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SEATTLE WEEKLY • HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE 2016 • PART THREE

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To make a personalized sculpture for his customers, Jimmy Visaya works a while with their shoes.

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come to life and, in one case, touch the top of the Space Needle (via forced perspective at Kerry Park). When kids are involved, Visaya enjoys involving them in the creation process so they can start learning to create on their own. Kids often discover new creatures in the shoes that Visaya had not envisioned himself. In the future, he wants to create a workspace where kids can learn his techniques and work with paper and clay as well. It’s late in the game to commission a new work to be finished for Christmas, but you can pick up one of Visaya’s robo-creations at Capitol Hill’s sneaker mecca, BAIT Seattle (915 E. Pike St., 257-1178). Starting in 2017, you’ll be able to find his work in other locations around town. The best way to contact Visaya and follow his work is on his Instagram page, upcycledsneakers. Followers in Seattle can look forward to an Easter-egg hunt, during which Visaya will leave works in public spaces around town. Get those walking shoes ready. 

atasha Shulman, more commonly known as “Lady Krishna,” wears many hats: A devoted yogi, visual and performance artist, style icon, and triple Scorpio, she performs in a glam-rock band called Cosmic Panties and leads a free weekly meditation class at 9 p.m. each Thursday at 8 Limbs Yoga on Capitol Hill. On December 30, she will hold a workshop called “Invoking the Goddess” from 7 to 9 p.m. at The Vajra on 10th Avenue (tickets available on a sliding scale at thevajra.com). Over turmeric lattes (“a drink for a goddess!”) at Oddfellows Cafe + Bar, the glamorous guru divulges her secret wishes for the holiday season. Meditation practice for everybody My #1 wish is that everybody would contribute to the planet by meditating. If you had everybody on the planet meditating, really sitting still once or twice a day to reflect on themselves, a lot of the problems we’re seeing now would be more easily solved. Everyone thinks meditation is passive, but really it’s active. Meditation is an active form of love, because it induces self-love. If not meditation, then tai chi or a hatha yoga practice. Anything that will lead into sitting still for a little bit! I feel like lots of people miss the point about meditation. People sit down once, and think, “Oh, I didn’t become enlightened” (whatever that means). Everything is one step at a time, one positive action. You may not see these gigantic direct results, but meditation is like a butterfly. You don’t see [the effect of ] those fluttering wings, but it’s profound. I’ve been painting butterflies for 25 years. To finish the projects that I start I wish to have [my art show] “She Bleeds for Me: Menstruation/Menopause,” last shown at Fred Wildlife Refuge, shown at the Frye Art Museum, and I wish for my latest album, Cosmic Panties Live at Linda’s, just sent to [local music producer] Erik Blood to work his magic on, to be ready by January 2017! A full set of beautiful antique encyclopedias I have part of a set of 1920s encyclopedias, with marbled edges. I love books with pictures! A pair of over-the-knee lace-up Doc Martens I am totally into Doc Martens. I have been coveting a pair that came out a few years ago, called Agyness. I can’t seem to find them, but if someone can find them in a size 8 . . . A gigantic bottle of Tobacco Oud by Tom Ford As far as personal items, I’d like the biggest bottle of Tom Ford’s Tobacco Oud. I love perfume. It’s invisible, but [like meditation], it’s like butterfly wings! 

SEATTLE WEEKLY • HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE 2016 • PART THREE

Art With Sole

according to the memories associated with them. For athletes, shoes worn during an important play become a figurative tableau of that moment. Pink sneakers worn during countless marches and walks in support of breast-cancer research become a flower pot, holding new life and beauty. Sneakers quickly outgrown by a toddler after a first trip to the beach become a toy for the next excursion. “Shoes mean a lot to a lot of people, and they mean very different things,” Visaya notes. Beyond the obvious connection with a literal journey, more than any other type of clothing, they bear a sense of humility, trustworthiness, and playfulness. Visaya thoroughly cleans the shoes before using them as material, but doesn’t hide the scuff s and worn patches, which become part of the character of the final work. Visaya has also started to play with other media in connection with his sculptures. For clients who commission one of his fully articulated robot sculptures, he has made stop-motion animations, in which the bots

