Issuu on Google+

Basket case: Gift-shipping business booms, 4 DECEMBER 2016 | VOL. 19, NO. 9

Rise of Funko

How Everett toymaker grew into a $400 million empire • 6-7 Supplement to The Daily Herald

More from The Herald Business Journal: On www.theheraldbusinessjournal.com: ◗ Keep up to date with our weekly newsletter. ◗ See what’s on the local business calendar and submit your events. On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ heraldbusinessjournal On Twitter: @HBJnews

The Herald Business Journal 1800 41st St., Suite 300 Everett, WA 98201


2 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2016

Get our fast business Internet and our lowest price.

The faster your business moves, the higher its productivity. Switch now to Frontier Business Edge and you’ll receive: • Fast and reliable high-speed Internet • Our lowest entry-level package price • Unlimited nationwide calling, voice mail and advanced calling features included • 24/7 tech support that never sleeps Add an optional OnHub router from Google at a low monthly rate. • Improved Wi-Fi connectivity for all your devices • Easier and faster streaming, downloading and sharing

Better. Faster. Router.

• Simple setup with the easy-to-use Google On app

Offer ends soon – switch to Frontier now.

Call 888.970.8493 | business.frontier.com *Subject to availability Offer not valid in TX, nor in select areas in FL or CA. Must subscribe to a qualifying package of Business phone service and new Business Internet with two-year agreement. Internet will be provisioned at our fastest speed available at your location of up to 768Kbps, 1Mbps, 3Mbps, 5Mbps, 6-7Mbps, 10-15Mbps, 18-20Mbps, 24-30Mbps, 40-45Mbps, 50Mbps, 75Mbps, 100Mbps, or 150Mbps download based on line requirements. Internet service speed is not guaranteed and will depend on many factors. Service subject to availability. Optional OnHub router charge of $7.50/mo applies for initial 2-yr term. Equipment charges, activation fee, and/or $9.99 broadband processing fee upon disconnection of service may apply. Early termination fee equal to the remaining balance of the agreement applies. Voice service order or install charge may apply. Nationwide phone minutes exclude 900, international, directory assistance and dial-up calls. Usage restrictions may apply. Other terms and conditions apply. Frontier reserves the right to withdraw this offer at any time. ©2016 Frontier Communications Corporation.

1519944


DECEMBER 2016

TABLE OF CONTENTS

KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

Anji Cozart works at the offices of Art of Appreciation in Arlington. Cozart started the business more than 15 years ago out of her home, Page 4.

COVER STORY Everett’s Funko sees profits jump from $40 million to $400 million in two years, 6-7

BUSINESS NEWS Art of Appreciation ships 1,000 gift baskets a day during holidays . . . . . 4 What to know about new Boeing Commercial Planes CEO. . . . . . . . . . 5 WSU looks for housing in Snohomish County for its medical students . . . . 8 Nominate Emerging Leader candidates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Port sees decline in shipping yearover-year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Bank of the Cascades to be acquired by Montana bank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Longtime leader of Canyon Creek Cabinets to retire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Everett business owner attracts with a splash of color and espresso . . . . 15

BUSINESS BUILDERS Tom Hoban: What Trump’s election means for Washington state. . . . . . 19 Andrew Ballard: Learn to write right message for customers. . . . . . . . . . 20 Monika Kristofferson: A clutter-free workspace helps productivity. . . . . 21 PEOPLE WATCHING . . . . . . . . . . 16

Mechanics warn consumers to be wary of cheap auto parts. . . . . . . . 10

BUSINESS BRIEFS . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Everett City Councilman leads effort to grow green economy. . . 12

BUSINESS LICENSES. . . . . . . 24-25

TAX LIENS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

ECONOMIC DATA. . . . . . . . . 26-27

NEWSROOM

ADVERTISING SALES

Editor: Jim Davis 425-339-3097; jdavis@heraldnet.com; businessnews@heraldnet.com

Tara Raimey 425-339-3445 — Fax 425-339-3049 traimey@soundpublishing.com

Contributing Writers: Jennifer Sasseen, Megan Brown, Dan Catchpole, Victoria Buritsch-Tompkins Contributing Columnists: Monika Kristofferson, Tom Hoban. Andrew Ballard Publisher Josh O’Connor 425-339-3007 joconnor@soundpublishing.com

COVER PHOTO Funko has seen an explosion in popularity, especially with its Pop! products such as these Stormtrooper figures. Kevin Clark / The Herald

SUBSCRIPTIONS 425-339-3200 www.theheraldbusinessjournal.com

CUSTOMER SERVICE 425-339-3200 — Fax 425-339-3049 customersvc@heraldnet.com Send news, Op/Ed articles and letters to: The Herald Business Journal, P.O. Box 930, Everett, WA 98206, or email to businessnews@ heraldnet.com. We reserve the right to edit or reject all submissions. Opinions of columnists are their own and not necessarily those of The Herald Business Journal. 1727475

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 3


4 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2016

Appreciating the art of gift giving Arlington firm sends gift baskets across U.S., including 1,000 a day during holidays By Megan Brown

For The Herald Business Journal

Giving is an art. That’s the business model of Anji and Bill Cozart’s company. The couple are the founders of Art of Appreciation Gift Baskets, which strives to delight every category of gift-getter, one basket at a time. New parents, fresh graduates, golfers or gardeners. Art of Appreciation bundles up treats, snacks, toys and more for them all. The Arlington company ships about 1,000 baskets per day during the winter holiday season. Before Thanksgiving, they filled a wholesale order for 65,000 baskets. Not surprisingly, Mother’s Day is their second-busiest holiday. But gifting isn’t just for the holidays. The firm supplies new parents with newborn essentials such as burp cloths, rattles, diapers and bottles for $39.99. Most items are carefully cuddled into the arms of fluffy stuffed animals. Need some fizz in your relationship? The Sparkling White Wine & Chocolates basket sells for $89.99. Spa baskets, starting at $29.99, include lotions and scents specially formulated for Art of Appreciation. The Cuddles & Kisses spa set, $49.99, has chocolates, cookies, body lotions and a white teddy bear wrapped in cherry-red gift boxes. “Was well worth the money, it came came timely & was the easiest one stop shop ever,” Amazon reviewer Rahim Malik wrote about the basket. The range of gift baskets includes gourmet combinations of savory nuts and cheeses to an “All American Snacker” basket, a $49.99 bundle overflowing with king-sized candy bars and popcorn. All ground orders in the U.S. ship free. Anji Cozart, 47, estimated that about 80 percent of the baskets are food-based. There’s a wide range of treats, from gourmet chocolates and cheeses to salmon and jerky. Salmon might be Northwest inspired, but sells well throughout the country. “I’m from Tennessee. In the south, they eat salmon from a can,” said Bill Cozart, 54. Baskets are assembled by production associates. Around 30 employees work at the warehouse year-round. They hire around 10 seasonal employees, mostly high school seniors from Marysville Getchell High School. Anji Cozart designs the baskets herself. There are hundreds of basket choices across the website’s 51 categories, and she’s always eager to expand. “Every time she goes to the store, she finds something she wants to add,” said production manager Cindy Russell, an employee of 16 years.

PHOTOS BY KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

Anji Cozart, left, and Cindy Russell have worked together building a brand for more than 15 years. Cozart started the business more than 15 years ago out of her home and some of her clients include Amazon.com and BabiesRUs.

A previously wrapped gift is reworked for a more pleasing look at the offices of Art of Appreciation in Arlington.

Production associates carefully piece together baskets according to the designs. Then, the gift baskets are sent through a machine that wraps them in a pliable plastic, ensuring that they won’t be punctured in transit. Since the company started using the stretchy plastic, reports of damages fell dramatically. That protection is essential, because their top customers are located on the East Coast. “We sell extremely well there,” Anji Cozart said. “We don’t know why. But we’re not complaining.” She has come a long way from wrapping baskets in the 15-by-15-foot loft of their Marysville home 20 years ago when she was a stay-at-home mom. Before having two sons, she had worked with mutual and investment funds.

Though she didn’t want be away from her children, it soon became evident that she needed an outlet. “She was bouncing off the walls,” her husband said. “I’d come home she’d have the wall painted red, and the next week it’d be green.” Creating gift baskets combined her interest in crafts and her boundless energy. They considered purchasing an existing gift-basket company, but Anji Cozart realized that she was up for the challenge of starting fresh. The couple started Art of Appreciation with $3,000 and Anji Cozart’s priceless enthusiasm. She enlisted the help of her friends, including Cindy Russell, to assemble and wrap baskets. In the beginning, they were selling directly to consumers on their

website and through eBay. It was when Art of Appreciation began selling with Amazon in 2004 that they experienced their most significant growth in sales. “The baskets started to overtake the house,” said Bill Cozart. Once there were more baskets than there was house, it was time to expand. The couple first rented out a 7,000-squarefoot space in Arlington. Then they outgrew that. Finally they moved into their current space, a 40,000-square-foot warehouse in a UPS building in Arlington. Bill Cozart joined full time in 2007. Before that, he worked at The Seattle Times. Originally from Tennessee, he met Anji while serving he was a Navy officer. After he retired from his 24-year career, the couple moved to Washington to be closer to her family. The couple’s sons, Joshua and Michael, have helped with the company since the beginning. Joshua, 18, is a senior at Getchell High School, and Michael, 21, is studying at Washington State University in Pullman. One of their best-selling Christmas baskets also happens to be the trickiest one to wrap. It’s a festive mini-sleigh and the tricky part is getting the shrink wrap around it to keep it all together. For that reason, Anji Cozart offers to do it herself. “It’s my punishment,” she said. “Every year I say it’s the last year we’re going to sell it.” So far, she’s assembled 200. “I’m tired,” said Anji. “I’m ready to sleep.” But not yet. She still has 250 more to wrap.


DECEMBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 5

4 things to know about Boeing exec

Commercial Airplanes head is first outsider to run division By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

Boeing for the first time tapped an outsider to run its highly profitable Commercial Airplanes division. Kevin McAllister, 53, was named as CEO and president of the division last month. He joins Boeing after 27 years with GE Aviation, one of Boeing’s biggest suppliers, Kevin where he McAllister served as president and CEO since 2014. McAllister replaces Ray Conner, 61, who will retire next year after leading Boeing Commercial Airplanes since 2012. The division is based in Tukwila, and most of its operations are in Western Washington, including factories in Everett and Renton. Here are four things to know about McAllister:

held various materials engineering leadership roles supporting product design, manufacturing, component repair and technology development, according to his GE Aviation biography. He’s a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in materials

3. Familiar with Boeing In a video to Boeing

employees, Muilenburg praised McAllister as someone who is already deeply familiar with the company. “He’s been a strong partner of Boeing for many, many years,” Muilenburg said. “Most importantly from a cultural standpoint, he’s a great fit.” McAllister echoed the sentiment. “I’ve had the opportunity to work with a lot of folks at Boeing,” McAllis-

ter said. “I’m not new to Boeing. In the last 15 years both in supporting products out in the field, working with customers and in the trenches of campaigns to go out and win.” 4. Excited about job McAllister said in the video message he was “humbled and honored” to join this incredible Boeing team. McAllister said that his wife told him how much

he looked forward to the new job: “Kevin, you light up like I haven’t seen you light up when you talk about Boeing.” He will receive 120,000 shares of stock in the company that vests over the next decade, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing. The first 20,000 shares vest next year, another 25,000 in 2021, another 50,000 in 2023 and the final 25,000 in 2025.

FESTIVAL OF TREES

Thank You

Thank you to all who made the 2016 Festival of Trees such a tremendous success through your generosity, time and talents. We are so grateful for your incredible support of Children’s Services at Providence. From corporate sponsors and volunteers, to tree designers and every event attendee—it is the communal efforts of many individuals that make a celebration like Festival of Trees possible.

1. Boeing’s shaking things up At least one analyst called it a surprise move by Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg. “Muilenburg is shaking up (Boeing Commercial SPIRIT OF FESTIVAL Airplanes) with a surprise outside appointment which is likely a healthy move given that fresh leadership eyes can create positive movement,” analyst Peter Arment from Baird Equity Research told Reuters. Another analyst, Richard Aboulafia, vice president of the Teal Group, told The Herald that McAllister is highly respected in the industry. McAllister had a frontrow seat to see “both the challenges and failures of the 787,” Howard Rubel, an aerospace analyst at Jeffries, told Bloomberg. “So he knows how hard it is to run an airplane company.” 2. Background in engineering McAllister joined GE Aviation in 1989 and

engineering. He rose through the ranks at GE. As vice president and general manager of global sales and marketing at GE Aviation since 2008, he was credited with delivering record backlog growth for the nearly $25 billion GE business. He took over GE Aviation two years ago.

SPIRIT OF FESTIVAL AWARD

SPIRIT OF

Jay & Terry Ackley

FESTIVAL

SPIRIT OF FESTIVAL

K&H Integrated Print Solutions SPIRIT OF

FESTIVAL

• • • • • • • • • •

SPIRIT OF

FESTIVAL

thank you to our sponsers TITLE SPONSOR

MEDIA SPONSOR

www.tulalipcares.org

distinguished platinum sponsors

platinum sponsors

gold sponsors

Premera Blue Cross

The Everett Clinic

Radia Inc., PS-Patient Centered Imaging and Technology Solutions

silver sponsors

bronze sponsors

Klein Honda

The Dwayne Lane’s Auto Family

Providence Medical Group

Mortenson Construction

Frontier Communications

Rodland Toyota/Scion

RA Investment Properties, LLC

Heritage Bank

Roy Robinson Chevrolet, Subaru & RV Center

Sodexo

Hermanson Company Jan & Harv Jubie and Linda & Larry Jubie

Western Washington Medical Group

Sean & Lisa Kelly

Moss Adams LLP Pediatrix & Obstertrix Medical Group Peoples Bank Seattle Children’s ZGF Architects LLP

• • • • • • • • • •

& centerpieces CORT Party Rental

décor

Stadium Flowers

entertainment sponsor

photo booth sponsor

Coastal Community Bank

Courrier & Boggeri General Dentistry

www.ProvidenceGeneralFoundation.org 1723132


6 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2016

COVER STORY

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Product development manager Corinne Cavalaro, facing, and product manager Stephanie Sisolak talk in the conference room at Funko, a pop culture and licensed-focused collectibles company.

