohomish County BY GALE FIEGE

How a busy lawyer, husband and father finds time to write a novel James D. Shipman, an Everett family law attorney who grew up in Marysville and now lives in Snohomish, spends every other Friday, some weekends and two weeks in the summer just writing. “I’ve always loved to write,” he said. “I decided when I was 40 that I wanted to get serious about writing. I didn’t want to be 85 and look back at what I hadn’t done.” Now 46, Shipman has published three works of historical fiction, with yet another novel just off to the publisher and expected in print later this year. His most recent book, “It Is Well,” was released in December just days before the 75th anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the U.S. entry into World War II. Yes, the title comes from the hymn by Horatio Spafford, whose children all died tragically: “When peace like a river, attendeth my way, When sorrows like sea billows roll; Whatever my lot, Thou hast taught me to say; It is well, it is well, with my soul.” And, yes, Shipman’s novel, set during World War II, includes a lot of sadness — and some solid hope. The main character, Snohomish hardware store owner Jonathan Beecher, is a middle-aged widower. His eldest son, a contractor, is trapped on a Japanese-occupied island in the Pacific. His teenage son joins the Army and is sent to Europe. And his daughter is mixed up with an abusive guy.

Jonathan begins to doubt his Christian faith. But then Sarah Gilbertson, who also is widowed, comes into Jonathan’s life. Shipman writes with knowledge about grief. “My parents owned Schaefer-Shipman Funeral Home in Marysville. I know a lot of people who went through some terrible losses,” Shipman said. “And Mom is a widow now.” The novel involves the deepening friendship between Sarah and Jonathan. But don’t call it a romance novel. “All of my books have a love story. I like to explore relationships between men and women,” Shipman said. “Set in the 1940s, this story reflects the attitudes of the time. So a lot takes place off stage.”

“The important thing was just to have time to work on the craft. Now I am so glad I did it.” — James D. Shipman

Likewise, the story can’t be labeled a Christian novel. However, the book is an examination of how people keep their faith when everything around them falls apart, he said. “And these characters are faced with multiple tragedies,” Shipman said. Shipman grew up in the Methodist Church. He graduated from Marysville-Pilchuck High School, attended Everett Community College, earned a degree in history from the University of Washington and then graduated with a law degree from Gonzaga University. His wife, Becky, is a teacher in Snohomish. Together they have seven children, four in college and three in middle school and high school. One of the enjoyable things about “It Is Well”

10 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

James D. Shipman pens historical novels with local flavor. is its setting in Snohomish County. “I believe in writing what you know, but I needed to know more about downtown Snohomish when it was still a small town,” Shipman said. “I got a 1940s map and then I got people to walk around and talk about what it was like at that time.” “It Is Well” is historically accurate, he said. “I’m a longtime student of World War II, and I have tried to portray people on the day and in the way that it occurred in history.” His first book — “Constantinopolis” — is set in 1452 during the Ottoman Empire. The second book — “Going Home: A Novel of the Civil War” — involves a true story about his great-great-grandfather. Book No. 4 — a manuscript with the working title of “A Bitter Rain” — focuses on a family in Germany as the Nazis came to power. “They went step by step into the nightmare,” Shipman said. “The reality is that it wasn’t unique. These were sophisticated people who allowed themselves to slowly become passive observers. It’s important for people to realize that the biggest crime of the Holocaust was that millions of people let it happen.” Shipman currently is at work on another World War II novel, this time set in Holland, which will complete a trilogy on the war. Having his books published by Lake Union Publishing, which focuses on historical fiction, is beyond what Shipman dreamed of when he set up his writing schedule six years ago. “The important thing was just to have time to work on the craft,” he said. “Now I am so glad I did it.”


ONE-STOP SHOPPING FOR WINNEBAGO AND ITASCA!

Get Out of the Rain & Snow!

STK#TT4751 • VIN#54CFD1723G4021018

2016 WINNEBAGO DESTINATION 39FB MSRP $105,690 SAVE $39,691!

STK#M4685 • VIN#WDAPF4CC9G9637553

2016 ITASCA NAVION 24G MSRP $129,769 SAVE $32,270!

$97,499

$65,999

STK#TT4692 • VIN#54CA11127G1E14293

2016 WINNEBAGO ULTRALITE 27RBS MSRP $40,431 SAVE $10,432!

$29,999

STK#M4758 • VIN#3C7WRVLG6GE111579

2017 WINNEBAGO TREND MSRP $96,830 SAVE $16,831!

$79,999

1766682

LARGE SERVICE FACILITY & BODY SHOP • #1 SELLING DIESEL MOTORHOMES IN THE NATION RoyRobinsonRV.com • 866-901-2059 • 360-659-6236 • Motorhome/Trailer Center Open Evenings & Weekends. In Low Overhead Marysville • 1 Block Off Exit #199 • 6616 35th Ave NE • Marysville, WA 98271

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 11


TOP: Kristina Robinson, owner of The Kitty Catfe in Edmonds, talks with a customer. RIGHT: Cats lounge on coffee tables, benches and cat trees at The Kitty Catfe.

Sip coffee, adopt a cat or just come for the entertainment EDMONDS — Homeless cats, bratty dogs and tipsy people. It’s all in a day’s work for Kristina Robinson, 33. The 9-to-5 life isn’t for her. The former bartender, pet lover and mother of three owns a doggy daycare, a cat cafe and she recently launched a designated driver taxi for partying humans. First came the dogs. In 2011, she opened Precious Paws, a daycare that accepts all dogs, including the “bully” breeds. In the fall of 2016, Robinson started The Kitty Catfe a few doors down in the Firdale Village Shopping Plaza. The quaint suburban strip mall also has a cat grooming salon, dog wash, canine aquatic therapy center, aquarium store and a diner where dogs sit at tables to eat off plates. At Robinson’s cafe, the cats sit on the tables. Cat trees are everywhere. Meals are served in pet dishes, but only to the cats. People get snacks. Robinson spent more than a year planning the cat cafe. Her husband, Ahadu, cashed out his 401(k) from working at a tire store to join her risky and frisky businesses. For $5 admission, you get a can of soda and a whole lotta cattitude. About a dozen cats are there for the petting or playing in the lounge.

Hang out, swing feathery things, rub furry ears. Watch cats sleep. It’s entertainment. A lovey-dovey striped female cat named Wilbur greets you at the door of the cat cafe. Wilbur is one of four resident cats, meaning she isn’t up for grabs but eight other cats are. The Kitty Catfe partners with Motley Zoo Animal Rescue in Redmond to provide the cats for adoptions, which go through the rescue. Cat cafes are a global phenomenon where people go to cozy up with those elusive purring paradoxes with piercing eyes and cute little noses. The trend started in Asia, where cat cafes are popular with young adults who can’t have pets where they live. Robinson’s cat cafe is geared to all ages. She offers private events from birthday parties for kids to senior field trips. The cat cafe has couches, chairs, tables and a TV. It is decorated in punk pink, animal prints and bling. “We’re rocker style. Glitz and glam and edgy,” Robinson said. Her nails and lips are hot pink. Bright tattoos spill down her arms and black cat ears top her brightly colored mane. Her interest in cat cafes started with singer Katy Perry who, by the way, has a cat named Kitty Purry.

12 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

STORY BY ANDREA BROWN PHOTOS BY IAN TERRY


KITTY CATFE I was watching [Katy Perry’s] movie ‘Part of Me’ with my 7-year-old daughter and she goes, ‘Mommy, look where Katy Perry is.’ She was on tour in Tokyo and they went into a cat cafe. I was like, ‘What is that? … Oh, my God, I have to do that.’ —KRISTINA ROBINSON

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 13


Julie Crowell, of Shoreline, watches Zelda the cat climb around on her table at The Kitty Catfe in Edmonds.

Letting the cat out of the bag... C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 12

Q&A...

ANDREA: Talk about how you got started. KRISTINA: I was watching the movie “Part of Me” with my 7-year-old daughter and she goes, “Mommy, look where Katy Perry is.” She was on tour in Tokyo and they went into a cat cafe. I was like, “What is that? … Oh, my God, I have to do that.” It was very risky for us and still is. My husband had to quit his full-time job to help run the dog daycare and take care of the kids. It’s been tough for us these first couple of months, but we have faith in ourselves and are gaining more support every day. If it doesn’t work, we’ll do something else. I used to bartend. There’s always a job for that. He is great with mechanics. You never know if you don’t try. ANDREA: How many cats are up for adoption at the cafe? KRISTINA: We try to have 10 at a time. We have been adopting them out faster than we get them in. ANDREA: What activities do you have? KRISTINA: We started yoga with cats classes. We can fit 20 to 25 people comfortably with mats. We have “Wine with Whiskers.” Painting classes have begun. We started a storytime. We are going to add a webcam and live stream. There’s this thing called “kittencams” that’s crazy popular. ANDREA: Any cat-astrophes? KRISTINA: Wilbur gets out once in awhile,

but we’ve solved that problem. We bought her a harness and a leash so people can take her for walks. (Wilbur is a she: The previous owner thought she was a boy and the name stuck.) The cats make the most messes at night, when no one is here. They run around and knock things down. Like the tic-tac-toe; I find the pieces all over the floor. They knock things off the shelves. They rip open the bags of popcorn. ANDREA: What is the biggest misconception people have about cats? KRISTINA: That they are all the same and do the same things: Eat, sleep, be a jerk. Cats are so very different from one another. A misconception I’ve noticed people have about cat cafes is they think it’s a place you can bring your own cat, too — you can’t. ANDREA: Why did you start The Tipsy Taxi? KRISTINA: We have a big van that had just been sitting. I bought it for the doggy daycare because we used to drop them off and pick them up. On Friday and Saturday nights, I drive people and pick them up from the bar. People can rent us for private parties, bachelorette parties, birthday parties. It is by reservation only. They can’t just call us and we pick them up. Our motto is “You booze, we cruise.” ANDREA: What are three things in your fridge at home? KRISTINA: Cold pizza. Ranch dressing. Milk. Those are the necessities. ANDREA: What is your pet peeve?

Zoe De Mello, 6, pets Spiro while he takes a cat nap.

14 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

KRISTINA: When my husband shaves his beard, and doesn’t clean it up, and it gets on the floor and then I step on the prickly hair. ANDREA: What is your guilty pleasure? KRISTINA: Peppermint breve hot chocolate. I have to start my day with it. ANDREA: If you could have a drink with anyone alive or deceased, who would it be and why? KRISTINA: Cleopatra. I’ve always been fascinated by Egyptian culture. The live person: Tia Torres, who started “Pit Bulls and Parolees.” I love all animals, but I have a soft spot for pit bulls. I like that she has combined her love of animals with also helping people. ANDREA: What’s your proudest moment? KRISTINA: I don’t have just one proud moment but five. Three are the days my beautiful children were born (Isabella, 7; Gabriel, 6; Cristen, 18 months) and the other two the grand openings of my businesses. ANDREA: Finish this sentence: People would be shocked to know... KRISTINA: That I’m a big reader. I’d much rather zone out with a book than watch TV, and I read myself to sleep every night. ANDREA: Where do see yourself in 10 years? KRISTINA: Living on a big chunk of property as near to the city as I can be and having a huge animal rescue from my home. It’s just my ultimate goal to rescue as many animals as I can someday.


