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Rising Crest Lynnwood bank excels at doing things a little different • 6-7 Riverfront: Development finally under way • 4-5 Hot market: Why bankers are eager to do business here • 8 Family law: Marysville lawyers more than firm • 14-15 Supplement to The Daily Herald

NOVEMBER 2016 | VOL. 20, NO. 8

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

Mountlake Terrace’s The Nock Point attracts archery enthusiasts from all over the Puget Sound region, Page 10.

COVER STORY Pacific Crest Savings Bank goes against the grain of traditional banks, 6-7

BUSINESS NEWS Homes built in long-planned Riverfront development . . . . . . . . 4-5 Bankers discuss why Snohomish County is such a hot market. . . . . . . 8 Western Washington students work with Edmonds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Mountlake Terrace’s Nock Point offers equipment, instruction. . . . . 10

Spanish aerospace supplier MTorres builds Everett plant. . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Everett radio stations start broadcasting on FM channel. . . . . . 17

BUSINESS BUILDERS Tom Hoban: Developer seeks to meld nature, design . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Monika Kristofferson: Stay connected even when busy. . . . . . . 20 Andrew Ballard: Develop customer persona for your business. . . . . . . . 21 PEOPLE WATCHING . . . . . . . . . . 18

Marysville company builds popular aluminum decking, railings . . . 12-13

BUSINESS BRIEFS . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Marysville law firm is one big happy family. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-15

BUSINESS LICENSES. . . . . . . 24-25

TAX LIENS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

ECONOMIC DATA. . . . . . . . . 26-27

NEWSROOM

ADVERTISING SALES

Editor: Jim Davis 425-339-3097; jdavis@heraldnet.com; businessnews@heraldnet.com

Tara Raimey 425-339-3445 — Fax 425-339-3049 traimey@soundpublishing.com

Contributing Writers: Deanna Duff, Megan Brown Contributing Columnists: Monika Kristofferson, Tom Hoban. Andrew Ballard Publisher Josh O’Connor 425-339-3007 joconnor@soundpublishing.com

COVER PHOTO Pacific Crest Savings Bank CEO and president Sheryl Nilson has helped shaped the way her bank does business. Ian Terry / The Herald

SUBSCRIPTIONS 425-339-3200 www.theheraldbusinessjournal.com

CUSTOMER SERVICE 425-339-3200 — Fax 425-339-3049 customersvc@heraldnet.com Send news, Op/Ed articles and letters to: The Herald Business Journal, P.O. Box 930, Everett, WA 98206, or email to businessnews@ heraldnet.com. We reserve the right to edit or reject all submissions. Opinions of columnists are their own and not necessarily those of The Herald Business Journal. 1703892

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Everett Riverfront homes go up, finally Questions linger about commercial property By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

EVERETT — Drive east on 41st Street toward the Snohomish River and you’ll see the city’s newest neighborhood taking shape. Construction crews are building 30 homes in Overlook at Riverfront, the first of two new developments along the river that will add 425 homes to the city. That’s a massive project for the Puget Sound region where in-fill development — building just a handful of homes on any available lot — is more the norm. “Master-planned communities of this size really are not possible right now, because of the amount of land you need,” said Alaina Robertson, director of sales and marketing for Polygon Northwest, the builder for the developments. It’s also quite a turnaround for the area, the site of the former Eclipse and Simpson mills and the city’s former landfill, the scene of the infamous Everett Tire Fire in 1984. The city of Everett has spent decades — and nearly $90 million — to clean up and prepare the industrial land for homes, a 3-acre city park and an area for shops and restaurants. “It’s a huge boon to our city,” said Lanie McMullin, Everett’s Economic Development executive director. “It’s going to be a beautiful riverside neighborhood with trails and parks and a lifestyle entertainment area. It’s going to be a beautiful asset to our community.” If all goes well, the first homeowners will move into Overlook by December. “Sold” signs already are sprouting outside unfinished homes. “We have eight sold and that’s without model

ANDY BRONSON / THE HERALD

Matthew Wallace, of D&L Fence, nails in a fence support on a model home at the Overlook at Riverfront last month. Polygon Northwest has started construction on the first 30 homes in two developments along the Snohomish River in Everett.

Open house The public is invited to see the first model homes at Overlook at Riverfront. The event is planned from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Nov. 19 at 4312 30th Drive SE, Everett. Light hors d’oeuvres and children’s activities will be provided.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Polygon Northwest plans to build 425 homes on the Riverfront property near the Snohomish River in Everett. Of those, 235 homes are three- to five-bedroom houses like this one.

homes,” Robertson said last month. “People bought them before we even added cabinets or even had them painted or the dry wall up.” In all, 235 single-family houses are expected to be built in the Overlook development and another 190 town homes in a nearby development called Towns at Riverfront. While home construction progresses, details about the retail area still aren’t fleshed out. Shelter Holdings has taken

over development of the commercial area from Polygon. The company is run by Gary Young, who used to own Polygon Northwest before selling to William Lyon Homes, a publicly traded company based in Newport Beach, California. Young said he couldn’t offer many details about the commercial project, other than saying that there will be more information in the coming year.

“We’re following in the spirit of a more dynamic shopping area that encompasses restaurants, some type of housing and a possible movie theater,” Young said. When it bought the property, Polygon took on the obligation to build at least 400,000 square feet of commercial property — and as much as 1.1 million square feet of space — in the Riverfront area. Everett City Councilwoman Brenda Stonecipher has worried that

Polygon will build the homes and then say that the commercial area isn’t feasible. While the land needed to be cleaned up, the city always expected a return on its investment, Stonecipher said. A commercial area will generate sales tax revenue to help offset the city’s costs. “We keep hearing they’re working hard on a lot of announcements, but we haven’t seen what those are,” she said. “It’ll be interesting to see what they come up with.” The Riverfront area includes more than 100 acres that can be built on, plus wetlands and other areas where development is not possible. The city has been planning this development at least since the early 1990s. The land encompasses the former Everett landfill that began operating in 1917 and was closed in

1975. It also includes two mills that were part of Everett’s early history. The Simpson Paper Co. mill operated from 1891 until it shut down in the early 1970s. The Eclipse mill was built in 1897 and burned down in 1962 in spectacular fashion with flames shooting 300 feet in the air. The city plans a 3-acre park along the Snohomish River and is expected to keep at least one reminder of the river’s working past, Robertson said. “They have the old boom that used to pull the logs out of the river that will remain there as a historical piece,” she said. San Diego-developer OliverMcMillan purchased the land from the city for $8 million in 2008 and agreed to build a mix of homes and shops in the area. But the developer never


NOVEMBER 2016

carried the project forward. In 2013, OliverMcMillan sold the property to Polygon Northwest. Polygon has a great deal of experience building homes in Snohomish County, including projects at Silver Lake, Lake Stevens, Mill Creek and Bothell. In all, the company has built more than 14,000 homes in Washington and Oregon. For Overlook, Polygon is offering homes with several floor plans that include three-, fourand five-bedrooms. The houses range in size from 1,600 to 2,500 square feet. Prices range from the high $300,000s to the high $400,000s. Each home will have landscaped front yards and fully fenced back yards. For the Towns at Riverfront, Polygon also plans several floor plans with two- to four-bedrooms apiece. Prices haven’t been set. Schools include Lowell Elementary and Evergreen Middle for Overlook as well as Jackson Elementary and North Middle for the Towns. Students would go to Everett High School from both developments. Depending on demand, the company expects build out to be complete within the next three years. As a master-planned community, Polygon was able to pick the colors and styles of homes that would bring both developments together and allow it to mesh with their view of the area, Robertson said. “You’re going to see homes that fit in the Northwest and really speak to the history of the Riverfront and the Everett area,” Robertson said. “People aren’t going to drive down here and think they’re being transported to beach community or sky rises and brownstones in New York.” Something that shouldn’t be a problem is flooding, she said. The company has received a letter from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to that effect. “We are not in the flood zone; none of our homes are,” Robertson said. “We are actually physically above the flood level so we don’t have any concerns.” Polygon has never been about building mil-

lion-dollar homes on top of hillsides. Instead, they’ve built homes that are more affordable for families, Robertson said. And that will be a boon for Everett, where home ownership rates are some of the lowest in the state. “These are what we do best, which is focus on building community,” Robertson said. “Making it an opportunity for all walks of life to own a home and live in a home … for years to come where their families can grow in.”

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 5

Polygon Northwest plans to start building the Towns at Riverfront in Everett near the Snohomish River next year. The development includes 190 two- to four-bedroom town homes.

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COVER STORY

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

Sheryl Nilson, Pacific Crest Savings Bank CEO and president, and Wayne Bull, the bank’s chief financial officer, stand outside of their fifth-floor office in Lynnwood. The bank has no branches and instead provides customers with online banking and service.

Bank that does things differently By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

P

icture a bank. The ATM machine at the entrance, the cashier at a window and the vault with the heavy metal door open during business hours. That’s nothing like Pacific Crest Savings Bank. There’s no ATM, no cashier, no vault. As a matter of fact, the Lynnwood bank has a sign that reads, “No Cash on Premises.” Instead, the bank encourages customers to do banking online. “Technology has helped us justify that decision each year because so much can be done online,” said Sheryl Nilson, Pacific Crest’s CEO and president. “People can do transfers, they do payments, they can make deposits on their phones.” Need some cash? Customers can withdraw money from any ATM nationwide without fees. (Cash deposits need to be taken to certain ATM machines.) While plenty of banks have shifted to online banking, Pacific Crest adds another wrinkle. The bank has only a single location, on the fifth floor in an office building near Alderwood mall.

There are no branches. “It really is all about being efficient and having low overhead,” Nilson said. “We don’t need a lot of staff to sit in a branch. We bring the bank to the client.” This seems to have worked for a community bank which weathered the recession while larger, more established banks faltered around Snohomish County. Case in point: The bank’s assets surpassed $200 million for the first time at the end of September. Pacific Crest has a lot of foresight in the banking industry, said Fred Safstrom, the Housing Hope CEO who is the chairman of the bank’s board of directors. “There are other banks that don’t have branches, so we are not completely unique in that, but I think we are far from the normal for banks,” said Safstrom, who is a former president and CEO of Everett’s Cascade Bank. “Normally, banks use their branching system to provide convenience to their depositors. What we’re doing is we’re using technology and the computer to provide that convenience.” Pacific Crest, at 3500 188th St. SW, looks more like a real estate headquarters than a traditional bank. That’s probably because the bank

started as a mortgage company. Founders John Fairchild, Harold Sankey and Nilson created the company in 1984, which was then named Phoenix Mortgage and Escrow. Nilson had started working with Fairchild while she was still at the University of Washington, when he owned another mortgage company. He gave her opportunities to grow, and she quickly became his right-hand person at the firm. Phoenix Mortgage was first located in the Northgate neighborhood of Seattle. The company moved its corporate offices to Lynnwood in 1990. In 1998, the company converted to a Washington-state-chartered, federally insured savings bank, becoming Phoenix Savings Bank. “Our tagline back then was, ‘Northwest Savings for Northwest Loans,’ because that is pretty much what you do, taking the deposits that help you fund more loans,” Nilson said. In 2005, the company underwent a name change. Fairchild was beginning to wind down his career, and he knew that Nilson always hated the name. It was called Phoenix because the company emerged from a previous business deal that went sideways.

Bank size A selection of banks in Snohomish County ranked by assets with headquarters and full-time employees. Heritage Bank, Olympia, $3.75 billion, 735 employees Peoples Bank, Bellingham, $1.5 billion, 399 employees 1st Security Bank, Mountlake Terrace, $783.9 million, 293 employees Coastal Community Bank, Everett, $646 million, 146 employees UniBank, Lynnwood, $248 million, 51 employees Pacific Crest Savings Bank, Lynnwood, $200 million, 16 employees Mountain Pacific Bank, Everett, $199 million, 42 employees Bank of Washington, Lynnwood, $177 million, 39 employees Source: SNL Financial


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So the company was the phoenix emerging from the ashes. “I was the one who went to conferences and I would always get the, ‘What do you mean you’re in Lynnwood, but your name is Phoenix’ like in Arizona,” Nilson said. “You don’t know how many times I repeated that we were the ashes rising above.” The company settled on Pacific Crest Savings Bank, what Nilson calls a good Northwest name in honor of the trail that makes its way along the West Coast. Pacific Crest grew to add bank branches in Northgate and Bellevue and home loan centers in Mount Vernon, Federal Way and Lake Tahoe, Nevada. In 2006, Fairchild thought the real estate market was becoming too erratic. So the company sold its mortgage and escrow divisions to American Home Mortgage Investment Corp. of Melville, New York. And the bank consolidated the rest of its operations in Lynnwood. Overnight, the company dropped from 200 employees to 20. American Home Mortgage was one of the first major mortgage companies to fold during the recession. Most of Pacific Crest’s former loan officers went to work for Spokane-based Sterling Bank, which has since been acquired by Umpqua Bank. “The timing was good,” Nilson said. “Did we see the crash coming? Absolutely not.” But Pacific Crest didn’t emerge unscathed. “Honestly, going into the downturn, we like many other banks had too many construction loans,” Nilson said. “That’s what hurt us. We had expanded into Pierce County, and nobody expected the rug to get pulled out as fast and as hard as it did.” Still, Pacific Crest continues to make loans to the real estate industry. She thinks the Puget Sound region’s market is stronger now than it was before the recession, with Amazon, Google and others investing heavily in the area. And that should make the real estate market more secure. And real estate has always been part of Pacific Crest’s core mission. “It kind of goes back to sticking with what you know best,” Nilson said. “Even though we got stung in the downturn, I’m absolutely sticking with what we know best.” The bank specializes in loans for smaller housing projects; Nilson calls a $2

IAN TERRY / THE HERALD

With no cash on hand, Pacific Crest Savings Bank’s lobby in Lynnwood looks like a typical office.

million loan its “sweet spot,” although the bank has made loans up to to $4 million. The bank may extend a loan on a project that national banks may skip. “We always called it make-sense underwriting, because we could take different scenarios that wouldn’t fit in a normal conventional box and as long as it made sense to us we can make that loan,” she said. “We can help more borrowers who have a different story.” Most of the bank’s loans are on projects in Snohomish and King counties. One of its specialties is lending to buyers of floating homes, the 400 homes on Lake Union and Portage Bay in Seattle. Those homes are considered personal property, rather than houses, so getting a traditional loan at a national bank can sometimes be difficult. Pacific Crest is also a full-service bank offering checking accounts, money markets and CDs. Nilson knows that her bank does things a little differently with its emphasis on online banking and its single location. But she notes that a lot of banks are moving away from branches. “It’s very expensive to have brick-andmortar branches on every street corner,” Nilson said. “You see the big national banks that have a lot of branches. If you go into those, they’re having less and less staff, because the activity really isn’t there.”

