Page 1


2

SEATTLE WEEKLY • HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE 2016 • PART ONE

BELLEVUE SQUARE


SE AT

IMAGES COURTESY OF JESUS MARY ANNE JOSEPH

EKLY’S WE E TL

N PA R T O

E

The artist, in all her glitter.

The Glittery World

Artist Mary Anne Carter’s new line is bold, funny, and slyly subversive. BY JULIANNE BELL

M

ary Anne Carter is hard to miss: On the day she sat down with Seattle Weekly, her short crop of black hair was shellacked to her head with gel and flecked with chunky gold flakes of glitter. Her eyes were outlined in a dark slash of liquid eyeliner with meticulously drawn-on Twiggy lashes, and she sported a sequined coat, a leopard-print blouse, and a sparkly phone case. It doesn’t end there. The 27-year-old artist and designer’s unique sense of style can be found in her line of hand-printed tanks, Ts, totes, and enamel pins under the name Jesus Mary Anne Joseph (jesusmary annejoseph.com). Her work, available at the boutique Rose Gold and online, features tongue-in-cheek feminist quips, like “It’s Not Just a Phase” and “This Bitch Face Does Not Rest.” At the center of her line is screenprinting, a skill she started to hone at age 10, by way of an art class. These days she spends about 30 hours a week screenprinting at

Pratt Institute and teaches a printing class for teens. She likes the medium for its practicality and its ease of reproduction. “Screen-printing isn’t always regarded as a fine art, and I’m OK with that,” she says. “I think art should be duplicated. Access is really important to me.” The name of the line is a playful nod to Carter’s Catholic upbringing: Until fourth grade, she thought her Catholic school teachers were saying “Jesus Mary Anne Joseph.” That irreverent, slyly subversive sense of humor pervades much of her work. Carter’s subtle, winking sensibility is also present in her “Femme” designs, which include an illustration of two broken-off nails on an otherwise manicured hand. Like a modern hanky code, the inside joke telegraphs its message only to those in the know. Says Carter, “I love that as a symbol because it’s recognizable only to people who are at least an ally, or understand what’s going on. So I can march that bag around my family, and nobody is thinking of it as a sex joke.” Carter attributes her affinity for strik-

ing style to the port-wine birthmark on the left side of her face, which forced her to develop a preternatural level of confidence at an early age. She says, “I was asked what happened to my face so many times, several times a day. I quickly decided the best defense was a good offense, so I incorporated it into my look and never shied away from bold things.” In addition to prints, Carter also carries a glitter hair gel called Holy Hairdo, which she proudly displays during our interview. As with screen-printing, Carter is attracted to glitter for its unassuming nature and its ability to spread easily. “I think glitter is cool because it’s relatively inexpensive and accessible, and eye-catching and dazzling,” she says. “We have wars over diamonds and precious gems, but since glitter is mass-produced and inexpensive, people don’t think of it as beautiful.” “Just imagine a glitter factory for a moment,” she adds. “I hope that’s the afterlife!” 

SEATTLE WEEKLY • HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE 2016 • PART ONE

GREATEST GIFT

3


OUTDOOR VIBES Play it cool this season with a bold, new monochromatic men's 574 design inspired by the crisp chill of the season. The elevated athletic style of the 574 will be your favorite go-to shoe this winter.

new balance BELLEVUE

823 Bellevue Way NE Bellevue, WA. 98004 425.454.8542

SEATTLE WEEKLY • HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE 2016 • PART ONE