Who says we can’t keep up with our grandkids?

Forget about the cooking, the cleaning and the yard, and spend your life doing those things that fill you up and make you laugh.

Where Senior Living Comes Alive! Locally Owned and Operated since 2002

520 112th St. SW • Everett • 425.438.9080 GardenCourtRetirement.com

EQUAL HOUSING

1680655

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 15


G

Delighting gift-getters, one basket at a time iving is an art. That’s the business model of Anji and Bill Cozart’s company.

The couple are the founders of Art of Appreciation Gift Baskets, which strives to delight every category of gift-getter, one basket at a time. New parents, fresh graduates, golfers or gardeners: Art of Appreciation bundles up treats, snacks, toys and more for them all. The Arlington company ships about 1,000 baskets per day during the holiday season. Before Thanksgiving, they filled a wholesale order for 65,000 baskets. Not surprisingly, Mother’s Day is their second-busiest holiday. But gifting isn’t just for the holidays. The firm supplies new parents with essentials such as burp cloths, rattles, diapers and bottles for $39.99. Most items are carefully cuddled into the arms of fluffy stuffed animals. Need some fizz in your relationship? The Sparkling White Wine & Chocolates basket sells for $89.99. Spa baskets, starting at $29.99, include lotions and scents specially formulated for Art of Appreciation. The Cuddles & Kisses spa set, $49.99, has chocolates, cookies, body lotions and a white teddy bear wrapped in cherry-red gift boxes. “Was well worth the money, it came timely and was the easiest one-stop shop ever,” Amazon reviewer Rahim Malik wrote about the basket. The range of gift baskets includes gourmet combinations of savory nuts and cheeses to an “All American Snacker” basket, a $49.99 bundle overflowing with king-sized candy bars and popcorn. Anji, 47, estimated that about 80 percent of the baskets are food-based. There’s a wide range of treats, from gourmet chocolates and cheeses to salmon and jerky. Salmon might be Northwest inspired, but sells well throughout the country.

“I’m from Tennessee. In the South, they eat salmon from a can,” said Bill, 54. Baskets are assembled by production associates. Around 30 employees work at the warehouse year-round. They hire about 10 seasonal employees, mostly high school seniors from Marysville Getchell High School. Anji designs the baskets herself. There are hundreds of basket choices across the website’s 51 categories, and she’s always eager to expand. “Every time she goes to the store, she finds something she wants to add,” said production manager Cindy Russell, an employee of 16 years. Production associates carefully piece together baskets according to the designs. Then, the gift baskets are sent through a machine that wraps them in a pliable plastic, ensuring that they won’t be punctured in transit. Since the company started using the stretchy plastic, reports of damages fell dramatically. That protection is essential, because its top customers are located on the East Coast. “We sell extremely well there,” Anji said. “We don’t know why. But we’re not complaining.” She has come a long way from wrapping baskets in the 15-by-15-foot loft of their Marysville home 20 years ago, when she was a stay-at-home mom. Before having two sons, she worked with mutual and investment funds. Though she didn’t want be away from her children, it soon became evident that she needed an outlet. “She was bouncing off the walls,” Bill said. “I’d come home, she’d have the wall painted red, and the next week it’d be green.” Creating gift baskets combined her interest in crafts and her boundless energy. They considered purchasing an existing gift-basket company, but Anji realized that she was up for the challenge of starting fresh. The couple started Art of Appreciation with $3,000 and Anji’s priceless enthusiasm. She enlisted the help of her friends, including Russell, to assemble and wrap baskets. In the

16 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

beginning, they were selling directly to consumers on their website and through eBay. It was when Art of Appreciation began selling with Amazon in 2004 that they experienced their most significant growth in sales. “The baskets started to overtake the house,” Bill said. When there were more baskets than there was house, it was time to expand. The couple first rented a 7,000-square-foot space in Arlington. Then they outgrew that.


How an Arlington company became a

Gift-Giving powerhouse

STORY BY MEGAN BROWN

Finally they moved into their current space, a 40,000-square-foot warehouse in a UPS building in Arlington. Bill joined full time in 2007. Before that, he worked at The Seattle Times. He met Anji while he was a Navy officer. After he retired from his 24-year career, the couple moved to Washington to be closer to her family. The couple’s sons, Joshua and Michael, have helped with the company since the beginning. Joshua, 18, is a senior at Marysville Getchell

PHOTOS BY KEVIN CLARK

High School, and Michael, 21, is studying at Washington State University in Pullman. Anji and Bill each have their own office, divided by a wall. He manages the accounting side, while she manages employees, spreadsheets and the creative aspect of the business.

Anji Cozart (left) and Cindy Russell have worked together building a brand for more than 15 years. Cozart started the business out of her home. Some of her clients include Amazon and Babies R Us.

They enjoy working together even though they’re not always together. “Sometimes, I go the whole day without seeing him,” she said. C O N T INUED O N PAG E 18

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 17


C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 17

One of their best-selling Christmas baskets also happens to be the trickiest to wrap. It’s a festive mini sleigh and the tricky part is getting the shrink wrap around it to keep it all together. For that reason, Anji offers to do it herself. “It’s my punishment,” she said. “Every year I say it’s the last year we’re going to sell it.”

.

We sell extremely well [on the East Coast]. We don’t know why. But we’re not complaining. —ANJI COZART

18 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE


It’s all about family... Our auto family serves your family with a superb selection of new and pre-owned trusted-brand vehicles, financing, as well as service and parts.

DWAYNE LANE’S DWAYNE LANE’S DWAYNE LANE’S DWAYNE LANE’S CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP RAM SKAGIT FORD CHEVROLET SKAGIT MAZDA EVERETT BURLINGTON ARLINGTON BURLINGTON 425.267.9000 360.752.2000 360.435.2125 360.757.2200

DWAYNE LANE’S DWAYNE LANE’S NORTH CASCADE FORD SKAGIT SUBARU SEDRO-WOOLLEY BURLINGTON 360.855.1551 360.757.7737

1.888.444.LANE (5263) • www.DwayneLane.com

1769677

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 19


C A M A N O I S L A N D | S TA N W O O D | C O N WAY | L A C O N N E R

Walk the beaches and enjoy the views of the Olympic Mountains. It’s a beautiful time of year.

STORY BY GALE FIEGE PHOTOS BY DANIELLA BECCARIA

A view of Cama Beach State Park where visitors can stay in cabins on the beach, rent boats and hike through trails in the woods.

WASHINGTONNORTH NORTHCOAST COASTMAGAZINE MAGAZINE 20 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON


Winter is a great time to visit the Port Susan-Skagit Bay area The Camano Island-Stanwood-Conway-La Conner area is split between Snohomish, Island and Skagit counties, but these burgs have much in common. A visit to one place isn’t truly complete without a trip to the others. Water and mountain views are plentiful, as are good restaurants, shops and activities. Four festivals this month (see page 23) pull it all together. The mouth of the river where Stanwood now sits was first home to the Stillaguamish people. The history of the establishment of Stanwood and East Stanwood (the Twin Cities) about 100 years ago is replete with stories about flooding, logging and lumber mills, fish canneries, pea processing and dairy creameries. The towns were consolidated in 1960. Cross over to Camano Island on the Gateway Bridge, adorned with iconic Northwest creatures by metal artist Debbi Rhodes. The island is about 18 miles long and between 1 mile and 7 miles in width. Now primarily residential, Camano was first logged and then farmed, much like the Stillaguamish and Skagit river valleys. To get a handle on the interesting history of this region, visit the Stanwood Area Historical Society, 27108 102nd Ave. NW in Stanwood (www.sahs-fncc.org) and the Skagit County Historical Museum, 501 Fourth St. in La Conner (www.skagitcounty.net/ Departments/HistoricalSociety). Agriculture still plays a big cultural role in Snohomish and Skagit counties. At harvest time, watch for festivals, markets, farm stands and tours in these valleys. La Conner is located near the north fork of the Skagit River, and Conway sits alongside the south fork. The region’s dairy farms are fewer now, but Fir Island still boasts soil from some of the most fertile river loam around. Potatoes, wheat, berries and vegetable seed are grown alongside flower bulbs. And as it is with many beautiful, bountiful places, this region is home to many artists. Lake Ketchum glass artist Mark Ellinger and his son, Marcus, blow all the glass floats for the Great Northwest Glass Quest. To participate in the treasure hunt, pick up a brochure at A Guilded Gallery, 8700 271st St. NW, Stanwood, and head out to find a plastic “clue ball.” If you find one, return it to the location listed inside the orb and receive a limited-edition glass art ball. More information is at thegreatnwglassquest. wordpress.com. Other notable places to see local art include Karla Matzke’s Art Gallery and Sculpture Park, 2345 Blanche Way on Camano Island, www.matzkefineart.com, and the Museum of Northwest Art, 121 N First St., C ONTINUED ON PAGE 22

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 21


Snow on the mountains and mud in the valley couldn’t dampen the spirits of 8-year-old Grace Kelley, of Mount Vernon, who ran alongside the daffodil field in her colorful boots. She’s carrying a broken off bloom she found at RoozenGuaarde Flowers and Bulbs during the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival. PHOTO BY DAN BATES

C O N T IN U ED F RO M PAG E 21

La Conner, www.monamuseum.org. Port Susan and Skagit bays are home to numerous shorebirds and waterfowl, herons, eagles, hawks, snow geese and trumpeter swans. These waters support some of the greatest concentrations of shorebirds, raptors, waterfowl and seabirds found along the northern Pacific Flyway. On Fir Island Road between Conway and La Conner, the Skagit Wildlife Area offers a wonderful place to watch birds (www.wta. org/go-hiking/hikes/big-ditch-skagit-wildliferefuge). The Port Susan Snow Goose and Birding Festival offers free bird-watching tours of the region and related activities families can do at their leisure. The birding festival, headquartered at the Floyd Norgaard Cultural Center, 27130 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood, has information about this year’s festival here: www.snowgoosefest.org. The Conway Muse, conwaymuse.com, in

Conway is a great live music venue, as is Anelia’s Kitchen and Stage, www.aneliaskitchenandstage.com, in La Conner. In addition to music, Anelia’s has a nice Polish menu, as does Polska Kuchnia, www.facebook.com/ Polska.Kuchnia, in Stanwood. Other notable restaurants in Stanwood include Wayne’s Corner Cafe, www.facebook. com/Waynes-Corner-Cafe, across the street from the Amtrak passenger train platform. Others in La Conner include Nell Thorn, www.nellthorn.com. One of the Northwest’s best zipline tour companies is located on Camano. Canopy Tours Northwest gets people zipping through the tops of the trees in the Kristoferson family forest at 332 NE Camano Drive; canopytoursnw.com. The jewels among all the fine city and county parks in the region are the state parks at the south end of the island: Camano Island State Park and Cama Beach State Park.