Upping the fun factor

Everett collectible maker experiences explosive growth By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

O

n the right stands a giant bow-tie-wearing Willy Wonka, cane in hand, top hat reaching the ceiling. On the left stands a chesthigh Oompa Loompa, orange-skinned, green-haired. Welcome to Funko, a world where pure imagination becomes reality. The Everett company is the maker of toys and collectibles, mainly cartoony, anime-inspired, cute-factor-turned-upto-the-max figures of the world’s biggest pop culture characters, such as Batman, Spider-Man and Darth Vader. Funko has seen stratoBrian Mariotti spheric growth in the past few years as it looks to elbow its way among industry heavyweights like Hasbro and Lego. It went from earning $40 million a year

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Collectibles ranging from Marvel’s Deadpool to Disney’s Mickey Mouse, line a case in Funko’s lobby.

in revenue in 2014 to making an expected $400 million this year, said Mark Robben, the company’s director of marketing. “It makes people smile,” Robben said. “I think we all know that we’re not curing cancer, but if we can put a smile on people’s faces with a cute little potted (Guardians of the Galaxy) Groot figure then I think it matters. It makes people

happy. It makes us happy.” This lightning-in-the-bottle success is expected to continue, he said. Funko employs about 250 people but is looking to hire more in all departments. How many will depend on growth, Robben said. The company is currently based in a warehouse with offices in south Everett

but plans next year to move its headquarters to the former Trinity Lutheran College, a five-story building in downtown Everett at 2802 Wetmore Ave. The new headquarters can house as many as 300 employees — mainly in art, sales, marketing, finance and IT. The company will also keep its current headquarters at 1202 Shuksan Way as a key warehouse, as well as, two other warehouses in the Everett area. Funko will bring scores of creative types to downtown Everett to eat in the city’s restaurants, visit the city’s breweries and even live in the city’s core, said Lanie McMullin, the city’s economic development executive director. “They’re so much fun, rarely do you see this much energy…” McMullin said. “I think that attitude will reflect in our downtown.” Funko is ramping up product lines, such as its line of stuffed figures called plushes, a line of T-shirts with Funko characters and even home accessories such as coffee mugs with a Funko Boba Fett face or Funko Batman and Joker salt-and-pepper shakers. The company already makes short YouTube videos with Funko characters, but there are plans with Marvel comics to expand to longer-form videos. “As the marketing director, I would love


DECEMBER 2016

nothing more than to eventually see the Funko movie using our art style,” Robben said. “I think that would be perfect for that. Obviously that’s a long ways away.” So how did the company reach these heights? It didn’t happen overnight. The company was founded by Mike Becker in 1998 in Snohomish. The early product lines included bobbleheads and coin banks based on cereal advertising characters and other retro figures like Popeye and Evel Knievel. Becker sold the company in 2005 to current CEO Brian Mariotti, who had been running and designing nightclubs. The company continues to be privately held, but private equity group Acon Investments bought into the company last year. Mariotti has been aggressive about getting licensing deals to make collectibles from Marvel and DC comics, “Star Wars” and Disney. The company has gone after some of the hottest popular culture trends of the day, making figures for hit television shows including “Game of Thrones” and “The Walking Dead.” The company also lined up a who’s who list of retailers to sell the company’s products: Target, Walmart, Amazon, Hot Topic, GameStop, Barnes & Noble. Artists in-house do the majority of design work. The final products are made in China and Vietnam, shipped back to Funko through the ports of Everett and Seattle and, for apparel, through the port of San Diego. Then the products are shipped around the world. In 2010, Funko debuted its Pop! line of vinyl cartoony figures with oversized heads and giant eyes, giving them a distinct Funko style and feel. The first four characters — two versions of Batman, Green Lantern and Batgirl — were shown at Comi-Con in San Diego. The line has helped rocket Funko forward. “Brian always said he knew he had something when it wasn’t just middle-aged men lining up,” Robben said. “He started seeing women and kids line up.’” Robben credits hard work by Funko employees, the artists who have been able to create a unique style with a mix of cuteness and fun. Robben, who joined Funko two years ago after working for Big Fish Games in Seattle, also said the market has grown for these pop culture items. “When you’re a fan of something, when you’re a fan of ‘The Avengers’ or a fan of ‘Game of Thrones,’ you want to be able to get T-shirts and artwork and figures,” Robben said. “That’s just how people consume pop culture.” The items that Funko produces are also inexpensive. People can buy a Pint-Size Hero for $3.99. Most of its Pop! figures are just more than $10. Some people collect the figures hoping that they’ll increase in value over time. (Robben’s first Funko figure was a fairly rare Elvis Pop! figure that is now sells for $175 on eBay.) Funko has licenses from so many content providers that it could make thousands of characters, probably more than it will ever produce, Robben said. That allows the company to make figures and products for niche groups of fans which might be small in terms of population but whose members are passionate about what they follow. “We’re able to spread across a lot of

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 7

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Georgia Paschen takes inventory in the samples room at Funko. The company sends out samples to retailers and news media such as television show Good Morning America.

KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

The new home of Funko is the now defunct Trinity Lutheran College in downtown Everett.

“As the marketing director, I would love nothing more than to eventually see the Funko movie using our art style.” — Mark Robben different fandoms — there is something to collect for everybody,” Robben said. “There’s no way my dad would care about ‘Star Wars’ or Marvel, but he might be interested in one of the NFL figures that we make or he might think Ricky Bobby from ‘Talledega Nights’ is interesting and put that on his desk.” To that end, the company really tries to engage its fan base, Robben said. “If fans go to our Twitter feed or Facebook feed, we listen, we run polls we ask people what do you want to see? What are you interested in? We asked fans, do you want ‘Stranger Things’? And they said yes, that was a great show, we want Funko ‘Stranger Things’ figures. So we went and got the license,” Robben said. “I think even Netflix took notice of that. When Netflix saw how many of our fans were saying we want this. That made those discussions pretty easy and very, very easy to get it done.”

About 30 percent of all toy sales in the U.S. come from products brand licensing, said Adrienne Appell, director of communications of the New York-based Toy Industry Assocation. And collectible items are seeing a huge upsurge; her association named 2016 as the Year of the Collectible. “Funko kind of fits in the sweet spot of both,” Appell said. “Not only are they appealing to adults and some kids they really do have some terrific licensing deals.” The toy industry goes through fads, but toys made through licensing deals and collectibles seem to be holding a lasting appeal, she said. All of these elements make up the successful formula for the company. Funko is still small compared with Hasbro and Lego — which made $4.5 billion and $5.1 billion in revenues respectively last year. But the company sees continued growth.

“At some point the law of large numbers will prevent you from growing at those rates,” Robben said. “We definitely foresee growth continuing. If we didn’t see the growth continuing then I don’t think we’d bother moving into a new headquarters and hiring new headcount.” That new headquarters will be unlike anything that downtown Everett has ever seen. The building is close to the existing offices so it won’t be a major change of commute for Funko employees. It’s also close to Xfinity Arena: “I’m not making promises, but I know having the arena fairly close gives us the opportunity to put on some fan events and do some things around Emerald City Comicon or events that we put on ourselves,” Robben said Right now, Funko gets visitors from around the country, people who pop in to look at the Funko headquarters. The company used to give tours, but there’s enough proprietary information from upcoming movies that Funko hasn’t been able to let fans come through the doors these days. In the new headquarters, the company plans to include a bottom-floor exhibit hall that features its current and historical products and some giant figurines, like the Willy Wonka and Oompa Loompa in its current lobby. Funko also plans to open a flagship retail store at the location. (Although the company doesn’t see itself competing in the future with its current retail partners.) The headquarters aims to bring a “touch of whimsy, a touch or retro, a touch of class” to the building with its logo on the outside and images of its artwork on display. CEO Marriotti’s fingerprints are all over the design of the new building, Robben said. “He wants the building to reflect the brand 100 percent,” Robben said. “Our brand is fun. It’s warm, it’s bright colors, it’s playful, it’s slightly irreverant. We’re not afraid to poke fun at ourselves and have a laugh. We don’t take what we’re doing too ultra seriously. We know who we are and we love what we do.”


8 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2016

Housing needed for medical students WSU students to stay for short stints in Everett next school year By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

EVERETT — The first wave of students at Washington State University’s new medical school will arrive in Everett during the next school year — at least for short stays. Fifteen students will

spend a week at a time — six weeks total during their first two years of studies — in Everett, hopefully, to begin to grow roots in the community. “We really want them to feel like they’re a part of this community and not just here to do a rotation and leave,” said John Tomkowiak, the WSU medical

school dean. To prepare for the arrival, the university is seeking families who will house the students. This “billet program” will allow the students to become familiar with the town and surrounding communities and also connect with local families. “We hope to have 15 students on this campus so we’re looking for 15 potential billets going forward,” Tomkowiak said.

To learn more Families interested in hosting medical students can contact Cheryl Blackburn at cheryl.blackburn@wsu.edu or 425-405-1712. WSU will host information sessions with the community in early 2017. During the third- and fourth-years of medical schools, the same students will train in Everett and the surrounding towns, but will be responsible

to find their own housing. Even so, Tomkowiak hopes that the students will remain in contact with the host families. WSU is just getting the

medical school under way. In 2015, the Legislature gave approval and funding for the university to start just the second public medical school in the state. The Floyd College of Medicine, named after WSU’s late president, Elson Floyd, received preliminary accreditation this fall. The medical school is a community-based training model where students will spend the first two years doing classroom work in Spokane, but then get more clinical experience and more classroom work either by remaining in Spokane or studying in Everett, the Tri-Cities or Vancouver. In Everett, WSU has reached agreements with Providence Regional Medical Center Everett and The Everett Clinic to help teach the medical students. More than 680 people applied for just 60 spots by late November. The school is only taking students from Washington or those with ties to the state. “I think it’s exciting to think about that in just a few short months, we’ll have that first group of 60 medical students showing up ready to be our inaugural class, ” said Kirk Schulz, WSU’s president, at celebration of the accreditation in Everett in October. From the beginning, students will be assigned to each of the four communities. The medical school is also recruiting staff including an associate dean to start as soon as next spring in each of the towns. That way, the students will have support when they arrive for their one-week stays. One of the goals for the program is to train doctors who are willing to practice in rural and under-served urban areas, Tomkowiak said. Studies have shown that the best way to do that is to actually train them in those communities. “We want to create this continuum where they have this opportunity to grow up, come from an area, train in medical school there, do their residency program and be able to stay and practice,” Tomkowiak said. “I think we have that model all mapped out and ready to go.”

TULALIP MY GAME IS ALWAYS MIXING BUSINESS WITH PLEASURE.

Transform your meeting into an unforgettable event. Unrivaled luxury and flexible meeting spaces with stateof-the-art facilities combine to promise success truly more than a feeling - This is My Tulalip.

3 0 M I N U T E S N O R T H O F S E AT T L E

R E S E R VAT I O N S : 888 .7 1 6 .7 1 6 2 | T U L A L I P C A S I N O. CO M

1722396


DECEMBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 9

Help recognize an Emerging Leader Nominations are being sought for the second annual Emerging Leader contest to recognize and celebrate the next generation of leadership in Snohomish County. The award seeks to highlight young individuals who exemplify strong character, initiative, leadership and community involvement. Sponsors include HeraldMedia, accounting firm Moss Adams, Economic Alliance Snohomish County, Puget PR and Leadership Snohomish County. The deadline to nominate a candidate is Jan. 8. To submit a name, go to www.heraldnet.com/emergingleaders. The winner will be announced in April. Last year, Everett’s Adams & Duncan law firm partner Chris Adams received the inaugural award. Adams was a member of Everett’s planning commission and was chairman in 2013 and 2014. He’s also worked on the city’s salary and charter review commissions. He’s a former board president of Sherwood Community Service helping people

Nominate today The deadline to nominate a candidate is Jan. 8. To submit a name, go to www.heraldnet. com/emergingleaders. The winner will be announced in April. with disabilities, served on the board and executive committee for Providence Hospital and worked on the Everett YMCA board. More than 50 people were nominated, and many were nominated multiple times. Of those, the field was cut to a dozen then pared to four finalists. The other three finalists were George Kosovich of the Verdant Health Commission; Lisa Lefeber, director of strategic communication and policy for the Port of Everett; and Shanon Tysland, owner of Experience Momentum, a Lynnwood health and fitness business.

Here to Help Businesses Grow & Thrive Responding to your business opportunities with Local SBA Expertise, Quick Decisions & Streamlined Processing

Port sees year-overyear drop in shipping By Dan Catchpole Herald Writer

EVERETT — Lower oil prices, a weaker Chinese economy and trade sanctions with Russia are contributing to less cargo passing through the Port of Everett this year. While a decline had been expected, it was greater than what port officials had forecast because of a dramatic drop in cargo for oil projects in Alaska and Canada. “We took a big beating on that one,” said Carl Wollebek, the port’s chief operating officer. Last year, Royal Dutch Shell used the port to stage equipment for exploring drilling sites off Alaska’s coast. The port also moved a substantial amount of cargo headed for Canada’s shale oil industry. This year, Shell suspended its Alaska exploration, and shipments for shale oilfields have dried up, Wollebek said. The increase in energy industry cargo in 2015 masked a downturn in timber exports bound for China’s construction industry. The Port of Everett exported 187,861 tons of logs in 2014 and 144,991 last year, a 23 percent decline. Log exports through October slightly are behind where they were 12 months ago. Wollebek said they likely will close that gap by the end of the year. Timber exports are expected to be about the same in 2017, he said.

Economic sanctions between Russia and the United States have taken a toll on Everett’s waterfront. The sanctions came out of Russia’s takeover of Crimea from Ukraine in 2014. As a result, the Russia-based Far Eastern Shipping Co. (FESCO) no longer sends a cargo ship to Everett, which used to receive a FESCO ship at least once a month. Another line, Sakhalin Shipping Co. still moves freight between Everett and Russia. At the same time, shipments to the South Pacific and Southeast Asia have increased, Wollebek said. Fifty-five containers full of soybeans from South Dakota are waiting at the port for a ship headed to Papua New Guinea, he said. The number of ships stopping at Everett is down from last year, but each ship is hauling more cargo. That shift is expected to continue as shipping companies move to bigger cargo ships. One shipping company, Westwood Shipping Lines’ ships are already too big for Everett’s berths. The Port of Everett is in the early stages of strengthening and expanding its berths — work that port officials estimate will take at least another six years and cost more than $300 million to complete. President-elect Donald Trump railed against U.S. trade relations as unfair and promised to renegotiate or pull out of some international agreements. It is not clear what Trump’s actual trade policy will be, but it could significantly affect Everett’s docks, Wollebek said.

