Page 1

Art on the tide Jeffro Uitto transforms driftwood into sculpture

In this issue

+

Voss Acres seasonal bounty

Schwingfest! Swiss festival comes to life

PHOTO ESSAY Highway 105

FALL 2016

$3.99

A supplement to The Daily World


fall 2016

contents

FEATURES

32

ART COMES IN ON THE TIDE

40

VOSS ACRES

Sculptor Jeffro Uitto turns driftwood into pieces of art

TOP Schwingfest wrestlers. Photo by Matt Coyle ABOVE Sharon Voss is using her farm to build community. Photo by Patricia Jollimore

Local family grows fresh produce for grocery store

COVER Artist Jeffro Uitto seated in one of the fine art chairs he builds. Photo by Marcy Merrill

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Fall 2016 | WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE

COVER

46

SCHWINGFEST 2016

All things Swiss and wrestling at this favorite festival that’s been a tradition for decades.


Our work is not about houses... ...it’s about people.

Multi-year winner!

Serving all of Grays Harbor County Residential - Commercial - Land

Windermere Real Estate

101 South Broadway • Aberdeen • 360-533-6464 837 Point Brown Ave NW • Ocean Shores • 360-289-3373 www.windermeregraysharbor.com


ND FALL A R WINTE S T N EVE

fall 2016

contents

59 IN THIS ISSUE 12

BOOK

59

Happily Ever After

15

OFF THE MAP

Our Favorites

64

Unique cemetery walking path

19

DINE Red Velvet Bakery By the Sea

26

EVENTS WHO & WHY Jill Smith has made her home in Grays Harbor for 25 years

66

LAST SHOT Freshly baked cupcakes that will tempt your tastebuds!

DRINK Westport Winery Expands

54

19

TRAVEL Photo essay from Highway 105

TOP Loggers Playday in Hoquiam Sept. 10 ABOVE Coffee is the perfect partner to the delicious items in the Red Velvet Bakery in Seabrook. Photo by Juli Bonell

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Fall 2016 | WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE

IN EVERY ISSUE 10 From the Editor 63 Advertisers Directory


LOVE WINS. The longest-lasting sedan in its class

Most Awarded Small SUV

Your Subaru Dealer for 33 Years

1-360-943-2120 2300 Carriage Loop SW • Olympia • Mon-Sat 8 to 7 ~ Sun 11 to 6 • www.HansonMotors.com


Beach Homes Aren’t Just For Summer Visit www.OwnOceanShores.com

Donna Jones Broker 360-580-5354

donnajones55@live.com

360-532-4000 | editor@washingtoncoastmagazine.com

Publisher

Stan Woody

Editor

Doug Barker

Contributors Editorial

Real Estate / Ocean Shores

Elma

Gateway to Grays Harbor Since 1888

Winter Wine Festival JANUARY 21, 2017

Join us for these great events in 2016! October 31 November 11 December December 3 Jan 21, 2017

• Elma’s Downtown Trick or Treat • Elma’s Veterans’ Day Celebration & Parade • Elma’s Tree Lighting Ceremony (Date to be determined) • Santa photos with kids & pets • Winter Wine Festival

Elma Chamber of Commerce

For more information on these and other great events: www.elmachamber.org • (360) 482-3055 • 222 W. Main

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Fall 2016 | WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE

Doug Barker Angelo Bruscas Eric Degerman David Haerle Terri Harber Andy Perdue Jill Smith

Photography

Doug Barker Juli Bonell Matt Coyle Marguerite Garth Marcy Merrill Patricia Jollimore Andy Perdue Kim Roberts Spencer Uitto

Editorial Assistant

Karen Barkstrom

Magazine Kristina Case, Simply Graphic Graphic Designer

Ad Graphic Designers

Constance Ellis Emily Evans


Advertising Sales Manager

Jo Treadwell 360-537-3917 jtreadwell@soundpublishing.com

Production Manager

Martin Osburn

Circulation

Kris Cearley

Subscriptions

Addy Moreno

Distribution

Doug Ames

Contact information Advertising inquiries, subscriptions & change of address: 360-532-4000. Back issues $8 plus shipping and handling. Washington Coast Magazine is published by The Daily World, a division of Sound Publishing and may not be reproduced without express written permission, all rights reserved. No liability is assumed by Washington Coast Magazine, The Daily World or Sound Publishing regarding any content in this publication. A subscription to Washington Coast Magazine is $14 annually. Single copies are available at select locations throughout À>ÞÃ>ÀLœÀ>˜`*>VˆwVVœÕ˜ÌˆiðœÀ`iÌ>ˆÃ]ÛˆÃˆÌ www.washingtoncoastmagazine.com © 2016 by The Daily World 315 S. Michigan St. Aberdeen, WA 98520

WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE | Fall 2016

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FALL ISSUE :

Creativity on the coast

Creation comes in many forms and this edition of Washington Coast Magazine has a diverse collection of examples of people who find ways to create wherever they happen to be.

A

fter seeing Marcy Merrill’s photos of Jeffro Uitto’s creations in this month’s magazine (page 32) you may never look at driftwood the same again. He uses wood that washes up in Willapa Bay and the surrounding beaches to make sculptures, typically of animals. He can look at a sun-bleached piece of fir and see motion and energy in the shoulder muscle of a horse, or a smaller piece of cedar and see the aerodynamics in the wing of a hawk.  The material he works with literally washes up at his feet, but one gets the idea that the medium in which he works is a coincidence of where he lives. The creative energy would come out in some form. If it wasn’t wood, usually driftwood, it would be something else.  Creation comes in many forms and this edition of Washington Coast Magazine has a diverse collection of examples of people who find ways to create wherever they happen to be.  One can’t look at what Trista Evans creates at the Red Velvet Bakery by The Sea in the beach town of Seabrook (page 19) and not consider her an artist of the oven. These are not the cupcakes your mom made for the school fundraiser. 

Stay connected! VISIT OUR NEW WEBSITE! www.WashingtonCoastMagazine.com Click it to read our past articles and learn about upcoming events.

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Fall 2016 | WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE

In the Copalis Beach area a little ways north of Ocean Shores, Sharon and Steve Voss (page 40) are creating what may be the most challenging thing of all, community. They’ve taken over an old homestead and turned it into a produce market, and they’ve opened the first grocery store in the community in several years. Copalis Beach is somewhat isolated and Sharon Voss thinks everybody ought to have access to healthy food, no matter where you live. In so doing, she’s created a gathering place. If you’ve lived someplace outside of an incorporated town, you know that it can be hard to maintain an identity for a rural area, a center. School’s are important for that and Voss is of the belief that healthy food can be, too.  We hope you’ll enjoy reading about some of the people who are finding ways to satisfy the creative bones in their bodies, and we’ll have a few more for you in the next edition of Washington Coast Magazine.  Doug Barker, Editor

Thank you for taking the time to write to us on >ViLœœŽ°7iœÛi…i>Àˆ˜}vÀœ“œÕÀÀi>`iÀð/…ˆÃ is just our seventh issue and we’ve already got readers from as far away as Texas. We are very happy that you are enjoying our magazine, we enjoy making it for you.


Goodbye Summer. Hello Autumn! Still lots of things to do at the beach! SEPT 15 BOAT BASIN SALMON DERBY thru OCT 31 Dockside fishing for salmon with great prizes at the Westport Marina. SEPT 3 70th ANNUAL SEAFOOD FESTIVAL & CRAFT SHOW

A family feast with fresh fish, oysters, & more. Live music & local crafts.

SEPT 3 CORVETTES AT THE MARINA

Bring your Corvette and join the fun at the Westport Marina.

SEPT 10 BRADY’S WORLD FAMOUS OYSTER FEED Oysters served every way you love them. Proceeds benefit clean water & scholarships.

SEPT 17-18 10th ANNUAL 30 MILES OF JUNQUE

From Tokeland to Westport and Ocosta. Garage sales galore.

SEPT 24-25 5th ANNUAL SALMON TALES

Celebration of Westport’s favorite fish.

OCT 7 CRANBERRY FESTIVAL COOK-OFF

Enter your best cranberry dishes in the Cook-Off competition.

OCT 7-8 15th ANNUAL CLEANWATER CLASSIC

Watch or participate in this surfing contest in Westport.

OCT 8-9 CRANBERRY HARVEST FESTIVAL

Bog tours, cranberry cook-off, and firelight parade. Grayland.

OCT 9 JOG THE BOG & BEACH

10K & 5K run / 3K walk. 9am start Grayland Community Hall.

DEC 3 SANTA-BY-THE-SEA

Join the South Beach Buccaneers as they welcome Santa to the South Beach at 10:30 am at the Westport Marina.