22 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

TOP: The owner of Stangeland Farm, Louis Stangeland, walks past calves waiting to be fed at Stangeland Farm on Pioneer Highway near Stanwood. PHOTO BY SOFIA JARAMILLO

LEFT: Andy Bergman chats with local customer Tony Renn at Wayne’s Corner Cafe in Stanwood. PHOTO BY DANIELLA BECCARIA

RIGHT: Karla Matzke designed and constructed Matzke Fine Art Gallery and Sculpture Park, where she enjoys walking her dog, Bruno. PHOTO BY DANIELLA BECCARIA


Spectacular

Winter festivals to enjoy this season February, with its promise of spring, is a beautiful time to explore the Camano Island-Stanwood-Conway-La Conner area. Hugging Port Susan and Skagit Bay, this region is celebrated in late winter with four festivals.

vacations

First up is the eighth annual Great Northwest Glass Quest, a treasure hunt that rewards successful explorers a trove of artistmade glass floats. The quest kicks off Feb. 17 and continues through Feb. 26 on Camano and in Stanwood. Then the 12th annual Port Susan Snow Goose and Birding Festival, which focuses on migratory birds, is Feb. 25 and 26. See wintering trumpeter swans and snow geese in the Stanwood area, as well as on Fir Island near Conway. In La Conner, the 52nd annual Smelt Derby offers lots of family fun, also on Feb. 25 and 26. Cast jigs for the small, silver fish that are the namesake of the festival to win prizes for best catches. And at the tail end of all this, the third annual La Conner Daffodil Festival is in March. Realistically, though, many of the daffodil bulb fields in Skagit Valley start blooming toward the end of February.

NOW OPEN

in the Mill Creek Town Center Family cruise or honeymoon, land or sea. Close to home or on the other side of the world, our expertise makes the difference in planning your next spectacular vacation.

TOP: Glass floats made by Glass Quest Fine Art Studio in Stanwood exclusivley for the upcoming treasure hunt quest on Feb. 17.

With our exclusive Expedia® Extras, you will enjoy the best in value and amenities.

PHOTO COURTESTY OF GLASS QUEST FINE ART STUDIO

March – Annual Daffodil Festival April – Skagit Valley Tulip Festival August – Annual CLASSIC Boat & Car Show

October – Annual Brew on the Slough December – Light up your Holidays in La Conner (Annual Tree lighting and Lighted Boat Parade)

We are your local travel agency and your “friend in the business.” Come visit us today.

(425) 318-3344

1750322

15415 Main Street, Ste. 104, Mill Creek www.cruiseshipcenters.com/MillCreek

1771086

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 23


Alpine Paradise

STEVENS PASS STORY BY MEGAN BROWN PHOTO BY SAMUEL WILSON

Snowfall doesn’t always spell disaster. At Stevens Pass Mountain Resort, it’s a cause for celebration. Since opening in 1937, the 1,125-acre mountain resort has become a winter hotspot for Washington skiers and snowboarders. The 65-mile drive from the downtown Everett area goes through changing landscapes of pleasant stretches of farmland and forest to say-your-prayers switchbacks over Stevens Pass on Highway 2.

Before you head for the hills… Stevens Pass, Summit Stevens Pass, Highway 2, Skykomish; 206-812-4510; www.stevenspass.com Road cam: www.stevenspass.com/site/ mountain/cams/wsdot-cams Resort cam: www.stevenspass.com/site/ mountain/cams/resort-cams Sevens Pass Shuttle departs from the Safeway parking lot, Monroe; www.StevensPassShuttle.com 24 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE


Every time I set foot on the Pacific Crest Trail, I think how crazy it is that the trail goes continuously all the way to Mexico. —RUDY GIECEK

A mountain resort where the fun never melts Prepare for your trip by checking weather and traffic reports.

1 2 3

Cameras are fixed on locations throughout the slopes and roads to provide real-time glimpses of visibility and road conditions. Consider getting a seat on a shuttle bus and letting someone skilled do the white-knuckle driving. Get going. The 2016-17 season opened in late November and is expected to close near the end of April. Operational hours are 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily.

Even night owls can hit the slopes. After sunset, giant lights illuminate the mountain.

Consider going during non-peak times, when lift tickets cost less. Pick your course.

The resort has equipment rental and ski lessons. Experienced skiers and snowboarders can go Alpine or cross-country skiing through a range of trails, with the expert double black diamond slope peaking near the 5,845-foot summit of Cowboy Mountain.

Novices such as Marcus Lindsay, a nursing student from Mukilteo, might stick to the bunny slopes. ABOVE: Laura Culver (right) leads Jean Warren and Nancy Uhl on a showshoe hike near Grace Lakes at Stevens Pass. PHOTO BY SAMUEL WILSON LEFT: Nan Lammers, of the Mount Baker Snoqualmie Forest, demonstrates how to properly fasten snowshoes before a hike. PHOTO BY MATTHEW WILLIAMS

Lindsay first visited Stevens Pass Mountain Resort last year. “I stayed on the beginner course, as this was my first time boarding,” said Lindsay, 33. “The lifts are easy and fast, with little lines if you go early during the week. I had a really good time. I would suggest going with a group of friends, carpooling and getting lift tickets at Costco to save some money. Dress warm, wear gloves, and that’s about it.” To accommodate its growing popularity, the resort invested $1.9 million in parking last year. A pedestrian bridge connects the resort to the new parking lot, which has 250 new spots.

Events throughout the season include a playground for the kids, Easter activities, 24-hour skiathons, women specific events, rail jam/slopestyles and races.

4

The fun doesn’t end when the snow melts. The area is a favorite for outdoor enthusiasts, with hikers and bikers trekking and cycling through the area in the warmer weather. The resort opened a bike park in 2016. The park has numerous trails and holds races for mountain bikers.

Starting in spring, many hikers hop on a leg of the 2,650-mile Pacific Crest Trail.

Rudy Giecek, who writes the blog “North Cascade Hiker” and podcasts as “Cascade Hiker” (www. northcascadehiker.com), frequently heads to Stevens Pass in the summer. “I love walking the Pacific Crest Trail south or north from the Highway 2 crossing. It can be a fun time for hikers to climb through the empty, ghostly chair lifts on a sunny summer day,” Giecek said. “Every time I set foot on the Pacific Crest Trail, I think how crazy it is that the trail goes continuously all the way to Mexico.” The Hogsback high-speed quad chairlift continues operating after the winter season. The ride offers a panoramic view of the Cascades. Giecek, a father of two daughters, recommends a stop at Deception Falls en route to Stevens Pass. “Recently we stopped for the first time and our kids loved the easy walk,” he said. “The interpretive signs and viewing platforms gave them a reason to take a rest.” The resort is 35 miles from Leavenworth, a Bavarian wonderland of dining, shops, spas, arts, music, microbrews, wine tours and interesting museums. It has everything for the indoor enthusiast in your family. C ONTINUED ON PAGE 26

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 25


LEFT: Carol Stuhley ejects a spent cartridge as she sights downrange during the women’s 10km biathlon race. PHOTO BY JENNIFER BUCHANAN

RIGHT: A mountain biker rides down a trail at Stevens Pass. The resort has gotten permission from the U.S. Forest Service to add trails and skill parks in its mountain bike park.

Five things to do in the spring/ summer

PHOTO COURTESY S T E V ENS PA SS MOUN TAIN RE SOR T

1 C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 25

Along the way Stretch your legs at Eagle Falls, about 2 miles east of Index where the South Fork Skykomish River parallels the road. The waterfall is a short trek along a trail with thick brush and a slippery jump over precariously spaced rocks in water. There are two small pullover spots, though you wouldn’t know from the road there’s anything special back there. It’s worth getting your feet wet.

2

Don’t change your shoes yet. Next stop is Deception Falls, about 20 minutes down the highway. The trail is safer to negotiate for kids and uncoordinated adults. There’s an observation bridge where you can see the rapids up close and hear them roar. Romping around this neck of the woods is a day trip in itself for hiking, rafting and losing yourself in nature.

3

uuu Stop at Espresso Chalet at milepost marker 36 on Highway 2. Opened in 1991, it is one of the longest-running coffee stands in Snohomish County. The site was one of the sets for the movie “Harry and the Hendersons,” a 1987 comedy starring John Lithgow about a family that adopts a friendly Sasquatch after accidentally hitting him with their station wagon. Bigfoot’s likeness is everywhere at the coffee stand chalet that sits against the backdrop of Mount Index. There are Bigfoot signs, statues, souvenirs, specials and footprints. Warm up with a Stevens Passquatch latte or a Lift Ticket with four shots of espresso and heavy cream in an 8-ounce cup. Customers can search for Sasquatch or hike, bike or picnic in the 5-acre Bigfoot Park behind the chalet.

26 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

4

5

5

Scenic chairlift rides: Head up the Hogsback highspeed quad chairlift and enjoy the peace and serenity that is the Cascade Mountains in the summer. You can either ride the lift or walk down the hike-only trail back to the base area. From the top of the lift you will have an intimate view of Cowboy Mountain and spectacular views of the North Cascades. Hiking: The 2,650-mile Pacific Crest Trail runs straight through the heart of Stevens Pass. You can catch the PCT from the base area or take a more leisurely approach and take a ride up the chairlift. From the top of the lift, hike a connector trail to the PCT and then hike back to the base area. Along the way, see pika, marmots, alpine plant life and wildflowers, including heather, huckleberry, mountain hemlock and the yellow cypress, commonly known as the Alaska yellow cedar. Disc golf: The Stevens Pass Disc Golf Course offers 18 holes of play on a dramatic mountain landscape. This chairlift-accessed course is built for players of all abilities to enjoy. Ride the chairlift up and play disc golf down. Rental discs are available at the bike shop. Yoga: Experience yoga at the pass this summer with 90 minutes of all-level Vinyasa-style yoga in a gorgeous alpine setting. Then grab some lunch and choose your adventure with a chairlift ride, exploring hiking trails or hitting the mountain bike park. RV camping: If you’re looking to make a weekend out of the bike park or just heading over the pass, there’s an RV lot complete with plug-ins. Source: www.StevensPass.com


IN

LA CONNER Experience friendly people, diverse communities, cultural attractions, outdoor sculptures, boutiques, galleries and an environment of mountains, farms, rivers and islands. Adventures

ANTIQUES & THRIFT SHOPS Vintage La Conner Thrift & Consignment Store

A non-profit unusual department store run by Soroptimists of La Conner. Bargain prices and a very pleasant atmosphere create a satisfying shopping experience. 301 Morris St. • 360-466-4017 facebook.com/vintagelaconner

BREWPUBS & WINE La Conner Brewing Company

Unique Northwest-style family-friendly brewpub featuring wood-fired pizzas, burgers and other fresh local pub fare served with our small-batch, hand-crafted beers. Enjoy by the fireplace or on the garden terrace. 117 S. 1st St. • 360-466-1415 laconnerbrewery.com

Seeds Bistro and Bar

Honoring and promoting our beautiful Skagit Valley serving farm to table, local seafood, homemade bread, NW wine, micro beer and craft cocktails. 623 Morris St. • 360-466-3280 seedsbistro.com

DECOR & GIFTS Bunnies by the Bay — La Conner Re-Tail Shop

Endearing gifts for wee ones in their first years of life. Loveys, blankets, clothing and toys to comfort and cherish. 719 1st St. • 360-420-9018 bunniesbythebay.com

Pelindaba Lavender

The Complete Lavender Experience® — unique, exclusively San Juan Island handcrafted lavender products for personal care, therapy, home, kitchen, pets, decor & more. 605 S. 1st St. • 360-399-1511 pelindabalavender.com

The Wood Merchant

For over 35 years The Wood Merchant has offered the Northwest’s best selection of fine woodcrafts: Furniture, jewelry boxes, humidors, kitchen utensils, wood sculptures, gifts. 709 S. 1st St. • 360-466-4741 woodmerchant.com

GALLERIES & MUSEUMS Skagit County Historical Museum

Three galleries of fascinating Skagit history – featuring Native American baskets, transportation, early industry and home life. Two rotating exhibit spaces. 501 S. 4th St. • 360-466-3365 skagitcounty.net/museum

from the relaxing to the exhilarating are yours, all in a setting of stunning natural beauty. Come visit and stroll the village! La Conner is truly the heart of the Magic Skagit Valley.

