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OLYMPIC PENINSULA NORTH

2016-2017 FALL/WINTER EDITION

discoverm OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK PORT TOWNSEND JEFFERSON COUNTY SEQUIM DUNGENESS VALLEY PORT ANGELES FORKS WEST END NW COAST VICTORIA, B.C.

An advertising supplement produced by Peninsula Daily News, Sequim Gazette and Forks Forum


Hobuck Beach Resort The beauty of Neah Bay speaks for itself.

Coastal lodging where the Pacific meets the Peninsula

Cozy cabins on the beach • Camping & RV

(360) 645.2339 • www.HobuckBeachResort.com • hobuck@makah.com

THE CAPE RESORT

Nestled on the coast of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the heart of Neah Bay.

New Cabins • RV & Camping

360-645-2250 • www.cape-resort.com • caperesort@makah.com 2

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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FALL/WINTER 2016-2017


TERRY R. WARD REGIONAL PUBLISHER

WELCOME TO PARADISE! W

hether you’re a first-time visitor, a returning visitor or a new resident, you’re sure to fall in love with the North Olympic Peninsula. Whatever you imagined it to be, look forward to an experience that exceeds your imagination. You’ll find the Olympic Peninsula, filled with glorious surprises, is home to beautiful beaches, majestic mountains, natural lakes, salmon-bearing rivers, temperate rainforests and the wilderness of the Olympic National Park. This North Olympic Peninsula Guide encourages residents and visitors alike to savor all that is a natural part of our environment and enjoy the multitude of pleasures that transform the ordinary into the extraordinary. Included in this guide is a wealth of information about the goods, services and activities available on the Peninsula. You’ll find sections representing each of the unique communities and regions: Port Angeles, Sequim and the Dungeness Valley, Port Townsend and Jefferson County, Forks and the West End, the North/West Coast and, just across the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Victoria., B.C. We combine all the adventures of wilderness recreation with the comforts of a premier resort destination. While you’re here, we encourage you to read our three newspapers — Peninsula Daily News and the weekly Sequim Gazette and Forks Forum. They contain updated information about community and entertainment events throughout the year. You can also keep in touch 24/7 by logging onto their websites with a smartphone or computer: www.peninsuladailynews.com, www.sequimgazette.com and www.forksforum.com. Welcome to the wonderland of the North Olympic Peninsula.

Terry R. Ward, Regional Publisher

FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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CONTENTS GETTING HERE

Find the best route to the North Olympic Peninsula

WHAT DO YOU DO FOR FUN?

There’s plenty for the whole family to check out

11

ELWHA RESTORATION

13

Learn about the largest dam-removal project in history

WHAT TO DO IN THE PARK

Find out what adventures await you this winter season in ONP

19

PORT TOWNSEND

24

PENINSULA SPIRITS

33

SEQUIM

34

SCENIC DRIVES

52

The Victorian-infused port city is teeming with opportunity If you’re looking for a winery, brewery or cidery, the Peninsula has plenty There’s much to see and do in town and around the Dungeness Spit area Take a ride and take in the scenery along the Peninsula’s roadways

MAP OF THE PENINSULA

Easily find your destination

54-55

PORT ANGELES

58

LAKE CRESCENT

70

FORKS/WEST END

85

PENINSULA TRIBES

94

NORTH/WEST COAST

96

The busy hub boasts a downtown revitalization This popular spot is full of mystery and photo ops Fishing, hiking, hunting, rain forests and more lay in wait Learn about the cultures that make our Peninsula so diverse Treasure hunters delight at what they find along our shores

BEYOND THE PENINSULA

100

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

102

Just across the water, you’ll find even more history and adventure Tune in to what’s coming up on the North Olympic Peninsula ✦

14-15

EMERALD TOWNS

Explore these tiny gems and find art, science and more

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK

Discover what the beautiful park has to offer you

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7

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/ SEATAC Bus To SEATTLE KINGSTON / EDMONDS

Serving:

Port Angeles • Sequim Port Townsend • Discovery Bay Kingston • Edmonds • Greyhound Amtrak • Downtown Seattle Sea Tac Airport • Seattle Hospitals Olympic Bus Lines is an independent agent of Greyhound. You can now purchase your Greyhound tickets locally at your only nationwide reservation location on the Olympic Peninsula. • Free WiFi on board • Providing complimentary home-made chocolate chip cookies and bottled water.

(360) 417-0700

6A1679434

Late night or early morning flight? Ask us about special hotel rates!

Port Angeles/Sequim Outside the area toll free

(800) 457-4492

www.dungenessline.us FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

REGIONAL PUBLISHER Terry R. Ward GENERAL MANAGER Steve Perry

OLYMPIC PENINSULA NORTH

2016-2017 FALL/WINTER EDITION

discoverm OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK PORT TOWNSEND JEFFERSON COUNTY SEQUIM DUNGENESS VALLEY PORT ANGELES FORKS WEST END NW COAST VICTORIA, B.C.

An advertising supplement produced by Peninsula Daily News, Sequim Gazette and Forks Forum

ON THE COVER Clockwise, from top left: The Hoh River emits steam on a cold, wintry day; trees around Lake Crescent boldy show off their autumnal colors; an early-morning frost weighs heavily on a tree limb near the Hoh Rain Forest entrance; a man cross-country skis toward Hurricane Hill up on Hurricane Ridge in Olympic National Park.

The North Olympic Peninsula Guide is a semi-annual publication of Peninsula Daily News, Sequim Gazette and Forks Forum. Copies are distributed at locations throughout the North Olympic Peninsula. All content ©2016-2017, Peninsula Daily News, Sequim Gazette and Forks Forum. The editors of this guide make every attempt to be accurate at the time of its compilation. Report any errors to 360-452-2345 or news@peninsuladailynews.com. 6

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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SPECIAL PROJECT EDITORS Patricia Morrison Coate Brenda Hanrahan Laura Lofgren CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Michael Foster ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Holly Erickson CREATIVE SERVICES MANAGER Sam Nugent CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Michelle Lynn CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Christi Baron Patricia Morrison Coate Michael Dashiell Paul Gottlieb Brenda Hanrahan Laura Lofgren Jonel Lyons Matthew Nash Keith Thorpe ADVERTISING SALES Christi Baron Jeanette Elledge Vivian Hansen Renee Leaf Harmony Liebert Jonel Lyons Joylena Owen Marilyn Parrish GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Brittney Berglund Keith Curtis Mary Field Kevin Franklin Roger Hammers Nicole Harrison Leticia Sparkman


GETTING HERE Victoria 2:10h • 25m

Neah Bay

• 15.5m

• 37m

0:30h

• 21m

2:5

5h

Forks

1:1

5h

North Olympic Peninsula

Kalaloch

2:4

101/20 Junction

• 67

m

•7

5h

3m

•1

Port Hadlock Chimacum Port Ludlow

m

0:40h • 34m

La Push

Lake Crescent

Port Townsend Sequim

0:22h • 13

0:22h

0:42h

• 71m

Coupeville Port Angeles

13m

1:45h

Joyce

0:2 2h •

Sekiu/ Clallam Bay

Quilcene

Edmonds Ferry

26

m

Bainbridge Ferry

5h

1:2

SeaTac

5m

•2

Tacoma Aberdeen

Hood Canal Bridge

Peninsula to the Olympic Peninsula along state Highway 104. Note that the bridge opens for marine vessels that are too large or tall to pass underneath its trusses. It is not an uncommon sight to view a submarine surface to pass through the

opened bridge thanks to Hood Canal’s proximity to Naval Base Kitsap Bangor. Vessel openings — which can take about 30 minutes to complete — are not announced in advance. Phone 5-1-1 or vist www.wsdot.com/ traffic/hoodcanal/ for traffic information.

Weather

lows only dropping into the mid-30s as the water acts a bit like a warming blanket. Snow events are just a handful of times a year, and hard freezes are rare and typically short-lived. Overall, Sequim averages only about 18 inches of rain per year. Port Angeles gets about 27 inches of rain per year, but for every mile you drive west from there and away from the rain shadow, you add about 1 inch of additional rain per year. Once you reach Forks about 75 miles to the west, you’re in a town that averages about 100 inches of rain per year.

Planning your trip

Most visitors to the North Olympic Peninsula cross the Hood Canal Bridge, the longest floating bridge over salt water in the world at 7,869 feet (6,521 feet of it floating). The bridge connects the Kitsap

The North Olympic Peninsula is one of the most temperate spots you’ll find in the United States as the cool waters of the Pacific Ocean to the west and the Strait of Juan de Fuca to the north keep away the heat waves in the summer and the extended freezing periods in winter. Average high temperatures are around 60˚F in the spring and upper 60s in the summer, with just a handful of 80-degree days in the summer. In the winter, high temperatures typically reach the mid-40s, with overnight

FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

The key to being comfortable on the Peninsula is preparing for cloudier days, cool and damp weather, wind and rain and that famous Northwest mist that isn’t really rain but slowly dampens everything around you. Layering is everything; bring long sleeves, sweatshirts/hoodies and a waterproof raincoat for the winter months. Jeans, thermals, winter hiking boots and extra socks are a must. Bring gloves, a warm hat and sunscreen for those days when you’re out and about.

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Discover what do you do

for fun?

Hike

Fish

Explore

Find

Eat Uncover


WHATEVER

YOUR

PASSION IS OR WHEREVER IT MAY LIE, OPPORTUNITIES ABOUND ON THE

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA!

For the hiker: For those looking to hike in Olympic National Park (p. 11) or trek across a coastline (p. 96), look no further than the Peninsula. With endless trails from the mountains to the sea, there’s a hike for everyone. Though the winter season may dampen your experience, the cooler weather makes for a great hike. Whether you’re an experienced backcountry hiker, looking to take the kids on a forested walk or want to wander a well-beaten trail, check out the rest of this visitors guide and read any number of the local guidebooks. Just make sure to pack the 10 essentials, stay safe around wildlife (p. 18), and pack out what you pack in!

For the foodie: When you travel, you gotta eat, and the Peninsula has some fine dining around every bend in the road. Tease your tastebuds with local seafood and homemade entrees and desserts as you make your way around the towns. For all you beer, wine and cider connoisseurs, be sure to check out any number of wineries, cideries or breweries (p. 33).

For the history buff: Looking for some historical action during your trip? The Peninsula has plenty of it for you to discover. With old forts (p. 27) and lighthouses (p. 39) sprinkled throughout each county, families can enjoy learning of our loaction’s past. Many state parks are home to these historical structures and require specific passes to park and tour them.

For the fisherman: The West End of the Peninsula (p. 85) is home to many fishing rivers that boast tremendous trout and salmon opportunities. Try your hand at fly-fishing on the Hoh River; take a drift boat down the Sol Duc with a local guide; or meet up for some bank fishing around the Three Rivers area. (The Sol Duc, Bogachiel and Quillayute rivers all feed into each other, and that’s where you can get into some of the best steelhead fishing in the world.) With state laws subject to changing, be sure to check the local fishing guidelines for whichever area you intend to fish. There are also plenty of fishing opportunities on the North/West Coast (p. 96). Fish for halibut off a boat or participate in a salmon derby. The fishing options are endless!

For the animal-lover: Kids and parents alike will take delight in discovering the wildlife along the North Olympic Peninsula. The Feiro Marine Life Center in Port Angeles (p. 68) boasts tons of information about the local sealife along our shores. Come visit its Pacific octopus and maybe even catch a chance to watch it eat lunch. The Olympic Game Farm in Sequim is a drive-thru excursion where you can get up close and personal with exotic animals. Port Townsend’s Marine Science Center (p. 30) is an interactive natural history museum and hands-on aquarium featuring countless animals, plants and exhibits to touch and discover, including colorful touch tanks filled with anemones, sea stars, urchins, hermit crabs and more.

For the treasure-hunter At low tide along the coast and along the Strait of Juan de Fuca, kids and adults alike get giddy from what they find in our tidepools (p. 99). Explore Freshwater Bay (p. 72) to find shells, hermit crabs, snails, sea urchins, star fish and even the occasional octopus. Along the coast (p. 96), you may find some polished seaglass, old buoys and other washed-up treasures. Just be mindful that many areas do not allow you take home what you find, so bring a camera to capture the moment!

For the snow-enthusiast: Hurricane Ridge (p. 14) in Olympic National Park, just outside Port Angeles, offers skiing, snowboarding and snowshoeing opportunties when there’s snow on the mountain. The Ridge averages 400 inches of snowfall a year. The Hurricane Ridge Ski and Snowboard Area boasts two rope tows, a poma lift, a snow-tubing area and a terrain park. It is open mid-December through the end of March on Saturdays and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and some holidays. FALL/WINTER 2016-2017 ✦ NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE 9


INFORMATION Visitor Centers and Chambers of Commerce CLALLAM BAY/SEKIU CHAMBER 16795 state Highway 112, Clallam Bay 360-963-2339 www.sekiu.com or www.clallambay.com FORKS CHAMBER 1411 S. Forks Ave., Forks 360-374-2531 or 800-443-6757 www.forkswa.com HOH RAIN FOREST VISITOR CENTER Approximately 31 miles south of Forks and east of U.S. Highway 101. Take Highway 101 to Upper Hoh Road. 360-374-6925 HURRICANE RIDGE VISITOR CENTER 17 miles south of Port Angeles on Hurricane Ridge Road.

NEAH BAY CHAMBER www.neahbaywa.com OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK VISITOR CENTER 3002 Mount Angeles Road, Port Angeles 360-565-3130 www.nps.gov/olym OLYMPIC PENINSULA GATEWAY State Highway 19 (Beaver Valley Road), near intersection with state Highway 104 360-437-0120 OLYMPIC PENINSULA VISITOR BUREAU 618 S. Peabody St., Suite F, Port Angeles 360-452-8552 or 800-942-4042 www.olympicpeninsula.org

Transit CLALLAM TRANSIT 360-452-4511 or 800-858-3747 www.clallamtransit.com Public transportation serving Clallam County; operates county’s public specialized paratransit service. JEFFERSON TRANSIT 360-385-4777 or 800-371-0497 www.jeffersontransit.com Serves East Jefferson County; connects with Clallam, Kitsap and Island Transit. OLYMPIC BUS LINES 111 E. Front St., Port Angeles

360-417-0700 or 800-457-4492 www.olympicbuslines.com Operates Dungeness Line; provides two trips daily among Port Angeles, Sequim, Discovery Bay and Kingston, to and from Edmonds, downtown Seattle and Seattle-Tacoma International Airport; charter service. ROCKET TRANSPORTATION 360-683-8087 or 1-877-697-6258 www.gorocketman.com Door-to-door airport shuttle service to and from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport for Clallam and East Jefferson counties.

Hospitals

Ferries

FORKS COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 530 Bogachiel Way, Forks 360-374-6271 www.forkshospital.org JEFFERSON HEALTHCARE 834 Sheridan Ave., Port Townsend 360-385-2200 www.jeffersonhealthcare.org OLYMPIC MEDICAL CENTER 939 Caroline St., Port Angeles 360-417-7000 www.olympicmedical.org

BLACK BALL FERRY/MV COHO 101 E. Railroad Ave., Port Angeles 360-457-4491 www.cohoferry.com Year-round car and passenger walk-on ferry service between Victoria and Port Angeles. WASHINGTON STATE FERRIES 800-843-3779 www.wsdot.wa.gov/ferries State ferries depart from Port Townsend for Coupeville on Whidbey Island daily or from Seattle areas to Bainbridge Island or Edmonds in order for passengers to visit the North Olympic Peninsula via car.

Taxi Services

_____________________________

FORKS Forks Taxi — 360-640-4473

PORT TOWNSEND & EAST JEFFERSON COUNTY Peninsula Taxi — 360-385-1872

PORT ANGELES Black Tie Taxi — 206-483-8652 Northwest Cabs — 360-406-0210 Steady Cabs — 360-912-5666

10

SEQUIM Sun Taxi — 360-681-4090

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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PORT ANGELES CHAMBER, VISITOR CENTER 121 E. Railroad Ave., Port Angeles 360-452-2363 www.portangeles.org JEFFERSON COUNTY CHAMBER 440 12th St., Port Townsend 360-385-2722 or 888-365-6978 www.jeffcountychamber.org NORTH HOOD CANAL CHAMBER 295142 Highway 101, Quilcene 360-765-4999 www.emeraldtowns.com SEQUIM-DUNGENESS VALLEY CHAMBER 1192 E. Washington St., Sequim 360-683-6197 or 800-737-8462 www.sequimchamber.com

TOP 6

Things you didn’t know about the North Olympic Peninsula 1 Mountain goats are not native. On

Jan. 1, 1925, the United States Forest Service released four mountain goats on Mount Storm King.

2 Port Townsend is called the “City of Dreams” because of the early speculation that the city would be the largest harbor on the west coast of the U.S. 3 The “Blue Hole” over Sequim is a climate anomaly where the city receives on average less than 16 inches of rain per year.

4 Forks is named after the forks in the nearby Quillayute, Bogachiel, Calawah and Sol Duc rivers.

5 Average January temperatures in Neah Bay are warmer than Kansas City and Oklahoma City.

6 The blue color of the Hoh River is

due to high amounts of glacial sediment. This “rock flour” comes from rocks grinding together underneath the Hoh Glacier high in the Olympics.

Airline RITE BROS. AVIATION 1406 Fairchild Airport Road, Port Angeles, WA 98363 360-452-6226 or 800-430-7483 www.ritebros.com Charter flights, sightseeing, plane rentals, pilot training, plane repairs and inspections.


Ozette Loop

The 3.3-mile hike to the campground at Cape Alava sounds easy: A short jaunt on a boardwalk to the Pacific Ocean. The stroll along the beach to the petroglyphs at Wedding Rocks to the south sounds equally inviting. Don’t be fooled. The boardwalk can be treacherous in spots. It is quite slick when wet and the beach is an ankle-bending jumble of rock and gravel. The trail starts at the Ozette Ranger Station with a bridge crossing the tranquil, tannin-stained water of the Ozette River. The path soon splits in the woods, one branch heading west toward Cape Alava, the other southwest to Sand Point. Each trail forms a leg of a triangle loop hike, with a 2.9-mile stretch of beach forming the third leg. The path traverses an up-and-down path through young spruce and hemlock packed tight with ferns and other greenery. Part way through the hike, the trail enters a clearing, once the site for homesteader Lars Ahlstrom. After the prairie, the boardwalk plunges into a forest of spruce and ferns. The sound of ocean surf and the fresh whiff of ocean air soon spur weary legs to a scenic overview of the rocky coast. Rather than carry heavy backpacks any farther, hikers can pick a campsite among the twisted spruce and shoulder-tall grass north of the trail.

Arches, excellent tide pools, spires, arches and more. The Shi Shi Beach Trail, a 3.3-mile trek from the Makah Reservation in Neah Bay to the beach, is the easiest way to reach the beach. Much of the trail is a boardwalk that meanders through lush forests, but other sections of the trail can be very muddy, especially after a heavy rain. As the trail winds closer to the ocean, take note of sheer and unmarked cliffs and keep children close. Caution should be used when walking down the steep 150-foot bluff that leads to the beach. Take advantage of safety ropes and pay close attention to tree roots as you descend to the beach. A $10 Makah Recreation Permit (see Page 97) is required to use the trail. Located south of Shi Shi Beach is the spectacular Point of the Arches — a milelong parade of rugged sea stacks. A long stretch of sandy beach leads to Point of the Arches in about 2.3 miles. Photographers flock to Point of the Arches and often camp for several days to try to capture the beauty of the craggy sea Shi Shi Beach and Point of stacks at sunset and sunrise. the Arches Pay close attention to weather reports Numerous publications have listed and tides if planning to camp. Olympic National Park’s Shi Shi Beach as a Camping reservations are required from top beach experience for good reason. May 1 through Sept. 30. This wilderness beach offers breathtaking For details, phone the park’s Wilderness views of the Pacific and nearby Point of the Information Center at 360-565-3100.

Then unburdened, they can head off with light daypacks for the one-mile trek of hopping tide pools and avoiding shifting rocks south to Wedding Rocks — named after a pictogram depicting a man and a woman with a sexual symbol of a bisected circle. The carvings are estimated to be 300 to 500 years old. Respect these historical and sacred artifacts, which predate European settlement in the Northwest. If the tide is low, continue along the surf. If the tide is high, use the steep but short signed trails that bound over rough headlands. Continue on a wide beach and approach another spot that may require a headland detour if the surf is high. Continuing south, the going makes its laborious way across wave-tossed stone past a headland to Sand Point, where stately spires jut out of the sea. A circular sign just past the point marks the trailhead back to the ranger station. Reservations are required for overnight camping between May 1 and Sept. 30. Phone Olympic National Park’s Wilderness Information Center at 360-565-3100 for more information.

Beyond the Peninsula

After enjoying your visit to the North Olympic Peninsula, it is easy to extend your travels to southern Washington and Oregon or even to travel to Vancouver Island, British Columbia. What may not be so easy is actually leaving behind the rugged Olympic Mountains, pristine Pacific Ocean beaches, quaint little seaside towns and the giant stands of oldgrowth trees that decorate the forest. Enjoy one last look at the beauty of the Peninsula as you make your way down Washington’s scenic coastline into Oregon. Or gaze at Port Angeles while aboard the ferry to Victoria, B.C. — a big city with a ton of British charm.

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Ferry to Victoria

The Butchart Gardens

The privately owned Black Ball Ferry Line operates the MV Coho, which takes passengers and vehicles between Port Angeles and Victoria daily. Crossing time takes about 90 minutes. Departures leave from the Port Angeles ferry landing, 101 E. Railroad Ave., and return from the Victoria ferry landing, 430 Belleville St. For schedule and fare details, contact Black Ball Ferry Line (360-457-4491, www.cohoferry.com).

Required crossing documents

All U.S. citizens and permanent residents who cross the international border must carry a valid passport or an accepted traveler program card to return to the United States via sea, including passengers aboard the ferry to the Port Angeles port of entry. Citizens of the United States and Canada will need to present one of the following if taking the ferry between the two countries: o  Passport, passport cards or trusted travel program cards (NEXUS, SENTRI and FAST). o  An enhanced driver’s license/ID card. o  U.S. military identification with military travel orders, U.S. Coast Guard Merchant Marine ID document when traveling on official maritime business, or enhanced tribal cards. Peninsula visitors who are not U.S. or Canadian citizens will be required to have a passport and possibly a visa to enter the U.S. A permanent resident of the U.S. will be required to show his or her immigration “green card” at the ports of entry. All U.S. and Canadian citizens 15 and younger only need proof of their citizenship with an original or photocopy of a birth certificate or citizenship card. Groups of U.S. and Canadian citizen children 18 and younger, when traveling with a school or religious group, social organization or team, will be able to enter under adult supervision with originals or copies of their birth certificates or other proof of citizenship. Those with a criminal record — including a DUI — can be denied entry into Canada. There is a process for applying for a waiver. For details, visit U.S. Customs and Border Protection at www.cbp.gov and Canadian Border Services at www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca.

Things to see in Victoria

Victoria’s Chinatown, founded in 1858, is the oldest and most intact such district in Canada. If you begin exploring Chinatown from Government Street, you’ll pass under the Gate of Harmonious Interest. The gate is made of Taiwanese ceramic tiles and elaborate, decorative panels. Explore the shops and stands as you wander through narrow alleys like the historical Fan Tan Alley, which is only five feet wide and three stories tall.

What started as a sweet pea and a single rose in 1904 has blossomed into The Butchart Gardens, a 55-acre cascade of color that overwhelms the senses. More than 1,000 varieties of flowers can be enjoyed during a stroll through the gardens, but allow yourself plenty of time — one visit can take several hours to properly enjoy the gardens. The former cement factory and quarry site at Tod Inlet can be reached by taking the ferry from Port Angeles to Victoria, then traveling 12 miles north by bus or car. Transit and tour buses are found just east of the Victoria ferry landing. Butchart is really a series of gardens, each with a distinct flair. Full-time, year-round gardeners are constantly planting different flowers, which are identified in a published flower guide noting different flowers by common names written in several languages. The gardens keep with the Victorian tradition of seasonally changing the outstanding floral displays. For more information, phone 866-6524422 or visit www.butchartgardens.com.

Market Square

One of Victoria’s oldest landmarks, Market Square, is a block south of Chinatown; an easy 5-to 10-minute walk from Inner Harbour. Meticulously preserved to maintain its unique character, Market Square is the heart of Victoria’s Old Town. It has more than 35 independently owned and operated shops, eateries and a nightclub. Heritage brick buildings surround an open air courtyard that is great for lunching in the summer sun among colorful, hanging flower baskets.

Art Gallery of Greater Victoria

A bit farther from downtown, the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, 1040 Moss St., is a public art museum with almost 17,000 works of art. When it opened in 1951, the gallery exhibited art in the historical Spencer Mansion. FALL/WINTER 2016-2017 F NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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Olympic Birdfest

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING TO DO? CHECK OUT THE

CALENDAR OF EVENTS There’s something happening on the North Olympic Peninsula throughout the year. During the fall and winter the region plays host to a variety of festivals and events. CALENDAR HIGHLIGHTS Nov. 25-27 — Festival of Trees, Vern Burton Center in Port Angeles — This fundraising event for Olympic Medical Center Foundation and other local charities kicks off the holiday season a teddy bear tea, gala, tree auctions and a silent auction wreaths and other

102

donated items. www.omhf.org April 7-9 — Olympic Birdfest — The weekend attracts birding enthusiasts nationwide with guided birding trips, photography workshops, birding cruises, owl prowls, a banquet, a silent auction, a featured birding expert and more. www.olympicbirdfest.org

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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May 5-14 — Sequim Irrigation Festival — 122nd annual festival commemorating irrigation in the Sequim-Dungeness Valley. Festivities include two street fairs, Kids Day and family picnic, a carnival, a juried art show, logging show and truck and tractor pulls, a car cruise and show and the grand parade. www.irrigationfestival.com

FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

May 26-29 — Juan de Fuca Festival of the Arts — A Memorial Day weekend festival in Port Angeles that features more than 100 international music and dance performances. The festival includes a street fair with arts and crafts and food vendors, art workshops, children’s activities and more. www.jffa.org


OCTOBER PORT TOWNSEND & JEFFERSON COUNTY Port Townsend Farmers Markets, Lawrence and Tyler streets every Saturday through Dec. 17. Chimacum Farmers Market, every Sunday through October. Port Townsend Gallery Walk, first Saturday of each month. Downtown Trick or Treat and Halloween Parade, Port Townsend, Oct. 31. SEQUIM & DUNGENESS VALLEY Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park. “Something’s Afoot,” Olympic Theatre Arts, 414 N. Sequim Ave., Oct. 28-Nov. 13. Trick or Treating Downtown Merchants, Oct. 31. PORT ANGELES Farmers Market, The Gateway, 125 E. Front St., Saturday mornings. Studium Generale, Thursday 12:35 p.m. programs, in the Peninsula College Little Theater. Magic of Cinema Series, Friday nights in the Maier Performance Hall. Downtown Trick or Treat, Oct. 31. FORKS/WEST END Hickory Shirt/Heritage Days, Oct. 5-9. Fish N Brew, Rainforest Arts Center, Oct. 8. “Rain of Terror” Haunted House, Quillayute Airport, Oct. 28-29, Oct. 31.