Resonance-Seattle-Weekly_QTR-pg-10.27_Final_conv.indd 1

4

10/28/16 10:24 AM

new balance

ALDERWOOD MALL 3000 184th St SW Lynnwood, WA 98037 425.774.1014


SE AT

PHOTOS BY JOSE TRUJILLO

EKLY’S WE E TL

N PA R T O

E

New Century Tea Gallery

Momo

Deng Studio & Art Gallery

4 5 7

S Jackson St 1

10th ave S

8th ave

with high-style S King St6 brands (Cop 2 3 Copine, Marita S weller St Huurinainen) S Lane St and lots of great locally S dearbornSt designed gifts, including are in the area for happy hour, pop into ceramics, mittens, bandannas, furoshiki, 7. Kaname (610 S. Jackson St., 682-1828) and toys. Next door, the historic 5. Kobo for exotic cocktails and Japanese comfort at Higo (602 S. Jackson St., 381-3000) food. Last but not least, if you really want offers a wide range of décor, jewelry, books, to unwind, head to 8. Panama Hotel and prints. Currently, Kobo is displaying its (605 S. Main St., 223-9242). It’s not just annual simple cup show, with unique cups one of the best cafe settings in town; it’s a from national and international potters. It museum of local history, including one of alone is worth the trip to the ID. America’s most shameful episodes, Japanese If you are there in mid-afternoon, get internment. You don’t just leave the ID with some goodies and a hot cocoa from 6. Fuji goodies and fond memories. You also take Bakery (526 S. King St., 623-4050). The away a strong sense of place, history, and— fondant chocolate is outrageously rich, and hopefully—gratitude.  their curry buns are the best in town. If you 7th ave

wonderful accessories and teapots, too. If you need a snack, the nearby 2. Purple Dot Cafe (515 Maynard Ave. S., 6220288) is a perfect spot for noodles or dim sum. Plump ha gao and steamy dumplings are a great pick-me-up on a cold day, and the restaurant’s clean, contemporary setting is quite relaxing. Tucked further back on Seventh Avenue, 3. Deng Studio & Art Gallery (515 Seventh Ave. S., 682-3533) is its own little world, full of everything one needs for ink painting (paper, pigments, brushes galore, unique mineral formations), and plenty of paintings by Zoulie Deng himself. Jade chops line many shelves, and Deng can hand-carve initials into them for a small fee. They make a fascinating, beautiful, personalized gift, perfect for artists and writers. On Jackson, 4. Momo (600 S. Jackson St., 329-4736) is a hip, quirky boutique

5

S main

8

maynard ave

T

he International District is a trove of history, art, retail, and dining, especially in Chinatown and Nihonmachi near the transit tunnel. A visit to the famous Kinokuniya bookstore is a must, but more rewards—and great gifts—await those who explore the whole neighborhood, whose historic facades hide eccentric but welcoming shops. On Maynard Avenue you’ll find the family-owned 1. New Century Tea Gallery (416 Maynard Ave. S., 622-3599). In addition to excellent Chinese and Taiwanese loose-leaf teas, the shop has more than 50 varieties of pressed tea cakes, large and small, oolong and pu-erh. The beautiful wrapping makes them ideal gifts for tea lovers. Co-owner Grace Li is often there, pouring gong fu tea tastings with love. (I recently enjoyed a velvety smooth pu-erh from 1992. So good.) Naturally, they have

6th ave

BY T.S. FLOCK

S Washington 5th ave

Just south of downtown is a world of shops, galleries, and cafes with wares you can’t get anywhere else.

4th ave south

Ideas in the ID

Yesler

SEATTLE WEEKLY • HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE 2016 • PART ONE

GREATEST GIFT

5


SE AT

COURTESY EAGLE HARBOR BOOK CO

EEKLY’S EW TL

Black Friday Sale 25% O FF S EL ECT ST YL ES November 21st–30th

250 Pine Street

N PA R T O

206-441-2639

E

Photo: Blake Jorgenson

COURTESY MAGNOLIAS

M O U N TA I N H A R D W E A R

SEATTLE WEEKLY • HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE 2016 • PART ONE

Offer valid at the Mountain Hardwear Seattle store. Limit one discount per household. Offer may not be applied to prior purchases, combined with any other offer, used online or at any other store, redeemed by employees, or applied to gift card purchases or shipping charges. [If any portion of purchase is returned or exchanged, you will receive a merchandise credit for the price paid after discount (prorated per item based on price), and prorated discount amount will be void.] Mountain Hardwear reserves the right to,change or cancel this offer at any time. Void if assigned, transferred, sold, bartered, or reproduced, and where prohibited, restricted, or taxed. Cash value 1/100¢. Valid from [11/21/2016] through [11/30/2016]. ©2016 Columbia Sportswear USA Corporation.