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While it encourages online banking, Pacific Crest works with each client. One convenience store in Lake Stevens has daily cash deposits, so the bank sends an armored truck to pick up the money. “Everybody has different needs,” Nilson said. “It’s up to us to sit down and figure out how we’re going to make our environment work for them.” Safstrom said he has three grown children who are millennials and they never step into a branch. All of their banking is done with smart phones or online. “Those in that generation hate writing

checks,” Safstrom said. “To them, writing a check is an antiquated way to pay your bills. Why would anybody do that? It’s a different perspective.” With the emphasis on online banking and the single location, the bank has been able to keep a staff of just 17 employees. That makes the bank “incredibly efficient,” Safstrom said. Nilson said older customers flock to the bank’s CDs and money market accounts, because the bank offers competitive rates. Those customers usually do visit the Lynnwood office. “They for sure want to see that we’re real and have four walls and meet our people and then they’re happy customers forever,” she said. Of the original founders, Fairchild retired in 2007 and Sankey has died. Fairchild is suffering from Alzheimer’s disease and his wife, Kerry Fairchild, took his seat on the board in 2012. Another thing that sets Pacific Crest apart from other banks: Its reluctance to consider mergers. Acquiring another bank usually means taking on another bank’s problems, Nilson said. Selling to another bank would mean dismantling her team, who have nearly 15 years tenure, on average. While she says never say never, she said she prefers keeping things the way it has been. “That’s kind of everything with us,” Nilson said. “Slow and steady and just kind of keeping the ship pointed straight. We don’t do any outrageous lines of business. We stick with what we know and it’s worked out well.”

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NOVEMBER 2016

Why bankers are so bullish on county By Deanna Duff

For The Herald Business Journal

The economic roller coaster of the past decade often provided more dips than highs. Recent years demonstrate positive momentum upward at both the national and regional levels. “We’re not declaring ‘mission accomplished,’ but we’re now in a good position. Like most other community and national banks, we’re enjoying an economic rebound,” says Eric Sprink, president and CEO of Everett’s Coastal Community Bank. Around 2008, 14 community banks were based in Snohomish County. There are now six following the acquisition this year of Prime Pacific Bank by Bend, Oregon,-based Bank of the Cascades. “It’s been a relatively slow recovery, but we’ve seen improvement year over year, which has accelerated the past two years,” says Bryan McDonald, Heritage Bank’s executive vice president and chief lending officer. Heritage’s metro markets, including Snohomish County, have experienced impressive growth. Commercial lending activity increased 30 percent and mortgages 40 percent in the first half of 2016 compared to the same period in 2015, he said. Other institutions are actively expanding their footprint in the county. Peoples Bank opened an Edmonds branch in July. The bank’s new Everett flagship location celebrated its opening Sept. 15. “What we like about Snohomish County is the ability to build longstanding relationships,” says Tony Repanich, Peoples Bank’s executive vice president and chief retail banking and marketing officer. “We’re very bullish about the long-term prospects in Snohomish County and look forward to continuing being part of the community.”

Economic confidence The county is home to a number of large employers including Boeing and the U.S. Navy. Not only do large institutions provide jobs, they anchor medium and smaller businesses. “Companies like Boeing have periods of reductions and additions, but are generally stable. Having large, stable employers allows small businesses to invest with confidence in the foreseeable future,” Sprink says. The area also benefits from companies such as Amazon, Expedia and Microsoft. Support businesses and employees often locate to Snohomish County where it is more affordable. Job growth and wage increases are occurring at a “tremendous pace,” according to Sprink. Coastal itself invested in the long-term, positive viability of the county. “It was a bold statement. We decided to plant our corporate flag and start lending money back into the community and growing the franchise at the height of the recession. We hired close to 40 employees in 2010-2011,” Sprink says. The move paid off with Coastal experiencing more than 20-percent annual-

FILE PHOTO

Development like the work on the seven-story CityCenter Apartments in Lynnwood have bankers convinced that Snohomish County will be a good place to do business.

ized growth since 2010. Their employees now number 146. In general, Heritage Bank’s small business clients are also progressively strengthening their positions. McDonald specifically cites strong growth and expansion in construction and its supporting trades. “Loan growth is a significant driver in terms of our viewpoint regarding the strength of the market. Are they expanding, buying equipment, re-investing in themselves?” McDonald says. “We’re seeing more investing as of 2016 than even last year. Confidence is returning.”

Northern exposure Location positively influences everything from retail commerce to housing and business. A unique economic influence is Snohomish County’s relative closeness to the Canadian border. “We bank a lot of Canadian citizens who like having an account in the U.S. because they enjoy shopping here. They are on our roads supporting the economy. To be honest, we relish having that business,” says Cheryl Bishop, Skagit Bank’s CEO. The county is a strategic location for Skagit Bank. In 2016, they opened a loan production office in Everett. “It fills in a gap for us between Seattle and the Canadian border. If the economy wasn’t as booming and robust as it has been, we wouldn’t have moved into Everett. With the departure of some of the larger banks in the early 2000s, though, it gave us a great opportunity,” Bishop says. Skagit Bank intends to use the Everett production office as a test market for eventually opening a full-service branch. Sprink echoes the sentiment that closeness to the Canadian border can be a boon.

“When the Canadian dollar was really strong in 2010-2012, it was a huge benefit and part of Snohomish County’s economic recovery. Hotels were filling up and visitors were spending money at restaurants, shops and activities,” Sprink says. “Since the dollar flipped, it’s slowed down, but everything is a cycle.”

Buildable land The area’s natural resources also play a factor. The county still boasts open land and building flexibility. The real estate sector is strong across the board in single-family housing, apartments, office and industrial space. “I think a lot of people are increasingly looking at this area. The farther away you get from Seattle, the less expensive it becomes. Businesses can also find larger spaces and warehouses that might not be available at all elsewhere,” says Mark Duffy, president and CEO of Everett’s Mountain Pacific Bank. Geography also plays a role at the consumer level. During the recession, people were less likely to move households and sometimes were forced to downsize. With unemployment rates low and consumer confidence high, individuals are again on the move. “Construction is strong. Very strong. Some of our housing contractors and subcontractors have recently had their best years ever,” Duffy says. “One unique aspect is the number of older and retired people looking for onefloor ramblers,” Duffy says. “There is a lot of new construction for those types of homes, but it’s hard for that to happen in areas with existing high density. A lot of people are looking to this area instead.” Furthermore, Duffy feels confident this is not another real estate bubble destined

to burst. He observes that customers receiving mortgage loans are better qualified and buying for the long term rather than flipping for profit.

Community identity The backbone of any business, including banks, is community support. Snohomish County’s residents and workforce are major factors in overall optimism. “We look to be part of communities with strong identities where we can really engage with business leaders,” Repanich says. “People are looking to make connections here and there is an ability to build strong, long-lasting relationships. That’s the root of our business.” The area’s workforce is also a draw. According to Bishop, the availability of talented employees was a crucial component in the successful opening of Skagit Bank’s new Everett loan production office. “There is a really good workforce in Snohomish County. We’re partially bullish about being in the area because we’re able to find good people. It’s extremely important to find the right people in order to grow,” Bishop says. The collective voice of the community also is represented via organizations such as Economic Alliance Snohomish County. Formed in 2011, the group advocates for economic development, expansion and retention as well as public policy issues. “Being able to represent and advocate for Snohomish County with a clear consistent voice is key when meeting with people who influence the area’s future,” Sprink says. “When people listen, action happens. There are very few communities in the country who are as well organized. The Economic Alliance is fantastic for our economic vitality.”


WWU students help Edmonds on green projects By Megan Brown

The Herald Business Journal

In September, Edmonds became a guinea pig. By choice. Edmonds was selected to be the subject of a year-long program where Western Washington University students help shape the city’s environmental policies. Over the course of the 2016-17 academic year, scores of students from Western Washington will work with the city through the Sustainable Cities Partnership. Edmonds is in good hands. Going green has become a hallmark of Western’s campus culture. Its environmental science college, Huxley College, is one of the oldest in the nation. The program was modeled after the University of Oregon’s pilot Sustainable Cities Initiative program. Similar programs have sprung up around the country. “A university is the birthplace of the new innovations, the cauldron of inventions,” said David Davidson, program coordinator of Western’s Sustainable Cities Partnership program. Davidson expects at least 250 students to enroll in Sustainable Cities Partnership-related courses this academic year, with majors from business, computer science, marketing and environmental science, contributing diverse skills to a wide range of sustainability issues. This quarter, journalism students are promoting a downtown arts-and-culture corridor; environmental science students are researching methods of minimizing stormwater impact in the Edmonds marsh; and computer science seniors are coding a mobile mapping application. Davidson is confident that the relationship will continue after the academic year. “The model is, ‘Onto the next city,’ but every year they’re looking for outside partners for 30 or 40 students that need to do senior projects,” he said. “I can imagine them going back to Edmonds year after year.” Mayor Dave Earling and several other Edmonds officials visited the campus in Bellingham for a luncheon in September. “To see all of the excitement and energy of students involved was really terrific,” Earling said. Earling, a former instructor at Shoreline Community College, has complete confidence in undergraduates at the wheel. “I know that students have lots of good ideas,” he said. “I’m sure that they will have, on many of these projects, a positive impact. It will truly be fun.” Western students have long concentrated on projects to improve sustainability on campus.

External efforts have mostly been limited to nearby cities. “For years, what they’ve been working on is Bellingham’s problems,” Davidson said. “All throughout a university campus are service learning courses. We’ve worked with Whatcom County and the city’s parks department.” Those projects include stream buffers and wetlands and the Nooksack Salmon Enhancement Program. The Sustainable Cities Partnership was an opportunity to expand Western’s horizons. Robert Chave, Edmonds Developmental Services director, was instrumental in landing the partnership by constructing the city’s application. He approached the mayor with the idea. Earling was eager, with one condition: “As I told the staff, ‘I’m glad to enter as long as we win,’” Earling said. “And I’ll be darned, we did win.” No wonder: Edmonds’ robust application included 46 project proposals across various categories. They went back and forth with Western about program possibilities, eventually whittling the number to 11 projects. Edmonds’ sustainability track record helped its chances. “We have the green team within the city that tries to improve efficiencies and do simple stuff like recycling,” Chave said. “We have all kinds of things like electric cars, and our City Hall is Energy Star awarded, which is unusual, especially for a retrofitted building like that. It’s an overarching approach to how Edmonds does things.” In 2005, then Edmonds Mayor Gary Haakenson signed the Mayor’s Climate Protection Agreement. In 2012, the Association of Washington Cities awarded Edmonds with the Municipal Excellence Award for its sustainability initiatives. Chave wrote the city’s first sustainability effort in 2009. “These are all things that the city has an interest in, but the resources weren’t necessarily there right now,” Chave said. “So it pushes these initiatives forward, and helps get them a leg up. Otherwise they’re having to wait for staff availability, or money, or those kinds of things.” The cost-benefit analysis of using student research and work allows the city to start projects previously out of reach. “The city had contacted a few companies to get a kind of estimate of what that (mobile application) would cost, and they come up with a range of $100,000,” Chave said. “With the students, we could do it with just $7,000. That’s crazy savings.” The benefits are more than financial. “It may open some eyes,” Chave said. “Classwork is classwork, but it’s sometimes a little more complicated when you get to the real world.”

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Nock Point brings archery to masses Mountlake Terrace business offers training, equipment, even faux-deer urine By Megan Brown

The Herald Business Journal

Bill and Jody Hickey believe that archery is for everyone. They also believe a little training wouldn’t hurt. During a hunting trip 30 years ago, the couple saw inexperienced hunters using advanced archery equipment. “We were hunting up in the hills, and we saw a guy go up the hill with a broadhead arrow,” Jody Hickey said, referencing an extremely powerful, potentially dangerous arrow type. “We thought, ‘Gee whiz, we gotta help educate these people.’” In 1987, they opened The Nock Point, an archery equipment shop in Mountlake Terrace. Today, the range invites novice archers to shoot alongside world champions. “In the beginning, we were mostly a hunting outfit,” Jody Hickey said. “We had a small eight-lane range where guys tried out our bows. We grew to accommodate target shooters along with hunters.” The shop started small. Too small, almost. “It was kind of silly, because we only opened with $5,000 worth of product, when we should have had $50,000,” Jody Hickey said. “It was just little by little that we grew it. We made a name for ourselves pushing service more than price. We offer so much service in training, and in shooting.” The store caters to every skill level, providing professional-grade gear and the expertise of bow technicians. “The Nock Point is the pro-shop, or the toy-shop, if you will,” said Jim Farmer, who works at the front desk. The shelves are lined with wooden bows for sale, dozens of types of arrows, and even cans of faux deer-urine scent to help the hunters attract their targets. When the store relocated to its current location at 22313 70th Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace, six years ago, the range size more than tripled from eight lanes to 26. The new range is big enough to accommodate archers trying out gear or just shooting for fun. A bow, six arrows, protective gear and all-day range access costs $25. For those who bring their own gear, range use is $10 for a day pass. Want to shoot day and night? The center offers a membership that allows 24-hour access to the range with a special key-code. Colorful targets are available for $1 from the front desk. These are pasted on a wall 20-yards from the shooting line, or closer for a beginner or child. Every few minutes, an employee clears the range for archers to cross the line and collect their

PHOTOS BY KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

Vincent Hancock (left) practices with Mike Hooper, Nock Point employee and instructor at the business in Mountlake Terrace. Below, Hooper extracts his arrow from a target.

“Shoot until your shoulder falls off.” — Jim Farmer arrows. Visitors receive a safety briefing prior to shooting. After that? “Shoot until your shoulder falls off,” Farmer said. Archers stand with one foot on each side of a red line that runs through the range. Though archery isn’t a team sport, it can be a cozy one. The range can accommodate up to 26 shooters at once, spaced two feet apart. The range was crafted to regulation standards so that Nock Point can host competitions. It puts in bids for at least two tournaments a year. Contestants are can learn next door, at the Next Step Archery school started in 2005 by Bill and Jody’s son, Bob Hickey. Bob broke his neck in 1990 and became a quadriplegic. He wanted to give back to the community so he became an archery coach. The school has three shooting ranges for newbies to experts. “Next Step archers go from kids who can’t yet spell a bow to folks who are taking a stab at the U.S. Olympic archers team,” Farmer said. Darrin Barry manages the day-to-day operations at Next Step Archery. He also facilitates partnerships with organizations such as the Wounded Warriors Project, to make archery accessible for people with disabilities. Accommodations range from students shooting with prosthetics to people

shooting with their tongues. Keith Sekora, who was wounded by an explosive device in 2010 while serving in Afghanistan, discovered archery accidentally four years ago during his recovery. “I got on the wrong bus,” Sekora said. “I thought I was headed to the Air Rifle course, but I wound up at archery. I started to really like it. At the time, I was still using two arms, but shooting from a wheelchair.” Due to the injury, he needs a special device to help him shoot his bow. The tranquility of archery appeals to Sekora, who now coaches others. “It’s my therapy,” he said. Both Barry and Sekora have seen archery benefit veterans in their mental and physical recovery. “Most of the wounded warriors that come in say it helps them with their

PTSD,” Barry said. The Wounded Warriors Project paid for Sekora to advance his training and become a coach. He also shoots for the U.S. Paralympic archery team. Next Step Archery teaches private lessons and six-week group classes in all skill levels. Students are taught a variety of archery techniques, and encouraged to discover styles and equipment that fit them. Archers travel to Las Vegas every year for largest indoor archery tournament in the world, “The Vegas Shoot,” where they have won cash prizes and scholarships. Sekora traveled to the competition with his young daughter, Olivia, last year. “It was funny, a 7-year-old shooting arrows in Vegas,” Sekora said. “But it’s a great family activity.”


NOVEMBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 11

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12 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2016

Aluminum decks add hip, urban feel

Marysville company seeks to export railings, decks to other parts of country By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

MARYSVILLE — Goodbye wooden railings and decks on condos. So long steel-and-concrete balconies on high-rises. Architects and builders in this region have moved away from wood — which can rot — and steel — which can rust — for decks, railings and balconies in new construction. Instead, they’re using materials like light-weight, rust-proof aluminum to create out-in-the-elements pieces on new buildings. A Marysville company has been on the forefront of this, fabricating and installing these decks, balconies, trestles and green screens across the Northwest. “Whatever goes on the side of a highrise building,” said Norman Singfield, president of Skyline Engineered Systems. “And we do it in aluminum so it doesn’t rust. That seems to be what’s happening here now in Seattle and has spread to Portland.” There’s been an “evolution of tech-

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

These aluminum railing were designed and manufactured by Skyline Engineered Systems in Marysville. In the past 10 years, builders have shifted to aluminum decking, railing and other features on buildings.

niques” to battle water intrusion, said Jeff Oaklief, an architect with Johnson Architecture and Planning in Seattle. His company does work up and down the I-5 corridor, including Library Place and Aero Apartments. He agrees with Singfield that aluminum bolt-on-decking is becoming a more

popular feature in new construction. He pegged it at about 90 percent of new decking on new construction. “I would say the bulk of the balcony work that we do is aluminum bolt on decking,” Oaklief said. “It’s faster and cheaper.” Now, Singfield wants to take what

they’ve learned and start marketing these pieces to developers in other parts of the country. He said it makes sense for condos and mixed-use buildings that are currently in favor in urban settings. “Our market, when I analyze it, is driven almost entirely by the high-tech, IT industry,” Singfield said. “They’re all living down there. They’re millennials, they’re urban dwellers, they want to live in high-rise buildings. They don’t want lawns or dogs. They want to live in a big building, they want to go to work on mass transit, if necessary, and they want to pull down six-figures.” He’s created a second company called Skyline Engineered Aluminum to supply and manufacture modular aluminum decking and railing and train contractors in other parts of the country to install the pieces. His companies employ 100 people in Washington, Oregon and California. He thinks that this new venture means that he could add 15 to 20 new people in the first year with the potential of adding far more in the future. “Once the toehold is in, it just depends on how much we push it,” he said. “How many resources we apply to it, how quickly we can expand the plant. We’re very hopeful this is quite a good business.” Singfield, who is originally from Canada, got his start in the roofing industry.

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 13

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Skyline Engineered Systems is looking to market these decking systems in other parts of the country.

He shifted to the decking industry when he moved here and married his wife, Heidi. In the 1990s and early 2000s, the Northwest suffered from what was known as the ‘leaky condo crisis’ where extrusions on the sides of condos rotted and caused damage to building exteriors and interiors, he said. The crisis involved multi-billion-dollar lawsuits. He owned a company in Warm Beach, which was then called Skyline Decking, that built new decking, but moved into rehabbing rotten decking on condo projects around the Puget Sound region. That often involved putting on vinyl or elastomeric, a kind of polymer, over wood. About a decade ago, he noticed that he stopped getting contracts for large projects. Instead, architects and builders started using metal for decks and balconies. He said those people realized that wood was a train wreck for decking. And while steel-and-concrete balconies weren’t as bad on high-rises, builders started moving to more lightweight materials like aluminum. About a decade ago, he started looking into installing aluminum decking. “When I felt that breeze, I moved,” he said. “Now at the time, it wasn’t that obvious, but something inside me said, ‘Whoa, I better shift,’ because I suddenly wasn’t building big complexes and rehabs anymore.” At first, he bought pieces from a Canadian supplier and then he started buying pieces from a Minneapolis, Minnesota, firm. But he was dissatisfied with the products. When the recession was beginning, Singfield took a chance and hired an engineer and a plant manager to help

him start fabricating aluminum decks and balconies. Since then, the company has grown and added about 50 workers. “Each one of these guys are like trained fabricators,” Singfield said. “They have to be able to think to construct what we’re building. We give them a blueprint. They have to think it through. … So they’re trained to design and build something and not just stand in an assembly line and weld.” Skyline Decking moved three years ago from Warm Beach to its headquarters at 13421 39th Ave. NE in Marysville. He said the advantage of aluminum other than it being rust proof is it’s a third of the weight of steel, but has two-thirds the strength. It also is easily recyclable. His company takes on mostly custom projects for multi-story buildings. He said it’s not feasible to do this for individual homes. The next step is taking the modular pieces that the company is building and start market the pieces in other parts of the country. They’ve talked with builders in Boston and Utah and are making inroads in California. “California is still waking up to how to do all of this,” he said. “They don’t get a lot of rain, but they get enough that buildings rot.” Other companies around the Puget Sound region are making aluminum decking and railing. He said that his is the only company that he knows of that is vertically integrated — designing, fabricating and installing projects. “I don’t think that any of them have the background like we do in the installation, which is kind of critical,” Singfield said. “You can learn about something, but, until you’re actually doing it, you’re not paying attention to all of the nuances.”

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14 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2016

NOVEMBER 2016

Firm gives new meaning to ‘family law’

Aerospace supplier MTorres invests in new Everett plant

Marysville lawyer has hired all four of his grown children into bankruptcy practice

By Dan Catchpole

By Jim Davis

Herald Writer

The Herald Business Journal

MARYSVILLE — Thomas Neeleman took his daughter to work. She stayed. And she wasn’t the only one. The Marysville bankruptcy lawyer has hired on all four of his working age children to his practice, one as a partner, two as associates and another as his head paralegal. “I say on the website that I couldn’t find any good employees so I had to raise them,” Neeleman jokes. Talk about family law. Parents often bring their children into the family business. It’s more unusual to bring them in to the law profession. For one, the children have to be interested in the law. And then, there’s the whole legal training. Even when they choose the legal profession, the children could go to another firm. But the Neeleman children all trained in the law and they all returned to the family business, the Neeleman Law Group. A law practice where Dad is the senior counsel has its ups and downs. It’s easier for the Neeleman children to take time off to attend to family matters. “I love the flexibility,” said Emilee Neeleman Morzelewski, 38, who works as the firm’s lead paralegal. “It’s always nice to come and leave when I need to.” One of the drawbacks is family familiarity. Phone calls about cases at a quarter to midnight aren’t unheard of. And screw up and the boss is going to get mad. “I’m sure he yells at us more than he would yell at his other employees,” said Ben Neeleman, 34, who just joined the firm after passing the bar. “That’s one of the negatives.” Then, there are family gatherings.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

A portrait of Angie Neeleman, Jennifer Neeleman, Ben Neeleman and Emilee Neeleman Morzelewski.

KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

Emilee Neeleman Morzelewski, Ben Neeleman and Thomas Neeleman at the Neeleman Law Group in Marysville. Thomas Neeleman has brought in all of his working-age children into the firm, including Angie and Jennifer Neeleman.

“When you fight with a coworker, you get to leave. When you fight with a family member, you’ve got to see them at Thanksgiving.” — Angie Neeleman Thomas Neeleman said his wife, Kristi, who spent a short stint at the law office as a receptionist, runs “screaming from the room” when talk turns to work. “Everybody gets together and we’ll say we’re not going to talk about the office today,” Thomas Neeleman said. “And then it will be that way for two hours and then someone will say, ‘What about this?’ and it rolls back in.” It wasn’t the law practice, but actually restaurants that started this all off.

Thomas Neeleman received a law degree and a masters of business administration from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, worked for an accounting firm in Texas and then returned to Utah. “I had a little stint buying bombs — doing price negotiations with the Air Force — for about six months right after going back to Utah,” he said. He eventually put his law degree to good use with a practice in Salt Lake City in the early 1980s.

“I took the bar and hung up my shingle and started doing the normal things, divorce, suing people and that kind of thing,” he said. “A guy walked in and said, ‘Can you do a bankruptcy?’ and I said, ‘Well, I can’t dance.’ So I did it and it just felt right, helping people instead of suing people.” His bankruptcy practice eventually expanded to add an office in St. George, Utah. Neeleman’s own parents had always run restaurants. And he had that bug. So in Salt Lake City, he opened a restaurant called The Shed, an all-youcan-eat, steak-and-chicken restaurant. His law practice was on the second floor above the restaurant. He had a manager running The Shed. But he hired his oldest daughter, Jennifer

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 15

Neeleman, who started off putting lemon slices in water and wrapping potatoes with aluminum foil. As the children came of working age, each would work at The Shed or his other restaurants, the Good Old Days Cafe or later on his doughnut shop, Legal Doughnut. Once in the restaurant, it was only a short hop away from the law practice, helping with cases when his firm got too busy. “In Utah, we were filing over 100 cases a month at that point,” Thomas Neeleman said. “It was a busy, busy practice. Emilee came one day and sat behind a counter and I was back in my office and came out and the whole entire front was under her control. “I go, ‘What can I say, Emilee, you found your niche.’” Thomas Neeleman moved his practice from Utah to Washington 12 years ago. He started off in Long Beach in southwest Washington, but moved to Everett just six months later. The Neeleman Law Group now is located in a converted house at 1403 Eighth St. in Marysville. The practice has eight employees — Neeleman and his four children and three others — working in Marysville and satellite offices in Everett and Bellingham. Years ago, he used his creative bent to obtain and keep the domain name www.debtguy.com for the practice. Jennifer Neeleman started practicing law with the firm when it was still in Utah in 2001. Emilee had started a family, but spent time to get a paralegal degree and

worked in Utah. His third oldest daughter, Angie, received a law degree and started at the practice in Washington in 2006. Ben Neeleman, the fourth oldest, cast about looking for another profession. A little bit of work in Marysville helping with case files convinced him to pursue law and choose bankruptcy. Jennifer Neeleman, 40, said that working with her Dad and her family always felt right. “We’ve always just got along well,” she said. “It’s kind of all I know at this point.” But yes, like any family, things aren’t always smooth. “We have days where we get along and it’s great and we’re good resources for each other and there are days that aren’t like that,” said Angie Neeleman, 36. “When you fight with a coworker, you get to leave. When you fight with a family member, you’ve got to see them at Thanksgiving. So you’ve got to make this work.” Neeleman has two more children, Feliciti, 19, who goes by Felix, and who is attending the University of Oregon, and Robee, 17, who is a senior at Arlington High School. Felix hopes to go into computer design and Robee is involved in music and drama at the high school where his mom, Kristi, is a substitute teacher. “Like I say, it seems like I’m forcing them into this,” Thomas Neeleman said. “But we kind of let them do what they want to do. Who knows? They may migrate back. If they do, we’ll figure it out.”

EVERETT — Aerospace supplier MTorres has big plans for its new facility under construction near Boeing’s Everett plant. The building — dubbed the MTorres Innovation Center — will support current production and help the company and customers develop better ways to automate airplane production. Ultimately, the company, which is based in Pamplona, Spain, hopes it will be a launch pad for getting into the Pacific markets. The task at hand is delivering automated machines and tooling that Boeing will use in making the composite-material wings for its 777X, which goes into production in 2017. “We are already installing part of those in the Boeing facility,” said Luis Izco, MTorres managing director. The company — a leader in robotic and automated assembly machines — has three contracts on the 777X program. Two are for equipment and tooling used in assembling the wings’ spars and stringers. The other is for automated fiber placement machines used to make the wing stringers from carbon-fiber composite material. Everything should be delivered by 2019, he said. The 777X work is just the start for the company here, said Eduardo Torres, son of company founder Manuel Torres and head of its U.S. subsidiary, MTorres America. In 2011, long before landing the 777X work, the company decided to buy a U.S.-based firm to get better access to the market here. It settled on Bothell-based Pacifica Engineering, which it bought the following year. MTorres came to Washington to be

close to Boeing — and Pacific and Asian markets expected to boom in coming decades, Torres said. “We believe the Pacific area will experience the highest economic growth over the next 50 years.” That means plenty of opportunities for MTorres, whose products and services cover a broad swath of the aerospace, paper and wind energy industries. The company is betting big on building its reputation for top-shelf engineering here. Since buying Pacifica Engineering, it has more than doubled its U.S. workforce to about 125. It should be about 140 when the $15 million Innovation Center opens in May, Torres said. Some of the workers are from Spain; many were locally hired. Torres moved his family here last year. The Innovation Center will also house the MTorres Lego Education Center, a program for kids interested in the STEM subjects exploring science, technology, engineering and mathematics. MTorres has plenty more land to expand, too. Torres said he wants to land new work with aerospace suppliers. The industry’s supply chain is expected to see substantial growth as Boeing, Airbus and other airplane makers execute plans to ramp up production in the coming years. MTorres benefited from the state’s tax breaks for aerospace companies and a one-time business-tax incentive offered by the city of Everett worth $1,000 for every new full-time job added here. The incentive is granted in batches of 50 jobs. Those benefits have been nice, but they did not swing MTorres’ decision when picking a site, Torres said. “We were going to come here regardless of the support,” he said.

