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Market Facts: Statistical profile of county Inside this issue JANUARY 2017 | VOL. 19, NO. 10

Party over: Will Trump dump pot? 12

Room Service Why so many hotels are opening in county • 8-9 Supplement to The Daily Herald

More from The Herald Business Journal: On www.theheraldbusinessjournal.com: ◗ Keep up to date with our weekly newsletter. ◗ See what’s on the local business calendar and submit your events. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ heraldbusinessjournal On Twitter: @HBJnews

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

A room at the Everett Courtyard by Marriott, which is the latest in a wave of hotels to open in Snohomish County, Pages 8-9.

COVER STORY Why so many hotels are opening new properties in Snohomish County, 8-9

BUSINESS NEWS Brooklyn Bros. to add pizzerias in Mill Creek, Camano Island. . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Boeing Store starts product line selling aircraft parts as decor . . . . . . 6

Pot shop owners cautious about new administration .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

BUSINESS BUILDERS Tom Hoban: Entrepreneurial effort aims to help local inventors . . . . . . 13

BUSINESS BRIEFS . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 BUSINESS LICENSES . . . . . . . . . . 15

How UW Bothell aids biotech firms in the Puget Sound region . . . . . . . . . 11

ECONOMIC DATA . . . . . . . . . 18-19

NEWSROOM

ADVERTISING SALES

Editor: Jim Davis 425-339-3097; jdavis@heraldnet.com; businessnews@heraldnet.com

Tara Raimey 425-339-3445 — Fax 425-339-3049 traimey@soundpublishing.com

Contributing Columnists: Tom Hoban, Andrew Ballard Publisher Josh O’Connor 425-339-3007 joconnor@soundpublishing.com

COVER PHOTO The eight-story Courtyard by Marriott that opened in October in downtown Everett is just one of many new hotels opening in Snohomish County. Kevin Clark / The Herald

Bankers who get it.

Andrew Ballard: How to find the right mix of media for marketing . . 13

Woodinville’s Briotech develops groundbreaking disinfectant. . . 10-11

Contributing Writers: Victoria Buritsch-Tompkins, Patricia Guthrie

Jim Croasdill • Downtown Everett

PUBLIC RECORDS . . . . . . . . . 16-17

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Brooklyn Bros. to grow the pie Homegrown pizzeria to add locations this year in Mill Creek, Camano Island By Victoria Buritsch-Tompkins For The Herald Business Journal

Brooklyn Bros. Pizzeria is about to double in size. With the original Everett location and the newer Mukilteo site running like clockwork, Vicki Evola, her former husband Don Evola and their business partner Brett Alkan started looking for a future location. Then two sites came up almost at the same time. “So how do you pick?” Alkan asks. They don’t have to. The Evolas and Alkan plan to open two new restaurants at the same time the first half of this year — one on Camano Island at Terry’s Corner and one at the Mill Creek Town Center. They’re confident in the chain’s ability to grow so much so fast. While the Camano Island will be a pizza-focused branch similar to the Mukilteo and Everett locations, the Mill Creek site will boast an extended menu and bar. There are early plans for a mural of the New York Skyline. Each of the locations, of course, will get its own graffiti wall. The most exciting challenge for prepping the two new stores? The ability to start from scratch. Like a puzzle, they look forward to incorporating what they know has worked and adding it into a new space. The large, rotating, circular ovens — Rotoflexes — will be a must-have at the new locations, for example. It’s certainly keeping them busy. Don Evola hasn’t quite planned which traditional dishes will be included at the Mill Creek location. It’s not quite top-secret, but he does think there will be more pasta entrees. Part of the charm of Brooklyn Bros. is the stripped-down menu — pizza only, only two meats. Not to mention the dough, which has a light, crisp texture on the bottom and a distinctive flavor. The dough, perfected by Vicki Evola when they moved to Everett, has history. “It’s like the New Yorkers say,” she says. “It’s in the water.” Training new hires takes patience — if a new person adds too much or too little of an ingredient to a batch, they don’t find out right away, because the dough needs three days to rise before it is ready to be used. The sausage is from a Ballard Italian sausage company that uses an Italian blend specifically for Brooklyn Bros.’ flavor, the pepperoni curling into a petite bowl is essential. The ricotta, Polly-O, puts all other ricotta cheese to shame for its sweetness and mild texture. “We shut down the shop if we don’t have it,” Vicki Evola insists. There’s no

PHOTOS BY KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

Joaquin Cruz tosses dough to make a pizza pie Friday afternoon at Brooklyn Bros. Pizzeria in downtown Everett. The business plans to open new sites in Mill Creek and Camono Island.

The most exciting challenge for prepping the two new stores? The ability to start from scratch.

Vicki Evola, co-owner of Brooklyn Bros. Pizzeria, takes an order at the downtown Everett site. She likes to work the front counter, especially after events at Xfinity Arena, to stay in touch with her customers.

substitutions, no compromising with other pieces that don’t fit in the puzzle. The tomatoes on the menu are shipped from Italy — Mt. Vesuvius San Marzanos. The tomatoes grow as non-acidic fruit thanks to the volcanic ash, meaning that they are naturally sweet as well. Handpicked ingredients and other standards — like adhering to the Brooklyn Bros. way — pay off in dividends. Their staff has gone from four people at the Everett store’s initial launch to 35 or 40 between the current locations at 1919 Hewitt Ave., Everett, and 8326 Mukilteo

Speedway, Mukilteo. (The Evolas and Alkan declined to comment on their yearly revenue.) Now the goal is to take their current success, and apply it to the new venues. It’s a tall order, but the Evolas built a business on the community of their staff and customers. When crowds overflow from Xfinity Arena, Vicki Evola still tries to work the front counter. It’s a great way to get to know her clientele. The customers have returned the favor in different ways. Inside the Everett location is the original graffiti wall. What

started as a few kids who wanted to draw on the wall — with the owners’ blessing — has evolved into a scrawled mass of permanent marker signatures, manifestos and even birthday announcements. Years of layers melted into one another. But they aren’t the only marks that customers leave behind. “So many things have been donated,” Vicki Evola said. A laminated full-color subway map over by kitchen had been willed in a customer’s final wishes: “Donate to Brooklyn Bros. upon my death.” A vanity license plate – banged up with age — was added to the shop by Don Evola’s family members. An oversized print of Everett’s historic Hewitt Avenue was passed along to Brooklyn Bros. by the recently shuttered Everett Museum. Vicki Evola tells the story of one kid named Jordan who started eating at the Everett pizzeria. He loved watching the pizza guys behind the counter. As a teen, he applied online and said it was his dream to work at Brooklyn Bros. “I saw him the other day making pizzas behind the corner, and there were three kids watching. ‘Jordan,’ I said, ‘that was you!’”


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PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE BOEING STORE

The Boeing Store is using parts from decommissioned aircraft to create a unique items under a product line called Custom Hangar. This propeller blade from a B-17 Flying Fortress makes a conversation piece for the aviation enthusiast.

New life for old parts

By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

EVERETT — Call it a window of opportunity. Three years ago, the Boeing Store obtained 16 airplane windows from a decommissioned Boeing 747. Employees decided to polish the pieces and sell them as home decor. “We thought we had enough supply for a year, but we sold out in a day,” said Madia Logan, the Boeing Store marketing manager. All of a sudden, the Boeing Store had a new line of business. The company decided to work with artisans to create a line of furnishings and decor made from aircraft parts. Now the Boeing Store offers more than 100 mainly high-end items under a product line called Custom Hangar. The pieces include a chair made from an F-4 Phantom II ejection seat that retails for $19,500; a conference table made from slats of a 727-200 wing that goes for $18,000; and even a wine bar made from a 727 airliner rear-mounted jet engine offered at $10,500. While those pieces are out of reach for most households, the Boeing Store has also added some more affordable options. One is a ballpoint pen with the Boeing logo made with a circuit-breaker tab as the pusher. That sells for $50. Another option is a $55 wallet made from the leather of a 737 seat. The Boeing Store, which has six public

Boeing Store employees put polished windows from a decommissioned Boeing 747 for sale as a home decor just more than three years ago. The store sold out in a day.

locations, including one at the Future of Flight at 8415 Paine Field in Everett, has seen impressive growth in sales for the unique items, Logan said. Sales doubled the first year after they put those 747 windows on sale. This past year, the stores saw a third more growth than the year before. “We’re just building the recognition and awareness that we have these products,” Logan said. About 90 percent of the items come off decommissioned aircraft, said Gerardo Mores, a buyer for the Boeing Store. The

company also looks for surplus aircraft parts wherever available. In fact, Mores flew to Florida to meet a collector of warplanes who had a warehouse filled with aircraft parts. He purchased two wooden crates filled with four untouched B-17 Flying Fortress propellers. The crates even contained the original typed work order, Mores said. “It was a kind of a ‘Raiders of the Lost Ark’ experience where we’re opening up this mysterious box,” Mores said. The propellers were finished with a smoke-colored powder coating and

attached to a base to serve as what’s being marketed as an “impressive display for the home or office.” The store also picks through its own surplus aircraft parts at Boeing, although nothing has been used to make any items yet, Mores said. The high-end furnishings is a departure for the Boeing Store, which started out years ago as small employee convenience stores that sold aspirin, magazines and a limited selection of logo souvenirs. Fifteen years ago, Boeing centralized all company stores under a new subsidiary, Boeing Store Inc. For the most part, these stores only sold trinkets and other smaller items, such T-shirts, books and model airplanes. Now the Boeing Store is getting a handle on marketing 727 engine coffee tables. The Custom Hangar pieces can be purchased at any of the Boeing Stores or online and through Amazon. Logan said the company would also consider working with high-end retailers in the future. Several artisans from around the country work with the Boeing Store to refurbish and finish by hand these products. And the pieces that started it all off, the airplane windows are now in stock, including a $695 747-100 window called the Joe Sutter edition after the head of the 747 program who later came to be called the “Father of the 747.” To see the pieces of aviation history, visit one of the public Boeing Stores, go to www.BoeingStore.com.


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COVER STORY

KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

The Everett Courtyard by Marriott features this popular aerospace-themed sitting area and meeting rooms with the names First Class Boardroom, Hangar Room and Flight Deck. The downtown Everett hotel is one of several new hotels that have recently opened or are planned to open in Snohomish County.