6

Give gifts with exquisite taste. Visit our stores to sample and pick the perfect flavors for everyone on your list, or shop our extensive range of gift options—to suit any budget—at KuKuRuZa.com! Downtown Seattle | Ballard | Bellevue Square | Alderwood Mall | KuKuRuZa.com

GIFT TRIP

Shop Hopping PERFECT PRESENTS FOR THE LOVER OF THE GREAT OUTDOORS. BY NICOLE SPRINKLE

D

o you ever really need an excuse to hop on a ferry and head over to Bainbridge Island? The charming, wooded haven with beautiful views of the Sound and Seattle feels like it’s worlds away from the relatively fast-paced life of the city, yet it’s only a 30-minute ferry ride. While it’s easy to spend a day hanging out on the beaches or meandering down back-country roads, the main drag on Winslow Way, walkable from the ferry, actually boasts a fabulous new art museum, lauded restaurants, and some seriously sophisticated shopping, with one-of-akind boutiques that can make your holiday shopping for that special item a cinch. At Petit and Olson (156 Winslow Way E., 201-3262), where French Provincial vintage decor meets eclectic, modern bohemian, you’ll find women’s clothing that’s both stylish and Pacific Northwest-inflected, like flannel shirts with lovely, detailed printed backs and gorgeous cashmere sweaters with intricate designs, as well as unique accessories like handbags and hats. There are also plenty of items for the home, like luxe pillows and bedding, some of it made by local designers. This store is so chic that it snagged a write-up in Elle Décor a few years ago. Meanwhile, over at Magnolias (123 Winslow Way E., 842-8333), across the street, it’s all about shoes—mostly. But not just any shoes; these all look like something you’d find in Europe, and run the gamut from on-trend booties in styles you won’t find at Nordstrom to clogs, sandals, flats, and sneakers that truly manage to fuse comfort with style. But if it’s too difficult to pick out shoes for someone,

this shop also has plenty of fashionable jewelry, like cute copper rings, handbags, scarves, and bath and body products. Where else will you find a bar of soap with a ferry and the words “Bainbridge Island” emblazoned on it? For the book lover in your life, Bainbridge Island truly boasts one of the best indie bookstores in all of greater Seattle. Eagle Harbor Book Co. (157 Winslow Way E., 842-5332) has been around since 1970, and its cavernous space is expertly curated. From shelves with the hottest, current reads in fiction and nonfiction and interesting staff picks to a great cookbook section and an entire area in the back devoted to kids’ books (complete with a couch to read on), Eagle Harbor is the kind of place you can easily while away hours in, and one where book sellers openly approach you to talk about what you—and they—are reading. A week before the election, my daughter bought a Hillary Clinton biography, and a staffer gave her a free Hillary button when she checked out. It’s that kind of little touch that make it a don’t-miss destination. Looking to send a far-flung family member or friend a little token of the Pacific Northwest? Then Millstream (122 Winslow Way E., 842-4495) is your place, featuring sculpture, artwork, jewelry, and other home decor that is mostly local-made and celebrates the scenery and native history of the area. From prints with ancestral symbols to sculptures that feature flora and fauna of the region, you can spend a little or a lot—depending on your budget. Housed in a charming cottage on Winslow Way, it’s right in the heart of Bainbridge. ■


SIERRA STINSON FOR PRAIRIE UNDERGROUND

WISH LIST

Hollis Wong-Wear Seattle’s renaissance woman wants us all to dump the status quo.