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NOVEMBER 2016

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THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 17

Everett stations to broadcast in FM By Jim Davis

The Herald Business Journal

EVERETT — It’ll be a chance to play to a whole new audience. Everett’s two commercial radio stations — AM stations KRKO and KKXA — just received approval to broadcast programming on FM frequencies. The stations will reach a much broader audience since the majority of radio listeners only tune to FM. “There are a lot of people who aren’t even aware that AM even exists anymore,” joked Stitch Mitchell, KKXA’s morning show host. KKXA, which goes by Classic Country KXA on air, plays country music from the ‘50s to the ‘90s. KRKO broadcasts sports including Silvertips and AquaSox games, the nationally syndicated Dan Patrick Show and the locally produced Jeff “The Fish” Aaron show. KRKO and KXA will continue to transmit on AM channels, 1380 AM and 1520 AM respectively. Starting as soon as this month, the programming on those channels will simulcast at 95.3 FM for KRKO and 101.1 FM for KXA. The stations are owned by Andy and Craig Skotdal, who also own several downtown Everett office and apartment buildings. To be able to broadcast on FM is “kind of like moving an advertising sign from

DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Stitch Mitchell, with a sunrise at his back, hosts the KKXA-AM morning show from the 14th floor of the Everett Mutual Tower on Colby Avenue.

a side street to Interstate 5,” said Andy Skotdal. “We didn’t think we would have this opportunity,” Skotdal said. “The fact it’s here now, we’re thrilled.” When the stations start transmitting on FM, the signals will displace two Canadian radio stations that currently reach into Snohomish County. Those stations are CKZZ, known on air as Z 95.3, and CRMI, that goes by Rock 101. “There may be some people who lis-

ten to those stations down here and may be disappointed that they won’t be able to listen to them,” Skotdal said. “But I’m more focused on all of the people who don’t know we even exist who are going to find us for the first time.” The FCC is granting permission for AM stations across the country to simulcast programming on FM channels if an FM frequency is available in the area. It’s what’s called the AM Revitalization Act. As of September, the FCC has received

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939 FM license applications and 824 have been approved. KXA and KRKO will transmit the FM signals from existing radio antennas in the Everett area. The stations will be broadcast at 250 watts or enough to reach most of the western part of Snohomish County and parts of eastern Island County. Somewhere between 20 to 30 percent of radio listeners tune into AM programming, said Chuck Maylin, the general manager for KRKO and KXA. When the FCC started allotting frequencies for radio stations in the 1960s and 1970s, the agency awarded 23 commercial FM stations to King County and 11 to Pierce County, Skotdal said. Snohomish County only received one: KCMS or Spirit 105.3 FM in Edmonds. Radio — and, in fact, all media — is an important community resource, Skotdal said. Communities with more signals tend to grow faster than those without. “If all you hear is Seattle, Seattle, Seattle, pretty soon you start to orient that way,” Skotdal said. “Bringing two more signals to Everett is one way to counter the Seattle vacuum effect.” With so much consolidation in the radio industry, it’s great for a city like Everett to have a locally run radio stations, said Maylin, the general manager. “When you’re an announcer sitting in a booth looking outside at the Space Needle, what are you going to talk about?” Maylin asked.

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18 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2016

LYNNWOOD — The Snohomish County Tourism Bureau has hired Kristine Vannoy as a group sales manager. Responsible for promoting the county’s convention facilities to meeting and event Kristine planners, her sales focus Vannoy includes working with social, educational, military, religious and fraternal organizations to facilitate events and meetings in the county. EVERETT — The McKinley Irvin law firm announced that attorney Shayla McKee has joined its Everett office. McKee focuses on divorce and custody cases, as well as child support and parenting plan modifications. She has a special interest in cases involving domestic violence, LGBT issues, adoption and assisted reproduction. EVERETT — Leadership Snohomish County presented its annual awards at the Community Engagement Breakfast on Oct. 14. Chris Knapp, CEO of The Everett Clinic and a graduate of LSC’s first Signature Class in 1998, received Chris the Distinguished Alumni Knapp Award. Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation was presented the Community Partner Award. It was accepted by

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Paul Pitkin. Swedish Edmonds Chief Executive Jennifer Graves delivered the keynote address. EVERETT — David Conner from Everett’s All Battery Sales and Service, is spending a week in Haiti supporting relief efforts in areas affected by Hurricane Matthew. He is working with Children of the Nations, a non-profit organization focusing on the welfare of children. With the financial support of his church, friends and his employer, Conner will assist in the construction of housing for residents. CAMANO ISLAND — Briana Hallsted has been named general manager of a new TurnKey Vacation Rental office on Camano Island that includes rental properties in the Puget Sound region. Hallsted has more than 15 years of experience in hotel and Briana vacation rental operations Hallsted and sales. The Internet-based rental company has 32 service areas in U.S. MARYSVILLE — The Marysville City Council confirmed appointments on Oct. 10 to Marysville’s 2016-2017 Hotel/Motel Committee. Those include: Jennifer Caveny, Holiday Inn Express; Mark Jensen, Maryfest, Inc.; Mary Kirkland, Downtown Merchants Asso-

ciation; and Charles Lee, Village Motor Inn. Council president Kamille Norton was previously named to serve as committee chairperson representing the city.

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EVERETT — Moss Adams has announced the addition of new partners in Everett — Jason Thompson, Kristine Hoeflin and Olga Darlington. Thompson focuses on providing clients with specialty tax guidance, specifically tangible asset incentive services. Hoeflin provides tax services to financial institutions and serves as the financial institution tax practice group leader. Darlington provides accounting and advisory services to utility and transit clients. EVERETT — Snohomish County Executive Dave Somers has finished hiring his cabinet. He has appointed Barb Mock as the director of the Department of Planning and Development Services. She has been the interim director since January. Nathan Kennedy is the new director of finance for Snohomish County. The Certified Public Accountant

recently relocated to Snohomish County from Ohio. MONROE — The Rotary Club of Monroe, serving Snohomish/Sky Valley, recently installed a new board of directors for the 2016-17 club year. Sam Wirsching is club president and Katy Woods is president elect. Other directors include Kelly Backstrom, Lisa Caldwell, Staci Cogar, Brenda Hunt, Sally Petty, Marlene Rouleau, Delma Silva, Jamie Silva and Philip Spirto. MONROE — Canyon Creek Cabinet Company has hired Vincent Heslop to be its director of supply chain management. Heslop has more than 25 years of supply-chain-management experience in a Vincent variety of industries. He Heslop will attempt to help as the Monroe company makes lean-manufacturing process improvements. SNOHOMISH — Vista Clara Coffee owner and master roaster Dave Stewart has been presented with the Patriot Award by the Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve for hiring and supporting guard members. Stewart was nominated by his employee, Scott Noll, who serves in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve. Vista Clara Coffee is located in Snohomish.

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BUSINESS BRIEFS EVERETT — Arc of Snohomish County last month received the Community Employment Alliance Non-Profit Employer of the Year award. The organization was nominated by its partner, Work Opportunities, for its commitment to the inclusion of people with disabilities. Arc has hired five people with disabilities as part of its workforce.

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MUKILTEO — Oki Golf announced last month that it sold its courses including Harbour Pointe Golf Course in Mukilteo to a Hong Kong-based investment group. HNA Holdings, which owns Hainan Airlines, paid $137 million for the properties. As part of the sale, Oki Golf will be retained to manage and run the courses. Oki Golf previously sold The Golf Club at Echo Falls in Snohomish, which it continues to manage.

Nov. 1: Westwood, Bardu

EVERETT — Providence General Foundation has joined #GivingTuesday, an annual global day of giving held on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving. The foundation has pledged to raise $5,000 or more for the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Providence Regional Medical Center Everett. To donate, go to www. providence.org/givingtuesday. For more details, visit the #GivingTuesday website www.givingtuesday.org or follow the #GivingTuesday hashtag on social media. EDMONDS — Sport Clips Haircuts has opened a location in Edmonds. The franchise, owned by Yen Liu, is located in the WinCo shopping center at 21940 Highway 99. Sport Clips in Edmonds will provide free MVP upgrades, including a massaging shampoo, hot-steamedtowel treatment and neck and shoulder massage, to all first-time clients who purchase a haircut. EVERETT — Learn about career opportunities available at Puget Sound region community and technical colleges at a diversity career fair Nov. 5 at Everett Community College, 2000 Tower St., Everett. Doors open at 8 a.m. at EvCC’s Henry M. Jackson Conference Center. Presentations and workshops are 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. LYNNWOOD — More than 90 exhibitors representing local, state and

Ship port calls 2016 YTD: 67 Barge port calls 2016 YTD: 50 Ship port calls 2015: 133 Barge port calls 2015: 61 Nov. 8: Westwood, Westwood Olympia Nov. 15: Westwood, Hammonia Berolina Nov. 25: Westwood, Westwood Rainier Nov. 25: Swire, Shengking Nov. 28: ECL, M. Leader Nov. 29: Westwood, Westwood Pacific Source: Port of Everett federal agencies, small business resources and services, and prime contractors will gather this month for the North Puget Sound Small Business Summit. The free event is from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 2 at Lynnwood Convention Center. For more information and registration, go to http://npssmallbusinesssummit.org/. EVERETT — Perteet has announced the launch of its new logo and brand identity. This is the first major rebrand in the the Everett engineering company’s 28-year history. The new logo and brand was designed and developed by Seattle’s Hansen Belyea. The new tagline is, “Better Communities, By Design.” EVERETT — Washington retailers in 2016 will hire above last year’s holiday seasonal levels, according to the state’s Employment Security Department. It predicts more than 12,700 seasonal workers to be hired throughout this holiday season with about 5,321 coming from Snohomish and King Counties. Last year, employers hired 10,542 additional workers with 6,167 from Snohomish and King counties. MOUNTLAKE TERRACE — Health plan provider Premera Blue Cross and Quartet, a technology company

dedicated to making behavioral health care more accessible and integrated into primary care, have announced a collaboration to improve the quality of care for Premera members. The integration of care should improve patient health outcomes and increase cost savings. OLYMPIA — In October, hospitality leaders from around the state gathered in Olympia to mark the official start of a new trade association, the Washington Hospitality Association. The new entity is a collaboration of the Washington Restaurant Association and the Washington Lodging Association. LYNNWOOD — Inspirus Credit Union, which recently opened its newest branch in Lynnwood, has surprised local educators with donations totaling $35,000. The funding will benefit students at Beverly Elementary, Cedar Way Elementary, Chase Lake Elementary, College Place Elementary, Hazelwood Elementary, Meadowdale Elementary and Oak Heights Elementary, among others. EVERETT — Western Washington Medical Group Podiatry last month relocated to offices at 3802 Broadway Ave., Suite B, in Everett. The new building, located next to the Everett Gateway Center and the Aquasox Stadium, has plentiful, easy-access parking. The phone number is not changing. Patients can still schedule with Dr. Jeffrey Boggs and Dr. Kristen Boyce at 425-259-0855. EVERETT — During the summer, Cory Long of Judd & Black presented an $8,000 check to Christmas House, a nonprofit charity that provides Christmas gifts and items to low-income families throughout Snohomish County. The check presentation was made at the company’s annual charity golf tournament. Also, Judd & Black’s Rick Kvangnes presented a $3,000 check to Mike McGinnis, unit director of the North Everett Boys & Girls Club, at the event. Go to www.christmas-house.org for details. EVERETT — The latest Apartment Insights survey shows a surge in units in the construction pipeline. The hot market has inspired developers to create more than 72,000 units, accord-

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 19

ing to Tom Cain of Apartment Insights. The data are from his Seattle firm’s third quarter statistics and trends on 50-or-more unit properties in the Snohomish-King counties market. EVERETT — Choux Choux Bakery, Everett’s newest artisan bakery specializing in rustic and sweet breads and assorted French pastries, has opened at 2900 Grand Ave., Everett. The bakery is owned by Rachel Schreffler who is also the lead baker. The business features espresso and coffee from Vista Clara Coffee of Snohomish. MONROE — The EvergreenHealth Monroe Foundation’s third annual Blue Jeans and Boots Gala on Sept. 10 raised $141,000 to benefit the Breast Center at EvergreenHealth Monroe. The gala initiated a yearlong campaign to raise a total of $200,000 to fund the a 3-D mammography unit for the breast center. OLYMPIA — The Washington State Department of Labor & Industries has announced the state’s minimum wage will increase 6 cents in 2017. The wage will rise to $9.53 an hour Jan. 1. The change reflects a 0.7 percent increase in the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers over the last 12 months ending Aug. 31. EDMONDS — Chermak Construction in Edmonds has been ranked at No. 60 in the nation and No. 1 in Washington state in Remodeling magazine’s list of the Top 550 Full Service Remodelers. A full list of Top 550 companies can be found at http://tinyurl.com/j7vde9u. OLYMPIA — Washington employers can now receive a tax credit for hiring unemployed veterans. The veteran must have been honorably discharged, unemployed for more than 30 days and hired into a full-time position held for at least six months. The program runs between Oct. 1 and June 30, 2022. For details, go to http://tinyurl.com/z5eqhgr. MILL CREEK — MultiCare Health System has opened a new type of urgent care center at 800 164th St. SE, Mill Creek. Hours for the MultiCare Indigo Urgent Care clinic are from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

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20 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2016

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Making buildings ‘sexy’ with nature T

he tree forts that Brian Heather built as a boy never truly left him. As he grew up, Heather couldn’t shake the idea of building nature and design into structures. Now, his Seattle-based company, Solterra, is changing the way we think about apartment living and other building systems. Founded in 2008, Solterra doesn’t just build green. Green building construction, says Heather, “… has a tendency to be functional boxes and resemble prisons.” Solterra endeavors to take that functional model and make it beautiful, even sexy, Heather said. Complex patented systems are designed into Solterra’s buildings from the beginning so that they integrate in an appealing way that supports Heather’s dream of bringing nature to green building construction. Emotional appeal is critical to engagement, says Heather, so much so that they are incorporating nature into every

He imagines someone walking down an urban street past one of his buildings and for a split second that person takes a deep breath, smile and react. Tom Hoban

aspect of design well beyond traditional planter boxes and a rooftop Realty decks. Markets “Complex technological devices and systems have to be understood by everyone on the design team,” he explains. Baking these systems into the design from the ground up is how they avoid taking a box and making nature feel bolted on. These systems include such things as screen siding systems that can protect a building from the elements, reusable

rooftops that filter water and allow residents to interact with greenscapes, and living walls which include rainwater catchment systems that re-purpose water back into the walls. These elements of a Solterra project are just as sensible as windows and kitchens, he explains in a 2014 TEDx Talk in Seattle. One of his earliest projects in Portland, Oregon, delivered all of this and met the highest green building certification, LEED platinum, at half the cost of a traditional building, a pattern that continues on other projects. Solterra buildings have health benefits,

too. Their website notes more than 50 studies that suggest naturalistic settings reduce pain, reduce stress, and decrease dependency on medication. For Heather, though, it’s the sexiness of nature that is vital to life. He imagines someone walking down an urban street past one of his buildings and for a split second that person takes a deep breath, smile and react. Bringing nature next to, onto, and into the building itself helps us keep our important relationship with nature even if we live in the core of a city. But it must create a reaction, Heather explains. He actually sees the linkage as vital to human life, “We’re bringing nature to the urban landscape because we’re not supposed to be separated from nature in the first place.” Tom Hoban is CEO of The Coast Group of Companies. Contact him at 425-339-3638 or tomhoban@coastmgt.com or visit www. coastmgt.com. Twitter: @Tom_P_Hoban.