Hotel hotbed in Snohomish County

More than 1,100 hotel rooms being added in county in less than 10 years By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

Shannon Myers turns a corner at the new Courtyard by Marriott in downtown Everett and shows off the riveted aluminum desk and chairs with the wall-sized photo of a cockpit. “This has been a kind of Facebook favorite,” Myers said of the aeronautical-themed furnishings in the public area of the hotel’s second floor. Myers is the general manager for the eight-story, 156-room hotel that opened in late October at 3003 Colby Ave. The newest hotel in Everett has already seen a steady stream of locals touring the building, as well as a couple of sold-out nights even though its winter. “We have definitely felt very wel-

Rising hotel revenue Year

Occupancy Ave. Rate

Revenue

2010

62.5% $81.72

$102,837,533 64

5,413

2011

65.4% $85.47

$114,588,616 66

5,617

2012

66.5% $93.04

$126,781,565 66

5,616

2013

68.1% $94.86

$132,433,295 68

5,616

2014

71.5% $101.56 $152,995,358 68

6,012

2015

69.5% $105.52 $161,231,598 68

6,012

2016** 71.5

Hotels* Rooms*

$108.30 $127,474,718 68

*Based on Jan. 1 data **through September

comed from the community,” Myers said. “Everybody is very excited and we’ve been hearing from people that they’ve been waiting for something like this.” By itself, the new hotel, with an empty corner space for a future high-end restaurant, is a noteworthy addition to the heart of downtown. It’s also part of a larger trend — a wave of hotels being built across Snohomish County. Since 2010, five new hotels opened doors across the county.

6,034

Source: Smith Travel Research At least another four hotels are slated to open by 2018 — a Red Lion Inn and Suites and a WoodSpring Suites in Everett, a Hilton Garden Inn in Lynnwood and Home2Suites by Hilton in Marysville. Altogether, the boom will add more than 1,100 rooms to the county, pushing the total from 5,400 rooms in 2010 to as many as 6,500 rooms by 2018. That leads to the question: Is the market being oversaturated?

It’s easy to see why hotel companies are targeting Snohomish County. Overall revenue for hotels in the county jumped from $102.8 million in 2010 to $161.2 million in 2015, according to Smith Travel Research, a Tennesseee-based firm which collects data from hotel companies across the country. That’s an increase of 56 percent in five years. The past year has looked less promising. Occupancy and revenue per room have been flat since 2015, according to the firm. With several new ones coming online, that could put a strain on existing hotels, said Amy Spain, executive director of the Snohomish County Tourism Bureau. “It does concern me that demand is flat and there are new hotels coming into the marketplace,” Spain said. “I hope that (the past year has been) a blip and next year we’ll be stronger.” Smaller mom-and-pop hotels will be most at risk, said Julie Horrigan, president of the Snohomish County Lodging Association.


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“If we work together, we’ll drive more market to us and work on filling those rooms.”

Hotels on tap 2016 Courtyard by Marriott: Everett, 8 stories, 156 rooms Red Lion Inn and Suites: Everett, 3 stories, 45 rooms

— Mark Beatty “It’s definitely worrisome for some of the older hotels that, without naming names, haven’t kept up,” Horrigan said. The hotel market in Snohomish County relies on business travelers more than events or tourism, said Horrigan, director of sales for Residence Inn Seattle North/Lynnwood-Marriott. “A lot of it will depend on what happens with Boeing,” Horrigan said. “If Boeing cuts back, we feel it immediately.” Pressure is coming not just from new hotels in Snohomish County, but what’s being built from Seattle north, she said. Hotels in the south county rely on overflow guests — people who can’t find a hotel in King County during the cruise ship season and during major conventions, she said. Those travelers will look to Bothell or Lynnwood. She said that some hotels will find new uses. For instance, she said, the Hotel Nexus in the Northgate neighborhood of Seattle is converting from a hotel to condominiums. “I’ve heard this term, ‘The ship will right itself at some point,’” she said. The new hotels that are coming online in Everett are offering different amenities and price points that will appeal to differ-

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 9

2017 WoodSprings Suites: Everett, 4 stories, 122 rooms Home2Suites by Hilton: Marysville, 5 stories, 90 rooms 2018 KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

A room at the Everett Courtyard by Marriott. The eight-story, 156-room hotel opened in October.

ent consumers, Snohomish County Tourism Bureau executive director Spain said. “There’s demands for different kinds of cars,” Spain said. “There’s someone who’s looking for a Volkswagen and there’s someone who’s going to Mercedes Benz.” Hotels do appeal to different marketing segments, said Mark Beatty, the Washington State University hospitality program coordinator in Everett. The Tulalip Resort & Casino will draw a different clientele than the new WoodSprings Suites in Everett, which is an extended-stay hotel. There will be competitive pressures with all of the new hotels, but that makes it important for the county’s hotels to

“band together and grow the pie,” Beatty said. “We have a lot going for us up here in Snohomish County,” Beatty said. “If we work together, we’ll drive more market to us and work on filling those rooms.” Myers, the Everett Courtyard by Marriott general manager, said that she’s planning to work with the former Holiday Inn Downtown Everett — long Everett’s biggest hotel with 243 rooms and 11,000-square-feet of meeting space. The hotel is being remodeled into a sister brand, Delta Marriott, and plans to re-open this coming summer. The remodeled hotel will attract events and could push overflow guests other hotels

Hilton Garden Inn: Lynnwood, 6 stories, 150 rooms Source: Snohomish County Tourism Bureau in the area, Myers said. Myers, who has been in the hotel business for 22 years including 13 in the county, has seen bursts in hotel construction before. She points to a growth in business in the community and the potential for a new commercial air traffic terminal at Paine Field. “I’ve been through this over the years,” Myers said. “Somehow it just works, especially with the Paine Field airport looking like it’s a go. I just feel like there’s so much in the works, as far as development goes, that it makes sense and it’s definitely needed.”

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Biotech breakthrough draws praise Disinfectant shown in federal study to kill notoriously tough mad cow disease By Patricia Guthrie

For The Herald Business Journal

Dan Terry is out to change the world. Or at least rid it of deadly germs, viruses and fungi that kill millions every year. How? With hypochlorous acid, known as HOCL, that mimics the human body’s response to wounds and invading microbes. Medical science has long known about the wondrous ways of HOCL and inventors have long sought to duplicate its germ-fighting power with just the right mix of chemicals. Replicating the body’s HOCL into a pure and stable solution as a low-cost liquid disinfectant has been the challenge. Mass producing HOCL and distributing it at an affordable price is the goal of Terry and his company, Briotech, Inc., based in Woodinville, just south of the Snohomish-King county line. He envisions the spray could be used in health-care facilities, restaurants, cruise ships, water parks, any place where many people interact in a potential breeding ground for infectious diseases that are becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics. Briotech’s HOCL formula, called BrioHOCL, has yet to be scientifically tested on an array of the most prevalent, problematic pathogens that infect food, such as salmonella, listeria, e.coli O157:H7 or norovirus. But in a recent federally funded study, the formula successfully inactivated one of the world’s deadliest infectious pathogens called prions. These misfolded proteins are the cause of bovine spongiform encephalopathy or mad-cow disease and the brain-wasting fatal disease in humans called Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD). A study published in medical journal PLOS Pathogens found Briotech’s HOCL formula “eliminated all detectable prion-seeding activity” in the brain tissue of humans known to have died of CJD, cattle infected with mad cow disease and other animals suffering from prion-caused disease. “That it knocks out the infectivity completely that was in those brains, it was surprising,” said Byron Caughey, a senior investigator at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, a division of the National Institutes of Health, which led the study.

From acne to Ebola After pouring $6 million into setting up the company warehouse and offices, traveling the world to learn from scientific experts and enduring chemical conundrums for years, Terry says Briotech is making inroads toward his goal

PHOTOS BY DANIELLA BECCARIA / THE HERALD

Dan Terry, CEO and co-owner of Briotech in Woodinville, helped find a way to create an artificial disinfectant that has been found to kill the mad cow infection and may be used for other pathogens.

(Terry’s most famous invention: Jane Fonda’s first treadmill sold during her aerobic exercise era of the 1980s.) The name of the company seems a play on words for biotech but Terry stresses he named it Briotech because the word “brio” means strength, spirit, life, action, passion and energy. Even though the recent federal study found BrioHOCL can inactivate one of the toughest pathogens on earth — prions — the spray is “perfectly safe,” says Terry who resembles a shorter version of another unusual chemist, Breaking Bad’s Walter White. “See,” he says, aiming a sample size bottle toward his face, “I can spray it my eyes. Doesn’t hurt.” (Terry has also been known to stand in buckets of the stuff to prove it doesn’t sting, irritate or burn.) Briotech produces and sells BrioHOCL worldwide for cuts and scrapes. A recent study found the substance was able to wipe out the mad cow pathogen.

People protecting themselves

of becoming an important public health tool. BrioHOCL is already in use in 22 countries, from Ghana to Qatar, and it’s being considered for sanitation systems, health-care settings and other uses in 35 countries. While company executives travel globally to establish partnerships with local governments, the product is also available online in much smaller quantities. It sells on Amazon in spray bottles as a “cosmeceutical created to protect and promote skincare wellness.” The 4-ounce bottle at $14.95, and 16 ounce for $39.95, additionally are plugged as “an all-natural and potent signaling solution that mimics the essence of human healing.” On the company website, and in Amazon product testimonials, dozens of customers state that the spray cleared their acne, helped heal wounds faster and calmed skin irritations. Terry calls his product an example of

If Terry’s global mission goes according to plan, BrioHOCL will help make water systems clean worldwide, stop the spread of deadly infections in hospitals, eliminate the spread of food poisoning in agricultural settings, food plants and commercial kitchens and help curb cholera and other diseases during natural disasters. “Our goal is to help people protect themselves,” Terry says. “I wanted to get a solution into the hands of the people who need it. The proof will be the lack of problems.” It is unknown whether BrioHOCL will be the long-waited solution to accessible, clean water in remote villages or make a dent in global rates of cholera, hepatitis, typhoid and other persistent infectious diseases. But Terry, 60, is determined to try. “I’ve made a lot of inventions but they didn’t fulfill me,” he says. “This justifies

“disrupter technology,” one that creates a new market and displaces established practices. For that reason, large healthcare organizations, food manufacturers and other systems in the U.S. needing to meet sanitation code may be hesitant to switch disinfectant practices. One system it has cracked is the funeral industry. Briotech is partnering with Dodge Company, an international supplier to funeral homes, in supplying its BrioHOCL sanitizing spray. Funeral homes have been known to refuse bodies suspected of being exposed to CJD, fearing contamination and spread from deadly prions.

Safe yet effective Terry co-founded Briotech with his wife and chief administrative officer, Cynthia Varela. They previously ran Danterry Inc., which specialized in product development of thermal and alternative energy.

Continued on Page 11


JANUARY 2017

Continued from Page 10

the oxygen and hydrogen I take up in the world.”