Bank of the Cascades, a leading Northwest SBA lender, is proud to provide Small Business Administration (SBA) loans to help local business succeed. We provide SBA loans for: • Business Expansion • Business Buyouts • Working Capital • Equipment

• Franchise Financing • Self Storage • Manufacturers • Wholesale

Please call or stop by any of our local branches to discuss how we might help your business today. Lynnwood Branch 2502 196th St SW Lynnwood, WA 98036 425.774.5643

Kenmore Branch 6717 NE 181st St Kenmore, WA 98028 425.415.6564

Mill Creek Branch 2130 132nd St SE Mill Creek, WA 98012 425.357.1516

Serving Communities Throughout The Northwest 541.617.3500 | botc.com | Member FDIC 1729625


10 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2016

Mechanics warn about cheap parts Poor-quality auto parts, often from China, as well as counterfeit parts pose real problems By Jennifer Sasseen

For The Herald Business Journal

Fixing your own car is a pastime that is as American as apple pie and baseball. But it’s getting more difficult these days and can even be downright dangerous. Cheap car parts, often from China, have flooded the U.S. market in the past 15 years and the quality is hit-or-miss, local mechanics say. “Every other time I work on a car, I’m being stymied by Chinese parts,” said Marc Buchea, a mechanic at a private garage in Shoreline. He worked on a Mercedes Benz recently and had to file the brake pads the owner bought at a national auto parts store. It wasn’t his first experience doing that. The problem, he said, “is that when they stamp out the brake-pad backing, which is a piece of steel, their dies aren’t accurate. So a lot of times I’ll have to take those brake pads and I’ll have to actually file them, file the ends of them to make them work.” Accuracy needs to be within a couple hundred thousandths of an inch so a discrepancy in the finished product is not visible to the naked eye and is only discovered at installation, he said. Tom McAllister, owner of Brakes for Less in Lynnwood, said he’s had to file brake pads a couple of times, but he tries to buy higher quality to avoid the problem. He agreed the quality of Chinese-made parts is not as good as car parts made in the United States, but they’re often all that’s available. “It’s really hard to buy American anymore,” said McAllister, who has operated his shop for 30 years. It’s not just brakes. Problems are being seen in all sorts of car parts. Look at online review sites such as Yelp and www.consumeraffairs.com and you’ll find dozens of customers citing faulty car parts manufactured by Chinese companies that stranded people on highways and led to accidents and near-accidents. Bucheau recalled a time that he went through eight alternators for one particular car at a national car parts chain before finding one that worked. “And we kept calling stores and having them bench-test that alternator and it turned out that out of like seven or eight stores that we called, at five or six of them the alternator wouldn’t even work out of the box,” he said. One thing consumers can do to help determine if a part is good, Buchea said, is ask for the defect rate, which is based on the rate of return. However, not all stores have that information. McAllister and Steve Hottinger, who

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Brakes for Less owner Tom McAllister buys higher-end parts to avoid problems. “You don’t want cheap when it comes to stopping your car,” he said.

“Every other time I work on a car, I’m being stymied by Chinese parts,” — Marc Buchea owns Pro Muffler and Brakes in Everett, buy parts from trusted vendors such as Renton-based Olympic Brake Supply or wholesale parts distributors WorldPac, which has a Lynnwood warehouse. Many auto parts at those businesses are still made in China, but the quality is closely tracked. At least one company thinks it’s a matter of educating the public on the benefits of using higher-end parts, according to a story at www.autonews.com. Federal Mogul, a Michigan-based company that owns a number of parts suppliers, sends its technicians around the country to spread the word about its brands, such as Champion spark plugs, Moog steering parts and Fel-Pro gaskets. “We used to train installers, but as the AutoZones and the O’Reillys took over, they began to train them; when we lost that connection, customers began converting to private-label, cheap products,” said Daniel Ninivaggi, CEO of the company’s aftermarket division, in the story. As if it wasn’t difficult enough to tell the difference between good- and poor-quality car parts, a recent rise in counterfeit car parts available on sites like eBay is further complicating things. Counterfeit parts often look like one that bears the trademark of a legitimate and trusted brand, but was produced by another party and is usually not made to

the specifications of the original equipment manufacturer. These parts “represent a grave threat to public safety,” according to the Intellectual Property Rights Coordination Center, which is part of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission places the value of the counterfeit car-parts sector at $12 billion a year. A seemingly endless string of prosecutions on counterfeit parts includes two Washington state cases from 2013, involving the online sale of counterfeit airbags from sources in China. It’s a product the center considers potentially extremely harmful. “Some of the most dangerous counterfeit products involve the explosive elements of air bags that can literally explode in the victim’s face during an accident,” the center states on its website. Buchea, the Shoreline mechanic, thinks there should be more U.S. government oversight on all imported car parts, especially those related to crucial areas of performance. Tires, brake hoses and brake fluid are among 13 items of motor-vehicle equipment for which the federal government enforces minimum safety performance requirements. Certification of compliance is shown by the symbol DOT, for Department of Transportation, on the outside of the part’s box or container.

Brake pads are not on the list. Buchea said the only control the government currently exerts on brake pads is the amount of metal in them, because the state Department of Ecology has determined that the dusting from brake pads that contain a non-ferrous metal, such as brass or bronze, gets into storm water runoff and negatively affects fish. “So now they’ve got certifications for the brake pads being eco-friendly but not for being DOT approved,” he said. “So that’s more important now, is the eco thing, than actually being government approved to stop your vehicle.” Customers want cheaper parts because they don’t want to spend money on car repairs, Buchea said. Brakes are the most important item on a car, he said, “and everybody handles them like such a trivial thing — oh, it’s just brake pads, right? No big deal. “Well, there’s a huge difference between a $20 brake pad and a $60 brake pad.” He advises customers to go with original equipment manufacturer brake pads — usually made by the original supplier though often also in China — rather than the cheaper aftermarket, or generic, brake pads. “That’s where you should not compromise, is on tires and brakes,” he said. “Because you’re talking about wet traction around here, we have so much rain around here. Stopping distance is key.” McAllister of Brakes for Less and Hottinger of Pro Muffler and Brakes agreed. “You don’t want cheap when it comes to stopping your car,” McAllister said. Or as Hottinger puts it, “There’s no use going somewhere if you can’t stop.”


DECEMBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 11

SEE YOUR COMMUNITY GROW NOT YOUR BANK CHARGES.

Are you tired of your bank charges constantly increasing? When you choose a community bank you get personalized services, local decision making, and your money stays here to help build and strengthen our community. Say goodbye to those big bank charges and say hello to a bank who is truly local.

YEARS CELEBR ATING

2006-2016

EVERETT 425.263.3500 3732 BROADWAY

LYNNWOOD 425.493.5200 19705 HIGHWAY 99

BALLARD 206.397.3110 2244 NW 56th St

MountainPacificBank.com

1729591

mpb-community-grow-Sept-2016-.indd 1

8/9/16 3:32 PM


12 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2016

Trying to grow the green economy By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

Washington state sits in a unique position to emerge as a leader in the green economy not just nationally, but also globally. That’s the opinion of Paul Roberts, the Everett city councilman who is also the past president of the Association of Washington Cities. He’s working with the association and its nonprofit arm, The Center for Quality Communities, to bring together businesses, government and other voices to make it happen. The first step needs to be an analysis of the state’s strengths and weaknesses in the green economy, Roberts said. “Part of this is an inventory on what’s going on out there and how does that relate to what’s most likely going to happen in

FILE PHOTO

Everett City Councilman Paul Roberts is leading an effort to help grow the green economy in Washington. One of the first steps is to assess what’s being done in the state.

the next 20 years,” Roberts said. “And how do we pull these things together to make this the center where if I want to go work in that field I want to come here.” The group is seeking to raise $70,000 from private foundations and corporations to do that study. If the

money can be raised, the group hopes to conduct the study next year. One of the advantages for the state is a private sector community — people in the legal, business, finance and insurance worlds — willing to work on the issue, Roberts said.

“They’re not wondering whether this is happening around the globe,” Roberts said. “They’re on the cutting edge of how to respond to a changing world and a changing climate.” In just the past several years, there’s been a

MARKETPLACE

AUTO GLASS • GLASS REPLACEMENT • TINTING • VINYL WINDOWS

Rock Chip Repair…

Serving Snohomish County Since 1980

$

TRANSMISSIONS Our Speciality, Not a Sideline

CLEAR-VIEW GLASS COMPANY

Quality Transmission Service & Repair

• Remanufactured • Automatic • Standards • Differentials • CV Axles Drivelines • Repairs and/or Replace

Serving the NW Since 1952

www.clearviewglass.com

www.edstransmission.com

1729689

We can TOW or MOVE just about ANYTHING!

1729701

EastValleySandAndGravel.com Winter Road Repairs & Site Work Road Building & Construction

(Mention this ad and receive a 10% Off Discount)

1729697

1729687

1729694

Serving ish 2406 39th St. • Everett, WA 98201 Snohom Cou nt y! (425) 259-9264 • RonMayTowing.com

1811 Everett Ave. Everett (425) 252-2161 Deliveries Available

ROADSIDE SERVICES: Flat Tires • Car Lockouts Car Jump Start Service • Fuel Delivery Heavy Machines • “Auto Offload” • Antique Autos Motorcycles with Condor • Lathes • Small Forklifts • Toolboxes Latte Stands • Golf Course Mowers • Small Tractors • Safes

universities. The state’s top companies have a global supply reach, including Boeing, Microsoft and Amazon. There’s available manufacturing capacity in the Puget Sound region from Everett and Arlington and also in Pierce County. He notes that countries around the world are at trying to capitalize on the green economy. A changing climate creates challenges, but also opportunities, Roberts said. “Adaptation and mitigation has been described — not by me, but I love the description — managing the unavoidable and avoiding the unmanageable,” Roberts said. The first step is to figure where the state is at and where it needs to go. “Are we going to solve climate change? No,” Roberts said. “Are we going to be able to turn some corners in terms of reducing our carbon footprint and greenhouse footprint… that’s what needs to happen.”

TRANSMISSION SERVICE

3495

4317 Rucker • Everett 425-258-9399

progression in how people respond to climate change, Peter B. King, CEO of the Association for Washington Cities. King went to a conference several years ago in Arizona about climate change and received several questioning emails from his membership about why he was attending. Now he said he’s not getting those questions from his members. “We’ve come a long way in a pretty short time in people recognizing that we need to be proactive,” King said. Roberts said what will most likely be impacted by a changing climate is: water; energy; agriculture and forestry; and the types of materials to construct buildings. “In each of those four areas, the state of Washington has some pretty deep roots,” Roberts said. “We’re not somewhere out of the picture in terms of any of those sectors.” The state also is home to several top research

Sand & Gravel • Crushed Rock 5/8” to 4’ Washed Rock 3/8” to 8” • Disposal Site for Clean Dirt Recycled Asphalt & Concrete 5802 Cemetery Road • Arlington

QUICK QUOTE

360.403.7520 • 7:30-5:00

How to Advertise in the Herald Business Journal Call 425.339.3445 Email TRaimey@soundpublishing.com www.TheHeraldBusinessJournal.com

1743068


DECEMBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 13

JIM DAVIS / HBJ

Bank of the Cascades, which purchased Lynnwood’s Prime Pacific Bank earlier this year, is now being acquired by Montana-based First Interstate.

Montana bank to buy Bank of the Cascades By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

LYNNWOOD — Bank of the Cascades, which moved into the Snohomish County market this year by purchasing Lynnwood’s Prime Pacific Bank, is now being acquired by a Montana bank. First Interstate, headquartered in Billings, announced that it was buying Bend, Oregon-based Bank of the Cascades for cash and stock. “This opportunity is a good fit for us geographically, strategically, financially and culturally. Cascade’s operating philosophy, commitment to community banking and corporate responsibility are similar to ours, allowing for a seamless integration of our two companies,” said Kevin Riley, First Interstate’s president and CEO, in a statement. Bank of the Cascades CEO Terry Zink said First Interstate is an exceptional banking partner for his company. “Strategically they intend to grow Cascade’s branch network, as well as our metropolitan commercial banking centers across the Northwest,” Zink said in the statement. Last spring, Bank of the Cascades made a deal to purchase Prime Pacific, which has branches in Lynnwood, Mill Creek and Kenmore. That deal closed in August. Zink said that the time that it was his bank’s entry into the Seattle-area market. “What it will probably do for us is actually accelerate some of our expansion plans in Seattle,” said Reeves, noting that the First Interstate will be about four times larger than Bank of the Cascades. First Interstate also has more consumer programs that it will be able to offer to current and future customers, Reeve said. First Interstate is paying $589 million

for Bank of the Cascades in the deal, which is expected to close by mid-2017. The deal must be approved by regulators and First Interstate and Bank of the Cascades shareholders. Bank of the Cascades has 50 branches across Oregon, Idaho and Washington. After the acquistion, First Interstate will have about $12.1 billion in assets, $10.1 billion in deposits and $7.6 billion in loans. First Interstate will also have 131 banking offices stretching from the Rockies to the Pacific Northwest. Four of those offices will be the Puget Sound region. First Interstate will need to shed about 150 jobs after the merger. Reeves said that most of those positions will go away through attrition. Most of the jobs are in Billings or Bend; none are in the Puget Sound region. If the name and logo sound familiar, there’s a reason. First Interstate Bancorp was a holding company that was acquired by Wells — Chip Reeves Fargo in 1996. What was then known as First Interstate BancSystems, headquartered in Billings, had a franchise agreement with First Interstate Bancorp. After the latter company was purchased by and merged into Wells Fargo, First Interstate BancSystems purchased six banking offices in Montana and Wyoming and obtained an exclusive license to use the “First Interstate” name and logo in Montana, Wyoming and the six neighboring states of Idaho, Utah, Colorado, Nebraska, South Dakota and North Dakota. Reeves said that First Interstate Bank doesn’t have the licensing to use the First Interstate name in Oregon or Washington, so the branches here will keep the Bank of the Cascades name for now.

“What it will probably do for us is actually accelerate some of our expansion plans in Seattle.”

1721980


14 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2016

DECEMBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 15

CEO turned around Canyon Creek Splashy Rock City grows in Everett Espresso, candy and haircuts, with a dash of eye-catching color, equals a hit

By Deanna Duff

For The Herald Business Journal

By Victoria Buritsch-Tompkins For The Herald Business Journal

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Canyon Creek president and CEO Bill Weaver wears his usual Hawaiian shirt. People wouldn’t recognize him if he didn’t, he said. Weaver is retiring after turning the company around from near bankruptcy to one of Snohomish County’s largest employers.

market with a focus on customization. They pursued and were longtime participants in the Seattle Street of Dreams, a showcase for trends and innovation in luxury housing. When a new warehouse was built in 1997, Canyon Creek seized the opportunity to implement environmentally friendly practices from the ground up. It included such efforts as using finishes with low-emittance rates. In 2000, it received the Evergreen Award from the Environmental Protection Agency for environmental excellence and leadership in pollution prevention. His dedication to community extends beyond the office. “You can focus on numbers in business and you do have to do that because it pays the bills. However, you can never lose sight of the people. You’re dealing

I didn’t know how I was going to do it, but my banker did.

Edouardo Jordan | Chef/Owner | Salare

with their lives and the most important thing you owe them is to make the wisest choices you can,” Weaver says. He is a longtime and generous benefactor to the Monroe Gospel Women’s Mission through monetary donations, auction fundraising and moral support. “Bill is incredibly unselfish in what is sometimes a selfish world,” says John Stima, pastor at Monroe Gospel Women’s Mission. “We work with some of the most vulnerable people in our community and help as much as we can. Bill has even helped with basics such as getting a new heater so we can keep the ladies warm every night.” Weaver’s hands-on leadership has served Canyon Creek, the regional community and affected national change. He is now looking forward to a more hands-on approach to what inspired all of

it: woodworking. From his childhood, he still recalls the sight of curled wood shavings and sounds of planing studs as carpenters remodeled the family home. He looks forward to returning to his own woodworking and perhaps adding to the family heirloom he crafted, a cherry-and-maple dining set. Perhaps he will finally finish remodeling his own kitchen — a hub of activity for Sunday night family dinners. The end of December marks his official retirement. “My plan is to quietly walk out the door. Maybe a few weeks later someone will finally ask, ‘Has anyone seen Bill around lately?’” Weaver says. “I’m leaving things on healthy footing. Now it’s time for new blood and the next generation to lead.”