3 strategies to stay connected when busy I f you’ve gone from sitting by the phone waiting for it to ring to not having enough time to answer the phone, that’s a positive sign that business has blossomed. Maybe it’s time to implement some strategies to deal with your active business life now. I have personally witnessed frustrated clients because business owners weren’t returning calls or getting back to potential customers with bids in a timely manner. I’m also aware of business owners who weren’t invoicing customers on a regular schedule. Believe it or not, most customers want to pay their bills when a job is complete. Not receiving the invoice can be a source of stress for them. If you aren’t getting back to people on a consistent basis, you run the risk of getting a bad reputation and people may choose to take their business elsewhere. I always tell business owners, “For every one of us in business, there’s someone else out there doing the exact same job.” Our clients and customers don’t have to be loyal to us and it’s easier than ever to find a replacement with social media and search engines at everyone’s fingertips. If you’re legitimately busy, you should still strive to remain professional. One of the biggest tools you can embrace is excellent communication when it comes to your clients, vendors, your team and supporters. Treat people how you’d like to be treated. Do you want to be in limbo waiting for an answer, waiting to schedule an appointment or waiting to get a bid from someone? I’m sure you don’t because it makes us feel unimportant or like

our business and money doesn’t matter. We want to make sure we don’t make the people who support our businesses feel that way. Be sure Monika to embrace strong Kristofferson communication skills with the following three Office strategies: Efficiency Requests: In business, there are many requests that come our way. Requests to answer a question, complete a task, schedule an appointment or review something, the list goes on and on. When we’re busy, it’s tempting to ‘temporarily’ ignore the request until we have time to get back to it. But, the person on the other end has no idea when we’re thinking about getting back to them. When people feel ignored, they can get frustrated and even angry. I’ve found that the best strategy is to quickly acknowledge the person’s request and let them know when you will be able to officially get back to them. Here are a couple of examples: “Thank you for reaching out to me with questions about my business. I’m in an all-day meeting today, but I’ll be happy to get back to you with answers by 3 p.m. tomorrow. In the meantime, here’s a link to frequently asked questions on my website.” “I would love to schedule an appointment with you. I’ll be out of my office for the rest of the day, but I look forward to speaking with you tomorrow at 10 a.m.

If you aren’t getting back to people on a consistent basis, you run the risk of getting a bad reputation and people may choose to take their business elsewhere.

to set it up.” As you can see, I was very specific about the day and time for follow-up. The key here is you must follow up when you say you will. So, make sure you’re available at the time you say and schedule the follow-up in your calendar or with a reminder notification on your phone. Voicemail: I believe most people respond well when they know what the parameters are for our phone or office hours. Although it can be tempting to be available all hours of the day and night, I don’t believe it’s good for our life balance to create those expectations with people. I think it’s perfectly acceptable to leave an outgoing message on your voicemail letting people know when you’ll get back to them. Here’s an example: “You’ve reached the voicemail for (your name and business). I’m sorry to have missed your call. All business calls will be returned by 5 p.m. the next business day. I look forward to speaking with you soon.” If you happen to have time to call back before the next business day, great. But, now the person on the other end of the phone knows they shouldn’t be expecting a call back from you at 8 p.m. There’s a reasonable expectation set for your return call. Email autoresponder: When you know you’ll be away from your office for

a few days, be sure to set up an autoresponder for your email to set a reasonable expectation for a response from you when you get back. It’s OK to give yourself an extra day to get caught up before returning emails when you return to the office. If you’re returning on a Monday, consider saying you’ll be returning emails on Tuesday. Here’s an example: “I will be out of the office until (date). I will be returning emails on (date). Thank you!” I think it’s OK to go with short and sweet for autoresponders with no need to explain where you are. If you have a team, you may want to direct them to send urgent email to someone on your team or provide their phone number. Just be sure to give the person a head’s up that you’ve shared their contact information. Communication in business is powerful. Poor communication has the potential to break your business contact’s confidence in your services. Strong communication has the potential to bridge the gap between busy and reliable. Be sure to stay professional by staying connected. Monika Kristofferson is a professional organizer and productivity consultant who owns Efficient Organization NW inLakeStevens. Reach her at 425-220-8905 or monika@efficientorganizationnw.com.


NOVEMBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 21

BUSINESS BUILDERS

Form customer persona for success A

few years ago I wrote a column — The Four Secrets to Marketing Success — that generated far more response than usual. That feedback inspired me to provide more detail on the topic. This is the first of a four-part series that breaks down the four fundamental truths of generating a greater return on marketing investment. The four secrets to marketing success are as follows; and the sequence is important. ■ Target the right market; ■ With the right message; ■ Through the right media; ■ At the right moment. I joke with colleagues and clients by saying, “You only need to do four things right to be wildly successful in marketing. Market, message, media and moment…what could be more simple?” Of course, doing all four things right is much easier said than done. Understanding these fundamentals is not difficult… therein lies the challenge of “doing them right.” Secret number one — target the right market. I believe it’s obvious to many who run a business they need to target the right market if they want to sell their product or service. My observation is, however, that few have a structured way of doing

so. The tool many market- marketing resources… ing experts use, toward the including yours most responsive truly, to more and profitable effectively hone segment of your in on the most overall market. lucrative niche Doing this is called a Cusright will lower tomer Persona your cost of age, relationship status, Profile. acquisition, residence, income, eduAndrew Before which, will cation, employment. If explaining how increase your selling to businesses, entail Ballard to develop margin. industry, size (revenue and your customer A customer employees), location and Growth persona profile, persona is a decision makers. Strategies I’ll debunk profile of your Pain Points: Your custhe common ideal customer. tomers’ fears, frustrations, misconception It identifies challenges…essentially about targeting. the person with the greatthe problems they want The process of targetest need for your product solved. Pain points estabing a market is counter or solution…one who will lish their priorities. intuitive. remain loyal and refer Personality CharacYou’d think that the others to your business. teristics: Define their larger the market you tarThe key elements of your nature and temperament, get, the more customers customer persona are (but e.g. pragmatic verses you’d attract. not limited to) as follows: spontaneous, people or That approach actually Demographic Attritask oriented, logical or results in the opposite butes: Include gender, emotional, charismatic or effect. If you spread your marketing resources too thin, you won’t create the necessary impact to influence behavior. Several studies cite “the rule of seven” which references that it takes an average of seven exposures to a marketing message before consumers recall AUTO GLASS • GLASS REPLACEMENT • TINTING • VINYL WINDOWS the brand or respond to the offer. Rock Chip Based on your budget, Repair… you may want to target a smaller footprint or a single more responsive niche segment. Going through the process of developing your customer persona profile will help you deterServing mine where to aim your Snohomish www.clearviewglass.com

You’d think that the larger the market you target, the more customers you’d attract. That approach actually results in the opposite effect. quiet. Values and Goals: What is important to them, what they care about, what they aspire to accomplish, and what motivates their behavior and choices. Research Habits: The process they go through to find a solution to their problem, and how they research to find a provider to meet their wants and needs. If you do an online search for “customer persona” you’ll find free templates that can help guide you through the

process of developing your profile. Customer persona profiles are not only used to “target the right market,” they are a great tool to refine and personalize your marketing “with the right message.” Be sure to look for my December column when I’ll write about how to craft the right message. Andrew Ballard is president of Marketing Solutions, an agency specializing in growth strategies. For more information, call 425-3371100 or go to www.mktg-solutions.com.

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22 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

Snohomish County tax liens Tax liens are gathered from online public records filed with the Snohomish County Auditor’s Office. These federal and state liens were filed between Sept. 1-30.

Federal tax liens 201609070157: Sept. 7; Parke, Joshua A., 12639 Eaglenest Drive, Mukilteo 201609070158: Sept. 7; Watts, Caroline J. (+), 16658 Ladd St. SE, Monroe 201609070159: Sept. 7; Wright Joyce D, 3119 115th Ave SE, Snohomish 201609070160: Sept. 7; Imus, Marcellina F. (+), 8215 325th Place NW, Stanwood 201609070161: Sept. 7; Imus, David A., 8215 325th Place NW, Stanwood 201609070162: Sept. 7; Maynard, Shirley (+), 4719 119th Place SE, Everett 201609070163: Sept. 7; Freerks, Jerry L., 1415 84th St. SE, Unit 39, Everett 201609070164: Sept. 7; Myung, Jang D. (+), 19031 33rd Ave W, Suite 211, Lynnwood 201609070165: Sept. 7; Ness, Jennifer (+), 1211 164th St. SW, Suite 103, Lynnwood 201609070166: Sept. 7; Dougan, Kelly S., 5803 232nd St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201609070167: Sept. 7; Palmer, Shawn D., 16684 Wales St. SE, Monroe 201609070168: Sept. 7; Porter, Joy L., 6332 107th Place NE, Marysville 201609070169: Sept. 7; Clip-N-Dip Pet Grooming (+), PO Box 12987, Everett 201609070170: Sept. 7; O’Bannon, Mark E., 2829 130th Place SE, Everett 201609070189: Sept. 7; Castoriano, Marc S., 6306 61st Ave SE, Snohomish 201609070190: Sept. 7; David R. Downing & Associates (+), 4229 76th St. NE, Marysville 201609070191: Sept. 7; Taylor, Donna (+), 5424 84th SW, Mukilteo 201609070192: Sept. 7; Kuhr, Liliana E. (+), 6017

NOVEMBER 2016

136th Place SW, Edmonds 201609070193: Sept. 7; Kane, Jane B. (+), 15465 179th Ave SE, Apt. 128, Monroe 201609070194: Sept. 7; Leading Edge Gymnastics Academy Inc., 1500 Industry St., Suite 300, Everett 201609070195: Sept. 7; Tom’s Auto Body Collision (+), 23125 Highway 99, Edmonds 201609070196: Sept. 7; Crawford, Jeremy R., 17910 37th Drive NE, Arlington 201609070197: Sept. 7; Helfenberger, Dan E., 532 Hawthorne St., Unit B, Everett 201609070198: Sept. 7; Ala-Wa Inc., 1227 147th Place SW, Lynnwood 201609130408: Sept. 13; Brengle, Bryan B., 8905 176th St. SE, Snohomish 201609130409: Sept. 13; Jess, Timothy B., 656 Third Ave. N, Edmonds 201609130410: Sept. 13; Keyes, Kyle, 14102 N Creek Drive, Apt 2625, Mill Creek 201609130411: Sept. 13; Butler, Jeffrey D., 5130 99th St. SW, Mukilteo 201609130412: Sept. 13; TW Consulting Inc., 701 Cedar St., Edmonds 201609130413: Sept. 13; G&S Greenery, 19321 63rd Ave NE, Arlington 201609130414: Sept. 13; Prather, Lauretta L., PO Box 43, Everett 201609130415: Sept. 13; Gac, Dennis M., 8010 212th St. SW, Edmonds 201609130416: Sept. 13; Gac, Dennis M., 8010 212th St. SW, Edmonds 201609140099: Sept. 14; Booker, Barbara A. (+), 1010 100th St. SE, Apt 1015, Everett 201609140100: Sept. 14; Davis, Jody L., 4319 151st Place NE, Marysville 201609140101: Sept. 14; Zackuse, Joseph W, 131 NE, 92nd St., Marysville 201609200481: Sept. 20; Barrys LLC, 7130 19th Ave NE, Tulalip 201609200482: Sept. 20; Acheson, Angel R., 2808 96th Place SE, Everett 201609200483: Sept. 20; McGehee, Norma J., 1624 Seventh St., Marysville 201609200484: Sept. 20; Boser, Vicki (+), PO Box 70, Snohomish

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PUBLIC RECORDS 201609200485: Sept. 20; Garcia, Domingo (+), 4306 228th St. SW, Suite 8 and 9, Mountlake Terrace 201609200493: Sept. 20; Bower, Charmaine, 6307 95th Place NE, Marysville 201609200494: Sept. 20; JTC Enterprises NW, 17910 37th Drive NE, Arlington 201609200495: Sept. 20; JTC Enterprises NW, 17910 37th Drive NE, Arlington 201609200496: Sept. 20; Spearman Corp., 4700 56th Place NE, Marysville 201609200497: Sept. 20; Cascade Decks (+), 123 Dorn Ave., Apt. 2, Everett 201609200498: Sept. 20; Howard, Susan A. (+), 18578 Rainier View Road SE, Monroe 201609200499: Sept. 20; Hicks, Cheryl L., 7122 287th Place NW, Stanwood 201609200500: Sept. 20; Wegeleben, Steven, PO Box 3223, Lynnwood 201609200501: Sept. 20; Jang, Myung D. (+), 19009 33rd Ave. W, Suite 201, Lynnwood 201609200502: Sept. 20; Tjalas, Kirk (+), 7620 N Hartman Lane, Suite 180, Tucson, Arizona 201609200503: Sept. 20; Carpenter, John S, 15220 220th St. SE, Snohomish 201609200504: Sept. 20; Fry, Jasmine L. (+), 20817 29th Ave SE, Bothell 201609200505: Sept. 20; Andreozzi, William H., PO Box 528, Lake Stevens 201609200506: Sept. 20; Williams, Holly E., 18611 37th Drive SE, Bothell 201609200507: Sept. 20; Florez M. Sarausad (+), 16000 75th Place W, Edmonds 201609200508: Sept. 20; Gonzalez, Gerardo (+), 6824 147th Ave NE, Lake Stevens 201609200509: Sept. 20; Casale, Deborah A. (+), 10432 56th Drive NE, Marysville 201609200510: Sept. 20; Haines, Ronald, 13310 Meadow Drive, Snohomish 201609200511: Sept. 20; Allen, John W., 2124 Hoyt Ave., Everett 201609270300: Sept. 27; Napstad, Rolf E., 15908 Larch Way, Lynnwood 201609270301: Sept. 27; Bowman, Richard P., 626 128th St. SW, Suite 107, Everett 201609270302: Sept. 27; Skycorp, 526 N West Ave. Arlington 201609270303: Sept. 27; Poteet, David D., 1701 121st St. SE, Apt N301, Everett 201609270304: Sept. 27; Webb, Aurora (+), 4633 58th Drive SE, Everett 201609270305: Sept. 27; Lor, Pa H. (+), 1433 Austin Ave., Snohomish 201609270306: Sept. 27; Wohlfeil, Dennis, 18902 Marine Drive, Stanwood 201609270307: Sept. 27; Sweet, Kerry W., 18530 36th Ave. W, Apt D, Lynnwood 201609270308: Sept. 27;

Graver, Wendi, 415 Ave. G, Snohomish 201609270309: Sept. 27; Miller, Lisa (+), 16528 First Ave. SE, Bothell 201609270310: Sept. 27; Saban, Theresa M. (+), 3201 W Mukilteo Blvd., Everett 201609270311: Sept. 27; Ostman, Bruce L., 3405 172nd St. NE, Suite 5, PMB 253, Arlington 201609270312: Sept. 27; Servicemaster By Willanger (+), 146524 Sixth Ave. W, Lynnwood 201609270313: Sept. 27; All County Evictions (+), 2302 Rucker Ave., Apt 4, Everett 201609270314: Sept. 27; Pfaff Quality Carbide Tooling RC (+), 17700 147th St. SE, Suite B, Monroe 201609270405: Sept. 27; Envirocoating Innovations Inc., 909 Everett Mall Way, Suite A175, Everett 201609270406: Sept. 27; Knight, Jacqueline J., 6414 66th Place NE, Marysville 201609270407: Sept. 27; Davalos Farriers Inc., PO Box 1722, Sultan 201609270408: Sept. 27; Helle, Arlana J. (+), 13521 Dubuque Road, Snohomish 201609270409: Sept. 27; Babus, Barbara, 7103 172nd St. NE, Arlington 201609270410: Sept. 27; Orca Electrical Contractors, PO Box 14693, Mill Creek 201609270411: Sept. 27; Marysville Daycare and Learning Center (+), 1262 State Ave., Suite A, Marysville 201609270412: Sept. 27; Stewart, Elizabeth A., 9910 Marine View Drive, Mukilteo 201609270413: Sept. 27; Roten, Shawn, 9910 Marine View Drive, Mukilteo