NOVEMBER PORT TOWNSEND & JEFFERSON COUNTY Port Townsend Farmers Markets, Lawrence and Tyler streets every Saturday, through Dec. 17. Gallery Walk, Port Townsend, First Saturday. JeffCo Holiday Fair, Jefferson County Fairgrounds, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Nov. 5-6. Port Townsend Woodworkers’ Show, American Legion Hall in Port Townsend, Nov. 5-6. Harvest Wine Tour, Olympic Peninsula Wineries, throughout area, Nov. 11-13. www. olympicpeninsulawineries.org. Veterans Day Concert, Port Townsend American Legion Hall, Nov. 11. Thanksgiving Weekend Cruise to

Protection Island, Port Townsend Marine Science Center, Nov. 26. Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Tri-Area Community Center, Chimacum, Nov. 26. Confirm at www.d15.wotfa.org. Port Townsend Holiday Craft Sale, 620 Tyler St., Nov. 5-6. Quilcene Holiday Bazaar, Quilcene Community Center, 294952 Highway 101, Nov. 26. SEQUIM & DUNGENESS VALLEY First Friday Reception and First Friday Art Walk, Nov. 4. Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park. “Something’s Afoot,” Olympic Theatre Arts, 414 N. Sequim Ave., Oct. 38-Nov. 13. Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Sequim Prairie Grange, Macleay Hall, Nov. 12. Confirm at www.d15.wotfa.org. Olympic Orchard Society Fruit Display & Tasting, Clallam County Courthouse, Nov. 7. Native and Non-Native Holiday Fair, Red Cedar Hall, Jamestown S’Klallam campus, Blyn, Nov. 5. Harvest Wine Tour, Olympic Peninsula Wineries, throughout area, Nov. 11-13. www. olympicpeninsulawineries.org. Free admission day, Olympic National Park, Nov. 11. Holiday Nature Mart, Dungeness River Audubon Center, Nov. 18-19. Sequim Guild Holiday Bazaar, Sequim Prairie Grange, Nov. 19. Greywolf Holiday Bazaar, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Nov. 19-20. Yuletide Bazaar, Dungeness Valley Lutheran Church, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Nov. 19. Down Home Holidays, Sequim High School, Nov. 26. Santa’s Coming to Town, Bank of America Park, Nov. 26. Sequim City Band, Sequim City Center, Nov. 26. Annual Lavender Holiday Bazaar, Sequim Lavender Growers Association at Sunland ballroom, 109 Hilltop Drive, Sequim, Friday, Nov. 25, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 26, from 9 p.m. to 4 p.m. PORT ANGELES Farmers Market, The Gateway, 125 E. Front St., Saturday mornings. Studium Generale, Thursday 12:35 p.m. programs, Peninsula College Little Theater. Port Angeles Symphony Orchestra, Port Angeles High School Auditorium, Nov. 5. Sequim City Band, Port Angeles High

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School auditorium, Nov. 6. Christmas Cottage, Vern Burton Center, Nov. 11-13. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. Port Angeles Eagles Auxiliary Bazaar, Nov. 5. First Baptist Holiday Bazaar, Nov. 4-5. Queen of Angeles Holiday Bazaar, Nov. 11-13. Port Angeles Senior Center Bazaar, Nov. 5. Ski Swap, Vern Burton Center, Nov. 5. Holy Trinity Lutheran Church Bazaar, Nov. 12. Harvest Fall Wine Tour, Nov. 11-13. Second Weekend Art Event, downtown. “The Odd Couple,” Port Angeles Community Players, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd. Nov. 18-Dec. 4. Winterfest, Vern Burton Community Center, Nov. 19. Community Christmas Tree Lighting, Conrad Dyar Memorial Fountain, Nov. 26. Festival of Trees, Vern Burton Center, Nov. 25-27. FORKS/WEST END Forks Wine and Cheese, Roundhouse, Nov. 12. Free entrance day, Olympic National Park, Nov. 11.

DECEMBER PORT TOWNSEND & JEFFERSON COUNTY Port Townsend Farmers Markets, Lawrence and Tyler streets every Saturday through Dec. 17. Chimacum Arts and Crafts Fair, Chimacum High School, 91 West Valley Road, Dec. 10-11. Gallery Walk/Artists Receptions, Port Townsend, first Saturday. Community Treelighting, Santa Arrival and Parade, Haller Fountain, Port Townsend, Dec. 3. Admiralty Audubon’s Christmas Bird Count, Dec. 17. “Port Townsend’s Christmas Carol,” Key City Playhouse, Port Townsend, Dec. 1-31. Port Townsend Community Orchestra Holiday Concert, Chimacum High School auditorium, Dec. 3. First Night, non-alcoholic family New Year’s Eve celebration, in/around Port Townsend City Hall, Dec. 31. New Year’s Eve Cruise to Protection Island, Port Townsend Marine Science Center, Dec. 31.

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SEQUIM & DUNGENESS VALLEY Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park. Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Sequim Prairie Grange, Dec. 18. Confirm at www.d15.wotfa. org. First Friday Art Walk, Dec. 2. Handmade Christmas Fair, Sequim Prairie Grange, Dec. 3. Sequim-Dungeness Christmas Bird Count, contact Dungeness Audubon River Center, 360-681-4076, Dec. 19. PORT ANGELES Farmers Market, The Gateway, Saturday mornings. Annual Christmas Bazaar, Port Angeles Friends of the Library, 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Dec. 2-3. North Pole Stroll, downtown Port Angeles, Dec. 3. Vern Burton Christmas Fair, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Dec. 3-4. Second Weekend Art Event, downtown. Port Angeles Symphony Orchestra, Port Angeles High School auditorium, Dec. 10. Raindeer Run and Walk, Port Angeles City Pier and Olympic Discovery Trail, Dec. 17. Shop ’til You Drop, downtown store event with music and treats, Dec. 22. “Best Christmas Pageant Ever,” Port Angeles Community Players, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., Dec. 9-11. FORKS/WEST END Cherish Our Children, A-Ka-Lat Center, LaPush, Dec 2. Breakfast with Santa, Congregational Church, Forks, Dec. 3. Moonlight Madness, Forks downtown merchants, Dec. 3. Twinkle Light Parade, Forks, Dec. 3. Forks Festival of Trees, Dec. 3-4.

JANUARY PORT TOWNSEND & JEFFERSON COUNTY Gallery Walk/Artists Receptions, Port Townsend, first Saturday. Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Tri-Area Community Center, Chimacum, Jan. 28. Confirm at www.d15.wotfa.org. Strange Brew Festival, American Legion Hall, Port Townsend, Jan. 29-30. Port Townsend Chamber Music Festival, City of Angels Ensemble, Joseph F. Wheeler Theater, Fort Worden State Park, Jan. 15.

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SEQUIM & DUNGENESS VALLEY First Friday Reception & First Friday Art Walk, Jan. 6. Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park. Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Sequim Prairie Grange, Macleay Hall, Jan. 14. Confirm at www.d15.wotfa.org. Port Angeles Symphony Chamber Orchestra, Sequim Worship Center, Jan. 14. “The Importance of Being Earnest,” Olympic Theatre Arts, 414 N. Sequim Ave., Jan. 27-Feb. 12. PORT ANGELES Farmers Market, The Gateway, Saturday mornings. Studium Generale, Thursday 12:35 p.m. programs, Peninsula College Little Theater. Second Weekend Art Event, downtown. Port Angeles Christmas Bird Count, Jan. 2. Port Angeles Symphony Chamber Orchestra, Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, Jan. 13. Young Artist Competition, Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, Port Angeles, Jan. 21. Snowgrass 2017, local bands, bluegrass, Port Angeles High School, TBA. Comedy Night, Port Angeles Community Players, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., Jan. 14.

FEBRUARY PORT TOWNSEND & JEFFERSON COUNTY Gallery Walk/Artists Receptions, Port Townsend, first Saturday. Red Wine and Chocolate, wineries throughout area, Feb. 11-12 and Feb. 18-20. www.olympicpeninsulawineries.org. Olympic Peninsula Salmon Derby, Port Townsend Boat Haven, Gardiner Boat Ramp and other areas, Feb. 17-19. Port Townsend Community Orchestra Winter Concert, Chimacum High School auditorium, Feb. 26. Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Tri-Area Community Center, Chimacum, Feb. 26. Confirm at www.d15.wotfa.org. Annual Shipwrights’ Regatta, Port Townsend, Feb. 25-26. SEQUIM & DUNGENESS VALLEY First Friday Art Walk, Feb. 5. Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park.

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Red Wine and Chocolate, wineries throughout area, Feb. 11-12 and Feb. 18-20. www.olympicpeninsula wineries.org. Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Sequim Prairie Grange, Macleay Hall, Feb. 12. Confirm at www.d15.wotfa.org. NPBA Building, Remodeling & Energy Expo, Sequim High School, Feb. 18-19. “The Importance of Being Earnest,” Olympic Theatre Arts, through Feb. 12. Olympic Peninsula Salmon Derby, John Wayne Marina and other areas, Feb. 17-19. Sequim Irrigation Royalty Pageant, Sequim High School auditorium, Feb. 11. PORT ANGELES Farmers Market, The Gateway, 125 E. Front St., Saturday mornings. Studium Generale, Thursday 12:35 p.m. programs, Peninsula College Little Theater. Port Angeles Symphony Chamber Orchestra, Port Angeles High School auditorium, Feb. 4. Second Weekend Art Event, downtown. Doll Show, Vern Burton Center, Feb. 4-5. Red Wine and Chocolate, wineries throughout area, Feb. 11-12 and Feb. 18-20. www.olympicpeninsulawineries.org. Olympic Peninsula Salmon Derby, Ediz Hook, Freshwater Bay and other areas, Feb. 17-19. “The Haunting of Hill House,” Port Angeles Community Players, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., Port Angeles, Feb. 24-March 12.

MARCH PORT TOWNSEND & JEFFERSON COUNTY Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Tri-Area Community Center, Chimacum, March 26. Confirm at www.d15.wotfa.org. SEQUIM & DUNGENESS VALLEY First Friday Reception and First Friday Art Walk, March 3. Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park. Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Sequim Prairie Grange, Macleay Hall, March 12. Confirm at www.d15.wotfa.org. Soroptimist Gala Garden Show, Boys & Girls Club, March 18-19. “Over the River and Through the Woods,” Olympic Theatre Arts, March 31-April 16.

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PORT ANGELES Farmers Market, The Gateway, 125 E. Front St., Saturday mornings. “The Haunting of Hill House,” Port Angeles Community Players, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., through March 12. Port Angeles Symphony Orchestra, Port Angeles High School auditorium, March 11. Clallam County Home and Lifestyle Show, Port Angeles High School, March 11-12. Second Weekend Art Event, downtown.

FORKS/WEST END Easter Egg hunts, various locations, April 15. Easter Breakfast, Elks Lodge, April 15. RainFest, multiple venues, April 21-29. Fabric of the Forest Quilt Show, April 21-23. Welcoming of the Whales Ceremony, La Push, TBA.

Rearing Pond, May 7. Forks Logging and Mill Tour, Forks Chamber of Commerce, starts May 31, Wednesdays through Sept. 6.

MAY

FORKS/WEST END Quillayute Scholarship Auction, Forks High School, March 17-18. Welcoming of the Whales Ceremony, La Push, TBA.

PORT TOWNSEND & JEFFERSON COUNTY Port Townsend Farmers Market, Lawrence and Tyler streets. Gallery Walk/Artists Receptions, Port Townsend, first Saturday. Rhody Festival, Port Townsend, May 14-21. Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Tri-Area Community Center, Chimacum, May 28. Confirm at www.d15.wotfa.org. Brinnon Shrimpfest, field between Cole RV and the Yelvik Store, 303375 U.S. Highway 101, May 27-28.

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE WEBSITES Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce, Port Townsend/Chimacum: www.jeffcountychamber.org North Hood Canal Chamber of Commerce, Quilcene/Brinnon: www.emeraldtowns.com Sequim-Dungeness Valley Chamber of Commerce, Sequim/Dungeness Valley: www.sequimchamber.com Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce, Port Angeles and other regional www.portangeles.org Forks Chamber of Commerce, Forks/La Push: www.forkswa.com Clallam Bay/Sekiu Chamber of Commerce, Clallam Bay/Sekiu: www.clallambay.com Neah Bay Chamber of Commerce, Neah Bay: www.neahbaywa.com

APRIL PORT TOWNSEND & JEFFERSON COUNTY Gallery Walk, Port Townsend, first Saturday. Port Townsend Community Orchestra Spring Concert, Chimacum High School auditorium, April 30. Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Tri-Area Community Center, Chimacum, April 23. Confirm at www.d15.wotfa.org. Port Townsend Farmers Market reopens, Lawrence and Tyler streets, opens first Saturday in April. SEQUIM & DUNGENESS VALLEY “Over the River and Through the Woods,” Olympic Theatre Arts, through April 16. Olympic BirdFest, Dungeness River Audubon Center, 360-681-4076, April 7-9. First Friday Reception & First Friday Art Walk, April 7. Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park. Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Sequim Prairie Grange, Macleay Hall, April 9. Confirm at www.d15.wotfa.org. PORT ANGELES Farmers Market, The Gateway, 125 E. Front St., Saturday mornings. Second Weekend Art Event, downtown. Port Angeles Symphony Orchestra, Port Angeles High School auditorium, April 22. “Dracula: The Musical,” Port Angeles Community Players, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., April 28-May 14.

SEQUIM & DUNGENESS VALLEY First Friday Art Walk, May 5. Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park. Irrigation Festival, May 5-14. www. sequimirrigationfestival.com. Port Angeles Symphony Chamber Orchestra, Sequim Worship Center, May 13. Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Sequim Prairie Grange, Macleay Hall, May 15. Sequim Irrigation Festival Grand Parade, May 13.

For up-to-date information about events across the North Olympic Peninsula check out chamber of commerce websites in each city and region.

For even more event information, check out Peninsula Daily News — www.peninsuladailynews.com, Sequim Gazette — www.sequimgazette.com and Forks Forum — www.forksforum.com.

PORT ANGELES Port Angeles Farmers Market, The Gateway, 125 E. Front St., Saturday mornings. Second Weekend Art Event, downtown. Port Angeles Symphony Chamber Orchestra, Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, May 12. Juan de Fuca Festival of the Arts, multiple venues, May 26-29. www.jffa.org. North Olympic Mustang Annual Show, May 6-7. Cruise at 11 a.m. Saturday from Price Ford; registration 9 a.m. Sunday at Gateway Center, www.northolympicmustangs. com. FORKS/WEST END Forks Lions Club White Cane Days Live Auction, Blakelee’s Bar & Grill, May 6 Annual Kids Fishing Derby, Bogachiel

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HIKE YOUR HEART OUT IN

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK Often called “three parks in one,” where else can you view breathtaking mountain vistas, colorful tide pools and some of the largest remnants of ancient forests remaining in the nation in just one day? Did you know?

The park protects 922,651 acres encompassing three distinctly different ecosystems — rugged

glacier-capped mountains, more than 70 miles of wild Pacific coast and magnificent stands of old-growth trees and

temperate rain forest. A United Nations World Heritage Site and International Biosphere Reserve, the park is

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celebrated for its dramatic variety and untamed beauty. About 3 million people visit the park each year.

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Before you start exploring

Stop by the Olympic National Park Visitor Center, 3002 Mount Angeles Road in Port Angeles, to pick up a map, buy a park pass and talk to a ranger about what there is to see and do during your visit. An Olympic National Park pass is good for up to seven consecutive days at any Olympic National Park entrance. The pass costs $20 for vehicles, $10 for noncommercial motorcycle and $7 for hikers, bicyclists or pedestrians. Children 15 and younger are admitted free of charge. An annual pass costs $40 and is good at any Olympic National Park entrance for one year from the month of purchase. The America the Beautiful pass costs $80 and allows admission to all national parks for one year from the month of purchase. A lifetime America the Beautiful pass is available for seniors (62 and older) for $10. For additional pass information, including other discounted and volunteer pass options, visit www.nps.gov/olym.

Getting around the park

Olympic National Park can be easily visited on foot or by car. More than 600 miles of trails weave throughout the park, from short, easy loop trails to rigorous, primitive hikes along high passes or ocean beaches. For most of the arduous trips inside the park, you’ll need a topographic map, which you can buy at visitor centers and ranger stations. For those who prefer to see some of this nearly 1-million-acre park by car, there are 168 miles of paved and gravel roads that provide access to various points. All park roads are “spur roads” off U.S. Highway 101. Remember: No roads traverse the Olympic wilderness. The rugged wilderness is a fragile environment. To help protect animal and plant life, waterways and each person’s wilderness experience, the National Park Service creates and enforces a variety of regulations. The Olympic National Park Visitor Center on the way to Hurricane Ridge in Port Angeles is fully accessible, as is the Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center on the West End. Other centers and ranger stations provide varying levels of accessibility and hours of operation. For more information, visit www.nps.gov/olym.

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NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

Counterclockwise from top: A group of visitors enjoy a break up at the Hurricane Ridge Visitors Center. Point of Arches is set against the wild and rugged Olympic coast. Camp riverside up at the Hoh Campground on the West End. Lake Angeles is worth the leg-burning hike into the park.

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Celebrating 100 years

The National Park Service turned 100 on Aug. 25. This centennial kicked off a second century of stewardship of America’s national parks and engaged communities through recreation, conservation and historic preservation programs. Fee-free admission to national parks will be offered Nov. 11 in honor of Veterans Day. The fee waiver includes entrance fees, commercial tour fees, and transportation entrance fees. Other fees such as reservation, camping, tours and concessions are not included. Kids can join in the Centennial celebration by discovering the wonder of our country’s majestic national parks in a fun,

informative and adventure-filled Centennial Junior Ranger booklet. The guide is filled with color photos, fun facts, cool things to do, conservation tips and more. Download it at www. tinyurl.com/100JuniorRanger. The United States Mint is commemorating the National Park Service’s Centennial by issuing three limited-edition coins. The 100th anniversary of the National Park Service Commemorative Coin Program includes a $5 gold coin, a silver dollar and a half dollar clad coin. Proceeds from coin sales go to the National Park Foundation to support projects that protect parks for future generations. For more information about the park service’s centennial, visit www.tinyurl.com/NPScentennial.

Elwha River Restoration

The Elwha River Restoration is a National Park Service project that began in mid-September 2011. The project, the largest dam-removal project in history, entailed tearing down the 108-foot Elwha Dam and the 210-foot Glines Canyon Dam and restoration of the Elwha River watershed. The removal of both dams was completed in August 2014. In May 2016, the Elwha River interpretive center was completed. The panels inside the building describe the history of the Elwha River and its dam removal and restoration. A collage of photos of the Elwha River and a painting by a Lower Elwha Klallam tribal member called “Five Nations” are also part of the center. The interpretive center is located at 66 Lower Dam Road, off state Highway 112.

Newly formed beaches near the mouth of the Elwha River, west of Port Angeles Online, there is a link to a series of webisodes on the National Park Service Elwha River Restoration page that chronicle the removal of the Elwha and Glines Canyon dams. The videos begin with

the history of the dams and continue through their deconstruction and restoration of the ecosystem. Visit the National Park Service site at www.nps.gov and search for “Elwha River Restoration.”

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WHAT

TO DO IN THE

PARK?

Winter may be a bit rough out here on the North Olympic Peninsula, but that doesn’t stop anyone from visiting the many amazing aspects of Olympic National Park. Although most of the areas of the park remain accessible, a few ranger-led programs and many facilities are closed. Check out what you can do despite the blustery winter days ahead.

Leaf-peeping Sight-seers don’t have to travel far to enjoy the vibrant colors of autumn. Olympic National Park is full of native deciduous trees and shrubs that burst with an assortment of fall shades and hues. While you’re out taking in the colors of the Peninsula, you’ll find yourself in a few different types of forests. There are four basic types of forests on the North Olympic Peninsula: Temperate rain forest, lowland, montane and subalpine. Temperate rain forest is found at low elevations along the Pacific Ocean coast and in the western-facing valleys of the Peninsula, where lots of rain, moderate temperatures and summer fogs exist. The lowland forest grows farther inland from the coast and above the rain forest valleys. The lowland forest gives way to the montane forest. As elevation increases, temperatures cool and more moisture falls as snow; growing seasons get shorter and the subalpine zone takes over. The lower portion of the subalpine zone consists of continuous forest, but in the upper part of this zone, the forest thins out. Increasing elevation causes even more severe climatic conditions. Trees become fewer, shorter and more misshapen.

Hiking Thankfully, hiking in the park is much cooler than in the summer. The Pacific Northwest’s mild autumnal weather means the only extra gear you need to pack is a raincoat. As the season changes into winter, however, heavier gear may required depending on your hiking destination. Layers are your best friend. Per usual, backcountry campers are required to obtain a permit. Some good hikes in the park include Shi Shi Beach and Point of the Arches, any of the three beaches in La Push, Marymere Falls and Hurricane Hill. Remember to hike by the tide if you’re heading to the coast, and always let someone know where you’re heading off to and when they can expect you back.

Skiing/Snowboarding/Snowshoeing Hurricane Ridge is the focal point for snow and winter recreation, with opportunities for snowshoeing, cross-country and downhill skiing, snowboarding and tubing. Weather permitting, Hurricane Ridge Road opens Fridays through Sundays and holiday Mondays during the winter season, but storms or avalanche hazards can lead to road closures at any time, according to www.nps.gov/olym. The Hurricane Ski and Snowboard Area is operated by the Hurricane Ridge Ski Club. The ski area includes two rope tows, a poma lift and tubing area.The ski area is generally open from mid-December through the end of March, weather permitting. Visit www.hurricaneridge.com for more information about prices and hours. All vehicles are required to carry tire chains when traveling above the Heart O’ the Hills entrance station during the winter season. Call the Road & Weather Hotline at 360-565-3131 for current information or follow @HRWinterAccess on Twitter for road updates. 14 NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE ✦ FALL/WINTER 2016-2017


Mushrooming Autumn is the perfect season to forage for mushrooms in Olympic National Park. Our dense regions are full of wild mushrooms, including lobsters, chantrelles, king boletes and hedgehogs. Remember, some mushrooms are poisonous. Always check with an expert source if you are unsure of what’s edible. Out of Sequim, the Olympic Peninsula Mycological Society is made up of fungi enthusiasts who share the common interest of studying mushrooms. For more information about this club, visit www.olymushroom.org.

Salmon-viewing The Sol Duc River is one of the best places in Olympic National Park to view spawning coho salmon in October. Thanks to a series of cascades along a narrow, rocky stretch of river, outdoor enthusiasts of all ages and abilities can watch the salmon jump up small waterfalls from a viewing platform. These determined fish are forced to jump up and over a waterfall called the Salmon Cascades. The cascades can be found 7 miles from U.S. Highway 101 along the Sol Duc Valley Road. The falls are easily seen from the road, and parking is provided a short distance away, where a short path leads to a deck overlooking the cascades. Another good spot to view spawning salmon is the small tributary of the Hoh River, accessed by the Hoh Visitor Center nature trail in November and December.

Stargazing The days are getting shorter, so the opportunities for stellar star-gazing are growing. Head into the park at dusk, post up with a camp chair, blankets and some hot cocoa, and gaze upward to name the constellations, look for shooting stars and maybe even catch a glimpse of the Northern Lights. Spend an evening on a mountain peak, along the coast or at your campsite leisurely viewing the night sky. The Milky Way can sometimes be seen more easily in fall evening skies.

Camping Olympic National Park boasts 16 park-operated campgrounds with a total of 910 sites, but during the fall/winter season, many campgrounds close. The following campgrounds are open year-round: Heart o’ the Hills (walk-in if snow covered); Hoh, Kalaloch, Mora, North Fork (primitive); Ozette (primitive); and Staircase. Sol Duc is open through Oct. 30, and Deer Park is open through mid-October, depending on snow conditions. Rangers suggest getting to your camping destination early, particularly on holiday weekends. It is a first-come, first-served basis at all established campsites. Campgrounds may close on short notice due to weather or unsafe conditions. Call 360-565-3130 for the most current information. All park campsites provide a picnic table and a fire pit. Park campgrounds do not have hook-ups or showers. The majority of the campsites in the park charge $15-$22 per night. All park campgrounds are handicapped accessible, with the exception of Dosewallips, which is walk-in only. Kalaloch does not have handicapped beach access trails. The Altair and Elwha campgrounds, nestled near the Elwha River, are closed indefinitely due to storm damage and are not expected to open this winter or upcoming summer. For more information, visit www.nps.gov/olym. FALL/WINTER 2016-2017 ✦ NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE 15


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Riverview RV Park

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e-mailjeffcofairgrounds@olypen.com www.jeffcofairgrounds.com

6A1698812

RV Group Camping Available 4907 Landes Street Port Townsend 360-385-1013

“Newest” RV Park • 28 sites, 19 pull-thru on the • Full hookup Peninsula

SEQUIM

www.gilgaloasisrvpark.com 360-452-1324 • 1-888-445-4251

www.olympicanglers.com

6A1698814

(behind Econo Lodge, across from QFC)

6A1698835

• Paved pads & roads • Clubhouse, laundry showers 400 S. Brown Rd., Sequim

• 32 acre Riverfront Property • Cabin Rental • Wi-Fi • RV & Boat Storage On-Site • 5 Mi. to Pacific Ocean Beaches • Guided River Trips • Spacious & Quiet • Fish Cleaning Station • Ice, Bait, Fishing Tackle

33 Mora Road, Forks 640-4819 • 640-4820 • (360) 374-3398

CABINS, RV SPACES, TENTS & GIFT STORE

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6A1698838

2634 West Sequim Bay Rd., Sequim, WA 98382 • 360-681-DUKE www.johnwayneswaterfrontresort.com


PROPANE

53802 Hwy. 112 West Port Angeles (360) 928-2488 www.olypen.com/scrv

Crescent Beach & R V Park EVERCHANGING SURF • AWESOME SUNSETS • SAND DOLLARS AGATES • EAGLES • SEASHELLS

DAY • TENTS • RVS (w/e/s) LAUNDRY • HOT SHOWERS

(360) 928-3344

15 miles west of Port Angeles off Hwy 112

www.olypen.com/crescent • E-mail: crescent@olypen.com

6A1698822

HALF MILE SAND BEACH

Campground & RV Park Shadow Mountain

Clallam County Parks

Close to Olympic National Park 15 miles W. of P.A. on Hwy. 101 Across from Lake Sutherland

Dungeness & Salt Creek Recreation Areas

Full Hookups, Tent Spaces, Laundry, Store, Deli, Fuel

WiFi Hot Spot 6A1698826

232951 Hwy. 101 Port Angeles (360) 928-3043 (877) 928-3043

PORT ANGELES

6A1698813

Located on Washington’s Beautiful Olympic Peninsula

• 9 Hole Golf Course • Clubhouse • Pull Thrus • Propane • Group Discounts

Discounts for Active Military, Police & Firemen www.shadowmt.com

Elwha Dam RV Park

Offering: Camping Year-Round Playgrounds Campsite Reservations Picnic Sites Full-Service Restrooms Beach Recreation Birding Opportunities Hiking Trails

Port Angeles, WA

On beautiful Scenic By-way Highway 112

www.ElwhaDamRVpark.com

651585295

360-452-7054

651587680

• Conveniently located for exploring the Olympic National Park • 10 minutes to quaint downtown shoppes • 10 minutes to Victoria ferry • Quiet wooded setting

360-417-2291

www.clallam.net/parks • email parks@co.clallam.wa.us FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

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Wildlife safety

Olympic National Park offers many opportunities to view animals in their natural habitats. But along with these chance viewings come risks and responsibilities for visitors. Here are a few tips from www.nps.gov to keep your park visit fun and safe: •  Observe wildlife from a distance: All wildlife is protected by the park, and visitors are asked to maintain a distance of at least 50 yards (half a football field) between themselves and any animal, even if the animals approaches closer. •  Never feed wild animals: This includes birds, squirrels, marmots, deer, otters, etc. •  Keep children close: Kids should stay within immediate sight at all times. •  Store food properly and keep your campsites clean: Cook and eat away from your sleeping area. Store food by locking it in your vehicle or using a bear-proof container. •  Avoid wildlife during sensitive times: This includes when animals are mating, nesting, raising young and during winter. While in the park, you may find yourself observing mountain goats. While they may appear harmless, it is necessary to take precaution when you are in their vicinity. Goats have sharp, potentially lethal horns, and they may stand their ground if encountered on a trail. Never feed mountain goats. If a goat approaches, slowly move away. If it persists, chase it off by yelling, waving your arms, waving clothing or throwing rocks. Mountain goats are attracted to salts found in human sweat and urine. Do not leave clothes or gear unattended on a trail. If you must, urinate on rocks, bare soil or snow at least 100 feet from the trail. Male goats may become particularly

The 10 essentials

Deer at Hurricane Hill

aggressive during the autumn and early winter breeding season (October through December). Black bears and cougars also inhabit Olympic National Park. Follow the aforementioned guidelines when one is sighted. Please report all cougar observations to your nearest ranger. Along with the park’s larger animals, visitors should take caution with insects, too. Although insect bites are generally uncommon, stinging insects like wasps, bees and hornets can cause some hiking safety considerations for those with severe allergies. During fall, foraging wasps can become aggressive. Certain clothing and scents can

It is a good idea to pack “The 10 Essentials” whenever you step into the backcountry, even on day hikes. Although you might never use these items, they could save your life if trouble strikes on the trail. 1. Map and compass. 2. Sunscreen, hat and sunglasses. 3. Extra clothing

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4. Headlamp and/or flashlight. 5. First-aid supplies. 6. Waterproof matches or lighter. 7. Repair kit and tools. 8. Extra food. 9. Extra water. 10. Emergency shelter. Also, leave a detailed hiking plan with someone before you hit the trail.