Lady Krishna’s Very Mindful Holiday

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immy Visaya developed his unique approach to sculpture almost by accident. Now his work resides in the private collections of celebrities, athletes, musicians, and filmmakers around the world. Most of his clients have come via word-of-mouth, but some find his work because they came for donuts or teriyaki to his parents’ restaurant and laundromat, King Donuts, in Rainier Beach, where he is often found cracking wise with customers from behind the counter. It’s his medium that has brought him attention. Visaya uses upcycled shoes to create posable figures and functional sculptures. His first creation was a robot made from old work boots. A former player for the Chicago Bulls took notice, and when he asked to buy the work, Visaya instead told him to give him his own shoes, which he then converted into a new sculpture— his first commission. Visaya always works with the clients’ shoes for commissions, which he sculpts

WISHLIST

Capitol Hill’s mystic rocker shares her wants for the season.

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Please join us for in-store tastings during the month of December! Find the perfect gift, or a new favorite for yourself!

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December 8 4-6PM: Oo La Distillery 5-6:30PM: Holiday Classics + Ports

Records galore at Daybreak.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE 2016 • PART THREE

December 13 3-5PM: Tres Agaves

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YOUR NEXT IN-STORE PURCHASE Not valid with any other discounts or promotions. Expires 12/30/16 Esquin Wine & Spirits 2700 4th Ave South Seattle, WA 98134 (206) 682-7374 • madwine.com

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December 12 3-5PM: Amador Tequila

The brilliant entrance at Portage Bay Goods.

COURTESY FREMONT VINTAGE MALL

December 9 4-6PM: Crater Lake Spirits by Bendistillery Inc. December 10 2-5PM: Glass Distillery Tasting and Bottle Etching Event 2-5PM: Roco Wines + Opici Selections

COURTESY PORTAGE BAY GOODS

AARON LEITZ PHOTOGRAPHY

December 7 3-5PM: New Deal Distillery

A fine dining set at the Vintage Mall.

SHOP LOCAL

Pulling shots at ETG Coffee & Bakery.

Winter Wanderings With hand-crafted food, locally owned businesses, vintage treasures, and Seattle-made art, Fremont is a haven for creative adventurers.

By Talia Shapiro

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t’s unclear exactly when Fremont was deemed “the center of the universe”—after all, the neighborhood has long been recognized as a Seattle hub for art and counterculture. Case in point: Fremont’s unofficial motto is “Freedom to be peculiar.” During the holidays, the gigantic, eight-ton statue of Lenin at the center of the neighborhood is illuminated—its permanence meant to remind us that art outlives politics. Wandering the streets of this quirky destination, locals and out-of-towners will find a mecca for hidden treasures and cozy treats. The Fremont Sunday Market (3401 Evanston Ave. N., 781-6776) is the neighborhood’s long-running weekly street-fair—an excellent place to support local artists and indie designers selling their wares. You’ll find everything from screen-printed T-shirts and ceramic

tableware to locally sourced honey and a range of food-truck fare. The sign for Portage Bay Goods (621 N. 35th St., 547-5221) reads “A gift shop for the thoughtful procrastinator,” but all are welcome here. The store offers an assortment of children’s toys, adult coloring books, made-in-Seattle art prints, and a huge selection of small-batch greeting cards. Next, step into Fremont Vintage Mall (3419 Fremont Pl. N., 329-4460) and prepare to lose track of time as you search for one-of-a-kind collectibles, funky flannels, and whimsical oddities. For a break and hot beverage, head over to ETG Coffee & Bakery (3512 Fremont Pl. N., 633-3685). The tiny storefront’s festive decor and housemade chai are not to be missed. And be sure to grab a bag of single-origin, whole-bean coffee—ETG has been perfecting