That’s Knot All an Artists’ Co-operative

We are an eclectic mix of creative individuals and feature an ALL LOCAL artists’ run co-op. 128 S. 1st St. • 360-391-1660 facebook.com/thatsknotallartisis

HOTELS & INNS Katy’s Inn Bed & Breakfast

Located in the heart of La Conner with a view of the channel, walking distance to all shops and restaurants. Victorian home, built in 1882. Four rooms, all with private baths. A taste of Skagit. Fabulous breakfast! 503 S Third St. • 360-466-9909 bedandbreakfastlaconner.com

La Conner Country Inn & Channel Lodge

Stay refreshed at our charming Country Inn, or stay rejuvenated at our waterfront Channel Lodge. Make our beautiful lobby and guest rooms your home away from home and stay as our guest. Complimentary continental breakfast, Wi-Fi, and parking included. (Inn) 107 S. 2nd St. (Lodge) 205 N. 1st St 360-466-1500 • 888-466-4113 laconnerlodging.com

RESTAURANTS Anelia’s Kitchen & Stage

Calico Cupboard Café and Bakery

Award-winning specialty café and bakery, featuring breakfasts, lunches, vegetarian and gluten free entrees, famous baked goods, NW wine, micro beer and espresso. 720 S. 1st St. • 360-466-4451 calicocupboardcafe.com

La Conner Sweet Shoppe

La Conner Sweet Shoppe hand crafts high quality, artisan candies and chocolates one small batch at a time. We also serve ice cream & espresso. 623 S. 1st St. • 360-466-5015 laconnersweetshoppe.com

SENIOR LIVING La Conner Retirement Inn

Dedicated to serving our seniors with exceptional care and amenities. Stop in for a visit today. 204 N. 1st St. • 360-466-5700 laconnerretirementinn.com

TRAVEL TOURS La Conner Kayak

La Conner Kayak offers a variety of daily, evening and moonlight tours. We also offer kayak, paddleboard and bike rentals. 724 S. 1st St. • 425-263-6082 laconnerkayak.com

Enjoy a diverse menu with a focus on family polish recipes and northwest fare made in house with fresh, local ingredients, a full bar featuring house infused vodkas and live music on stage every Thursday - Saturday. 513 S. 1st St. • 360-399-1805 aneliaskitchenandstage.com 1768153

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 27


RIGHT: Snow geese travel thousands of miles from Russia’s Wrangel Island to winter here. TOP: Flickers are a common sight in Washington. BOTTOM: An eagle scratches itself with its talons.

28 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE


Birding A family outing or activity in your own backyard STORY AND PHOTOS BY MIKE BENBOW

Winter is a good time for birding in the Northwest. The area has birds that are here year-round like eagles and woodpeckers, others that leave for warmer climates like osprey and some hummingbirds, and a few like snow geese and swans, that spend the winter here before heading back north to raise their young.

Birding is a good excuse to get outdoors and stretch your legs, especially in the winter. It’s a great family activity. Generally, there are fewer people and less competition in winter. And some birds can be easier to find in the outdoors because they’re working a little harder to find food and spending less effort at hiding. C ONTINUED ON PAGE 30

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 29


C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 29

Snohomish and Island counties

Winter birding spots Snohomish River Walk/Spencer Island A visit to Everett’s Langus Park is nice in itself, but the park can also be a jumping off point for a paved 2-mile hike to Spencer Island in the middle of the Snohomish River. The walk or bike ride along the river to the island offers an opportunity to see a variety of birds, including herons, woodpeckers, ducks and geese. In April, osprey return from Mexico and South America. Spencer is a former family farm now turned Snohomish County park with trails and portable toilets. If you don’t like the idea of a 2-mile walk, you can drive past the park on Smith Island Road just east of I-5, park and walk a shorter distance to the island. WHERE: 400 Smith Island Road

Port of Everett The port’s property along Everett’s waterfront provides a lot of opportunity to view birds. The 10th Street boat launch off Marine View Drive is a good spot to see ducks and geese, herons, eagles, mergansers, terns and other birds, especially when some young salmon start showing up in saltwater in March.

TOP: A pair of swans heads home at sunset. MIDDLE: Garden sunflowers attract many birds, especially Steller’s jays. BOTTOM: Anna’s hummingbirds spend the winter here.

Take binoculars, because osprey start arriving in April to rebuild some of the nests atop area pilings. There is parking available, and you can walk on several routes along the waterfront. Check out portofeverett.com for a printable map of trails and public areas. WHERE: 10th Street, west of Marine View Drive

Stanwood/Silvana This is mostly a drive through farm fields in the communities of Stanwood and Silvana. Swans from Alaska and British Columbia and snow geese from Wrangel Island in Russia winter in the area, spending nights in Puget Sound’s Port Susan and local lakes and days in farm fields in Snohomish and Skagit counties. A drive through farm roads near the Stillaguamish River often produces feeding birds. WHERE: Check the roads off Marine Drive, south of Stanwood

30 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE


Bob Heirman Wildlife Reserve The Snohomish County park is a tremendous spot to see wintering ducks, geese and swans. The swans often spend the night at Shadow Lake below the parking lot, so you might be able to see them either early or late in the day, but remember that the reserve closes at dusk. The site is a former gravel pit and offers about 3 miles of trails. WHERE: 14913 Connelly Road, Snohomish

Eide Road/Leque Island Located west of Stanwood on the way to Camano Island, this state property is a former farm that is home to wintering sparrows, shorteared owls, snow geese, hawks, northern harriers, ducks, herons and songbirds. Once a salt marsh, the area was diked for farming and now has wetlands and fields. The state pays farmers to plant grains for wintering waterfowl. There is parking and a portable toilet. The island is just west of the Mark Clark bridge. State Discover Pass required. WHERE: Eide Road

Narbeck Wetland Sanctuary Located just across the street from Boeing Co.’s Everett factory, the sanctuary is an unexpected delight. It’s a small wetland that provides a good winter home for ducks, geese and the occasional heron.

Your backyard If you don’t have a feeder already, consider placing one in your yard. Bird species that remain here in winter will be attracted if you provide food and water. It also helps to put feeders near trees and bushes that provide cover for the birds and make them feel safer while eating. That same cover can also make a good background if you like to take photos. TOP: Providing water helps attract birds in your yard. RIGHT: Feeders in winter are important for birds.

The sanctuary has an exterior trail and an interior boardwalk. Either way, it’s a good way to stretch your legs. Avoid the slick boardwalk in freezing temperatures. Restroom, benches. WHERE: 6921 Seaway Blvd., Everett

Riverview Wildlife Refuge Established in 2013 with help from the Pilchuck Audubon Society, the refuge involves about a three-hour walk atop a river dike along marshy fields and city water treatment ponds. In winter, there are many ducks and gulls, herons, kingfishers and hawks. There’s also a heron rookery with about seven nests. Park on the south side of First Street as far west as you can. Then walk west to a sewage pump station. The trail is on the left side of the building. WHERE: 1805 First St., Snohomish

North Creek Park This former farm south of Mill Creek has forest and marsh habitats, and includes nearly a mile of boardwalk that can be slippery in freezing weather. It has a variety of birds in winter, including harriers, hawks, herons and kingfishers. The floating boardwalk offers a flat-grade trail that was built by installing plastic foam floats under decking. It allows you to explore the marsh without getting your feet wet. Restrooms, picnic shelters, picnic tables, playground. WHERE: 1011 183rd St. SE

Owls are frequently seen off Leque Island.

More about birding If you’re interested in birding, you might consider joining a local club for more information and activities. The Pilchuck Audubon Society has members from Snohomish County and Camano Island. It offers weekly outings, classes, regular meetings and a host of local and general information at its website, pilchuckaudubon.org. Whidbey Island is served by www.whidbeyaudubon. org. Its site offers local information on unusual bird sightings, bird photos, classes and a club newsletter. WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 31


Cinebarre Mountlake 8

Regal Alderwood Stadium 7

Anderson School Theater

STORY BY ANDREA BROWN PHOTOS BY KEVIN CLARK

Going to the movies keeps getting more fun as theaters butter up viewers with plush seats, gourmet fare and cocktails. Here are three cinemas that just might get you out of your easy chair… and into theirs. n Cinebarre Mountlake 8 It’s the classic date night. Dinner-drinks-movie. But in this case, it’s all rolled into one. Food and cocktails are served during the show at Cinebarre, a Mountlake Terrace movie complex for ages 21 and older. No children allowed. No noisy teens. No Sour Patch Kids stuck to the seats. ABOVE: Empty seats and condiments await movie-goers at Cinebarre.

Step inside (after you get carded) and relax at the full-service bar before the movie or sip a cold one on the patio with friends.

32 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

The open lobby has sectional sofas and comfy chairs. The bright atrium has more of a lounge feel than that of a movie theater. There’s no concession stand crush or bleeping video games. None of that gaudy patterned carpet on the floor, either. Instead there are 10-foot-tall retro movie posters that create a cool vibe. Like a stroll through Tarantino’s mind. The smell of popcorn doesn’t hit you at the door. The popper is there, though. It’s just hidden in the kitchen.


BELOW: Movie-goers watch the preview show at Cinebarre.

Servers bring the popcorn to you in the theater in a silver bowl, with butter or with various flavors, such as toasted coconut curry and apple bacon caramel. They bring drinks from the bar. Not only that, they serve meals. Inside the eight screening rooms, alternating rows of seats in the multiplex were replaced with rows of tables to make room for feasting. Order from your seat before the movie. During the show, use a pen and paper to make an order so you don’t have to talk. Servers pick up and deliver your fare. These movie theater ninjas have it figured

out how to do it without being distracting.

eat. Admission to the bar is free.

Condiments are there at the ready. It’s like at a diner, not a fast-food joint. Ketchup is in a bottle, not little plastic packets. Water is served in plastic cups with ice, for free. You don’t have to pay $4 for a bottle of water, but you can if you want.

The drink menu is impressive. In addition to beer and wine, check out the grown-up milkshakes laced with booze or cocktails, such as the Moscow mule and the cilantro gin & tonic.