EVERETT — The flash of color catches the eye driving near Silver Lake: Tangerine orange, bright blue and a bubblegum pink. That’s what it’s supposed to do. Three businesses with the splashy colored buildings are the brainchild of Christopher and Jill Dayton. They started with Rock City Espresso, added Rock City Cuts and just opened Rock City Sweet Shop with its giant lollipop sign. The colors of the three separate buildings are supposed to give the Rock City business hub at 1831 Silver Lake Road a retro-skater feel. It’s been a long journey for the Daytons, who are originally from the San Francisco Bay Area, but who moved to the Puget Sound area in 2003. Christopher Dayton, 50, was working in mortgage and real estate before the recession. He knew that his job wasn’t going to last. He could see that people were being frugal as the recession started, but saw that people still treated themselves to an occasional latte. So the couple decided to try their hand at the trend of hand-roasted espresso in a new market: Las Vegas. “I came up with the name on the way out to Vegas,” he said about the Rock City brand. A drummer in his spare time for a Christian rock band, Christopher felt the name would be a play off his Christian faith and his love of music. He opened a Rock City espresso stand in Las Vegas in 2008. It flopped. Hard. They moved back to the Puget Sound area within months, where Christopher started selling espresso out of the back of his truck, in a 5-by-4-foot trailer.

JIM DAVIS/HBJ

Jill and Christopher Dayton started Rock City Espresso during the recession. It failed miserably in Las Vegas. So they returned to Snohomish County and gave it another try.

Rock City hub Three businesses with the Rock City name share the same corner at 1831 Silver Lake Road, Everett. More information can be found at its Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ RockCityEspresso/.

He started toting the cart to soccer games, and approached the Safeway at 11031 19th Ave. SE, Everett, near Silver Lake about using their parking lot to sell coffee. They agreed. The stand became a hit. “It was amazing,” Christopher said. “[Las Vegas] was such a massive failure. We moved back and it just took off.” As the customer base grew, Christopher

was approached about moving the stand to Silverlake Commons. Despite a short move to Snohomish, Rock City Espresso has been able to grow its customer base. They returned to the Silverlake Commons early in January 2016, and took over the barber shop. The sweet shop opened in August. For the candy shop, Jill said they wanted a “bright, happy pink,” and interior garnishes of lemon yellow to evoke sweets like taffy, pastilles, and baked sundries. The shop was initially soft-launched in August, but as of late October the snug shack has been replaced by a larger pink trailer with a wheelchair-accessible ramp. It was a necessity to Christopher — he talked about the limited space of the original shack, and how sometimes people would have to stand outside in the rain while their family members browsed. It just wasn’t the experience he wanted.

The businesses employ four, but the Daytons’ older kids, Julian, 19, and Claire, 16, lend a hand. The younger ones, Audrey, 12, and Ethan, 10, are also around. Ethan is the Sweet Shop’s official taste tester. Christopher waxed poetic when asked about his decision to open the candy store. “It’s like my father used to say, ‘There are two places that people will always have a smile on their face, regardless of the country or culture — and that is ice cream stores and candy stores. Even for just two minutes out of your day.’” Determined to keep building reasons for customers to head to their corner, Christopher is looking to add a food truck to the property. What advice does he have for other entrepreneurs: “Gather as much information as you can from business owners. Not textbooks. Write down as much as you can. Ask lots of questions.”

When Chef Edouardo was ready to open his first restaurant, Columbia was the only bank that took the time to get to know him. We saw savviness in his strategy and the value of his credentials. Together, we perfected his business plan and went through the entire SBA loan process side by side. It was the perfect recipe for success. See how good your relationship with a bank can be. Visit WhereRelationshipsRule.com.

Equal Housing Lender

Member FDIC 

1662256

Bill Weaver recalls contemplating the California landscape decades ago while stationed at Coronado Bay. His four years in the U.S. Navy were coming to a close and he had yet to choose his next path. “It suddenly hit me that I wanted to make things. I wanted to work with wood,” Weaver says. “Some people go through their entire lives trying to figure out what they want to do. I was blessed to know early and actually did it.” This month, Weaver is retiring as president and CEO of Monroe’s Canyon Creek Cabinets. He joined the company in 1995 when it was in turmoil, verging on bankruptcy and trying to re-establish itself under new ownership. By 2000, he was leading the company on a path of success. At its 2007 peak, sales were $92 million with a workforce of 715. Under Weaver’s leadership, Canyon Creek successfully survived the recession and downturn in sales. It is surging forward with 2016 projected sales at $60 million and a workforce of 440 employees. “One of the truest examples of Bill’s great leadership is how he directed Canyon Creek through the recession years,” says Doug McIalwain, showroom manager at Canyon Creek’s Spokane location. Weaver’s business philosophy is rooted in family values. From the age of 4, he worked at his father’s pharmacy stocking candy shelves. As an adolescent, he worked full time during his summers earning 50 cents an hour. He grew up in a town in New Jersey of only 800 people, so customer service was paramount. He learned the basics of business from dusting to merchandising, selling to window displays. “Small businesses and entrepreneurs are really the backbone of what runs this county,” Weaver says. “We’re the ones who provide most of the jobs. We enhance people’s lives because they can stay and work in their own communities.” Part of the original strategy to revitalize Canyon Creek in the mid-1990s was revamping the mission. Weaver helped the company transition into a high-end


16 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2016

LYNNWOOD — Edmonds Community College Board of Trustees member Emily Yim attended the White House Community College Convening on Oct. 26 in Washington, D.C. The convening featured a retrospective of the Obama administration’s accomplishments on Emily Yim behalf of community colleges and the effort to build broad support to guarantee free community college education to hardworking students across the country. LYNNWOOD — The Board of Commissioners of Snohomish County’s Verdant Health Commission announced it will formally hire Robin Fenn as the superintendent of Verdant during its next regular meeting Robin Fenn on Dec. 14. She will replace current superintendent, Carl Zapora, who is retiring at the end of 2016. Previously, Fenn was research manager at the Snohomish County Department of Human Services. LYNNWOOD — Edmonds Community College Board of Trustees member Carl Zapora was reappointed on Oct. 1 by Gov. Jay Inslee. He will also serve as

PEOPLE WATCHING

the board chair. Zapora has served on the board since January 2013. He will continue to serve as a board member for another five-year term ending in September 2021, and as chair through September. MONROE — Canyon Creek Cabinet Company in Monroe has announced the promotion of Marla Wardell to customer service manager. She has been a member of Canyon Creek’s customer service team for nearly two years and previously held supervisory roles Marla Wardell in other organizations. Wardell will provide leadership for the customer service and order entry teams. BOTHELL — Gov. Jay Inslee appointed Sabine Thomas on Oct. 3 to the Cascadia College Board of Trustees. Thomas is the executive director of the Washington Association for Infant Mental Health. She has been an instructor and research associate with Bastyr University as well as a private practitioner. EDMONDS — WestWater Research has appointed Erik Borgen as the Northwest Regional director in Edmonds. Borgen will be responsible for new business development and project management for WestWater throughout Washington, Oregon, and northern California. He brings more than 10 years of experience

to WestWater, working with water rights, water transactions and hydrology on projects throughout the western U.S. MOUNTLAKE TERRACE — Dr. Michael Hrankowski has been inducted as an Associate Fellow of the American Academy of Implant Dentistry. Hrankowski’s practice, Edmonds Woodway Dental Care, is in Mountlake Terrace. EVERETT — Providence General Foundation, fundraising organization for Providence Regional Medical Center Everett, announced the appointment of Lynne Hall to its board. Prior to joining the foundation board, Hall served as chair for two years at Lynne Hall the Everett Golf & Country Club’s Annual Golf Tournament, which benefits the Providence Linda Baltzell Cancer Patient Assistance Fund. EVERETT — Sno-Isle Libraries’ business librarian, Kassy Rodeheaver is scheduled in March will present at the South by Southwest, or SXSW, conference in Austin, Texas. Rodeheaver and Jay Lyman from the Seattle Public Library received notice recently that SXSW would like their presentation on how public libraries can help entrepreneurs for the event’s Interactive Festival in its Startup Village.

AWARD EVENT COMING APRIL 2017

NOW OPEN!

SNOHOMISH — Professional Compounding Centers of America has named Dawn Ipsen, owner of Kusler’s Compounding Pharmacy in Snohomish, as its Pharmacist of the Month for October. Ipsen has been a compounding pharmacist for nearly 20 years. She Dawn Ipsen holds a full fellow with the American College of Apothecaries and is a clinical instructor for the University of Washington School of Pharmacy.

From simple sprains to major pains, the doctors at Ankle & Foot Clinic of Everett are trained exclusively to diagnose and treat ankle and foot problems.

Top nominees will be honored at an event in Spring 2017 and featured in the April edition of The Herald Business Journal.

DEADLINE TO NOMINATE IS SUNDAY, JAN. 8! The Herald Business Journal and Moss Adams – in partnership with Puget-PR, Economic Alliance Snohomish County and Leadership Snohomish County – are seeking to honor the next generation of leadership in our community. The Emerging Leaders Award pays tribute to an individual who exemplifies outstanding professional values: demonstrates the ability to go above and beyond the expectations of a leader; and serves as an inspiration to the community. All nominees must currently work or reside in Snohomish County.

When experience, knowledge, and personal attention are important to you – give us a call and meet these special doctors. Let us help you put your best foot forward!

Complete the nomination form today at: theheraldbusinessjournal.com/emergingleaders

SECOND LOCATION!

In partnership with:

17432 Smokey Point Boulevard, Arlington WA • 360-653-2326

Alpine Foot & Ankle Clinic

www.alpinefootandankle.com Practicing at both locations:

Contact HBJ editor Jim Davis at 425.339.3097 or jdavis@heraldnet.com if you have questions. 1741414

ARLINGTON — State Farm agent Jim Minifie has received the company’s prestigious Crystal Excellence award. Only a select few agents within the State Farm network receive this honor. Minifie has been with State Farm for 27 years. His office is in Arlington.

We Know Feet Inside and Out!

Recognizing and celebrating the next generation of leadership!

NOMINATIONS

EVERETT — Tom Lane, owner and dealer principal at Dwayne Lane’s Auto Family, has been nominated for the 2017 Time Dealer of the Year award. Lane oversees six Washington dealerships in Everett, Arlington, Sedro-Woolley and Burlington. He is one Tom Lane of 49 dealer nominees from across the country who will be honored at the 100th annual National Automobile Dealers Association convention in January.

Dr Jarrod Smith & Dr Robert Stanton

1727375

3131 Nassau Street • Everett, WA 98201 (across from Providence Everett Medical Center, Pacific Campus)

425-339-8888

www.ankleandfootnorthwest.com


DECEMBER 2016

1729628

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 17


18 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

EVERETT — The Holiday Inn Downtown Everett, long the biggest hotel in town, has been sold to a Bellingham group that plans to completely renovate it and reopen it as a Delta by Marriott. Hollander Hospitality purchased the hotel at 2105 Pine St. in June for $15.5 million. The hotel is expected to close for sometime next year for the renovation.

DECEMBER 2016

BUSINESS BRIEFS

both new and existing customers in Washington state at no additional cost. Most new customers will receive these new speeds immediately when they sign-up. Existing users can expect to see new speeds before Dec. 1.

PORT OF EVERETT SHIPPING

Dec. 2: Swire, Shengking

EVERETT — Holiday shoppers are invited to help support the Providence General Children’s Association simply by shopping at one of the two volunteer-supported gift shops at Providence Regional Medical Center’s Colby and Pacific Avenue campuses in Everett. Both shops feature unique gift items and holiday decor.

SNOHOMISH — Snohomish Chamber of Commerce member banks will compete to support the Snohomish Community Food Bank once again in their annual Battle of the Banks. The competition takes place Dec. 1 through 30. Nonperishable food items and monetary donations for the food bank are being collected at Snohomish locations of Coastal Community Bank, Columbia Bank, Opus Bank, Peoples Bank - Fred Meyers, and Washington Federal.

LYNNWOOD — On Nov. 21, Comcast announced it is significantly increasing the speeds of its most popular Xfinity Internet speed packages – Performance Pro and Blast Pro – for

LYNNWOOD — SmartTalent, a premiere staffing agency in Lynnwood, has partnered with Volunteers of America and The Everett Foodbank for their annual Holiday Food Drive. The event

Ship port calls 2016 YTD: 77 Barge port calls 2016 YTD: 55 Ship port calls 2015: 133 Barge port calls 2015: 61 Dec. 1: Westwood, Westwood Pacific Dec. 6: Westwood, Westwood Victoria Dec. 13: Westwood, Bardu Dec. 20: Westwood, Westwood Columbia Dec. 22: ECL, Asian Naga Source: Port of Everett runs through Dec. 16. The public is invited to drop off their donations between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. on weekdays at 19031 33rd Ave. W., Suite 203, Lynnwood. EDMONDS — The Foundation for Edmonds School District has received a donation from HomeStreet Bank. The $5,000 gift will support the District’s Nourishing Network program — a weekend meal program to help feed homeless and

THE PEKING ACROBATS Wednesday, January 25, 2017 7:30 pm | Tickets $24–$49

The Peking Acrobats perform daring maneuvers atop a precarious pagoda of chairs; are experts at trick-cycling, precision tumbling, somersaulting, and gymnastics; and defy gravity with amazing displays of contortion, flexibility, and control. Masters of agility and grace, they push the envelope of human possibility.