WESTPORT & SOUTH BEACH

Visitor Information Center

For more information on these events & more!

cometowestport.com experiencewestport.com 2985 S. Montesano Ave • Westport • 800-345-6223

Stock up for your beach adventures! Box Lunches • WDFW License Agent Western Union • Liquor, Beer, Wine Natural & Organics • Fresh Produce & Meat Naat Deli & Bakery • Donuts • Lotto Propane Propa an Tanks Fishing & RV Supplies • Crab Bait

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gg BOOK S T O R Y BY T E R R I H A R B E R

MAKING A LIVING AT HAPPILY EVER AFTER A FEW YEARS AGO, STEPHANIE HOFFMAN MCMANUS, 26, WAS OPERATING A BAKERY AND CAKE SHOP IN HER HOMETOWN OF HOQUIAM. NOW SHE’S ATTRACTING ATTENTION FOR A DIFFERENT SKILL — WRITING LOVE STORIES. She has found a career niche writing “New Adult Romances” — a fairly new publishing category that caters mostly to female readers between the ages of 18 and 30. The term was coined by St. Martin’s Press in a call for novelists to address a market for something a little more mature than the established “Young Adult” category. The themes often include leaving home, embarking on careers and emerging sexuality. Some of the topics she explores in her writing include loss, depression, abuse, poverty, young pregnancy, single parenting, cancer, war and PTSD. Such struggles not only provide compelling drama, but allow her to shine a brighter light on issues that need society’s attention.  She also enjoys stories about redemption. Her favorite is the Beauty and the Beast tale about a handsome prince made ugly by a spell. After he stops manipulating the beautiful young woman of his dreams to try to make her love him, she sees him heartbroken, realizes she loves him and her love breaks the spell. The attractive pair live happily ever after.  She took up writing as a career about two years ago. “My parents are both big readers, and from an early age we had books in our hands,” she said.  She’s been able to make a profit from novel writing since her first one became available on Amazon.com in April 2014. Some readers purchase hard copies, but most of her novels are sold as e-books. Hoffman McManus credits a good portion of her success to Amazon. She used it to distribute her first novel electronically so friends and family could access “Finding Ever After,” which she started in late 2013. People she didn’t know started reading it and her fan base began to form and grow.  “I let a couple of my friends read it, and

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Fall 2016 | WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE

they encouraged me to put it out there,” she said. “In the first couple of months it sold thousands of copies. I realized ‘I can do this.’” Hoffman McManus has completed eight novels and has others in the works. Like most writers in the category, she doesn’t have major publishing houses promoting her books and has to do the marketing herself.  She uses blogs that promote independent authors, social media and more traditional personal appearances. Altogether selfpublishing has spawned what Hoffman McManus described as “an explosion” in the field.  While Amazon made it simple to sell one’s own writing, it also caused the market to become saturated. “It’s hard to make yourself stand out,” she said.  She sold off most of her assets related to the bakery, called The Recipe Box, and her parents, both successful business owners, helped her become financially free to move on to her writing career.  Hoffman McManus said she was encouraged to take a career risk and do something that makes her happy.  The first book, “Finding Ever After,” sold nearly 10,000 copies in its first three months. She said her latest offering, “Anywhere But Here,” might surpass the first quarter sales of her first novel.  She is raising her 8-year-old son, Skyler, who she adopted about five years ago, she said. Her parents served as his foster parents for three years before that.  “I was really happy to take over. I just kind of fell in love with him,” she said of the boy.  She works mostly from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. while he’s in school. In addition to writing, she works on marketing, promotion and other matters related to her business. It

Info

Stephanie Hoffman McManus has nine titles for sale through Amazon. com: “Anywhere But Here,” “Finding Ever After,” “Pieces of Forever,” “Risking Ever After,” “Chasing Ever After,” “Saving Ever After,” “Broken Ever After,” “Fighting Ever After” and “Red Red Rose.” Electronic editions sell for $2.99 and paperback editions for $14.99.

BELOW: Hoffman McManus’ early book covers. She has published 9 books to date.


BOOK  ff

“I let a couple of my friends read it and they encouraged me to put it out there,” she said. “In the first couple of months it sold thousands of copies. I realized ‘I can do this.’” allows her a good amount of time to spend with Skyler because she can adjust her work schedule as needed to accommodate his needs and activities. The book promotion sometimes means small giveaways such as bookmarks, lip balm or free e-reads. Photographer friends have taken the cover art for many of her novels and she is involved in the cover designs.  The cover for her first novel was shot behind the 7th Street Theatre in Hoquiam: a nighttime scene in a rainy alley and a pair of sky-high heels left behind, along with a tiara and a pearl necklace. It’s an image that brings to mind a darker version of Cinderella’s flight from the prince as the clock struck midnight.  “Even though I’m doing well with this, I can’t justify spending a couple hundred dollars for a photograph or a cover,” Hoffman McManus said. “I need to make sure this is profitable and not just an expensive hobby.”  Hoffman McManus has spent most of her

P HO TO BY DO U G BARKE R

life in Hoquiam. She only left to attend two years of culinary school in Spokane, where one of her four brothers lives. She is the only daughter of the family. “I was always outnumbered. They were louder and more outgoing,” she said. “I was the quieter one.”  Her brothers were also fairly protective of her — especially once she started dating.  Though some of her male characters might do things or have experiences similar to those of her brothers or other men she knows, none of the characters in her books are based solely on anyone, Hoffman McManus stressed. But she did create a male character who is

a musician and two of her four brothers are in that line of work. One of them helped her write a song included in one of her books. Hoffman McManus said she might end up living in Olympia or Spokane at some point, but she doesn’t envision a life outside the Evergreen State or far away from her loved ones. She also wants to buy a house for herself and Skyler and they recently moved in with her parents so she can save for it.  “My long-term plan is to just keep writing and telling stories that mean something to me and will hopefully mean something to my readers,” she said. “…While giving my readers the happily ever afters they crave.” 

An excerpt from “Anywhere But Here” “Can we just freeze time?” I asked softly. It was getting later in the afternoon and pretty soon I’d have to leave. I still had homework I’d been putting off all weekend and tomorrow was Monday, which meant I’d avoided it as long as I could. He didn’t say anything, just gave me a squeeze and stroked his hand over my hair and down my back to let me know he was feeling it too. After another minute he broke the quiet. “If you could go anywhere in the world, where would you go?” “I don’t know.”

He leaned up on his elbows and looked down at me. “You don’t know? Come on, if you could be anywhere but here, where would you choose?” “What’s the point of this?” I asked, amused. “It’s a game. Just close your eyes, picture yourself somewhere, the place you want to be most, and tell me where it is.” I humored him and closed my eyes, letting my mind take me wherever I wanted to go. Then I opened them. “Right here.” He laughed, “I don’t think you understand this game. It’s called anywhere but here.”

I pushed myself up onto my knees and sat back on my legs. “You told me to close my eyes and picture myself anywhere I wanted. I did. The only thing I see is you. The place I want to be most is wherever you are.” I leaned forward and dropped my hands to the blanket, bringing us nose to nose. “And you’re here, so I’m exactly where I want to be.” The last word wasn’t even out of my mouth before he dragged me to his. I fell in a heap on him, and then we were laughing and kissing.

WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE | Fall 2016

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Another Record Year at Grays Harbor!

‘we do’ weddings

We are celebrating the 400,000 vehicle shipped out of Grays Harbor

If you like dining with us, then you’ll love the way we cater to your wedding or special event!

SETTING GOALS & ACHIEVING THEM!