its roasts and blends for more than three decades. On the other side of Fremont Avenue, an adorable English bulldog will welcome you to Show Pony (702 N. 35th St., 706-4188), a beautifully curated boutique full of contemporary clothing, jewelry, and fragrances. Order a holiday wreath from Juniper Flowers (459 N. 36th St., 285-2700) and grab a sweet or savory snack from Pie (3515 Fremont Ave. N., 436-8590) before heading up the hill to Daybreak Records (4308 Fremont Ave. N., 268-0702), the newest addition to the neighborhood. The record store’s eclectic playlist is sure to get you moving as you flip through crates of high-quality used vinyl. Afterward, stop by Book Larder (4252 Fremont Ave. N., 397-4271), an epic cookbook shop and great gift spot for all the foodies on your list. As the light grows long and your feet grow weary, it’s finally time to slow down and reflect on Seattle’s bounty and beauty at Fremont Peak Park (4357 Palatine Ave. N.) as you catch a glimpse of the sunset over the Olympic Mountain range. ■


COURTESY OF SAFETY PIN BOX

GIVING BACK

Directions Delivered

The Safety Pin Box helps allies walk the walk.

By Jacob Uitti

Leslie Mac

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Marissa Jenae Johnson

with the ‘ally’ and ‘safety pin’ language. If you wore a safety pin, it’s very easy for you to subscribe to this.” Five days in, safetypinbox.com had already received more than 100 subscriptions. Customers can choose from four different boxes: a “Premier” box ($100) with ally tasks for the month; a “Pin Pals” box for partnership tasks ($50 each); an “E-Ally” box ($25) with one solidarity task; and a Single Use box ($50). To give the service as a gift, the best option is the Single Use box, or what the founders dub their “Revenge Box.” They say, “Send this box to a Trump supporter, bigot, or white supremacist of your choice,” and it includes a statement of donation to a cause in the name of the recipient. All boxes provide subscribers with directions for how they can help fight oppression. In return, a portion of the subscription fees (or simple donations) goes to black women for whatever they need, no questions asked. Recipients are chosen at random from a pool of people who register with the site called “Black Women Being.” “We’re so excited for the potential to just give black women money,” says Johnson. “Black women are the best stewards of their own money.” Johnson and Mac, in their own careers, have worked tirelessly to bring justice to communities in the face of violence against marginalized people. But with their Safety Pin Box business, the two can take hold of their work in a way they hadn’t before. “A lot of the work we’ve done,” says Johnson, “has been very reaction-based. We’ve been responding to something that’s very traumatic. But this effort is a way of engaging with work that’s safer and more sustainable—it isn’t dependent on the news cycle and on black trauma.” 

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE 2016 • PART THREE

t’s one thing to say to folks, ‘Go and do the work,’ ” says Seattle activist and writer Marissa Jenae Johnson. “I certainly understand that sentiment, but it can be hard for some people to grasp.” The work she’s referencing, of course, is visible, tangible efforts made by everyday citizens to dismantle oppressive systems like racism, ableism, and the patriarchy. Johnson, world-renowned for her work with Black Lives Matter, is a staunch advocate for sacrifice, especially when it comes to privileged white people giving up their comforts to people of color and the marginalized, who have suffered at the hands of an abusive system for hundreds of years. As a result, Johnson, along with Ferguson Response Network founder Leslie Mac, recently created the Safety Pin Box project, a new subscription service for people who want to help in the fight against systematic oppression but don’t know what to do or where to turn. “Black women,” says Johnson, succinctly. “We’ll tell you what to do.” Johnson and Mac met in November, a few days after the presidential election, during a trip to Jamaica with friends and colleagues. “That’s when the safety-pin-fever stuff came up,” she says, referring to a national trend of wearing safety pins to express solidarity after Trump’s election. “We thought, ‘Is this really the best response? Safety pins?’ ” It was the first time the two had spent together, though they’d talked regularly online in what Johnson calls “a really small neighborhood” of black activists. A few weeks later they’d created the Safety Pin Box. “Black people, including me,” says Johnson, “are ingenious at using the jargon people are familiar with to further the movement. And people have backed themselves into a corner

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SHOP SPOTLIGHT

A Better Boutique Simple & Just offers designer shopping for a cause.

time. Void if assigned, transferred, sold, bartered, or reproduced, and where prohibited, restricted, or taxed. Customer pays applicable taxes. Cash value $109.00. Valid from 12/08/16 while supply lasts. ©2016 Mountain Hardwear Corporation.