Instead of those flimsy theater napkins, a roll of paper towels is mounted on the table. Brilliant! Arrive early for pre-show socializing or stay after the movie to talk about the show. Heck, you don’t even have to see a movie. You can go there just to drink and

The menu is extensive, with fried pickles, pizza, lamb burger, veggie walnut burger, fish tacos and bison sliders. Still hungry? Squeeze in a salted caramel brownie sundae. If you must have your Skittles or Milk Duds fix, traditional candy options are good and plenty. C ONTINUED ON PAGE 34

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 33


C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 33

n Regal Alderwood Stadium 7 If relaxing in a recliner is your movie watching position, Regal Alderwood Stadium 7 in Lynnwood has your back.

teens. You just can’t have your adult beverage during the show. Best to hit happy hour before or a well-deserved nightcap after.

The theater, across the street from the Alderwood mall, removed all those clunky seats that flip up and replaced them with faux-leather power recliners that have a footrest extension. The seven screening rooms are like luxury home theaters.

Seating is reserved. When you buy a ticket, online or at the window, you select your seat. No more bumping elbows with strangers. The seats provide distance between you and any chatty, texting, popcorncrunching neighbors.

Sink in. Stick your giant soda in the side cup. Kick back and curl up with a bucket of popcorn.

The row aisles have laminate flooring and are wide. That guy who gets up six times during the show and makes you get up so he can get by? He’s a bother no more. Once reposed, stay reposed.

The manager said a lot of people bring blankets. The sidearms of select seats lift up to be ADA accessible, so it is possible for people in wheelchairs to scoot over into the recliner. There aren’t servers bringing cocktails or burgers to your seat, but there is a cool candy kiosk in the hall where a touch-screen robot will mix you a cup of your choice from 16 candies for $5. The theater is for all ages, so you can bring your grandkids. Or your noisy

It’s like watching a movie from home. Except the screen is 1,000 times bigger. And the popcorn is much better. TOP: Leila Vezzoni (left) and Vanessa Hale await a friend at Cinebarre. BOTTOM: The lobby before the start of the 7 p.m. show at Cinebarre.

34 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

n Anderson School Theater The historic Anderson School in downtown Bothell was rebuilt into a hotel with bars, a brewery, restaurants, a saltwater pool and a movie theater. Minors are allowed with a guardian at this theater where old-world charm meets a newworld theater experience. There are rocker seats and chandeliers. Pizza, burgers and ales are delivered to your seat. After the movie, head to the former Principal’s Office. It’s a bar. Bet you never thought you’d be downing lemon drop cocktails there.


n The Price of Pampering… Cinebarre Mountlake 8: 6009 244th St. SW, Mountlake

Terrace; 425-672-7501; www.regmovies.com. Tickets online range from $10.70 to $16.78 (3-D) for adults; $10.49 to $14.47 (3-D) for seniors. Menu items: Fried pickles, $8.50. Lamb burger, $15.50. Veggie walnut burger, $13.50. Fish tacos, $13.50. Four sliders — lamb, bison, chicken and beef — and a flight of beer, $16.50. Quadruple Feature pizza, $14. Popcorn with butter, $8.50; with toasted coconut curry or apple bacon caramel, $10. Moscow mule, $8; cilantro gin & tonic, $8. Salted caramel brownie sundae, $8.

Regal Alderwood Stadium 7:

3501 184th St. SW, Lynnwood; www.regmovies.com. Tickets online range from $11.33 to $17.93 (RPX) for adults; $9.75 to $14.87 (RPX), child and senior.

Anderson School Theater: 18603 Bothell Way NE, Bothell; www.mcmenamins.com/theaters.

TOP: Addie Wilson shakes a cocktail at Cinebarre. BOTTOM: Beers on tap at Cinebarre.

Admission is $9 for adults after 5 p.m. and $7 before. Children 12 years and younger are $7.

Time travel. Finally.

1743236

©2016 Porsche Cars North America, Inc. Porsche recommends seat belt usage and observance of all traffic laws at all times.

A legend returns. The new 718 Boxster S.

Porsche Bellingham 2200 Iowa Street htaylor@rogerjobs.com Bellingham, Washington 98229 Tel. 360-734-5230 www.bellingham.porschedealer.com 8:30AM - 7:00PM 9:00AM - 5:00PM

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 35


Cascade Art Museum and the American Scene STORY BY GALE FIEGE

It’s an important part of art history in our region. During the Great Depression and into the post-World War II period, many Northwest artists set out to report reality in their paintings. Northwest Social Realism and the American Scene, 1930-1950 is the new exhibition at Cascadia Art Museum, which focuses on Northwest art through the 1960s. The show, up through March 26 at the Edmonds museum, offers a glimpse into everyday life in the region, reflecting the industrial, political and social aspects — the racial and class inequities of the period. Artistically, the period focused on what artists saw in their own communities, Cascadia’s curator David Martin said. “Beginning in the late 1920s, younger American artists were turning away from the dominant influence of European Impressionism and Modernism in search of a completely unique representation of America,” Martin said. Artists represented in the exhibition include Abe Blashko (1920-2011), Richard Correll (1904-1990), Yvonne Twining Humber (1907-2004), Helmi Juvonen (1903-1985), Anne Kutka McCosh (1902-1994), Kamekichi Tokita (18971948), Kenneth Callahan (1905-1986), Fay Chong (1912-1973), Ernest Norling (1892-1974) and Pieter van Dalen (1897 to 1975).

TOP LEFT: Abe Blashko (1920-2011) “The Pillars,” 1939, Lithograph, Private Collection BOTTOM LEFT: Pieter van Dalen (18971975) “Statesmanship,” circa 1938, oil on board, Private Collection

36 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

These artists celebrated urban as well as rural environments, and painted local industries, labor activity, street scenes and even recreation. “Some of it was in-your-face politics,” Martin said. “This kind of work had not been done before.” Many of these artists worked for the federal Works Progress Administration program, which kept them employed during hard times. “And many were socialists,” Martin said. “Some had fought in World War II and were very patriotic, but they also were very leftist. “The leftist movement was so strong in Washington state that, in 1936, Postmaster General James Farley quipped, ‘There are 47 states in the union, and the Soviet of Washington.’”

IF YOU GO 190 Sunset Ave., Edmonds Open 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday On the third Thursday of each month, it is open later for free from 6 until 8 p.m. Parking is free. Entrance to the museum shop is free. General admission is $10, tickets for seniors and students 18 and younger are $7, and free for preschool children. For more information, call 425-336-4809 or go to cascadiaartmuseum.org.

TOP & BOTTOM RIGHT: Virna Haffer (1899-1974) Hooverville series No. 2, circa 1936, Gelatin Silver Print, Private Collection, courtesy of the estate of Virna Haffer


RIGHT: Delbert J. McBride (1920-1998) Untitled [African American mother and child], circa 1948, Gouache, Collection of Washington State Historical Society, 2001.65.173

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 37


SPONSORED CONTENT

The benefits of having an estate plan

W

By Kathryn Garrison, Senior Financial Advisor, Moss Adams Wealth Advisors LLC, and Kelli Anderson, Senior Manager, Tax Services

hile initiating an estate plan can be intimidating for many reasons, it’s still important to have one in place.

Many folks believe they don’t need an estate plan. They might think, “Why should I pay an attorney for something I don’t need,” or procrastinate because they don’t know what they want. Or perhaps they think: “There’s always tomorrow.” At the very least, providing clear, written guidance to your loved ones on what to do in your absence is a chance to ensure your contributions toward a family legacy and your community continue in the manner you wish. The benefits of having an estate plan filter into other areas as well.

Taking Care of Family Providing for your immediate family is perhaps the most important reason for having an estate plan. This is particularly important if you have children under 18 because a will specifies who will be their guardian should something happen to you. Without a will to follow, a court decides who will raise your children.

Start With a Will If you don’t spell out your wishes with clear instructions, this could result in the improper administration of your estate—a costly and frustrating scenario. A will is a good starting point for any estate plan, no matter the shape or size. A will provides direction on where your assets should go. There are also ways to transfer your property to heirs outside of a will. Insurance, retirement plans, trusts, and certain other assets for which you completed a beneficiary designation form can pass directly to your named beneficiary. Good estate planning involves more than just a will, however. For example, you can also plan for your own incapacity by establishing a person or persons of authority who can make financial and health care decisions for you. In addition, proper planning can protect your estate from shrinking due to taxes, unnecessary legal fees, or excessive administration expenses. This leaves more of your estate assets to your chosen beneficiaries, including charities.

Even with no children, you may have other family members—parents, siblings, or even pets—who are unable to care for themselves or need help to care for themselves. There are specific ways you can provide for them through your estate plan, but the courts may direct your assets elsewhere if there isn’t a plan in place. Your assets are also susceptible to what’s known as laughing heirs, who are blood relatives minimally related to you and happy to laugh all the way to the bank with your assets.

Charitable Gifts

Make Your Wishes Clear

Retirement Accounts

Another important benefit of good estate planning: It eases the strain on your family.

If you have an IRA or other retirement or taxdeferred account, you may want to consider gifting all or a portion to charity. If left to your heirs, the distributions from those accounts will be taxable to your heirs as income. In contrast, not only are charities not taxed on the income, but your estate will receive a dollar-for-dollar deduction against the taxable estate for estate tax purposes.

When you have an estate plan in place, your family members know and understand your intentions, alleviating the need for them to make hard decisions during an already difficult time. Clearly spelling out your wishes may also keep family from fighting over assets when you aren’t around to play referee. We’ve seen family members who were on good terms prior to the death of a loved one end up not speaking to each other because they all had different ideas of what the deceased wanted to do with their assets, whether cash or a sentimental object. Confusion, anger, and heartache could be avoided with an estate plan prepared ahead of time.

You can allocate part of your estate to your favorite charity or charities. Beyond helping to achieve a certain goal, such as establishing a scholarship, there are ways to make charitable gifts that can result in reduced estate taxes— an outright gift made through your will is the most straightforward method. An estate planner can help you develop and implement these goals in a tax-efficient manner, especially as your estate becomes more complex.

Here’s an example: If you leave a $100,000 IRA to your nephew, he’ll owe income taxes on the distributions he takes from that inherited IRA. At a minimum, he has to take an annual required distribution based on the value of the account and his age. However, most heirs end up withdrawing the full amount right away, which can push them

Kathryn Garrison advises organizations on their investment strategies and prepares personalized financial plans and wealth strategies for executives and high net worth individuals. She can be reached at (206) 302-6752 or kathryn. garrison@mossadams.com.

38 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

into a higher tax bracket. Let’s say this pushes your nephew from the 25 percent bracket to the 33 percent bracket. The IRS will receive $33,000 of your $100,000, while only $67,000 will go to your nephew. If you leave that same $100,000 to a charity, it can liquidate the IRA and spend the full $100,000 on its mission. You could then gift a different asset to your nephew instead of the IRA, such as a $100,000 taxable investment account; he would likely pay no taxes at all if he liquidates the assets soon after your death. If you want to make a charitable gift and need additional income now, a charitable gift annuity (CGA) may be a good option. A CGA provides a stream of income and generally pays higher interest rates than certificates of deposit (CDs), around 6.8 percent for a single 80-year-old donor. Any principal remaining when the annuitant passes away goes to support the charity. For those with larger estates, a charitable trust can help reduce estate taxes. They can also allow you to maintain some control over funds after you’re gone.