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Fall 2016 | WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE

360-276-4884

catering@mill109.com 5 W Myrtle Ln. | Seabrook, WA A


OFFff THE MAP 

A unique walking path through an old cemetery provides beautiful scenery

Overgrown Lives  

PHOTOS BY MARCY MERRILL TEX T BY D OUG BARK ER 

A

re you the type who wants to get off the OCKPTQCFCPFƂPFVJQUG spots only the locals know about? We’ve got one for you: the Johns River Cemetery at Markham along the southern shore of Grays *CTDQT| Markham is a cluster of houses around the Ocean Spray Cranberry plant on Highway 105 about midway between Aberdeen and Westport. The cemetery is mostly grown over, the final resting place of some of the pioneer stock of the late 1800s.  There is a parking area that requires a state Parks Discovery Pass and you’ll

have to hike about 1.6 miles from there. The cemetery is on the north side of Johns River, across the river from the cranberry plant. The trail is pleasant and you’ll likely see herons and signs of beaver, but the signage isn’t good. There’s a fork in the trail at one point and the only marker is a piece of wood with a crudely painted, but bright orange, arrow. Follow it.  The cemetery is no longer tended, but here and there the headstones are visible in the underbrush. Daryl Graham, who lives in the area and has taken an interest in its history, says there are probably 20 or fewer headstones, but probably 50 or more graves, many with wooden markers long since gone.  WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE | Fall 2016

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gg OFF THE MAP

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Fall 2016 | WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE


OFFff THE MAP 

FIND YOUR WAY Here are the directions someone has posted on the internet at findagrave.com: “The old logging road meanders through a beautiful stretch of land that takes you through bits œv>`iÀÌÀiiÃ̅>Ìwi`ˆ˜À>̅iÀ quickly once given the chance and on down next to wetlands. Often times you will see, or hear, a fair amount of wildlife in here … you move into an evergreen forest and visions of trees from many years past. Your path will take you up from the wetlands and you will walk along the plateau where it’s shaded, cool and calm. It’s very serene and beautiful in here. The road dips back down to the water and goes up again. Somewhere after you’ve climbed up a bit, there will be a slight fork in the road, go to your right.”

ABOVE: The walk requires crossing over a small bridge.

Several headstones belong to members of the Fry family. An internet search of genealogy sites indicates that young men in the family came there from Illinois in the middle of the 1800s and their letters home made it sound good enough that others followed. Graham says the original town of Markham had a couple of cedar shingle mills in the early 1900s

and there were thriving logging camps nearby. When the highway came through in 1912, it seemed to scatter the people who lived there, he said. The headstones suggest stories bearing witness to the severity of life in those days: a child who lived from July to November in 1904, a woman dead at the age of 43 in 1914, a boy of 7, a young woman of 26.  But some, like Jacob Phillips, had long lives, born in 1819 when James Monroe was president. He lived through 18 presidents before he died in 1900.  If you’re in the neighborhood, we’re sure he wouldn’t object to a drop in.  For a clipSearch Johns river cemetery WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE | Fall 2016

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DINING  ff

Red Velvet Bakery 202 Meriweather St. 2CEKĆ‚E$GCEJ9# 360-556-1468 Now serving lunch!

@redvelvetbakerybythesea

Sweet Life at the Beach For Trista Evans and her family, opening a bakery at Seabrook has been a dream come true. One that involves a lot of cinnamon rolls and early mornings. S T OR Y BY D AV ID HAERLEÂ PHOTOGRAPHS BY JULI BONELL

W

hen you meander through “downtownâ€? Seabrook, it’s not hard to find the various shops, eateries and businesses, as quaint directional signs point the way at every corner.Â

But there’s one business nestled among the various shops that needs no sign. You can simply follow your nose thanks to the almost-magnetic aromas wafting from the Red Velvet Bakery By the Sea. And if you think the name is a mouthful, try sampling the sumptuous wares, which encompass an array of sweet, fresh-baked treats. Possibly borrowing part of its name from the famed California tourist enclave of Carmel by the Sea, once

you get a sugary whiff of the diminutive bakery situated across the road from the salty Pacific, you realize it’s more about things caramelized by the sea. The bakery, located at 202 Meriweather St., is owned and operated by Trista Evans, 37, who visited Seabrook with her husband, Brian, and their three children a couple years back and fell in love with the place. In the summer of 2014, they decided to leave the hustle and bustle of Olympia to buy a home and open businesses in Seabrook. In something of a ying and yang approach to a family business, she started the bakery, while Brian opened Seabrook’s fitness center — Rusty Anchor Fitness. 

Bakery life CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: Trista pipes frosting on a fresh batch of cupcakes. Red Velvet Whoopie Pies are a favorite. The bakery sign and smells lure passersby to the bakery. Strawberry buttercream awaits a cake.

WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE | Fall 2016

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DINING gg DRINK

ABOVE: Clockwise from above: Bakery offerings are made fresh daily including baguettes. A busy morning at the bakery includes many customers on bikes. RIGHT PAGE: The interior of the small bakery has whiskshaped lights. Chocolate dipped strawberries are a popular item. Batdorf & Bronson coffee is a perfect accompaniment with a fresh cinnamon roll or croissant.

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Fall 2016 | WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE

We moved out here to pursue our dreams and promote a balanced life. We just wanted to be doing what we loved. We love living at the beach. -Trista Evans


DINING  ff

WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE | Fall 2016

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Fine dining with a Spectacular View Furnishings for Coastal Living.

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Fall 2016 | WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE

50 Miles of Unforgettable Beaches

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Unforgettable Concerts, Festivals, & Events


gg DINING Call 360-532-1900 300 Myrtle St. Hoquiam, WA

Quality Pet Care Serving the Twin Harbors since 1980

Dr. David Westby and Dr. Dan Brown If pets could drive, it’s where they’d go! “We moved out here to pursue our dreams and promote a balanced life,” said Trista. “We just wanted to be doing what we loved. We love living at the beach.” But it’s not just living, she’s working there, too — a lot.  “We’re so much busier than we ever thought,” she said with a bit of a laugh. 

“We bake our doughnuts; we don’t fry them. The baked maple bars may be the most popular.”

raintreevetcenter.com

Country Closet

Trista cranks up the ovens at 4 a.m. each morning to get ready for opening at 7:30 a.m. The bakery closes at 4 p.m. daily during tourist season and 2 p.m. during winter hours. On most weekend mornings — and some weekdays — there’s a line of people outside waiting for Batdorf & Bronson coffee and one of the bakery’s specialties — her cinnamon rolls.

“We sell out of those daily,” said Trista. “We usually go through more than a hundred per day.” Other popular items include marionberry scones, red velvet cakes, chocolate chip cookies and an array of doughnuts.  “We bake our doughnuts; we don’t fry them,” she noted. “The baked maple bars may be the most popular.”  The bakery celebrated its one-year anniversary back in June and Trista said business has been “consistent,” with excellent support from the Seabroook community, along with the tourists.  While busy days take their toll, Trista said her five employees help take a lot of the load off the self-taught pastry chef.  “I grew up baking pies and things with my mother and grandmother. I’ve been doing it ever since,” she said. Prior to

Décor • Baby Boutique • Holidays • Gifts 209 S Broadway | Aberdeen | 533.5152 WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE | Fall 2016

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A Unique Journey into the Pacific Northwest Coastal Lifestyle.

Largest Liquor Store on the Washington Coast

Wine, Beer, Spirits

Take a relaxing tour through Washington Coast Magazine, celebrating people, places, events and cultural enrichment. There’s food, wine, anecdotes, homes, shopping, day trips and proud history in every issue.

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gg DINING

Jewelry Event of the Season!

opening Red Velvet, she operated a homebased “cottage bakery” in Olympia, selling her wares to local restaurants and shops. As for Red Velvet, nothing is out-sourced — it’s all made on the premises. 

The bakery’s daily offerings are baked fresh and from scratch. Nothing is outsourced.

Our 90th Anniversary Celebration

“Everything is made fresh daily,” Trista said. “Everything is made from scratch.” And that seems to be a recipe for success for this Seabrook business.  “It’s a wonderful community,” she said of her new home. “We’ve gotten great support from our Seabrook family. We’ve been blessed to be as busy and successful as it has been.” 

You can also get more information at: www.yelp.com/biz/ Ài`‡ÛiÛi̇L>ŽiÀއLއ̅i‡Ãi>‡«>VˆwV‡Li>V…

Jewelry Store, Inc. Tues.-Fri. 10:00-5:30 • Sat. 10:00-3:00

201 E. Wishkah St. Downtown Aberdeen 532-6280 www.wiitamaki.com

WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE | Fall 2016

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gg DRINK

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Fall 2016 | WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE


DRINK  ff

WESTPORT WINERY EXPANDING 6JGYKPGT[YKNNQRGPKVUƂTUVVCUVKPITQQOKP%CPPQP$GCEJ B Y E R I C D E G E RMA N A N D A NDY P ER DUE, G R E A T N O R T H WES T W I N E

As it approaches its 10th anniversary, tiny Westport Winery on Washington’s coast is proving that success can come from equal parts innovation and hard work. The 5,000-case winery has made big strides in its quality in recent years, thanks to bringing in grapes from some of the state’s top vineyards, including Red Willow and Olsen Brothers in the Yakima Valley, Conner Lee in the Columbia Valley and Discovery in the

Horse Heaven Hills. Now the Roberts family — Blain, Kim and their children Dana and Carrie — have taken another leap forward. In July, they opened a tasting room in Cannon Beach, the iconic Oregon coastal community. While Cannon Beach is home to a distillery, two wine shops and three breweries, Westport will be its first winery tasting room. 