How UW Bothell aids biotech firms

A mad cow killer Prions are known to be one of toughest pathogens to kill. They withstand extremely high temperatures and chemical decontamination efforts against prions are dangerous to people and equipment. The study substituted stainless steel wire as a surrogate for expensive surgical instruments, said Caughey, the NIH scientist. BrioHOCL effectively knocked out prions and it didn’t irritate surfaces or skin. “It seems like you can practically bathe in it,” he said. “I think it will have an extraordinary important application in the world.” Joel Watts, an assistant professor at the University of Toronto’s Tanz Centre for Research in Neurodegenerative Diseases, called the findings groundbreaking, but with a caveat. “I would caution against assuming that it will be effective against every single pathogen out there,” said Watts, who was not involved in the NIH study. “Nonetheless, all the evidence points to BrioHOCL being the best prion disinfectant discovered to date, which is itself a remarkable achievement.” So is there anything it can’t do? Rising from this chair, the inventor of the germ-buster-in-a-bottle answered. “Well,” Terry said, patting his head. “I’m still short and I’m still bald.”

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 11

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Students Luis Contreras, Virkamal Dhaliwal and chemistry professor Lori Robins (left to right) in a University of Washington Bothell lab. They helped Briotech prove its product is effective in destroying abnormal proteins that cause dementia disorders.

By Patricia Guthrie

a transportable manufacturing process to make a decontamination solution of hypochlorous acid, or HOCL. Its mission is to stop the spread of infectious diseases in hospitals, water systems and other settings by using the liquid as a cleanser, fogger, wound healer and hand sanitizer, among other uses. To test its formula, the company pitted its BrioHOCL solution against prions, one of the toughest pathogens known and the cause of fatal brain-wasting diseases in humans, cattle and other animals. The National Institutes of Health con-

For The Herald Business Journal

Bringing in academia to assist in a Woodinville’s biomedical company’s research seemed natural to Jeff Williams. “I realized there was a tremendous resource here in the middle of our biotech corridor — the Bothell campus of the University of Washington,” said Williams, a retired Michigan State University microbiology professor and chief science officer at Briotech, Inc. The private company has developed

ducted the study at its Allergy and Infectious Disease lab in Hamilton, Montana. Researchers determined BrioHOCL eliminated prions ability to replicate in brain tissue samples and in experiments with mice. It also found the formula capable of killing prions on surgical equipment known to transmit Crueutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, a fatal dementia, to patients. Prions under scrutiny for a possible connection to Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s were also inactivated by the Briotech solution, the NIH said. UW Bothell students Luis Contresas and Virkamal Dhaliwai worked for Briotech as seniors, analyzing the purity of the BrioHOCL formula and how long it remains effective. They’ve since graduated. The students names appear on the NIH findings published in the journal PLOS Pathogens as part of the research team. “I was very fascinated on ‘the how’ of the experiments,” said Contresas, 23. “And, honestly I still can’t wrap my head around the paper. I come from a small town in Mexico. I never expected to go this far, to even graduate from college.” Lori Robins, associate biochemistry professor in the School of Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics at UW Bothell, said she and her students met weekly with Williams to review what they’d learned. “It’s been a really exciting process for me,” Robins said. “It helped us all grow as scientists and we learned things we would not have been exposed to.”

NOMINATIONS NOW OPEN! Deadline to nominate is Sunday, Jan. 8! Recognizing and celebrating the next generation of leadership!

AWARD EVENT COMING APRIL 2017 The Herald Business Journal and Moss Adams – in partnership with Puget-PR, Economic Alliance Snohomish County and Leadership Snohomish County – are seeking to honor the next

Top nominees will be honored at an event in Spring 2017 and featured in the April edition of The Herald Business Journal. generation of leadership in our community. The Emerging Leaders Award pays tribute to an individual who exemplifies outstanding professional values: demonstrates the ability to

go above and beyond the expectations of a leader; and serves as an inspiration to the community. All nominees must currently work or reside in Snohomish County.

Complete the nomination form today at:

theheraldbusinessjournal.com/emergingleaders In partnership with:

Contact HBJ editor Jim Davis at 425.339.3097 or jdavis@heraldnet.com if you have questions.

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Could state’s pot party be over? By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

Marijuana may be legal in Washington, but things can change fast — especially with a new administration coming in the door. President-elect Donald Trump said on the campaign trail that individual states should decide the issue. Then he nominated an attorney general who called legalizing pot a “tragic mistake.” Should people in Washington who own pot shops or who have invested heavily in the marijuana industry be concerned? Bruce White, who owns White Rabbit Cannabis along Highway 99 in Lynnwood, doesn’t think so, but then he said Trump is “untested and unpredictable.” “I would be quite surprised if the new administration actually went after the marijuana business as it’s going right now, but who knows?” White said. If the feds were to put a stop to the sales, it would be devastating for him and his wife. “Oh, it would wipe us out. We’ve invested a good portion of our life savings into this. It would be catastrophic. We have 19 employees here.” Another pot shop owner says he’s “vaguely concerned” about the new administration. Gene Kulinovsky owns two pots shops in Snohomish County — Kushman’s at 15804 Highway 99 in Lynnwood and the

DAN BATES / THE HERALD

White Rabbit Cannabis owner Bruce White says it would be devasting for him and his wife if the new administration were to actually put a stop to marijuana sales.

just opening Kushman’s at 11110 Mukilteo Speedway, Suite 102, in Mukilteo. He thinks there would be too much outcry for the feds to stop legal pot sales, noting that 70 million on the West Coast have voted to make it legal. “I don’t see the administration going against this many people,” Kulinovsky said. Recreational use is now legal in eight states and medicinal use for pot is legal in

28 states and the District of Columbia. But Trump’s nominee for attorney general, Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions, has long been critical of pot. Last year, Sessions said during a Senate hearing that “good people don’t smoke marijuana.” He went on to say, “We need grown-ups in charge in Washington to say marijuana is not the kind of thing that ought to be legalized.” For now, a 2013 memo from then-Deputy U.S. Attorney General James Cole

continues to guide federal prosecutors on marijuana enforcement. Simple possession is considered a low priority left up to state and local enforcement. Federal officials are encouraged to focus instead on priorities such as ensuring that marijuana sales aren’t supporting gang activity and that the drug isn’t getting transported across state lines to places where it remains illegal. Sessions hasn’t said laid out what, if anything, he would do differently with pot. The state has issued 467 licenses for pot businesses. Pot buyers spent $972 million for legal marijuana in the state’s last fiscal year from July 2015 to June 2016. Of that, the state collected $185 million in excise taxes. White was one of the first licensees, part of the lottery for the initial release of retail pot licenses. His father-in-law had purchased a slice of property at 15928 Highway 99 S about 50 years ago and had never done anything with the property. White and his wife had been in construction when they applied for the retail license. After they received it, they brought an 840-square-foot modular building onto the land, which met all the zoning requirements for the new businesses. “It’s been excellent,” White said. “It’s surpassed my expectations. We get a complete cross-section of humanity coming in here.”

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JANUARY 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 13

Helping Snohomish County inventors

W

ith costs rising for housing, office and labor in Seattle and Bellevue, the idea of incubating start-ups in areas outside of King County is gaining momentum. Diane Kamionka, executive director of the non-profit Northwest Innovation Resource Center, is one of those leading that effort. After a successful career in the corporate world, Kamionka found her calling to entrepreneurism in a tent on Vancouver Island several years ago. “I was ready to unplug from the corporate life that had been so good to me, so I took a cross-country trip by myself and landed on a remote beach on the Pacific,” said the unassuming Kamionka. “That’s when I realized that I wanted to relocate and help communities outside of the major urban centers become entrepreneurial and feel all of the benefits.”

Her concept is simple. “There are great ideas being birthed all around Snohomish County and up to the Canadian Border. Why do they need Tom to go to King County to launch Hoban when they can bring their business Realty ideas to life right Markets here?” To do that, she’s worked with local business leaders to create the elements required to help entrepreneurs and inventors succeed. For inventors, that includes a program called Slingshot NW, a subsidiary of the Innovation Resource Center, that helps

inventors get their product to market. Through the center, they can tap into the advisory support they need to launch, then work with Slingshot to get to the finish line. For those entrepreneurs who are starting a new business, they often have all the elements required but lack enough money to hit the start button. Without private investors in our area, they are driven to King County, other urban areas or their idea dies. Local investment funds are the missing component, according to Kamionka. Usually referred to as angel investors, they are often an entrepreneur’s first source of outside capital. “Angel investors are entrepreneurs themselves, so they are a source of capital, a network of connections and often the best advisors to the entrepreneur” she explains. “What I’ve seen in Snohomish,

Skagit, Whatcom and Island counties impresses me. Angel investors here just needed someone to organize them.” The benefits to the community include diversifying the job base, creating more jobs and creating more local wealth. “Bill Gates started this way. Jeff Bezos started this way. That’s what inspires me. Maybe we can find the next Bill Gates right here in Snohomish County?” That’s not the endgame for Kamionka, though, “Obviously, we want investors and the entrepreneurs to all do well. But the community is the real winner. The best places to live and work are entrepreneurial at their core.” To learn more, visit www.nwirc.com or www.slingshotnorthwest.com. Tom Hoban is CEO of The Coast Group of Companies. Contact him at 425-339-3638 or tomhoban@coastmgt.com or visit www. coastmgt.com. Twitter: @Tom_P_Hoban.

You don’t need the Caped Crusader to select the best media mix — you may, however, want to consult a professional media planner. If you don’t have a media planning, media outlet sales reps will provide the audience and CPM data you need to make an informed selection at no charge. When you target the right market with the right message through

the right media, you are three-quarters the way there. Check out my February column to learn about the secret of the best timing to succeed in marketing. Andrew Ballard is president of Marketing Solutions, an agency specializing in growth strategies. For more information, call 425337-1100 or go to www.mktg-solutions.com.