A

Anti-harassment and anti-assault policies. I’d like to see every nightclub, bar, and place where people gather where alcohol is also present to develop a clear statement of of these policies, and to train their security to be vigilant and proactive when these instances invariably occur. I was really grateful that a woman who came to see my band The Flavr Blue at Neumos last March reached out to me about a traumatic experience with assault as an audience member—it was an important reality check for me as a performer: Just because I personally value the safety and autonomy of all people does not mean that people gathered to see my band also share those values. The places we go to dance, drink, and find joy need to make strong statements that articulate a zero tolerance for nonconsensual behavior when it threatens anyone, including women and queer and trans folks. Q Nightclub, Night Shift, and Afropunk hold good examples of such messaging. A gift certificate to Spinasse. After living on the Hill for 10 years, I still haven’t been to this local mecca of pasta deliciousness, and I’m trying to find out what’s good. An Alaska Airlines gift certificate. Fly me to Havana ASAP! A Blue Yeti Pro USB condenser microphone. I am scheming on a couple podcast ideas and would love to have a USB mic that’ll make it so much easier for me to track my musical ideas on my laptop in addition to my podcast ideas. Other than that, I don’t need any more material sh*t in my life! 

SEATTLE WEEKLY • HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE 2016 • PART ONE

poet, musician, activist, and world traveler, Hollis Wong-Wear has seen her fair share of humanity— from singing in packed stadiums chanting for more to helping a young student write her first poem. As a result, we thought it a wonderful idea to ask Wong-Wear what might be on her wish list this year for the holiday season. Anti-racism and anti-oppression commitments from everyone. In the age of Trump, “business as usual” means upholding the status quo, which means upholding latent prejudice and discrimination. A genuine commitment entails not only an outward outreach to community, but also acknowledging the rigorous internal education and coaching needed to truly transform our society. Every nonprofit, institution, community collective, company, and publication within Seattle (and beyond) needs to define common language and work actively to make sure that white fragility isn’t being prioritized over the voices, experiences, and needs of people of color; that they are not complicit in the intimidation, harassment, and exclusion of those on the margins; and that they are actively examining and harnessing their resources—with humility—toward social justice. A couple good beginning steps include engaging the City of Seattle Office of Civil Rights and the People’s Institute for Undoing Institutional Racism. This is no time to “wait and see”; it’s time to assess, strategize, and activate.

7


SE AT

TONY & ILANA

PHOTOS COURTESY OF INDIAN SUMMER

INSTRUCTORS:

EEKLY’S EW TL

January 10, 2017 206.781.9553

N PA R T O

BALLARD: 2232 NW Market St. • 206-297-5920 U-DISTRICT: 4530 University Way BELLINGHAM: 1209 N. State St. NE • 206-545-0175 • 360-676-1375 BUFFALOEXCHANGE.COM •

Santa photos with your dog!! SEATTLE WEEKLY • HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE 2016 • PART ONE

December 3rd from 3 to 6pm

8

$15 sitting fee + a portion of the proceeds benefits PAWS.

Happy 4-7pm Every Day 10am - 2pm Sat & Sun Hour & Late Nite Fri - Sat 11pm - 1 am Ring In The New Year At Norm’s!

WEEKEND BREAKFAST! Open @ 9am! TRIVIA Thursdays 8pm!

206-547-1417 • 460 N 36th St in the Heart of Fremont

E

SHOP SPOTLIGHT

Bizarre Opulence Capitol Hill’s Indian Summer is much more than just a vintage store. BY JULIANNE BELL

R

ecently, I stumbled upon Indian Summer (534 Summit Ave. E., indiansummerseattle@gmail. com), a vintage-clothing boutique tucked away on Capitol Hill. The racks inside were laden with baby Ts from the ’90s, plaid pleated skirts, sleek black jumpsuits, and glittering spaghetti-strapped frocks that beckoned at every turn. Checking the price tag, perhaps gritting my teeth in anticipation of the worst, I experienced a different kind of sticker shock: How can this dress be only $10? Best of all, a wide range of sizes and styles make it likely that you will find something that fits and flatters—if you’re buying new threads for yourself and not gifts for friends and family, that is. Since the shop’s inception in 2010, owner Adria Garcia has cultivated a cozy, sunny space, with friends and regulars filtering in and out to chat while Kate Bush plays in the background. The back room, which includes a fireplace, frequently serves as a venue for performances. Garcia is fiercely dedicated to making Indian Summer accessible to everyone, including people of color and queer and non-binary people. Besides offering diverse sizing, she hosts events like her popular “More Fats, More Femmes” sale, where she sells items in sizes 12 to 32 alongside mimosas and cupcakes. Garcia, who terms her aesthetic “bizarre opulence,” traces her love of style back to her Taino Indian roots. “Regalia expresses who