M O U N TA I N H A R DW E A R

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expensive tickets to an auction, not everyone is part of a foundation, but everyone can participate here,” she says. By participating, she means the donation and purchase of clothes, handbags, jewelry, and other accessories available in the lovely, on-trend space that has nary a hint of the musty grandmother’s-closet look of many resale shops. Simple & Just presents a clean, fresh aesthetic with its rustic wood walls, gold geometric art, faux fur throws strewn on dressing-room chairs, cowhide rug, and succulents dotted throughout. The clothing, for women and men, leans toward designer labels (though Quatier insists she won’t turn down an item from, say, Old Navy if it’s cute and trendy). There’s even a “sparkle shop” in the back—a rack of blingy holiday pieces that includes party and cocktail dresses—that is perfect for highschool girls looking for an affordable but fashionable homecoming outfit or perhaps someone gearing up for a night at the ballet or symphony. You might even snag a Coach or Ferragamo handbag or some designer denim, all of it generally offered at a third of its retail price. Quatier chose Queen Anne for the flagship store because she lives in Queen Anne and “there wasn’t a place here to donate to regularly. . . . I was always going to Ballard. I wanted somewhere that had had foot traffic and had both the shoppers and the donors nearby.” And it certainly doesn’t hurt that the high-income zip code has plenty of women and men who are prone to buy—and donate—expensive wares. ■

SEATTLE WEEKLY • HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE 2016 • PART THREE

ueen Anne Avenue is home to many upscale, one-of-akind clothing boutiques for women, but one affordable newcomer offers something the others don’t: an opportunity to support girls who have been victims of trafficking and exploitation. In the former Video Isle space, Carolyn Quatier, a former manager of tailoring and alterations at Nordstrom, has opened Simple & Just (2213 Queen Anne Ave. N., 5880257), a high-end second-hand clothing and accessories nonprofit shop whose dollars go to providing care to survivors ages 13 to 17 from Seattle and Portland. The organizations that benefit from dollars spent at the store cover all aspects of what a survivor needs to get back on her feet, from housing and health care to mentoring and education, and include Door to Grace, Real Escape From Sex Trafficking, Organization for Prostitution Survivors, Northwest Children’s Outreach, and Unbound, among others. Quatier has been working in the nonprofit sector for 15 years. In 2009 she started Door to Grace in Portland and organized a community of volunteers, mentors, and staff trained in treating trauma and abuse with a faith-based component. While building that organization, she was witness to the difficulties involved in allocating staff time to working with the girls and fundraising. That is where Simple & Just comes in. The store, which opened on October 1, is a sustainable source of funding that gives people not aligned with the world of philanthropy a way to contribute. “Not everyone can afford

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Cookware at India Plaza.

GIFT TRIP

The Middle of Somewhere 7710 SE 34th St., Mercer Island, WA 98040 (206)275-7760 www.mercerislandthrift.org Store hours: Monday - Saturday 10-7, Sunday 12-5

A short walk from light rail, the commercial center of Tukwila’s immigrant community has a lot in store.

By Cate McGehee

SEATTLE WEEKLY • HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE 2016 • PART THREE

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f you ever start to feel that Seattle is just too small, try going 10 miles north or south. The entire metropolitan area is unknowably expansive and diverse—but, thanks to the light rail, a strip of it happens to be terrifically accessible. For a shopping destination this holiday season, we recommend one of the Link’s least-hyped stations: Tukwila International Boulevard. The colossal glass station, just one stop before the train pulls into Sea-Tac Airport, is the tallest building around, rising from the sea of its own parking lot with a barren field next door. When it opened, this station was described in the press as “really, truly in the middle of nowhere.” But if you cross Southcenter Boulevard and International Boulevard and walk about five minutes, you’ll find the commercial center of Tukwila’s large immigrant population (though the structure is technically located in SeaTac). This shouldn’t be surprising. Tukwila is the most diverse city in Washington (and 11th most diverse in America); according to the most recent census, 39.7 percent of residents are foreign-born. There’s a lot more here than just “a connection to the airport.” The Bakaro Mall (15245 International Blvd.) is the centerpiece of the complex. Named after the biggest market in Mogadishu, Somalia, it comprises dozens of small stalls lining either side of two central aisles. The aisles meet in the back at a cafe and gathering space. The retailers who occupy the stalls sell jewelry, electronics, cosmetics,