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help minimize contact. Close-fitting white or tan clothing are encouraged; stay away from loose-fitting, brightly colors clothing, especially light blue, pink, red and orange. Minimize use of scented body items like perfumes. In late summer and early fall, yellow jacket populations peak. Keep food covered when picnicking or hiking in the park. Avoid walking barefoot and watch where you walk or sit down. Avoid waving your arms to shoo yellow jackets away. Instead, back away slowly and use both hands to cover your face. Swift movements will only attract more yellow jackets. Stay on trails to avoid disturbing any potential yellow jacket nests.


Quilcene River

BIG PAY-OFFS IN THE LITTLE

EMERALD TOWNS Discovering the “emerald towns� of Quilcene and Brinnon is like finding a rare gem. These quiet whistle-stops offer visitors a place to relax and experience life the way it should be lived: peacefully. Did you know?

Well-known for its clams and oysters, this Hood Canal region also offers seasonal crabbing,

shrimping and fishing opportunities. For those who would rather let others do the hunting and gathering, there are many

seafood retailers and restaurants throughout the region. Nearby are pristine scuba diving opportunities.

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For those who prefer the RV life or tent camping, opportunities exist in several federal, state, county or private campgrounds.

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OLYMPIC PENINSULA CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Clallam County Gem & Mineral Association General Meeting: 3rd Tuesday, 7 p.m. “The Fifth Ave.”, 500 W. Hendrickson, Sequim Classes Available, Lapidary Shop. Rock Show, Sept. 10 & 11, 2016 360-681-3994 www.sequimrocks.com

Port Angeles Senior Center 328 E. 7th Street, Port Angeles 98362 Business Hours: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday-Friday, Closed Holidays D Bellamente, 360-457-7004 www.portangelesseniorcenter.com paseniorcenter@olypen.com

Clallam County Republican Party Republican Headquarters, 509 S. Lincoln, P.A. 4th Monday each month at 6:30 p.m. Mon - Fri 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. • 360-417-3035 or Dick Piling 360-460-7652

Puget Sound Anglers North Olympic Peninsula Chpt. Trinity United methodist Church 100 S. Blake Ave., Sequim 3rd Thursday of month @ 6:30 p.m., Free Kids Fishing Derby in May - Carrie Blake Park Sherry Anderson, Secretary 360-681-4768 psanopc.org • webmaster@psanopc.org

Fraternal Order of Eagles #483 2843 E. Myrtle St., Port Angeles Aerie - 1st & 3rd Mondays @ 6:00 p.m. Auxiliary - 2nd & 4th Mondays @ 7:00 p.m. Jackie Smith 360-452-3344 International Footprint Association Olympic Peninsula, Chapter 74 Dinner meeting 2nd Monday, 6 p.m. Sequim Elks Lodge No. 2642, 143 Pt. Williams Gene Mattson 360-681-0533 Naval Elks Lodge #353 131 East First Street, Port Angeles 1st & 3rd Thursday of the month 360-457-3355 naval@gmail.com Olympic Driftwood Sculptors 1st Wednesday Every month, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Sequim Prairie grange, 290 Macleay Rd., Sequim Driftwood Show July 15-17th at Sequim Middle School Tuttie Peetz, President & Instructor 360-683-6860 info@olympicdriftwoodsculptors.org Olympic Peninsula Equine Network “We provide rescue, rehabilitation & dignity to abandoned, abused or neglected horses” 2nd Tuesday, 6:30 pm Sequim Library Valerie Jackson, president 360-207-1688 www.olypenequinenet.org

Sequim City Band Swisher Hall, 563 N. Rhodefer, Sequim Wednesdays 7 pm - 9 pm Richard Greenway 360-207-4722 www.sequimcityband.org Sequim Prairie Grange 290 Macleay Road, Sequim 2nd Wednesday at 7 p.m. - Business Meeting 4th Wednesday with 6:30 Potluck & program Joy Barrett 360-683-7021 Sequim Valley Lions Paradise Restaurant, 703 N. Sequim Ave., Sequim 2nd & 4th Thursday at 6:30 p.m. Betty Wilkerson 360-461-6090 Soroptimist Int’l Port Angeles Jet Set Senior Center Corner of 7th & Peabody 7:00 a.m., Every Thursday Marsha Robin 206-650-5431

Pacific Northwest Wood Artisans General meeting: Port Angeles Senior Center Workshops in Carlsborg, 2nd Thursdays, 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. Workshops/ Instructions, every Tuesday, 12:00 - 3:00 p.m. Gordon Day, President, 360-681-7032 Gary Cummins, Publicity, 360-379-0771 Port Angeles Business Association Joshua’s, 113 DelGuzzi Rd., Port Angeles Tuesdays 7:30 a.m. John Brewer, President jcbrewer8@gmail.com

Rotary Club - Nor’wester Seasons Café - Olympic Medical Center Friday @ 7 a.m. Andy Callis, President, 360-452-2314 www.rotarynorwester.org

Sequim Visitor & Information Center Sequim Dungeness Valley Chamber of Commerce 1192 E. Washington Street Sequim, WA 98362 360-683-6197, 800-737-8462 Wapiti Bowmen Meeting - 374 Arnette Rd, Port Angeles First Wednesday every month 7 p.m. Except no meeting September or December Scott Gordon 360-460-5636

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6A1698764

If you would like to have your club or organization listed on this page in our Fall Olympic Peninsula Guide call (360)452-2345 ext. 3060 or email mparrish@peninsuladailynews.com


Quilcene and Brinnon

Quilcene and Brinnon are nestled among the trees near Olympic National Forest. Some campsites are in the seclusion of quiet forests, while others are adjacent to or within easy walking distance of Hood Canal and the three main rivers that flow out of the Olympic Mountains to Hood Canal — the Dosewallips, Duckabush and Hamma Hamma. While exploring the beaches, riverbanks and forest roads or trails, visitors can observe an abundance of wildlife including a variety of bird species, seals and perhaps a glimpse of one of the several bands of majestic elk that roam throughout Brinnon’s Dosewallips and Duckabush valleys.

Coyle

Take a side trip over to Coyle, where you can experience an all-ages Concert in the Woods at the Laurel B. Johnson Community Center, 923 Hazel Point Road (www. coyleconcerts.com). There are no services like gas stations or markets out on the “Coyle Peninsula,” so come prepared. Additional details and information are available from the North Hood Canal Chamber of Commerce at www.emerald towns.com.

Port Hadlock and Tri-Area

Port Hadlock and the Tri-Area of Chimacum, Nordland and Irondale are at the crossroads of the most populated area in Jefferson County, near Port Townsend. This commercial hub is also the gateway to Marrowstone and Indian islands. Port Hadlock and the Tri-Area have a history of building business and community. In the 20th century, agriculture, smelting and lumber were the primary industries.

Port Ludlow

Port Ludlow is a residential and recre-

Marrowstone Island

Located southeast of Port Townsend, Marrowstone Island is a narrow piece of land that houses the small community of Nordland along with Fort Flagler State Park.

Despite its small stature, the island’s community has plenty to offer visitors. Those looking to camp or fly some kites can find the perfect spot at Fort Flagler as well as Mystery Bay State Park, a 10-acre marine state park located at 7875 Fort Flagler Road. Here and at the fort, campers can partake in clamming, crabbing, fishing, diving and more. A Discover Pass is required for both parks as well as corresponding licenses for recreational activities. Take the turnoff for Port Townsend off U.S. Highway 101. Turn right onto Anderson Lake Road, left on Rhody Drive and right onto Highway 116.

HOOD CANAL DIRECTORY Stottle Winery Tasting Room Hwy 101 in Hoodsport Taste Handcrafted Award Winning Washington Wines

Winter Hours Fri - Sun 11am - 5pm 24180 Hwy 101 Hoodsport, WA www.StottleWinery.com FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

Vintage ♥ Gifts ♥ Handmade

A Family Tradition Since 1994!

Visit us at www.the-picketfence.net for more information

22 Washington St., Quilcene, WA

6A1698756

Chimacum is known for its dairy farms spreading across Chimacum Valley. H.J. Carroll Park, off state Highway 19, is a county park that offers a playground, BMX track, disc golf course and other amenities.

ational community built up around the shores of Ludlow Bay. The natural environment and developed facilities offer hikes on wooded trails and paths, digs for clams and oysters along the beach, drives through scenic countryside, bicycling and jogging. Explore the gravelly shores at low tide at Shine Tidelands, a state park property next to the Hood Canal Bridge.

6A1698480

Chimacum

Quilcene is known for its tasty oysters

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Olympic National Forest

The Olympic Peninsula features more than 2,132,300 acres of federal lands to enjoy. Of these, more than 633,600 acres are managed by Olympic National Forest, which blankets the foothills of the Olympic Mountains and surrounds much of Olympic National Park. Most of the forest is within Clallam and Jefferson counties, with parts in Grays Harbor and Mason counties. Olympic National Forest features 19

developed campgrounds, five boating sites, four nature trails and one viewpoint. Visitors should know which agency manages the site or lands they plan to visit because opportunities and regulations differ among agencies. A recreation pass is needed for visiting Olympic National Forest. Recreation passes do not cover fees for cabin rentals, winter snow-parks or climbing and wilderness permits. Passes also do not cover fees at developed campgrounds.

A National Forest Recreation Day Pass costs $5 per day and is honored at all Forest Service entrances or day-use fee sites in Washington and Oregon. An annual Northwest Forest Pass is available for $30; an Interagency Annual Pass is available for $80. Fees are waived at National Forest Service-managed day-use sites on Veterans Day (Nov. 11). Visit www.fs.usda.gov/olympic for more information about Olympic National Forest and permits and passes.

WINERY DIRECTORY

6A1698745

Est. 1982

1010 Water St., Port Townsend, WA

Wine • “Champagne” • Beer Cheese-Deli • Chocolate

Wine Tastings Everyday Value 1st & 3rd Fridays Oct-June Wines from Check Store or Website for 2 for $799 Other Events Open 7 days a week 11-7ish Weekdays 10:30-8ish Weekends Even Later Summer & Holiday Hours

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www.PTwineSeller.com

691698748

6A1698483

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Just a few short blocks from the Ferry! 360-385-7673


Taste the Elements of the Olympic Peninsula: Earth, Air, Water & Wine

Sequim’s Premier Winery and Wine Bar

Hours:

Artisan Wine and Art in the Winery

Wed. & Thur. 2–6pm Fri. 2–9pm, Sat. 12–9pm

Traditional Ciders • Vinegars • Shrubs Tasting room hours: 12-5 Fri-Sun, Mar-Dec alpenfirecider.com 360-379-8915

Open: Wed - Sun May - October Noon - 5:00 p.m. (360) 385-9608

Live Music Fri. & Sat.Night 360-681-0690 windrosecellars.com

Tasting room 143 W Washington Sequim, WA

www.MarrowstoneVineyards.com

ComeforaUniqueExperience! q p

Wine&Beer Tasting

Marrowstone Vineyards

Crafted wine excellence in a beautiful garden setting. Visit us at 334 Benson Rd. Port Angeles www.cameraderiecellars.com

TastingRoomOpen TTasting i Mon.-Sat.11am-6pm Sun11am-5pm

360-417-3564

2358 Highway 101 West (360) 452-4262

ORCHARD & CIDER GARDEN

OPEN DAILY FOR TASTINGS! Open Daily 12-6pm & Fri-Sat to 9pm

(360) 732-4337 124 Center Rd., Chimacum, WA www.finnriver.com info@finnriverfarm.com

Red Wines Hard Ciders And Meads

NEW Tasting Room at the Palindrome

1893 S. Jacob Miller Rd., Port Townsend

360-732-4084

Check website for tasting room hours

www.eaglemountwineandcider.com

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✦

6A1698142

Visit our website for our events: www.olympicpeninsulawineries.org Find us on Facebook at the Olympic Peninsula Winery Association and Instagram @olypenwineryassociation

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Fort Worden State Park

FIND HINTS OF THE VICTORIAN ERA IN

PORT TOWNSEND Established in 1851, Port Townsend’s character comes from its boom in the 1880s and 1890s as a major seaport, fishing and lumber area. The architecture of the Victorian era peppers the city. Did you know?

the North Olympic Peninsula. It is the seat of Jefferson County. Artists of all disciplines

At the eastern end of the Peninsula, Port Townsend takes pride in being a cultural hub on 24 NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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gravitate to the town of 9,100 that relishes its eclectic personality. The city boasts festivals,

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homages to wooden boats and a plethora of music and theater performances throughout the year.


A port’s pinnacle

Port Townsend’s heyday as a lateVictorian seaport brought wealth and style to the community as upwardly mobile captains and merchants built fine homes for themselves. A leisurely drive around the “uptown” area overlooking Admiralty Inlet reveals about 30 homes built between 1860 and 1900, restored to their late 19th-century glory in a variety of styles, including classic Victorian and Victorian Gothic, Italianate, Italianate Villa and Italianate Renaissance, Queen Anne and Georgian. Most are private residences and not open to the public. Port Townsend shined in the 1880s and 1890s with the promise of a railroad. So many of the homes reflect the style of the waning Victorian Age with massive construction and elaborate ornamentation. Tasteful plaques and signs give a mini-history lesson with the original owners’ names and dates built. The state’s oldest Methodist church, from 1871, has a museum open to the public, and the Episcopal church, built in 1860, remains a place of worship today. But the most magnificent Port Townsend structure overseeing the entire city is the classical Victorian Jefferson County Courthouse, built in 1892 of red brick with its 124-foot clock tower. The county’s business still is conducted in the building, a National Historic Landmark and one of the two oldest

courthouses in the state. Port Townsend was designated a National Historic District in 1976. After 15 years with an active Main Street program, Port Townsend was honored in 2000 with the Great American Main Street award from the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Several blocks of buildings restored to their late-Victorian facades and tree-lined streets make ambling downtown a pleasurable activity. Don’t forget to visit the downtown wharf for another great photo opportunity. If you’re looking to shop, the downtown area has a plethora of businesses to fit any family members’ wants and needs.

From high-class boutiques to sporting goods stores to consignment shops, spice shops to art galleries, the family could spend a whole day just in the downtown. Manresa Castle was completed in 1892 as the home of Charles and Kate Eisenbeis. This then-30-room private residence went through several changes before becoming what it is today — a castle hotel that can accommodate anywhere from a couple to a wedding party. The Waterstreet Hotel is another one that offers old-world charm near the port. If you’re looking for a spot to sit down, relax and munch on a meal, Port Townsend has a wide array of restaurants and pubs that offer a range of culinary delights.

FALL INTO FUN

Special Fall Packages include Bed, Breakfast & Brews! Fall packages start at $199/night and include:

Bring this ad when you join us during our regular programming and receive $1.00 off admission

691697485

Use FallFun code when booking!

6A1697874

Something for everyone

• Vacation Home • Breakfast for Two • $25 Voucher for Taps at the Guardhouse

FORTWORDEN.ORG • 360.344.4400 FALL/WINTER 2016-2017 fasll visitors guide.indd 1

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ART

Galleries

PORT TOWNSEND

Art by Jeff Tocher

1. Pacific Traditions & Aloft Images 637 Water St. 360-385-4770 Local & nationally recognized Native Artists of distinction. www.pacifictraditions.com

Daily 10-6

MARITIME CENTER MEMORIAL MADISON ST.

ATHLETIC FIELD

807 Washington St. Daily 10-6 360-379-1713 Port Townsend’s destination woodcraft gallery featuring over 30 local artists, and our own work in figured and burl Redwood, Myrtlewood, and Western Quilted Maple. Expanded inventory of raw materials such as live edge planks, book matched table tops, turning stock, slabs, and natural bases of all sizes. Our full woodshop can assist with your projects from shelves to dining tables. www.forestgems.com

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3. Frame Works

WASHINGTON ST.

Open Daily 10

35

WATER ST.

2

JEFFERSON ST.

715 Water St. 360-379-8110 Fine Arts Cooperative Gallery in Port Townsend for 19 years. www.porttownsendgallery.com

4

ADAMS ST.

211 Taylor Street, Suite B5 (in the Undertown) Mon - Sat 10-5 360-385-3809 A fun & efficient framing studio featuring a gallery of local and regional artists. www.frameworksnw.com

4. Port Townsend Galler y

1

QUINCY ST.

TO UPTOWN

6A1684966

2. Forest Gems Galler y

TAYLOR ST.

TYLER ST.

5. The Red Dragonfly

211 Taylor St. Suite B2 (in the Undertown) Thurs-Tues 11-5 360-385-1493 Port Townsend’s alternative art gallery, offering contemporary art, artisan jewelry and unique gift items. www.reddragonflypt.com

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1012 Water St Daily 10-6 360-379-8881 A gallery with inspiring and diverse talent. Celebrating the 12th anniversary of this cooperative organization of creative local artists. www.gallery-9.com

7. Earthenworks

TO FERRY

6. Galler y 9

TO INSERT

702 Water St. Daily 10-5 360-385-0328 “A Gallery of Fine Things” Representing more than 300 American artists in a variety of medias. Quality work displayed as it might appear in your home or office. www.earthenworksgallery.com

8. Phoebe Cantelow Ceramic Sculpture

2009A 4th St. (Behind Habitat for Humanity) 360-774-6885 Handmade Whimsical Ceramic Sculpture

4TH ST.

Wed-Sat 12-5

9. Daily Bird Pottery

2009 4th St. Weds- Fri 12-5 360-301-5646 Artist Production Studio and Gallery. Elevating art to everyday ware, all handmade on site. Find us Saturdays 9-2 at the Jefferson County Farmer’s Market, Sundays 10-3 at the Ballard Farmer’s Market dailybirdpottery.com

www.EnjoyPT.com

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ON GT HIN

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Art Walk first Saturday evening of every month.

S WA

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TRIO To uncover the best places to romp with your dog on the beach, hike to your heart’s content, be lullabied by waves slapping on the shore and fling open your tent flap to the sun sparkling over the mountains, just ask some Olympic Peninsula residents for their favorite parks. More than likely, they’ll direct you to a trio of former forts, now state parks, that are destinations unto themselves. A Discover Pass is required to visit these sights.

Fort Flagler State Park

Fort Flagler State Park on the tip of Marrowstone Island is a bit out of the way, but definitely worth the scenic drive, as it is surrounded by Puget Sound. The state park has about 785 acres on a high bluff with vistas of Puget Sound and the Cascade Mountains. It has 12.5 miles of roads, five miles of hiking/biking trails and more than 3.5 miles of generous sandy shoreline. For the intrepid, there’s swimming and waterskiing as well as saltwater fishing in the brisk water or from the shore. Fort Flagler was a working Army fort from 1897-1953 and became a state park in 1955. A number of its Victorian buildings remain and can be toured by phoning the park office at 360-385-3701. Visitors also can explore the military museum with its interactive, interpretative display. It’s open weekends from October through May.

service. In 1895, after Port Townsend’s heyday, the barracks burned and the fort, like its namesake, faded into Jefferson County history for decades. Owned by the state since 1953, the site has about 370 heavily wooded acres and 3,960 feet of saltwater shoreline offering views of Admiralty Inlet, Port Townsend Bay and the Cascade Mountains. There are 6.5 miles of forested hiking trails, including a self-guided nature trail and one highlighting the park’s fort history. The park is open for day use during the winter months.

Fort Worden State Park and Conference Center

For visitors from all over, Fort Worden State Park and Conference Center is a day trip and camping destination with its two miles of sandy beaches. Upon entering the park, visitors will be swept back a century by three dozen Victorian houses that were used as barracks in the fort’s early years.

OF

FORTS

The houses, ranging from one-bedroom to six-bedroom units with living rooms, dining rooms and kitchens, may be reserved by calling 360-344-4434 or visiting www.parks.wa.gov/fortworden/ accommodations. The park has 12 miles of hiking/biking trails and five miles of trails that are handicapped-compliant. Along the beach-side road are the Port Townsend Marine Science Center, the Natural History Museum, a concession stand with restrooms, the Point Wilson Lighthouse and the Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum. New to the grounds is the Taps at the Guardhouse, a 21 and older pub and eatery serving small plates that feature locally sourced ingredients, regional distilled spirits and craft brews, ciders and wines from the Pacific Northwest. For more information about Taps, visit www.facebook.com/TapsFortWorden. For more information about Fort Worden State Park, visit www.fortworden.com.

JEFFERSON COUNTY RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA

Fort Townsend State Park

Flowers, Concentrates, Edibles, the Works!

Now Serving Medical

Herbal Access 8962 Beaver Valley Rd, Chimacum WA

(1st building on the right when coming into town from the east)

www.herbalaccess.com

6A1699108

Although the Strait of Juan de Fuca and its inland bays had been explored and named by British Capt. George Vancouver in the late 1790s, the settlement of Port Townsend (originally Port Townshend) didn’t begin until about 1850. Old Fort Townsend was established in 1856 on Port Townsend Bay to protect these early settlers from surrounding Native American tribes. Throughout the next century, the fort was on furlough more than it was in

10-8 daily | 360.379.4689

This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

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METHODIST

LUTHERAN Grace Lutheran Church

Trinity United Methodist Church

Built in 1871 609 Taylor Street Port Townsend (360) 385-0484 email: trinityumc@olympus.net Rev. Tony Brown

PORT TOWNSEND

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

First Church of Christ Scientist Port Townsend 275 Umatilla, near Discovery and San Juan Port Townsend • (360) 379-1139 SUNDAY 10 a.m. Sunday Service 10 a.m. Sunday School WEDNESDAY 12 p.m. Testimony Meeting READING ROOM IN SUNDAY SCHOOL Mon & Fri. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wed 1:30 to 3 p.m. Sun After Sunday Service christiansciencechurchporttownsend.com

SUNDAY 10 a.m. Worship We welcome and accept all persons equally, regardless of race, gender, or sexual orientation. Come hear our two pipe organs. Child care available and handicap accessible.

BAPTIST San Juan Baptist (SBC)

FRIDAY 7:30 a.m. Bible and Breakfast for Men at Seaport Landing 1201 Hancock Street, Port Townsend For current schedules, special activities and information, please call: 385-1595

Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 2333 San Juan Avenue Port Townsend (360) 379-0609 Rev. Bruce Bode, Senior Minister Rev. Florence Caplow, Minister

WEEKLY SUNDAY SERVICES 9:15 and 11:15 a.m. each Sunday. Religious Education for children at 9:15 a.m. Childcare available at both services. A Welcoming Congregation A Green Sanctuary Visit our website at www.quuf.org quuf@olympus.net Follow us on Facebook!

2135 San Juan Ave. Port Townsend (360) 385-2076

1704 Discovery Road, PT b/n Sheridan & McPherson (360) 385-2545 www.sanjuanbaptist.com Dr. Conrad B. Dodd, Pastor David L. King, Minister of Music and Youth Proclaiming the Gospel in Port Townsend for over 46 years

10 a.m. Worship Service* and Kingdom Kids

Family Friendly. Bible Believing. Pastor James Lyman (360) 385-4544 SUNDAY 10 a.m. Bible Study 11 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m. Children’s Church FRIDAY Third Friday of the month Free Movie! (Come early for popcorn and cartoons!) www.ebcpt.org

*Nursery provided WEDNESDAY 10:00 a.m. Prayer Meeting DURING THE WEEK Home Bible studies, Kids Club and Youth Activities. Call the church office for times & locations, and for special events.

First Baptist Church 1202 Lawrence St. (Uptown) Port Townsend, WA 98368 (360) 385-2752 Skip Cadorette, Pastor Loving God and Loving Port Townsend SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Worship Service

ROMAN CATHOLIC St. Mary Star of the Sea 1335 Blaine Street Port Townsend (360) 385-3700 Father Peter Adoko-Enchill

MASS SCHEDULE SATURDAY 9:00 a.m. sabado misa en espa–ol 5:30 p.m. Vigil Mass SUNDAY 8:15 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. WEEKDAYS Mon., Thurs., Fri. 12:05 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m. COMMUNION SERVICES 12:05 Tuesday www.stmaryss.com

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UNITY Unity Spiritual Enrichment Center Spirituality with Open Hearts ...Open Minds Rev. Pamela Douglas-Smith 3918 San Juan Ave. Port Townsend (Near Blue Heron School) Mailing Address: PO Box 1853 Port Townsend, WA 98368 (360) 385-6519 SUNDAYS 11 a.m. Inspirational Service & Children/Youth/Team Circles Check our website for classes, special events and meditation groups. Authentic Transformative Spiritual Community info@unitypt.org Visit our website at: www.unitypt.org

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A relaxed, blend of contemporary and traditional styles of music, prayer and honest Biblical teaching. Nursery provided. www.firstbaptistpt.org firstbaptistpt@gmail.com

WEDNESDAY 10:00 a.m. Lessons of the week Bible study

EVANGELICAL Evangelical Methodist Church

“The Church on Discovery”

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

SUNDAY 10:30 a.m. Worship with Holy Communion

Visit us on the World Wide Web: www.gracelutheranpt.org

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SUNDAY SERVICES 9 a.m. Sunday School* for all ages

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Evangelical Lutheran Church in America 1120 Walker Street • (360) 385-1595

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST


Ferry to Coupeville

Port Townsend offers a Washington State Department of Transportation ferry from the city to Coupeville. This quiet waterfront farming community — known to many as the heart of Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve on Whidbey Island — still reflects the character of a frontier seaport when Puget Sound was being settled. It is home to Fort Casey State Park, beaches and 91 nationally registered historical structures. This route is arguably one of the most scenic ferry routes in Washington. For more information on Port Townsend ferry departure/arrival times, delays and more, visit www.wsdot.com/ferries.

Chetzemoka Park

Named in honor of the Klallam chief Chetzemoka, friend of the pioneers, the 5.1-acre park overlooks Admiralty Inlet. The city-owned gem is located on the water and has a stunning view of the

Nearly two dozen parks dot the landscape of Port Townsend, but the showpiece is Chetzemoka Park, located at Jackson and Blaine streets.

PORT TOWNSEND PRESBYTERIAN

First Presbyterian Church of Port Townsend

1111 Franklin Street (360) 385-2525 Spirit, Compassion, Justice SUNDAY 10 a.m. Worship & Youth Education www.fpcpt.org

PORT LUDLOW

COMMUNITY CHURCH Port Ludlow Community Church

Connecting Christ and Community 9534 Oak Bay Road Port Ludlow, WA 98365 (360) 437-0145 Dennis LaMance, Pastor

SUNDAY 8:45 a.m. Adult Bible Class 10:30 a.m. Service of Worship email: plcc@olympus.net portludlowcommunitychurch.org

Cascade Mountains and Whidbey Island on clear days. The park features flower gardens, picnic areas, play equipment and a bandstand, plus easy access to the beach and tidelands.

QUILCENE

PRESBYTERIAN

Quilcene First Presbyterian Church

“A Little Church with A Big Heart” Corner of Columbia and Hwy 101, Quilcene (360)765-3930 Rev. Dennis Hughes, Ph. D. SUNDAY 10:00 a.m. Sunday School & Bible Study 11 a.m. Worship Service

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Aero Museum

If antique airplane aficionados are anything like their car-worshipping counterparts, they’ll hit every museum within a hundred miles. One not to miss on the North Olympic Peninsula is the Port Townsend Aero Museum at Jefferson County International Airport, 4 miles south of the junction of state Highways 19 and 20. About 30 antique airplanes have been donated to the nonprofit and, after meticulous restoration, are displayed on three levels. At any given time, a half-dozen are being hand-restored by youth apprentices in the building’s shop, mentored by skilled volunteer craftsmen. The museum is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays. Admission is $10 for adults, $9 for seniors and active military, $6 for youth 7-12 and free for kids 6 and younger. For more information, phone 360-3795244 or visit www.ptaeromuseum.com.