JESSE COOK

Friday, January 27, 2017 7:30 pm | Tickets $24–$59 Jesse Cook is a Canadian guitarist, composer and producer. Widely considered one of the most influential figures in “nuevo flamenco” music, he incorporates elements of flamenco, rumba, jazz, and many forms of world music into his work.

low-income families in the Edmonds School District who don’t have enough to eat at home. OLYMPIA — A report showing total compensation costs for private industry workers in the Seattle-Tacoma-Olympia metropolitan area is now available online at http:// tinyurl.com/hubcsts. The annual increase in compensation costs in Seattle was 2.4 percent in September, compared to advances that ranged from 3.3 percent to 2.6 percent in the three other metropolitan areas in the West. EVERETT — The annual An Evening at Emory’s event at Emory’s on Silver Lake in October raised a record $36,000 for Housing Hope’s ChildHope initiative. The gathering hosted nearly 100 supporters. Proceeds will go to fund ChildHope’s education, support and service programs for homeless and low-income children and their parents in Snohomish County. EVERETT — Pacific

OLYMPIA — Washington state’s taxable retail sales reached $36.8 billion in the second quarter of 2016, an increase of 8.6 percent over the same quarter in 2015, according to the Washington State Department of Revenue. Retail trade rose nearly 5.2 percent to a total of $15.8 billion. Snohomish County’s taxable retail sales reached $3.39 billion with retail trade at $1.79 billion. EDMONDS — Edmonds Center for the Arts announced that they have received a two-year grant from Boeing to support summer arts enrichment camps, free artist residencies and outreach programs for young people. The grant, totaling $25,000, will also help with professional development opportunities for educators. Nearly 11,000 children, families, teachers and community members benefited from Boeing’s last grant to the arts organization. EDMONDS — Ombu Salon + Spa in Edmonds is hosting a Days for Girls product drive through the end of the year. Days for

Transmissions of Marysville

ECA SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT:

NATURALLY 7

European • Japanese • Domestic

Sunday, February 15, 2017 7:30 pm | Tickets $24–$59

One Day Service/Rebuilds in Stock 36 mo. Unlimited Mileage. Warranty Available

This 7-man crew is more than just your average singing group. Its members have perfected an intriguing a cappella style they’ve branded as “Vocal Play” — singing as instruments. Naturally 7 not only sings but also creates every backing instrument heard on its songs.

ec4arts.org | 425.275.9595 410FOURTHAVENUENORTH EDMONDSWA98020

Northwest Aerospace Alliance hosts its annual holiday party and toy drive from 5 to 8 p.m. Dec. 8 at the Museum of Flight Restoration Center at Paine Field in Everett. Dress is casual for this networking event. Cost is $50 per person with a toy donation and $70 without. Toy donations benefit Toys for Tots. Registration and details can be found at http://tinyurl.com/ hqyvxcg.

1744542

1729622

Free Local Towing w/Major Repair www.edstransmissions.com (360) 653-1835 10226 State Ave. Marysville

Girls collects and distributes disposable feminine hygiene products to the Edmonds School District for girls in need. Drop off feminine hygiene products or checks made payable to “Days for Girls of Edmonds, Washington” at Ombu Salon + Spa. MONROE — Canyon Creek Cabinet Company has donated cabinets to The House Church in Snohomish for their Washed mobile laundry service truck. The 16-foot box truck is a fully contained mobile laundromat. It provides access to laundry facilities for the homeless in Snohomish County. EVERETT — Washington Technology Institute is starting a new campus at 13027 Bothell-Everett Highway, Everett. Electronics Engineering Technology and Computer Aided Drafting and Design are the first two programs that have been approved. The twoyear technical school is aiming for a January start date with students able to start each month, on a space available basis. BELLEVUE — The Master Builders Association of King and Snohomish Counties was honored by the National Association of Home Builders Remodelers program with an award for Demonstrating Remodeling Excellence in the Public Relations and Promotion category. The award was in recognition of the MBA’s own Remodeling Excellence and Trade Remodeling Excellence awards program. The awards were announced on Oct. 6 during a presentation in Baltimore. EVERETT — Coastal Financial Corporation, the Everett-based holding company for Coastal Community Bank, reported record net earnings for a quarter with $1.3 million of net income for the third quarter of 2016. The bank has already exceeded earnings for the full year of 2015, with three months left in the year, recording the highest ever year-todate net earnings of $3.6 million.


DECEMBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 19

BUSINESS BUILDERS

What Trump means for local economy F or only the second time since 1928, Republicans will control the White House and both houses of Congress. Like the first two years of President Bill Clinton and President Barack Obama’s terms under friendly Democrat control, legislation has a chance of passing that might not in other circumstances. Many in commercial real estate are cautiously optimistic about the future as early signals from President-elect Trump indicate his interest in repatriating overseas capital, increasing infrastructure investment and creating a culture of regulatory changes designed to get banks back into the game of lending to smalland medium-sized businesses. Of the anticipated changes, repealing or modifying Dodd-Frank Act as well as temporary tax incentives that might repatriate the estimated $1.3 trillion in corporate funds sitting in overseas accounts might be the two most important to ordinary Americans and commercial real estate investors alike. Dodd-Frank is the regulatory act that came behind the bank failures during the recession. Brian Moynihan, CEO of Bank of America, sums up the effect of Dodd-Frank today by noting that it

accomplished it’s primary objective in making banks safer, “but we aren’t making enough loans.” Banks need to get back into the business they’re Tom designed for and repealing or modiHoban fying Dodd-Frank would be a good Realty step. Markets Pair that with repatriation of overseas capital would be another good step. In the Pacific Northwest, there is already anticipation by most economists that we can expect net in-migration for the foreseeable future, which supports growth. Our challenges in the Puget Sound area, specifically, are around reacting to growth wisely, which is why President-elect Trump’s pairing of repatriation of overseas corporate cash with infrastructure spending is important. The Puget Sound region needs more roads and affordable housing. Another viable north-south corridor to serve the

So we lack any real political muscle in Washington, D.C., at the moment if, other states want to plant the seeds for a Boeing expansion in their backyard. eastern part of Snohomish, King and Pierce counties — along with the expansion of light rail — needs to be planned soon. Otherwise,we’ll lose the chance to keep great jobs here because we’ve created long commutes and expensive housing that drives business away. What we should begin to worry about is Boeing. President-elect Trump didn’t need Washington state to win and even our sitting Republican members of the house (both of our Senators are Democrats) were on the fence in their support from what was dubbed a Ted Cruz state going into the Republican Convention this summer. Most of the country’s governors and over half of the state houses are in Republican hands. So we lack any real political muscle in Washington, D.C., at the moment if other states want to plant the seeds for a

Boeing expansion in their backyard the way seeds were sown before Washington lost the second 787 plant to South Carolina in 2008. In the meantime, every category of commercial real estate today in the Puget Sound is experiencing some degree of good health, with the exception of office buildings in the urban areas of downtown Everett and parts of Tacoma. Even these, though, are on the comeback now. Everett, in particular, stands to see a surge in demand if and when Paine Field opens up commercial passenger service. A Trump presidency that simultaneously repatriates corporate cash and invests in infrastructure could only help. Tom Hoban is CEO of The Coast Group of Companies. Contact him at 425-339-3638 or tomhoban@coastmgt.com or visit www. coastmgt.com. Twitter: @Tom_P_Hoban.

The legal services you need for your business and your family.

Congratulations to all the Emerging Leaders Nominees ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

4220 132nd St. S.E., Suite 201 Mill Creek, WA 98012

Business Construction Real Estate Litigation Will & Trusts Employment & Labor Divorce & Family Estate Planning

425-332-2000 www.millcreeklaw.com 1744391


20 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2016

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Craft the right message for success M

arketing is a complex pseudoscience, one that has become even more challenging to get “right” in the adolescence of our digital era. And your success depends on crafting the right message. This is the second installment of a four-part series detailing the “four secrets to marketing success,” which covers “the right message.” After you “target the right market” (the first secret), you’ll develop messages that are compelling and relevant to your target audience. When crafting messages, remember that you are writing for your future customers, based on their values, and not for yourself. To truly understand what your prospective customers care most about requires research. Growth strategy nerds like me refer to this research as “voice of the customer.” Understanding the preferences and perceptions of your customers is arguably the most important business information you can acquire. It gives you insight into how other people like them (prospective customers) make buying decisions. You can gather voice of the customer information

through interviews and focus groups. Once you know what your customers care about, there is a tried-andtrue formula that will help you properly Andrew sequence your mesBallard sages to improve results. Growth Many successful copywriters use Strategies the AIDA method, which stands for Attention, Interest, Desire and Action. These are the four stages a consumer or purchasing agent go through (during the buying process) as they consider and eventually make a buying decision. The length of time it takes a consumer to go through these four stages has mostly to do with the product category. When purchasing a loaf of bread, a consumer isn’t even aware of the buying process… it takes a matter of seconds. However, when considering a larger purchase, such as a new car or cloud application for a business, the buying process can be lengthy. Following is the AIDA

messaging process. Attention: You need to cut through the clutter before you’ll get anyone’s attention. The most important copy you’ll ever write is the headline or hook. Advertising legend David Ogilvy started by writing up to 16 headlines for every ad he wrote. And he made a gazillion dollars doing so; you might consider following his lead. Asking a poignant question and using a stunning illustration or photograph are also effective attention-getters. Interest: You want to communicate “what’s in it for them” early in your message to peak your prospects’ interests. Use short, simple sentences that convey advantages and benefits. A list of features won’t get prospects excited; benefits are why people buy. Explain how your product or service will make your prospect’s life better, safer, more fun or productive. Desire: All purchases are motivated by either “decreasing pain” or “increasing gain.” Make a connection with your audience’s underlying motivation based on the solution or satisfaction your product or service will provide. This is the part of your message where

you’ll make an irresistible offer, a strong guarantee or astonishing claim (as long as it’s legitimate). Action: A “call to action” is imperative if you want to generate a response. Be specific about what you want your prospect to do: call for more information, go to our website, click on our app, schedule an appointment, etc. Creating urgency (limited time or inventory), building value (third-party endorsement) and offering an incentive can also increase action and response rates. Another best practice in crafting messages that succeed in generating results to be very clear and concise. Don’t try to cram in every copy point imaginable… stick to a single selling proposition. Following the AIDA method — and order — will most likely improve your results. When you target the right market with the right message, you are halfway there. Check out my January column to learn about the recipe for selecting the right communication channels and media to deliver your message. Andrew Ballard is president of Marketing Solutions, an agency specializing in growth strategies. For more information, call 425337-1100 or go to www.mktg-solutions.com.

Get Efficient with Rooftop Controllers

2016 325

$

SALE

Sit-Stand Desktop Model No. M1

UPIS1 KEEP MOVING!

SALE

Sit/Stand

Don’t miss out on our great PUD incentives!

Your Choice

160

$

SALE

199

$

EC1

Element C1 Mesh Task Chair Black Seat

Working with the PUD, Northshore Christian Church & Academy upgraded to advanced rooftop controllers, which can improve HVAC efficiency by 40% or more. Northshore is now saving more than $11,000 annually on energy bills. Call or go online today to learn how PUD energy-efficiency programs can help you save energy and money.

425.783.1700 1729603

Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Be An snopud.com/hvac

$

SALE

199

In Stock

Sierra Mid Back

Stocked in Black Premium Bonded Leather. Model No. 10311 • List $395 | Model No. 10321 • List $365

HAPPY

HOLIDAYS

EVERETT OFFICE FURNITURE carries a large selection of quality NEW and pre-owned office furniture. With a LARGE SHOWROOM, from the simplest task chair to a complete office solution, with design & installation, E.O.F. can solve your facility needs. www.EverettOfficeFurniture.com

Everett Office Furniture 2931 Broadway • Everett, WA

1729599

(425) 257-3242


BUSINESS BUILDERS

DECEMBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 21

Keep clutter away and productivity up O

ne of the keys to being productive when we get down to business is to create an environment that supports us in working in an efficient manner. If our offices (and our minds) are in disarray, cluttered and feel overwhelming, it can be a challenge to sit down and get to work. The following five strategies are attainable ways you can create conditions in your work life to support your pursuit of productivity: ■ Create an organized work space. I love being able to find what I need in my office in 30 seconds or less. Searching for things brings on a dose of stress that none of us need, right? Make sure you have a supportive chair at the correct height for your monitor and desk. Also make sure office supplies you use every day are within easy reach. Keep organized files with clear labels (preferably labeled with a label maker) within arm’s reach. ■ Reduce clutter. Visual clutter can feel overwhelming, it can make a space feel smaller and result in misplaced documents. Go stand at the door to your office and pretend like you’re seeing the space for the first time. Are there piles, duplicates, stacks and papers out of place? Are there bulletin boards loaded with

flyers, calendars, schedules, photos and mementos? It may be time to do a clean sweep of the room. ■ Reduce mental clutter. To do lists, project Monika ideas and creative Kristofferson thoughts are all good things unless they become overOffice whelming and turn Efficiency into mental clutter. Get things out of your head as thoughts and onto paper as words. This can help you feel assured that tasks and ideas won’t be forgotten or slip through the cracks. Be sure to find a reliable system you can count on instead of writing lists on napkins and sticky notes all over your office. Keep in mind the ‘reduce clutter’ tips above. Some of the many options available to use are legal pads, a note taking app or you can create a Word document. Schedule projects on your calendar so you have concrete times to work on them. Be reasonable about how many new projects you can work on at one time.

If you have a list of new products you’d like to create, focus on getting one done before you move onto the next one. ■ Create white space. The first time I heard the term white space, I didn’t know what it was. Now I appreciate the concept. Creating white space in your calendar means creating time with nothing on your calendar. Yes, nothing. I believe that one of the reasons people get so stressed out in life is by over committing themselves, taking on too much and saying, ‘Yes’ too often. There’s great value in removing tasks, meetings, commitments and social engagements from your plate when you can. If you don’t have white space built into your schedule, you can easily find yourself carving into time that could be better spent on personal care or family time. ■ Embrace tools for productivity. We’re very fortunate to have a vast array of productivity tools at our fingertips just a search engine away. Although, I don’t think it’s necessary to always be on the search for the newest, latest and greatest. What I do think is important is to find a system that works for you that you can use consistently and works with your

natural work habits. A few good tools include a solid calendar system for reminders, appointments, recurring events, meetings, etc. Something else that you need is great note-taking app. Being able to jot down notes on your computer that are synced with your phone is a very effective way of having your notes with you wherever you go. A timer is a fantastic way to manage time by lighting a fire to get us working and can provide the benefit of a little challenge to try to beat the clock. You can use a timer on your phone, free timers on the Internet and of course you can purchase timers as well. Last, a solid client data base goes a long way for productivity and your bottom line when you can easily stay in contact with your clients. Being productive doesn’t just happen on its own. You can foster productivity by creating conditions and an environment that supports you in your efforts to work in a calm space, feel in control and promote a balance between your work and personal life. Monika Kristofferson is a professional organizer and productivity consultant who owns Efficient Organization NW inLakeStevens. Reach her at 425-220-8905 or monika@efficientorganizationnw.com.

EVENTS.

You’re invited …

STATE OF EVERETT PRESENTED BY EVERETT COMMUNITY COLLEGE & WSU NORTH PUGET SOUND Edward D. Hansen Conference Center 7:30 - 9:00 a.m.

This photo of Everett is courtesy of TripAdvisor

December 2016

8th Business After Hours @ Brookdale Senior Living in Monroe, 5:00 – 7:00 p.m. 15th Speaker Series @ Sparta’s Pizza & Spaghetti House in Bothell,

11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. January 2017

11th Introductory Seminar @ EASC, 8:00 – 9:30 a.m. 19th State of Everett Presented by Everett Community College & WSU North Puget Sound at Everett @ Ed D. Hansen Conference Center, 7:30 – 9:00 a.m.