Top: Breakwater Seafood and Chowder House looks out over the Wishkah River in downtown Aberdeen. Above: Customers enjoy a selection of fresh seafood

Blain and Kim Roberts own Westport Winery on the Washington coast with their children, Dana and Carrie. They plan to open a second tasting room this winter in Cannon Beach, Ore. (Photo by Andy Perdue/Great Northwest Wine) WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE | Fall 2016

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gg DRINK MEDAL WINNING WINES Here are four Westport wines that earned gold medals at this spring’s Cascadia Wine Competition.

Westport Winery 2013 Jetty Cat, Columbia Valley, $29: Jetty Cat, a title inspired by a feline waterfront resident, is the proprietary name for this red blend of Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, Merlot and Malbec. It has a hint œvi>w˜iÃÃœ˜ˆÌØœÃi]«Õà cherries and blueberries. On the palate, it’s a complex drink of black cherries, blackberries, blueberries and plums, with V…œVœ>Ìiˆ˜ˆÌÃw˜ˆÃ…>˜` grippy tannins. (14% alc.)

$

Westport Winery 2013 Charterboat Chick, Horse Heaven Hills, $28: Discovery Vineyard is a rising star in Washington’s Horse Heaven Hills, and Westport brings in Cabernet Sauvignon grapes for this delicious red. Aromas of coffee and black fruit overlaid by plum lead to a lush palate of black cherry, blackberry, blueberry, plum and coffee, w˜ˆÃ…i`œvv܈̅Üi‡“>˜>}i` tannins. When you pick up a bottle, the rain slicker-clad woman on the label is none other than co-owner Kim Roberts. (14% alc.)

For purchase: The wines are sold only at the winery, so call 360-648-2224.

Westport began when the family purchased land in Grays Harbor County, about eight miles from the coast near Westport, and son Dana learned his winemaking skills at Washington State University. He and his team now craft 38 different bottlings, including two ciders and a nonalcoholic Riesling grape juice. The styles include everything from big, rich reds to sweet desserts to tropical fruit wines. The expansive

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Westport Winery 2014 Fleur de Lis, Columbia Gorge, $26: This Pinot Gris using grapes from the cool Columbia Gorge reveals lime, Asian pear and starfruit aromas, then lime, pear and more starfruit on the palate, plus juicy acidity, 0.6% residual sugar and minerality ˆ˜ˆÌÃw˜ˆÃ…°̽ÃÛiÀÃ>̈i enough for sipping alone or with seafood or lighter chicken dishes. (12% alc.)

Fall 2016 | WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE

Westport Winery NV Shiver Me Timbers, Washington, $27: The folks at this funloving coastal winery spent much of their life running a dive operation out of Maui, and their time in the tropics sometimes spill over into their life as Washington vintners. Such is the case with this wine, which has a base of Riesling >˜`ˆÃˆ˜vÕÃi`܈̅y>ۜÀÃœv passionfruit, orange and guava. The result is a luscious drink ܈̅>Àœ“>Ã>˜`y>ۜÀÃ̅>Ì ÃÜii«ÕÃ̜̅i-œÕ̅*>VˆwV] where the cares of the world are replaced by swaying palm trees. Its sweetness is backed by impressive acidity. It stands alone as dessert but also could pair nicely with orange sherbet and mango cheesecake. (11% alc.)

tasting room, on-site restaurant and acres of themed gardens make Westport a winery that attracts thousands from throughout the Pacific Northwest. The new tasting room is directly across the street from Bruce’s Candy Kitchen in downtown Cannon Beach.  (cont’d on page 31)


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JJewelers ewelers G Gemologists emologists Rare Rare Coins Coins Gold Gold & Silve Silver Bullion

313 Wishkah St. Aberdeen,WA 98520 360-532-6140 bryanandsonjewelers.com

Westport Winery’s Cannon Beach tasting room has a wide selection of merchandise. Friends sample selections from Westport winery (Photos by Kim Robers)

About the authors: Eric Degerman and Andy Perdue run Great Northwest Wine, an award-winning news and information company. Learn more about wine at www.greatnorthwestwine.com.

To visit Westport Winery (360) 648-2224 www.westportwinery.com 1 South Arbor Road, Aberdeen, WA 98520 WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE | Fall 2016

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art

COMES IN ON THE

TIDE 32

Fall 2016 | WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE

UITTO’S DAUGHTER TIMBER SITS ATOP HIS MAMMOTH SCULPTURE OF A RHINO.


Sculptor artist Jeffro Uitto turns driftwood into animals, furniture and whatever else comes to mind. STORY BY D OUG BARK ER PHOTOS BY MARCY MERRILL 

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The only thing I know is I DON’T KNOW ANYTHING and there are NO RULES. I don’t know where everything is going and that’s kind of the excitement. 1LăYV<P[[V(pronounced U-TOW)


W

WOOD. THE FORMS IT TAKES IN JEFFRO UITTO’S LIFE ARE ALMOST AS MANY AND VARIED AS THE WAVES THAT WASH IT ASHORE FOR HIM TO FIND AND SCULPT INTO FINE ART. His work has been well known on the southern coast of Washington for years. Initially, much of it fell into a general category of furniture, more accurately furniture as art, with form always overshadowing function. The pieces were big, bold and dramatic, curving and twisting in their natural forms but carved and polished to lend an other worldly quality. In recent years, his focus has changed to tap into a creativity not driven by function but an inner vision to sculpt the wood into something entirely new. Some of the work is free form, inspired by something natural, like the kelp

forests that grow just off the coast. But lately, the most impressive pieces are sculptures of powerful animals – giraffes, horses, Texas longhorns, spectacular eagles — all lifesized and imbued with motion and energy. The medium, as always, is wood, pieces of driftwood, sometimes hundreds of them, for the most part just as he found them, fitted together to mimic the muscle, sinew and bones of the animals in an organic form that blurs the lines between plant and animal.

Left: An eagle disiplays the mixes of wood and textures. Below: Uitto with the bust of a horse.

P HO T O B Y SP E N C E R U I T T O

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The driftwood medium includes logs and root wads of trees claimed by erosion along the ocean. His foraging includes pieces ranging from finger sized and smaller, up to sizes that require a winch or a small crane to salvage from the beach. There’s a photo of him wading — in winter — waist deep in water brimming with bobbing pieces of driftwood to get the pieces he wants.

jeffro Uitto

“Big projects” is how he refers to the pieces he’s concentrating on now, and it’s particularly apt for the life-size rhinoceros he made last year for the Chimei Museum in Taiwan. He had the project in mind for years and when the museum asked him to create something for an exhibit about animals, it was the push he needed. “I had saved stuff for 10 years off and on. It wasn’t a solid idea yet, I was just saving texture,” said Uitto. “ … The opportunity to do the show was the spark. They didn’t even really know what I was doing. We had four or five months to do everything and get it over there.” The museum leased the piece for six months and in July purchased it for its permanent collection.  He doesn’t typically talk about what his work sells for, deferring out of respect for the privacy of clients, but in one conversation about the rhino, he was hopeful it would bring a six-figure price.  He has begun working on a life-size Texas

PHOTO BY SPENCER UITTO

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LEFT: A bird skull was carved from a burl that Jeffro found in a burn pile. BELOW L-R: He identifies some of his work with his custom label. Restaurant in Westport features a custom bar. Furniture is what Jeffro created in his earlier years, but function has given way to pure form. Glass topped coffee table. RIGHT PAGE TOP: Red tailed Hawk took Jeffro several hundred hours to sculpt. RIGHT PAGE BOTTOM: Outside his studio, some of the neverending material the ocean provides.