Historical Society

The Jefferson Museum of Art & History,

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located at 540 Water St., is in the magnificently restored 1892 Port Townsend City Hall building. Housed in the former municipal courtroom, fire hall and jail spaces, the museum’s exhibits illustrate the lively history of communities born in waterfront forests more than 150 years ago. Museum hours are daily from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission for adults is $6, $5 for seniors, and children 3-12 are $1. For more information, phone 360-3851003 or visit www.jchsmuseum.org.

Marine Science Center

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The Jefferson Museum of Art & History

With exhibits on both the scenic pier and shoreline at Fort Worden’s expansive sandy beach, the Port Townsend Marine Science Center rewards residents and visitors alike with dynamic displays of intertidal plants and animals indigenous to the Salish Sea. The center, founded in 1982 as an educational and scientific organization, is devoted to inspiring conservation of the Salish Sea. The interactive natural history museum and hands-on aquarium feature countless animals, plants and exhibits to touch and discover, including colorful touch tanks filled with anemones, sea stars, urchins, hermit crabs and more. They also boast a hydrophone to listen to nearby whales, brand-new interactive exhibits on glaciers and climate change,

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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Marine Science Center and one of only six fully articulated orca skeletons in the United States. Tiny plants and animals, known as plankton, are collected daily off the pier with the help of visitors, to be viewed under microscopes. Interactive oceanography-on-the-dock activities are free and open to the public. Scheduled guided beach walks to nearby tide pools and live feeding of the animals in the marine exhibits are summer favorites for children and available with admission to the exhibits. Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for children and free for members. In the summer, the center is open daily from noon to 5 p.m. (except Tuesdays) and in the fall, winter and spring from noon to 5 p.m. Fridays through Sundays. For more information about the center, visit www.ptmsc.org.


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NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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PENINSULA SPIRITS The North Olympic Peninsula is home to several award-winning wineries, cideries and breweries. Explore hidden backroads and see spectacular countryside as you visit the different locations and taste distinctive wines, hard ciders and beers.

Wine

Many of the wineries use grapes from Eastern Washington, although some grow their own cool-climate grapes or use berries and fruit from local farms. Often you’ll find the winemakers themselves pouring in the tasting rooms and greeting visitors. A handful of the wineries banded together to form the Olympic Peninsula Wineries Association (www.olympic peninsulawineries.org). Starting in Port Angeles, Harbinger Winery is located at 2358 W. U.S. Highway 101. Camaraderie Cellars, located at 334 Benson Road in Port Angeles, is surrounded by the forests of Olympic National Park. Heading east on U.S. 101 toward Sequim,

Discovery Bay

Cider

Make your way over to Port Townsend for a stop at Eaglemount Wine & Cider at 1893 S. Jacob Miller Road for a glass. If you use GPS, don’t rely solely on it when trying to find the winery; use your eyes and look for the sign. Alpenfire, located at 220 Pocket Lane, has a certified organic orchard. For more options, travel to Chimacum’s Finnriver Farm & Cidery, located at 142

Barn Swallow Road, for some popular local brews.

Beer

Who doesn’t love a trip to a local taproom where hops are turned into amber ales, IPAs and stouts? Port Townsend Brewing Company opened its doors in 1997 with only two beer offerings. Today, they have more than 10 ales. They are located at 330 10th St., Port Townsend. Propolis Brewing, with its now-secured retail and production locations at 2457 Jefferson St., brews ales using 100 percent certified organic Pacific Northwest malted barley and wheat. 101 Brewery is located at 294793 U.S. Highway 101 in Quilcene. Stop in for a bite and a brew. In Port Angeles, check out Barhop Brewing & Taproom, 124 W. Railroad Ave. They brew small-batch microbrews made from Olympic Mountain water, including rye ales, IPAs, porters and more.

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FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

Forbes (Nov. 4, 2012) A large NIH-sponsored trial has turned up substantial evidence in support of chelation therapy for patients with coronary artery disease. Known as TACT (Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy), headed by Gervasio Lamas, MD, the study was sponsored by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. Chelation therapy with EDTA, known to remove heavy metals from the blood, has been used to treat coronary artery disease since the 1950’s. TACT was a double blind study of chelation in stable patients with a history of myocardial infarct. The primary endpoint of the trial--the composite of death, heart attack, stroke, bypass surgery, stent procedure, and hospitalization for angina--was significantly lower in the chelation group. Chelation Therapy is an important therapeutic support for patients having coronary and cardiovascular disease. Call for a consultation to discuss the option of having chelation therapy.

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Discovery Bay is an ideal place to take a rest from the road, stay overnight or just get away from the faster pace of living. It is located at U.S. Highway 101 and state Highway 20. The Port of Port Townsend owns a public recreational boat launch off Gardiner Beach Road that provides access to the bay. British explorer Capt. George Vancouver found Discovery Bay in 1792 and named the body of water after his flagship, HMS Discovery. After a sawmill was built in 1853, boats carried wood in and out of the bay. The old mill is no longer standing. In 2008, the North Olympic Salmon Coalition created and restored salt marsh habitat, known as the Salmon Creek Estuary.

stop in at Olympic Cellars for a true wine treat. In Sequim, Wind Rose Cellars is located at 143 W. Washington St. FairWinds Winery, located at 1984 W. Hastings Ave., Port Townsend, relies on growers in the Yakima Valley to produce small-batch wines. In Port Townsend, visit Lullaby Winery, located at 274 Otto St., Suite S. Marrowstone Vineyards, 423 Meade Road, Nordland, presents red, white and fruit wines within the vineyard with views beautiful enough for a wedding.

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SPEND A SUNNY DAY IN

SEQUIM In the rain shadow of the 8,000-foot Olympic Mountains, this city in the Dungeness Valley is one of the driest locales in Western Washington, which means summertime sun abounds. Did you know?

region long before their arrival. many of whom retired to the Approximately two hours from area from across the country. The first European settlers Pronounced “Skwim,� downarrived in the Dungeness Valley Seattle, Tacoma and Olympia, the Sequim-Dungeness Valley is town is a destination for in the 1850s; however, the Klallam tribe had inhabited the home to some 27,000 residents, tourists and locals to eat, shop, 34 NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE F FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

catch a little culture and enjoy conversation over cups of coffee or glasses of wine. Come for the sun and stay for the friendliness of the locals.


A sunny town

The Sequim-Dungeness Valley gladly has adopted the moniker of “Sunny Sequim,” as it is blessed by an average of 300 days of sunshine. In the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains, Sequim receives an average of 16 inches annually. The city is home to the longest running festival in the state of Washington. The Sequim Irrigation Festival will celebrate 122 years in May and was named “The Best Small Town Celebration” in Evening Magazine’s 2015 Best of the Northwest competition.

Explore downtown

Downtown Sequim is a destination for

those who enjoy eating, shopping, exploring and relaxing. The downtown is a walkable community of locally owned and operated specialty shops anchored by Sequim Avenue and Washington Street. There are nearly 60 small businesses — which are conveniently located — that offer plenty of variety and take pride in personalized customer service. Downtown businesses and artists joined forces several years ago to make art available to all with the 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. First Friday Art Walk. From 5 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., join the artists’ reception, which offers snacks and wine at the art co-operative, Blue Whole Gallery, at 129 W. Washington St.

The walk includes more than a dozen venues highlighting more area artists. Maps are available at participating businesses. It’s a great time to mingle, nosh and appreciate all the art downtown Sequim has to offer. Sequim has a strong community theater in Olympic Theatre Arts, 414 N. Sequim Ave. “Something’s Afoot” is on stage through Nov. 13, followed by “The Importance of Being Earnest” from Jan. 27-Feb.12, “Over the River and Through the Woods” from March 31-April 16 and “Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike” from June 9-25. For performance and ticket information, visit www.olympictheatrearts.org or phone the box office at 360-683-7326 between 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays.

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For families

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www.SequimChamber.com

Visitor Information Center

Noted as one of the best places in the country to retire, Sequim also provides much for visitors with children: playgrounds, a skate park, animals, old bones, music and enough activities to settle even the most tireless in bed peacefully come nightfall. • The Olympic Game Farm offers a chance to meet animals up close on drive-through or walking tours, 1423 Ward Road; 360-683-4295 or 800-778-4205; www.olygamefarm.com. Open nearly every day; fee for tours. • Carrie Blake Park (on Blake Avenue near the QFC shopping center) has woodsy groves, trails, an off-leash dog park, duck ponds, playground equipment, a skate park, ball fields and soccer fields offer space for a game. Just north of Carrie Blake Park, the Water Reuse Demonstration Park has walking and biking trails, exercise stations and a pond for radio-controlled boats where children under 14 also can fish. • At the Museum & Arts Center are the bones of a mastodon found at the Manis site near Sequim in 1977. The bones are displayed in their proper positions on a large artist’s rendering of the mastodon, with the tusks displayed separately. A short video covers the archaeological excavation

of the site. Admission by donation; museum store, 175 W. Cedar St.; 360-6838110; open Tuesdays through Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. • The Dungeness River Audubon Center at Railroad Bridge Park offers indoor and outdoor adventure. Outdoors, the old railroad bridge and the Dungeness River are open to explore. Indoors, the Dungeness River Audubon Center overflows with family friendly exhibits. Railroad Bridge Park is open daily during daylight hours. The Audubon Center is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays and from noon to 4 p.m. Saturdays; 360-6814076; www.dungenessrivercenter.org. • The 5.5-mile walk out Dungeness Spit to the lighthouse is a favorite. Rest, snack and take a volunteer-guided tour of the lighthouse before beginning the walk back. The best walking is at low tide. It’s wise to pack water, snacks and jackets and allow half a day for this 11-mile round-trip hike. • The Olympic Discovery Trail features hiking, jogging and bicycling through scenic areas. Bicycles available for rental at All Around Bikes, near the trail at 150 West Sequim Bay Road, 360-681-3868; and Ben’s Bikes, 1251 W. Washington St., 360-683-2666.

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Sequim Museum & Arts

Sequim Museum & Arts is dedicated to presenting the history and culture of the families that settled the Sequim Prairie, Dungeness and areas of eastern Clallam County. The exhibit center at 175 W. Cedar St. is home to the Manis mastodon bones that are the oldest in North America. Carbon testing and DNA testing have earned Emanual Manis and his discovery a place in the Smithsonian Institution and multiple scientific magazines for decades. On permanent exhibit is a rowing shell built by George Popcock, the man who build the boat that the University of Washington crew won the gold medal in the 1936 Olympics against Hitler’s team in Germany. Follow local athlete Joe Rantz’s road to the Olympics shown on the poster wall. Regional displays, including farming, marine and air travel, Native American baskets and taxidermy, are complemented by local art displays that change every two months.

The museum bookstore carries an impressive collection of local history books, postcards and gifts. The museum is open from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays and First Fridays from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. For extended hours on special occasions, phone 360-683-8110 or visit www.SequimMuseum.com. The Dungeness Schoolhouse at 2781 Towne Road hosts weddings, musicals, classes, family reunions and tours that keep the 125-year-old National Historic site busy. Phone 360-681-2257 and leave a message, or visit www.sequimmuseum.com/dungeness-schoolhouse.html download a rental agreement. Visit the Veterans Memorial at 544 N. Sequim Ave., also the site of the new exhibit center. This museum building houses the administration building, research library, artifact collection and has a classroom for students to see and learn about the mastodon tusks. Veterans ceremonies are held throughout the year.

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Lavender history

The first Sequim lavender farms began more than 20 years ago as local farmers recognized that the region had the ideal growing climate for the plant. The founders of the Sequim lavender industry began with a vision of rolling purple fields to replace fallow dairy pasture, restoring the agricultural base of the fertile Sequim prairie. Cultivation of lavender in the Sequim-Dungeness Valley has grown into a strong, environmentally sound, agri-business. Over 110,000 lavender plants are grown each year in the area. With myriad uses beyond sheer fragrance — cosmetic, culinary, medicinal, craft, decorative — the magical herb has fostered dozens of small, creative ventures across the Olympic Peninsula and beyond. Area lavender growers have a worldwide online presence and visitors from all over the world attend Sequim Lavender Weekend. The Sequim Lavender Festival, part of Sequim Lavender Weekend, has expanded the lavender industry in the SequimDungeness Valley and increased agri-tourism, cultural tourism and culinary tourism on the North Olympic Peninsula. Save the date for the three-day weekend,

slated for July 21-23, 2017. The festival buzzes with farm tours, a street fair with lavender products of all kinds, arts and crafts fair, children’s activities and live music. For more information, visit www. lavenderfestival.com. As with any crop, lavender plants are dormant during the winter months, but they rejuvenate with the spring season, becoming lush and green. The first purple hues tint the fields in late June. Though the local farms aren’t painted in purple during autumn and winter, the products produced from lavender can still

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Lighthouses

Strait of Juan de Fuca, that wide and deep passage from the open Pacific Ocean to Puget Sound at Point Wilson. Tatoosh Island is not open to the public but it and the lighthouse can be seen from high cliffs at the end of Cape Flattery Trail near Neah Bay.

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Preserving and cherishing the North Olympic Peninsula’s maritime heritage also extends to its lighthouses. In 1850, Congress authorized 16 lighthouses along the Pacific coast and Strait of Juan de Fuca as shipping and passenger traffic surged with settlement of the Northwest. Clallam County, established in 1854, has a lighthouse heritage going back to 1857 when Congress appropriated about $40,000 to build the Cape Flattery (Tatoosh Island) and New Dungeness lighthouses, both of which are functional as automated navigational aids today. The New Dungeness Lighthouse is at the tip of Dungeness Spit, a trek of 5.5 miles. It is open to the public, and tours of the lighthouse are available daily from 9 a.m. to two hours before sunset. Boat access is permitted by reservation only through the refuge office, 715 Holgerson Road, Sequim, 360-457-8451. The lighthouses of Jefferson County (1852) — Point Wilson (1879), Destruction Island (1891) and Marrowstone Point (1912) — came considerably later and all three remain active, but with automated equipment. The Point Wilson Lighthouse and tower are open free to visitors from May-September on Saturdays between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. Phone 360-385-5520. The lighthouse is owned by the Coast Guard, and it is seeking bids for an organization to operate and maintain the complex. A Discovery Pass is required to park. The Cape Flattery Lighthouse on Tatoosh Island is just off the northwesternmost spot in the continental United States. The island is part of the Makah Nation. The lighthouse marks the entrance to the

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Made Fresh in Sequim, WA

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Dine in • Take out Banquet room Outside Seating Available Open 11am - 10pm Daily

Sequim, WA 98382

921 E Hammond Sequim, WA 360-683-6806

Open to the public Monday to Friday 9:30am to 2:30pm

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6A1698693

651566160

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Breakfast served all day! Daily Soup and Specials Waffles, biscuits & gravy, sandwiches, burgers, salads, and more!


SEAFOOD

Specializing in Handcrafted Breakfasts and Creative Lunches Since 1981

STEAKS PASTA

R E S TAU R A N T

Casual Elegant Dining

171 W. Washington St., Sequim www.thattakesthecakes.com

Corner of S. 3rd & Bell St. Sequim Open Daily 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Early Bird Dinner Menu • 11am–6pm • Banquets Up To 50 Full-Service Lounge • Happy Hour In Lounge 4pm–6pm Tues. – Fri. 11 am – 9 pm • Sat. 4 pm – 9 pm Sun. 11 am – 9 pm • Closed Monday

6A1698691

360.565.6272

Fresh Oysters • Dover Sole 16 oz. T-Bone • Prime Rib Fresh Dungeness Crab Meat

360-683-1977

(360) 683-2179

www.oaktablecafe.com

The Birch Door in Bellingham

Also visit our kids at

The Oak Table Cafe in Silverdale

703 N. Sequim Ave., Sequim

Coming Early 2017

6A1698474

6A1697492

Wedding Cakes Cupcakes Specialty Cakes Mon-Sat, 10-6

Serving Sequim for over 27 years

The Maple Counter Cafe in Walla Walla

Old Mill

wn

ki

n’

Do

H o m e C oo

CAFE

Open Tuesdays 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Wednesday - Sunday 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. 671633282

582-1583

721 Carlsborg Rd., Carlsborg

“Cooking is Mama’s Passion”

Recommended by National Geographic Traveler March 2003 Recommended by the San Francisco Chronicle 2006

Open 6 Days a Week 11 am– 8:30 pm (Closed Wednesdays)

Special Lunch Menu 11-3 • Dinner 4:30-8:30

Dine where the locals know best!

691697869

Orders to Go Welcome (360) 683-8188 271 S. 7th Ave., Suite #31 (Behind McDonald’s) Sequim, Washington FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

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Visit Mexico Without Leaving Sequim! EXCELLENT FOOD • ORDERS TO GO • FULL MENU

Open 7 days a week for lunch & dinner, cocktails, great margaritas, beer & wine

Banquet Room for up to 50 Senior Citizens Discount Tuesdays

3 Soups Daily Home Baked Goods Lots of Hot & Cold Sandwhiches including Falafel Hot Lunches 11am-3pm Comfort Food Dinners 3pm-7pm

SEQUIM DINING DIRECTORY

(NE corner of Co-Op parking lot)

6A1698629

11am-7pm • Mon-Sat Robins-Place.com | 360.681.5124

6A1697491

300 E. Washington St. | Sequim

681-3842

Open Daily 11 a.m. -9 p.m

Check F or our website for our Daily Specials & full menu

1085 E. Washington Street, Sequim (Next to Days Inn) As seen in

Sunset Magazine

In the mood for teriyaki?

Voted Penisula’s Best Seafood

~Fast and Fresh~

Northwest Waterfront Dining at John Wayne Marina

We use only the freshest ingredients!

Now offering

FRESH LOCAL SEAFOOD, STEAKS & MORE LUNCH SERVED 11:30AM - 3PM DINNER SERVED 4PM - 9PM OPEN WEDNESDAY - SUNDAY CLOSED MON & TUES

Traditional Korean Food

Bibim Bap, Tofu Soup and More!

360

683-5668

Open Mon.-Sat. 11-9 • Sun. 11-8

1243 W. Washington Street, Sequim In the “Home Depot” Shopping Center

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*Of equal or lesser value. Coupon good through June 2017. Cannot be combined with other offer.

Sequim’s Garden to Table Restaurant

Sequim

ORGANIC • LOCAL • 100% GLUTEN FREE

360-683-8573

www.nourishsequim.com www.nourishsequim.com •• 360-797-1480 360-797-1480 101 Provence View Lane, Sequim (off (offSouth Sequim Ave.) Sequim Ave.) 101 Lane, Sequim

680 W. Washington, Suite E (Safeway Plaza)

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

651566147 6A1697976

360-385-1463

GET ONE 6” FREE *

6A1699810

1300 Water St. (Across from Ferry)

Winter Hours begin Nov 1, close 8 pm 360-683-7510 2577 West Sequim Bay Rd. Sequim

Buy one 6” Sandwich and a 21 oz drink

sh eat fre

TWO GREAT LOCATIONS Port Townsend

COCKTAILS • WINE LOCAL MICRO BREWS

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6A1681872

691697862

BENTO TERIYAKI

FALL/WINTER 2016-2017


get face to face with wildlife. 6A1697859

Over 3 miles of Drive-Thru Adventure!

Gift Shop Observation Tower & Picnic Area Driving Tours Available 363 Days a Year • Snack Bar & Petting Farm in Summer

OLYMPIC GAME FARM

Open Daily 9:00 am • 1423 Ward Road • Sequim

Family Fun Since 1972

John Wayne Marina

(open in Summer)

800-778-4295 | 360-683-4295

w w w.olygamefarm.com

Discover what’s possible with Evergreen We offer: • • • • • •

FHA and VA USDA Conventional Jumbo Cash-out Refinance First-Time Homebuyer Programs

Sequim Branch Tel: (360) 681-8197

542 N. Fifth Ave., Ste. 2B | Sequim, WA 98382

Branch NMLS 1253790

Port Angeles Branch Tel: (360) 203-3690

1115 E. Front St., Ste. B | Port Angeles, WA 98362

Branch NMLS 1250094

© 2016 Evergreen Home Loans is a registered trade name of Evergreen Moneysource Mortgage Company® NMLS ID 3182. Trade/service marks are the property of Evergreen Home Loans. All rights reserved. Licensed under: Washington Consumer Loan Company License CL-3182. 3/16

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Popular with boaters and landlubbers alike, John Wayne Marina (2577 West Sequim Bay Road) offers a beautiful park-like area, a fuel dock, moorage, boat launches and a fine restaurant. Located on Pitship Point in Sequim Bay (longitude 123 02’ 18” W/latitude 48 03’ 43” N), John Wayne Marina is named for “The Duke,” but since opening in 1985, the marina has made a reputation for itself as a full-service facility in a superb location. The marina offers both permanent and guest moorage on a first-come, first-served basis, parking and a launch for smaller craft and boat rentals. Ashore, the John Wayne Marina includes a restaurant and restrooms, with showers and laundry for tenants and even a public meeting room with kitchen. Film actor John Wayne loved sailing his Wild Goose in the area of Sequim Bay, which he considered a prime place for a marina. Wayne donated the land in 1975. Owned and operated by the Port of Port Angeles, the marina is a popular stop, included as “Best of the West” by Sea Magazine. Boaters can take advantage of a fuel dock open seven days a week, and the marina offers electric and water hookups. Trash disposal, a sewage pump-out and waste oil disposal also are available. The marina and its beautiful park areas are popular walking and picnicking places for nonboaters. Don’t forget to stop by the Dockside Grill for meals prepared by award-winning chefs.

HOME OF THE WAVING BEARS!

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Sequim elk

Be on the lookout for Sequim’s famous Roosevelt elk herd as you enter town from the east. Elk-crossing signal lights on U.S. Highway 101 are triggered by herd members wearing transmitting radio collars. From time to time, they do cross the road en masse, halting traffic. Roosevelt elk are native to the Olympic Peninsula, with bulls weighing up to 1,100 pounds and cows in the 600-pound range.

One herd, comprised of about 100 animals, considers the Sequim area part of its range. When not in the forest, they graze in farm fields and on lawns. Although the Sequim elk appear to be tame, they are not. Normally, they avoid close contact with people and move away when approached; however, they may show signs of agitation if people get too close, throw things or when people or cars block what the elk consider to be an escape route. Caution should be used at all times when

viewing the herd. Favorite spots for elk viewing seem to be along Happy Valley Road, West Sequim Bay Road and Port Williams Road.

SEQUIM HEALTH & MEDICAL

Walk-In Clinic

840 N. 5th Avenue, Sequim • (360) 582-2930

“Move Better. Feel Better. Live Better.”

is now part of

Providing same-day, non-emergency services: Monday through Friday – 8:00am to 5:00pm Saturday and Sunday – 10:00am to 4:00pm

Auto Accidents • Post-surgery • Rehabilitation Pelvic Health • Work Injury • Medicare

360-683-0632 www.Fyzical-Sequim.com

6A1699378

Accepted

500 West Fir, Suite A, Sequim 6A1695701

New location opens in early 2017: 907 Georgiana Street, Port Angeles Please visit OlympicMedical.org for hours.

Come See Our New Solutions For Fall Prevention & Balance Training

Clinical staff: Clinic owner Jason Wilwert, PT, DPT, OCS; Dale Rudd, PT; Sheila Fontaine, PTA; Vonnie Voris PT, CLT; Britt Moss, MPT, OCS, CSCS; Claire Beukes, PTA; Marsha Melnick, PhD, PT

INTERNAL MEDICINE

PACIFIC FAMILY & INTERNAL MEDICINE OPEN IN SEQUIM ON SATURDAYS

6A1696738

Physicians Who Care ... Care you can trust

CASH-PAY FEES for UNINSURED or LOW-INCOME Simple - $80 • Intermediate $100 • Complex $125

Medical Massage Therapy Available

George Mathew, M.D., PhD Board Certified Internal Medicine

Register at www.pfimhealth.com • 522 N. 5th Ave. Sequim

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NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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SEQUIM, WASHINGTON • 24/7 Secure Access • Strength Training • Live Virtual Classes • Fitness Coaching • Speed and Agility Training • FEEL GREAT! sequimwa@anytimefitness.com 360-683-4110 10131 Old Olympic Hwy, Sequim

691698144

360-775-3515

Get to a healthier place.™


Dungeness River Audubon Center

Why does a Stellar jay’s feather look blue when there is no blue pigment in it? Why does the murre’s egg have that odd shape? How do you tell a lynx from a bobcat? All kinds of answers — and a wonderful place to ramble — are found at Dungeness River Audubon Center at Railroad Bridge Park, 2151 W. Hendrickson Road. The main room is lined with cases housing hundreds of examples of birds of the area, along with lynx, black bear, raccoons and mountain lion. Hands-on exhibits include drawers full of the fascinating and the curious: bones, feathers, eggs and teeth of species from songbird to mammoth.

The Audubon Center’s staff and docents are eager to show visitors the collection and answer questions. Children will enjoy going on a scavenger hunt through the park, and the Audubon Center is a great place to begin a ramble along the riverside trails through the forest or over the stony shore of the Dungeness River. The center is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays and noon to 4 p.m. Saturdays. From 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. every Wednesday, take a bird walk with volunteers from the Dungeness River Audubon Center. Meet at the center in Railroad Bridge park. For more information, visit www.dungenessrivercenter.org or phone 360-681-4076.

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA FARMS & SUPPLIES

by NORTHWEST CHAINLINK

FENCE

Installation, Repairs & Materials Privacy Slats • Field Fence

“The First Fence Company on the Peninsula Since 1969”

Serving All of Clallam County

683-4673

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360

Price Sells . . . Quality Tells

get face to face with wildlife. 6A1698678

Over 3 miles of Drive-Thru Adventure!

Gift Shop Observation Tower & Picnic Area Driving Tours Available 363 Days a Year • Snack Bar & Petting Farm in Summer

OLYMPIC GAME FARM

Open Daily 9:00 am • 1423 Ward Road • Sequim

Family Fun Since 1972 6A1698760

Email: a2zfencing@hotmail.com Website: www.a2zfencing.net Licensed CONTR#A2ZFEF*870DM Bonded & Insured

INDUSTRIAL COMMERCIAL c o m p a n y RESIDENTIAL

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Cedar Chain Link Vinyl Custom Wrought Iron Gates & Fencing CALL FOR A FREE Installation ESTIMATE! Automatic Openers 360-460-9504

See our website for open days and online shopping Also open by appointment 1818 Hastings Port Townsend www.farreachesfarm.com

Vinyl Coated Green Black Chain Link

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(open in Summer)

800-778-4295 | 360-683-4295

w w w.olygamefarm.com NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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Dungeness Spit

Dungeness Recreation Area

Dungeness Recreation Area, 554 Voice of America Road, is another of Clallam County’s favorite recreational destinations and the gateway to the Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge which includes the Dungeness Spit. The 216-acre county park has upland forest, wetlands, sandy bluffs, campsites and spectacular vistas of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Vancouver Island and

BRIGADOON VACATION RENTALS Great Rates – 2 Night Minimum (3 Night Minimum for Holidays & Local Festivals)

All Sizes & Locations Furnished & Nice Amenities

SEQUIMRENTALS.COM 6A1699378

6A1699017

800.397.2256 or 360.683.2255 Brigadoon@olypen.com 46

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Mount Baker. Park amenities include a group camp with picnic shelter, play equipment and miles of trails for pedestrians and equestrians. From U.S. Highway 101, between Sequim and Port Angeles, turn north onto KitchenDick Road (near milepost 260). To get there, travel approximately 3.5 miles; the road takes a 90-degree turn becoming Lotzgesell Road and the park entrance will be on your left. The recreation area has 66 standard campsites within the park. Half of the sites may be reserved in advance (sites 34-66), the remaining are open on a first-come, first-served basis (1-33). In addition, two restrooms are available with showers. There’s a limit of six people per campsite, pets are allowed on leashes and firewood is available for a fee. Campsite reservations are done only by mail. Reservations begin to be accepted in January for that year. All reservations must be received at the park a minimum of two weeks prior to their desired camping date. For more information on the Dungeness Recreation Area, visit www.clallam.net/ Parks/Dungeness.html or phone 360-6835847.


Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge

enter the refuge. The spit is approximately 5 miles long with the New Dungeness Lighthouse (p. 39), first lit in 1857 and available for tours. The lighthouse was built at the tip but is now 0.5 mile from the tip which has grown in 150-plus years; however, the last 0.5 mile (the “tip”) is closed to the public. Hikers are restricted to the north shore of Dungeness Spit to reach the New Dungeness Light Station. The lighthouse is open only from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (tours stop at 4 p.m.), but the

Adjacent to the county park is the Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge which is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and covers 631 acres. It turned 100 in 2015. A trail wanders through the trees and eventually drops down to the Dungeness Spit. The spit is the longest natural sand spit in North America, growing at a rate of about 12-15 feet per year. Pay a $3 fee, which covers up to four adults, at the kiosk/information center to

refuge closes as early as 4:15 p.m. in darkest winter, making it difficult to generalize about visiting times, avoiding high tides. For a tide schedule, visit www. newdungenesslighthouse.com. At its highest point, the spit is about 15 feet above sea level and parts of it are under water during winter storms. Camping, pets and beach combing are not permitted in the refuge but leashed pets are allowed in the adjacent Dungeness County recreation area. Phone 360-457-8451 for information.

SEQUIM RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA

Sequim’s Premier RECREATIONAL

Flower, Edibles, Concentrates, Tinctures, Topicals, Paraphernalia and more...

RETAILER

Sun - Wed • 8:30am 9pm |10 Thurs - Sat • 8:30am – 10pm 8:30–ampm.

(360)

797-1743

6A698858

MARIJUANA

131 River Rd. • Sequim, WA

WWW.KARMACANNABISWA.COM

This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

’ NATURE S GIFTS Re Tail eR s oF Fine C a nnabis

happy hour 6 – 8 pm everyday • 10% off 755 West Washington street, suite C, sequim • 360.797.1993 naturesgifts420.Com • monday - sunday 8:30 am - 10 pm

FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

6A1698351

This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming / Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product / For use only by adults 21and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

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BAHA’I

LUTHERAN

Baha’i Faith

Faith Lutheran Church

1-800-22 UNITE

“The happiness of mankind lieth in the the unity and harmony of the human race... Spiritual and material developments are conditioned upon love and amity amoung all men.” - Baha’u’llah

SEQUIM

NON DENOMINATIONAL

Church of Sequim Dungeness Valley, Brethren in Christ (360) 912-2291

We are a kingdom church serving the Sequim Dungeness Valley area. We are disciples of Jesus, the Son of God, proclaiming the gospel of Christ and His kingdom, in both word and deed. As such, we purposefully submit to Jesus Christ as Lord, obey His teachings, and strive to follow His example in everything. Our simple purpose, as given by God in His word, is to obey His Son Jesus and teach others to do the same. Mt. 28.19-20; Mk. 16.15-16. Our desire is to introduce you to Jesus and to your gospel calling to pick up your cross and follow Him. The teachings of Christ bring life to all who believe and obey them. Jn. 6.63, 68. They are for every day life. We give much time and attention to the living out of His words. Using His word, and Jesus Himself as our example, we regularly teach lifestyle application for areas of life that are often overlooked. We heartily invite you to join us and learn of Christ and His kingdom.

(360) 683-5520 for information on - going study and devotions

ASSEMBLIES OF GOD Sequim Worship Center

“Sharing Good News from the Edge of the Olympic Mountains to the Ends of the Earth” 640 N. Sequim Avenue (360) 683-7981 David Westman, Pastor

Peninsula Evangelical Friends Church

Between Sequim & Port Angeles on Old Olympic Hwy. 1291 N. Barr Road, Pt. Angeles (360) 452-9105 Pastor Jonathan D. Fodge Ministers: The Entire Congregation SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Meeting for Worship jfodge@olypen.com

www.sermonaudio.com/pefc www.pefcpa.com

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Olympic Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Many Paths In The Quest For Faith

Youth Groups & Family Activities Christian Preschool

10:30 a.m. Sunday Service and Children’s Program-Enrichment & Play

HOLY COMMUNION 1st, 3rd & 5th Sundays of the month Both Services www.flcsequim.org

Between Sequim & Port Angeles 73 Howe Rd, Agnew off N. Barr Rd. Between Hwy 101 & Old Olympic

Dungeness Valley Lutheran (ELCA) 925 North Sequim Ave. (360) 681-0946 Pastor Jack Anderson

Welcoming Congregation Email: admin@olympicuuf.org Facebook: OlympicUUFellowship www.olympicuuf.org (360) 417-2665

info@sequimworshipcenter.org www.sequimworshipcenter.org

WEDNESDAY 5:45 p.m. Potluck 6:30 p.m. Education Hour

www.dvelca.org email: dvlcoffice@gmail.com

JEWISH Congregation Olympic B’nai Shalom

Monthly Shabbat gatherings for services and educational programs High Holy Days & Other Jewish Holiday Services

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST

Social and Cultural Events...

Sequim Seventh-day Adventist Church

30 Sanford Lane (Off Sequim Ave.) (360) 683-7373 sequimadventist@sequimsdachurch.org www.sequimadventistchurch.org Mark Pekar, Pastor Collette Pekar, Pastor

Bi-Monthly Newsletter

Connections to Seattle & Tacoma Congregations For Information: www.obsh.org, (360) 452-2471 or write P.O. Box 553, Port Angeles, WA 98362

SATURDAY Morning 9:30 a.m. Bible Classes-all ages 10:50 a.m. Praise & Worship WEDNESDAY Evening 7 p.m. Prayer Meeting For activities throughout the year, call, email or visit our web page. Come worship with us!

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EPISCOPAL St. Luke’s Episcopal Church 525 N. 5th Avenue P.O. Box 896 • (360) 683-4862 Fr. Bob Rhoads

SUNDAY EUCHARIST 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. All Are Welcome Here www.stlukesparish.net

METHODIST Trinity United Methodist Church

100 S. Blake Ave., Sequim (Next to Carrie Blake Park) P.O. Box 3697 • (360) 683-5367 Bill Green, Pastor SUNDAY 10 a.m. Sunday School and Nursery 10 a.m. Worship Service 11 a.m. Fellowship/ Refreshments Web site: www.sequimtumc.org Email: church@sequimtumc.org

6A1699090

Families worshiping and learning together

SUNDAY 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. Worship 9:45 a.m. Bible Classes

Looking for a different kind of “church” community?

SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Worship 10:40 a.m. Education Hour

SUNDAY 10:45 a.m. Worship Service

Call for meeting time and location sdvalleychurch.com

FRIENDS/QUAKER

(LCMS) 382 W Cedar • (360) 683-4803 Rev. Steve Eaton Rev. Roger Stites

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST


BAPTIST Faith Baptist Church 7652 Old Olympic Highway Sequim (360) 683-7303 Pastor Lonnie Jacobson

SEQUIM

CATHOLIC CHURCHES St. Joseph Parish

101 E. Maple St., Sequim (360) 683.6076 www.clallamcatholic.com Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Monday 8:30 a.m. Wednesday: 12:00 p.m. Thursday - Friday 8:30 a.m. Spanish Mass every 2nd Sunday 2 p.m. Confession: 30 minutes prior to all daily Masses (Except Thursday) Weekend Confessions: Saturday 3:30-4:30 p.m.

Queen of Angels Parish 209 West 11th St. Port Angeles (360) 452.2351 www.clallamcatholic.com

Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Tuesday evening 6:00 p.m. Wednesday 12:00 p.m. Thurs-Fri 8:30 a.m. Confession: 30 minutes prior to all daily Masses (except Thursday) Weekend Confessions: Saturday 3:30-4:30 p.m.

SUNDAY 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Morning Worship 6 p.m. Praise & Fellowship Service WEDNESDAY 7 p.m. Night Prayer Meeting Nursery Available Family oriented ministry emphasizing Bible preaching & teaching www.faithbaptistsequim.com

NON DENOMINATIONAL Dungeness Community Church 45 Eberle Lane • 683-7333 (Off Sequim-Dungeness Way) info@dcchurch.org Lead Pastor: Tim Richards Assoc. Pastor: Wayne Yamamoto Youth Pastor: David Piper

BIBLE CHURCH Sequim Bible Church 847 N. Sequim Avenue (360) 683-4135

Dave Wiitala, Senior Pastor Shane McCrossen, Family Life Pastor Patrick Lynn, Youth Pastor

SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Traditional Service Adult Sunday School Classes Children’s Classes 10:30 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 11:00 a.m. Contemporary Service Adult Sunday School Classes Children’s Classes ages 3-12 Nursery - Infants - 2 yrs 5:30 p.m. High School Youth Group MONDAY 7:00 p.m. Precepts Co-ed TUESDAY 8:00 a.m. Sons of Issachar 9:30 a.m. Women’s Precepts WEDNESDAY 5:30 p.m. Middle School Youth Group 6 p.m. Adult Bible Study & Prayer 6:30 p.m. AWANA THURSDAY 7:30 a.m. Men’s Breakfast & Bible Study at Mariner Cafe

Call the church office for information about Precept Bible Studies, Home Bible Studies and Prayer Meetings. email: sqmbible@olypen.com www.sequimbible.org

SUNDAY

8:45 Vintage Worship 10:30 a.m. Family Worship 10:30 a.m. Sunday School (2 yrs. thru high school)

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE First Church of Christ, Scientist 337 West Spruce Street

SUNDAY 10 a.m. Service 10 a.m. - 11 a.m. Sunday School (in the Reading Room) WEDNESDAY 7 p.m. Testimonial Meeting CHRISTIAN SCIENCE READING ROOM at 121 N. Sequim Ave. Open Noon-3 p.m. Tues. through Sat. For more information call: (360) 683-9174

Olympic Bible Fellowship

414 N. Sequim Ave (in the Olympic Theatre Arts Building) RICH HAY, Pastor SUNDAY 10:00 am Worship Service, Nursery & Childern’s Church 5:45 pm Awana - 3 years through High School Weekly programs provided for youth and adults, such as AWANA and Precept Bible studies. www.obfchurch.org 360-683-6731

Nursery available at 10:30 a.m. www.dcchurch.org

SPIRITUAL LIVING Sequim Center for Spiritual Living

Planning a Wedding While Visiting the Olympic Peninsula? Rev. Victoria Kelley is available to officiate your special day. Rev. Kelley is a practitioner at the Sequim Center for Spiritual Living and can be reached at 360-977-7689 or 425-785-1788 Services are held at 10 a.m. each Sunday at: 387 E. Washington St., Sequim Rev Lynn Osborne, Pastor

NAZARENE

Port Angeles Church of the Nazarene Corner of 2nd & Race P.O. Box 2086 • (360) 457-4839 Pastor Neil Castle (360)670-2393

EVERY SUNDAY 9 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Worship Service Nursery available during AM services EVERY WEDNESDAY 6 p.m. Christian Maturity Studies (call to verify)

FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

6A1699099

Invite your friends & neighbors for clear, biblical preaching, wonderful fellowship, & the invitation to a lasting, personal relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ.

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Olympic Discovery Trail

The route of the Olympic Discovery Trail (ODT) traverses almost 130 miles of lowlands, bordered on the south by the Olympic Mountain Range and on the north by the Strait of Juan de Fuca. It starts in Port Townsend and ends on the shores of the Pacific Ocean. The trail is a wide, paved pathway designed to multi-user standards for bicyclists, hikers and disabled users, with a 4-foot shoulder for equestrians where appropriate. Construction started in the 1990s. Completed sections now total 69 miles, with another 9 miles under construction as of May 2015. The trail exhibits a wide diversity of fauna and flora. Travelers also can enjoy the ODT in small bites. In the Sequim-to-Port Angeles segment, distances between trail nodes — places where the ODT crosses public roads — often are short. Visit www.olympicdiscoverytrail.com for more information.

158 E Bell Street (In the Bank Plaza) Sequim, Washington 98382 (360)681-5087 Mon - Fri 10-5 Sat 10-4 The largest selection of Beads on the North Olympic Peninsula.

SEQUIM SHOPPING

691681860

TheGemstone largest selection of Seed Beads on the Beads -Toho Beads North Olympic Peninsula. Czechmate 2-Hole Beads Gemstones - Toho Beads Seed Beads CrystalBeads Bicone-Shell Findings and Wires 2-Hole – Stringing materials Czechmate Beads Crystal Bicone - Shell Beads 158 ECzech Bell Street the Bank Plaza) Gifts and(In Collectibles Glass Beads - Findings and Wires Large selection of tumbled stones Sequim, Washington 98382 Gifts & CollectiblesCrystals Crystals -Mineral Specimens (360)681-5087 Large selection of tumbled stones Gemstone Carvings and- Mineral Spheres Specimens Carvings & Spheres MonGemstone - Fri 10-5 Sat 10-4 Sterling Silver Jewelry Czech Silver Glass Beads Sterling Jewelry The largest selection Fossilsof Beads on the

Purple Haze Lavender Store

The Bag Ladies

TheBagLadiesOfSequimWA.COM

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

• Music • T-shirts • Hoodies • Jackets • Totems • Scarves

Open Daily 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 1033 Old Blyn Hwy, Sequim

FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

• Hats • Prints • Baskets • Blankets • Dream Catchers

360-681-4640

SHOP ONLINE www.NorthwestNativeExpressions.com

6A1681865

167 WASHINGTON STREET Next to The Emerald Grill

6A1697488

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Gemstone Carvings and Spheres Offering Unique Forms of Sterling Silver Jewelry Northwest Native American Art Czech Glass Beads

6A1697487

purplehazelavender.com

GIFT SHOP &ofART GALLERY Large selection tumbled stones

LocatedCrystals at Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal Center -Mineral Specimens

• Jewelry • Handcrafts • Plaques • Carvings • Books • Cards

127 W. Washington St. M-F 9-5 • Sat. 10-5 • Sun. Noon-4

1-888-852-6560 • 360-683-1714

NORTHWEST NATIVE EXPRESSIONS Gifts and Collectibles

of Sequim,WA AN ECLECTIC BLEND OF LOCAL ARTISTS CREATIONS for The Discriminating Shopper

natural lavender products & gifts

DOWNTOWN SEQUIM

Olympic Peninsula. 158 E. BellNorth St. (in the Bank Plaza), Sequim (360) 681-5087 • Mon - Fri 10-5 Sat 10 - 4 Gemstone Beads -Toho Seed Beads Czechmate 2-Hole Beads Crystal Bicone-Shell Beads Findings and Wires – Stringing materials


Department of Natural Resources

Prior to statehood, a cash-poor, land-rich federal government provided Washington with more than 3 million acres of land to build schools and other vital public institutions. Two square miles of every 36-squaremile “township” were given to the young state to generate revenue for education. In 1957, the Legislature created the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to manage state trust lands for the people of Washington. DNR manages seven specific trusts to generate revenue and preserve water, forests and habitat.

It manages 5.6 million acres of forest, range, agricultural, aquatic and commercial lands for more than $200 million in annual financial benefit for public schools, county services and state institutions. DNR operates under an order from the Commissioner of Public Lands to ensure management of state-owned lands is done in collaboration with the 29 federally recognized tribes of Washington. A DNR Discover Pass is your gateway to exploring Washington’s great outdoors. The annual pass is $30 and is transferable between two vehicles. A one-day pass is $10. Additional fees may apply. DNR-managed campgrounds include Bear Creek, Cottonwood, Hoh Oxbow,

Minnie Peterson and South Fork Hoh, all located on the West End off U.S. Highway 101, and Lyre River, located off Highway 112 in the Joyce area. For more information on DNR campgrounds, visit www.dnr.wa.gov/go. For more information about the Washington Department of Natural Resources, visit www.dnr.wa.gov.

FINE LINENS & UNIQUE GIFTS FROM INDIA

ITEM...

5A1417701

TOP SELLING

KIMONOS!

New Fall Colors!

6A1681907

- Gifts - Home Decor - Locally Made Candle Products -

Monday - Friday 10-5:30, Sat. 11-5

Shop Online

119 E. Washington St.

www.fullmooncandle.com

360-681-4431

360.683.8377 • Open Tues-Sat 10-5 609 W. Washington St., Suite 13

www.pondicherrionline.com Karen’s

Mon–Sat, 10am–5pm Call for more information

Gifts & Northwest Treasures

www.karens-quilt-shop.com

www.karens-quilt-shop.com

271 S. 7th Ave #26 Sequim, WA 98382

6A1697977

360.681.0820

135 W Washington St • Downtown Sequim

www.solarcitysequim.com

121 W Washington St • Sequim

“Where every day is a Day in the Sun”

www.foragegifts.com

FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

(360) 681-7299

Open Monday - Friday 9-6 • Saturday 10-5

360-797-1018

360.681.0820

“Where Everyday is a Day in the Sun” Tribal Sportswear • Nomadic Traders “Where Everyday is a Day in the• Jag Sun”Jeans Exclusive Vera Bradley Retailer in Sequim Quality Tanning Equipment and Luxury Skincare Smart Tan Certified Retreat & Skincare Consultants 6A1698651

Open Monday–Saturday 10–5 Sunday 11 – 4

6A1698651

Sequim’s Premiere Destination for Northwest Souvenirs, Sweets, Treats & Treasures

271 S. 7th Ave #26 Sequim, WA 98382 sequimsew@yahoo.com sequimsew@yahoo.com

Boutique •• Retreat Retreat••Gift GiftShop Shop Boutique

Gifts & Northwest Treasures

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

51


Scenic drives

Hurricane Ridge Road

651 Garry Oak Dr. | Sequim, WA 98382| (360) 582-9309

Dedicated to families and community by... Enhancing the lives of those challenged by Alzheimer’s, Memory Loss and other forms of Dementia, by providing quality of care unsurpassed in the industry to help those on their journey with Dementia.

• Licensed nurses on-site 24/7 • Variety of activities encouraging socialization while stimulating the mind and spirit • Adult Day Stay Program 7 days a week up to 10 hours daily • Overnight Respite Stay Program (1 to 30 days) • Secured home environment with freedom to wander inside and outside our uniquely and specifically designed building

CALL FOR YOUR PERSONAL TOUR 360-582-9309 Visit us at www.dungenesscourte.com

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NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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6A1681847

See our ebrochure at http://online.pubhtml5.com/nhpa/pffx/#p=1

FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

Many of the North Olympic Peninsula’s highways and roads curve around glaciercarved lakes, wind past sea stacks and lighthouses, and provide views of working farms, old-growth trees and the majestic Olympic Mountains. All of these landscape features combined with the chance to see deer and elk in forested areas and harbor seals and whales just off a quiet coastal roads blend to make the Peninsula a wonderful place to take a leisurely day trip. On any day, it is hard to beat a drive along these scenic and fun-to-drive roads: Port Angeles: Hurricane Ridge A staple for any Peninsula local or tourist alike, the 17-mile drive up to Hurricane Ridge is worth the twists and turns. This trip requires an Olympic National Park pass. Single visits for vehicles are $20; individuals on foot or bicycle are $7; motorcycles are $10; and children 15 and younger are admitted free of charge. An annual pass is $40. Once past the Heart o’ the Hills entrance station, climb your way past tall pines and dramatic drop-offs. There are opportunities to stop along the way for views of the Olympic Mountains and pause for a selfie or two with friends. During the winter season, Hurricane Ridge Road is open from 9 a.m. to sunset, Friday through Sunday and holiday Mondays, weather and road conditions permitting. All vehicles are required to carry chains and must be off the ridge by sunset. Call the Road & Weather Hotline at 360-565-3131 for current information or follow @HRWinterAccess on Twitter for road updates. Neah Bay: Highway 112 to Cape Flattery For a long day trip, start early out on state Highway 112 and head toward Neah Bay and Cape Flattery. Once on 112, also known as the Strait of Juan de Fuca Scenic Byway, enjoy the rolling countryside that leads to scenic views of the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Motorcyclists take care when nearing the area near Pillar Point County Park. The road is bumpy and curvy. Pass through Clallam Bay and Sekiu, potentially pausing for a bite to eat and seeing some fishermen do what they do best.


Continue on past Sekiu’s famous Rosie the Fish statue after stopping for a photo, and take in views of the coastal sea stacks rising out of the blue water. After reaching Neah Bay, stop for a Makah Recreation Permit at the Makah Museum, located within the Makah Cultural and Research Center or Washburn’s General Store, before continuing to Cape Flattery. Take Cape Loop Road until you reach the parking area for Flattery. A short hike from the trailhead through Sitka spruces leads to an amazing view of the tumultuous strait, the sturdy Cape Flattery Lighthouse on Tatoosh Island and plenty of opportunities for photos of puffins, murres and other coastal creatures.

Forks: Coastal beaches A favorite spot, no matter the distance, is heading down U.S. Highway 101 past Forks toward the coastal beaches. Starting in Port Angeles and eastward, travelers can take in views of the Elwha River, Lake Sutherland and Lake Crescent before that long extension into Forks. Before Forks, one can turn right onto state Highway 110 to spend a few moments at beautiful Rialto Beach. Enjoy a picnic and take in sea stack views as fishermen surfcast into the waves. Depart Rialto and continue into Forks. Blaze a trail through the Hoh Rain Forest area and fishing rivers like the Bogachiel and Hoh before popping out on the coast.

Stop at Ruby Beach for a scenic walk filled with views of eagles, the Destruction Island Lighthouse and crashing waves. Agnew/Sequim Old Olympic Highway Set out east from Port Angeles on U.S. Highway 101 toward Old Olympic Highway for a short jaunt through the Dungeness Valley/Agnew area. After taking a left off 101, follow the old highway for wide-open spaces and farmland views reminiscent of Midwestern countryside. Chug along and veer right onto Marine Drive, crawling toward Cline Spit and enjoying the lovely bluff houses and view of the bay. Take a sharp left down Cline Spit Road to stop for a walk, a picnic or some serene water views.

PRODUCE

SUPPLEMENTS & BODY CARE

Historic Railroad Bridge, Beautiful Parklands, Easy access to the Olympic Discovery Trail

GROCERY

UNIQUE MERCANTILE

• Interpretive displays • Educational programs • Weekly bird walks Wednesday mornings, 8:30 - 10:30 am

OLDTYME BUTCHER

• Farm-Direct • Organics • Sequim & Eastern Washington

• Vitamins • Herbal Remedies • Homeopathy • Skin, Hair, & Face Care •Natural Cosmetics

• Natural, Organic, Allergen Free and Non GMO Selections • Bulk Foods

• Gifts & Greeting Cards • Kitchen Supply

FARM STORE

• In-Store Fresh Smoked Meats • Our Own Beef • Fresh Poultry & Seafood

COUNTRY-STYLE DELI

• Daily Soups, Salads, & Sandwiches • Espresso & Fruit Smoothies

360-681-4076

rivercenter@olympus.net www.dungenessrivercenter.org 2151 W. Hendrickson Road, Sequim, WA Tues.-Fri. 10 am - 4 pm • Sat. 12-4 pm

• Animal Feeds • Hay & Straw • Pet Supplies • Birdseed

NURSERY

• Fruit & Veggie Starts • Ornamentals • Flowers • Natural Fertilizers & Soils • Potted & Bare-Root Trees

691681853

Come see our store in the Sequim Village Center

• Vitamins • Herbal Remedies • Homeopathy • Skin & Nail Care • Natural Cosmetics • Largest Selection of Domestic & Imported Organic Wines

FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

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NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

6A1698637

Monday-Saturday 9am - 5:30pm • (360) 683-6056

53


er Riv

Quinault Reservation

Lake Quinault Amanda Park tR ul

i na

d lan be

y Is

Mount Walker

Dosewallips R

Dosewallips

cka bush River

iv e

r

r ive

Staircase

Lake Cushman

Lilliwaup

y

err

ef

305

Silverdale

Seabeck

303

101

ma River Ham

Sk

Poulsbo

Keyport

Dosewallips State Park

Triton Cove State Park ma Ham

3

Coyle

Brinnon

Eldon W

Wh id

ic l

Mount Constance

Bremerton Port Orchard

l

ive tR ul

eh

Mount Fricaba

Mount Mystery

Port Gamble

Quilcene

na

r u i n a l t Rive u

kQ

Fo r

Qu

104

101

Hood Ca

101

or k E. F

Port Ludlow

Hood Ca na l

Mount Deception

N.

Queets

Quinault Rain Forest r

R ult

Fort Flagler State Park

19

The Brothers

Queets Rain Forest

Olympic National Forest

Clearwater

Kalaloch Lodge

Qu

Queets

ts ee

Qu in a

Cle a

Kalaloch

r Rive ter a rw

er Riv

/v

Chimacum

20

Mount Townsend

Du

Destruction Island

Blyn

er

Shine

Mount Anderson

Ruby Beach

525

Irondale Nordland Port Hadlock

y Ba

Mount Queets

D

10 Miles

101

. ish R om ok k o r ochee River o yn

10 Kilmoeters

7,980 ft.

Olympic National Park

S. F

Marina

ti Na

Golf Course

National Park Lodging

r ve

le s

Hospital

Ri

ed

Information

rk e l Pa e f ug na fe R tio il dli Na al W on

Ne

Ranger Station

Mount Mount Olympus Tom

Oil City

Obstruction Peak

f

ove ry

Jamestown S’Klallam Reservation

ng

Fort Townsend State Park

Olympic National Forest

Deer Park

ol

Bay

uc

te

Hoh Rain Forest

7 Cedars Casino

Blue Mountain

Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center Mount Carrie

Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center

River B ogachiel

Sequim Bay State Park

er R iv

lD

yu i l la

Public Campground

Eagle

ve r

El w ha

Hoh River

Hoh Reservation

Heart O’ the Hills

Mount Angeles

Forks Bogachiel State Park

Ol ym pi c

Ri

Sequim

ess

Olympic National Forest

Elwha

So

Qu

an

Lighthouse

5

Lake Crescent Lodge Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort

i sc

uim

ry

O ce

Quileute Reservation

Airport

5

Storm King Information Center

Mora

110

Lake Sutherland

Lake Crescent

101

Olympic National Park Visitor Center

20

Keystone

Port Townsend

P a sse

Dungen

tu a

101

101

La Push

112

Sappho

Beaver

Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge

Oak Harbor

Coupeville

Fort Worden State Park

Seq

an c

Lake Pleasant

Olympic Game Farm John Wayne Marina

Dabo bB ay

Log Cabin Resort

Lake Dickey

Lake Ozette

New Dungeness Lighthouse

Port Angeles

Reservation

Joyce

ui na

ne S

Pacific

nal Park pic Natio Olym

M ar i

113

Rialto Beach

Elwha Lower River Elwha Casino Klallam

Salt Creek Recreation Area

Ozette

ly)

Pysht

Ozette Reservation

r on

Clallam Bay

me

Fu ca

um

n de

y (s

National Wildlife Refu ge

l ationa Coast N

Jua

err er f

of

eng

112

Sekiu

MAP KEY

0 1

it

To Friday Harbor

s Pas

r y R o c ks

Makah Reservation

ra

Victoria

Passenger/vehicle ferry

e Flatt

Ol ym p ic

Neah Bay

North Olympic Peninsula Recreation Map

01

St

Makah Cultural Museum

Cape Flattery

Vancouver Island

Gr ay W

Tatoosh Island

160 3

16

r ive

Hoodsport


er Riv

Quinault Reservation

Lake Quinault Amanda Park tR ul

i na

d lan be

y Is

Mount Walker

Dosewallips R

Dosewallips

cka bush River

iv e

r

r ive

Staircase

Lake Cushman

Lilliwaup

y

err

ef

305

Silverdale

Seabeck

303

101

ma River Ham

Sk

Poulsbo

Keyport

Dosewallips State Park

Triton Cove State Park ma Ham

3

Coyle

Brinnon

Eldon W

Wh id

ic l

Mount Constance

Bremerton Port Orchard

l

ive tR ul

eh

Mount Fricaba

Mount Mystery

Port Gamble

Quilcene

na

r u i n a l t Rive u

kQ

Fo r

Qu

104

101

Hood Ca

101

or k E. F

Port Ludlow

Hood Ca na l

Mount Deception

N.