Life Insurance and Other Options Life insurance is another estate planning tool that, when used correctly, can improve the efficiency of your estate plan. A life insurance policy can provide assets for your heirs when you’ve given an IRA to charity or set up a charitable trust or annuity. It may also be used to provide enough cash to pay estate taxes or to help equalize gifts made to beneficiaries. There are many other tools estate planners use that may fit your specific estate plan— from a variety of trusts to 529 accounts for the education expenses of children and grandchildren. Business succession planning should also be addressed as part of the estate plan, including the succession of both ownership and management, as it may not always be the same person or group of people. A good estate planner can help you determine which of these strategies might be appropriate for you. It’s never too early to start your estate plan. Once you do have one in place, be sure to review it at least every five years and update it when there are significant life changes. These might include divorce, the death of a loved one, a marriage, or the birth of a child or grandchild. And while it might feel daunting, it’s important to include funeral and memorial instructions as well as passwords to access your social media accounts and digital assets. n

Kelli Anderson has been in public accounting since 2007. She specializes in estates, gifts, trusts, and high net worth individuals. She can be reached at (206) 302-6763 or kelli.anderson@mossadams.com.


How Can We Make You Smile? TMJ Treatment

Financial coaching for the long game.

Sleep Apnea Full Mouth Reconstruction Cosmetic Dentistry Implant Dentistry Invisalign® Braces General and Family Dentistry Periodontics

Whether it’s tax planning, wealth management, multistate residency, business consulting, or something else you need, we’ve got you covered.

Orthodontics Sedation Dentistry Dentures Whitening

2707 Colby Avenue, Suite 801 | Everett, WA 98201

Personal Treatment Advanced Dentistry Our patients enjoy an exceptional experience in our dental care. In twenty years of practice, Dr. Amy Norman has refined a patient experience that is notably personal and caring.

Dream Smile

Dr. Amy Norman and her team are highly educated and trained in advanced dentistry procedures. Dr. Norman’s dental care addresses your overall health and well-being.

W W W. M O S S A D A M S . C O M / P R I VAT E C L I E N T S

1612728

We never take for granted the trust you put in us when you join our dental family.

Amy Norman, DDS, PS

Call us today for a consultation 1-866-376-6762 3601 Colby Avenue • Everett, WA 98201

DreamSmile.com

1767351

NORTHWEST SOCIAL REALISM & THE AMERICAN SCENE: 1930-1950 Come explore the industrial, political and social aspects of the Great Depression and WWII through the eyes of Northwest artists.

$1 off Adult Admission (must present ad to receive discount)

May purchase up to four discounted tickets. Discount cannot be applied toward gift certificates or gift cards. Not valid with any other offer. May not be used retroactively. Valid through March 26, 2017.

Yvonne Twining Humber (1907 - 2004)

190 Sunset Ave #E Edmonds, WA 98020 CascadiaArtMuseum.org

1772202

JANUARY 19 - MARCH 26, 2017

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 39


Embrace TheShake STORY BY ANDREA BROWN PHOTOS BY DAN BATES AND IAN TERRY

A wavy workout well worth the ride. 40 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE


MUKILTEO—The waves and

Ride the waves...

sharks aren’t real, but the workout is. It’s Surfset, a fast-paced, musicpumped exercise regimen on dry land using a 6-foot board propped on bouncy balls to mimic sea turbulence.

Anything goes on these surfboards and anybody can do it. “From cardio to doing surf-inspired pop-ups to ending with downward dog,” George said.

“It’s so different, it draws a lot of attention,” said Laurie George, owner of Mukilteo Fitness Bar, the only place in the Seattle area that has Surfset.

“We do the kids class and adult classes. We get a lot of outside groups who want to try it out. We have a CrossFit club from Seattle.”

Fitness trends keep going off the deep end. There are giant inflatable balls for bubble soccer, and fabric slings that hang from the ceiling so ordinary souls can act like Cirque du Soleil performers. The list goes on: pole dance, Booty Barre — anything to get away from those ho-hum static workouts.

The board is 22-inches wide and rocks about a foot off the ground. “If you fall, no one cares,” she said.

Surfset was created by a pro hockey player who wanted to maintain that toned physique of surfing in the off-season. No other workout could compare, so he designed a device to replicate a ride-the-waves workout. A stint on “Shark Tank” and investment backing helped take Surfset to the next level and to fitness studios worldwide.

LEFT: Mukilteo Fitness Bar’s Laurie George teaches Surfset classes, which make for a fun way to improve core strength, balance and flexibility. RIGHT: Laurie George leads a routine of vigorous exercises on Surfset Fitness boards. Surf-like moves are combined with yoga and TRX.

MUKILTEO FITNESS BAR

11700 Mukilteo Speedway, Mukilteo. For more information, call 425-263-6793 or go to www.mukilteofitnessbar.com.

You won’t drown in anything but your own determination to get back on the board. Without a wobble, George gracefully stands on one leg and extends the other leg straight out to the side horizontally, grabbing her toes. Most people can’t do that on solid ground. The motto is “Embrace the shake.” “The comments are always, ‘It goes by so quickly, it is so much fun I don’t even realize I am working out.’ Then the next day it’s, ‘Gosh, I’m really sore in a funny place,’” George said. “It’s those stabilization muscles you don’t use doing anything else.” Kids gravitate to the challenge. “They hop up on the boards,” she said. It’s therapeutic for seniors. “I’ve had some older people who come in just to work on balance,” she said. “Sometimes they’ll hold the bar. After the first class, their balance changes.” It’s not Maui, but it’s the next best thing.

New Year New You! Restore

Refresh

Rejuvena te

All Laser Hair Removal Packages

STAY TWO NIGHTS, GET ONE FREE*

1767348

50

% OFF

Good Thru 2/28/17

4310 Colby Avenue, Suite 101 Everett, WA 98203

425-259-9999 • www.LuminaSkin.Us

1609882

*One time offer, valid for new guests only.

call 425.259.6001 or visit: portofeverett.com/marina

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 41


CUSTOM HANGAR takes flight STORY BY JIM DAVIS

High-end furnishings is a whimsical and sophisticated departure from decommissioned aircraft

42 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE


It was a kind of a ‘Raiders of the Lost Ark’ experience where we’re opening up this mysterious box. —GERARDO MORES

EVERETT — Call it a window of opportunity. Three years ago, the Boeing Store obtained 16 airplane windows from a decommissioned Boeing 747. Employees decided to polish the pieces and sell them as home décor. “We thought we had enough supply for a year, but we sold out in a day,” said Madia Logan, the Boeing Store marketing manager. All of a sudden, the Boeing Store had a new line of business. The company decided to work with artisans to create a line of furnishings and décor made from aircraft parts. Now the Boeing Store offers more than 100 mainly high-end items under a product line called Custom Hangar. The pieces include a chair made from an F-4 Phantom II ejection seat that retails for $19,500; a conference table made from slats of a 727-200 wing that goes for $18,000; and even a wine bar made from a 727 airliner rearmounted jet engine offered at $10,500. While those pieces are out of reach for most households, the Boeing Store also has added some more affordable options. One is a ballpoint pen with the Boeing logo made with a circuit-breaker tab as the pusher. That sells for $50. Another option is a $55 wallet made from the leather of a 737 seat. The Boeing Store, which has six public locations, including one at the Future of Flight at 8415 Paine Field Blvd. in Mukilteo, has seen impressive growth in sales for the unique items, Logan said. Sales doubled the first year after they put those 747 windows on sale. This past year, the stores saw a third more growth than the year before. “We’re just building the recognition and awareness that we have these products,” Logan said. About 90 percent of the items come off decommissioned aircraft, said Gerardo Mores, a buyer for the Boeing Store. The company also looks for surplus aircraft parts wherever available.

Photo courtesy of The Boeing Store The Boeing Store is using pieces from decommissioned aircraft and surplus parts to create unique items under a product line called Custom Hangar. This propeller blade from a B-17 Flying Fortress makes a centerpiece for the aviation enthusiast.

In fact, Mores flew to Florida to meet a collector of warplanes who had a warehouse filled with aircraft parts. He purchased two wooden crates filled with four untouched B-17 Flying Fortress propellers. The crates even contained the original typed work order, Mores said. “It was a kind of a ‘Raiders of the Lost Ark’ experience where we’re opening up this mysterious box,” Mores said. The propellers were finished with a smoke-colored powder coating and attached to a base to serve as what’s being marketed as an “impressive display for the home or office.” The store also picks through its own surplus aircraft parts at Boeing, although nothing has been used to make any items yet, Mores said. C ONTINUED ON PAGE 4 4

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 43


LEFT: This DC-9 Pratt & Whitney Jt8D engine cowling has been converted into a sleek leather chair. BELOW: This wine bar is made from a DC-9/MD-80 rear-mounted turbofan engine. It’s one of the pieces of the Boeing Store’s Custom Hangar product line. The bar retails for $9,500. BOTTOM: Boeing Store employees put polished windows from a decommissioned Boeing 747 for sale as home décor about three years ago. The store sold out in a day. Photos courtesy of The Boeing Store.

C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 43

The high-end furnishings are a departure for the Boeing Store, which started out years ago as small employee convenience stores that sold aspirin, magazines and a limited selection of logo souvenirs. Fifteen years ago, Boeing centralized all company stores under a new subsidiary, Boeing Store Inc. For the most part, these stores only sold trinkets and other smaller items, such T-shirts, books and model airplanes. Now the Boeing Store is getting a handle on marketing 727 engine coffee tables. The Custom Hangar pieces can be purchased at any of the Boeing Stores or online and through Amazon. Logan said the company would also consider working with high-end retailers in the future. Several artisans from around the country work with the Boeing Store to refurbish and finish by hand these products. And the pieces that started it all off, the airplane windows, are now in stock, including a $695 747-100 window called the Joe Sutter edition after the head of the 747 program, who later came to be called the “Father of the 747.” To see the pieces of aviation history, visit one of the public Boeing Stores or go to www.BoeingStore.com.