and religious objects, but Bakaro is really a destination for clothing. The stalls are tiny in size—maybe 5´ by 7´—but the vendors make good use of the vertical space and the highhung garments line the walls and hallways, creating a dazzling quilt of colored fabric. This is a great place to find long, covering dresses, tunics, jilbābs, abayas, head coverings, and traditional East African and Muslim apparel for both men and women. SeaTac Market (15221 International Blvd.), another Somali-run business, is another vast world of merchandise. Housed in a warehouse-like ex-casino, it’s now a kind of cavernous general store, with everything from pieces of art to fresh produce and a full restaurant in back serving Eastern African cuisine (with the best lentil soup you’ll ever have). Come here for housewares—there are dozens of imported tea sets and serving implements. Also beside the Bakaro Mall is India Plaza (15245 International Blvd. #113), an expansive Indian grocery store packed with potential gifts. Indian cookware like flat tava pans are available alongside hundreds of ingredients, but we recommend going for ready-made stocking-stuffers: fennel candy, boxed soan papdi, or light-pink rocks of salt from Pakistan that have all the beauty of quartz crystals for less than $3. India Plaza also has a collection of fresh, handmade mithai—Indian sweets—that will dazzle your guests or gift recipients. Try the kaju katli, a smooth cashew confection cut into diamonds and coated with edible silver leaf. 


SUGGESTED GIFTS

Books That Cook

Five cookbooks for the techies, classicists, and globally obsessed on your list.

By Nicole Sprinkle and arresting photography, it documents the specific history and culinary landscape of Macau, the melting pot of Asia, where Chinese, Portuguese, Malaysian, and Indian food all come together in singular style. The dishes, adapted from Fat Rice restaurant, include the signature arroz gordo (a fried rice dish), Portuguese barbequed seafood with Big Ben’s sambal, and porco bafassa (smothered and roasted turmeric pork shoulder). Big, bold flavors meet big, bold art in this long-awaited cookbook. $35 Vegan, Vegetarian, Omnivore: Dinner for Everyone at the Table If you’ve ever found yourself trying to plan a dinner for friends and family with different food imperatives (vegetarian, gluten-free, and others), then you’re sure to appreciate the latest from Anna Thomas. Starting with the premise that most of us eat fruit, vegetables, grains, and bread, the book builds around those basic blocks, adding or subtracting meat, dairy, and other ingredients to flesh out about 200 recipes that ensure a delicious, inclusive meal. With the holidays approaching, I particularly love the varied options for my Christmas and New Year’s table—from meaty entrées accompanied by hearty veggie sides to companion soups that can also stand alone as meals. Easy subheads identify each recipe like “Vegetarian or Omnivore” or “Vegan or Vegetarian”—giving you simple instructions on how to transform it either way. $35 