Queets

Quinault Rain Forest r

R ult

Fort Flagler State Park

19

The Brothers

Queets Rain Forest

Olympic National Forest

Clearwater

Kalaloch Lodge

Qu

Queets

ts ee

Qu in a

Cle a

Kalaloch

r Rive ter a rw

er Riv

/v

Chimacum

20

Mount Townsend

Du

Destruction Island

Blyn

er

Shine

Mount Anderson

Ruby Beach

525

Irondale Nordland Port Hadlock

y Ba

Mount Queets

D

10 Miles

101

. ish R om ok k o r ochee River o yn

10 Kilmoeters

7,980 ft.

Olympic National Park

S. F

Marina

ti Na

Golf Course

National Park Lodging

r ve

le s

Hospital

Ri

ed

Information

rk e l Pa e f ug na fe R tio il dli Na al W on

Ne

Ranger Station

Mount Mount Olympus Tom

Oil City

Obstruction Peak

f

ove ry

Jamestown S’Klallam Reservation

ng

Fort Townsend State Park

Olympic National Forest

Deer Park

ol

Bay

uc

te

Hoh Rain Forest

7 Cedars Casino

Blue Mountain

Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center Mount Carrie

Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center

River B ogachiel

Sequim Bay State Park

er R iv

lD

yu i l la

Public Campground

Eagle

ve r

El w ha

Hoh River

Hoh Reservation

Heart O’ the Hills

Mount Angeles

Forks Bogachiel State Park

Ol ym pi c

Ri

Sequim

ess

Olympic National Forest

Elwha

So

Qu

an

Lighthouse

5

Lake Crescent Lodge Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort

i sc

uim

ry

O ce

Quileute Reservation

Airport

5

Storm King Information Center

Mora

110

Lake Sutherland

Lake Crescent

101

Olympic National Park Visitor Center

20

Keystone

Port Townsend

P a sse

Dungen

tu a

101

101

La Push

112

Sappho

Beaver

Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge

Oak Harbor

Coupeville

Fort Worden State Park

Seq

an c

Lake Pleasant

Olympic Game Farm John Wayne Marina

Dabo bB ay

Log Cabin Resort

Lake Dickey

Lake Ozette

New Dungeness Lighthouse

Port Angeles

Reservation

Joyce

ui na

ne S

Pacific

nal Park pic Natio Olym

M ar i

113

Rialto Beach

Elwha Lower River Elwha Casino Klallam

Salt Creek Recreation Area

Ozette

ly)

Pysht

Ozette Reservation

r on

Clallam Bay

me

Fu ca

um

n de

y (s

National Wildlife Refu ge

l ationa Coast N

Jua

err er f

of

eng

112

Sekiu

MAP KEY

0 1

it

To Friday Harbor

s Pas

r y R o c ks

Makah Reservation

ra

Victoria

Passenger/vehicle ferry

e Flatt

Ol ym p ic

Neah Bay

North Olympic Peninsula Recreation Map

01

St

Makah Cultural Museum

Cape Flattery

Vancouver Island

Gr ay W

Tatoosh Island

160 3

16

r ive

Hoodsport


TOWN & COUNTRY

REALTOR DIRECTORY

Mark Macedo questionmark@olypen.com

6A1699319

(360)477-9244 TOWN & COUNTRY

AS SEEN ON

WWW.REALESTATEINSEQUIM.NET

Professional Property Management

Moving to Sequim? Need a rental?

Call Me Today

Tyler J. Conkle Broker lic# 112797

Cell: (360)670-5978 tylerj@olypen.com

Jim McLaughlin

360.582.7361

6A1699325

6A1599326

137 Fairway Dr. , Sequim Office: (360) 683-6880

137 Fairway Dr., Sequim

1-800-359-8823 | (360) 683-6880

Broker, Lic#97342 (360) 460-9513 800-786-1456 feltys@olypen.com jenniferfelton.withwre.com

Broker Lic#119519 Cell: (360) 775-5780 Office: (360) 683-4844 rickbrown@olypen.com rickbrown.withwre.com

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

WWW.PROPERTIESBYJIM.COM

FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

Robert & Carolyn Dodds

Property Managers Brokers, Lic#48709, 73925 Cell:(360) 460-9248 cdodds@olypen.com www.sequimaccess.net

Windermere Real Estate/Sequim East 842 East Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382

Office: (360)683-4844

6A1699329

56

Rick Brown

6A1699330

711 E Front St, Port Angeles (360) 457-0456

jamesm@olypen.com Your Personal Professional in real estate

6A1699327

Sequim-East 842 East Washington Sequim, WA 98382

Jennifer Felton

Windermere Real Estate/Port Angeles

(360)477-2134

Dollie Sparks

Broker/Property Manager

6A1699322

Quality Rentals Quality Service

WWW.SEESEQUIMPROPERTIES.COM Windermere Real Estate/Sunland

TOWN & COUNTRY


219 W. Washington Street... In the ♥ of downtown Sequim

REALTOR DIRECTORY

Dial Us at... 360. 681 .8778

www.BrokersGroup.com

PRIME

PRIME LIZ POwAneRr/DKesSigna, AteBRd,BCroDkePEr

Dedicated to superior customer service, communication & professionalism.

901 W Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 360-460-7322 • 360-683-1500 www.sequimagent.com

Realtor®

Don Edgmon

For Real Estate Buying and Selling contact

BROKER®, GRI, ABR, CNE 6A1699354

CAROLYN DAWSON Broker

Office: 360.683.4131 Cell: 360.461.2422

Toll Free (800)

446-8115 457-8593 x310 Cell (360) 460-0204 Fax (360) 457-0941

1190 E. W ASHINGTON S T . S EQUIM

6A1699356

6A1699351

CDAWSON@OLYPEN.COM ✦

Realtor of the year 2015 Office(360)

Cell: (425) 330-3532 Direct: (360) 582-5770 Office: (360) 683-4131

FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

6A1699350

Welcome to the Olympic Peninsula

1190 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382

917-763-9273 marcus.oden@remax.net

PORT ANGELES

Real Estate - Sequim

BARB BUTCHER

www.johnlscott.com/barbarabu

Marcus Oden 6A1699348

SEQUIM

6A1699347

“Making it Better for Someone... Every Day!”

dedgmon@olypen.com www.doned.johnlscott.com Get on the leading “EDGE” with Edgmon!!!

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

57


Port Angeles City Pier

ENJOY RECREATION, ART AND MORE IN

PORT ANGELES With more than 19,000 residents, Port Angeles is the largest city on the North Olympic Peninsula. Visitors use the city as a base to explore Olympic National Park and Victoria. Pretty as a picture

Views of the Olympic Mountains and Strait of Juan de Fuca are abundant in this authentic and

58

laid-back Northwest town. A variety of events, a quaint downtown and an active harbor make Port Angeles a joy to visit throughout the

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

F

cooler season. The city offers plenty of trails to hike, a chance to snowshoe and downhill ski in the snow-capped Olympic

FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

Mountains, low-traffic roads to cycle along, cobble-strewn beaches to stroll on and a variety of shops and eateries to explore.


Establishing Port Angeles

Port Angeles sits between the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Olympic Mountains on a natural deepwater harbor, originally named “Puerto de Nuestra Señora de los Angeles” (or “Port of Our Lady of the Angels”) in 1791 by Spanish explorer Don Francisco de Eliza. This was eventually shortened into its current name, Port Angeles Harbor. However, long before Don Francisco came across the region, the area was home to Klallam tribes and two major Klallam villages, I’e’nis and Tse-whit-zen. Port Angeles was established as a townsite by President Abraham Lincoln in 1862 by executive order. The Board of Trade in 1890 called Port Angeles the “Second National City,” with Washington, D.C., being the first. In 1887, the Puget Sound Co-Operative Colony settled in Port Angeles and the population steadily grew. While the colony did not last long, it played a major role in the development of Port Angeles.

A chance to explore history

PORT ANGELES ART DIRECTORY

Heatherton Gallery Embracing life through art

Olympic Peninsula’s eclectic art gallery featuring fifty artists and craftsmen.

Counterclockwise from top: The Conrad Dyar Memorial Fountain at First and Laurel streets greets downtown visitors.

Traditional and Contemporary Art Jewelry • Ceramics • Glass • Cards Prints and Gifts

The MV Coho makes trips between Port Angeles and Victoria.

Open Sun - Fri 10:30 am - 4:30 pm

FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

115 E. Railroad Ave., Port Angeles

(360)461-6546

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

6A1681291

Built in 1914, the impressive Clallam County Courthouse at Fourth and Lincoln streets is a Georgian-style brick structure with distinctive features such as a stained-glass skylight, marble steps and a clock tower. Nearby, the Museum at the Carnegie, 207 S. Lincoln St., offers a glimpse into Clallam County’s past. The Museum at the Carnegie, located in the cityowned historical 97-year-old Carnegie Library, is operated by the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe. Seven permanent exhibits — one describing the North Olympic Peninsula’s Native American heritage — are located on the museum’s second floor. Heritage Tours offers you a guided walking tour through Port Angeles’ past. The tour takes you through historical downtown buildings, past murals that tell stories and down into the Port Angeles underground, created when downtown street levels were raised above the tidal flats in 1914. The tours start from the Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center, 121 E. Railroad Ave., on the waterfront. For more information and Heritage Tour availability, phone 360-452-2363, ext. 0, or visit www.portangelesheritagetours.com.

59


Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce

Be sure to stop by the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce, 121 E. Railroad Ave., to talk to friendly and knowledgeable volunteers about what there is to see and do in Port Angeles. Located on the scenic waterfront, the chamber carries an array of maps, brochures and tourist-related guides to help visitors enjoy their time on the North Olympic Peninsula. Visitors also can view a scenic video about the Peninsula. Volunteers can inform visitors about upcoming events and make recommendations for activities ranging from shopping to hiking. Visitors also can purchase maps, postcards, books and other Peninsula-related items. For more information about the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce, phone 360-452-2363 or visit www.portangeles.org. Pop over to The Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad Ave., before starting to explore the rest of the town. The mall features a variety of restaurants, shops and art galleries. For details, visit www.thelandingmall.com.

3

GOODWILL OLYMPIC

PENINSULA LOCATIONS TO TREASURE HUNT! www.goodwillwa.org

Port Townsend 602 Howard St 360.385.6600

Sequim 680 W Washington St 360.681.2635

Port Angeles 603 S Lincoln St 360.452.2440

6A1699088

6A1584490

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NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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FALL/WINTER 2016-2017


Port Angeles Fine Arts Center

modern Northwest architecture that sits on the crest of Beaver Hill. Kirk’s use of voids and indigenous materials offers a low-impact structure that ushers indoors the abundance of the natural world. With sweeping vistas of the city, Port Angeles Harbor, the Strait of Juan de Fuca and British Columbia’s Vancouver Island, the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center presents an atmosphere conducive to observation and reflection.

The 1,300-square-foot visual arts exhibition at the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center, 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., is a wonderful place to visit. The center’s gallery, originally the private residence of Esther and Charles Webster, was designed in 1951 by Paul Hayden Kirk as both a residence and artist’s studio. The semi-circular Webster house is a plate-glass-and-timbered classic of

Visitors can explore Webster’s Woods Art Park independently by using the park trails to discover artworks hanging in trees, burrowing in the ground or camouflaged by the natural beauty of the foliage. The center is open Mondays through Fridays from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Webster’s Woods is open daily from dawn to dusk year-round. Admission is free, with donations accepted. For details., phone 360-417-4590 or visit www.pafac.org.

PORT ANGELES DINING    

Fresh Fresh Fresh Local Local Local

     

C'EST SI BON

Seafood Seafood Seafood Local Seafood

Authentic French Cuisine

Delicious Delicious Grilled Grilled Sockeye Sockeye Salmon Salmon~~~Fresh Fresh Fire Fire Grilled Grilled Halibut Halibut Delicious Grilled Sockeye Salmon Fresh Fire Grilled Halibut

Fresh Local Ingredients Romantic Fine Dining Great Venue for Class Reunions, Weddings & Large Parties Chef Trained in Lyon, France

6A1698695

Halibut Halibut Stuffed Stuffed with with Dungeness Dungeness Crab Crab ~~Weathervane ~Weathervane Weathervane Scallops Scallops Fresh Fresh Halibut Stuffed with Dungeness Crab Scallops Fresh Daily Halibut and Salmon Specials Delicious Grilled Sockeye Salmon ~ Fresh Fire Grilled Halibut Wild Wild American American Prawns Prawns ~~Signature ~Signature Signature Smoked Salmon Salmon Chowder Chowder Jumbo Jumbo Wild American Prawns Smoked Salmon Chowder Jumbo Fresh Halibut Stuffed with Dungeness Crab ~Smoked Weathervane Scallops Fresh Halibut Stuffed with Dungeness Crab ~ Weathervane Scallops Jumbo Wild American Prawns ~ Award Winning Smoked Salmon Chowder Crusted Crusted Neah Neah Bay Bay King King Salmon Salmon~~~Fire Fire Grilled Grilled Steaks Steaks Pistachio Pistachio Crusted Neah Bay King Salmon Fire Grilled Steaks Pistachio Fire Grilled Steaks ~ New Orleans Style Grilled Oysters ~ Chorizo Clams and Mussels Jumbo Wild American Prawns ~ Signature Smoked Salmon Chowder Orleans Orleans Style Style Grilled Grilled Oysters Oysters ~ ~ Chorizo Chorizo Clams Clams and and Mussels Mussels New New Orleans Style Grilled Oysters ~ Chorizo Clams and Mussels New Enjoy Our New Water View Lounge with Sweeping View of the Strait. Pistachio Crusted Neah Bay King Salmon ~ Fire Grilled Steaks

452-8888

on Hwy 101, across from Deer Park Cinema

www.cestsibon-frenchcuisine.com

Kokopelli KokopelliGrill Grill Kokopelli Grill Kokopelli Grill

New Orleans Style Grilled Oysters ~ Chorizo Clams and Mussels

Craft Craft Beer’s Beer’s~~~Full Full Bar Bar~~~Extensive Extensive Wine Wine List List~~~Wine Wine Shop Shop Local Local Local Craft Beer’s Full Bar Extensive Wine List Wine Shop

Open Daily 6:30 am - 9:30 pm Breakfast

203 203 East East Front Front St. St. Port Port Angeles Angeles (corner (corner of of Front Front and and Lincoln) Lincoln) 203 East Front St. Port Angeles (corner of Front and Lincoln)

Local Craft Beer’s ~ Full Bar ~ Extensive Wine List ~ Wine Shop 457-6040 457-6040~~~Kids Kids Menu Menu Available Available~~~www.kokopelli-grill.com www.kokopelli-grill.com (360) (360) (360) 457-6040 Kids Menu Available www.kokopelli-grill.com

Lunch

203 East Front St. Port Angeles (corner of Front and Lincoln)

Coming Soon!

Fresh Salads, Sandwiches and Seafood

Dinner (starts at 4 pm)

Monday Monday ——Thursday —Thursday Thursday 11 11 am—9 am—9 pm pm Monday 11 am—9 pm

457-6040 ~ Kids Menu Available ~ www.kokopelli-grill.com (360) Full Full Full

Local Fresh Seafood and Steaks

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1506 East First, Port Angeles 651584373

457-4611

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Traditional, Specialty Items and Baked Goods Made From Scratch

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Catering Catering Catering Full Service Catering

A New Restaurant Coyote’s Southern BBQ Pub next door to Kokopelli’s

FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

&&Saturday &Saturday Saturday 11 11 am—10 am—10 pm pm Friday Friday 11 am—10 pm Friday Monday — Thursday 11 am—9 pm 24 2pm—8 pm—8 pm pm Sunday Sunday 2pm—8 pm Sunday Friday & Saturday 11 am—10 pm Reservations Reservations Recommended Recommended Reservations Recommended

Sunday 2 pm—8 pm

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE 61 Reservations Recommended


Ediz Hook

Waves at Ediz Hook

Only a few minutes from downtown Port Angeles, you will find Ediz Hook, a 3-mile-long sand spit enhanced by rock that juts into the Strait of Juan de Fuca to form Port Angeles’ deepwater harbor. This is an ideal spot to view the city and the Olympic Mountains rising in the background. Public beaches offer beachcombing opportunities and places to view ships traveling through the Strait. Harbor seals, orcas and seabirds can be spotted from the hook. Access is via Marine Drive, which passes through the Nippon Paper Industries USA paper mill.

A Taste of Mexico VOTED BEST MEXICAN FOOD SINCE 2003!

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636 E. Front St. Port Angeles

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NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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691681873

360.452.3928

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BANQUET ROOM AVAILABLE


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Coyote

BBQ

Serving Thai Tapas & Traditional Thai Fares Home of

Pub

Lemongrass Kobe Sliders Spicy Northern Thai Sausage & much more

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(Across from the Red Lion)

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Open Monday-Saturday Closed Sunday 222 North Lincoln St.

6A1698853

“Holy Smokes” is Port Angeles ready for real Southern BBQ in a Downtown PUB with a Steam Punk theme? Well here it is, located right next to Kokopelli Grill on the corner of Front and Lincoln. We feature West Texas style Prime Smoked Brisket, Smoked Chicken, St. Louis Ribs, Homemade Sausage, huge Stuffed Potatoes, Sandwiches, Craft Beers, Cocktails and more. Always family friendly with huge platters for larger groups. You can dine in or take out. Our new outdoor seating will be a huge hit in the spring and summer. Order online at Coyotebbqpub.com

Home Style Comfort Food We make our own Fries and Hashbrowns, Our Burgers are fresh, hand pressed and never frozen.

Serving Breakfast & Lunch • Bring in your hotrods • Interior designed with re-purposed lumber with an Old Car Theme

Open Every Day 5 a.m. - 2 p.m.

6A1698340

457-2003 2341 E Hwy 101 Port Angeles

201 East Front Street, Port Angeles, WA

360-477-4947

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Monday - Sunday 11-10

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GETTING THERE Strait of Juan de Fuca

U.S. Coast Guard Air Station/ Sector Field Office

1 Kilometer

Port Angeles Harbor Legend Airport

Golf Course

Hospital

Viewpoint

Museum

Ranger Station

School Olympic National Park

N Gales St Monroe Rd

Mount Pleasant Rd

zzi Dr DelGu

101

Peninsula Golf Course

Lee s

Rd

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les

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nis

Peabody St

Peninsula College Olympic National Park Visitor Information Center Mt

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Laurel St

Fine Arts Center Golf Course Rd

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Park Ave

Blac

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101

Ferry

Marina

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Elks Park

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Information

Boat Ramp

Park

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Blvd

S. T umw

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St

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W 18th St W Cla Fairgllam Co 16th St roun . d Linco ln Pa s rk W.Lau ridsen

d

Fairchild Int'l. Airport

th

t

W8

Public Camp

Lib

Shane Park

Passenger/Auto Ferry to Victoria Visitor Center R W ail City Pier W 1Froroad st Snt S Ave Feiro Marine t t Life Center Car olin Olympic e S Medical Museum at t the Carnegie Center E1 st S E F t ron E8 t St th St

hit eC

Marina

Rac eS t

St

Dr

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Hill

Peabody Cree k

W 4th St

Dr

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Milwa

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1 Mile

Hurricane R idge Rd

5

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Ediz Hook

Ho ok R

01

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PORT ANGELES LODGING

NEWLY REMODELED ROOMS! All Rooms are Non-Smoking Refrigerators Microwaves

• 16 large non-smoking/smoking units • Queen beds, kitchens or microwave/ refrigerators • Single or 2 bed units • Cable TV

Coffemakers Flat Screen TVs HBO

• Mountain View

64

Wireless Internet Service

“A comfortable night’s rest at an economical price” Reservations

1-888-304-3465

Front Desk

360-457-9494

415 E. 1st St. • Port Angeles, WA 98362 info@flagstonemotel.com • www.flagstonemotel.com

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2909 Hwy. 101 E., Port Angeles • 360-457-6196 www.sportsmenmotel.com

Direct TV

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• Ample parking for boats & trucks • Newly installed coin operated laundry for all motel guests • Free Wi-Fi


West End Park

The 1.5-acre waterfront West End Park is located along Front Street and features two beaches — one 80 feet by 200 feet, the other 80 feet by 130 feet — that fringe the shoreline. Take a moment to investigate the park’s public art sculptures. Have a picnic on the green grass, do a little bird watching or snap photos of boats moving about in the harbor.

Port Angeles City Pier

Located at the foot of Lincoln Street, Port Angeles City Pier features an observation tower, promenade, deck, picnic area and shortterm moorage for small boats. Take a stroll along adjacent Hollywood Beach or Waterfront Trail after you visit the pier.

Peabody Creek Trail

If you’re looking for a dog friendly trail that’s not too long and all-season friendly, check out the Peabody Creek Loop Trail near the Olympic National Park Visitors Center, 3002 Mount Angeles Road. From the west end of the parking lot, hikers will immediately descend through green trees. After about 1/4 mile, you will spot the creek. The trail crosses a bridge and under a large tree. To the left is a spur trail that will continue up the creek, but you’ll want to veer right to continue on the loop. Follow along the trail some more and go right again. Another bridge comes up, giving you another chance to peer into the creek. From there, head back up the stairs to the parking lot. In total, this hike is a half-mile long.

Counterclockwise from top: A group of kayakers paddle in Port Angeles Harbor near City Pier. The Peabody Creek Trail is an allseason friendly hike. Check out West End Park for great views of Port Angeles Harbor and to enjoy public art sculptures.

Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary

Comprised of 2,408 square nautical miles of marine waters off the rugged Olympic Peninsula coastline. It is difficult to miss Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary. Stop by the Olympic Coast Discovery Center, located on the Port Angeles waterfront at The Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad Ave., to learn more about the sanctuary and the animals and plants that call the area home. The free visitor center helps inform local and international guests about Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary natural and cultural resources, research and educational programs. For details, visit www.olympiccoast.noaa.gov.

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Peninsula flavors

The Olympic Peninsula offers diverse culinary options for a small region. The area is known throughout the Northwest for its scrumptious berries and fresh produce. The Dungeness Valley is one of the most fertile areas to grow berries ranging from strawberries, marionberries and raspberries to blueberries and loganberries. Peninsula blackberries, which grow wild pretty much everywhere, are probably the best in the state. The Peninsula is home to a number of familyowned farms, organic farms and farm stores. Farmers markets operate throughout the year in communities across the Peninsula. In the early fall, community markets burst at the seams with garden-fresh goodies. The abundance of fresh fish and seafood from the Pacific Ocean and the area’s many rivers are a delicious delight on the Peninsula. Locally caught fish such as salmon and halibut are staples on many restaurant menus. Mussels, oysters, razor and butter clams, shrimp and highly sought-after geoducks are available seasonally on many menus. One tasty crustacean — the Dungeness crab — is a popular delicacy and is the most commercially important crab in the Pacific Northwest. The crab receives its name from the community of Dungeness, which is located approximately five miles north of Sequim and 15 miles east of Port Angeles. In autumn, seasonal rains help mushrooms of all shapes and sizes grow on forest floors. Locally harvested chanterelle and portobello mushrooms are sold at local markets and stores.

Counterclockwise from top: Dishes with freshly-caught Dungeness crab are a local specialty. The damp forest floor is the perfect place for chanterelles to grow.

Northwest Smoked Salmon

Pepperoni

Sausage

Beef Jerky

Kippered, Hard, Smoked, Jerky, Candy, Pepperoni Summer, Italian, Polish, Cajun, German, Brats

Summer, Salami, Lanjagger Teriyaki, Cajun, Black Pepper, Garlic

360-457-3211 • 1-800-953-3211 • FAX 360-457-6566 • 1325 E. 1st St. • Port Angeles 66

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Mailed Anywhere in the U.S.A. • Try & Beat Our Prices!


Elwha Klallam Heritage Center

To learn more about the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe and its history on the North Olympic Peninsula stop by the Elwha Klallam Heritage Center, 401 E. First St. in Port Angeles. Port Angeles was once home to a huge village called Tse-whit-zen, which was unearthed in 2003 at the west end of Port Angeles Harbor. Many of the artifacts found are being stored at the Burke Museum in Seattle. Others can be viewed at the Elwha Klallam Heritage Center. The center, completed in 2010, integrates life and vocational skills, cultural values and history, as well as providing entrepreneurial avenues and initiating opportunities to learn traditional Klallam arts. The center also features meeting rooms and a commercial kitchen that community members can rent. For more information about the center, visit www.elwha.org.

Doc Neeley’s Gun Shop Purveyors of Fine Firearms & Accoutrement Pistols • Rifles Shotguns • Ammo Holsters • Scopes

Jim Rogers Owner

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PORT ANGELES RECREATION

• Quality Inn Uptown • All View • Red Lion

SWIM FOR FREE

(360) 452-2800

105 E. 8th St., Port Angeles Mon-Fri 10 am - 6 pm • Sat 10 am - 5 pm www.cowboygunsandgear.com doc@cowboygunsandgear.com

Celebrating over 57 Years of Family FUN!! Join A League Plan A Party Rent A Lane

Monthly Swim Lessons Birthday Rentals Exercise Classes Diving Board Rock Climbing Wall (in the deep end)

Rope Swing • Sauna Lap Swimming

Monday - Friday 5:30 am - 3 pm • 7:00 - 8:30 pm (M-F)

Voted #1 for Birthday Parties in Clallam County

Open Swim

Monday - Friday 7:00 - 8:30 pm

2016

Check our website for weekend hours and special events!

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Auto Scorers Auto Bumpers Snack Bar Beer & Wine Plenty of Parking

Guests of:

417-9767

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FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

225 East 5th Street, Port Angeles williamshorepool.org

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Feiro Marine Life Center

The marine life within the tanks at the Feiro Marine Life Center seems static until a volunteer points out a scallop filtering plankton, and several starry flounders and great sculpins blanketed in sand. These and other lessons are what the late Arthur Feiro, a Port Angeles biology teacher with a passion for marine life, wanted his legacy to be in establishing the center, which is situated on the city pier next to Hollywood Beach. The Feiro Marine Life Center is an educational and scientific organization promoting marine education and conservation.

Educational programs for the community are scheduled on a regular basis. Visitors can get up close to local marine life in the center’s touch and view tanks and bank of aquariums. The exhibits are representative of the marine life inhabiting the Strait of Juan de Fuca, including a young giant Pacific octopus captured in the Strait. Close to 20,000 visitors walk through the nonprofit center’s doors annually. Feiro is open seven days a week yearround, from noon to 5 p.m. during the winter months. Visit www.feiromarinelifecenter.org or phone 360-417-6254 for details. An Independent Full-Service Bookstore 1st Place Best e or Book St Clallam

Co

PORT ANGELES SHOPPING 6A1698704

NEW & USED BOOKS GREETING CARDS • TOYS GIFT ITEMS • JOURNALS • CDs Special Orders & Phone Orders Welcome

Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m. - 7 p.m. • Sun. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

360-457-1045 114 West Front Street, Port Angeles

Pacific Rim Hobby

Largest collection of spinning and felting items on the Peninsula, many locally sourced

Model Cars Boats Trains Planes RC & Supplies

68

125 W 1st Street, Port Angeles

Open Tues. - Fri. 11am-6pm • Sat. 10am - 5pm 360.504.2233 www.cabledfiberstudio.com

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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6A1696525

(360) 457-0794 138 W. Railroad • Port Angeles Mon. - Sat. 10-6 • Sun. 12-5

LOCALLY MADE yarns from local sheep LOCALLY MADE yarn bowls and buttons LOCALLY MADE fiber art works


Downtown art

Art on the Town is an ever-changing outdoor art project that graces downtown Port Angeles sidewalks. The art ranges from the realist to the abstract, conveyed in various media. Eleven steel sculptures along Laurel Street called “Avenue of the People” have become a popular photography opportunity for visitors. Conrad Dyar Memorial Fountain at First and Laurel streets features cascading water and benches for resting. The three-level Laurel Street stairs begin behind the fountain area and connect First and Second streets, and offer great views of Port Angeles Harbor.