Partial release of federal tax lien 201609230644: Sept. 23; Krance, Anna M. (+), 4018 51st Way S, Fargo, North Dakota 201609270414: Sept. 27; Swinburnson, Tyler F., 515 S Davies Road, Lake Stevens

Release of federal tax lien 201609070171: Sept. 7; Townsend, Geraldine L., 14932 30th Drive SE, Mill Creek 201609070172: Sept. 7; Cascade Materials and Aggregate, 12030 92nd St. SE, Snohomish 201609070173: Sept. 7; Cook, Peter G., 7617 201st St. SE, Snohomish 201609070174: Sept. 7; Bartelheimer, Kurt (+), PO Box 878, Snohomish 201609070175: Sept. 7; Bartelheimer, Kurt (+), PO Box 878, Snohomish 201609070176: Sept. 7; McDonald, Dean A., 7407 197th St. SE, Snohomish

SPORTS

201609070177: Sept. 7; Collins, Gina M., 1117 E Lakeshore Drive, Lake Stevens 201609070178: Sept. 7; Ieplexus Inc,, 20700 44th Ave. W, Suite 120, Lynnwood 201609070179: Sept. 7; Smith, Abigail A. (+), 5724 203rd St. SW, Lynnwood 201609070180: Sept. 7; Gelinas, David R., PO Box 548 201609070181: Sept. 7; Franklin, Julie L., 13328 56th Drive NE, Marysville 201609090200: Sept. 9; Cho, Jenny (+), 17410 Highway 99, Suite 150, Lynnwood 201609130417: Sept. 13; Gajdos Construction Inc., 317 S Madison St., Monroe 201609130418: Sept. 13; Carson, Dana W., 11925 174th Ave. NE, Arlington 201609130419: Sept. 13; Walla, Brenda S (+), PO Box 628, Stanwood 201609130420: Sept. 13; Quigley, Kristopher W., 11809 202nd St. SE, Snohomish 201609140102: Sept. 14; McGraw, Thomas G., 203o5 73rd Ave. W, Lynnwood 201609140103: Sept. 14; Sander, Scott W., 333 S French Ave., Arlington 201609140104: Sept. 14; Williams, Keith, 3623 156th St. SW, Apt 9, Lynnwood 201609140105: Sept. 14; McGraw, Thomas G., 20120 76th Ave. W, Edmonds 201609200512: Sept. 20; Ace Enterprises Inc., 29718 94th St. SE, Monroe 201609200513: Sept. 20; Patton, Ignacia B. (+), 9902 67th Ave., Apt B, Marysville 201609200514: Sept. 20; Care, Kristy S. (+), 6902 38th Place NE, Marysville 201609200515: Sept. 20; Brannam, Kyle M., 12629 43rd Ave NE, Marysville 201609200516: Sept. 20; Marine, Cheri L.L., 11914 22nd St. SE, Everett 201609200517: Sept. 20; Arnold, Jean T., PO Box 399, Lynnwood 201609200518: Sept. 20; Lange, Laurale (+), Po Box 399, Lynnwood 201609200519: Sept. 20; RAP Enterprises Inc., 2006 196th St. SW, Lynnwood 201609200520: Sept. 20; Arnolds Contract Design (+), 12414 Highway 99, Suite 9, Lynnwood 201609200521: Sept. 20; Jorgensen, Marchel L. (+), 13518 Beverly Park Road, Mukilteo 201609200522: Sept. 20; Lange, Laurale (+), 12414 Highway 99, Suite 9, Everett 201609270315: Sept. 27; Blake, Monica D. (+), 2122164th Street SW, Suite 201, Lynnwood 201609270316: Sept. 27; Graham, Kevin L., 2314 199th Drive SE, Lake Stevens 201609270317: Sept. 27; Ver-Heul, Tina L. (+), 12918 311th Ave. SE, Sultan 201609270318: Sept. 27; Porter, Joy L., 6332 107th Place NE, Marysville

201609270319: Sept. 27; Benson, Richard A., 15802 66th Ave NW, Stanwood 201609270320: Sept. 27; Gemmer, Jodi L. (+), 9889 Central Valley Road NW, Bremerton 201609270321: Sept. 27; Rickman, Ericka M. (+), 16429 75th Place W, Edmonds 201609270322: Sept. 27; Perez, Karen A., 5619 141st St. SW, Edmonds 201609270323: Sept. 27; Baize, Robert, 8021 Crown Ridge Blvd., Arlington 201609270415: Sept. 27; Alexander, Andrea L. (+), 7104 230th St. SW, Mountlake Terrace 201609020567: Sept. 2; Wheeler, Barbara J., PO Box 5144, Everett

Satisfaction of employment security lien 201609060568: Sept. 6; Care Controls Inc., State Of Washington (Dept Of)

Withdrawal of federal tax lien 201609060569: Sept. 6; Care Controls Inc., State Of Washington (Dept Of) 201609070182: Sept. 7; Riddell, Christian, 17414 62nd Ave. NW, Stanwood 201609200523: Sept. 20; Rose, Ryan B., PO Box 777, Monroe 201609270324: Sept. 27; Allen, Nancy K. (+), 54463 Elder Lane, Darrington

Bankruptcy filings The following Snohomish County businesses or individuals filed business-related bankruptcies with U.S. Bankruptcy Court for Western District of Washington from Sept. 1-30. 16-14661-MLB: Chapter 7, Michael Ritt and Annamaria Ritt; attorney for joint debtors: Brad L. Puffpaff; special request: Pro se; filed: Sept. 9; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual 16-14758-MLB: Chapter 7, Key Group Inc.; attorney for debtor: Kenneth J. Schneider; filed: Sept. 16; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: corporation 16-14875-MLB: Chapter 7, Matthew Dag Larsen and Debra Jones Larsen; attorney for joint debtors: Lawrence M. Blue; special request: Pro se; filed: Sept. 23; assets: no; type: voluntary; nature of business: other; nature of debt: business; type of debtor: individual

HeraldNet.com/subscribe Something for everyone.


NOVEMBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 23

1703585


24 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2016

PLEASE NOTE: Business license information is obtained monthly from the Washington Secretary of State’s Office through the paid commercial services of InfoUSA. For the complete list, please go to www.theheraldbusinessjournal.com.

Arlington Alpha Community Alliance: 3405 172nd St. NE, No. 5-4, Arlington, WA 98223-7717; Nonclassified BP Services: 20011 Tveit Road, Arlington, WA 98223-7437; Services Not Elsewhere Classified Eternity Collections: 119 N Olympic Ave., Arlington, WA 98223-1335; Nonclassified Fudge Motors: 36720 311th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-9208; Nonclassified High Bank Herbals: 21828 Jordan Road, Arlington, WA 98223-9571; Nonclassified Lularoe By Madison Wesley: 27510 Third Ave. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-5551; Clothing-Retail Lunchbox P: 18233 Cedarbough Loop, Arlington, WA 98223-5929; Restaurants Milk and Honey Photography: 117 E Gilman Ave., Arlington, WA 98223-1016; Photography Mugu Games: 3405 172nd St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-7717; 360-322-6152; Games and Game Supplies Noteworthy Piano Lessons: 13304 240th St. NE, Arlington, WA 98223-4818; Music Instruction-Instrumental Perfect Balance Bookkeeping: 25704 Whitman Road, Arlington, WA 98223-5339; Accounting and Bookkeeping General Services San Juan Islands Plus: PO Box 40, Arlington, WA 98223-0040; Nonclassified

Bothell Anandan Academy: 3916 212th Place SE, Bothell, WA 98021-7984; Nonclassified Cupcaketopia: 17716 Bothell Everett Highway, Bothell, WA 98012-6351; Bakers-Retail Emerald Data Science: 1919 235th Place SW, Bothell, WA 98021-5203; Nonclassified Eva Spa!: 2215 169th Place SE, Bothell, WA 98012-6452; Spas-Beauty and Day Have A Heart: 22624 Meridian Ave. S, Bothell, WA 98021-8358; 425-408-0984; Nonclassified Imprezzio Inc.: 24000 35th Ave. SE, Bothell, WA 98021-8990; 425-482-0469; Nonclassified Jingjing’s Beauty Studio: 4013 152nd Place SE, Bothell, WA 98012-6108; Beauty Salons Kristin M Nielsen Property: 19911 29th Drive SE, Bothell, WA 98012-7211; Real Estate Management MTM Solutions: 3415 211th St. SE, Bothell, WA 98021-3520; Nonclassified Quality Inn Grand Suites: 3807 185th St. SE, Bothell, WA 98012-8841; Hotels and Motels Shrinath Catering: 3202 217th Place SE, Bothell, WA 98021-3530; Caterers White Paint Group: 21924 Eighth Place W, Bothell, WA 98021-8162; 425-286-2473; Paint-Retail Whole Body Massage and Wellness: 908 233rd Place SW, Bothell, WA 98021-7314; Massage Therapists Wiacare Inc.: 22506 Fifth Place W, Bothell, WA 98021-9710; Nonclassified YK Coaching: 17417 31st Drive SE, Bothell, WA 98012-8551; Nonclassified

Darrington Malyna Country Crafts: 1055 Seeman St., Darrington, WA 98241-9102; Crafts

Edmonds Adaugeo Healthcare: 7500 212th St. SW, Edmonds, WA 98026-7641; 425-697-2792; Health Services America’s Best Value Inn: 23416 Highway 99, No. B, Edmonds, WA 98026-9328; Hotels and Motels BV&Y: 4818 147th Place SW, Edmonds, WA 98026-3935; Nonclassified

BUSINESS LICENSES

Carroll-Henderson School of Irish Dancing: 18335 81st Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 980265417; Dancing Instruction Connie’s: 4710 Picnic Point Road, Edmonds, WA 98026-3925; Nonclassified C-Side Consulting: 619 Eighth Ave. S, Edmonds, WA 98020-3413; Consultants-Business Not Elsewhere Classified Dorothy’s Piano Bar and Cabaret: 21628 98th Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98020-3923; Bars Douglas Day Consulting: 21518 90th Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98026-7315; Consultants-Business Not Elsewhere Classified Expedia Cruise Ship Center Mill Creek: 10016 Edmonds Way, No. C-319, Edmonds, WA 98020-5107; Travel Agencies and Bureaus Heavenrise: 14323 55th Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98026-3856; Nonclassified Kong Tofu House: 22511 Highway 99, No. 102, Edmonds, WA 98026-8398; 206-2917368; Restaurants Lularoe Heather Jacobo: 20209 83rd Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98026-6729; Clothing-Retail Maytag JLH Laundry: 23416 Highway 99, No. B, Edmonds, WA 98026-9328; Laundries McLain & Sons: 20608 81st Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98026-6718; Nonclassified Metro PCs: 23416 Highway 99, No. B, Edmonds, WA 98026-9328; Cellular Telephones (Services) Northgate Olympic Property: 112 Third Ave. S, Edmonds, WA 98020-3513; 425-3611045; Real Estate Pinkage Inc.: 23416 Highway 99, No. B, Edmonds, WA 98026-9328; Nonclassified Rock Folly: 14629 52nd Ave. W, Edmonds, WA 98026-3806; Nonclassified Simply Stronger: 7631 212th St. SW, Edmonds, WA 98026-7565; 425-697-2567; Nonclassified Songee Properties: 51 W Dayton St., No. 201, Edmonds, WA 98020-4111; 425-5828061; Real Estate Management Traditional Korean Beef Soup: G-1 22919 Highway 99, Edmonds, WA 98026; Food Products-Retail Transblue: 7601 Olympic View Drive, Edmonds, WA 98026-5425; Automobile Lubrication Service West Campus Dental Center: 23416 Highway 99, No. B, Edmonds, WA 98026-9328; Dentists

Everett 2 Go Express: 6100 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98203-6042; Nonclassified Alexa Cleaning Services: 17 W Casino Road, No. B5, Everett, WA 98204-7609; Janitor Service Ankle Chiropractic Physicians: 10430 19th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-4200; 425-3326561; Chiropractors Apollo Plumbing: 2815 Baker Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3710; 425-374-8549; Plumbing Contractors Bain Bottle Shop: 5019 Nichols Place, Everett, WA 98203-1558; Liquors-Retail Barkley’s Bunches: 10224 Holly Drive, Everett, WA 98204-3728; Nonclassified Best Tire Center-Everett: 406 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-3259; 425-3555471; Tire-Dealers-Retail Buddha’s Best Vietnamese: 215 100th St. SW, No. A304, Everett, WA 98204-2707; Restaurants CTP Travel: 12433 Admiralty Way, No. P108, Everett, WA 98204-8057; Travel Agencies and Bureaus Cedaran: 1909 Hoyt Ave., No. D, Everett, WA 98201-2261; Nonclassified Challenge A: 2209 23rd St., Everett, WA 98201-3101; Nonclassified Chanmayde: 3730 Grand Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4659; Nonclassified Chipotle Mexican Grill: 515 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-3214; 425-265-7631; Restaurants Connect Wireless-Everett: 221 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-3239; 425-4053814; Cellular Telephones (Services) Daydreamer Designs: PO Box 1043, Everett, WA 98206-1043; Nonclassified Electronic Gaming Source: 500 SE Everett Mall Way, No. B222, Everett, WA 98208-8128;