His pieces are big, bold and dramatic, curving and twisting in their natural forms but carved and polished to lend an other worldly quality. longhorn after being approached by a real estate development company in Texas. It started as essentially a commission with a price in mind and the possibility of more like it, but that felt limiting to him and now he’s letting it take its own direction. “I think I’ll try to go further with it and not scale it down … just blow it out of the water and see what happens. … What I wanna do is just not hinder this piece. I just want to feel that freedom and go as far as I want to on it.”  Uitto, who is 34, grew up in Tokeland, on Willapa Bay along the southern Washington coast. He, his partner Zela McKinstry and their daughters Leah and Timber live in the same house where he was raised by his grandmother. The property includes a cabin next door that he purchased and is converting into a studio. Wood, collected for years, surrounds both the house and studio, organized by shapes, textures, size and potential uses. He can look at many of the pieces and remember where he got them and what he saw in them at the time.  But he’s starting to feel like it’s a bit much and he’s working to “dial in” his physical environment, maybe lighten his load and in the process free up “chi” for himself creatively and improve the physical space for his family.  It’s hard because he appreciates the pieces for their own singular, intrinsic beauty and it’s not easy to part with some of them. He

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CLOCKWISE: Spiky chair, Jeffro and Zela work together on many of their projects, some tools of the trade. He makes many of his own tools. A chair carved for a burl, carved face emerges from a piece of driftwood.

points to a piece and says he’s thinking about leaving it just the way it is but putting a glass dome over it and simply display it for what it is, something natural and perfect. His affinity for wood and shaping it came early. He said he first saw the commercial potential as a child when he could carve something and trade it for something else.  He grew up around the beach, with a free and easy lifestyle that included bikers and riding Harleys with his grandmother. The ocean was just a block or two away and like most of kids in the community he grew up and went to work in the area, in the cranberry bogs or as a commercial fishermen or carpenter.  He supports himself with his art now, representing himself on the business side, as opposed to being represented by a broker. But it takes effort and he starts many

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jeffro Uitto

mornings on the computer, networking and looking for ways to get his name and his art more widely known. He sometimes travels to be part of shows and exhibits and counts it as part of the cost of doing business for an artist. “It’s just kind of a matter of creating a buzz,” he says. Almost strangely, he doesn’t entirely mind the business side and he enjoys the contact and friendships he’s developed with clients, but it requires contacts he doesn’t have if he is to exhibit on an even bigger stage, so he is weighing whether to get outside representation. Right now, most of his sales are handled directly through his website, jeffrouitto.com.  Tokeland is small — 151 people, according to the Census — but with a surprisingly large number of artists and creative types.  “It’s epic,” he says of the art community

around him. “There’s a killer group of people here, the energy is awesome. Everybody is just in their own world, doing their own thing, but when you get the opportunity (to collaborate) … that always helps you grow a little bit. It’s so easy to get too close to what you’re doing.” Lately he’s been energized by a collaboration with Judith Altruda a jewelry designer (Washington Coast Magazine, Winter 2015).  “It’s cool when you accidentally discover new techniques,” Uitto said. “We were sitting around one night and I was thinking ‘You know what would be cool, is to get different textures by blasting these (copper panels) with bird shot.’ We started doing it and it translated into some of her jewelry.” He produces a photo on his phone to show the effects. “Isn’t that freakin’ sick, man?” 


as it ages is a look that appeals to him. “On the other hand I like something that’s so authentic. I love the wood. It’s warm, it’s original, not a copy. And there’s a shelf life on material (like wood) that almost makes people appreciate things in the moment.”

Altruda has known him for a long time and seen him evolve as an artist. “Jeffro has an eye, a feel and the ability to capture the essence of his subject. He is a composer with wood, selecting and arranging a multitude of pieces with great skill to create something bigger than the sum of its pieces,” she said. “He taps into the life force beyond the physical piece and that is what I relate to. That is what creates the aha! moment. It’s something seen and felt.” She is also his friend. “As a person, he is funny, irreverent, serious and focused,” she said. “He’s a wonderful family man and always evolving as an artist. He’s never satisfied to repeat himself.”  Uitto often juggles multiple projects and says he feels like he’s never not working. “You live in your environment. I always have the mindset that wherever I’m going, I relate it to work,” Uitto said. 

John Gumaelius, a sculptor who lives in the North River area (Washington Coast Magazine, Fall 2014) is a friend and has also collaborated with Uitto. “I like that he’s using stuff other people just pass on by, and he makes something beautiful out of it. I really admire him for his artistic sense, and as a person he’s just so full of life. … He’s really patient (as an artist) but to meet him you wouldn’t think so because he’s bouncing off the walls. “He’s got things figured out. I’m sure he doesn’t think so, but he’s really arrived.” 

“It goes in waves. I’ll just get obsessed and start six things in one day. But to not burn out and keep the excitement going is a big deal. “My favorite is when you are just so dialed in that time doesn’t even exist. You don’t think about eating or anything. You’re a vessel, and energy is just coming through you. I don’t know where it’s coming from, but it’s coming through you. You could go all day and night. That energy is a big high.”  A turning point for him, he said, was acknowledging confidence in his own work. “Just knowing and believing and thinking about things like they’ve already happened, and thinking big. Think huge. And if you come close to your mark, make a new mark.”  In that category is one idea he’s been playing with for years. “I want to do this giant, humpback whale and have this thing kinda breaching, grabbing a lot of movement up in the air a little bit.” He already has some of the pieces and sees it as being maybe 20 feet long. He’s considering doing it in bronze. He would first sculpt it from driftwood pieces, then take it apart and have bronze castings made of the pieces then braze the bronze pieces back together like the original.  He’s on the fence about the technique. The longevity for something so large and involved is attractive and the patina and look of bronze

There are definitely days when Uitto doesn’t feel like he has it figured out. He recently finished a sculpture of a red-tailed hawk. He likes the way it turned out and sees energy coming from every painstaking piece, but early on he struggled with it and at one point hung it in the doorway so he had to face it every time he entered the studio. “Some days I would come in and I would be jamming, and some days I would just look at this thing all day and I’d pull off the pieces I put on the day before.” It’s been months and several hundred hours of work and he’s still fiddling with it. “Often, when Zela and I are searching for shapes, we call it a game of playing ‘nope.’ It’s so simple that it’s hard. But if you can step out of your own way, that’s a big deal.” Uitto says he’s not sure where his creative energy will lead him. “The only thing I know is I don’t know anything and there are no rules. I don’t know where everything is going and that’s kind of the excitement.”  “I know I will always be into some kind of creation and probably in this medium, but maybe more (directed to) my own environment.” He loves the beach and says he’ll always keep his place there, but he’s drawn to the lush North River forests south of Aberdeen, too. “I have some ideas and kind of dreams of getting land and expanding my vision and creating my own world up there.” 

1LăYVOHZHUL`LH feel and the ability to capture the essence of his subject. He is a composer with wood, selecting and arranging a multitude of pieces with great skill to create something bigger than the sum of its pieces. -Jewelry designer Judith Altruda

TO SEE MORE OF JEFFRO’S WORK

jeffrouitto

jeffro_art

jeffrouitto.com

WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE | Fall 2016

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STORY BY ANGELO BRUSCAS PHOTOS BY P ATRI CI A JO LLI M O RE

VOSS ACRES Local fresh produce and grocery business a growing success

S

haron Voss has an enthusiastic way of making melons seem seductive or of extolling the exotic attributes of kale.

“People need bananas, or potatoes … grapes … oranges,” Sharon says, emphasizing each word as if digesting its lingering taste and essential nutrients. “There is a big need for real basic food out here.” What started with an unabashed passion to feed people good food has led the proprietor of Voss Acres Produce Market to branch out and open Copalis Beach Grocery on Highway 109 about 10 miles north of Ocean Shores, bringing quality produce and products to a community that hasn’t had a grocery store in decades.

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TOP: Copalis Crossing years ago. The grocery store is one of the only buildings left standing. LEFT: Steve and Sharon Voss at their farm. Rows of vegetables are close to the hen house.

It seems only fitting that Sharon and Steve Voss ended up married and rooted in Copalis Crossing. From the moment they first met at what is now called the Grizzly Den — but in those days was the Five J’s — on the western edge of Highway 109 leaving Hoquiam, the road was leading them to the beach.

There was a fenced garden and a feeling of growth and rebirth all around the property.

“We were meant to come here and do this,” Sharon said.

When they reunited in 2007-08, Sharon’s children had grown and Steve’s children both welcomed their soon-to-be stepmother. Sharon also brought with her a passion to feed not only her immediate family but the community at large.

He was “blackberry banana milkshake guy” with “sparkly eyes” and she was a Hoquiam High School senior who would show up at his soccer games. “We knew each other in our 20s, but we just didn’t take the relationship seriously,” Sharon recalls, telling the story of how Voss Acres came to be. 

Blended family Twenty-some years later, with each going through first marriages and divorces, the couple would reunite just as Steve Voss was beginning to restore one of the landmark homes in the area — the Burgher house, which once served as the railway depot for the train up to Moclips.  Sharon was then living in Lake Stevens and working for the Lake Stevens School District when her father bumped into Steve at a community function. A letter led to a phone call and then another, and Sharon decided to take a drive out for the Fourth of July to visit Steve, her parents and the area where she grew up on Tulips Road.  She literally dropped in unannounced: “We hugged each other and it was everything I remember. We sort of just picked up where we left off.”  They each had two children from their first marriages, and Steve was just then working on what Sharon calls the “black, tarpaper house.” There was a tree house that one could sleep in, a number of small farm buildings, such as a chicken coop and a little barn for a pig. 