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Handcrafted Art “Made in the USA”

We have the perfect gifts!

Jewelry • Pottery • Scarves Interesting Clocks • Beautiful Candles Women’s Boutique Clothing • Baby & Toddler Gifts

360.504.2590

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124 W. 1st St. #B Dowtown Pt Angeles

like us on facebook

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Lake Crescent

The turnoff from U.S. Highway 101 to Olympic National Park’s Storm King Ranger Station leads to several picnic tables nestled in the trees, and makeshift sites along the shoreline provide the perfect place to enjoy a picnic lunch or dinner. Last-minute lunch supplies can be purchased at Shadow Mountain General Store, located along U.S. Highway 101 at Lake Sutherland, or at Fairholm General Store, located at the west end of the lake. The Storm King Ranger Station area includes restrooms and access to potable water, a ranger station, a boat launch and trails. More information about hiking along area trails is available at the Storm King Ranger Station. After a relaxing picnic, consider getting out on the water. Boat launches are located at both east and west ends of the lake. Rowboats are available for rental from historical Lake Crescent Lodge. The popular trail to Marymere Falls also starts from the Storm King Ranger Station. Whether it is taking a row, kayaking, sailing or simply relaxing on the beaches

The clear cool waters of Lake Crescent and shores, Lake Crescent is a great place to visit, hike and stay for the night. There are several lodging options if you want to extend your Lake Crescent experience. On the west end of Lake Crescent, the Fairholme Campground has 87 campsites, one of which is wheelchair-accessible. The campground is open May through mid-fall. Sites are first-come, first-served. The Fairholme Campground Trail begins across Camp David Junior Road and

wanders through dense stands of trees. For less primitive accommodations, try Lake Crescent Lodge or Log Cabin Resort. Historical Lake Crescent Lodge is located at Barnes Point on Lake Crescent Road just off Highway 101. (p 80.) Log Cabin Resort is located on the other side of the lake on East Beach Road, north of U.S. Highway 101. (p 80.) Visit www.olympicnationalparks.com/stay/ lodging/log-cabin-resort for details.

PORT ANGELES HEALTH & WELLNESS A

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Marymere Falls is a 1.8-mile roundtrip trail that leads day hikers through some of the Olympic National Park’s most pristine environment, weaving through old-growth forest. To reach the falls, take U.S. Highway 101 west from Port Angeles to the Storm King Ranger Station on Lake Crescent. The trailhead begins as a paved walkway that runs alongside the ranger station, a re-creation of the original station built in the early 1900s. You’ll see a nice view of the north side of the lake before wandering inland toward the falls. For about the first three-quarters of a mile of the trail, wheelchairs may be used with assistance. The final trek to the falls is a steep uphill

Sol Duc Falls

Easy-to-reach waterfalls

Sol Duc Falls can be enjoyed yearround, but the route might require snowshoes in the winter. During the early spring, the runoff from the falls is pretty spectacular. Take U.S. Highway 101 west from Port Angeles for 30 miles, or 26 miles east from Forks. Turn southeast on the Sol Duc Hot Springs Road and follow it 14 miles to the trailhead parking lot. There is a wide gravel trail and a railed viewing area at this falls. Be careful when crossing the bridge over the falls. The wooden planks are slippery from the constant spray from the falls.

Madison Falls climb, with the choice of two lookouts, one about 50 feet above the falls, the other at its base. Madison Creek Falls is an easy hike just west of Port Angeles. Follow U.S. Highway 101 to Olympic Hot Springs Road. Turn south and follow the road to the parking area. The trailhead begins right at the parking lot. This is the Olympic National Park’s most accessible waterfall — only about 150 yards from the parking area over a fully paved, accessible trail. The falls is listed as a 60-foot-high cascade by the National Park Service. Several old-growth trees and stumps line the trail. A nearby picnic area in an old orchard provides an easy place for families to dine and enjoy the beauty of the Elwha Valley. Visit the Olympic Peninsula Waterfall Trail website at www. olympicpeninsulawaterfalltrail.com for directions, photos and details about more than 20 waterfalls.

Marymere Falls

Properties by

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Freshwater Bay

Counterclockwise from top: The quiet waters of Freshwater Bay invite kayakers to enjoy a paddle around the bay’s lone sea stack appropriately named Bachelor Rock. Freshwater Bay is a stop on the Peninsula’s Whale Trail.

West of Port Angeles, Freshwater Bay, where river water spills into the Strait of Juan de Fuca, is a great place for an outing. Freshwater Bay County Park features 21 acres and has 1,450 lineal feet of public tidelands. The protected bay provides a tranquil location to launch kayaks and small boats to explore beautiful coves while enjoying panoramic views of Vancouver Island and Mount Baker. Once on the secluded bay, it is very common to come face to face with any number of marine mammals including harbor seals, orcas and river otters. Bald eagles often can be found soaring above the bay. Freshwater Bay also is great for stand-up paddle boarding thanks to relatively shallow and calm waters. A picnic area is located on the bluff above the bay. This area, the park’s restrooms and covered picnic shelters are open May 15 through Sept. 15. The lower picnic site, concrete launch ramp and beach access areas are open throughout the year. The east entrance of the state Department of Natural Resources’ Striped Peak Recreation Area also can be accessed from the park. Freshwater Bay is 10 miles west of Port Angeles on state Highway 112, then travel 3 miles north on Freshwater Bay Road.

SERVING OUR COMMUNITY AND FUELING OUR ECONOMY Peninsula College is a leader in advanced technology fields, particularly in the areas of aerospace, marine, and recreation composite applications. The College prepares a diverse student population for 21st century jobs and beyond.

Advanced Technology Programs Composites Technology Automotive Technology and Alternative Fuels Green Building Welding Peninsula College offers diversified programming for a diversified economy. For more information, visit www.pencol.edu

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Shellfishing options

On the Peninsula you can find bucketloads of oysters and clams. Going after crab and shrimp also are popular pursuits. Seasons fluctuate, and anyone wanting to go after razor or other clams, oysters and crab should first check the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations. The best way to figure out what’s open and what’s not is to visit www.wdfw.wa.gov/ fishing/shellfish. Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge sets its own seasons and rules. Contact the refuge at 360-457-8451. Licenses are required for shellfish harvesting and may be purchased at most tackle shops and other stores.

Razor clams are available on many coastal beaches, but domoic acid, a naturally occurring marine toxin that can cause amnesic shellfish poisoning in humans, sometimes causes digging closures. But in recent years, beaches have routinely opened to harvesting. Other species of shellfish are currently considered unsafe and should not be harvested from any beach on the state coastline. Look for informational signs at beach trailheads about closures. For details about which shellfish are and are not safe, and dates and locations on seasons, phone the state Department of Health’s beach closures/shellfish toxin hotline at 800562-5632 or visit www.wdfw.wa.gov.

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Whether one is pursuing an active, independent lifestyle, or you require more personal living assistance PARK VIEW VILLAS OFFERS A SAFE, SECURE AND FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENT.

Rentals include meals, weekly housekeeping/linen service, utilities, cable, weekly scheduled transportation, Senior Center memberships, entertainment and social and recreational activities. Our Wellness Team ensures exceptional PERSONAL CARE 24 HOURS A DAY.

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EPISCOPAL

St. Andrew’s Episcopal 510 East Park Ave. • 457-4862 (1 block east of PA High School) sapa@olypen.com The Rev. Gail Wheatley

PORT ANGELES

CATHOLIC CHURCHES Queen of Angels Parish 209 West 11th St. Port Angeles (360) 452.2351 www.clallamcatholic.com

Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Tuesday evening 6:00 p.m. Wednesday 12:00 p.m. Thurs-Fri 8:30 a.m. Confession: 30 minutes prior to all daily Masses (except Thursday) Weekend Confessions: Saturday 3:30-4:30 p.m.

St. Joseph Parish

101 E. Maple St., Sequim (360) 683.6076 www.clallamcatholic.com Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Monday 8:30 a.m. Wednesday: 12:00 p.m. Thurs-Fri 8:30 a.m.

Spanish Mass every 2nd Sunday 2 p.m. Confession: 30 minutes prior to all daily Masses (Except Thursday) Weekend Confessions: Saturday 3:30-4:30 p.m.

UNITY

SUNDAY 9 a.m. Adult Forum & Sunday School 8 & 10 a.m. Holy Eucharist Nursery available on Sundays MONDAY 8:15 p.m. Compline

2917 E. Myrtle • (360) 457-3981

SUNDAY 10:15 a.m. Silent Meditation 10:30 a.m. Worship Service 11:30 a.m. Fellowship Time

Peninsula Evangelical Friends Church

Port Angeles Church of the Nazarene

Between Sequim & Port Angeles on Old Olympic Hwy. 1291 N. Barr Road, Pt. Angeles 452-9105 Pastor Jonathan D. Fodge Ministers: The Entire Congregation SUNDAY 10:45 a.m. Meeting for Worship

www.standrewpa.org

www.sermonaudio.com/pefc www.pefcpa.com

Corner of 2nd & Race P.O. Box 2086 • (360) 457-4839 Pastor Neil Castle (360)670-2393

EVERY SUNDAY 9 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Worship Service Nursery available during AM services EVERY WEDNESDAY 6 p.m. Christian Maturity Studies (call to verify) Invite your friends & neighbors for clear, biblical preaching, wonderful fellowship, & the invitation to a lasting, personal relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ.

NONDENOMINATIONAL Calvary Chapel Port Angeles

PENTECOSTAL

Bethany Pentecostal

506 S. Francis • 457-1030 Corner of 5th & Francis Omer Vigoren, Pastor Jeff Douglas, Music/Youth Leader SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Worship Service 6:30 p.m. Evening Service

SATURDAY 7:00 p.m. Prayer Service

JEWISH Congregation Olympic B’nai Shalom

www.bethanypa.com

BAHA’I

The Bahá’i Faith

“The happiness of mankind lieth in the unity and harmony of the human race... Spiritual and material developments are conditioned upon love and amity amoung all men.” Bahá’u’lláh

Childcare services available

“Is there any Remover of difficulties save God?” The Báb

www.unityintheolympics.org uito@olypen.com

Call 360-417-1869 for information about on-going study and devotions.

SUNDAY 10:30 a.m. Worship Service Children’s classes during teaching time taught at their level and nursery. WEDNESDAY 6 p.m. Dinner 7 p.m. Refuel (worship & bible study), Youth and Kid’s Ministry www.calvarypa.org

WEDNESDAY 7 p.m. Evening Service

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

213 E. 8th St. • 360-504-2106 (at the corner of Lincoln & 8th) Andrew McLarty, Pastor

Monthly Shabbat gatherings for services and educational programs High Holy Days & Other Jewish Holiday Services Social and Cultural Events...

FOURSQUARE Harbor of Hope Foursquare Church 1018 W. 16th St., Port Angeles (360) 461-7979 Pastor David Rich SUNDAY 10:00 a.m. Worship Service WEDNESDAY 9 a.m. Prayer THURSDAY 6 p.m. Evening DVD Series

Bi-Monthly Newsletter

www.harborofhopechurch.com

Connections to Seattle & Tacoma Congregations

www.facebook.com/ harborofhopechurch/

For Information: www.obsh.org, (360) 452-2471 or write P.O. Box 553, Port Angeles, WA 98362

email: davidrich8@gmail.com

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NAZARENE

jfodge@olypen.com Families worshiping and learning together

WEDNESDAY 11 a.m. Holy Eucharist

www.bahai.us • 1-800-22UNITE www.northolympicbahais.org

Unity in the Olympics

FRIENDS/QUAKER


BAPTIST

LUTHERAN

Hillcrest Baptist Church (SBC)

St. Matthew Lutheran and Preschool

205 Black Diamond Road 457-7409

SUNDAY 9:45 a.m. Bible Study, all ages 11 a.m. Worship 6 p.m. Prayer Time Nursery provided

PORT ANGELES BIBLE CHURCH Independent Bible Church 452-3351

SATURDAY 6:00 p.m. Upper Room Service 112 North Lincoln St. PA SUNDAY 8:15 a.m. & 11 a.m. Worship Services 9:50 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 116 E. Ahlvers Road, PA www.indbible.org

WEDNESDAY 6 p.m. Bible Study Call for more info regarding other church activities.

First Baptist Church

Leading people in an ever changing culture to the hope of Jesus. (American) 105 West 6th Street • (360) 457-3313 Tim Hughes, Pastor SUNDAY 9:30 & 11 a.m. Worship Service (nursery available) www.firstbaptistpa.org

(Missouri Synod) Lincoln at 13th St. • (360) 457-4122 Patrick Lovejoy, Pastor SUNDAY 8:45 a.m. Adult Bible Class 8:45 a.m. Children’s Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship Service 7 p.m. Service WEDNESDAY 5:30 p.m. Free Dinner Call for more information regarding other church activities. www.stmatthewportangeles.org

Holy Trinity Lutheran Church & Preschool (ELCA) 301 East Lopez • (360) 452-2323 www.go2trinity.org htlc@olypen.com Pastors Olaf & Kristin Luana Baumann

Call or check our website for Worship & Sunday School hours. Nursery available during morning services Broadcast on KONP 1450 at 11 a.m. We have many ongoing Bible studies, youth and social activities. Call us for more info.

METHODIST

SPIRITUAL LIVING

First United Methodist Church

Center for Spiritual Living Port Angeles

110 E. 7th St. (7th & Laurel) (360) 452-8971 Tom Steffen, Pastor SUNDAY Nursery provided 8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Worship 9:45 a.m. Adult Education MONDAY 12-2 p.m. Clothes Closet WEDNESDAY 1-3 p.m. Clothes Closet FRIDAY 5:30 p.m. Free Dinner office@pafumc.org website: www.pafumc.org

Our Gatherings

PRESBYTERIAN First Presbyterian

139 West 8th • (360) 452-4781 Wendy Taylor, Interim Pastor

Looking for a different kind of “church” community?

Olympic Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Many Paths In The Quest For Faith 10:30 a.m. Sunday Service and Children’s Program-Enrichment & Play Between Sequim & Port Angeles 73 Howe Rd, Agnew off N. Barr Rd. Between Hwy 101 & Old Olympic Welcoming Congregation Email: admin@olympicuuf.org Facebook: OlympicUUFellowship www.olympicuuf.org (360) 417-2665

PRESBYTERIAN REFORMED Redeeming Grace Orthodox Presbyterian Church Meeting at Port Angeles Senior Center 328 E. 7th Street (Corner of S. Peabody St.)

SUNDAY 9:45 a.m. Study Hour 11:00 a.m. Worship Service For information: (360) 504-1950 www.rgopc.org

Contact Rev.T. 714-642-4925 cslportangeles@gmail.com

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SUNDAY 8:30 a.m./11 a.m. Worship Services (school year) 9:45 a.m. Sunday School (school year) Nursery provided For more information call church office or visit us on our website www.fpcpa.org

MEDITATION MONDAY 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. TEACH TUESDAY 6:30 p.m. WORKSHOP WEDNESDAY 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. TALK THURSDAY 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. FUNDAY FRIDAY Varies We are open, safe, creative, inclusive, Spiritual Community, where we experience Divine Love and connection everyday! Check out our website: www.cspla.org

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST

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Medicus curat, natura sanat. Medicus curat, natura sanat.

RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA DIRECTORY

Happiness is Available!

Port Angeles’ “Go-To” for Medical MJ Patients 2947 E Hwy 101, Port Angeles • 360-477-4222 Sunday-Thursday 9 am-8 pm Friday & Saturday 9 am -10 pm

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Locations in Port Townsend & Mount Vernon! Check our website for more info!

www.sweetreliefwa.com

This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

LARGEST SELECTION OF NO-HIGH NON SMOKING OPTIONS AVAILABLE ON THE PENINSULA.

Visit the Friendliest Cannabis Shop on the Olympic Peninsula!

Mon-Thurs • 10 a.m. -7 p.m. Fri -Sat • 10 a.m. -10 p.m. Sun • 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

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1403 E. First St., Suite B Port Angeles, WA


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Recreational marijuana Here’s a quick rundown of where legal marijuana is available on the North Olympic Peninsula and how to go about procuring it. In Clallam County: • Mister Buds, 536 Marine Drive, Port Angeles • Sparket R&R, 1403 E. First St., Suite B, Port Angeles • The Hidden Bush, 3230 E. U.S. Highway 101, Port Angeles • Muffy’s Smokin’ Greens, 3134 E. U.S. Highway 101, Port Angeles • Karma Cannabis, 131 River Road, Sequim • Nature’s Gifts, 755 W. Washington St., Suite C, Sequim In Jefferson County: • Sea Change Cannabis, 282332 U.S. Highway 101, Discovery Bay • Herbal Access Retail, 661 Ness’ Corner Road, Port Hadlock • Reefer Den, 2123 W. Sims Way, Port Townsend Where can I smoke? On private property out of view of the general public. How much can I possess? For those 21 and older, 1 ounce of usable marijuana, marijuana paraphernalia, 16 ounces of solid marijuana-infused product or 72 ounces of liquid marijuana-

infused product. What’s not allowed? Pot use and possession remain a criminal act on federal lands, which include Olympic

National Park and Olympic National Forest. Do not take products to another state or country. Do not drive while under the influence.

Port Angeles’s Premier RECREATIONAL

MARIJUANA RETAILER

THE

Flower, Edibles, Concentrates, Tinctures, Topicals, Paraphernalia and more... (360)

452-9395

3230 E Hwy 101 • Port Angeles, WA

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This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

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Sun- 10 pm• 8am – 10pm Sun - Wed • 8am – Sat, 9pm 8am | Thurs - Sat


Dog parks

In Port Angeles, check out the PA Dog Park, located in Lincoln Park next to the BMX track at 1900 W. Lauridsen Blvd. The park provides two large fenced-in areas for dogs to play off leash based on size. For more information, visit www. padogpark.org. Port Townsend has one official off-leash dog park, a small area next to Chetzemoka Park. The Port Townsend Dogs group is looking

After a long trip to the Peninsula, owners and their canine companions will yearn to stretch their legs. Sequim Dog Park is a perfect place to enjoy the fresh air in a safe environment. This is a community park that is over one acre in size on the east side of Carrie Blake Park, two blocks north on Blake Avenue from Washington Street. The park encourages people to bring their dogs for exercise and off-leash doggie play. There is a fenced area for large dogs and one for small dogs. The park is well-groomed and clean and its users are self-policing and friendly. Restrooms, doggie clean-up bags and covered benches are available for visitors’ use. Park rules are posted onsite and online at www.sequimdogparks.org. A portion of the Olympic Discovery Trail runs by Carrie Blake Park and there also is a walking trail for dogs and their people around the park. Hours for both parks are from dawn until dusk.

to strategize ways to develop an official park for dog recreation in the near future. Other good places to bring your dog in Port Townsend are the Larry Scott Trail and North Beach County Park (low tide is the best time). Pets in a state park, such as Fort Worden, for example, must always be on leash. For other city park rules for doggies, check in with a chamber of commerce office.

BED & BREAKFAST DIRECTORY

PORT ANGELES COFFEE

Come relax and enjoy the beauty and serenity of Sea Cliff Gardens and the Olympic Peninsula.

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Ten Acre Oceanfront Estate Luxurious Accommodations Oceanfront King Suites Romantic Fireplaces Two Person Jacuzzi Spas Gourmet Breakfast

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Toll Free: 1-877-457-9777 Local: 360-457-9197 www.colettes.com

• 2 Acre Oceanfront

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397 Monterra Dr., Port Angeles, WA 98362 www.seacliffgardens.com

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Historical lodges

Staying in a historical lodge is a wonderful way to enjoy the beauty of the area. Four lodges on the Olympic Peninsula provide comfortable accommodations directly inside Olympic National Park. Check each resort for availability and seasonal schedules. Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort (open late spring to early fall) offers several rustic cabins that are free of modern distractions such as telephones, televisions and radios. These cabins offer access to mineral hot spring soaking pools and one freshwater pool. Kalaloch Lodge (open year-round) is perched high on a bluff just steps from a pristine stretch of a sandy Pacific Ocean beach. The main lodge offers two suites with stunning ocean views and three rooms. There are also several cabins and additional rooms in the Seacrest Building. Lake Crescent Lodge (open late spring to Jan. 1) was built in 1915 and is an ideal base camp for enjoying the park. A variety of guest room options are available, including the lakeside Roosevelt cottages. Log Cabin Resort (open May to September) offers lakeside chalets, lodge rooms, cabins, full hook-up RV sites and tent camping sites. Although it is not located within Olympic National Park, nearby Lake Quinault Lodge (open year-round) was built in 1926 and has several room choices, many with lakeside views, as well as boathouse rooms that are pet-friendly.

Counterclockwise from top: Quinault Lodge offers rooms with forest and lakeside views. Lake Crescent Lodge has a variety of rooms and cottages along the shores of the beautiful lake.

$16 / $25 ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP DUES

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360-457-7004

328 E. 7th, Port Angeles, WA (SW corner of 7th & Peabody) Check us out at: www.portangelesseniorcenter.com

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Port Angeles Senior Center


Salt Creek Recreation Area

One of the county’s most popular parks, Salt Creek Recreation Area near Joyce offers visitors forests, rocky bluffs, tide pools, a sandy beach and campsites, and features wonderful panoramic views of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Crescent Bay and Vancouver Island. Highlighted as a premier birding site, Salt Creek is on the National Audubon’s Olympic Loop of the Greater Washington State Birding Trail. The area was once the location of Camp Hayden, a World War II harbor defense military base. Two concrete bunkers preserve its military history. The area was purchased after being decommissioned at the end of World War II. The adjacent Tongue Point Marine Life Sanctuary includes a rocky outcropping that, at low tide, reveals starfish, sea urchins, limpets, sea cucumbers and many other forms of marine life. When you visit tidal areas, practice tide pool etiquette. Remember the Makah tribal saying: “Take nothing but pictures; leave nothing but footprints.” The waters surrounding Salt Creek are popular spots for kayaking, surfing and paddleboarding. Mountain bikers and hikers can access the state’s Striped Peak Recreation Area from the Salt Creek area. Salt Creek is a popular camping sites

Salt Creek Recreation Area for families. Park amenities include one picnic shelter with a fireplace, play equipment, basketball, volleyball and horseshoe courts and a softball field, plus several trails. For details about camping reservations, visit www.clallam.net/Parks/SaltCreek.html or phone 360-928-3441. The scenic Whale Trail is a string of 20 locations around Washington where visitors are likely to see whales and other marine mammals from shore. A sign at Salt Creek Recreation Area — positioned in the northwest corner of the park, near the stairs leading to Tongue Point — overlooks Crescent Bay, where

gray whales often are seen. Along state Highway 112, which is also known as the Strait of Juan de Fuca National Scenic Byway, Whale Trail sites are found at Freshwater Bay County Park, the Sekiu Overlook and Shipwreck Point. For more information about the trail, visit www.thewhaletrail.org. To reach Salt Creek Recreation Area, take state Highway 112 west from Port Angeles toward Joyce. After nine miles, turn right (north) onto Camp Hayden Road (near Milepost 54). Travel about three miles. The park entrance will be located on your right.

Breakfast Served All Day Home Cooking • Friendly Service Homemade Biscuits & Gravy Burgers • Soups & Sandwiches

Daily Specials Open All Holidays! OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 6:30AM – 2:00PM 612 S. LINCOLN, PORT ANGELES

457-1656 Owners: Jim & Sheri Mackrow

Experience the 1,000s of pieces of memorabilia on our walls & see our electric train travel 150’ around the room. FALL/WINTER 2016-2017

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Back row: Left to right; Mike, Russ, Dave, Sheri & Jim. Front row: Left to right; Carmen, Patti, Tarynn, Jordyn & Bobbie.

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Fishing, hunting rules

Everything from heavy, world-class salmon to small, fun-to-fight alpine brook trout can be caught with a rod and reel in waters across the North Olympic Peninsula. Be sure to pick up a copy of the Washington State Sportfishing Rules pamphlet while you’re here, as well as Olympic National Park official sportfishing guide. The pamphlets detail boundaries and regulations, as well as licensing. Current regulations usually are available at most tackle shops, sporting goods stores or wherever fishing licenses are sold. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife fishing regulations are at 360-9022500, www.wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations.

NEED TO KNOW

Licensing: Anglers can renew their license by visiting www.fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov or by calling 866-246-9453. A list of license vendors is available online at www.wdfw. wa.gov/licensing/vendors. >> continued on Page 83

Tails are Waggin’ & Dogs are Braggin’ About our Condo Suites

New Clients: Stay Monday & Tuesday night receive Wednesday night free

PET DIRECTORY

Expires 12/31/2016

42 Dory Road, Sequim • 360.582.9686

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NEAR PORT ANGELES AIRPORT

Stay 4 nights or more, receive $3 off each additional night.

Emergency Service & House Calls Available

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA GUIDE

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160 DelGuzzi Drive Port Angeles, WA 98362

452-7686

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Pocket Pets, Dogs & Cats Quality Professional Health Care Since 1980 Andi R. Thomson, D.V.M. Christina Wagner, D.V.M. Andrea Goldy, D.V.M. M - F 8am to 6pm • Sat. 9am to 1pm


<< continued from Page 82

Regulations: All anglers should refer to Fish and Wildlife fishing regulations before departing on any trip. Refer to the state’s Sportfishing Rules pamphlet, which is available where licenses are sold or online. Check regulations before fishing. Boater alert: A warning to private boaters with state fishing licenses only: make sure you stay on the U.S. side of the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Those wanting to try the Canadian half must obtain a license from British Columbia. Peninsula Daily News publishes local

outdoors columns in its sports section Thursdays and Fridays. Columns also are available online at www.peninsuladailynews.com.

HUNTING

Peninsula visitors can hunt everything from elk and deer to bear and cougar — even rabbit and grouse. Areas around Forks, Clallam Bay, Neah Bay and Sequim provide chances at large Roosevelt elk, while blacktail deer can be found all around the Peninsula. Detailed information about hunting seasons and regulations can be found in the Washington Big Game Hunting Seasons

and Regulations pamphlet or the Migratory Waterfowl and Upland Game Season rules pamphlet. Both of the pamphlets outline specific information about boundaries, restrictions and licensing information. Free pamphlets usually are available wherever licenses are sold and also can be downloaded at www.wdfw.wa.gov. Note that hunting is prohibited inside Olympic National Park. Washington law requires first-time hunters born after Jan. 1, 1972, to successfully complete a hunter education class before they can purchase a hunting license.

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Come in and see us at our NEW Location!

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New Location Opening SOON! Watch for details on our website www.bonitaspetsupplies.com

(360)379-0436 Celebrating the animal-human bond since 1979! 1st Place Best Vet Clinic Jefferson Co Our Full-Service Veterinary Medical & Surgery Center in Chimacum

Appointments Mon - Fri 8:00 - 5:00 & Saturday 8:00 - Noon 820 Chimacum Road Port Hadlock, WA 98339 (360) 385-4488

1st Place Best Vet Abbie Doll Jefferson Co

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(Pet Townsend)

Jefferson Co

Offering traditional Veterinary Medicine, as well as Acupuncture and Herbal Therapies Appointments Mon - Fri 9:00 - 5:00

1445 F Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 (360) 379-1133

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Front Row: Abbie Doll, DVM • Maya Bewig, DVM Back Row: Jeff Highbarger, DVM • Chris Frank, DVM Dalton Webb, DVM

Finalist Best Vet Clinic

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Joyce

For a small town, Joyce has a really big personality. What the town, located just west of Port Angeles, lacks in size it makes up for with fun festivals, historical sites and a general store that offers an eclectic array of goods you need to see to believe. Joyce General Store is what you think of when you think of a small-town momand-pop shop in the Northwest. This quaint little store is located just 16 miles west of Port Angeles in the town of Joyce. The store, built in 1911 by Joe Joyce, from whom the town gets its name, remains very much the same — false front, beaded ceilings and wooden floor. Much of the store’s interior is made of remnants from the opera house and Markhum House, which stood in the township of Port Crescent in the 1800s. Port Crescent was located a few miles north of Joyce on what is now Crescent Beach. Joyce Museum, housed in a former railroad station, is located next door. Built in 1915, it is considered to the last remaining log depot from the Milwaukee Road. Museum displays include railroad memorabilia with photos and artifacts of Port Crescent, Gettysburg, Disque, Twin, Piedmont, Camp Hayden at Tongue Point, Lake Crescent, Sol Duc and, of course, Joyce.