Games and Game Supplies Essential Skin Concepts: 1410 W Casino Road, No. C29, Everett, WA 98204-6800; Skin Treatments Everett Tobacco Co.: 607 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett, WA 98208-3248; 425-322-4052; Cigar Cigarette and Tobacco Dealers-Retail Exceptional Care Home Of Bothell: 12433 Admiralty Way, No. G206, Everett, WA 982048046; Nursing and Convalescent Homes GICP: 1405 Lombard Ave., Everett, WA 98201-1626; Nonclassified Go Fetch Pet Services: 13902 54th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-9470; Pet Services Hacienda Studios: 3310 Rockefeller Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4319; Nonclassified Homegirl Souldogs and BBQ: 8304 Xavier Way, Everett, WA 98203-6621; Barbecue Restaurant Huynh Tranz: 1908 112th St. SW, Everett, WA 98204-3750; 425-514-0127; Nonclassified Infinity Equity Group Inc.: 11807 56th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-9187; Loans JC Innovations Inc.: 1609 England Ave., Everett, WA 98203-1617; Nonclassified JP Artistries: 3120 Colby Ave., No. 409, Everett, WA 98201-4050; Artists-Commercial K&M Day and Night Services: 3816 Smith Ave., Everett, WA 98201-4548; 425-374-7718; Services Not Elsewhere Classified Koreis Home: 1819 Walnut St., Everett, WA 98201-1903; Nonclassified L&B Towing: 301 77th Place SW, Everett, WA 98203-6212; Wrecker Service Links Languages: 1721 Hewitt Ave., Everett, WA 98201-3570; 425-512-8332; Nonclassified M2C Training Solutions: PO Box 4591, Everett, WA 98204-0053; Training Consultants Morones General Construction: Care Of Prompresa LLC, Suite B21, Everett, WA 98201; Construction Companies Noodle Bar: 11419 19th Ave. SE, No. A101, Everett, WA 98208-5120; 425-225-6183; Restaurants North West Consultancy Firm: 10130 29th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-4544; Consultants-Business Not Elsewhere Classified Northstar Building Specialists: 11718 29th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-6024; Building Contractors Pleasant Place: 2600 122nd St. SW, Everett, WA 98204-4753; Nonclassified Polar Bear Construction: 821 114th St. SW, No. 204, Everett, WA 98204-5971; Construction Companies Reclaim Sports Academy: 330 Elm St., No. 308, Everett, WA 98203-1904; Sports Instruction Registered Agent Services NW: 527 Legion Drive, Everett, WA 98201-1133; Services Not Elsewhere Classified Rocksnow 13 Inc.: 10331 33rd Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-4535; Nonclassified SIF Styles: 6402 Highland Drive, Everett, WA 98203-4630; Beauty Salons Samookie Studio: 14118 Fourth Place W, Everett, WA 98208-6908; Nonclassified Seeing Beyond: 3043 Belmonte Lane, Everett, WA 98201-1251; Nonclassified Smith’s Installation: 2900 Grand Ave., No. 218, Everett, WA 98201-4889; Installation Service Soho Bar: 9602 Evergreen Way, Everett, WA 98204-7140; Bars Star Quality: 12414 Highway 99, Everett, WA 98204-5544; 425-405-3215; Nonclassified Sublime Makeup-N-Mobile Tanning: 1126 W Casino Road, No. F65, Everett, WA 982046804; Tanning Salons Tea Tree Tea Co.: 151 1430 W Casino Road, Everett, WA 98204; Coffee and Tea Tercrisca Salon and Spa: 312 Sydney Lane, Everett, WA 98203-4201; Beauty Salons Tri-Fi 3D: 7306 Highland Drive, Everett, WA 98203-5727; Nonclassified TV Tech: 1415 Lombard Ave., Everett, WA 98201-1626; Television and Radio-Service/ Repair Universal Baking: 9018 27th Ave. SE, Everett, WA 98208-3601; Bakers-Retail WLSS: 215 105th St. SE, Everett, WA 982083929; Nonclassified Will’s Roofing Co.: Care Of Proempresa,

2120 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201; Roofing Contractors

Gold Bar H&H Construction: 608 First Ave. W, Gold Bar, WA 98251-9215; Construction Companies Urban Farm Montessori School: 15832 Larson Drive, Gold Bar, WA 98251-9542; Schools

Granite Falls Cailins Java: 205 Meadow Lane, Granite Falls, WA 98252-8411; Coffee Shops Mountain Loop Mine: 26709 Mountain Loop Highway, Granite Falls, WA 98252; 360691-6104; Nonclassified Osborne Landscape: 812 N Granite Ave., Granite Falls, WA 98252-8775; Landscape Contractors RAG Services: 605 Eagle View Drive, Granite Falls, WA 98252-8001; Services Not Elsewhere Classified

Lake Stevens April’s Visitation Services: 10016 32nd St. SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-5750; Visitation Services Buenos Diaz Cafe: 1811 Main St., Lake Stevens, WA 98258; 425-249-2963; Restaurants Eastern Breeze: 2814 116th Drive SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-5189; Nonclassified Erin’s Lularoe: 3305 114th Drive NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8787; Clothing-Retail Foal Creek Designs: 1716 90th Drive NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-2466; Nonclassified Hardwood Floor Solutions: 3428 99th Ave. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8134; Floor Laying Refinishing and Resurfacing Hodge Podge Ginn: 11720 Meridian Place SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9223; Nonclassified Jackie Wist’s Boutique: 2711 123rd Drive NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9143; Boutique Items-Retail Jaeger Consulting: 13704 84th St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8830; Consultants-Business Not Elsewhere Classified Juniper Studio: 12919 Seventh St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-5406; Nonclassified Lincs Services: 1603 94th Drive SE, No. A, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-3732; Services Not Elsewhere Classified Melissa Goodwin’s Boutique: 1322 130th Ave. SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8075; Boutique Items-Retail Metro PCs: 1907 131st Drive NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8694; Cellular Telephones (Services) Mighty Oak Counseling: 9005 Eighth St SE, No. A, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-3776; Counseling Services North Sound Networks: 8328 Eighth Place NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-3430; Nonclassified Northlake Mechanical: 5716 119th Ave. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8717; Mechanical Contractors P3 Vacations: 3215 127th Ave. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-8064; Nonclassified Simpson Door Co.: 10422 24th St SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-5662; 425-263-9609; Doors Smokin Riff’s Sliders: 107 N Nyden Farms Road, Lake Stevens, WA 98258-9705; Food Products-Retail

Lynnwood Abe & Roger: 705 191st Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4939; Nonclassified Alderwood MMA: 2006 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7089; 425-670-9710; Martial Arts Instruction Amaryllis & Stone: PO Box 5757, Lynnwood, WA 98046-5757; Miscellaneous Retail Stores Not Elsewhere Classified Aqua & Fern: 6423 164th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-2721; Nonclassified Authorized Appliance Repair Co: 2519 196th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036; Appliances-Household-Major-Repairing Belle Cherie Lash & Brow Suite: 16825


BUSINESS BUILDERS 48th Ave. W, No. 246, Lynnwood, WA 98037-6406; Nonclassified Beryl Zoe Photography: 4103b Shelby Road, Lynnwood, WA 98087-5530; Photography Brothers Food: 4525 164th St. SW, No. GG201, Lynnwood, WA 98087-9213 Busy Baby Consignment: 3009 204th St. SW, No. 2, Lynnwood, WA 98036-6950; Consignment Shops Chris Juliano Auth Franchisee: 20926 44th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7703; Franchising Crime Busters Of Nevada Inc.: 19009 33rd Ave. W, No. 330, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4741 Cristianstef: 3326 Lincoln Way, Lynnwood, WA 98087-1623; Nonclassified Dog Blobs: 20804 53rd Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7601; Pet Services Emily Deal Speech-Language: Lynnwood Corporate Center 1940, Lynnwood, WA 98036; Speech Pathologists Five Star Chemdry: 312 164th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-8113; 425-582-2022; Carpet and Rug Cleaners GDL Mr. Clean Inc: PO Box 368, Lynnwood, WA 98046-0368; Janitor Service Go Mart: 15332 Highway 99, No. 11, Lynnwood, WA 98087-2390; Convenience Stores Hardy Development: 3500 188th St. SW, No. 234, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4759; 425582-8906; Nonclassified Himalyan Enterprises: 192nd St. SW, Unit 5, Lynnwood, WA 98036; Nonclassified Horizon Communications Inc.: 6501 212th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7476; 425-5820106; Communications Hume Music: 5620 181st Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-7311; Nonclassified Ilovekickboxing.Com: 19220 Alderwood Mall Parkway, No. 16, Lynnwood, WA 980364800; Martial Arts Instruction Independent Contractor: 1710 206th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7908; Contractors JJ Art Inc.: 19730 64th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5957; 425-361-7291; Art Galleries and Dealers Jun’s Garage: 16911 Highway 99, No. 108, Lynnwood, WA 98037-3104; Automobile Repairing and Service KS Dollar Plus: 19820 40th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-6733; 425-245-8815; Variety Stores Lularoe Teresa Disotell: 6619 164th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-2723; Clothing-Retail Lularoe With Amanda: 14501 16th Place W, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6092; ClothingRetail Metro PCs: 18429 36th Ave. W, No. D201, Lynnwood, WA 98037-7662; Cellular Telephones (Services) Oasis Health + Beauty: 3711 164th St. SW, No. T176, Lynnwood, WA 98087-7052; Cosmetics and Perfumes-Retail Pam’s Cleaning Services: PO Box 1643, Lynnwood, WA 98046-1643; Janitor Service Pocket Studio: 16625 58th Place W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-8306; Nonclassified Pure Skin Beauty Bar: 1132 164th St. SW, No. A, Lynnwood, WA 98087-8167; Beauty Salons RBC Bearings: 4100 194th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-4613; 425-697-2514 SK Co.: 6431 188th St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4203; Nonclassified Sierra Construction: 21300 68th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7310; 425-697-2791; Construction Companies Stop Dirt Cleaning Services: 13909 15th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6050; Janitor Service Telecell Seattle: 18023 Highway 99, No. A, Lynnwood, WA 98037-4492; Cellular Telephones (Services) Tousled Dollhouse: 1415 195th Place SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-7167; Nonclassified Woodinville Signs: 4132 192nd St. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036-5628; 425-967-3085; Signs (Manufacturers) XO Lashes By Ann: 18113 40th Ave. W, Lynnwood, WA 98037-3817; Nonclassified Yafa Cafe: 5009 176th St. SW No. B, Lynnwood, WA 98037-9237; Restaurants

Marysville Aloha Compassionate Counseling: 5613 74th Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-8898; Counseling Services AT&T Store: 319 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-5027; 360-474-4883; Cellular Telephones (Services) Brianna’s Cafe: 314 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-5028; Restaurants Captain Dizzy Car Wash: 1413 Grove St., Marysville, WA 98270-5643; 360-363-4082; Car Washing and Polishing Collins Hills: 13628 57th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98271-7725; 360-659-8687; Nonclassified Cupcake Creations By Carla: 7507 56th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-9203; Nonclassified Double J Accounting: PO Box 1166, Marysville, WA 98270-1166; Accounting and Bookkeeping General Services Elite Xpressions: 8119 49th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-3574; Nonclassified GR X2: PO Box 194, Marysville, WA 982700194; Nonclassified Hair With Heart: 15212 Willow Drive, Marysville, WA 98271-8135; Beauty Salons India’s Bazaar Saris to Spices: 1266 Woodgate Ave., No. A, Marysville, WA 98270-3646; Flea Markets J&T’s Reliable Construction Services: 5408 90th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-2634; Construction Companies Jasmine & Lori: 3525 81st Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-7016; Nonclassified Jimmy John’s: 412 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270; 360-322-6905; Restaurants Keltic Kraze: 4817 73rd Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-8854; Nonclassified Living Room Coffee House: 1636 Fourth St., Marysville, WA 98270-5014; 360-454-0986; Coffee Shops Llynn: 6121 59th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-9528; Nonclassified Lularoe Nicole Beck: 5617 80th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-8996; Clothing-Retail Natural Approach Home Cleaning: 5406 89th St. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-2630; Janitor Service Pacific Land Preservation: 5029 98th Place NE, Marysville, WA 98270-2349; Property Maintenance Panaderia El Angel: 514 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-4541; 360-322-6065; Bakers-Retail Roe’n With Me: 6438 86th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA 98270-8517; Nonclassified Scales & Tails: 1068 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270-4241; Nonclassified Tree Huggers: 6404 77th Drive NE, Marysville, WA 98270-8945; Tree Service

Mill Creek Champion Security Solutions: 16000 Bothell Everett Highway, Mill Creek, WA 980121742; 425-225-6581; Security Control Equip and Systems-Wholesale Come and Go Catering: 1127 141st St. SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-1360; Caterers Emek: 1215 142nd Court SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-1365; Nonclassified Jeffrey A Brennan PLLC: 3100 145th Place SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-5018; Nonclassified Lularoe Emily Lugtu: 1108 Mill Creek Blvd., No. A111, Mill Creek, WA 98012-3093; Clothing-Retail Max Beauty Inc.: 1316 Mill Creek Blvd., No. Q204, Mill Creek, WA 98012-3035; Beauty Salons Northwest Classic: 914 164th St., Suite B12 No. 422, Mill Creek, WA 98012; Nonclassified Pro Players Sports: 15720 Main St., Mill Creek, WA 98012-1555; 425-332-2683; Nonclassified Quality Inn: 3207 159th Place SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-8329; Hotels and Motels Russell Wright Consulting: 14627 13th Ave. SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-5519; Consultants-Business Not Elsewhere Classified Sound Raiser: 914 164th St. SE, No. B12, Mill Creek, WA 98012-6339; Nonclassified That! Interpreting Services-Deaf: PO Box 13653, Mill Creek, WA 98082-1653; Translators

NOVEMBER 2016

and Interpreters Tomato Solution USA: 15913 26th Ave. SE, Mill Creek, WA 98012-7804; Nonclassified

Monroe Apex Seattle Training and Therapy: 261 E Fremont St., Monroe, WA 98272-2335; Training Consultants Cross Fit: 15721 179th Ave. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-1713; Health Clubs Studios and Gymnasiums Ecklund Productions: 24430 144th Place SE, No. 2, Monroe, WA 98272-7798 Ember Ridge Brewery: 14575 Ravenwood Road SE, Monroe, WA 98272-8323; Brewers Hair Art By Jordan Ryder: 15194 Woods Creek Road Lower, Monroe, WA 98272-1511; Beauty Salons Healing Grounds Coffee: 15431 167th Ave. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-2649; Coffee Shops Re/Max Legacy: 1129 W Main St., No. 150, Monroe, WA 98272-2034; Real Estate Sloate Sales: 20101 N High Rock Road, Monroe, WA 98272-8825; General Merchandise-Retail Stained Grains Woodworking: 13790 194th Drive SE, No. Garage, Monroe, WA 98272-7754; Woodworkers Sweet Home Love Decor: 14863 Jake Drive SE, Monroe, WA 98272-2690; Home Accessories and Furnishings Three River’s Salon: 18109 154th St. SE, Monroe, WA 98272-1703; Beauty Salons

Mountlake Terrace ABNC Services: 22301 37th Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-4201; Services Not Elsewhere Classified Ana’s Pupusas: 4717 216th St. SW, No. M203, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-5967 Chaska Mobile Dental Hygiene: 24010 53rd Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace, WA 980435510; Dentists H&R Framing Inc.: 22803 Lakeview Drive, No. C104, Mountlake Terrace, WA 980432886; General Contractors KIS Inventory Services: 22307 65th Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043-2449; Inventory Service