Steve then was working for a construction company building custom homes. As a specialty contractor, he built the Emerald Surf condos in Ocean Shores in his 20s. “His favorite things are foundations, framing, siding, roofing, the exterior work,” Sharon said of her husband’s building skills. 

Historic roots After working a while as a payroll supervisor at a local bank, Sharon began to think about doing more with a bountiful organic garden. She also went to visit the Museum of the North Beach up the road in Moclips and met director Kelly Calhoun one afternoon to find out more about the history of the house that Steve and she now called home.  “She told me she was living in the historic railroad house at Copalis Crossing. I was excited to share our photos and history of this iconic structure; one of the very few left standing from over 100 years ago,” Calhoun recalled.  “Kelly came out to visit with me, but I didn’t want to tell him that I was starting to stir this idea about the produce market being in the garage of the house,” Sharon said. “I thought if I could gather enough of the story, share enough of the garden, it would be a perfect setup.”  In 2009, she even went so far as to acquire a business license for the produce market without even having a working space for what is now Voss Acres.  “I pinned it on my bedroom wall because I wanted to draft the name and daydream the idea together,” she said. 

People need bananas, or potatoes … grapes … oranges... there is a big need for real basic food out here. ~Sharon Voss

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Voss Acres proved to be perfectly located for a garden — outside of the coastal fog line with rich soil and plenty of summer sun. It also proved to be well suited for a roadside business. “I was watching the traffic come in on a Thursday, and then it would leave on a Sunday or Monday,” she said of the location along Ocean Beach Road, which became the well-traveled route for those heading to the bustling new beach community at Seabrook, or to Iron Springs, Moclips, Pacific Beach and Copalis Beach. 

Branching out Voss Acres has spread that good luck with good will. This past year, Steve and Sharon have expanded to the newly remodeled Copalis Beach Grocery in the old Beach Tavern building left abandoned when a colorful local character passed away. When Steve bought the property, the idea was to remodel it and resell it. Sharon, however, had a different vision once all the rubble had been cleared from the 1,300 square foot building. 

“I started realizing how big the word tourism is,” Sharon said. “I’m sitting there on the porch, formulating my idea, and I’m thinking, people need more than just what we have in the garden. There are hikers, boaters. There are clam diggers. There are all kinds of things that draw people here to the fabulous North Beach.”

“It took us a year to clean it up, but this area just needed a store,” Sharon said. “Rice, beans, milk, butter — just real, common everyday needs.”

Sharon also realized she needed more than just what her garden produced, and soon contracted with “my Charlie guy” — Charlie’s Produce out of Seattle — to stock up on a full line of fresh products she could never possibly grow.

“I am so thankful that the Voss operation of Copalis Crossing saw fit to come into Copalis Beach and bring us a much needed local store,” wrote longtime Copalis Crossing resident Phyllis Shaughnessy, who organizes the popular Lantern Lunch summer lunch program for North Beach children. “Long ago I was employed at Johnson’s Mercantile (the last store in Copalis Beach) and I saw the tremendous feeling that comes into a local store on a daily basis. It is an important part of the American heritage, a local community looking out for its own.”

In 2010, the garage finally was completed and Voss Acres officially opened on May 6, 2011. The first customer was Patti Dineen, who bought a pineapple. “As it turns out, the pineapple is a symbol of good luck,” Sharon said. 

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I thought if I could gather enough of the story, share enough of the garden, it would be a perfect setup.

Fall 2016 | WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE

The Vosses have taken a community eyesore and turned it into a community asset.

Calhoun notes that Voss Acres Produce Market became a business member of Moclips by the Sea Historical Society soon after it opened. “Sharon has been extremely supportive of the museum by selling our annual North Beach Historical Calendars and tide books at her business,” Calhoun said. She has donated numerous plants for the museum’s recently renovated historic 1927 Dorothy Anderson Cabin and garden located at Seabrook. She also has donated to the museum’s Heritage Fair fundraiser.  “A lot of us on the North Beach were very anxious to have a new grocery store on the North Beach. In the short time since they’ve been open, I’ve seen many customers at the Copalis Beach Grocery,” Calhoun said. “This was a much needed addition to the community.” 

North Beach ‘treasure’ Sharon and Steve take a keen interest in being part of the North Beach community at large and supporting all local enterprises.  Asked what his favorite part of their homestead is, Steve doesn’t hesitate: “Probably the history more than anything.” 


When he began to restore the building that is now Copalis Beach Grocery, Steve said he didn’t really know how much work it would take. The old roof had to be removed and replaced, the walls had to be uncovered: “It’s just one of those things. You do it for a living, so you are able to do it.” Voss Acres, he notes, “was just about laying on the ground when I got it. The hardwood floors were like a rollercoaster. But I got in there and said, ‘I can fix that.’”  Sharon now has embraced the modern era of social media as a way to stay close to her customers far and wide, and she has documented the growth and the birth of the new store as well as Voss Acres. “You get out of it what you put into it. If you are positive, that’s generally what you get back,” she says.  Calhoun likens Sharon to a childhood friend: “She is someone you can always count on in good times or bad. Her appreciation and support to preserve our North Beach history just makes me like her even more. Sharon Voss is a North Beach treasure.”  Paying for the construction out of their own pocket and growing things organically and naturally are what make the Voss family a success. Sharon estimates the store itself might seem like a risky investment,

and she lauds Newrizons Federal Credit Union of Hoquiam as being “the hidden gem” that backed the idea. Sharon sees Voss Acres as a “bright spot on the road,” and her growing staff bolsters that enthusiasm. When she first opened, she used to stand out by the road and wave at people, hoping they might venture to stop and smell the produce. Now, people stop by as a destination and her staff has grown to include five people. 

LEFT: The Copalis Beach Grocery store was a “much needed addition to the community.” TOP: Steve and his son work in the garden on a sunny afternoon. BELOW: Visitors can come to Voss Acres and bring home fresh produce!

There are days when she wakes up and maybe doesn’t feel like working so hard. “But as soon as I walk in the door and start my routine, it all changes when that first person walks in,” Sharon says. “It’s like taking a shower on a cold day. You don’t really want to, but as soon as that warm water hits, you’re all good with it. The customers are really all that. “My purpose is to feed people — make their lives easier so that they don’t have to go so far to acquire something to put on their dinner table.” 

Visit Voss Acres THE STORE

Copalis Beach Grocery is at 3090 State Route 109 in Copalis Beach.

PRODUCE MARKET

The Voss Acres Produce Market is at 1683 Ocean Beach Road in Copalis Crossing. Hours: Daily, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday to Saturday Sunday 11 a.m.-6 p.m. www.vossacres.com

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It don’t mean a thing if it ain ain’tt got that

Schwing STORY BY D OUG BARK E R P HO TO S BY M ATT CO Y LE

WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE | Fall 2016

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+

[ SCHWINGFEST ] A three day swiss celebration that focuses on schwingen, or Swiss wrestling AND includes beer, bratwurst, music and dancing.

I

t’s probably more complicated than this, but the basic strategy of Swiss wrestling seems to be to grab your opponent by the pants and tip him over before he tips you over.

If this is something you would like to try, or to watch, make sure that next year on the closest weekend to the Fourth of July, you’re in Frances — a small town along Highway 6 in Pacific County — for Schwingfest, a three-day celebration of all things Swiss. The Lewis-Pacific Swiss Society, with roots in the dairy farming families of Lewis and Pacific counties, has been throwing a Schwingfest since 1964 and the organization itself goes back to 1929. Schwingfest is a social event and wrestling competition with the feel of a family reunion. It brings together people from various Swiss societies around the region and lots of people who live in the area or who once lived in the area and come back for Schwingfest. There’s beer, bratwurst, music, dancing and the crowning of a Swiss Miss, but make no mistake, schwingen – Swiss wrestling — takes center stage.  It’s said to be the national sport of Switzerland and may go back as far as the Middle Ages, and at least as far back as the 1600s.  It goes like this: The contestants wear loose fitting, heavy canvas-type shorts — called Schwingerhosen — over their clothes. They’re held up by a leather belt (the shorts, not the contestants). The contestants come together in the center of a sawdust covered ring and lean in shoulder to shoulder, each reaching around to grab the other’s belt with one hand and get a good grip on the bottom hem of their opponent’s shorts with the other. After that it’s about strength, leverage, quickness, size, stamina and experience.  There is a referee in the ring and three judges sitting near the edge of it in a little hut that looks like it would be at home in the Alps. They award points to the winner and loser. And after the match, tradition calls

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ABOVE: Arthur Brogli came from California to yodel and play his accordian. RIGHT PAGE CLOCKWISE: Bells are awarded to the top wrestlers, decorative flags decorate a table, Swiss Miss contestants, music plays an important part of the event, Bratwurst, Swiss Miss dons a floral wreath. MIDDLE: The winner of the female Steinstossen event gets a victory ride.