How to select best media mix in marketing

J

ust when you thought the extent of noted by more readers than a quarter communications channels couldn’t page black-and-white. You can tell a get any more confusing — POW, a more in-depth story during a 60-second new medium emerges. radio spot than a 30. Plus, some messages Media fragmentation has made it produce a better response than others. far more difficult for companies to genBased on your marketing objectives erate a positive return on their marketing and budget, choose the medium — or investment. Holy media plan, Batman, mix — that is the most “value approwhat do we buy now? priate” for your market and This is the third installment message (secrets one and two). of my series detailing the Efficiency: After you’ve “four secrets to marketing determined the best media success.” After you “target the environment(s), narrow your list right market” (first secret), down to those that best target “with the right message” your market(s). Compare them (second secret), you’ll deliver based on composition, coverage your message “through the and cost. right media.” Composition is the percentAndrew Not long ago, the smorgasage that your target market Ballard bord of media was relatively represents of a media outlet’s small. Now marketers must total audience. Coverage is the Growth choose between 500-plus TV percentage of your total target and radio options, print publimarket a media outlet reaches. Strategies cations galore and a cadre of If you are doing direct-reother traditional media. Not sponse advertising (sale ends to mention the countless digital channels. Sunday, Sunday, Sunday), which requires Another challenge is that simultaneous a high frequency of exposure, opt for media consumption is on the rise — an outlet with a higher composition. If thereby diluting the impact of marketing. you are building brand awareness over a One 2016 study, by eMarketer, reported longer promotional cycle, lean toward a that nearly 85 percent of adults surf the vehicle with a higher coverage to extend Internet — most often on a smartphone your reach. or tablet — while watching TV…that There is not a single efficiency formula percentage is projected to approach 92 that levels the playing field for all media, by 2018. mostly due to the previously cited “value” Suffice to say, audiences and their factors. However, using a Cost-Perattention will continue to splinter. So, Thousand (CPM) calculation provides a how do you choose among the multifair barometer for comparing all media… tude of media to deliver your message? traditional and digital. By evaluating both the “value” and Formula: (Cost ÷ Audience) x 1,000 = “efficiency.” CPM. Example: Cost of media is $2,500 Value: Different media environments to deliver your message, divided by a total offer different values. A billboard may targeted audience reached of 50,000 = .05 deliver a heavy traffic count, but you can x 1,000 = a Cost-Per-Thousand of $50. only convey a short message, which may Of course, a CPM of $50 doesn’t mean be all you need. Print, on the other hand, anything by itself; however, when comis an excellent venue for detail, but lacks paring it to other media outlet CPM’s the multi-media allure of television and using the same budget, it objectively online channels. illustrates which among the outlets being Other value factors include the ad considered is the most cost-efficient itself. A full-page, four-color ad will be (based on the lowest CPM).

THE PEKING ACROBATS

Wednesday, January 25, 2017 | 7:30 pm Tickets $24–$49 The Peking Acrobats perform daring maneuvers atop a precarious pagoda of chairs; are experts at trick-cycling, precision tumbling, somersaulting, and gymnastics; and defy gravity with amazing displays of contortion, flexibility, and control. Masters of agility and grace, they push the envelope of human possibility.

THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE Saturday, March 11, 2017 | 7:30 pm Tickets $44–$69

Get carried away by New York Gilbert & Sullivan Players’ production of Pirates! Join the band of swashbuckling buccaneers, bumbling British bobbies, frolicsome Victorian maidens, and the delightfully dotty “model of a modern MajorGeneral” for a rollicking romp over the rocky coast of Cornwall.

NIYAZ featuring AZAM ALI Friday, March 17, 2017 | 7:30 pm Tickets $14–$44

Niyaz has created a 21st century global trance tradition, seamlessly blending poetry and folk songs from their native Iran and surrounding countries, with rich, acoustic instrumentation and state-of-the-art, modern electronics. Niyaz will perform with an electric/acoustic quintet and feature a classically-trained whirling dervish.

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14 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

EVERETT — Northwest investment firm D.A. Davidson & Co. has named two financial advisers from the Everett office to the President’s Club, one of the firm’s most prestigious honors. Named were senior vice president Jeffrey Decker and vice president/branch manager Daniel Leach. The D.A. Davidson President’s Club recognizes members with outstanding integrity and service to clients. EVERETT — Cuts are coming to the Boeing Co.’s 777 line — deeper and sooner than previously planned by company leaders. The company announced plans in December to cut production from the 8.3 airplanes a month to five a month in August. The decision likely will mean job cuts next year in Everett, where the 777 is assembled, though how many and exactly when is not clear.

JANUARY 2017

BUSINESS BRIEFS PORT OF EVERETT SHIPPING SCHEDULE Ship port calls 2016 YTD: 80

Daniel Leach

Barge port calls 2016 YTD: 57

Jeffrey Decker

Ship port calls 2015: 133 Barge port calls 2015: 61 Jan. 1: Swire, Siangtan Jan. 3: Westwood, Westwood Olympia Jan. 17: Westwood, Westwood Rainier Jan. 21: ECL, ISS Spirit Jan. 24: Westwood, Bardu

Trevor Faucett

Cassie Franklin

Jan. 31: Westwood, Westwood Victoria

EVERETT — Everett City Councilwoman Cassie Franklin has been appointed to the National League of Cities 2017 Human Development federal advocacy committee. As a member of the committee, Franklin will play a key role in shaping the organization’s policy positions and advocate on behalf of America’s cities and towns before Congress, with the new administration and at home. Everett Mayor Ray

Feb. 7: Westwood, Hammonia Berolina Feb. 14: Westwood, Westwood Columbia Source: Port of Everett Stephanson lauded the appointment. ARLINGTON — Trevor Faucett, a relationship manager and vice president with Northwest Farm Credit Services in Arlington, has been selected to participate in Class 39 of the AgFor-

estry Leadership Program – a premier leadership development program for those who work in the natural resource industries and related services in Washington State. The 18-month program includes in-state, national and international seminars.

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LYNNWOOD — On Nov. 29, the Edmonds Community College Foundation honored the 173 people, companies, and foundations who donated to its veterans campaign with the unveiling of the Boots to Books and Beyond Veterans Donor Wall in Lynnwood Hall. The campaign raised $1 million to provide on-campus support services for student veterans, including a centralized Veterans Resource Center and more. BELLEVUE — The Pacific Northwest Aerospace Alliance will present a lunch forum with the Aero Law Group at 11 a.m. Jan. 17 at 11120 NE Second St., No. 100, Bellevue. Learn how commercial and corporate jets are bought, sold, leased and financed and how Washington tax laws impact the industry. Details and registration links are at http://tinyurl. com/zfc4qfde. EVERETT — The American Institute of Chiropractors has recognized the exceptional performance of chiropractor Ronnie Sikka of Progressive Chiropractic and Massage in Everett. Sikka is one of 2016’s 10 Best Chiropractors for Client Satisfaction. Practitioners who are selected to the 10 Best list must pass the organization’s rigorous selection process and demonstrate the highest standards in client satisfaction. STANWOOD — The Country Living Expo and Cattlemen’s Winterschool is scheduled for Jan. 28, 2017 at Stanwood High School. Edible wild plants, home orchard pruning, beekeeping and pole building construction are just some of the 180 classes, 52 of them new, that will be offered. More than 65 vendors will be in the free trade show. To register and view classes, visit http://skagit.wsu.edu/ CountryLivingExpo. EVERETT — After a three-year social investment campaign, HopeWorks Social Enterprises has received a capstone loan of $300,000 via a pro-

gram related investment from the Community Foundation of Snohomish County. This significant investment allows HopeWorks to meet its $1.8 million campaign goal, and further positions the organization for its upcoming expansion of HopeWorks Station Phase II at 3331 Broadway in Everett. MONROE — Burger chain Carl’s Jr. added a second location in Snohomish County this week in Monroe. The restaurant opened Monday at 19143 Kelsey St. It is expected to employ 75 people. The restaurant is operated by the San Dimas, California-based Burger Makers Inc. A Marysville restaurant has been open for several years. OLYMPIA — The Washington Department of Labor & Industries has confirmed that the minimum wage in Washington will increase to $11 an hour starting on Jan. 1. This applies to all jobs, including those in agriculture. Workers under 16 years old can be paid 85 percent of the adult minimum wage. Seattle, Tacoma, and the City of SeaTac have higher minimum wage rates for 2017. MOUNT VERNON — Karen Neugebauer, master chocolatier and founder of locally-owned Forte Chocolates, was awarded the prestigious title of World Gold for her Dark Sea Salt Caramels at the International Chocolate Awards. The awards were held Oct. 6 to 11 in London, England. Neugebauer’s retail locations can be found in downtown Mount Vernon and Fairhaven. EVERETT — Re/Max Elite in Everett has announced that Renee Comey is now a seller representative specialist and Jen Murrweiss is a new certified negotiations expert. Tina Leggett has become an accredited buyer’s representative. Additionally, Ariel Myslak and Kathy Slack have joined the Re/ Max Elite team. Myslak has been an agent for two years. Slack has been one for 30 years.


BUSINESS LICENSES PLEASE NOTE: Business license information is obtained monthly from the Washington Secretary of State’s Office through the paid commercial services of InfoUSA. For the complete list, please go to www.theheraldbusinessjournal.com.

Arlington 12th Van Carpet Cleaning: 16910 59th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-3725; 360-3227406; Carpet and Rug Cleaners BR Operating: 19818 74th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-5021; Sheet Metal Work Contractors Barbara J. Petersib Beauty Shop: 625 S Stillaguamish Ave., Arlington, WA 98223-1688; Beauty Salons Bravo Construction-Remodeling: 6906 Upland Drive, Arlington, WA 98223-7872; Construction Companies Farmers Insurance: 16410 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington, WA 98223-8415; 360-3634994; Insurance Haggen Northwest Fresh: 3711 88 St. NE 98205, Arlington, WA 98223; 360-530-7700; Nonclassified Establishments Massage Rocks: 303 N Olympic Ave., No. 6, Arlington, WA 98223-1338; Massage Therapists Rolling Farms: 18520 67th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8942; 360-691-9882; Farms Sacred Path Day Spa: 3210 Smokey Point Drive, Arlington, WA 98223-7805; 360-6574509; Health Spas Snohomish County Excavation: 410 148th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8020; 360-5723186; Excavating Contractors Straw Field Alpaca Ranch: 15530 67th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-7509; 360-454-0685; Ranches

Everett 1st Security Bank: 2825 Colby Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3554; 425-263-8830; Banks ABC Retreat: 2427 132nd St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-7152; Retreat Houses Advanced Automotive Recond: 11715 Highway 99, Everett, WA 98204-4809; 425374-2810; Automobile Repairing and Service Advanced Computer Solutions: 6315 Fleming St., No. C, Everett, WA 98203-4590; Nonclassified Establishments Arctik Rose Contractor: 1817 Mcdougall Ave., No. B, Everett, WA 98201-2456; Contractors Azen Massage Spa: 4716b Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98203; Massage Therapists Aziel Construction: 10307 Meridian Ave., Everett, WA 98208-3951; 425-356-9945; Construction Companies Black Lab Gallery: 1618 Hewitt Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3516; 425-512-9476; Art Galleries and Dealers Block Advisors: 910 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-3709; 425-290-5966; Consultants-Business Borrals Custom Cabinets: 3404 Everett Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3815; 425-512-9028; Cabinets Brethren Entertainment: 11627 Airport Road, No. A, Everett, WA 98204-8781; 425212-9344; Entertainment Bureaus CM Hammack Law Firm: 1604 Hewitt Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3595; 425-789-1675; Attorneys Cari’s Hair Design: 3111 132nd St. SE, No. C402, Everett, WA 98208-6193; Beauty Salons Carmona Construction: 3229 Pine St., Everett, WA 98201-4536; 425-249-2034; Construction Companies Chanel’s Creations: 7425 Hardeson Road, No. D, Everett, WA 98203-7131; Nonclassified Establishments Community Tax Services: 7100 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98203-5168; 425-512-9555; Tax Return Preparation and Filing Crimson Studios: 13000 Admiralty Way, No. D103, Everett, WA 98204-6269; Nonclassified Establishments D&D Millworks: 2110 37th St., Everett, WA 98201-5019; 425-322-3954; Millwork (Manufacturers) Deep Dwella Records: 10101 Seventh Ave.