February 2017

2nd Business After Hours @ Ivar’s Mukilteo Landing, 5:00 – 7:00 p.m. 14th Speaker Series @ TBD, 8:00 – 9:30 a.m. 23rd Economic Forecast Presented by Banner Bank @ Embassy Suites,

1744102

1st EASC’s Night at the Silvertips @ XFINITY Arena, times TBD 16th Joint Business After Hours @ Village Community Services, 5:00 – 7:00 p.m. 28th Snohomish County Update @ Ed D. Hansen Conference Center, 11:30am – 1:00 p.m.

• ADVOCATE •

• DEVELOP • • • ADVOCATE • DEVELOP • CONNECT • CONNECT •

economicalliancesc.org

1729585

Lynnwood, 7:30 – 9:00 a.m. March 2017


DECEMBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 22

A place where you can

touch & feel your shopping treasures!

8825 34th Ave. NE Tulalip, WA 98271

Cabela’s

®

World’s Foremost Outfitter 116th St. NE

N Seattle Premium Outlets

Seattle Premium Outlets Tulalip Resort Casino

99th Place NE

Quil Ceda Boulevard

27th Ave. NE

105th St.

Legendary brands. Real savings.

Cabela’s

Home Depot Walmart Tulalip Bingo

QCV Retail Center

Walmart

®

Save money. Live better .

Quil Ceda Way

Use exit 200 or 202 and turn west. TDS-20929

Find us on Facebook and QuilCedaVillage.com

Home Depot

®

More saving. More doing. 1698224


DECEMBER 2016

PUBLIC RECORDS Bankruptcy filings The following Snohomish County businesses or individuals filed business-related bankruptcies with U.S. Bankruptcy Court for Western District of Washington from Oct. 1-31. 16-15236-MLB: Chapter 7, Kris Gudmundson; attorney for debtor: James J. Jameson; special request: Pro se; filed: Oct. 17; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual 16-15295-MLB: Chapter 7, Smithwright Services; attorney for debtor: Alan D. Smith; filed: Oct. 20; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: health care; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation

Snohomish County tax liens Tax liens are gathered from online public records filed with the Snohomish County Auditor’s Office. These federal and state liens were filed between Oct. 1-31.

Federal tax liens 201610040073: Oct. 4; Thurman, Randall A., 5822 Cady Road, Everett 201610040074: Oct. 4; Moote, Peter A., 6935 Holst Road, Clinton 201610040075: Oct. 4; Goldman, Cynthia J., 328 91st Ave. NE, Apt. 23, Lake Stevens 201610040076: Oct. 4; Wood, Norman Jr., 201 Fifth Ave. N, Edmonds 201610040077: Oct. 4; Wagner, Karl L., 23915 Highway 203, Monroe 201610040078: Oct. 4; Luce, Leah M. (+), 23915 Highway 203, Monroe 201610040079: Oct. 4; Petite Sweet Bakery, 2613 Colby Ave., Everett 201610040080: Oct. 4; Olney, Mary M. (+), 14229 21st Drive SE, Mill Creek 201610040142: Oct. 4; Wicked Cellars (+), 2016 Colby Ave., Everett 201610040143: Oct. 4; Kar, Erika (+), 1009 Eighth St. Mukilteo 201610040144: Oct. 4; Howard, Whitney R. (+), 14326 51st Ave. SE, Everett 201610040145: Oct. 4; Highland Glass, 4502 148th St. NE, Marysville 201610040146: Oct. 4; Wellbeing, 211 W Hill St., Monroe 201610040147: Oct. 4; Bruers, Ashley C., 313a S Davies Road, Lake Stevens 201610040148: Oct. 4; Moser, Louise S. (+), 15713 Old Snohomish-Monroe Road, Snohomish 201610120212: Oct. 12; Bowens, Cynthia A. (+), 8218 26th St. NE, Lake Stevens 201610120213: Oct. 12; Eusanio, Anthony M., Sixth Ave. S, Apt. C305, Edmonds 201610120243: Oct. 12; Stanton-Sharpe, HJ (+), 4758 Park Drive, Apt. 108, Mukilteo 201610120244: Oct. 12; Sound Storage

Management Inc., PO Box 43, Everett 201610120245: Oct. 12; Lopez, Leon Juan (+), 33307 13bst SE, Sultan 201610120246: Oct. 12; Seen On Screen Tv Inc., 4017 Colby Ave., Everett 201610120247: Oct. 12; Northstar Marble & Granite, 3337 Paine St., Everett 201610120248: Oct. 12; Berger-Bean, Linda (+), 1329 Sixth Place S, Edmonds 201610120249: Oct. 12; Grubbs, Gary L., 24302 45th Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace 201610120250: Oct. 12; Wolff, Daniel J., 2313 120th Ave. NE, Lake Stevens 201610120251: Oct. 12; Bucey, Donald C., 16919 Sixth Ave. W, Lynnwood 201610120252: Oct. 12; Chadwick, Patricia L. (+), 3119 20th St., Everett 201610120253: Oct. 12; Marelich, Jeffrey J., 5413 104th Place SW, Mukilteo 201610120254: Oct. 12; Derosia, Jacqueline L., 1242 State Ave., Suite I-260 Marysville 201610120255: Oct. 12; Walker, Holli, 19928 Bothell Everett Highway, Apt. 1123, Bothell 201610120256: Oct. 12; Reams, Robert W., 14915 21st Drive SE, Mill Creek 201610120257: Oct. 12; Sackman, Kristin M., 18022 36th Ave. W, Apt. S14, Lynnwood 201610120258: Oct. 12; Action Jackson Drain Cleaning & Plumbing, 23814 84th Ave. W, Edmonds 201610120259: Oct. 12; Bye, Sarah (+), 624 Price Road, Snohomish 201610120260: Oct. 12; Martin, Michael E., 2728 144th Court SE, Mill Creek 201610180571: Oct. 18; Mathey, John L., PO Box 14008, Mill Creek 201610180572: Oct. 18; Downie, Thomas J., 9805 NE, 116th St., Kirkland 201610180573: Oct. 18; Coleman, Gary A., 18021 Dubuque Road, Snohomish 201610180574: Oct. 18; Lemasters, Gregory W., 4320 196th St. SW, B626, Lynnwood 201610180575: Oct. 18; Gable, Brian, 6213 99th Place NE, Marysville 201610180576: Oct. 18; Swenson, Susan (+), 1920 150th Place SE, Mill Creek 201610180577: Oct. 18; Choi, Joon S., 18429 36th Ave. W, Apt. D-201, Lynnwood 201610180578: Oct. 18; Carey, Connie (+), 11811 59th Ave. W, Mukilteo 201610180579: Oct. 18; Blake, Monica D. (+), C/O 2122-164th St. SW, Lynnwood 201610180580: Oct. 18; Prasad, Savitri Devi (+), 3926 Sunnyside Blvd., Marysville 201610180581: Oct. 18; Youngs, Stanley E. Jr., 2329 Rucker Ave., Everett 201610180582: Oct. 18; YWKNG Inc. (+), 2510 164th St. SW, Apt. C-516, Lynnwood 201610180583: Oct. 18; Gunther, Carrol (+), 19113 26th Ave. NW, Stanwood 201610180584: Oct. 18; Gunther, Warren P., 19113 26th Ave. NW, Stanwood 201610280103: Oct. 28; Arends, Darren L., 11925 Wagner Road, Monroe

YOUR SUCCESS IS OUR BUSINESS

201610280104: Oct. 28; Hoppenbrouwer, Adrian K., 11531 192nd Drive NE, Arlington 201610280105: Oct. 28; Ruesken, James M., 3122 140th St. NW, Marysville 201610280106: Oct. 28; Elite Construction Services, 3333 164th St. SW, Apt. 1213, Lynnwood 201610280107: Oct. 28; Skin & Body Spa, 13119 Seattle Hill Road, Suite 106, Snohomish 201610280108: Oct. 28; Matriotti, Steve, 23207 La Pierre Drive, Mountlake Terrace 201610280109: Oct. 28; Funderburke Autobody (+), 26905 87th Drive NW, Stanwood

Partial release of federal tax liens 201610180585: Oct. 18; Henry, Vincent G., PO Box 733, Marysville

Release of federal tax liens 201610040081: Oct. 4; Belmont, Angela J., 14631 43rd Drive SE, Snohomish 201610040082: Oct. 4; Moser, Bruce M., 15713 Old Snohoumish-Monroe Road, Snohomish 201610040083: Oct. 4; Pickle Time Inc., 3625 C 148th St., B102, Lynnwood 201610040084: Oct. 4; Shalan, Kathleen G. (+), 12518 48th Drive NE, Marysville 201610040085: Oct. 4; Doerflinger, Daniel R., 18407 36th Ave. W, Apt. E302, Lynnwood 201610040086: Oct. 4; Groen, Marcia L. (+), 8811 196th St. SE, Snohomish 201610040088: Oct. 4; Ieplexus Inc, 20700 44th Ave. W, Suite 120, Lynnwood 201610040089: Oct. 4; Belmont, Angela J., 14631 43rd Drive SE, Snohomish 201610040090: Oct. 4; Leading Edge Gymnastic Academy Inc., 1500 Industry St., Suite 300, Everett 201610040092: Oct. 4; Bosch Electric Inc., PO Box 1083, Lake Stevens 201610120214: Oct. 12; Sahm, Roger A., 9020 192nd St. SE, Snohomish 201610120216: Oct. 12; Ramos, Deborah, 8431 Madrona Lane, Edmonds 201610120261: Oct. 12; Ieplexus Inc., 21312 30th Drive SE, Suite 201, Bothell 201610120262: Oct. 12; Ieplexus Inc., 20700 44th W Ave., Suite 120, Lynnwood 201610120264: Oct. 12; Crane, Michelle (+), 624 79th Drive NE, Lake Stevens 201610120265: Oct. 12; Reimer, Adena S., 11814 273rd Ave. SE, Monroe 201610120266: Oct. 12; Appert, Joni L. (+), 15803 Goldbar Drive, Gold Bar 201610120267: Oct. 12; Riemer, Adena S., 11814 273rd Ave. SE, Monroe 201610120268: Oct. 12; Ieplexus Inc., 20700 44th Ave. W, Suite 120, Lynnwood 201610120272: Oct. 12; Swinburnson, Shannah L (+), 515 S Davies Road, Lake

1743874

We offer a broad range of accounting, tax and consulting services for businesses and individuals with an emphasis on quality and proven client satisfaction. Services are customizable to meet your needs. Whether it is your first time needing an accountant or you are wanting to transition to a new accountant, our experience and technical expertise will make the process simple.

Please call us today - we’ll be happy to offer you a free initial consultation.

8490 Mukilteo Speedway, Suite 112 • Mukilteo, WA, 98275 www.compass-accounting.com • 425-350-6590

Stevens 201610120273: Oct. 12; Sullivan, Kim E. (+), 12626 84th St. NE, Lake Stevens 201610120276: Oct. 12; Olcese, Shannon J. (+), 19111 30th Drive SE, Bothell 201610180210: Oct. 18; Niemela, Jarl H., 304 135th Ave. SE, Snohomish 201610180586: Oct. 18; Killer Paint (+), 1033 Ave. D, Suite F, Snohomish 201610180587: Oct. 18; Monro, Stephen K., 10431 Trombley Road, Snohomish 201610180588: Oct. 18; Snohomish Garage Door Company, 2710 Hewitt Ave., Everett 201610180589: Oct. 18; Perez, Antonio, 9130 49th Drive NE, Marysville 201610180590: Oct. 18; Murray, Christy, 20 Winesap Road, Bothell 201610180591: Oct. 18; Smith, Gary J., PO Box 1472, Granite Falls 201610180592: Oct. 18; Gillis, Ruth (+), 3821 125th Place SE, Everett 201610180593: Oct. 18; Byrd, Benjamin J., 8605 Third St. SE, Lake Stevens 201610180594: Oct. 18; Henry, Vincent, PO Box 733, Marysville 201610180595: Oct. 18; Emery, Thomas M., 5220 176th St. SW, Space 77, Lynnwood 201610260291: Oct. 26; Sylte, Michael E., 4020 Serene Way, Lynnwood 201610270174: Oct. 27; Schwendtke, Brandon, 7704 176th St. SE, Snohomish 201610280110: Oct. 28; Hatcher, Richard S., 3915 Second Ave. NE, Seattle 201610030179: Oct. 3; Finney, Amy K. (+), 4407 149th Place SW, Lynnwood 201610040067: Oct. 4; Ostrom, Laura A., 16410 84th St. NE, Apt. D534, Lake Stevens 201610260101: Oct. 26; Brueske, Cathleen M. (+), 23516 81st Ave. SE, Woodinville 201610270168: Oct. 27; Stutzman J Jr (+), 28221 Kunde Road, Arlington 201610280506: Oct. 28; Poulton, David G., 1704 81st Ave. NE, Lake Stevens

Satisfaction of employment security liens 201610100566: Oct. 10; Architectural Millwork, State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201610100567: Oct. 10; Focus Micro Inc., State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201610100569: Oct. 10; Galeed Inc., State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201610280729: Oct. 28; B&B Construction Services (+), State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201610280730: Oct. 28; Little Lambs Childcare (+), State Of Washington (Dept Of)

Withdrawal of federal tax lien 201610120274: Oct. 12; Agee, Bob T., PO Box 109, Mukilteo 201610180596: Oct. 18; Robertson, Catherine D. (+), 7413 Third Drive W, Everett

ARE YOU LOOKING TO R R R

INTELLIGENCE INTEGRITY INGENUITY

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 23

Build your confidence? Grow as a leader? Improve your communication & public speaking skills?

VISIT A TOASTMASTERS CLUB – IT WILL CHANGE YOUR LIFE.

20 local clubs to choose from: Morning – noon – evening START YOUR OWN CLUB For more information and to find a club near you: www.toastmasters.org 1729671


24 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2016

PLEASE NOTE: Business license information is obtained monthly from the Washington Secretary of State’s Office through the paid commercial services of InfoUSA. For the complete list, please go to www.theheraldbusinessjournal.com.