you are within the native community, and I think that’s true for all communities,” she says. As a child, told she had to reserve wearing a tiara for special occasions, she smuggled the offending accessory into her school bag and wore it to class daily. Garcia has the finely tuned eye of someone who’s learned to hunt when options are lacking elsewhere: She recounts going shopping for prom dresses with a group of female friends in high school, all of them more than six feet tall and 200 pounds. After regular retail stores failed them, Garcia scoured Value Village and came up with beautiful dresses for all of them. Indian Summer is far more than just a place to buy clothing: 20 percent of all proceeds go to charity (currently, to support the protesters at Standing Rock Indian Reservation), and on the first Sunday of each month, Garcia throws a big feast in the store’s back room, open to anyone looking for a meal and companionship. She refers to her vintage wares as a “magpie lure” to draw passersby into her community-oriented space: “It’s a neighborhood place that also happens to have some badass vintage.” “I’ve had crazy conversations over just the purchase of a scarf, where I’m suddenly hugging and crying with a person and they’re coming back next week to help me cook and clean,” she says. “I’ve made friends at the shop who I would consider family, who will be with me to the day I die.” 


Young and old at Flying Bike.

SUGGESTED GIFTS

Book of brews

Suds With Love

HOPPY HOLIDAYS! (IT’S THE BEST STEIN OF THE YEAR.) BY TALIA SHAPIRO term goals and policies. Members are also invited to exclusive events like homebrew competitions—to help select new beers for production at the brewery—and Brewer’s Table discussions with Flying Bike’s head brewer, Kevin Forhan. $200 includes membership, pint glass, T-shirt. Flying Bike Cooperative Brewery, 8570 Greenwood Ave. N., 428-7709, flyingbike.coop. Pike Brewing Stout Beer Soap It’s a little-known fact that hops contain skin-smoothing amino acids—a quality that makes beer an unexpected but practical ingredient for soap. The folks at Pike Brewing realized this and created the Pike XXXXX Extra Stout soap, blending the brewery’s popular stout beer—with aromatic hints of chocolate and espresso—with palm oil, coconut oil, and olive oil to create a nourishing soap that still provides all the cleansing qualities of ordinary bar soap. $5.95. Pike Brewing Company, 1415 First Ave., 6226044, shoppikebrewing.com. Tavour Beer Concierge Gift Certificate Based in Seattle’s SoDo district, beer concierge startup Tavour has devised a convenient way to introduce beer lovers to new and different brews. Tavour’s team dispatches daily, curated beer offerings via e-mail—a mix of tasty local secrets and hard-to-find beers from around the world—and members simply reply back to order specific brews. In essence, members hand-select their own “variety packs” of fresh, unique beers, which are delivered to their door every few weeks. Prices vary. tavour.com. 

SEATTLE WEEKLY • HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE 2016 • PART ONE

My Beer Year by Lucy Burningham Driven by curiosity and thirst, longtime journalist Lucy Burningham set out to chronicle her escapades to becoming the ultimate beer expert—a Certified Cicerone. The result is an engaging and witty memoir entitled My Beer Year: Adventures with Hop Farmers, Craft Brewers, Chefs, Beer Sommeliers, and Fanatical Drinkers as a Beer Master in Training. Lucy introduces the reader to a colorful cast of beer-loving characters and sheds light on the charmingly quirky world of beer culture. Paperback; $16.95. roostbooks.com. Homebrew Starter Kit The perfect gift for any beer lover who claims “I can brew better than that,” Sound Homebrew Supply’s small-batch homebrew kits offer step-by-step instructions, equipment, and ingredients to brew beer at home. With several package options, from the basic One-Gallon Beer Starter Kit to the Total Package Starter Kit, each is tailored to fit a range of brewing interests (and beer styles), space constrictions, and previous brewing knowledge. Prices vary. Sound Homebrew Supply, 6505 Fifth Pl. S., 743-8074, soundhomebrew.com. Flying Bike Cooperative Brewery Membership As Washington’s first community-owned brewery, Flying Bike Cooperative Brewery offers locals a way to gain behind-the-scenes access to commercial craft brewing. Flying Bike’s unique setup gives member/owners equal voting power to elect the Board of Directors and set long-