SE, Everett, WA 98208-4746; 425-353-1010; Nonclassified Establishments Diehl Aerospace: 917 134th St. SW, Everett, WA 98204-9377; 425-412-3952; Aerospace Industries (Manufacturers) Dijon Cafe: 1822 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201-2349; 425-374-2115; Restaurants Eco Fuel: 101 E Marine View Drive, Everett, WA 98201-1255; 425-258-3575; Oils-Fuel (Wholesale) Eco Roof Care: 319 View Ridge Drive, Everett, WA 98203-2020; Roofing Contractors Free Shipping Tigers: 11604 Airport Road, Everett, WA 98204-3752; 425-404-3053; Freight-Forwarding Frenchy Bee: 10215 21st Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-4224; 425-338-4642; Nonclassified Establishments GTS Distribution: 2822 119th St. SW, Everett, WA 98204-5050; 425-212-9830; Distribution Services Genesis Credit Management: 7100 Evergreen Way, No. C, Everett, WA 98203-5168; Miscellaneous Personal Services Gibson Traffic Consult: 2813 Rockefeller Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3524; 425-339-8267; Traffic and Parking Consultants Godfather Pawn: 9220 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98204-7124; 425-374-8947; Pawnbrokers Greenside Recreational: 13220 Highway 99, Everett, WA 98204-5424; 425-582-0088; Amusement and Recreation Hair By Hollie: 7425 Hardeson Road, No. D, Everett, WA 98203-7131; Beauty Salons Homewood Development: 12414 Highway 99, No. 203, Everett, WA 98204-8510; Nonclassified Establishments House Of Painters: 1707 Merrill Creek Parkway, No. 1121, Everett, WA 98203-7113; 206-353-0428; Painters J&T Remodeling: 10628 Fourth Ave. W, Everett, WA 98204-7052; 425-3225726; Remodeling and Repairing Building Contractors Jennie’s Closet: 12115 19th Ave. SE, No. B204, Everett, WA 98208-6249; Clothing-Retail KOR Fitness: 305 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-3250; 425-903-4082; Nonclassified Establishments Kai Sushi: 2811 Colby Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3567; 425-374-7949; Restaurants Lotus Lounge: 11223 19th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-5119; 425-225-6642; Cocktail Lounges Maurices: 1402 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-2857; 425-265-9621; Clothing-Retail Memphis Pit BBQ: 2915 Colby Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4068; 425-259-1777; Restaurants Middle East Bread Market: 607 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-3248; 425-3223032; Bakers-Retail New Heights Management Group: 1124 Chestnut St., Everett, WA 98201; 425-3490891; Management Services NW Home Care Services: 4623 Glenwood Ave., Everett, WA 98203-1642; Home Health Service NW Vape Distribution: 909 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-3746; Electronic Cigarettes NW Zoological Supply: 3614 Smith Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4544; 425-263-9248; General Merchandise-Retail Panasonic Aviation Corp.: 3003 W Casino Road, Everett, WA 98204-1910; 425-290-3807; Aircraft-Dealers Payless Auto Sales: 4620 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98203-2840; 425-374-2472; Automobile Dealers-Used Cars Pho White Center: 9920 25th Drive SE, Everett, WA 98208-2916; Nonclassified Establishments Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen: 6504 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98203-4527; 425-5128881; Restaurants Pristine Virtual Assistant Services: 311 128th St. SE, No. 112, Everett, WA 982086344; Computers-Virtual Reality Puget Sound Chimney and Masonry: 1001 W Casino Road, No. C101, Everett, WA 982046911; Chimney and Fireplace Cleaning Purple Closet: 2306 122nd St. SW, Everett,

JANUARY 2017

WA 98204-4798; Nonclassified Establishments Ready Set Oil: 2701 Wetmore Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3593; 425-374-7150; Oil and Gas Producers SMJ Wireless: 2625 Colby Ave., No. 2a, Everett, WA 98201-2971; 425-212-9675; Cellular Telephones (Services) Serene Nursing Services: 2421 121st St. SW, Everett, WA 98204-6118; Nurses and Nurses’ Registries Skinny D’s Yogurt: 1402 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-2857; 425-423-8098; Yogurt Snax: 2701 Wetmore Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3593; 425-212-9384; Nonclassified Establishments Taylor Made Recovery: 2608 Center Road, Everett, WA 98204-4758; 425-267-4945; Nonclassified Establishments YPS Your Plumbing Solutions: 3508 105th Place SE, Everett, WA 98208-4624; Plumbing

Granite Falls Cobalt Enterprises: 104 E Stanley St., Granite Falls, WA 98252; 360-691-3613; Nonclassified Establishments Go Mart: 409 W Stanley St., Granite Falls, WA 98252-8631; 360-925-6215; Convenience Stores

Lake Stevens Bluewater Contractors Inc.: 10515 20th St. SE, No. 202, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-4767; Contractors Final Clean: 12910 16th St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9218; Janitor Service Handi-Works: 1003 86th Ave. SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-3459; Handyman Services Jenny Cookies: 12420 20th St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258; Cookies and Crackers Lake Stevens Design Build: PO Box 1517, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-1517; Building Designers Machias Auto Sales: 2315 N Machias Road, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9344; Automobile Dealers-Used Cars NLC Trucking: 16410 84th St. NE, No. 210D, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9060; Trucking

Marysville A Purr-Fectly WOOF-Tastic Spa: 6021 60th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-9510; Pet Washing and Grooming Big Box Retail: 1338 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270; 360-322-6111; Miscellaneous Retail Stores Closet Creations Inc.: 3505 136th St. NE, No. A, Marysville, WA 98271-7857; 360-6572043; Closets-Designing and Remodeling Coastal Vie Espresso: 9317 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-2200; 360-658-9300; Coffee Shops DWH Investments Inc.: 7315 43rd Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-3704; 360-651-0055; Investments Dazzling Home Services: 5502 93rd Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-2776; Services Junkers Extraordinaire: 15310 Smokey Point Blvd., Marysville, WA 98271-8941; 360653-7048; Junk-Dealers Kupcakes 4 Kuties: 4810 80th Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-7583; Bakers-Retail Lularoe Tasha & Jeana: 12208 56th Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98271-6250; Clothing-Retail Port Gardner Supply: 5704 61st Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-9578; Retail Profile Cabinetry: 7126 65th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-7733; Cabinets RE/MAX Of America Elite: 1612 172nd St. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-4039; 360-5724676; Real Estate Unifirst Corp: 13019 41st Ave. NE, No. 5, Marysville, WA 98271-8588; 360-657-7270; Nonclassified Establishments Wilkinson Fantasies: 4312 122nd Place NE, Marysville, WA 98271-8523; 360-651-2933; Nonclassified Establishments

Mill Creek Heart Of Rock and Roll: 13212 Bothell

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 15

Everett Highway, Mill Creek, WA 98012-5507; 425-225-6296; Nonclassified Establishments Ideal Wellness: 16300 Mill Creek Blvd., No. 208d, Mill Creek, WA 98012-1737; 425-2256328; Wellness Programs Sentry Northwest: 16000 Bothell Everett Highway, Mill Creek, WA 98012-1742; 425224-4074; Nonclassified Establishments South Sound Physical-Hand: 4220 132nd St. SE, No. 202, Mill Creek, WA 98012-8999; 360-650-8174; Physical Therapists Symphonious Enterprises: 914 164th St. SE, No. B12-220, Mill Creek, WA 98012-6385; Nonclassified Establishments TNT Enterprises: 15616 Third Drive SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-6328; Nonclassified Establishments

Monroe Advantage Tutoring: 17461 147th St. SE, No. 4a, Monroe, WA 98272-1070; Tutoring Authorized Appliance Repair Co.: 19103 U.S. 2, Monroe, WA 98272-1531; Appliances-Household-Major-Repairing Boldrin Building Co.: 13028 Wagner Road, Monroe, WA 98272-7712; Building Contractors Mardi Gras WIFI Cafe: 123 N Blakeley St., Monroe, WA 98272-1824; 360-243-3960; Restaurants NW Soft Serve and Sales: 14303 Autumns Ave. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-8316; 360-8632798; Ice Cream Parlors Sharina Bean’s On Main: 103 W Main St., Monroe, WA 98272-1809; 360-805-2933; Nonclassified Establishments Triple Sixteen Lanscaping: 19531 N High Rock Road, Monroe, WA 98272-9422; 360805-6885; Landscape Contractors

Quil Ceda Village GAXC: 10600 Quil Ceda Blvd., Quil Ceda Vlg, WA 98271-8081; 360-716-3380; Nonclassified Establishments GH Bass: 10600 Quil Ceda Blvd., Quil Ceda Vlg, WA 98271-8081; 360-651-9670; Nonclassified Establishments Prohibition Grille and Saloon: 8825 34th Ave. NE, No. L155, Quil Ceda Vlg, WA 982718085; Restaurants

Snohomish Affordable TV Repair: 119 Cedar Ave., Snohomish, WA 98290-2955; Television and Radio-Service/Repair Beauty By Coop: 712 Ave. D, Snohomish, WA 98290-2333; Beauty Salons Benjamin’s Interior Contracting: PO Box 806, Snohomish, WA 98291; Interior Decorators Design and Consultants Bookkeeping Etc.: 730 S Tulloch Road, Snohomish, WA 98290-7522; Accounting and Bookkeeping General Services Boombalatty Sandwiches: 17125 Highway 9 SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-7346; 360-6688086; Restaurants Christa’s Sandwich Board: 1206 First St., Snohomish, WA 98290-2737; Sandwiches G&S Properties: 8019 144th Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-9018; Real Estate Greg’s Mossbay Repair: 18611 92nd St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-3205; 360-568-1932; Repair Shops and Related Services Harris Estimating Services: 15124 63rd Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-4217; Business Services LA Tropicana Mexican Store: 204 Ave. C, Snohomish, WA 98290-2731; 360-563-0001; General Merchandise-Retail Property Pathways: 730 Ave. A, No. 203, Snohomish, WA 98290-3401; Real Estate Rensch Engineering: 111 Ave. C, No. 104, Snohomish, WA 98290-2766; Engineering Sunrise Services: 4429 94th Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-9215; 425-263-9386; Services Westlund Gate: 22814 146th Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-6842; 360-668-7285; Gates (Wholesale) Williams Land Holdings: 12704 217th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-3906; Holding Companies (Non-Bank)


16 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

Snohomish County tax liens Tax liens are gathered from online public records filed with the Snohomish County Auditor’s Office. These federal and state liens were filed between Nov. 1-30.