Mukilteo Alice Talbot’s Pop-Ups: 6022 Clubhouse Lane, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5027; Nonclassified Erin Johnson Independent Sales: 4500 Harbour Pointe Blvd., Mukilteo, WA 982754714; General Merchandise-Retail Lodge Sports Grille: 9910 Marine View Drive, Mukilteo, WA 98275-4112; Restaurants Marport Stout Inc.: 12123 Harbour Reach Drive, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5306; Nonclassified Massage Therapy By Brenda Kelch: 973 Goat Trail Loop Road, Mukilteo, WA 982752216; Massage Therapists Premium Marketing Associates: PO Box 24, Mukilteo, WA 98275-0024; Marketing Programs and Services Proper Picnic: 8221 44th Ave. W, No. B, Mukilteo, WA 98275-2847; 425-985-4745 Seals Motel: 12807 60th Ave. W, Mukilteo, WA 98275-5546; Hotels and Motels Solomon Education Center: 10044 Marine View Drive, Mukilteo, WA 98275-4500; Education Centers Yengich Family Sales: 10622 56th Ave. W, Mukilteo, WA 98275-4416; General Merchandise-Retail

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 25

Christy Kruse Fine Art and Photo: 7928 150th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-8401; Artists-Fine Arts DNW Landscape: 12811 189th Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-8633; Landscape Contractors Darren Lauby Building Products: 8008 211th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-7104; Building Materials Earth and Wood Construction: 5232 Pilchuck Tree Farm Road, Snohomish, WA 98290-4598; Construction Companies Evans Consignment: 8022 211th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-7104; Consignment Shops Fleet Pro Inc.: 350 1429 Ave. D, Snohomish, WA 98290; Nonclassified Full Spec Apparel Printing: 15805 242nd St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-6818; Nonclassified Happy Acres Pet Boarding: 10319 196th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-5016; Pet Boarding Sitting and Kennels In The Moment Clothing: 16609 Connelly Road, Snohomish, WA 98296-7056; Clothing-Retail Jaeger Creative: 9303 160th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-7060; Nonclassified Lakeside With Jamie Griffin: 19108 Lerch Road, Snohomish, WA 98290-7718; Nonclassified Manifest Sign and Graphics: 8818 152nd St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-8713; Signs (Manufacturers) Midici: PO Box 250, Snohomish, WA 982910250; Nonclassified Oster Online: 19204 Yew Way, No. A, Snohomish, WA 98296-8178; Nonclassified Patriot Sporting Arms: 11118 Wagner Road, Snohomish, WA 98290-7228; Guns and Gunsmiths Reliable Marine Services: 9513 62nd Place SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-9226; Towing-Marine Rochelle Ja Globstad MPA: 714 Ave. D, Snohomish, WA 98290-2333; 360-568-1814; Nonclassified Scout’s Artistry: 16907 Broadway Ave., Snohomish, WA 98296-8097; Nonclassified Shauna’s Salon: 14903 61st Drive SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-4209; Beauty Salons Whimsical Laughing Corgi: 22109 Villa Drive, Snohomish, WA 98296-7127; Nonclassified

Stanwood Barnstormer & Co.: 2917 181st Place NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-7980; Nonclassified Berryhill: 28920 28th Ave. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-9410; Coffee and Food Services-Mobile Detail On Demand: 31412 Ninth Ave. NE, Stanwood, WA 98292-9664; Automobile Detail and Clean-Up Service EUG Consulting: 7122 277th Place NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-6032; 360-572-3221; Consultants-Business Not Elsewhere Classified Escape Anacortes: 31806 19th Drive NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-5003; Nonclassified Evergreen Home Loans: 9902 270th St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-8091; 360-6546829; Real Estate Loans Khair Goat Farm: 8826 Thomle Road, Stanwood, WA 98292; Goats and Goat By-Products Queen To The End: 28118 73rd Ave. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-4729; Nonclassified Simply Smashing Hair & Makeup: 3223 319th St. NW, Stanwood, WA 98292-5414; Beauty Salons

Silvana

Sultan

North Sound Sweeping Inc.: PO Box 420, Silvana, WA 98287-0420; Sweeping Service-Power

Dustin Echols Racing: 32840 133rd Place SE, Sultan, WA 98294-5006; Nonclassified Robbin Tomich Photography: 32834 135th Place SE, Sultan, WA 98294-5004; Photography Sivewright Studios: PO Box 313, Sultan, WA 98294-0313; Nonclassified

Snohomish Boyd’s Beads & Birds: 7226 69th Ave. SE, Snohomish, WA 98290-6032; Beads-Retail CTK Security: 6921 164th St. SE, Snohomish, WA 98296-8716; Security Control Equip and Systems-Wholesale

Tulalip Vibarsan: 1110 Marine Drive NE, Tulalip, WA 98271-7344; Nonclassified


26 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2016

SNOHOMISH COUNTY ECONOMIC DATA Pending sales, residential real estate

Closed sales, residential real estate

Unemployment rate, percent

Continued unemployment claims

Aerospace employment

Construction employment

Professional services employment

Local sales tax distributions, Snohomish County and incorporated cities

Consumer price index, King and Snohomish counties

03/12

1,665

828

8.4

10,937

44,100

14,400

22,400

$3,503,955

235.74

04/12

1,570

886

7.3

10,674

44,400

14,700

23,100

$3,761,069

05/12

1,579

1,000

7.8

9,578

44,700

15,100

23,300

$4,247,900

06/12

1,448

1,025

8.4

8,951

45,200

15,400

23,300

$4,064,415

07/12

1,400

1,029

8.4

9,114

45,800

16,100

23,300

$4,264,446

08/12

1,324

1,027

7.5

7,834

46,300

16,500

23,400

$4,485,421

09/12

1,206

880

7.1

7,865

46,900

16,300

23,600

$4,522,340

10/12

1,325

937

7

7,870

46,800

16,300

23,300

$4,577,850

11/12

1,114

806

6.8

8,445

47,500

16,100

23,000

$4,768,450

12/12

872

892

6.6

9,351

47,100

15,900

23,100

$4,378,797

01/13

1,154

713

7.1

9,962

46,800

15,600

22,600

$4,466,777

02/13

1,236

673

6.3

9,182

46,600

15,300

22,500

$5,680,845

03/13

1,576

932

5.7

9,060

46,400

15,400

22,500

$4,093,977

04/13

1,500

1,020

4.9

8,891

46,100

15,500

22,900

$3,970,313

05/13

1,487

1,131

4.7

8,093

45,500

15,800

22,700

$4,725,432

06/13

1,488

1,159

5.7

7,888

45,700

16,200

22,900

$4,316,634

07/13

1,470

1,141

5.6

7,787

45,900

18,000

24,000

$4,584,288

08/13

1,402

1,143

6.2

7,062

44,900

18,400

24,000

$4,921,104

09/13

1,150

1,032

N/A

7,180

45,100

18,300

24,000

$3,573,194

10/13

1,219

1,041

6.0

7,149

44,500

18,200

23,900

$4,998,366

11/13

1,010

833

5.7

7,499

44,300

17,900

24,200

$5,132,975

12/13

835

871

5.3

8,829

44,700

17,800

24,000

$3,348,852

01/14

1,195

615

6.0

9,651

44,000

14,500

23,300

$3,382,321

02/14

1,180

688

6.4

8,850

43,700

14,800

23,100

$4,087,089

03/14

1,481

949

6.0

8,897

43,700

14,800

23,400

$3,013,059

04/14

1,454

943

4.9

8,069

43,400

14,800

23,100

$2,923,521

05/14

1,718

1,074

5.0

7,502

43,600

15,100

23,100

$3,370,904

06/14

1,545

1,220

5.1

7,177

44,400

15,400

23,300

$3,290,880

07/14

1,457

1,172

5.3

6,587

44,000

18,400

23,500

$3,474,651

08/14

1,393

1,163

5.4

6,244

43,000

18,800

23,800

$3,695,926

09/14

1,328

1,057

5.1

N/A

42,900

18,800

23,800

$3,838,762

10/14

1,327

1,113

4.8

N/A

41,400

18,300

24,200

$3,663,750

11/14

1,027

885

4.8

6,093

41,800

18,000

24,100

$3,852,205

12/14

956

920

4.5

N/A

42,000

17,700

24,100

$3,582,032

1/15

1,237

686

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$3,280,200

2/15

1,406

740

5.3

6,663

43,000

17,200

23,700

$4,146,999

3/15

1,938

1,075

4.5

6,762

42,800

17,500

24,000

$2,981,599

4/15

1,747

1,272

3.6

6,273

42,800

18,100

24,100

$3,041,795

5/15

1,777

1,315

4.0

5,923

42,800

18,600

24,000

$3,654,693

6/15

1,799

1,374

4.3

5,607

42,700

19,200

24,400

$3,445,201

7/15

1,764

1,411

4.3

5,323

44,100

20,700

25,000

$3,590,957

8/15

1,634

1,442

3.9

5,367

43,600

21,200

25,300

$11,743,713

9/15

1,501

1,290

4.1

5,089

43,600

21,200

25,200

$11,603,019

10/15

1,503

1,178

4.5

5,109

43,400

20,400

25,100

$10,854,566

11/15

1,307

973

5.0

5,748

43,500

20,100

24,900

$11,503,562

12/15

1,067

1,189

5.0

6,193

43,600

19,800

25,300

$10,765,437

1/16

1,249

811

5.7

7,085

43,600

19,300

24,500

$10,477,405

2/16

1,475

848

5.3

6,388

43,500

19,600

24,500

$13,559,687

3/16

1,825

1,156

5.2

6,084

43,100

20,000

24,800

$9,496,443

4/16

1,836

1,213

4.4

5,957

43,300

19,800

25,600

$9,617,406

5/16

1,979

1,386

4.8

5,770

43,300

20,300

25,800

$11,697,044

6/16

1,862

1,493

4.7

5,396

43,800

21,000

26,400

$10,816,389

7/16

1,795

1,515

4.8

5,489

44,000

21,700

26,400

$11,102,633

8/16

1.873

1,538

4.4

5,502

43,900

22,100

26,500

$12,493,656

9/16

1,601

1,431

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$12,193,233

237.93

239.54

240.21

241.36

237.99

239.90

240.82

242.82

242.77

242.78

241.05

242.77

246.61

247.64

247.18

247.854

245.05

245.496

247.611

251.622

251.617

250.831

250.385

250.942

253.815 256.098

256.907


NOVEMBER 2016

THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL 27

ECONOMIC DATA Boeing stock price

PUD retail electricity use, kilowatt hours

Snohomish County PUD connections

New vehicle registrations

Average gas price (regular, unleaded

03/12

$74.37

671,475,890

223

4,419

$4.00

04/12

$76.80

619,896,882

223

4,305

$4.08

05/12

$69.61

495,062,119

290

4,748

$4.16

06/12

$74.30

498,393,947

222

4,585

$4.00

07/12

$73.91

446,516,298

207

4,402

$3.57

08/12

$71.40

468,361,106

282

4,664

$3.81

09/12

$69.60

408,581,275

255

4,155

$4.01

10/12

$70.44

503,030,443

442

4,303

$3.96

11/12

$74.28

473,023,558

225

3,682

$3.47

12/12

$75.36

614,283,104

234

3,636

$3.34

01/13

$73.87

700,861,857

223

4,656

$3.37

02/13

$76.90

674,618,017

316

3,753

$3.62

03/13

$85.85

608,606,315

330

4,713

$3.80

04/13

$91.41

617,541,384

321

4,943

$3.64

05/13

$99.05

492,112,324

276

5,256

$3.83

06/13

$102.32

465,163,451

213

5,275

$3.79

07/13

$105.10

453,404,099

322

5,622

$3.82

08/13

$103.92

470,067,543

232

5,742

$3.78

09/13

$117.50

410,719,601

338

5,141

$3.65

10/13

$138.36

518,766,206

461

5,179

$3.44

11/13

$133.83

461,012,493

447

4,083

$3.24

12/13

$136.92

671,835,200

244

4,752

$3.29

01/14

$125.26

696,306,571

421

5,726

$3.36

02/14

$128.92

682,348,469

386

4,467

$3.31

03/14

$125.49

610,841,349

352

5,428

$3.75

04/14

$129.02

605,381,115

368

6,389

$3.74

05/14

$135.25

468,754,469

466

6,542

$3.87

06/14

$127.23

492,917,254

412

6,626

$3.93

07/14

$120.48

432,682,894

444

6,611

$3.95

08/14

$126.80

463,314,006

363

5,614

$3.83

09/14

$127.38

451,089,566

264

5,987

$3.74

10/14

$124.91

496,335,315

403

5,929

$3.40

11/14

$134.36

422,769,229

426

4,867

$3.04

12/14

$132.25

663,368,433

426

6,072

$2.88

1/15

$145.37

634,592,067

209

6,364

$2.30

2/15

$150.85

611,633,434

287

5,889

$2.30

3/15

$150.08

567,831,393

284

7,707

$2.85

4/15

$143.34

578,264,358

427

8,057

$2.70

5/15

$140.52

449,046,426

326

8,649

$3.05

6/15

$138.72

494,611,488

384

9,852

$3.10

7/15

$144.17

451,503,602

334

7,641

$3.20

8/15

$130.68

474,207,621

242

7,021

$3.09

9/15

$130.95

557,429,310

442

7,018

$2.79

10/15

$148.07

N/A

217

6,828

$2.49

11/15

$145.45

N/A

221

5,631

$2.41

12/15

$144.59

N/A

282

6,995

$2.35

1/16

$120.13

N/A

333

6,910

$2.33

2/16

$118.18

655,390,592

333

7,298

$2.02

3/16

$126.94

612,151,814

288

9,209

$2.12

4/16

$134.80

514,320,049

428

8,364

$2.25

5/16

$126.15

457,566,044

342

8,906

$2.44

6/16

$129.87

463,105,233

277

10,754

$2.57

7/16

$133.66

430,295,041

435

8,268

$2.56

Serving Communities Throughout The Northwest

8/16

$129.45

467,001,501

325

8,315

$2.49

541.617.3500 | botc.com | Member FDIC

9/16

$131.74

454,085,665

394

7,628

N/A

Here to Help Businesses Grow & Thrive Responding to your business opportunities with Local SBA Expertise, Quick Decisions & Streamlined Processing Bank of the Cascades, a leading Northwest SBA lender, is proud to provide Small Business Administration (SBA) loans to help local business succeed. We provide SBA loans for: • Business Expansion • Business Buyouts • Working Capital • Equipment

• Franchise Financing • Self Storage • Manufacturers • Wholesale

Please call or stop by any of our local branches to discuss how we might help your business today. Lynnwood Branch 2502 196th St SW Lynnwood, WA 98036 425.774.5643

1703584

Kenmore Branch 6717 NE 181st St Kenmore, WA 98028 425.415.6564

Mill Creek Branch 2130 132nd St SE Mill Creek, WA 98012 425.357.1516


28 THE HERALD BUSINESS JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 2016

Matt Smith Trident Marine Enthusiastic dad Geoduck farmer Aspiring guitarist

Each and every one of us is an original. Shaped by unique inuences that make us who we are today. Here at Heritage Bank, we think differences can build a better bank, too. That’s why we share the best ideas from across all of our branches and local communities with one goal in mind: to serve our customers better every day. By sharing our strengths, we’re able to offer customers like Matt Smith—and you—more than a community bank. But rather, a community oƒ banks.

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Herald Business Journal - 11.01.2016  

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Herald Business Journal - 11.01.2016  

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