Hoppy members at Flying Bike

9


The LiT LOWDOWN RECOMMENDATIONS Rumi’s Little Book of Love and Laughter: Teaching Stories and Fables By Coleman Barks Rumi, a 13th century mystic & poet, is presented here by renowned interpreter Coleman Barks. These fables and teachings lead us on a journey of the human soul that will delight, entertain and enlighten us all. They focus on life’s essentials of love, laughter & the soul and will make the perfect holiday gift for anyone!

Books, Tarot, Goddess, Magic, Astrology, Tibetan, Statues, Sage, Crystals, Candles, Incense, Oils, Aromatherapy, Fair-Trade, & much, much more!!

books!

BEST PSYCHIC READINGS DAILY!

TOWN HALL

104

3 Support your community. Shop local.

I-5

NORTH SEATTLE

522

(12/2) John Pomfret China & the US (It’s Complicated)

99

(12/3) Columbia Choirs presents YuleFest 2016

BALLARD

4

Save 20%

3

FRE MONT

2 5

Seattle

8

*Some restrictions apply.

© 2016 University Book Store

5

THE ELLIOTT BAY BOOK COMPANY Upcoming author events: Dec. 1 Michael Chabon Pulitzer Prize-winning author of

The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay

(12/5) Thomas L. Friedman Learning to Live in an Age of Acceleration

In Stores & Online

7

4 6 7

(12/4) Brandi Carlile Raise the Roof

in general books* November 25 – November 27

CAPITOL HILL

1

(12/1) Bonneville Power Administration presents Columbia River System Operations Public Meeting (12/1) League of Women Voters of Seattle-King County presents A Post-Election Conversation with David Domke

523

By Rebecca Solnit Rebecca Solnit is always appropriate, but following the most brutal election season the US has ever experienced, she has become essential. As explained by Solnit, hope is not the blind belief that things will improve, but the idea that actively advocating will in fact yield results. –Lizzie

8

(12/6) A System in Crisis Can We Fix Washington’s Foster Care System? (12/6) Town Music Marc Bamuthi Joseph and Daniel Bernard Roumain ‘Blackbird, Fly’ (12/7) King County Behavioral Health Legislative Forum (12/8) Solid Ground presents Can Rapid Rehousing Solve Seattle’s Homelessness Crisis? (12/8) Peter Godfrey-Smith Octopus Intelligence (12/8) Seattle Human Right’s Day Jose Antonio Vargas TOWN HALL

www.thirdplacebooks.com

COMMUNITY

(11/30) Susan Casey ‘Voices in the Ocean’

Serving Capitol Hill and wider Seattle for 30 years

Shoreline

ARTS & CULTURE

(11/30) ‘Seattle Times’ LiveWire presents K-12 Visions And Outcomes

cats!

6

SCIENCE

(11/29) T. J. Stiles General Custer, Deconstructed

Everyday After 6PM!

Mountlake Terrace

CIVICS

(11/28) David France The Battle Against AIDS in America

25% Off Everything

1530 FIRST AVE (1st & Pine) 206.467.7745

Hope in the Dark

SEATTLE WEEKLY • HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE 2016 • PART ONE

2

Open 10AM - 9PM Daily

MIND • BODY • SPIRIT • EARTH

By Third Place Books

Lake Forest Park Ravenna Seward Park

Twice Sold Tales 1833 Harvard Ave

By Eco Elements

10

1

LARGEST SELECTION OF METAPHYSICAL BOOKS IN DOWNTOWN SEATTLE

www.elliottbaybook.com

CIVICS

SCIENCE

ARTS & CULTURE

COMMUNITY

WWW.TOWNHALLSEATTLE.ORG TOWN HALL

CIVICS

SCIENCE

ARTS & CULTURE

COMMUNITY


SE AT

COURTESY OF GREEN TOYS & MEME

EEKLY’S EW L T

N PA R T O

E

Each Issue Includes: Left, a recycled truck from Green Toys; above, chic booties from même.