Federal tax liens 201611030046: Nov. 3; Skycorp Ltd., 526 N West Ave., Arlington 201611030047: Nov. 3; Bell, Malcom, 910 87th Drive NE, Everett 201611030048: Nov. 3; Schreier, T., 19410 Highway 99, Apt. A-340, Lynnwood 201611030049: Nov. 3; Sullivan, Laura P., 25724 Parker Road, Monroe 201611030050: Nov. 3; Lord, Catherine A., 12906 66th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201611030051: Nov. 3; Riojas, Lola C., 7828 150th Place NW, Stanwood 201611030052: Nov. 3; Bracamontes, Vicente, PO Box 1091, Lynnwood 201611030053: Nov. 3; Zimny, Tamera Dee, 13127 45th Ave. W, Mukilteo 201611030054: Nov. 3; Ramsey, Dax E., 918 Quinn Ave., Marysville 201611030055: Nov. 3; Sanders, Wati, PO Box 4492, Everett 201611030056: Nov. 3; West Coast Collision, 21718 66th Ave. W, Suite 100, Mountlake Terrace 201611030057: Nov. 3; Nickel Creek Construction Inc., 526 N West Ave., PMB 14, Arlington 201611030058: Nov. 3; Rouse, Mark W., 813 Hoyt Ave., Everett 201611030059: Nov. 3; Artz, Timothy, 10526 15th St. SE, Lake Stevens 201611030060: Nov. 3; Vonderhaar, Marvelle I., PO Box 916, Granite Falls 201611040254: Nov. 4; NW Coatings & Concrete, 4722 169th Ave. NE, Snohomish 201611040255: Nov. 4; Sadler, Karen, 16029 Sturtevant Ave., Stanwood

JANUARY 2017

201611040256: Nov. 4; Odell Corp., 11732 Airport Road, Everett 201611040257: Nov. 4; Marysville Chiropractic, 1617 Grove St., Marysville 201611040258: Nov. 4; Creative Flooring Design, 1428 Ave. D, No. 232, Snohomish 201611040259: Nov. 4; McMullen, Dennis L., 6016 98th St. NE, Marysville 201611040260: Nov. 4; McMullen, Mary V., 6016 98th St. NE, Marysville 201611040261: Nov. 4; AJS Full Service Automotive Repair, 2110 25th St., Everett 201611040262: Nov. 4; Cascade Midwives-Cascade Birth Center Inc., 2808 Colby Ave., Suite A, Everett 201611040263: Nov. 4; Mill Creek Lodge, 2720 Rucker Ave., Suite 101, Everett 201611040264: Nov. 4; James, Scott A., 10128 132nd St. NE, Arlington 201611040265: Nov. 4; Thorp, Casee J., 4933 284th St. NW, Stanwood 201611040266: Nov. 4; Thorp, Jayson, 4933 284th St. NW, Stanwood 201611040267: Nov. 4; Shum, Ka Lun, 11108 Chennault Beach Road, Apt. 621, Mukilteo 201611040268: Nov. 4; Traina, Eric P., 22221 Meridian Ave. S, Bothell 201611080570: Nov. 8; Hinkle, Svetlana L., 1710 100th Place SE, Suite 102, Everett 201611080571: Nov. 8; Graham, James S., 12311 21st Ave. SE, Everett 201611080572: Nov. 8; Taylor, Donna, 5424 84th SW, Mukilteo 201611080573: Nov. 8; Mashue, Selena J., 6308 W Flowing Lake Road, Snohomish 201611080574: Nov. 8; Odell Corp., 11732 Airport Road, Everett 201611080575: Nov. 8; Ion Technology, 10811 40th Ave. SE, Everett 201611080576: Nov. 8; Raptis, Niko, 9100 Olympic View Drive, Edmonds 201611080577: Nov. 8; Jones, Jennifer, 26102 47th Drive NE, Arlington 201611080578: Nov. 8;

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PUBLIC RECORDS Jones, Jennifer, 26102 47th Drive NE, Arlington 201611080583: Nov. 8; Servicemaster By Willanger, 146524 Sixth Ave. W, Lynnwood 201611080584: Nov. 8; Innovative Design Engineering & Analysis Corp., 727 Second St., Suite A, Mukilteo 201611080585: Nov. 8; Ruiz, Jimmy G., 7513 15th Place SE, Lake Stevens 201611080586: Nov. 8; Adams, Lucinda M., 7829 59th Ave. NE, Marysville 201611080587: Nov. 8; Forecast Roofing, 4463 Russell Road, Suite 105, Mukilteo 201611080588: Nov. 8; Waldal, Debra L., PO Box 25, Arlington 201611080589: Nov. 8; Um, Do Yeon, 5906 116th Court SW, Mukilteo 201611080590: Nov. 8; Packer, Marianela, 703 103rd Place SE, Everett 201611080591: Nov. 8; Saunders, Michele, 17420 62nd Ave. W, Lynnwood 201611080592: Nov. 8; Myron, Corbett G., 1931 Grand Ave., No. 102, Everett 201611080593: Nov. 8; Broggel, David D., 2126 177th St. SE, Bothell 201611080594: Nov. 8; Crawford, Robert S., 4423 133rd St. SW, Mukilteo 201611080595: Nov. 8; Weitzman, Harmon A., 8823 Holly Drive, Apt. B205, Everett 201611080596: Nov. 8; Vance, Michael C., 19403 63rd Ave. NE, Arlington 201611080597: Nov. 8; B&B Cable Contractors Inc., PO Box 3541, Lynnwood 201611080598: Nov. 8; Raleigh, Aaron M., 5503 128th Place SE, Everett 201611160103: Nov. 16; Kellogg, Amy L., General Delivery, Lake Stevens 201611160104: Nov. 16; Durham, Michael S., 17010 31st Drive SE, Bothell 201611160105: Nov. 16; All County Evictions, 2302 Rucker Ave., Apt. A, Everett 201611160106: Nov. 16; Linings Rhino, 430 SW Everett Mall Way, Everett 201611160107: Nov. 16; Cold Tech NW, 14617 E Lake Goodwin Road, Stanwood 201611160108: Nov. 16; Millcreek AFH Inc., 16000 75th Place W, Edmonds 201611160109: Nov. 16; Prichard, Michelle, 16000 Bothell Everett Highway, Suite 220, Mill Creek 201611160110: Nov. 16; Whiddon, Claudia, 121st St. SE, Apt. D103, Everett 201611160111: Nov. 16; Heineman, Lisa A., 5765 96th St. SW, Mukilteo 201611160112: Nov. 16; McKee, James L., 1401 Merril Creek Parkway, Apt. 17015, Everett 201611160113: Nov. 16; McKee, Cynthia, 1401 Merril Creek Parkway, Apt. 17015, Everett 201611160114: Nov. 16; Bakun, Carol F., 10709 130th Ave. NE, Lake Stevens 201611160115: Nov. 16; Caremasters Building

Maintenance Co. Inc., 14313 Highway 530 NE, Suite 16, Arlington 201611160116: Nov. 16; Caremasters Building Maintenance Co. Inc., 14313 Highway 530 NE, Suite 16 Arlington 201611160117: Nov. 16; M&D Quality Painting, 18501 66th Ave. W, Lynnwood 201611160118: Nov. 16; Gray, Renee M., 303 91st Ave. NE, Suite A106, Lake Stevens 201611160119: Nov. 16; Myers, Tra R., 12021 38th Ave. NE, Marysville 201611160120: Nov. 16; Smith, Gaylord R., 27911 35th Ave. NE, Arlington 201611160121: Nov. 16; Sound Storage Management Inc., PO Box 43, Everett 201611160122: Nov. 16; MTN Inc., 1519 132nd St. SE, Suite C322, Everett 201611180034: Nov. 18; Romero, Ezequiel Cesar, 4405 241st St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201611180035: Nov. 18; Jensen, Jason L., 1318 37th St., Unit 1312, Everett 201611180036: Nov. 18; Lares-Diaz, M., 5219 105th St. NE, Marysville 201611180037: Nov. 18; Calzada-Gonzales, Sergio, 15001 35th Ave. W, Apt. 13-104, Lynnwood 201611180038: Nov. 18; Braillard, Sherise D., 221 States St., Suite C321, Marysville 201611180039: Nov. 18; Marysville Daycare & Learning Center, 1262 State Ave., Suite A, Marysville 201611180040: Nov. 18; Guaymas Lynnwood Dox Inc., 3805 196th St. SW, Lynnwood 201611180041: Nov. 18; Everett Floral & Gift, 4522 Evergreen Way, Everett 201611180042: Nov. 18; Protek Roofing Inc., 13300 Bothell Everett Highway, Suite 303, Mill Creek 201611180043: Nov. 18; Bushman, Rick J., 13518 Jordan Road, Arlington 201611210683: Nov. 21; Colburn, Carole, 1624 Maple Road, Lynnwood 201611210684: Nov. 21; Clad Enterprise, 26407 127th St. SE, Monroe 201611210685: Nov. 21; Reed, Margo E., 11704 First Place SE, Lake Stevens 201611210686: Nov. 21; Nelson, Tyler J., 6224 53rd Ave. NE, Marysville 201611210687: Nov. 21; Cartwright, Judith E., 20212 Old Burn Road, Arlington 201611210688: Nov. 21; Daniels, Beth A., 16829 62nd Ave. W, Lynnwood 201611210689: Nov. 21; Bollefer, Timothy M., 20225 179th Place SE, Monroe 201611210690: Nov. 21; Leonardo, Beth, 1215 E Casino Road, Everett 201611210691: Nov. 21; Sturm-Vanderpol, P., 18827 24th Ave. W, Lynnwood 201611220523: Nov. 22; Ceis, Wendy, 18206 96th Drive SE, Snohomish 201611220524: Nov. 22; Rowlands, Bryan J., 2913 114th Ave. S, Lake Stevens 201611220525: Nov. 22;