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE 2016 • PART THREE

Alton Brown Everyday Cook The ultimate food geek, Brown sheds his quirky TV persona and gets down to business in his latest. In it, you’ll still find plenty of his science-y advice—on everything from thermometers and pressure cookers to telescopic forks and propane torches—but at its heart this book is really about the food that he loves to eat when he’s hanging out at home, much of it informed by his Southern roots, and perfect not just for meals but anytime-of-the-day snacks. Grits with shrimp, chilaquiles, turkey tikka masala, and midnight mug cake for two are just a few of the tempting, down-to-earth recipes interspersed among photos that were all taken with Brown’s iPhone. $35 Cooking for Jeffery There’s a reason you’re likely to find this book in many a food writer’s roundup this year: Ina Garten is simply America’s gourmet grande dame, and her latest cookbook is a love letter to the husband who’s made many a cameo on her Barefoot Contessa show and for whom, along with friends and family, she whips up her divine but approachable meals. Here again are ever-perfect dishes meant to not just wow guests but ultimately make them feel comforted and at-home, exuding the warmth that defines Garten herself. Filled with stunning but simple main dishes like brisket with onions & leeks, Moroccan grilled lamb, and root-vegetable gratin; party snacks like port wine prunes with Stilton and walnuts; desserts such as frozen mocha mousse; and cocktails like a limoncello vodka Collins, this is the perfect addition to an Ina library or a great first book to start a collection. $35 Food With Friends: The Art of Simple Gatherings If I had to choose just one cookbook that inspired me the most this year, it’d have to be this tome from Leelya Cyd. Besides the artful photography, with its quaint and feminine style, the recipes themselves are somehow both dainty and inventive yet never too precious. I love the way Cyd celebrates less-conventional meal times, such as Happy House, Teatime, and Picnics & Potlucks, as well as the unexpected but irresistible food that they comprise: matcha egg creams, sweet-potato tortilla Espanola, purple cauliflower hummus, beets in coconut with curry leaves, rose flan. Her kale pesto is already on weekly rotation in my home, and her beet-pickled eggs, a throwback to my childhood, are must-have hors d’oeuvres this season. $25 The Adventures of Fat Rice: Recipes From the Chicago Restaurant Inspired by Macau For the food-loving traveler with a penchant for comics and graphic novels, this unique cookbook by Abraham Conlon, Adrienne Lo, and Hugh Armano should do. Both a literal and visual feast, complete with comic strips, outrageous illustrations,

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PART FOUR ON STANDS DECEMBER 14TH! Each Issue Includes:

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CHARITY PAGES Each week we will focus on some notable non-profits in one of four spotlight categories—including Arts & Education, Food & Shelter, Animals, and Environment—we will tell you who you’re giving to and what that gift will do. FEATURES We will also provide fresh perspectives on giving, including the origin stories of some great gifts (and the local makers responsible for them), holiday wish lists from notable Seattleites, guides to the city’s best shopping neighborhoods (complete with hot cocoa suggestions!), suggestions for regional shopping trips (to Portland, Vancouver and beyond!), profiles of new shops with new things for you to buy and more!

AD RESERVATION DEADLINES 12/14 THURS 12/3

CONTACT US AT advertising@seattleweekly.com

The Safety Pin Box helps allies walk the walk.

By Meagan Angus Dab Presses The popularity of dabs is on the rise—and with good reason. Dabs can provide one of the very strongest and cleanest highs currently available from cannabis. And just like the home-brewing trend, making your own is quickly becoming the next cannabis pet project. The science behind creating quality rosins is fairly simple: apply heat and pressure in proper measure, and voila, a tasty smoking treat. Hook up the weed lover in your life by scoring them a rosin-oil press. Companies like Vape Society or Web Hydroponics feature presses that run anywhere from $125 to $400 and come with a variety of extras like silicon containers, mesh filters, and scrapers. If you wanna go baller, check out Rosin Technologies; their state-ofthe-art pneumatic presses feature extras like calibrated heat plates, air filters, and OSHA-certified controls, and they start around $3,600. rosintechproducts.com Stash Box I’ll admit I’m biased about this service as it sports an extremely cool name. But this is a gift like none other. Founded by Natasha Irizarry, Stash Box is a subscription service for weed aficionados. Think Birchbox or Ipsy for stoners. Simply fill out a small survey on your weed-lover’s usage, preferences, and favored forms of ingestion, and each month a curated grab bag of specialty pot products will show up at their doorstep: High-end vape pens, energy snacks designed to complement particular strains, grinders, and limited-edition rolling papers are just a few of the goodies they’ll find waiting for them in each lovingly packed box. With new innovations in weed tech coming out daily, Stash Box is a creative way to stay current with industry trends and to give products a try before heading to the store to buy. getstashbox.com

JAMES THE STANTON

SEATTLE WEEKLY • HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE 2016 • PART THREE

GIFT SUGGESTIONS Using their hard-won cultural know-how, our staff writers will identify the best gifts of the season in Food & Drink, Arts & Culture, Fashion & Retail, and Children & Families.

Ensure your business is top of mind for holiday shoppers!