It is built of Alaska yellow cedar and was restored by the Joyce Museum Society in 2002. Phone 360-928-3568 for hours of operation and other information. A popular local event is the Joyce Daze Wild Blackberry Festival, a one-day event that takes place the first weekend of August and features blackberry pies, pie-making contests, a community pancake breakfast,

a lively parade, arts and crafts vendors and much more. Blackberry brambles can be seen growing along highways and most side roads across the Peninsula and have been known to take over open fields and backyards if not cut back substantially. The reward from letting these prickly vines grow is delicious blackberries. For information, visit www.joycedaze.org.

Serving The Community Since 1911

“We are the oldest continuous operating General Store in the State of Washington”

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Warmth, friendliness, local color and a touch of history come with every purchase. The Joyce General Store, located on Hwy. 112 between beautiful Lake Crescent and Crescent Beach, has been in the same family for 48-plus years. We are more than happy to take time to chat and tell you about visiting the mythical University of Joyce. We will also give any directions to anywhere you might be interested in. “The finest people from all over the country pass through our doors. We welcome them as friends as well as customers.”

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Drop in at the Joyce General Store and step into a building that has had few changes since the early 1900’s. The false front, beaded ceiling, oiled wood floors and many of the fixtures remain the same. Much of the interior of the store is from the Markham House Hotel which stood in the now vanished town of Port Crescent in the 1800’s. The store carries gas, groceries, tackle, bait, and other items. There JOYCE GENERAL STORE also are unique gifts, souvenirs, and in beautiful downtown Joyce • 360-928-3568 Indian arts and crafts.


Ruby Beach

DISCOVER COASTAL HIKES, TEMPERATE RAIN FORESTS, FISHING AND MORE IN

FORKS/WEST END

Those looking for a taste of the rugged Pacific Northwest will find it on the West End of the Olympic Peninsula. Surreal and fantastically green rain forests and wild coastal beaches are plentiful. Ready for adventure?

Gigantic trees draped in moss surrounded by enormous ferns, beaches dotted with sea stacks and rolling rivers tinted by

glacier powder dominate the wild and wonderful West End. The Hoh Rain Forest receives 100-plus inches of rain each year and is one of the best

examples of a temperate rain forest in the world. Located along the Pacific Ocean, La Push is home to the Quileute tribe. Viewing coastal storms

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from a cozy cabin is a popular winter activity. In spring, visitors can look for migrating gray whales, while surfing and kayaking off First Beach.

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The coast with the most

Another natural glory of the West End is the accessibility of its beautiful beaches. Close to La Push are scenic and rugged Second Beach and Third Beach. Both involve short hikes through forest but are worth the effort as you are rewarded with long stretches of sandy beach. Sea stacks decorate the landscape and provide inspiration to snap a photograph or two. When the tide is out be sure to carefully peek around the edges of rocks and sea stacks for a glimpse at what lives in the Pacific. Ruby Beach, located about 35 miles south of Forks, is one of the most scenic beaches in the state. It offers rugged sea stacks, flat sand and a small stream that flows through it at the base of the short trail from the parking lot. Beaches in the Kalaloch strip of coastline are easy walks from car to shore. The beaches are numbered 6, 4, 3, 2 and 1.

Quileute tribe welcomes visitors

La Push is a wonderful place to stretch your legs after making the journey to the coast. The seafront town is the home of the Quileute tribe and offers beautiful views of the Pacific Ocean. You can stroll to First Beach to watch surfers catch a wave or simply to watch seabirds soar above James Island (the island is called a-ka-lat in the Quileute language, which translates to the “top of the rock”). The island, located at the mouth of the Quillayute River, is sacred to tribal members. Throughout the years, the island has been used to spot whales and was a burial spot for Quileute chiefs. Public access to the island is not permitted. First Beach is one of the main spots to watch for gray whales as they migrate along the coast. The beach also is an ideal location to watch tribal fishermen return after a long day on the water. A short stroll to the Quileute Harbor Marina will allow you to see them unload their catches and to view colorful stacks of crab pots, nets and coolers. Keep your eyes open for brown pelicans, which often fish in the river. As you wander through town, stop by the general store for a snack and head back out to the beach to watch the sun set over the Pacific.

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Wildlife viewing

The West End is one of the best places to view wildlife on the Olympic Peninsula. Deer and Roosevelt elk can be found munching on grass, and ground squirrels are a common sight in area forests. Harbor seals, sea lions, sea otters and gray and humpback whales are abundant along the coast. Bald eagles soar overhead while sea-based birds dive into the ocean and rivers in search of a snack. Olympic National Park provides one of the last remaining large tracts of intact primeval forest in the lower 48 states. These moist forests provide habitat for northern spotted owls, marbled murrelets and a variety of amphibians.

Forks Timber Museum and Loggers Memorial

To understand the history and importance of logging on the West End, stop by the Forks Timber Museum and Loggers Memorial. Look for the log cabin at the south end of Forks with the loggers out front — next door to the Forks Chamber of Commerce Visitors Center, 1411 S. Forks Ave. Built in 1989 by the Forks High School carpentry class and local volunteers, this cozy museum offers a self-guided interactive look into the local history of homesteading, farming, logging and Native American cultures — with a large dose of history thrown in. Children 12 and younger receive free entry with a paid adult admission and will be entertained with the Museum Hunt — finding things as they go through the museum. At the end of the “hunt,” children will be given a prize. Displays include a pioneer “home” with a wind-up phonograph, ringer washer, cast-iron stove and other old-time items. A loggers bunkhouse, chainsaw display and hand saws of all kinds are displayed. Models of old-time steam donkeys and tractors plus historical photographs are featured. A small gift shop offers locally made items to help fund the museum. Outside the museum, you will find the Forks Loggers Memorial, old equipment and a garden along with picnic tables. Entry costs $3. Visit www.forkstimbermuseum.org for information about when the museum is open or phone 360-374-9663.

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West End rain forests

East of U.S. 101, Olympic National Park’s Hoh Rain Forest ­­— which is the result of the West End getting 100-plus inches of rain each year — is one of the best examples of a temperate rain forest in the world. Less than an hour from downtown Forks, the forest is reached by the Upper Hoh Road off Highway 101. The trees of the forest can grow as tall as 300 feet with a circumference of 23 feet around. Several roadside parking areas provide easy access to short trails that meander through old-growth trees and lead to viewing areas with great views of the Hoh River. Once you’ve stretched your legs, head back to the car for the scenic and seemingly endless drive to the Hoh Rain Forest. Start exploring the forest by hiking the Hall of Mosses. This trail leads visitors through old big-leaf maples decorated with spikemoss that seems to glow after rain or following a heavy dew. Watch for nurse logs — fallen trees that have become seedbeds for seedlings and ferns. The trek is an easy 0.8-mile loop that takes about 45 minutes round-trip. This family-friendly hike starts at the Hoh Visitor Center at the end of Hoh River Road. Near the center of the Hall of Mosses is the Spruce Nature Trail, a 1.2-mile loop through the rain forest to the Hoh River. The trail meanders by the Hoh River and provides a chance to view elk exploring its braided gravel bars and cobbled rock banks. The well-maintained path wanders through impressive stands of old-growth Sitka spruce and other conifers with moss creating a surreallooking canopy. Budget about an hour for the round-trip hike. Travel south on Highway 101, and you’ll come across the green scenery at Queets. As the road begins to wind inland, take a drive to Lake Quinault. This glacier-carved lake is surrounded by the old-growth trees of the Quinault Rain Forest. Sometimes called the Valley of the Rain Forest Giants, this area is home to some of the state’s largest and most impressive trees. A 30-mile drive loops around Lake Quinault and could reveal elk feeding on vine maple buds. A 0.2-mile trail near Lake Quinault Lodge will take you to the largest Sitka spruce tree in the world.

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Counterclockwise from top: A nurse log colonnade, moss and dozens shades of green greet rain forest visitors. Ducks swim along waterways near the Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center. Ferns line the forest floor of the Quinault Rain Forest. Roosevelt elk are a common sight in West End rain forests.

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GETTING THERE

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Abundant rain forests, wild rivers and coastal beaches are just part of the allure of the wild and wonderful West End. Forests in the Quinault, Queets, Hoh and Bogachiel valleys are dazzling examples of primeval temperate rain forest. The drive to get there is beautiful in its own right, but the going can be slower than most North Olympic Peninsula trips. The main route, U.S. Highway 101, twists and turns around beautiful Lake Crescent, and you might compete with recreational vehicles and log trucks, but gaining an appreciation for natural beauty — pristine even outside Olympic National Park boundaries — makes it worthwhile. Have your camera ready to take photos at a moment’s notice. There will be a lot of photo opportunities so be ready. There are several marked scenic overlooks to stop at along the way. The beauty of Lake Crescent is difficult to resist and the lure of the Sol Duc Valley might inspire you to stop and explore on your journey to the West End. It is common to see a bald eagle soaring above Lake Crescent or elk drinking in the Hoh River. Stop in Forks to stretch your legs, buy lunch and learn about the town. A self-guided tour allows those wanting a look back in history to stop at signposts in downtown Forks that feature pictures and stories about historical buildings or happenings. For more tour information, make a stop at the Forks Chamber of Commerce at 1411 S. Forks Ave. (360-374-2531, www.forkswa.com).

Queets River

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Forever Twilight in Forks

Die-hard Twilight fans, eager to see the location of author Stephenie Meyer’s bestselling books, travel to the North Olympic Peninsula to retrace the footprints of their favorite characters. Although none of the movies was filmed in the small town of Forks, people from all over the world have come to the West End, making stops everywhere from Forks High School, where Bella and Edward met, out to La Push, where Bella visits her werewolf friend, Jacob. The majority of the four books of the Twilight series — and five motion pictures — are set in Forks. Fans celebrate “Forever Twilight in Forks,” on the weekend closest to Bella’s birthday (Sept. 13) as a way for fans to unite and reunite and enjoy the beautiful area that was the setting of the book series. For more information about the event, visit www.forevertwilightinforks.com. Although Meyer didn’t have specific Forks homes in mind when she wrote the books — she didn’t visit Forks until after the first book was completed — the Forks Chamber of Commerce has dubbed a couple of homes as those of Bella and Edward. The McIrvin residence at 775 K St. is considered the home of Bella and her police chief father. Fans are welcome to drive by the house, but since it is a private residence, they are asked to respect the family’s privacy and not go on the property.

The Miller Tree Inn, 654 E. Division St., with its large windows and open and airy layout, fits the bill for the Cullen house, residence of Edward and his vampire family. Feel free to take pictures, but do not go inside unless you are a guest. 

Other locations to visit

Forks Visitor Center, 1411 S. Forks Ave., to take photos next to a replica of Bella’s truck from the books and the movies. Forks High School, 261 S. Spartan Ave., is where the characters attend school and where Bella met Edward. Forks Police Department, 500 E. Division St., is where Police Chief Charlie Swan, Bella’s father, works. Forks Community Hospital, 530 Bogachiel Way, is where Bella — a selfproclaimed klutz — is a frequent visitor, and where Dr. Carlisle Cullen — Edward’s “father” — is employed. Forks Outfitters, 950 S. Forks Ave., is considered the “Newton’s Olympic Outfitters” store owned by the Newton family and where Bella works. Welcome to Forks sign, located at the north entrance to Forks to take a photo. About 15 miles west of Forks on state Highway 110 is La Push, another town with Twilight fame. La Push may be off-limits to vampires, but werewolf fans — and yes, vampire fans, too — can visit the Quileute reservation where Bella’s friend Jacob lives. Visitors can enjoy the beauty of the

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Quileute reservation while checking out First Beach, where Bella first learned of “the cold ones” from Jacob, who later is revealed to be a werewolf. The cliffs where the werewolves and Bella are said to have gone cliff diving are visible from La Push — but visitors should know that cliff diving is illegal and dangerous. The Quileute have a connection to wolves in legends, but no werewolves and vampires actually exist in them. The former Lincoln Theater, 132 E. First St. in Port Angeles, is considered the same cinema where some of the characters see films. The theater closed in 2014. The first three film adaptations of the books were shown here. Down the street from the theater is Bella Italia, 118 E. First St., where Edward and Bella have their first date (called La Bella Italia in the novel). The bookstore where Bella goes to shop after her friends look for dresses has two possibilities. It could either be Odyssey Bookshop, 114 W. Front St., or Port Book and News, 104 E. First St. Although the store where Bella’s friends buy their dresses also is not named in the books, Black Diamond Bridal, 109 E. First St., is considered the store where the characters shopped in Port Angeles. Bella would have flown into William R. Fairchild International Airport, located off Airport Road on the outskirts of Port Angeles.


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West End refuges

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From Grays Harbor to Neah Bay, more than 600 rocks, reefs and islands dot the rugged coastline. Three wildlife refuges totaling 430 acres are within the boundaries of Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary and Olympic National Park. Hundreds of seabirds and other marine animals can be observed from vantage points along the way, particularly near Kalaloch and La Push. During migration seasons, more than 1 million birds gather in the area. The Flattery Rocks National Wildlife Refuge runs from Cape Flattery to the Ozette area. Quillayute Needles National Wildlife Refuge extends from that southern boundary to about Kalaloch. The last of the three refuges is Copalis National Wildlife Refuge, from south of Queets to just north of Grays Harbor. All refuges are closed to the public to protect the habitat. But visitors can observe crowds of seabirds, either from land or sea. A good pair of lightweight binoculars and a camera are good accessories to have on hand. Protective rain gear, or at least a sturdy plastic bag, is recommended to protect cameras from rain showers. When walking along coastal beaches be aware of tides, weather, beach logs and other dangers. Most of the islands are small enough that they never earned names on a map. Destruction Island and Point Grenville are among some of the better-known locations. Refuge staff warn that boaters should stay at least 200 yards off the islands, both for their own safety and to avoid disturbing birds. The refuge areas are the primary breeding grounds for the tufted puffin, with its striped head and peculiar beak, and the common murre, which resembles a little penguin. The region, where 80 percent of the state’s seabird population nests, supports 12 types of marine birds. In addition, peregrine falcons and bald eagles reside with their cousins. Several types of seals, sea lions and otters also stop by the local kelp beds.


Rialto Beach, Hole-in-theWall, Ruby Beach, Kalaloch

incoming waters can trap visitors who must frantically scramble to reach high ground. Beware of “king tides” — higher-thanusual winter tides that embrace Washington shores — which occur when the gravitational pulls of the sun and moon reinforce one another. Informative tide books are available at local shops across the Peninsula. Keep an eye on waves, whether you’re in the water or along the shore, and be aware of tidal changes. Remember that logs so easily tossed ashore are still loose so care should be taken when climbing over logs. Many a beachcomber has fallen and been hurt when logs shift on the beach.

EPISCOPAL St. Swithin’s Episcopal

Meeting at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church 250 N. Blackberry Avenue, Forks (360) 374-7486 SUNDAY MEETING AT LONG TERM CARE CENTER 10:30 a.m. Worship

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A camera is very important to carry along during your visit to Washington’s coastal beaches, and the West End has some of the most accessible beaches on the North Olympic Peninsula. Rialto Beach features views of islands, pounding waves, giant drift logs and plenty of beach cobbles, making it one of the most popular beaches to visit. Hole-in-the-Wall, a natural sea-carved arch, is about 1.5 miles north of Rialto Beach. It is within the Olympic wilderness but can easily be reached at low tide from Rialto Beach. At about 1 mile, you will reach Ellen Creek. To avoid wet footwear, look for a log to cross or take your shoes off to plod through the chilly water. Do not cross through Hole-in-the-Wall when the tide begins to cover the floor of the arch, as high tide can block passage. Rialto Beach, located about 75 miles from Port Angeles, is accessible by Mora Road, off La Push Road. The Kalaloch area of Washington’s wild, wondrous coast — about 35 miles south of Forks on U.S. Highway 101 — has allseason attractions. Ruby Beach is at the northernmost tip of the seven main spots in the Kalaloch area. Marked trails offer easy access to pristine, sandy beaches. Migrating shorebirds and sea mammals such as otters can be observed. At low tide, seek out the tide pools for a glimpse at all the marine life. Beware of “killer logs,” as the locals call them. The tall conifers that make the area beautiful can be a hazard when washed up by the surf as logs and driftwood. As you clamber over these beached logs, it’s hard to believe you can’t always see them coming, but as a wave crests, it can obscure your view of what is riding behind it. Those who want to stay a night or two in the area have a few options. Olympic National Park provides a campground with flush toilets and water, although no utility hookups are available for recreational vehicles. Kalaloch Lodge also has rustic cabins and other accommodations.

Both locations are open all year. For details, phone the park at 360-5653130 or the lodge at 360-962-2271. The Peninsula’s northern and Pacific coasts offer a wealth of beaches for recreational fun, but if you explore, keep an eye on the tides and surf. Rescues by the Coast Guard, Olympic National Park rangers or both are occasionally necessary for people who either failed or didn’t know to consult a tide table and weather report. Headlands extending out to the water’s edge can create alcoves and grottos that may be readily accessible by thin strips of beach exposed during low tides. Unfortunately, when the tide turns, the

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NATIVE AMERICAN TRIBES

Jamestown S’Klallam tribe Members of Klallam communities formed the Jamestown S’Klallam tribe. The tribe’s complex is located east of Sequim in Blyn, right off U.S. Highway 101. The tribe operates several businesses located along the highway in Blyn, including 7 Cedars Casino — the largest casino on the Peninsula. The tribe also operates The Cedars at Dungeness golf course, located on Woodcock Road, that is known for its crab-shaped sand trap. For details, visit www.jamestowntribe.org.

Lower Elwha Klallam tribe Today, the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe resides in the Lower Elwha River Valley and adjacent bluffs, but has lived on the river for thousands of years. The tribe’s home once made up a majority of the Peninsula. In fact, Port Angeles was once home to a huge village called Tse-whit-zen, which was unearthed in 2003 at the west end of Port Angeles Harbor. Many of the artifacts found are being stored at the Burke Museum in Seattle. Others can be viewed at the Elwha Klallam Heritage Center, 401 E. First St. The tribe operates various enterprises in the Port Angeles area including the Elwha River Casino, located at 631 Stratton Road. Visit www.elwha.org for more tribal details.

Counterclockwise from top: Makah tribal members paddle a traditional canoe ashore for a ceremony during the regional Canoe Journey. A totem pole watches over A-KaLat Center in La Push, home of the Quileute tribe. The Jamestown S’Klallam tribe owns and operates 7 Cedars Casino in Blyn.

Quileute tribe The Quileute gained recent fame due to the success of the Twilight books and movies. While the fictional Quileute have legends of vampires and werewolves, no such stories exist in reality. But the tribe and many of the places mentioned in the books, including La Push and First Beach, are quite real and have been occupied by the tribe for hundreds of years. La Push is about one square mile, but the tribe’s territory once stretched along the shores of the Pacific. Visitors can stay at Quileute Oceanside Resort and enjoy the beauty of coastal beaches, surf or watch for whales and other wildlife. Each year, the tribe holds Quileute Days, a celebration rich in tradition. For information, visit www.quileutenation.org.

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Makah tribe The Makah Nation is located on the northwestern tip of the Peninsula. It is the home of the celebrated Makah Cultural and Research Center (p. 97), which houses, among other things, the extensive Ozette collection. From the reservation you also can reach Cape Flattery, the northwestern-most point of the lower 48 states. While Neah Bay is a small community, people wanting to extend their stay will find a variety of lodging choices, restaurants and stores for groceries and supplies. During the summer months, the Makah Marina is a busy place with fishing charter boats and tribal fishermen returning with the catch of the day. Each August, Makah Days, an annual celebration featuring traditional dancing, singing, canoe races and more is held. For more information about the tribe, visit www.makah.com.

Lower Elwha Klallam tribe welcomes Canoe Journey participants

Hoh tribe The Hoh tribe is a small community in West Jefferson County, located along the mouth of the Hoh River that runs untouched by dikes or diversion into the Pacific Ocean. The Hoh River — famous for its king salmon run — is jammed at its mouth with a maze of massive spruce, hemlock and cedar old-growth driftwood. The river is the focal point of the tribe’s identity and stories. Flooding is a nearly constant problem as the reservation is located on one square mile of land on a flood plain at the mouth of the Hoh River; however, additional land the tribe acquired will allow it to relocate much of the reservation to higher ground. For more information about the tribe, visit www.hohtribe-nsn.org. Quinault Nation The Quinault Nation consists of the Quinault and Queets tribes and descendants of five other coastal tribes ­— Quileute, Hoh, Chehalis, Chinook and Cowlitz. The Quinault Nation is located in the rainsoaked lands on the southwestern portion of the Olympic Peninsula.

Quileute tribe’s Welcoming of the Whales ceremony

The reservation is a land of forests, swiftflowing rivers, gleaming lakes and 23 miles of unspoiled Pacific coastline. The reservation is primarily in Grays Har-

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bor County, with some parts in Jefferson County. For additional information, visit www.quinaultindiannation.com.

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View from Cape Flattery Trail

ENJOY THE WILD COAST, STAND AT THE EDGE OF THE CONTINENT AND GO FISHING ON THE

NORTH/WEST COAST

The Olympic Peninsulaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spectacularly beautiful coastal area includes Clallam Bay and Sekiu, twin seafront towns about 50 miles west of Port Angeles, and Neah Bay, home of the Makah tribe. Go west for adventure The drive to the North/West Coast offers fabulous views of

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the Strait of Juan de Fuca and plenty of places to stop for a picnic, to snap a photograph

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or to search tide pools. A stop at the Makah Cultural and Research Center in Neah

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Bay is a must. The center features artifacts from Ozette, an ancient whaling village.


Edge-of-the-Earth views

The Cape Flattery Trail, a short trail featuring boardwalk, stone and gravel steps, and four observation decks, offers breathtaking views of the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, Tatoosh Island and the Cape Flattery Lighthouse. The lighthouse, built in 1858, is now automated. The trail is a Makah Wilderness Area, so stay on the trail and supervise children closely. You will need a $10 per car Makah Recreation Permit to hike the Cape Flattery Trail. Permits can be purchased at the Makah Marina, Washburnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s General Store, Makah Tribal Center, Makah Mini Mart and the Makah Museum.

Neah Bay â&#x20AC;&#x201D; home of the Makah

The Makah Nation is located in Neah Bay on the northwestern tip of the Peninsula. It is the home of the Makah Cultural and Research Center, which houses, among other things, the extensive Ozette collection. In 1970, tidal erosion uncovered an ancient whaling village at Ozette, parts of which had been covered by a mudslide hundreds of years ago. The artifacts now make up part of the exhibits at the museum. Its Ozette collection is the largest archaeological collection of any U.S. tribe. On display is about 1 percent of the 55,000 artifacts recovered from Ozette, all between 300-500 years old. For more details about the museum, phone 360-645-2711 or visit www.makahmuseum.com. Visit www.makah.com for more information about the tribe.

Counterclockwise from top: Tatoosh Island and Cape Flattery Lighthouse can be seen at the end of the Cape Flattery Trail. The Makah Cultural and Research Center provides a glimpse of what life was like for the tribe centuries ago. Gulls wait for the tide to wash ashore breakfast at Point of the Arches in Olympic National Park.

View wildlife at every turn

Clallam Bay, Sekiu and Neah Bay are great places to view wildlife ranging from bald eagles and an array of sea birds to harbor seals, sea lions, sea otters and gray and humpback whales. As you travel along state Highway 112, which also is known as the Strait of Juan de Fuca National Scenic Byway, you will find easy access to a number of beaches. The winding drive offers several just-offthe-road overlooks that are perfect for trying to spot whales as they move along the coast in search of food.

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Pillar Point County Park

Located 10 miles east of Clallam Bay along scenic Highway 112, you will find Pillar Point County Park. The 4.3-acre park offers saltwater-beach access and a concrete launch ramp for small boats, and is a good place to start a kayak trip. When the tide is out, it feels as though you could walk for days out on the mudflats before reaching water. The mudflats are a hunting spot for crabs when the season opens. Picnic tables are nestled under shade trees and provide a panoramic viewpoint to enjoy watching birds search for food in tide pools and in the cool waters offshore. This is also the location of an Audubon-designated IBA (Important Bird Area) due to the unique estuary bay shoreline habitat and wide variety of shorebirds.

Clallam Bay Spit

Stop by this 33-acre day-use county park located in the center of the Clallam Bay community, where the water of the Clallam River empties into the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Clallam Bay Spit Community Beach County Park is jointly managed with Washington State Parks. The park includes public access to Clallam Spit, a mile of a sand/ gravel saltwater beach and access to the Clallam River. Watch for bald eagles and osprey feeding on the beach. Watch for oystercatchers, cormorants and other birds on offshore rocks. It also is common to see a variety of marine life just offshore including harbor seals, sea lions and sometimes even whales. The interaction between the river and the Strait of Juan de Fuca’s tides often result in drastic changes in the landscape. A picnic area and full-service restroom are available.

Fishing opportunities

Clallam Bay and Sekiu (pronounced SEEK-you) are the Strait of Juan de Fuca’s fishing headquarters. Here you can find charters for fishing — halibut, salmon, lingcod and rockfish are good catches — plus diving, kayaking, whale watching, birdwatching and general sightseeing. Vacation homes, beach cabins, bed and breakfasts and resorts offer guests comfortable places to stay, while local restaurants serve up fresh-off-the-boat fish and other seafood. The beach area between the two towns is a good place to beachcomb, hunt agates and explore tide pools. For more details about Clallam Bay and Sekiu, contact the Clallam Bay/Sekiu Chamber of Commerce (360-963-2339, www.clallambay. com or www.sekiu.com). A little farther down the highway, the Makah Marina is a popular place to start a fishing trip. A number of guides operate charters out of Neah Bay and offer an array of opportunities to catch your limit. Marine tours of Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary are available through some sport fishing companies. Neah Bay Chamber of Commerce (www.neahbaywa.com) features more information about fishing in Neah Bay.

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Tide pool treasures

Counterclockwise from top: Low tide reveals a starfish at Second Beach in Olympic National Park. Anemones peek through sea grass at Shi Shi Beach. Urchins are common tide pool finds at Freshwater Bay.

As coastal waters retreat, pools of sea water — tide pools — expose a variety of marine life. Purple, red or yellow starfish, crabs, sea snails, sea urchins, brittle stars, hard-shelled limpets, wolf eels and anemones are just some of the treasures that can be found in area tide pools. Here are a few rules to follow when visiting tide pools: o  While exploring, remember to watch your step. To avoid killing or harming organisms in tide pools, try to walk on sand or bare rocks and do not attempt to jump from rock to rock. o  Never try to pull or pry something out of a tide pool or off a rock. While some plants and wildlife in a tide pool can be gently touched, keep in mind that these are living organisms. o  Never remove anything from a beach or tide pool. Everything within these pools exist as part of a very delicate ecosystem. Instead, only take photographs. o  Don’t leave behind anything that doesn’t belong on the beach including food, garbage and clothing. o  Check the tide schedule before heading out to explore, and keep an eye on water levels. Many rocks near pools can become submerged as the tide comes in. Recommendations for great tide pooling experiences include Ruby Beach and Beach Four in the Kalaloch area; Second Beach, Third Beach and Hole-in-the-Wall in the La Push/Mora area; Shi Shi Beach near Neah Bay; and Freshwater Bay and Salt Creek Recreation Area off Highway 112.

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Profile for Sound Publishing

Special Sections - Fall/Winter 2016-17 North Olympic Peninsula Guide  

i20161025172853994.pdf

Special Sections - Fall/Winter 2016-17 North Olympic Peninsula Guide  

i20161025172853994.pdf