SUGGESTED GIFTS

The New Arrivals What to get the YOUNG FAMILY ON your list. BY JACOB UITTI

A rocker T from Rowdy Sprout.

ing in T-shirt form–because they have those too! $20–$38. 1902 Post Alley, 634-0580 Dumps and Tugs Also in Post Alley’s Boston Street, parents can find toys made on the honest-to-goodness U.S. West Coast: San Francisco-based Green Toys, which makes their items out of recycled milk cartons, has created a dump truck (about a foot long and made for ages 1+) that sells for $30 and colorful little tugboats that can be used in the bathtub for $16. “It’s very hard to get local toys,” says Boston Street owner Cathy Aller. “But these are really cool.” 1902 Post Alley, 634-0580 Chic Kidswear Seattle designer Reina Acab, a graduate of Seattle Pacific University, started même Kidswear in 2014. The line, which features sustainable, gender-neutral clothing for children (made in the U.S.), offers a strikingly chic black-and-white design that’s simple in that somehow-timeless way. Some of the items to peruse on the website include a leather pacifier clip and a Paris-noir-esque bunny rattle, but the one we suggest you purchase immediately is a pair of black-and-white “penguin” booties for $22 that seem like they’re fit for the Roaring ’20s. memekidswear.com Little Prince Mobile Ask anyone about the best place to buy toys in Seattle and most of them will tell you it’s Greenwood’s Top Ten Toys. And displayed among the wide array of shelves, stuffed animals, and Legos sits a precious gift for infants: a Little Prince mobile with swirling stars and planets from Hape. Ask a new parent and they’ll tell you that having something to distract your baby is invaluable—and if that thing features themes from one of the most popular children’s books ever, what a bonus! $15. 120 N. 85th St., 782-0098 

CHARITY PAGES Each week we will focus on some notable non-profits in one of four spotlight categories—including Arts & Education, Food & Shelter, Animals, and Environment—we will tell you who you’re giving to and what that gift will do. FEATURES We will also provide fresh perspectives on giving, including the origin stories of some great gifts (and the local makers responsible for them), holiday wish lists from notable Seattleites, guides to the city’s best shopping neighborhoods (complete with hot cocoa suggestions!), suggestions for regional shopping trips (to Portland, Vancouver and beyond!), profiles of new shops with new things for you to buy and more!

AD RESERVATION DEADLINES 11/30 WED 11/23 12/14 THURS 12/3 12/7 THURS 12/1

CONTACT US AT advertising@seattleweekly.com SEATTLE WEEKLY • HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE 2016 • PART ONE

Pregnancy and Post-Partum Massage Tucked away in an unassuming office park off Midvale Avenue in Shoreline, Lisa Wood of Crescent Moon Massage Therapy offers soothing, professional massage—but what’s essential about her services (especially for the purposes of this guide) is that she offers both pregnancy and postpartum massages for new (and exhausted) parents. “All pregnancy massages are done with the client laying on her side on the table and pillows positioned under her to make her as comfortable as possible,” says Wood. $80 an hour, 17962 Midvale Ave. N., crescentmoonmt.com Cool Baby Ts Get your baby’s sense of history and good taste started at a young age with a tiny onesie featuring the face of trumpeter Miles Davis, Nobel laureate Bob Dylan, or psychedelic rock band Pink Floyd. At the Boston Street Baby Store, located in lovely Post Alley, these baby duds from California’s Rowdy Sprout are hot items, some of the store’s most popular. And when your infant grows up, she can graduate to the same cloth-

GIFT SUGGESTIONS Using their hard-won cultural know-how, our staff writers will identify the best gifts of the season in Food & Drink, Arts & Culture, Fashion & Retail, and Children & Families.

Ensure your business is top of mind for holiday shoppers!