Arlington 12th Van Carpet Cleaning: 16910 59th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-3725; 360-3227406; Carpet and Rug Cleaners Barbara J Petersib Beauty Shop: 625 S Stillaguamish Ave., Arlington, WA 98223-1688; Beauty Salons Bravo Construction-Remodeling: 6906 Upland Drive, Arlington, WA 98223-7872; Construction Companies Haggen Northwest Fresh: 3711 88 St. NE 98205, Arlington, WA 98223; 360-530-7700 Life Care-Marysville WA: 16710 Smokey Point Blvd., No. 20, Arlington, WA 982238435; 360-659-0726 Lularoe By Dotty Koger: 4116 226th Place NE, Arlington, WA 98223-9094; Clothing-Retail Lularoe Krystal Cles: 18718 Burn Road, Arlington, WA 98223-4621; Clothing-Retail Massage Rocks: 303 N Olympic Ave. No. 6, Arlington, WA 98223-1338; Massage Therapists Public Hospital District 3: 875 Wesley St., Arlington, WA 98223; 360-386-9918; Hospitals Rolling Farms: 18520 67th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8942; 360-691-9882; Farms SCI Call Center-Smokey Point: 3710 168th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8461; 360-2835949; Call Centers Snohomish County Excavation: 410 148th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-8020; 360-5723186; Excavating Contractors Straw Field Alpaca Ranch: 15530 67th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-7509; 360-454-0685; Ranches Tracie Sea Independent Consultant: 3616 186th Place NE, No. B, Arlington, WA 982237928; Consultants

Darrington 4-Corners Cafe: 1080 Seeman St., Darrington, WA 98241-9102; 360-436-9757; Restaurants

Edmonds 190 Sunset: 190 Sunset Ave., No. 190b, Edmonds, WA 98020-4112; 425-361-1752; Restaurants Bartell Drug Stores: 13619 Mukilteo Speedway, Edmonds, WA 98020; 425-7421444; Pharmacies Breffni Place Properties: 16101 60th Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98026-4615; Real Estate Management Clementine Vintage-Modern: 508 Main St., Edmonds, WA 98020-3148; 425-361-2338 Drake Family Investors: 8707 Talbot Road, Edmonds, WA 98026-5049 Everett Shuttle: 410 Fourth Ave. N, Edmonds, WA 98020-3119; 425-788-5466; Shuttle Service Healthcare International: 311 Edmonds St., Edmonds, WA 98020-3126; 425-245-8531; Health Services Hunsinger Law Firm: 13423 64th Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98026-3246; 425-678-0313; Attorneys Kong Tofu House: 120 W Dayton St., No. C3, Edmonds, WA 98020-4181; Restaurants Lice Spotters: 730 Brookmere Drive, Edmonds, WA 98020-2609; Sanitary Services Lighthouse Marine Services: PO Box 344, Edmonds, WA 98020-0344; Marine Equipment and Supplies Millpark Condominium: 7215 224th St. SW, Edmonds, WA 98026; Condominiums Mobile Salon Stylist: 23632 99th Place W, Edmonds, WA 98020-5606; Beauty Salons Sandoval Construction: 7209 210th St. SW, Edmonds, WA 98026; 425-361-1730; Construction Companies Sport Clips: 21940 Highway 99, Edmonds, WA 98026-8038; 425-361-7612; Beauty Salons Stone Korean Restaurant: 21314 Pioneer

BUSINESS LICENSES

Way, Edmonds, WA 98026-7343; Restaurants Traditional Korean Beef: 22929 Highway 99, Edmonds, WA 98026-8468; 425-678-0896; Meat-Retail Unlimited Wholesale: 23011 75th Place W, Edmonds, WA 98026-8522; Wholesalers VIR Inspection: 320 Dayton St., Edmonds, WA 98020-3567; 425-412-3332; Inspection Service

Everett ABC Retreat: 2427 132nd St. SE, Everett, WA 98208-7152; Retreat Houses Arctik Rose Contractor Services: 1817 Mcdougall Ave., No. B, Everett, WA 982012456; Contractors Asher Group: 203 130th St. SE, No. 101, Everett, WA 98208-6465; 425-948-6672 Azen Massage Spa: 4716b Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98203; Massage Therapists Bartell Drug Stores: 621 Highway 9, Everett, WA 98201; 425-334-8410; Pharmacies Black Lab Gallery: 1618 Hewitt Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3516; 425-512-9476; Art Galleries and Dealers Borrals Custom Cabinets: 3404 Everett Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3815; 425-512-9028; Cabinets Brethren Entertainment: 11627 Airport Road, No. A, Everett, WA 98204-8781; 425212-9344; Entertainment Bureaus CM Hammack Law Firm: 1604 Hewitt Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3595; 425-789-1675; Attorneys Cari’s Hair Design: 3111 132nd St. SE, No. C402, Everett, WA 98208-6193; Beauty Salons Carmona Construction: 3229 Pine St., Everett, WA 98201-4536; 425-249-2034; Construction Companies Chanel’s Creations: 7425 Hardeson Road, No. D, Everett, WA 98203-7131 Clio Samia-Lindenauer DDS: 1809 100th Place SE, No. A, Everett, WA 98208; Dentists Community Tax Services: 7100 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98203-5168; 425-512-9555; Tax Return Preparation and Filing Crimson Studios: 13000 Admiralty Way, No. D103, Everett, WA 98204-6269 Crista Ministries: 4813 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98203-2830; 425-258-1969; Religious Organizations D&D Millworks: 2110 37th St., Everett, WA 98201-5019; 425-322-3954; Millwork Deep Dwella Records: 10101 7th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-4746; 425-353-1010 Deep Pockets: 2701 Wetmore Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3593; 425-512-9917 Diehl Aerospace: 917 134th St. SW, Everett, WA 98204-9377; 425-412-3952; Aerospace Eco Fuel: 101 E Marine View Drive, Everett, WA 98201-1255; 425-258-3575; Oils-Fuel Eco Roof Care: 319 View Ridge Drive, Everett, WA 98203-2020; Roofing Contractors Emerald City Recovery: 2520 Center Road, Everett, WA 98204-4709; 425-513-0734 Frenchy Bee: 10215 21st Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-4224; 425-338-4642 GTS Distribution: 2822 119th St. SW, Everett, WA 98204-5050; 425-212-9830; Distribution Services Greenside Recreational: 13220 Highway 99, Everett, WA 98204-5424; 425-582-0088; Amusement and Recreation Hair By Hollie: 7425 Hardeson Road, No. D, Everett, WA 98203-7131; Beauty Salons Homewood Development: 12414 Highway 99, No. 203, Everett, WA 98204-8510 ISO Quality Testing Inc.: 1721 Hewitt Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3570; 425-374-8338 Ideal Option: 3624 Colby Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4776; 425-366-8516 J&T Remodeling: 10628 Fourth Ave. W, Everett, WA 98204-7052; 425-322-5726; Remodeling-Repairing Building Contractors Jennie’s Closet: 12115 19th Ave. SE, No. B204, Everett, WA 98208-6249; Clothing-Retail Kai Sushi: 2811 Colby Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3567; 425-374-7949; Restaurants Lotus Lounge: 11223 19th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-5119; 425-225-6642; Lounges Maurices: 1402 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-2857; 425-265-9621; Clothing-Retail

Memphis Pit BBQ: 2915 Colby Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4068; 425-259-1777; Restaurants Middle East Bread Market: 607 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-3248; 425-3223032; Bakers-Retail Nataslive: 1707 Wetmore Ave., Everett, WA 98201-2035 Nemo & Sanford: 2820 Colby Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3513 NW Home Care Services: 4623 Glenwood Ave., Everett, WA 98203-1642; Home Health Service NW Zoological Supply: 3614 Smith Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4544; 425-263-9248; General Merchandise-Retail Panasonic Aviation Corp: 3003 W Casino Road, Everett, WA 98204-1910; 425-290-3807; Aircraft-Dealers Payless Auto Sales: 4620 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98203-2840; 425-374-2472; Automobile Dealers-Used Cars Pho White Center: 9920 25th Drive SE, Everett, WA 98208-2916 Pristine Virtual Assistant Services: 311 128th St. SE, No. 112, Everett, WA 982086344; Computers-Virtual Reality Puget Sound Chimney & Masonry: 1001 W Casino Road, No. C101, Everett, WA 982046911; Chimney-Fireplace Cleaning Build/ Repair Purple Closet: 2306 122nd St. SW, Everett, WA 98204-4798 SMJ Wireless: 2625 Colby Ave., No. 2a, Everett, WA 98201-2971; 425-212-9675; Cellular Telephones (Services) Safet: 10101 Seventh Ave. SE, No. 317, Everett, WA 98208-4750 Serene Nursing Services: 2421 121st St. SW, Everett, WA 98204-6118; Nurses and Nurses’ Registries Snax: 2701 Wetmore Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3593; 425-212-9384 Taylor Made Recovery: 2608 Center Road, Everett, WA 98204-4758; 425-267-4945 YPS Your Plumbing Solutions: 3508 105th Place SE, Everett, WA 98208-4624; Plumbing Zentek: 3322 16th St., Everett, WA 982011912; 425-263-9621

Granite Falls Go Mart: 409 W Stanley St., Granite Falls, WA 98252-8631; 360-925-6215; Convenience Stores

Lake Stevens Bluewater Contractors Inc.: 10515 20th St. SE, No. 202, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-4767; Contractors Final Clean: 12910 16th St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9218; Janitor Service Handi-Works: 1003 86th Ave. SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-3459; Handyman Services Lake Stevens Design Build: PO Box 1517, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-1517; Building Designers Machias Auto Sales: 2315 N Machias Road, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9344; Automobile Dealers-Used Cars Mercy Housing: 12703 16th St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9254; 425-397-6373 NLC Trucking: 16410 84th St. NE, No. 210D, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9060; Trucking Northwest Property Services: 9228 42nd St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-4144; Real Estate

Lynnwood 3 D Innovations: 3000 184th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4718; 425-697-3456 3 Mountains Plumbing: 15806 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1400; 425-582-7845; Plumbing A Good Life Residential Care: 18124 44th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4658; Residential Care BCBG: 18700 Alderwood Mall Parkway, Lynnwood, WA 98037-8005; 425-640-8621 Best Teriyaki & Wok: 4210 198th St. SW, No. 201, Lynnwood, WA 98036-6737; Restaurants

Bryland Ridge Homeowners Assn: 16108 Ash Way, No. 201, Lynnwood, WA 980878781; Home Owners Associations Chaat N Roll: 3000 184th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4718; 425-697-2917; Restaurants Chiropractors & Chiro Services: 1212 164th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-8839; Chiropractors Cognitive Clarity Inc.: 3812 167th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-7078; 425-678-8485 Cornerstone Home Lending: 3500 188th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4716; 425-5820104; Real Estate Loans Custom Tacoma: 3000 184th St. SW, No. 5525, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4718; 425-745-9875 Escape Route: 21300 68th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7310; 425-835-0649 Exotic Tool Welding: 2831 156th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6355; 425-745-5200; Welding FRRC: 5108 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-6152; 425-582-7927 Home Run Electric: 21118 66th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7304; 425-967-3632; Electric Contractors Home Run Solutions: 16825 48th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-6401; 425-245-8825 Human Forge: 16921 48th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037; 425-361-2603 Labor Works: 13619 Mukilteo Speedway, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1626; 425-582-8419; Labor Organizations Lularoe By Katie Mckinnon: PO Box 2142, Lynnwood, WA 98036-2142; Clothing-Retail Mercedes-Benz Auto Services: 21116 67th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7307; 425-7755444; Automobile Repairing and Service New Alderwood Middle School: 1132 172nd St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-8255; 425-741-1666; Schools PTY Services: 17721 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98037-3621; 425-967-7918 Prisma Laser: 12407 Mukilteo Speedway, No. 23, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1518; 425-2639183; Lasers (Wholesale) Progress Pictures: 923 198th Place SW, No. 2, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7111 Reaction Physical Therapy: 4725 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5518; 425-9673970; Physical Therapists Roots Salon: 19031 33rd Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4731; 425-347-3700; Beauty Salons School Employees Credit Union: 3405 188th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4744; 425-673-7020; Credit Unions Serk Apothecary: 19410 36th Ave. W, No. 3, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5747; Pharmacies Shimadzu: 3400 188th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4747; 425-361-1240 Staging For Charisma: 18027 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4458; Lighting Engineers Sublime Gifts & Finds: 3000 184th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4718; 425-563-1042; Gift Shops Talking Stick Tea Co.: 624 164th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-8116; 425-678-0582; Coffee and Tea Velicahn Inc.: 15804 Highway 99, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1426; 425-245-7242 Waddell & Reed: 19020 33rd Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4746; 425-744-0659; Financial Planning Consultants Webtuner: 19711 64th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4588; 425-697-2900; Advertising-Computer Yenu’s Beauty Place: 19410 36th Ave. W, No. 10, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5747; 425-6707100; Beauty Salons

Marysville A Purr-Fectly Woof-Tastic Spa: 6021 60th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-9510; Pet Washing and Grooming Angel Love Adult Family Home: 9925 48th Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-2315; Homes-Adult Closet Creations Inc.: 3505 136th St. NE, No. A, Marysville, WA 98271-7857; 360-6572043; Closets-Designing and Remodeling


BUSINESS LICENSES Coastal Vie Espresso: 9317 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-2200; 360-658-9300; Coffee Shops Dazzling Home Services: 5502 93rd Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-2776 GMF Co.: 1242 State Ave., No. 74-I, Marysville, WA 98270-3672 Joli Moi: 2817 140th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98271-8260 Junkers Extraordinaire: 15310 Smokey Point Blvd., Marysville, WA 98271-8941; 360653-7048; Junk-Dealers Kupcakes 4 Kuties: 4810 80th Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-7583; Bakers-Retail Life Care-Marysville WA: 505 Cedar Ave., No. B1, Marysville, WA 98270-4561; 360-659-6713 Lularoe Tasha & Jeana: 12208 56th Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98271-6250; Clothing-Retail Padma Washington Inc.: 1221 Fourth St., Marysville, WA 98270-4916; 360-386-9676 Port Gardner Supply: 5704 61st Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-9578; Retail Profile Cabinetry: 7126 65th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-7733; Cabinets Re-Max Of America Elite: 1612 172nd St. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-4039; 360-5724676; Real Estate Unifirst Corp: 13019 41st Ave. NE, No. 5, Marysville, WA 98271-8588; 360-657-7270

Mill Creek Canyon Creek Church: 15117 Main St., Mill Creek, WA 98012-9035; 425-225-5310; Churches Heart Of Rock & Roll: 13212 Bothell Everett Highway, Mill Creek, WA 98012-5507; 425-225-6296 Sentry Northwest: 16000 Bothell Everett Highway, Mill Creek, WA 98012-1742; 425-224-4074 South Sound Physical-Hand: 4220 132nd St. SE, No. 202, Mill Creek, WA 98012-8999;

360-650-8174; Physical Therapists TNT Enterprises: 15616 Third Drive SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-6328

Monroe Advantage Tutoring: 17461 147th St. SE, No. 4a, Monroe, WA 98272-1070; Tutoring Boldrin Building Co.: 13028 Wagner Road, Monroe, WA 98272-7712; Building Contractors Mardi Gras WIFI Cafe: 123 N Blakeley St., Monroe, WA 98272-1824; 360-243-3960; Restaurants NW Soft Serve & Sales: 14303 Autumns Ave. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-8316; 360-8632798; Ice Cream Parlors Sharina Bean’s On Main: 103 W Main St., Monroe, WA 98272-1809; 360-805-2933 Sonolux: 14920 219th Drive SE, Monroe, WA 98272-9011 Triple Sixteen Landscaping: 19531 N High Rock Road, Monroe, WA 98272-9422; 360805-6885; Landscape Contractors

Mountlake Terrace Bauh Designs: 4314 216th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-3583 Heat & AC Guys Inc.: 22526 44th Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-4531; 425-2458941; Air Conditioning Contractors Shiraz Specialty Pharmacy: 6007 244th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-5427; 425697-2793; Pharmacies