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for the winner to brush the sawdust off the shoulders of his opponent as they leave the ring.Wrestlers win by pinning the opponent’s shoulders. If the shoulders are pinned flat as result of a standing move the winner gets 10. If ground work is required to roll them over then the winner is awarded 9.75. If time runs out, it is a tie and both get 9. Losers get 8.75. The bouts last five minutes (unless one guy pins the other) and every Schwinger wrestles six matches. It all takes at least half the day, with a break around lunch time, when the grill opens and the brats and burgers are ready. (Wrestlers get a free lunch and a spot at the front of the line).  Initially, the wrestlers are paired according to size and past performance. In later rounds, points are a bigger factor. After everyone has wrestled in one of the six rounds, they mix and match and assign opponents for the next round. Inevitably it means some mismatches in terms of size and ability, but the smaller wrestlers are amazingly adept at compensating.  A Schonschwinger, meaning “beautiful wrestler” is awarded in each age group, based on a combination of wrestling style, effort and sportsmanship. The winner is chosen by votes (in secret, because most voters don’t want any recognition) from five to 10 former wrestlers among the crowd, said Adrian Cook, vice president of the LewisPacific Swiss Society.  The events take place at Swiss Park in Frances, along the Willapa River at a campground owned by the Swiss Society. The park has lots of space for RVs and many of the rigs are sporting Swiss flags. Wrestlers and Schwingfest fans come from as far away as California, said Cook. 

ABOVE: Kids play in the Willapa River. A Schwingen match RIGHT: A painted saw blade goes to the champion Schwinger RIGHT PAGE: Festivities last all day and well into the night.

There’s a community hall with a large kitchen. Meals are inexpensive and there are dances Friday and Saturday nights. Saturday night, the top wrestlers get traditional Swiss kronzes — an oakleaf headcrown — bells and money awarded by their chosen crown girl (usually with a kiss or a hug). The rest of the wrestlers also get money and prizes including travel pay for those coming from other clubs or Switzerland — and the Shonschwinger awards According to a history of the Society, Schwingfest evolved from what started in 1929 as a gathering of Swiss people — many of them dairy farmers and loggers — for a picnic, which took place on part of the property that is now part of Swiss Park. By 1931 they had formed a Swiss Society and built an open dance floor for the picnics.

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Fall 2016 | WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE


making time for tradition In an age where traditional groups and organizations are struggling to hang on, the participation for Schwingfest seems nothing short of remarkable.

WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE | Fall 2016

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CLOCKWISE: vintage wooden skis on display, future schwinger holds out a crawdad caught in the river, horseshoers pass time at the campground

Fair’s fair “In 1941 a decision was made to have free beer at the annual meetings. One of the ladies suggested that since the men were getting free beer and the children were getting free ice cream, why shouldn’t the ladies be entitled to a free bratwurst. After a lengthy and amusing discussion, the men agreed that they would buy their ladies’ bratwurst.” -œÕÀVi\/…i…ˆÃ̜ÀÞœv̅ii܈Ç*>VˆwV-܈ÃÃ-œVˆiÌÞ>ÌÜÜÜ°«Ãðˆ˜vœ

Northwest Carriage Museum

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Fun, interactive exhibits for all ages! Group and school tours available Open Daily 10 - 4 PM 314 Alder St. (at Hwy 101 & St.Rt.6) • Raymond, WA (360) 942-4150 nwcarriagemuseum.org 52

Fall 2016 | WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE

OPEN DAILY 9am - 6pm 9

Call ahead for fresh fish selection!

1-800-572-3252 or 360-268-0077 www.bradysoysters.com West of the Elk River Bridge HWY 105 WESTPORT


The picnics and dances continued and the organization grew in number and in terms of a facility and 1964, the group resolved to put on Schwingfest. There was some doubt that people in other Swiss societies would travel for their remote event and the men had to learn the rules of schwingen, but they took the leap. That was 52 Schwingfests ago. In an age where traditional groups and organizations are struggling to hang on, the participation for Schwingfest seems nothing short of remarkable. This year’s Frances event drew at least 20 adult (18 and over) wrestlers, down a bit, but enough for a full day of wrestling. The senior and junior schwingers, aged 15 through 17, wrestle on Saturday and the buebeschwingers split into three age groups between the ages of 6 and 12, wrestle Sunday after church. The young wrestlers outnumber the senior ones, which

bodes well for the future of Schwingfest. There’s no female competition, but both males and females compete in another event, called steinstossen. It’s pretty straight forward. There’s a big rock and people throw it as far as they can. You have to figure that the roots of this event go back a ways.  Cook said he thinks the stone weighs about 30 pounds. It’s painted to resemble a Swiss flag, bright red with a white cross.  The fact that the event continues to thrive isn’t something the organizers take for granted. “We want to make sure our kids understand the heritage and enjoy it. … This day and age, there are so many demands on their time, (video games), phones, sports. … Right now, we’re lucky and we want to keep it that way.” 

WANT MORE SCHWINGEN?

'

www.swissinfo.ch for more information on Schwingen

' www.lpss.info for more information on the Schwingfest at Frances

“For all its popularity today, schwingen was actually forbidden at certain times in Switzerland’s history. According to the Swiss Schwingen Federation, in the 16th and 17th centuries the authorities feared that schwingen would keep people away from church. Because schwingen was often done on religious holidays, it kept being made a punishable offense.”

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gg TRAVEL

DISCOVERING THE LIGHT ON THE WASHINGTON COAST PHOTOS AND TEX T BY M ARG U E RI TE G ARTH

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Fall 2016 | WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE


TRAVEL  ff

One photographer captures the landscape along Highway 105 from Tokeland to Raymond

WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE | Fall 2016

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TRAVEL

OCEAN MEETS LAND


TRAVEL  ff

Although the land and the sea have always been the wellspring for my work as a photographer, having moved here from California, I struggled to find inspiration from the landscape I was seeing, as beautiful as it most certainly is. I think now that the land takes time to read and to understand. I had to stand still and

see the way a very different light changed contours and shapes. As the sun moves across the ocean, it lights forests and streams in dramatically singular ways. It took me a long time to really see this new light, influenced as it is by the ocean, which gives the Washington Coast its own song. - BY MARGUERITE GARTH

ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHER

Born, grew up, went to a good college where I learned nothing except about student loans, then worked like a dog in the fashion industry. Eventually I ended up here, in Tokeland. And this is where I do things. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve won a bunch of important and/or impressive awards for some of those things and I hope to continue doing so for sometime. WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE | Fall 2016

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QUIET STILL LIGHT


gg EVENTS

our favorite

EVENTS SEPTEMBER 1-5 Come Play on Labor Day  A weekend long celebration in South Bend. Events include a carnival, parade, oyster-opening and oyster-eating contests, kite show, softball tournament, triathlon, vendor and food booths, a poker paddle and duck races.   3  Paddle-A-Thon  Races and demonstrations of human-powered watercraft, canoes, kayaks. North Bay Park in Ocean Shores.  70th annual Seafood Festival & Craft Show  Perennial favorite features heaping plates of great food, live music and local crafters. The festival runs from noon to 6 p.m. on the Westport Maritime Museum grounds.  Vettes at the Marina  In Westport, dozens of classic Corvettes will grace the parking spaces along the Westport Marina Esplanade, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. This is the Corvette Club of Grays Harbor’s sixth annual Show ‘N Shine. More info: 360- 589-1716 or 360-580-0984  3-4  Kelpers Festival and Shake Rat Rendezvous  In Pacific Beach — main parade on Sunday, Kiddies Parade at noon on Saturday. Shake Mill events, vendors, live bands and evening dance.  9-11  Westport Blues Festival  Held on the grounds of the Westport Marina Cottages. Beer garden, fun, food and music, featuring several blues bands. Info: WestportBlues.com  A.A.O.S. Arts and Crafts Festival  In Ocean Shores, one of Western Washington’s largest indoor & outdoor handmade arts and crafts fair.  10  Logger’s Playday  In Hoquiam — Loggers share their skills and compete, plus a parade. 