Bud With a Bow

Take a Trip The Canna Bus is a super-fun way to spend a couple of hours checking out some cool weed resources in Seattle, stopping at the cozy Dawgstar Cannabis Growers and The Green Door dispensary. But if you really wanna spoil your special stoner, book the Canna Bus as a party bus and help them get lifted with up to 14 of their favorite people on a magic carpet ride. Cruise around the city in comfort and style, checking out the stoned sights while someone else takes the wheel, or take advantage of the killer sound system, bar, and fridges to create your own smoking lounge outside your favorite club. theoriginalcannabus.com Give Something Back Nothing complements a good buzz like good karma. This year, donate some green on behalf of the stoners in your life. We don’t know how Trump’s government is going to affect cannabis legalization, but his attorney general, Jeff Sessions, has referred to the reform movement as a “tragic mistake.” Many fear he will roll back the progress we’ve seen over the past decade. Consider supporting some nonprofits that have been fighting this prohibition for years; groups like the Drug Policy Alliance, C.A.R.E., the Marijuana Policy Project, and the ACLU will be on the front lines of securing medicine for patients and taking up the cases of those still being arrested in states that have yet to legalize. 


SUGGESTED GIFTS

Giving the Ghost Five picks from Ghost Gallery for the art-lover on your list.

By T.S. Flock Thunderstorm by Stasia Burrington This painter and illustrator creates sweet cartoons in an instantly recognizable sinuous style and portraiture in brooding realism. In the case of the small sumi paintings at Ghost Gallery (504 E. Denny Way, 832-6063), the result is both sweet and brooding. The bond between the two figures in Thunderstorm may be sisterly, motherly, or sapphic, but however one views it, their tender embrace between the splotchy, black clouds above is familiar for PNW residents. 4´ x 6´ sumi ink on watercolor paper. Framed and ready to hang. $75

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$6.59

Bloom II by Meggan Joy Trobaugh This emerging artist and photographer creates strange, lush digital collages that mesh organic and man-made materials. Her Bloom series isolates these hybrid forms against a black background. Some look like a corsage for a sabbat. Others feel like a fragment of an Arcimboldo painting, such as Bloom II, which uses sprigs from various plants to suggest a

Don’t Explain by Asher Locter Fans of jazz will love Locter’s hand-cut paper portraits of Ella Fitzgerald and Billie Holiday. As a street artist, he’s quite adept at capturing a dynamic moment in a simplified stencil form. By suspending these paper cuts in square floating frames, he allows for the works to cast a their image as a shadow, depending on how they are displayed. They look great on the wall or on a desk. 8´ x 8´ in white floating frames with glass. Ready to hang. $250 

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE 2016 • PART THREE

The Prettiest Star (Bowie) by Mariel Andrade 2016 was a year of falling stars. Some are still mourning the loss of David Bowie and Prince. Painter Andrade has been painting small, colorful portraits of the two music gods. Her portrait of Bowie is embellished with small crystals that up the kitsch factor, and in this case that’s kind of a good thing. (It’s not as if Bowie was known for subtlety.) It’s a perfect icon the shrine or altar of a Ziggy devotee. 10´ x 10´ acrylic and crystals on canvas. Ready to hang.

pair of hands, one offering a pearlescent bead to another. Apt for a gift. 9´ x 9´ digital collage. Framed and ready to hang. $150 Cascade Can by Hickory Mertsching Mertsching often includes bits of trash in his paintings of natural scenes and wildlife. In the small works at Ghost Gallery, he focuses solely on the rubbish with oil paintings of crumpled beer cans. They are certainly perfect for party pads and man-caves, but even a teetotaler can appreciate his cheeky, sympathetic renderings of blue-collar empties. 8´ x 8´ oil on canvas, mounted on wood. Ready to hang. $250

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE 2016 • PART THREE

This season, let your gifts give back.

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At Shine in South Lake Union an array of handcrafted, locallysourced and unique gifts await you. Your purchase of jewelry, clothing and accessories helps support patient and family services at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. That’s right, it’s retail therapy that helps others. 207 Pontius Ave N, South Lake Union SCCAshine.org

Pullout - 2016 Giving Guide Part Three  

i20161206173502877.pdf

Pullout - 2016 Giving Guide Part Three  

i20161206173502877.pdf