44 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE


Event Co-Chairs Donna & Gordy Bjorg and Jodie & Jeff Cymbaluk

Spirit of Festival honoree Jay Ackley with Preston Simmons

FESTIVAL OF TREES

Thank You

Thank you to all who made the 2016 Festival of Trees such a tremendous success through your generous support, time and talents. Together, we raised over $1 million for Children’s Services at Providence. From corporate sponsors and volunteers to tree designers and every event attendee—it is the communal efforts of many individuals that make a celebration like Festival of Trees possible. SPIRIT OF FESTIVAL AWARD

Jay & Terry Ackley K&H Integrated Print Solutions • • • • • • • • • •

thank you to our sponsers TITLE SPONSOR

MEDIA SPONSOR

www.tulalipcares.org

distinguished platinum sponsors

Sean & Lisa Kelly

platinum sponsors

gold sponsors

Premera Blue Cross

The Everett Clinic

Radia Inc., PS-Patient Centered Imaging and Technology Solutions

silver sponsors

bronze sponsors

Klein Honda

The Dwayne Lane’s Auto Family

Providence Medical Group

Mortenson Construction

Frontier Communications

Rodland Toyota/Scion

RA Investment Properties, LLC

Heritage Bank

Roy Robinson Chevrolet, Subaru & RV Center

Sodexo

Hermanson Company

Western Washington Medical Group

Jan & Harv Jubie and Linda & Larry Jubie Moss Adams LLP Pediatrix & Obstertrix Medical Group Peoples Bank

• • • • • • • • • •

& centerpieces CORT Party Rental

décor

Seattle Children’s ZGF Architects LLP

Stadium Flowers

www.ProvidenceGeneralFoundation.org 1723143

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 45


pirits STORY BY AARON SWANEY

Local craft distillers are making some of the best distilled liqueurs on the planet. THE WINTER SOUR PHOTO BY BLUEWATER DISTILLERY

The Pacific Northwest offers a special business environment to craft producers. —J O H N L U N D IN

SNOHOMISH COUNTY — Walk-

ing through Skip Rock Distillers, one gets the distinct feeling of observing the laboratory of a mad genius. Beakers of brown liquid, filled to varying levels, are set about a work table. A notebook stuffed with papers is opened to a sheet that is half full of scribbled writing with a distinct air of important scientific measurements. A number of gauges are set aside, ready to be used. Bubbling almost in the background are the stars of the show. Three tall and lean (and beautiful) stills reach toward the ceiling of the distillery, condensation collecting on their small circular windows. There’s little sound, but enough evidence that something rather serious is taking place here. Skip Rock owner Ryan Hembree walks grace-

fully around the stacked oak barrels and piles of grain bags and other fresh ingredients, taking a moment every once in awhile to sip on some of that brown liquid. Hembree opened Skip Rock with his wife, Julie, in 2009, and they’ve been making award-winning spirits just off First Street in Snohomish ever since. As most of us information-age clock-punchers toil away behind computer screens all day, Hembree and the other members of the new age of craft distillers work to create new and flavorful spirits that are reshaping the craft distillery world. With the precision and rigor of a chemist and the heart and soul of a backwoods bootlegger, these craft distillers are making some of the best distilled liqueurs on the planet. Nowhere is that more evident than in the state of Washington, where more than 110

46 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

distilleries have opened their doors since 2010. To put it in perspective, there are just north of 500 micro-distilleries in the entire United States. Here in Snohomish County, we’re fortunate to have some of the best. Along with Skip Rock, AJ Temple of Lynnwood’s Temple Distilling has won numerous awards for his Chapter One London Dry Gin and Bookmark Limoncello since opening in 2015, while John Lundin of Bluewater Distilling — and his vision of a modern cocktail bar and restaurant — are redefining what it means to be a “destination distillery.” “The Pacific Northwest offers a special business environment to craft producers,” said Lundin, from Bluewater’s home on Everett’s burgeoning waterfront. “One where consumers are genuinely interested in what we do and why we do it.” The No. 1 champion of these spirits are the very men who create them. Talk to any of them and they will tell you why their gin, whiskey, vodka, etc., is the best. Mix the spirits the way the creators like to enjoy them, and one will find it’s hard to argue with genius.


The following are some distillers’ favorite drink recipes. A.J. TEMPLE

JOHN LUNDIN

Temple Distilling

Bluewater Distillery

LY N N W O O D

EVERETT

ENGLISH CHANNEL

THE WINTER SUN

With the gin from jolly ol’ England on one side and the French St. Germain and Lillet on the other (thus the English Channel name), this drink can please both sides of the divide.

Using the distillery’s newest infused liqueur, this bright drink is like a rare solar sighting in January: The perfect way to brighten up any dark, short winter day.

1½ ounces Temple’s Chapter One London Dry Gin ½ ounce lemon juice ½ ounce St. Germain ½ ounce Lillet Healthy shake of orange bitters Shake and pour into a cocktail glass.

2 ounces Blood Orange Vodka ¾ ounce Cocchi Americano ½ ounce simple syrup 1 teaspoon Allspice Tincture ½ ounce lemon Muddle the lemon with the vodka and add all ingredients over ice. Shake and strain. Garnish with blood orange.

uuu

uuu STIRRED SOUR

VIKING DIPLOMACY

Temple’s Limoncello is great on its own, but he has been fielding a lot of questions lately about what kind of drink he likes best with the award-winning fruit liqueur.

The Akvavit is a new entrant to the Bluewater lineup, but Lundin wasted no time in expressing his Nordic heritage in this libation. Unlike its namesake, this drink’s subtle herbal flavors mixes well with others.

2 ounces bourbon 1 ounce Temple Bookmark Limoncello 2 shakes orange bitters Shake and pour over ice.

uuu ENGLISH

CHANNEL

2 ounces Nordsjon Akvavit ½ ounce lime ¼ ounce simple syrup 2 slices cucumber Sprig fennel Muddle the cucumber and fennel with lime and add all ingredients over ice. Shake and strain.

uuu STIRR

ED SO UR

RYAN HEMBREE Skip Rock Distillers SNOHOMISH

KING COLE This pre-Prohibition cocktail is one of Hembree’s favorites to show off the finer parts of the distillery’s Rye Whiskey, derived from locally sourced rye, triticale and malt. 2 ounces Rye Whiskey ¼ ounce Fernet Branc ¼ ounce simple syrup Stir well with ice and pour into a chilled glass. Garnish with an orange or pineapple wedge.

uuu BLACK RUSSIAN Hembree makes Skip Rock’s Coffee Liqueur with locally sourced Balam Coffee grown on the hills above the Jaguar Forest in southern Mexico. He likes to pour it over ice cream, but when he’s looking to make a drink, he turns to this classic.

PHOT

OS BY TEMP L

E DIS TI

2 ounces Skip Rock Coffee Liqueur 1 ounce vodka Pour over ice. LLING

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 47


S T O R Y BY LY N N J E F F E R S O N

A cheap fix for garden junkies

They’re shiny, colorful and peacock proudly above garden beds as if to say, “I should be the only thing you admire in this garden.” It’s not a ginormous Allium Gladiator flower or a Sunzilla sunflower, but rather a large flower imposter made of layered, recycled glassware. Mismatched plates, bowls, saucers and other findings are stacked together to mimic a glorious flower mounted on a copper-colored stake stem. Classy, glassy garden art that brings distinction to your flowerbeds. The first time you see one, you’re mesmerized by its reflective colors and how it glimmers in the sunlight. I imagined the cost of these prize beauties must be pretty steep, but my inner-crafter voice said, “I bet I can make one of those for a lot less.” Following a little research, I learned I can! They are quite popular. Who knew? My crafter’s ego took a blow as I discovered everyone knew about them except me. As if to cut deeper into my wounded ego, it turns out they are extremely easy and fun to make. So much fun that if you aren’t careful, you can develop a ridiculous case of SOS — Shiny Object Syndrome. Later stages of the syndrome develop into a strong addiction to glassware — of any kind.

48 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

TOP: Glass flower sculpture displayed in a garden in Lake Stevens. Photo by Lynn Jefferson


Then it happens. The perfect combination and a warm dose of euphoria passes through my body. — LY N N J E F F E R S O N

LAKE STEVENS — My glass

addiction first developed when I needed a craft project for my next Crafty Winer’s Party — a three-hour evening where friends get together, build a craft project, eat tasty snacks and drink wine. After some research on the internet and dissecting the process, it became immediately clear that glassware flowers were the perfect craft project for my guests. It could be produced in a one- to two-hour session with no post-party assembly required. It could also be transported without incident. After all, who wants to spend an evening building a work of art only to have it implode in the back seat of your car should you stop too fast for a traffic light? Or worse, if you have to lay some rubber on the pavement while braking for that self-absorbed critter crossing the road in the dead of night. The flower plate project passed all my hypothetical what-ifs and had the makings of the perfect Crafty Winer’s project.

childlike giggle of delight as I fingered through my plastic bag of coins for four bits. Holding back my happy dance, I casually strolled back to my car with a devilish smile on my face — like I just got away with something big. On to the next sale. This went on for a few hours until I got tired of countless drive-bys and popping in and out of my car. My glass addiction wouldn’t let me give up, so it was on to the thrift shop, where I could cruise aisle after aisle of glass products all in one spot — “Shop till you drop” is the glassaholic’s mantra. Plates, bowls, candleholders, candy dishes and ashtrays have all become viable components for my glass masterpieces. The prices are a little higher than the garage sale bargains, but my caffeine-free, fatigued body was ready to pay a little extra for convenience. And, if I was lucky, the pieces I found had that day’s color of discounted price tag to help justify I made the right decision to continue on.

I quickly made my supplies list based on my research. First on the list was a healthy stash of glass. Where could I get a huge supply of mismatched glassware really cheap? My bargain-hunting light bulb went on and I familiarized myself with the location of every thrift shop, flea market and community garage sale within a 50mile radius. Saturdays began with a warm cup of java, comfortable pants, sensible shoes and a full tank of gas. Leaving no furniture cushion or drawer unturned for loose change, I exited the house with my Ziploc bag of coins in hand and Macklemore’s song “Thrift Shop” playing on my iPhone for motivation.

Now, with a full stash of glassware, I washed and spread them out over a large table. Everyone knows you’re not supposed to play with glass, but it’s irresistible and the temptation is too great. I started playing mix-and-match by stacking layers of dishes in harmonious sets until I found that perfect combination that artistically best represented a flower. I came to the realization that if anyone observed me, it could be viewed as unhealthy, neurotic behavior as I assembled and disassembled my combinations over and over again. Then it happened. The perfect combination and a warm dose of euphoria passed through my body.

Garage sale after garage sale, I perfected the process of the glassy gawker’s drive-by, scanning the sales tables to catch a glimpse of shimmering glass products or shiny objects. If nothing caught my eye, I hit the gas and moved on to the next sale. If I spotted a sparkling object on a table, I’d park the car and casually stroll up in hopes of finding a treasure or two.

Once I settled on the design, it was time to assemble my beautiful glass botanical. After more research, gluing was out of the question and drilling was in — even military-grade silicon glue is no match for the weight of the layers of glass in our soggy Northwest climate. If I glued it, it would only be a matter of time before gravity, water and time caused the plates to give way and disassemble in my flowerbeds. Drilled plates, long steel bolts, fender washers and nuts would support my glassy pieces for a lifetime.