McAllister, Casi D., 10119 N Davies Road, Lake Stevens 201611220526: Nov. 22; Carter, Jennifer A., 8903 Lakewood Road, Stanwood 201611220527: Nov. 22; International Association Of Sheet Metal Air Rail & Transportation, 324 UTU Local, 5213 63rd Drive NE, Marysville 201611220528: Nov. 22; Mukilteo Sports Lodge, 7928 Mukilteo Speedway, Suite 101, Mukilteo 201611220529: Nov. 22; Ruiz, Sonya, 13321 209th Ave. SE, Monroe 201611220530: Nov. 22; Barnard, Marshall C., 20525 Mero Road, Snohomish 201611220531: Nov. 22; Wyman, Patricia A., 2717 143rd St. SW, Apt. C, Lynnwood 201611220543: Nov. 22; Duback, Debbie L., 9002 Ninth Place SE, Lake Stevens 201611220544: Nov. 22; Zab Thai Restaurant, 11108 Evergreen Way, Suite A, Everett 201611220545: Nov. 22; Artz, Terri, 10526 15th St. SE, Lake Stevens 201611220546: Nov. 22; Pumnea, Carrie L., 115 161st Place SE, Bothell 201611220547: Nov. 22; Cordon, Randy, 19723 144th Place SE, Monroe 201611220548: Nov. 22; Tobiassen, Julie B., 244126 105th Place W, Edmonds 201611220549: Nov. 22; Walsh, John D., 420 85th Place SW, Apt L-105, Everett 201611220550: Nov. 22; Nipper, Steven R., 926 Olympic Ave., Edmonds 201611290649: Nov. 29; Walsh, John D., 420 85th Place SW, Apt L105, Everett 201611290650: Nov. 29; Owens, Amy M., 702 91st Place SE, Everett 201611290651: Nov. 29; Coolbaugh, Janice G., 14225 61st Place W, Edmonds 201611290652: Nov. 29; Catanzaro, Annamaria R., 5015 175th St. SE, Bothell 201611290653: Nov. 29; Downing, Gloria J., 9502 61st Drive NE, Marysville 201611290654: Nov. 29; JST, 13601 Highway 99, Everett 201611290655: Nov. 29; Innovative Design Engineering & Analysis, 727 Second St., Suite A, Mukilteo 201611290656: Nov. 29; Castillo-Martinez, Gabino, 5623 186th Place SW, Apt. 6, Lynnwood 201611290657: Nov. 29; King, Bruce A., 28611 139th Ave. NE, Arlington 201611290658: Nov. 29; Sherman, Carl, 2311 136th Place SW, Lynnwood

Partial release of federal tax liens 201611040269: Nov. 4; Ponton, Gerald E, 7505 212th SW, C202, Edmonds 201611080579: Nov. 8; McDaniel, Lea D., 14911 70th Ave. NW, Stanwood 201611080580: Nov. 8; McDaniel, Lea D., 14911 70th Ave. NW, Stanwood

201611080581: Nov. 8; Nathan, Charles, 11515 Heberlein Road, Woodway

Release of federal tax liens 201611030061: Nov. 3; Vaughn, Denise A., 2201 Surgeon Drive, Tulalip 201611030062: Nov. 3; Vaughn, Denise A., 2201 Surgeon Drive, Tulalip 201611030063: Nov. 3; Vaughn, Denise A., 2201 Surgeon Drive, Tulalip 201611030064: Nov. 3; Emard, Phil P., 7703 200th St. SW, Edmonds 201611030065: Nov. 3; Jensen, Linda L., 16600 25th Ave. NE, Unit 9, Marysville 201611030066: Nov. 3; Mosbacker, Martin D., 10965 36th St. NE, Lake Stevens 201611030067: Nov. 3; Wright, Kurt M., 11612 Bothell Everett Highway, Apt. F315, Mill Creek 201611080582: Nov. 8; Kohl, Tina, 10620 63rd Drive NE, Marysville 201611080599: Nov. 8; Marshall, Joseph R., 602 Laurel Drive, Everett 201611080600: Nov. 8; Northwest Professional Residential and Commercial Construction Inc., PO Box 1017, Lake Stevens 201611080601: Nov. 8; Northwest Professional Residential and Commercial Construction Inc., PO Box 1017, Lake Stevens 201611080602: Nov. 8; Northwest Professional Residential and Commercial Construction Inc., PO Box 1017, Lake Stevens 201611080603: Nov. 8; Hendrickson, Susann E., 8425 319th St. NW, Stanwood 201611080604: Nov. 8; Northwest Professional Residential and Commercial Construction Inc., PO Box 1017, Lake Stevens 201611080605: Nov. 8; McDaniel, Lea, 14911 70th Ave. NW, Stanwood 201611080606: Nov. 8; Krance, Anna M., 5912 Third Drive W, Everett 201611080607: Nov. 8; Ponton, Dawn A. III, 7505 212th SW, C202, Edmonds 201611080608: Nov. 8; Zeiler-Fen, Christine, 19718 12th Ave. W, Lynnwood 201611080609: Nov. 8; Closet Guys Inc., 4806 56th Place NE, Marysville 201611080610: Nov. 8; BB&T Sign Services, 16212 Bothell Everett Highway, F239, Mill Creek 201611080611: Nov. 8; Edmonds, Joel A., 5504 226th St. NW, Stanwood 201611080612: Nov. 8; Closet Guys Inc., 4806 56th Place NE, Marysville 201611080613: Nov. 8; Kaneris, Sofia, 8521 Holly Drive, Everett 201611160123: Nov. 16; Ananko, Eduard, 8425 105th Ave. NE, Lake Stevens 201611160124: Nov. 16; Kuhr, Arthur, 13604 67th Ave. W, Edmonds 201611160125: Nov. 16; Sullivan, Jason L., 217 E First St., Arlington


PUBLIC RECORDS 201611160126: Nov. 16; Berg, Janet A., 16826 22nd Ave. SE, Bothell 201611160127: Nov. 16; Freerks, Lisa M., 6606 221st Place SW, Mountlake Terrace 201611160128: Nov. 16; Ananko, Eduard, 2529 74th Drive NE, Lake Stevens 201611160129: Nov. 16; Danard, Mariann, 21980 Vine Road, Brier 201611160130: Nov. 16; Jenkins, Judith J., PO Box 15080, Mill Creek 201611160131: Nov. 16; Avery Automotive, 32615 Cascade View Drive, Sultan 201611180044: Nov. 18; Allard, Robert E II, 12415 Ninth Drive SE, Everett 201611210692: Nov. 21; Fletcher, Douglas E,, 6406 185th St. SW, Lynnwood 201611210693: Nov. 21; Walker, Kerry D., 615 108th Place SE, Everett 201611210694: Nov. 21; Gordon, Bernard J., 8318 77th Ave. NE, Marysville 201611210695: Nov. 21; Lopez, Carmen, 5907 Broadway, Everett 201611210696: Nov. 21; Larsen, Carolyn M., 1212 Maple Ave., Snohomish 201611210697: Nov. 21; Gonzalez, Gerardo, 6824 147th Ave. NE, Lake Stevens 201611210698: Nov. 21; Creasey, Janien M., PO Box 397, Monroe 201611210699: Nov. 21; Rigby, Jill B., 2807 86th St. SE, Everett 201611210700: Nov. 21;

Rigby, Jill B., 2807 86th St. SE, Everett 201611210701: Nov. 21; Poulton, David G., 1704 81st Ave. NE, Lake Stevens 201611210702: Nov. 21; Chaney, Grover N., 927 132nd St. SW, Apt M3, Everett 201611210703: Nov. 21; Rigby, Jill B., 2807 86th St. SE, Everett 201611220533: Nov. 22; Harris, Mychel R., 14618 13th Ave. SE, Mill Creek 201611220551: Nov. 22; Automatic Entries Inc., 6720 210th St. SW, Suite A, Lynnwood 201611220552: Nov. 22; Lara-Flores, Arturo, 1001 W Casino Road, Apt G-103, Everett 201611220553: Nov. 22; Yi, Choongha, 3521 156th Place SE, Bothell 201611220554: Nov. 22; NBU Construction, 2615 Russell Way, Everett 201611220555: Nov. 22; Freeman, Tracy D., 10714 Vernon Road, Lake Stevens 201611220556: Nov. 22; McDaniel, Lea, 14911 70th Ave. NW, Stanwood 201611220557: Nov. 22; Lind, Jayme J., 533 101st Ave. NE, Lake Stevens 201611220558: Nov. 22; Schillereff, Christine G, 7924 212th St. SW, Apt. 113, Edmonds 201611220559: Nov. 22; Futurecom Technologies Inc., PO Box 844, Mukilteo 201611220560: Nov.

22; Automatic Enteries Inc., 6720 210th St. SW, Suite A, Lynnwood 201611220561: Nov. 22; Oh, Young S., 16824 44th Ave. W, Suite 200, Lynnwood 201611220562: Nov. 22; Nathan, Andrea S., 11515 Heberlein Road, Woodway 201611290659: Nov. 29; Tautscher, Rosalina, 5222 158th Place SW, Edmonds 201611290660: Nov. 29; Tautscher, Rosalina, 5222 158th Place SW, Edmonds 201611290661: Nov. 29; Locking, Kelly, 3727 Shore Ave., Everett 201611290662: Nov. 29; Allen, Kathy L., 14522 54th Ave. SE, Everett 201611290663: Nov. 29; Moe, Louisa B., 417 Ave. H, Snohomish 201611290664: Nov. 29; Bye, Sarah, 624 Price Road, Snohomish 201611290665: Nov. 29; Gunther, Warren P., 19113 26th Ave. NW, Stanwood 201611290666: Nov. 29; Smith, Mark, 7726 202nd Place SW, Edmonds 201611290667: Nov. 29; Smith, Mark, 7726 202nd Place SW, Edmonds 201611290668: Nov. 29; Larsen, Joshua N., 4817 103rd Place SW, Mukilteo 201611290669: Nov. 29; Scanlon-Hay, Linda E., 111 108th St. SE, Everett 201611290670: Nov. 29; Pascoe, David W., 19228 Fourth Drive SE, Bothell