Mukilteo HBB University Market: 4728 Harbour Heights Drive, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5834; 425361-2883; Food Markets King Wireless: 10709 Marine View Drive, Mukilteo, WA 98275-4515; Cellular Telephones Northwest Consultancy: 12138 Mukilteo Speedway, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5713; 425212-9315; Business Management Consultants

DECEMBER 2016

Perrault: 7730 Island View Court, Mukilteo, WA 98275-2603; 425-610-4848 Red Electric: 4433 Russell Road, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5483; Electric Contractors Waymaker Gifts: 4404 76th St. SW, Mukilteo, WA 98275-2745; Gift Shops

Quil Ceda Village GAXC: 10600 Quil Ceda Blvd., Quil Ceda Village, WA 98271-8081; 360-716-3380 GH Bass: 10600 Quil Ceda Blvd., Quil Ceda Village, WA 98271-8081; 360-651-9670 Prohibition Grille & Saloon: 8825 34th Ave. NE, No. L155, Quil Ceda Village, WA 982718085; Restaurants

Snohomish Affordable TV Repair: 119 Cedar Ave., Snohomish, WA 98290-2955; Television and Radio-Service/Repair Beauty By Coop: 712 Ave. D, Snohomish, WA 98290-2333; Beauty Salons Benjamin’s Interior Contracting: PO Box 806, Snohomish, WA 98291; Interior Decorators Design and Consultants Bookkeeping Etc.: 730 S Tulloch Road, Snohomish, WA 98290-7522; Accounting and Bookkeeping General Services CMD Installations: 16315 65th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-8722 Christa’s Sandwich Board: 1206 First St., Snohomish, WA 98290-2737; Sandwiches G&S Properties: 8019 144th Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-9018; Real Estate Greg’s Mossbay Repair: 18611 92nd St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-3205; 360-568-1932; Repair Shops and Related Services Harris Estimating Services: 15124 63rd Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-4217 LA Tropicana Mexican Store: 204 Ave. C, Snohomish, WA 98290-2731; 360-563-0001; General Merchandise-Retail Machias Ridge South: 3509 139th Ave. SE,

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 25

Snohomish, WA 98290-9746; 425-335-4357 Property Pathways: 730 Ave. A, No. 203, Snohomish, WA 98290-3401; Real Estate Sunrise Services: 4429 94th Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-9215; 425-263-9386 Westlund Gate: 22814 146th Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-6842; 360-668-7285; Gates (Wholesale)

Stanwood A Good Road Storage: PO Box 1028, Stanwood, WA 98292-1028; Storage-Household and Commercial Absolute Offroad & Auto: 8536 B, Stanwood, WA 98292; Utility Vehicles-Sport-ATV Audio Video Exclusives: 7528 Olympic View, Stanwood, WA 98292; 425-245-8846; Audio-Visual Equipment-Dealers Lularoe Kayla Platt: 28534 75th Drive NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-8149; Clothing-Retail Madak Creative: 8705 271st St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-5995; 360-572-3674 Now On Doody: 31113 76th Ave. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-5805 Recovery Center: 29901 80th Ave. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-9552; 360-572-4220 Serenity Massage: 7218 288th St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-8410; Massage Therapists Vicious Cycle Parts: 1401 Pioneer Highway, Stanwood, WA 98292; 360-654-2453; General Merchandise-Retail

Sultan Annie’s Fix-It Guy: 725 Fir Ave., Sultan, WA 98294-9701; Fix-It Shops Cascade Health Clinic: 805 Stevens Ave., Sultan, WA 98294-6800; Health Services

Tulalip Hana Teriyaki: 129 Marine Drive, Tulalip, WA 98271-6858; Restaurants

HELP YOUR EMPLOYEES

HELP EMPLOYEES EARNYOUR A COLLEGE

DEGREE EARN A COLLEGE With EvCC’s new competency-based DEGREE business degree, your company can: With EvCC’s new competency-based

• HelpEvCC’s your employees become college With new competency-based business degree, your company can: graduatesdegree, in 18 months less business yourorcompany can:

• Help your employees become college • graduates self-paced learning inemployees 18 months or less college • Support Help your become that works with employees’ graduates in 18 months less • Support self-paced learningorthat works busy schedules with employees’ busy schedules •• Build Support self-paced learning a talent pipeline with a fully • Build a talent pipeline with a fully that works business with employees’ transferable degree transferable business degree busy schedules

Find out more: Call Marie Connelley • BuildCPA) a talent pipeline with (MBA, at 425-388-9011 or a fully transferable business degree visit EverettCC.edu/CBE

Find out more: Call Marie Connelley (MBA, CPA) at 425-388-9011 or visit EverettCC.edu/CBE

Everett Community College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religious belief, sex, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national or ethnic origin, disability, genetic information, veteran status or age. Everett Community College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religious belief, sex, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national or ethnic origin, disability, genetic information, veteran status or age.

1729630


26 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2016

SNOHOMISH COUNTY ECONOMIC DATA Pending sales, residential real estate

Closed sales, residential real estate

Unemployment rate, percent

Continued unemployment claims

Aerospace employment

Construction employment

Professional services employment

Local sales tax distributions, Snohomish County and incorporated cities

04/12

1,570

886

7.3

10,674

44,400

14,700

23,100

$3,761,069

05/12

1,579

1,000

7.8

9,578

44,700

15,100

23,300

$4,247,900

06/12

1,448

1,025

8.4

8,951

45,200

15,400

23,300

$4,064,415

07/12

1,400

1,029

8.4

9,114

45,800

16,100

23,300

$4,264,446

08/12

1,324

1,027

7.5

7,834

46,300

16,500

23,400

$4,485,421

09/12

1,206

880

7.1

7,865

46,900

16,300

23,600

$4,522,340

10/12

1,325

937

7

7,870

46,800

16,300

23,300

$4,577,850

11/12

1,114

806

6.8

8,445

47,500

16,100

23,000

$4,768,450

12/12

872

892

6.6

9,351

47,100

15,900

23,100

$4,378,797

01/13

1,154

713

7.1

9,962

46,800

15,600

22,600

$4,466,777

02/13

1,236

673

6.3

9,182

46,600

15,300

22,500

$5,680,845

03/13

1,576

932

5.7

9,060

46,400

15,400

22,500

$4,093,977

04/13

1,500

1,020

4.9

8,891

46,100

15,500

22,900

$3,970,313

05/13

1,487

1,131

4.7

8,093

45,500

15,800

22,700

$4,725,432

06/13

1,488

1,159

5.7

7,888

45,700

16,200

22,900

$4,316,634

07/13

1,470

1,141

5.6

7,787

45,900

18,000

24,000

$4,584,288

08/13

1,402

1,143

6.2

7,062

44,900

18,400

24,000

$4,921,104

09/13

1,150

1,032

N/A

7,180

45,100

18,300

24,000

$3,573,194

10/13

1,219

1,041

6.0

7,149

44,500

18,200

23,900

$4,998,366

11/13

1,010

833

5.7

7,499

44,300

17,900

24,200

$5,132,975

12/13

835

871

5.3

8,829

44,700

17,800

24,000

$3,348,852

01/14

1,195

615

6.0

9,651

44,000

14,500

23,300

$3,382,321

02/14

1,180

688

6.4

8,850

43,700

14,800

23,100

$4,087,089

03/14

1,481

949

6.0

8,897

43,700

14,800

23,400

$3,013,059

04/14

1,454

943

4.9

8,069

43,400

14,800

23,100

$2,923,521

05/14

1,718

1,074

5.0

7,502

43,600

15,100

23,100

$3,370,904

06/14

1,545

1,220

5.1

7,177

44,400

15,400

23,300

$3,290,880

07/14

1,457

1,172

5.3

6,587

44,000

18,400

23,500

$3,474,651

08/14

1,393

1,163

5.4

6,244

43,000

18,800

23,800

$3,695,926

09/14

1,328

1,057

5.1

N/A

42,900

18,800

23,800

$3,838,762

10/14

1,327

1,113

4.8

N/A

41,400

18,300

24,200

$3,663,750

11/14

1,027

885

4.8

6,093

41,800

18,000

24,100

$3,852,205

12/14

956

920

4.5

N/A

42,000

17,700

24,100

$3,582,032

1/15

1,237

686

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$3,280,200

2/15

1,406

740

5.3

6,663

43,000

17,200

23,700

$4,146,999

3/15

1,938

1,075

4.5

6,762

42,800

17,500

24,000

$2,981,599

4/15

1,747

1,272

3.6

6,273

42,800

18,100

24,100

$3,041,795

5/15

1,777

1,315

4.0

5,923

42,800

18,600

24,000

$3,654,693

6/15

1,799

1,374

4.3

5,607

42,700

19,200

24,400

$3,445,201

7/15

1,764

1,411

4.3

5,323

44,100

20,700

25,000

$3,590,957

8/15

1,634

1,442

3.9

5,367

43,600

21,200

25,300

$11,743,713

9/15

1,501

1,290

4.1

5,089

43,600

21,200

25,200

$11,603,019

10/15

1,503

1,178

4.5

5,109

43,400

20,400

25,100

$10,854,566

11/15

1,307

973

5.0

5,748

43,500

20,100

24,900

$11,503,562

12/15

1,067

1,189

5.0

6,193

43,600

19,800

25,300

$10,765,437

1/16

1,249

811

5.7

7,085

43,600

19,300

24,500

$10,477,405

2/16

1,475

848

5.3

6,388

43,500

19,600

24,500

$13,559,687

3/16

1,825

1,156

5.2

6,084

43,100

20,000

24,800

$9,496,443

4/16

1,836

1,213

4.4

5,957

43,300

19,800

25,600

$9,617,406

5/16

1,979

1,386

4.8

5,770

43,300

20,300

25,800

$11,697,044

6/16

1,862

1,493

4.7

5,396

43,800

21,000

26,400

$10,816,389

7/16

1,795

1,515

4.8

5,489

44,000

21,700

26,400

$11,102,633

8/16

1.873

1,538

4.4

5,502

43,900

22,100

26,500

$12,493,656

9/16

1,601

1,431

4.3

5,377

43,500

22,200

26,500

$12,193,233

10/16

1,561

1,364

4.0

5,502

42,100

22,800

26,700

N/A

Consumer price index, King and Snohomish counties 237.93

239.54

240.21

241.36

237.99

239.90

240.82

242.82

242.77

242.78

241.05

242.77

246.61

247.64

247.18

247.854

245.05

245.496

247.611

251.622

251.617

250.831

250.385

250.942

253.815

256.098 256.907


NOVEMBER DECEMBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 27

ECONOMIC DATA Boeing stock price

PUD retail electricity use, kilowatt hours

Snohomish County PUD connections

New vehicle registrations

Average gas price (regular, unleaded

04/12

$76.80

619,896,882

223

4,305

$4.08

05/12

$69.61

495,062,119

290

4,748

$4.16

06/12

$74.30

498,393,947

222

4,585

$4.00

07/12

$73.91

446,516,298

207

4,402

$3.57

08/12

$71.40

468,361,106

282

4,664

$3.81

09/12

$69.60

408,581,275

255

4,155

$4.01

10/12

$70.44

503,030,443

442

4,303

$3.96

11/12

$74.28

473,023,558

225

3,682

$3.47

12/12

$75.36

614,283,104

234

3,636

$3.34

01/13

$73.87

700,861,857

223

4,656

$3.37

02/13

$76.90

674,618,017

316

3,753

$3.62

03/13

$85.85

608,606,315

330

4,713

$3.80

04/13

$91.41

617,541,384

321

4,943

$3.64

05/13

$99.05

492,112,324

276

5,256

$3.83

06/13

$102.32

465,163,451

213

5,275

$3.79

07/13

$105.10

453,404,099

322

5,622

$3.82

08/13

$103.92

470,067,543

232

5,742

$3.78

09/13

$117.50

410,719,601

338

5,141

$3.65

10/13

$138.36

518,766,206

461

5,179

$3.44

11/13

$133.83

461,012,493

447

4,083

$3.24

12/13

$136.92

671,835,200

244

4,752

$3.29

01/14

$125.26

696,306,571

421

5,726

$3.36

02/14

$128.92

682,348,469

386

4,467

$3.31

03/14

$125.49

610,841,349

352

5,428

$3.75

04/14

$129.02

605,381,115

368

6,389

$3.74

05/14

$135.25

468,754,469

466

6,542

$3.87

06/14

$127.23

492,917,254

412

6,626

$3.93

07/14

$120.48

432,682,894

444

6,611

$3.95

08/14

$126.80

463,314,006

363

5,614

$3.83

09/14

$127.38

451,089,566

264

5,987

$3.74

10/14

$124.91

496,335,315

403

5,929

$3.40

11/14

$134.36

422,769,229

426

4,867

$3.04

12/14

$132.25

663,368,433

426

6,072

$2.88

1/15

$145.37

634,592,067

209

6,364

$2.30

2/15

$150.85

611,633,434

287

5,889

$2.30

3/15

$150.08

567,831,393

284

7,707

$2.85

4/15

$143.34

578,264,358

427

8,057

$2.70

5/15

$140.52

449,046,426

326

8,649

$3.05

6/15

$138.72

494,611,488

384

9,852

$3.10

7/15

$144.17

451,503,602

334

7,641

$3.20

8/15

$130.68

474,207,621

242

7,021

$3.09

9/15

$130.95

557,429,310

442

7,018

$2.79

10/15

$148.07

N/A

217

6,828

$2.49

11/15

$145.45

N/A

221

5,631

$2.41

12/15

$144.59

N/A

282

6,995

$2.35

1/16

$120.13

N/A

333

6,910

$2.33

2/16

$118.18

655,390,592

333

7,298

$2.02

3/16

$126.94

612,151,814

288

9,209

$2.12

4/16

$134.80

514,320,049

428

8,364

$2.25

5/16

$126.15

457,566,044

342

8,906

$2.44

6/16

$129.87

463,105,233

277

10,754

$2.57

7/16

$133.66

430,295,041

435

8,268

$2.56

8/16

$129.45

467,001,501

325

8,315

$2.49

9/16

$131.74

454,085,665

394

7,628

$2.60

10/16

$142.43

N/A

N/A

6,861

$2.64 1696808


28 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

DECEMBER 2016

Dan Ollis, Whidbey Coffee Family man Mud runner Coffee connoisseur

Each and every one of us is an original. Shaped by unique inuences that make us who we are today. Here at Heritage Bank, we think differences can build a better bank, too. That’s why we share the best ideas from across all of our branches and local communities with one goal in mind: to serve our customers better every day. By sharing our strengths, we’re able to offer customers like Dan Ollis—and you—more than a community bank. But rather, a community oƒ banks.

W H AT ’ S YO U R H E R I TAG E?

HeritageBankNW.com | 800.455.6126 1517294

© 2016 Heritage Bank Member FDIC


Herald Business Journal - 12.01.2016