When I found the perfect piece, I grabbed it and held it up to the natural light. As it glimmered in the light, a little Gollum voice in my head said, “We wants it, we needs it. Must have the precious.” Gollum, for those who don’t know, is the ring-obsessed fictional character from “The Lord of the Rings.” I put on my best poker face and asked the garage sale attendant, “Would you take 50 cents for this?” They usually responded with a yes and I struggled to hold back an inner

Once my pieces were drilled, I reviewed my stacked flower to decide if a little more icing on the cake was needed. Embellishments offer a little more bling and interest. After I built a few, every lost button, knob, shower hook adornment, glass bead, marble or other novelty became a possible accent. Using a marine-grade

LEFT AND ABOVE: Glass flower sculptures made from recycled glassware by Lynn Jefferson. Photos by Andy Bronson

C ONTINUED ON PAGE 5 0

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 49


C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 49

silicon adhesive, I glued on my extra glitz. The final stage was to attach the plate to a pole to give it the prominence it deserved in my garden. Rebar, ½-inch copper piping or steel electrical conduit were all suitable stems. Copper is the most attractive and appealing, but the thought of cashing in a portion of my retirement for just one pole was not. Instead — and here’s where that bargain-hunting light bulb goes on again — I discovered electrical conduit sprayed with realistic copper paint is a much more cost-effective solution. After drilling a ¼-inch hole through the top of painted copper pipe and attaching my glass plate flower, Voila! The glimmering master-

piece was ready to take its throne in my garden. My addictive trip had now come full circle as I took a step back to admire the queen of my garden. If I wanted to protect my glass flower from the cold winter weather, I could unscrew the wing nut, remove the flower from its pole, place it in a plate stand and bring it indoors. At the Crafty Winer’s Party, I was amazed at the combinations of glassware my guests put together that even I hadn’t thought of. Looking at the completed glass blossoms was like driving through the tulip fields in April — simply breathtaking. Everyone’s flowers made it home, and we shared photos of our glass

creations radiating over the flowers in our gardens. After the party, I strolled back into my workshop with renewed inspiration. I passed by the table of remaining glass and something caught my eye. It’s a blue plate with scalloped edges. Perfect for the base of another flower design. I looked to the left and then to the right, seeing potential companions. As I reached for one, then another and another, I began stacking again. I can’t stop. Another work of art has begun. I’ll stop after the next one. I’m sure of it ... my precious.

1. Gather your glassware. Check your cupboards first.

Friends, family, neighbors, garage sales and thrift stores are great sources. Some glass is better than others. Candleholders and vintage ashtrays make wonderful centerpieces. Tempered glass is a no-no. Plates with scalloped edges make the flower shape. Wash and remove all labels and tags.

2. Buy your supplies. You’ll need a ¼-inch diamond-core drill bit, ¼-inch by 3- to 4-inch long bolts, nut, wing nut and steel and neoprene fender washers, marine-grade silicon glue, copper metallic spray paint, ½-inch electrical conduit pipe and a ½-inch by 12-inch piece of rebar.

1

2 Buy your supplies

Gather your glass stash

3. Stack your glass. Start with a larger dinner plate and begin stacking in layers. Mix and match colors, shapes, sizes and patterns until you settle on a design. Be warned. It’s intoxicating!

4. Drill the glassware. You can hand drill but a drill press is much easier and reduces your percentage of broken glass. Using a spray bottle, make sure to keep a generous amount of water around the drill bit to keep it cool. Set the drill press to 650-900 RPMs. Over 900 RPMs will crack glass. Avoid tempered glassware. It will shatter into a million pieces. My motto — never get attached to a piece of glass until it’s drilled. 5. Embellish your flower. If you feel it needs a little more bling, add embellishments. Glass stones, metal objects, buttons, drawer knobs and marbles all offer additional detail. Shooter marbles make great centerpieces for your flower. You can paint on your plates with enamel nail polish. Let it dry for 24 hours. 6. Assemble and install. Line up the holes and slide the bolt through the flower layers. Add neoprene washers between plates that need additional reinforcement around the holes. Slide a large fender washer on the back and screw on the nut. Don’t over tighten, as it can break the glass. Using a ¼-inch drill bit, drill a 1-inch hole completely through the pole. Slide the bolt on the back of the flower through the hole. Slide on the fender washer and secure with the wing nut. Find a firm piece of ground. Drive the rebar stake halfway in. Slide the pole with flower over the rebar stake and push down into the soil to the desired height. Store inside during the winter months. Display the plate in a simple stand. For flower design examples, visit www.facebook.com/pg/TheGlassAddict

50 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

3

4 Drill your glassware

Stack your design

5

6 Add your extras

Assemble and install


Whether it’s Snoring or CPAP…

An Oral Appliance Can Help with Your Sleep Problem! Do you have Obstructive Sleep Apnea? Are you unable to use your CPAP? Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a breathing disorder that occurs while you are asleep. The muscles in your airway relax to a point that your airway is narrowed and prevents you from getting adequate oxygen. The stress caused by this lack of oxygen impacts your overall health, increasing risks of high blood pressure, heart attack, and stroke. Sleep apnea can cause daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and mood disorders. It leads to increased risk of Type 2 Diabetes, and weight gain/ difficulty losing weight. Most people with sleep apnea don’t even know this is happening! Oral Appliance Therapy (OAT) is recommended by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine as a first-line treatment option for patients with mild or moderate sleep apnea, or as an alternative in cases of severe sleep apnea when a CPAP cannot be tolerated.

BENEFITS OF AN ORAL APPLIANCE Stops the Snoring! n

n

n

COMFORT – a custom-fitted device that fits discreetly in your mouth without need for hoses, masks, etc. PORTABLE – small enough to fit in a small travel bag or pocket CONVENIENT – no need for power supply, easy to care for

n

PREVENTS DAMAGE from teeth grinding

n

QUIET – more socially acceptable to bed partner

I have sleep apnea. I can’t tolerate a CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure) device. How can you help me? Every day, our dental sleep experts hear from patients just like you who have tried a CPAP device and found it uncomfortable or unbearable. Dental-supported devices offer a comfortable alternative solution to a CPAP device. Research indicates 4 out of 5 patients report still using an oral appliance after 3 years, while less than 60% of patients can tolerate using CPAP.

I use CPAP nightly but I’m tired of traveling with it. Can this portable solution do the same as my CPAP? Research demonstrates that oral appliances are an effective treatment for sleep apnea, showing not only significant increases of oxygen level, but also significant improvements in physiological and behavioral outcomes.

See who physicians trust for Oral Appliance Therapy when they don’t use CPAP!

You don’t just want an oral appliance – you want a therapy and protocol that works. The sleep dental teams listed below have had extensive training. They use the most advanced appliances which most dentists are not trained to provide. Everett Dental Solutions for Sleep 425.320.0111 • Everett, WA www.EverettDentalSleepMedicine.com Sound Sleep Solutions 844.SLEEP04 • Bellevue, Olympia, Port Angeles, Sumner & Vashon, WA www.SoundSleepSolutionsWA.com

1773420

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 51 WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 51


Why I love it here:

DIANNE WHITE

A retired pharmacist and former mayor of Stanwood, Dianne Warsinske White has a panoramic view from her kitchen window that includes the city, Camano Island, Port Susan, Skagit Bay, and, on a good day, the Olympic Mountains. It’s a beautiful view that White’s mother, the late Ethel Warsinske, also enjoyed when she looked out her kitchen window. White’s new house is built in the footprint of the Frank Lloyd Wright-inspired home where she grew up. It’s where White got married in the late 1960s and where her daughter was wed in 2005.

PHOTO BY GENNA MARTIN

I

grew up in Stanwood, a bossy older sister to my three brothers.

Until I was a sophomore at Twin City High School, Stanwood and East Stanwood had two of everything. One town was mostly Norwegian, the other mostly Swedish. I’m a Warsinske, so I didn’t really fit in with my classmates. My salvation was that my dad was Doc Warsinske, the vet who took care of large and small animals belonging to people in both towns. After consolidation, the City of Stanwood emerged. It had

about 2,000 citizens, who survived by milking cows and growing green peas.

zens, but had not really changed its identity. Local government was stuck in the past.

Stanwood was a very safe place to live, but pretty boring for a teenager — no movie theater, no drive-in fast food, no YMCA. I left to spend the next six years at Washington State University in Pullman.

The bossy big sister in me decided, on behalf of the taxpayers, that I wanted to help modernize the way things were done. This attitude change as City Hall fostered participation from a diverse collection of motivated movers and shakers in our community.

For another few decades, I lived in cities and in a town even smaller than Stanwood. After selling our last pharmacy, my husband and I moved back to Stanwood to be near my dad. The sleepy community had grown to just under 5,000 citi-

52 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

A new Stanwood has emerged because the time was right. We have cleaned up junky properties, gotten rid of abandoned cars, built an Amtrak train platform and now have a spanking-

new YMCA, funded locally. We have the vibrant Port Susan Farmers Market, city-sponsored concerts, a successful Soap Box Derby and the Floyd Norgaard Cultural Center, which hosts history events, the annual snow goose bird festival, the Fourth of July ice cream social and the old-fashioned Christmas program. The city has just acquired two riverfront properties that will be developed into parks. I love Stanwood because it has clean air, it’s easy to get around, and mostly because it has a collection of citizens who step up and say, “Bring it on.”


Providence

Festival ofTrees

3

1 Steve and Carol Klein, Donna and Gordy Bjorg, Carol Bjorg, Carol and Buzz Rodland, and Roxanne, Kelli and John Cronin

2 Back row: Anthony Armada, EVP, Chief Executive, Providence Health & Services Western Washington; Lori Kloes, Chief Development Officer, Providence General Foundation, and Daren Kloes; Henry Veldman. Front row: Racelle Armada; Jill and Preston Simmons, Chief Operating Officer and Administrative Officer, Providence Health & Services Western Washington; Kirk Schulz, President, Washington State University and Noel Schulz

4

3 Spirit of Festival award winner Spirit of festival award winner Jay Ackley, Chief Executive Officer of

K&H Integrated Print Solutions with Preston Simmons, Chief Operating Officer and Administrative Officer, Providence Health & Services Western Washington

4 Festival Co-Chairs Donna and Gordy Bjorg and Jeff and Jodie Cymbaluk 5 Mel Sheldon, Chairman, Tulalip Tribes Board of Directors 6 Back row: Jack Sather, Terry Ackley, Brad Moorehouse, Jay Ackley, Ian Tolmie. Front row: Rob Haines and Chanelle Shore, Debbie Shield and Mark Schultz, all of K&H Integrated Print Solutions

7 Rick Pedack, Jay Ackley and Matt Bolin

5

1 26 7

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 53


Going pink for awareness While many were hunkered down awaiting the big storm warning in October, I joined 7,500 of my closest friends for a raucous hockey game at Xfinity Arena. There, the wind and rain had no effect on the cheers, jeers and sportsmanship of the Everett Silvertips versus their big rival, the Seattle Thunderbirds. “Pink the Rink” was the theme of the night, for Breast Cancer Awareness. The donations brought in by the Silvertips will benefit hundreds of Snohomish County women. Go Tips! —ELIZABETH PERSON

I L L U S T R A T I O N B Y ELIZABETH PERSON

SEE THE OUTDOORS IN COMFORT

• LIGHTER WEIGHT • 2 YEAR STRUCTURE GUARANTEE

LIVE. LANCE. LIFE.

LOW 7.7% SALES TAX IN CLEARVIEW

CALL TODAY 1-800-289-7870

SALES • SERVICE • PARTS 17104 Highway 9 SE, Snohomish, WA

www.clearviewrv.com 54 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

1774378


1766691

WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE | WINTER 2017 | 55


TULALIP IS UNRIVALED LUXURY AND EXCITEMENT. Escape to Washington’s premier gaming destination. Luxury and excitement combine to promise an unforgettable experience - This is My Tulalip.

3 0 M I N U T E S N O R T H O F S E AT T L E

888.272.1111 | TULALIPCASINO.COM 1744589

56 | WINTER 2017 | WASHINGTON NORTH COAST MAGAZINE

Washington North Coast Magazine - Winter 2017  

i20170118100055676.pdf

Washington North Coast Magazine - Winter 2017  

i20170118100055676.pdf