201611290671: Nov. 29; Pascoe, Cynthia L, 19228 Fourth Drive SE, Bothell 201611290672: Nov. 29; Loomis, Patric M. Jr., 1310 Lombard Ave. Everett 201611010846: Nov. 1; Deo, Shaneel, 4777 Arbors Circle, Mukilteo 201611040627: Nov. 4; Hoff, Judith, 7227 44th Ave. NE, Marysville 201611040806: Nov. 4; Fry, Jasmine L., 20817 29th Ave. SE, Bothell 201611070394: Nov. 7; Santeford, Stephanie L., 413 46th St. SE, Everett

Withdrawal of federal tax liens 201611220016: Nov. 22; Robertson, Dale, PO Box 2095, Everett 201611220535: Nov. 22; Austin, Amye, 11421 26th Drive SE, No. B, Everett 201611210704: Nov. 21; Govaert, James J., 3029 Belmonte Lane, Everett

Bankruptcy filings The following Snohomish County businesses or individuals filed business-related bankruptcies with U.S.Bankruptcy Court for Western District of Washington from Nov. 1-30. 16-15570-MLB: Chapter 7, Jackye’s Enterprises Inc.;

JANUARY 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 17

attorney for debtor: Steven G. Phillips; filed: Nov. 3; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation 16-15586-MLB: Chapter 13, Ricardo Garcia Zarco; attorney for debtor: Davisson D. Culbertson; filed: Nov. 3; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual 16-15814-TWD: Chapter 11, Lodge Holdings Co.; attorney for debtor: Larry B. Feinstein; attorney for special requests: Zachary Mosner, Gregory R. Fox, Skyler M. Tanner, Maria A. Milano; attorneys for interested party: Michael E. Gossler, James L. Day, Maria A. Milano, Aditi Paranjpye Dore; filed: Nov. 18; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation 16-15834-BDL: Chapter 11, Cook Investments NW; attorneys for debtor: James L. Day, Katriana L Samiljan; attorneys for special request: Mark J. Rosenblum, Terrence J Donahue; attorney for interested party: The Tracy Law Group; filed: 11/21/2016; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation 16-15836-BDL: Chapter 11, Cook Investments NW; Attorney for Debtor: attorneys for debtor: James

L. Day, Katriana L Samiljan; attorneys for special request: Mark J. Rosenblum, Terrence J Donahue; filed: Nov. 21; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: single-asset real estate; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation 16-15837-BDL: Chapter 11, Cook Investments NW; attorneys for debtor: James L. Day, Katriana L Samiljan; attorneys for special request: Mark J. Rosenblum, Terrence J Donahue; attorney for interested party: Thom H. Graafstra; filed: Nov. 21; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: single-asset real estate; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation 16-15849-TWD-16-15854TWD: Chapter 11, Mukilteo Lodge; attorney for debtor: Larry B. Feinstein; attorneys for special request: Gregory R. Fox, Skyler M. Tanner; filed: Nov. 21; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation 16-15850-TWD: Chapter 11, Kirkland Lodge, Stadium Lodge, Downtown Lodge, Mill Creek Lodge, Greenwood Lodge; attorney for debtor: Larry B. Feinstein; attorneys for special request: Gregory R. Fox, Skyler M. Tanner, Katie J. Comstock; assets: yes; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation

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18 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

JANUARY 2017

SNOHOMISH COUNTY ECONOMIC DATA Pending sales, residential real estate

Closed sales, residential real estate

Unemployment rate, percent

Continued unemployment claims

Aerospace employment

Construction employment

Professional services employment

Local sales tax distributions, Snohomish County and incorporated cities

08/13

1,402

1,143

6.2

7,062

44,900

18,400

24,000

$4,921,104

09/13

1,150

1,032

N/A

7,180

45,100

18,300

24,000

$3,573,194

10/13

1,219

1,041

6.0

7,149

44,500

18,200

23,900

$4,998,366

11/13

1,010

833

5.7

7,499

44,300

17,900

24,200

$5,132,975

12/13

835

871

5.3

8,829

44,700

17,800

24,000

$3,348,852

01/14

1,195

615

6.0

9,651

44,000

14,500

23,300

$3,382,321

02/14

1,180

688

6.4

8,850

43,700

14,800

23,100

$4,087,089

03/14

1,481

949

6.0

8,897

43,700

14,800

23,400

$3,013,059

04/14

1,454

943

4.9

8,069

43,400

14,800

23,100

$2,923,521

05/14

1,718

1,074

5.0

7,502

43,600

15,100

23,100

$3,370,904

06/14

1,545

1,220

5.1

7,177

44,400

15,400

23,300

$3,290,880

07/14

1,457

1,172

5.3

6,587

44,000

18,400

23,500

$3,474,651

08/14

1,393

1,163

5.4

6,244

43,000

18,800

23,800

$3,695,926

09/14

1,328

1,057

5.1

N/A

42,900

18,800

23,800

$3,838,762

10/14

1,327

1,113

4.8

N/A

41,400

18,300

24,200

$3,663,750

11/14

1,027

885

4.8

6,093

41,800

18,000

24,100

$3,852,205

12/14

956

920

4.5

N/A

42,000

17,700

24,100

$3,582,032

1/15

1,237

686

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$3,280,200

2/15

1,406

740

5.3

6,663

43,000

17,200

23,700

$4,146,999

3/15

1,938

1,075

4.5

6,762

42,800

17,500

24,000

$2,981,599

4/15

1,747

1,272

3.6

6,273

42,800

18,100

24,100

$3,041,795

5/15

1,777

1,315

4.0

5,923

42,800

18,600

24,000

$3,654,693

6/15

1,799

1,374

4.3

5,607

42,700

19,200

24,400

$3,445,201

7/15

1,764

1,411

4.3

5,323

44,100

20,700

25,000

$3,590,957

8/15

1,634

1,442

3.9

5,367

43,600

21,200

25,300

$11,743,713

9/15

1,501

1,290

4.1

5,089

43,600

21,200

25,200

$11,603,019

10/15

1,503

1,178

4.5

5,109

43,400

20,400

25,100

$10,854,566

11/15

1,307

973

5.0

5,748

43,500

20,100

24,900

$11,503,562

12/15

1,067

1,189

5.0

6,193

43,600

19,800

25,300

$10,765,437

1/16

1,249

811

5.7

7,085

43,600

19,300

24,500

$10,477,405

2/16

1,475

848

5.3

6,388

43,500

19,600

24,500

$13,559,687

3/16

1,825

1,156

5.2

6,084

43,100

20,000

24,800

$9,496,443

4/16

1,836

1,213

4.4

5,957

43,300

19,800

25,600

$9,617,406

5/16

1,979

1,386

4.8

5,770

43,300

20,300

25,800

$11,697,044

6/16

1,862

1,493

4.7

5,396

43,800

21,000

26,400

$10,816,389

7/16

1,795

1,515

4.8

5,489

44,000

21,700

26,400

$11,102,633

8/16

1.873

1,538

4.4

5,502

43,900

22,100

26,500

$12,493,656

9/16

1,601

1,431

4.3

5,377

43,500

22,200

26,500

$12,193,233

10/16

1,561

1,364

4.0

5,502

42,100

22,800

26,700

$12,195,581

11/16

1,314

1,270

4.2

5,774

42,100

22,500

26,600

$12,515,314

Consumer price index, King and Snohomish counties 242.77

242.78

241.05

242.77

246.61

247.64

247.18

247.854

245.05

245.496

247.611

251.622

251.617

250.831

250.385

250.942

253.815

256.098 256.907

256.941

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JANUARY 2017

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 19

ECONOMIC DATA Boeing stock price

PUD retail electricity use, kilowatt hours

Snohomish County PUD connections

New vehicle registrations

Average gas price (regular, unleaded

09/13

$117.50

410,719,601

338

5,141

$3.65

10/13

$138.36

518,766,206

461

5,179

$3.44

11/13

$133.83

461,012,493

447

4,083

$3.24

12/13

$136.92

671,835,200

244

4,752

$3.29

01/14

$125.26

696,306,571

421

5,726

$3.36

02/14

$128.92

682,348,469

386

4,467

$3.31

03/14

$125.49

610,841,349

352

5,428

$3.75

04/14

$129.02

605,381,115

368

6,389

$3.74

05/14

$135.25

468,754,469

466

6,542

$3.87

06/14

$127.23

492,917,254

412

6,626

$3.93

07/14

$120.48

432,682,894

444

6,611

$3.95

08/14

$126.80

463,314,006

363

5,614

$3.83

09/14

$127.38

451,089,566

264

5,987

$3.74

10/14

$124.91

496,335,315

403

5,929

$3.40

11/14

$134.36

422,769,229

426

4,867

$3.04

12/14

$132.25

663,368,433

426

6,072

$2.88

1/15

$145.37

634,592,067

209

6,364

$2.30

2/15

$150.85

611,633,434

287

5,889

$2.30

3/15

$150.08

567,831,393

284

7,707

$2.85

4/15

$143.34

578,264,358

427

8,057

$2.70

5/15

$140.52

449,046,426

326

8,649

$3.05

6/15

$138.72

494,611,488

384

9,852

$3.10

7/15

$144.17

451,503,602

334

7,641

$3.20

8/15

$130.68

474,207,621

242

7,021

$3.09

9/15

$130.95

557,429,310

442

7,018

$2.79

10/15

$148.07

477,438,877

217

6,828

$2.49

11/15

$145.45

491,536,717

221

5,631

$2.41

12/15

$144.59

N/A

282

6,995

$2.35

1/16

$120.13

N/A

333

6,910

$2.33

2/16

$118.18

655,390,592

333

7,298

$2.02

3/16

$126.94

612,151,814

288

9,209

$2.12

4/16

$134.80

514,320,049

428

8,364

$2.25

5/16

$126.15

457,566,044

342

8,906

$2.44

6/16

$129.87

463,105,233

277

10,754

$2.57

7/16

$133.66

430,295,041

435

8,268

$2.56

8/16

$129.45

467,001,501

325

8,315

$2.49

9/16

$131.74

454,085,665

394

7,628

$2.60

10/16

$142.43

452,214,305

401

6,861

$2.64

11/16

$150.56

495,372,342

331

6,360

$2.59

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20 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

JANUARY 2017

Bernie Garcia, Moctezuma’s World traveler Photographer Fiery foodie

Each and every one of us is an original. Shaped by unique inuences that make us who we are today. Here at Heritage Bank, we think differences can build a better bank, too. That’s why we share the best ideas from across all of our branches and local communities with one goal in mind: to serve our customers better every day. By sharing our strengths, we’re able to offer customers like Bernie Garcia—and you—more than a community bank. But rather, a community oƒ banks.

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Herald Business Journal - 01.01.2017  

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