11


Holiday Fun

SE AT

Bainbridge Downtown

EEKLY’S EW TL

N PA R T O

E

DOWNTOWN Open house NOv. 26 10A - 6:30 PM Festive Holiday Shopping Holiday Music Hot Cocoa & Cookies Free Horse-Drawn Carriage Rides 5 PM - 6:30 PM Community Tree Lighting Santa • Live Entertainment

Win a $1000 Downtown Shopping Spree or Fabulous Child’s Gift!

SEATTLE WEEKLY • HOLIDAY GIVING GUIDE 2016 • PART ONE

Ask a Participating Merchant for an entry form or pick up a Holiday Guide. Drop the entry form in Santa’s bag at the Bainbridge Senior Center by Dec. 10 for a chance to win.

12

DOWNTOWN

FESTIVITIES CONTINUE

Nov. 26 - Dec. 31 Find the Elves on the Shelves Photos with Santa Claus Art Walk Dec. 2 Farmers’ Market Live Theatre Performances Winter Wonderland Dec. 10 Argosy Lighted Holiday Boats Dec. 14, 8:15-8:35 pm Waterfront Park Marina

For promotional details see:

www.bainbridgedowntown.org Thank you to our sponsors

An entry-level snowshoe, left; smartphone-friendly gloves, above; and a fruit-inspired snowboard.

SUGGESTED GIFTS

Going All Out PERFECT PRESENTS FOR THE LOVER OF THE GREAT OUTDOORS. BY GREG SCRUGGS Geoduck Travel Pillow The Puget Sound’s favorite bizarro bivalve makes for a dreamy pillow in your tent or on the road, at least once you swap the hard clamshell for soft down. Feathered Friends makes all of its down sleeping bags, puffy jackets, comforters, and insulated full-body suits (should an Everest climb be in your future) at a facility in SoDo. The pillow is one of the store’s most popular items, especially for out-of-towners who insist on calling it gee-oh-duck. (Hint: It’s gooey-duck.) $45 at Feathered Friends, 119 Yale Ave. N. Lib Tech Skate Banana Snowboard Snowboarding was invented in Vermont, but reinvented 10 years ago at The Summit at Snoqualmie, when Lib Tech’s founders first goofed around on their bright-yellow board. Designed to replicate a skateboard feel rather than ski construction technique, the Skate Banana’s reversed camber forced manufacturers the world over to reconsider their assumptions. In honor of the anniversary, the Seattle-based company has reintroduced the iconic fruit-inspired snowboard, which can be scooped up next door to their Stone Way offices. $499.95 at evo, 3500 Stone Way N.

Gripper Sensor Gloves Our phones are coming with us in the wilderness, from irresistible photo ops to pocket-sized map libraries. But cold weather can present a dilemma, one which local gear manufacturer Outdoor Research has tackled head-on with its line of smartphone-compatible handwear. The Gripper glove is a perfect midweight model that works just as well on a nippy bike ride as for a winter hike. For the resort-bound skier or snowboarder, upgrade to the warmer Ambit model ($99). $53 at Outdoor Research, 2203 First Ave. S. MSR Evo Snowshoes Snow is already here in the high Cascades, which can keep many fair-weather hikers from their favorite trails. But why settle for a gray, rainy day down here when it’s sunny and snowy in the mountains? Enter the Evo. Made in Seattle by Mountain Safety Research, this ideal entry-level snowshoe will get you up and down anything you tackle in the summer. Just remember to take an avalanche safety course before tackling slide-prone terrain. $139.95 at Second Ascent, 5209 Ballard Ave. N.W.

Platypus GravityWorks 4 Liter Water System Pumping water through a filter after schlepping a 40-pound pack 10 miles into the back country is a drag. Platypus, the hydration arm of local outfit Cascadia Designs, has an answer that lets gravity do the work—just find a tree to hang the water bladder from. Four liters of filtered water in 2.5 minutes will have you guzzling H2O in no time. Besides which, a heavy-duty filter will be handy once President Trump’s climate-change-denying EPA poisons our water supply. $119.95 at REI, 222 Yale Ave. ■

Profile for Sound Publishing

Pullout - 2016 Giving Guide Part One  

i20161122115620873.pdf

Pullout - 2016 Giving Guide Part One  

i20161122115620873.pdf