Loggers share their strength and agility! WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE | Fall 2016

59


gg EVENTS

Brady’s Oyster Feed Oysters any way you like them. Held at Brady’s Oysters, just west of the Elk River Bridge on State Route 105 from noon to 5 p.m. Proceeds go to clean water promotion and scholarships.   10-11  Annual Up Your Wind Kite Festival  Pacific Beach. This is a fun fly event on the beach at Pacific Beach State Park.  Rod Run the the End of the World  The 33rd annual event is in Ocean Park. The car show and swap meet features hundreds of classic cars.  16-18  25th Annual Sand Castles and S’mores Festival  On the beach, past the state park near Joe Creek in Pacific Beach. In partnership with the Museum of the North Beach.  Whale of a Quilt Show  Boutique vendors, handmade quilts, demonstrations and quilted items at the Ocean Shores Convention Center.  17  Discover Lake Sylvia Fall Festival  At Lake Sylvia State Park in Montesano. The Fall Festival offers fun for all ages as visitors enjoy the state park through mountain bike and off-road running races, live music and even shopping for art around the park. The day traditionally is kicked off with a pancake breakfast.  International Beach Cleanup  Register online with Washington Coastsavers, begins at 9 a.m.  17-18  30 Miles Of Junque  It’s the 19th annual beachwide garage sale — from Markham to North Cove and Tokeland.  23-24  Blues and Seafood Festival  At the Port of Ilwaco, this year’s event features Natty Bone, the Bottleneck Blues Band, North Coast Blues with The Cadillac Horns, The Tracey Fordice Band, Billy D & the HooDoos, Norman Sylvester and Jimmy Thackery. 

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Fall 2016 | WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE


23-25 Bacon Bash  At the Ocean Shores Convention Center — all things bacon, with food, vendors, novelties and entertainment.  24-25  Salmon Tales  The fifth annual celebration of Westport’s favorite fish and the people who chase after them. Held on the grounds of Westport Maritime Museum. 

Bacon lovers unite! Head to Bacon Bash Sept 23-25.

OCTOBER 1 Big Foot Brew Fest  In Seabrook — enjoy a variety of microbrews. Front Street beer garden.  7-9  Clean Water Classic Surfing Competition  Washington’s largest surf contest. It’s the 15th annual benefit for the Surfrider Foundation. All ages welcome. Pro/Amateur Shortboard division; Longboard division; plus Women’s, Junior’s and Masters. Half Moon Bay & the Groins off Neddie Rose Drive. More info: www.cleanwaterclassic.com  8-9  Cranberry Harvest Festival  At the historic Grayland Community Hall, it’s the 21st annual this year. The cranberry harvest season is celebrated with crafts, food, drink and decorations. Bog tours, a cook-off contest, local cranberry products, music and a nighttime Firefly Parade in Grayland. 

WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE | Fall 2016

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gg EVENTS 8-9 (cont’d) Cranberrian Fair At Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum in Ilwaco, it’s a celebration of local harvest including all things cranberry. Foods, vendors, craft demonstrations and more will showcase the area’s rich heritage. Cranberrian Fair buttons are $5 and cover admission to all events.   Celtic Music Festival  In Ocean Shores and Hoquiam. Largest Irish music celebration on the West Coast.(www.galwaybayirishpub.com).  29  Haunted Hoquiam Run 2 mile, 5k, 10k run. Contact: City of Hoquiam (360) 532-5700 

NOVEMBER 25-27 Winter Fanta-Sea  At the Ocean Shores Convention Center; Unique handmade items just in time for the holidays. 

DECEMBER 3 Ho Ho Hoquiam Fun Run  Two-mile, 5k and 10k runs. Contact: City of Hoquiam (360) 5325700 

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Fall 2016 | WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE

Santa By The Sea Santa arrives at Float No. 6 at the Westport Marina at 11 a.m. and then holds court at the Maritime Museum. All area and visiting children are invited. Refreshments served, photos with Santa and a kids’ store available.  9-10  Festival of Lights  In Montesano, residents go all out with their holiday lights. The city takes it seriously: there’s a choir in the county courthouse, a yule log at Fleet Park downtown and a lighted nighttime parade on Saturday that goes through downtown with each float elaborately decorated. 


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gg WHO & WHY

WHY I LOVE IT HERE:

by Jill Smith

PH O T O B Y JUL I B ONEL L

Thirty years ago I was Miss Grays Harbor, proudly preparing to represent my community at the Miss Washington pageant. I couldn’t wait to tell people about my hometown. Three decades have given me time to reflect and today, I am even prouder of what our community has to offer. From our high schools competing to raise money to supply local food banks, to the incredible fundraising efforts at local Relay for Life events for the American Cancer Society, I am excited to see how my community continues to come together and inspire one another.  This spring a new group called Grays Harbor Rocks invited people to paint and hide rocks for others to find; this simple activity has brought so much delight as people express themselves artistically and create a playful game of hide and seek that encourages others to join in the fun. Another new group, Play it Forward, developed with the mission to support local musicians by providing instruments and opportunities for them to perform. The towns of Aberdeen and Hoquiam worked together to establish a beautiful new YMCA for Grays Harbor in 1998. Local volunteers created the Grays Harbor Community Foundation to provide scholarships demonstrating our commitment as a community to the next generation. 

Growing up, my parents taught me to serve, to learn, to explore and to ask questions — so, I find myself still watching and wondering. What adventure is before me today? My life is about being an explorer with an attitude of discovery and wonder. Will I meet my dad and launch our kayaks in the Chehalis River and spot an osprey nest? Maybe I will take a watercolor class from Ken Mitchell at Westport Winery or learn more about blowing glass at Opal Art Glass with my mom. My husband and I might drive out to the beach to ride horses at Honey Pearl Ranch and spend the weekend at Seabrook, or we could meet our friends and see a performance at the Driftwood, 7th Street, Bishop Center or D&R Theatre. Of course if it’s Monday, Tuesday or Thursday evening, I’ll be at Turning Pointe Classical Studio of Dance with my teacher, Lori Oestreich. After college, I knew I would return to Grays Harbor. I am proud to work in public education here. People are willing to teach, coach, lead or lend a hand. Every time I discover something new here, I can’t wait to share it. In my heart, I never stopped being Miss Grays Harbor. With all our community has to offer, it’s easy to be excited about Grays Harbor. 

After college, I knew I would return to Grays Harbor. I am proud to work in public education here. People are willing to teach, coach, lead or lend a hand. Every time I discover something new here, I can’t wait to share it.

ABOUT

Jill Smith is a counselor at Hoquiam High School where she has been employed for 25 years. She and her husband Brian live in Aberdeen and will celebrate their 25th anniversary in December. They enjoy traveling, but some of their favorite adventures have taken place in Grays Harbor County.

HER FAVORITE COMMUNITY GROUPS & EVENTS

s Grays Harbor Rocks 64

Fall 2016 | WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE

| Play It Forward | Grays Harbor Community Foundation | Relay for Life


Jill Smith loves the adventures that surround her daily. She is pictured here at Opal Art Glass in Cosmopolis

WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE | Fall 2016

65


gg LAST SHOT

AAR ON LA VIN SKY

Favorite Treats - Cupcakes!

If a photo had flavor, this one would be bursting. Delicious cupcakes and other freshly baked goodies await at Red Velvet Bakery by the Sea at Seabrook (article page 19). Photo by Juli Bonell

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Fall 2016 | WASHINGTON COAST MAGAZINE


Historic Billy’s Bar & Grill is open 7 days a week for breakfast, lunch, & dinner. • Full Service Menu • Homemade Soups • Fresh Garden Salads • Famous Billy’s Brick Burgers on a Torta Bun • Large Appetizer List

• Featuring Breakwater’s Hand-breaded Fish & Chips, Halibut, & Calamari • Large rotating selection of of eers Pacific Northwest draft beers on tap.Full service bar.

322 E. Heron St. • Aberdeen 360-533-7144 SAME OWNERS SINCE 1981

Locally Owned FRESH SEAFOOD MARKET! Our fresh seafood market includes a variety of fresh fish arriving daily. We also carry Johnson’s Smoked products, a variety of locally canned seafood products, and T-shirts.

CHOWDER HOUSE SELECTIONS • Hand-breaded Fish & Chips, Prawns & Halibut • Oven-broiled Salmon, Halibut, & Cod • Grilled Crab & Cheese Sandwich p Crab, & Seabreeze • Fresh Salads ~ Shrimp, howder • Homemade Clam Chowder We serve beer on tap and wine by the glass. Cocktails coming soon! Open 7 days a week

306 South F St. | Aberdeen Ab d | 360-532-5693 360 532 5693

Fast, Friendly Service!


Washington Coast Magazine, September 01, 2016  

September 01, 2016 edition of the Washington Coast Magazine

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